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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00438
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 12-06-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00438
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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 47th Issue Thursday, December 6, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 5A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Outdoors ........................................................................Page 9A Taking Care of Business.....................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 5B Holiday Guide ..................................................................Page 6B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B INDEX OBITUARIES Marquis Lamor Hutchison Frederick Allen Hyatt Sr. Linward W. Kennedy Johnnie ‘Bill’ Donnie Roberts Delous ‘Del’ SparkmanChristmas in PanaceaPhotos, Page 2A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn keeping with one of his campaign promises, newly elected County Commissioner Howard Kessler brought forward the idea of eliminating the Public Service Tax (PST) at the “ rst regular meeting of the county commission. Kessler proposed the idea as a discussion item and informed the other commissioners at the Dec. 3 meeting that he would be presenting it as an agenda item in the future. After some discussion from each commissioner, it became apparent that Kessler had little support for the repeal. Chairman Randy Merritt asked Kessler if he had a plan to replace the revenues if the tax of 7-percent on the purchase of electricity, metered or bottle gas, fuel oils and water, was eliminated. How would the county make up the nearly $1 million the tax generates, he asked. Kessler said he had a few ideas of areas where he would cut, but said it was more about slowing down or eliminating the accumulation of reserves. The taxes that were implemented or increased in 2011 are too much for the citizens, he said. Merritt pointed out that the average bill from Talquin Electric is $150 and with the 500-kilowatt exemption in place, the tax equates to a $7 increase, which was not substantial, he said. He felt the PST was one of the fairest taxes. The more you use, the more you pay,Ž he said. He added that he would rather the commission look at reducing the millage rate. Continued on Page 3ACommission has discussion on Public Service TaxWakulla student dies By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Health Department con“ rmed a death related to the in” uenza virus on Thursday, Nov. 29. We are deeply saddened as a community to hear of this tragedy, and send our sincerest condolences,Ž said health department Administrator Padraic Juarez. The Wakulla County Health Department along with our neighboring health partners are committed to helping our community learn more about the ” u virus and its potential impact on a persons overall health.Ž Juarez is not able to release the name or any speci“ c information related to the death, but did say it was caused by complications from the flu. Very few people die from the ” u, he said. Your immunity is so low it allows other diseases to come in,Ž Juarez said. The ” u is preventable, he said. The important message out of this is to get the ” u shot.Ž The health department held a ” u shot clinic last week, as well as one at the high school on Monday. They will hold clinics at Wakulla Middle School and Riversprings Middle School on Thursday and Friday. Next week the clinics will be offered at the elementary schools. All students and staff can receive a shot at the schools. There is no cost to students. The health department also holds a ” u shot clinic at their of“ ce every Wednesday from 2 to 4 p.m. There is no cost for adults who are on Medicaid or have a CHP plan card. Otherwise, the cost is $25. There is a big push right now for people to get a ” u shot because of the death, but also because holiday season is fast approaching which means a lot of close interaction with people, Juarez said. It takes about two weeks for a person to reach full immunity from the virus after getting the vaccine, he added. Each year, the vaccine covers three strains of the ” u, including the one that is going around in this area, he said. Juarez said people do not have to come to the health department to get the ” u shot. Other places also offer the vaccination. He simply stressed the importance of getting the shot. To avoid catching the ” u, the WCHD urges two prevention methods: getting a flu shot and being alert to spreading germs. The CDC offers the following tips: € Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue away after use and wash your hands. If a tissue is not available, cover your mouth and nose with your sleeve, not your hand. Continued on Page 3AMarquis Hutchison, 15, succumbs to complications from the ” u on Monday, Nov. 26FILE PHOTOMarquis Hutchison in his JV football photo from this fall.1 death attributed to the flu; health department holds flu shot clinics By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA well-known and loved Wakulla High School freshman lost his life on Nov. 26. Marquis Hutchison, 15, passed away on Monday night at Shands Hospital in Gainesville after being LifeFlighted there from Tallahassse Memorial Hospital. Hutchison had the flu and then developed pneumonia in both of his lungs that eventually led to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, which is what caused his death, according to his mother, Felicia Thurman. Hutchison went to the high school football game on Friday, Nov. 23 and was “ ne, but started to get sick on Saturday. He went to school on Monday, Nov. 26 and wasnt feeling well so he was sent to the clinic. His mother was then called and he was taken to TMH and eventually to Shands. He died later that night. He is one of a kind and will truly be missed,Ž said Thurman. That smile he always had, his jokes, his dancing. Its just going to be hard to forget him.Ž Those who came in contact with Hutchison all describe him the same way, that he was always smiling, a happy kid. I did not know him personally, but I know he was well known and well loved by lots of people,Ž Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce said. Im sad I didnt get to know him.Ž Wakulla High School Principal Michael Crouch said its been a tough week at the high school, but the students, faculty and staff have done a great job sticking together and supporting one another. Crouch did not know Hutchison well, but said every time he saw him in the hallways, Hutchison had a smile on his face. Crouch said he was told Hutchison wasnt a complainer and let things go on longer than they should have. Its a tragedy, absolutely,Ž Crouch said. Were going to miss him.Ž Hutchison had perfect attendance in middle school at Riversprings, as well as at the high school. He loved school and never wanted to miss it, Thurman said. Continued on Page 3A Padraic Juarez  Riversprings will be held Thursday, Dec. 6  Wakulla Middle will be held on Friday, Dec. 7.  Elementary schools will be held next week.  There is a walk-in u shot clinic at the health department on Wednesdays from 2 to 4 p.m.School u shot clinics set 300 The number of u shots given at the health department on Friday, Nov. 30, and to students and teachers at Wakulla High School on Monday, Dec. 3By the numbers:Snowden: The tragic loss of a 15-year-old student, The Opinion Page, 4A.Fatal car crash on Surf Road near SopchoppySpecial to The NewsWakulla County EMS and Wakulla County Fire Rescue responded, along with Wakulla County Sheriff Of“ ce, to a fatal traf“ c accident on Monday Dec. 3. The accident occurred near 42 Surf Road in the Sopchoppy area. First Responders and volunteer “ re“ ghters from Sopchoppy VFD arrived just moments after the crash. A deputy from WCSO was nearby and arrived within two minutes after the accident was reported. Apparently, the northbound station wagon ran off the west wide of the highway and struck a tree. No other vehicles were involved. Personnel from all agencies extricated the lone driver of the vehicle and transported him to Tallahassee Regional Hospital, where he later died. Florida Highway Patrol investigated the accident. Florida Highway Patrol troopers conducting an investigation into a car crash on Monday, Dec. 3.PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Howard Kessler

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsCanadian writers visited St. Marks last week for a guided Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the ApalacheŽ tour at the historic Spanish fort. Wakulla historian Madeleine H. Carr and Johnathan Grandage from the Florida State Archives interpreted the state parks early Spanish history and continued their explanations on Joe Tilmans Wakulla Excursions boat tour, looking at the outside of the 17th century fort area. Their short visit was part of a quick St. Augustine/Tallahasse (St. Marks)/Pensacola research trip organized to prepare for next years Viva Florida 500 celebrations. The Conquistadors tour, which was introduced to Visit Florida and Visit Tallahassee staff last spring, is part of a schedule of tours each April during Wild About Wakulla Week. The tours can be booked online at palmettoexpeditions.com, a local company owned by certified green guide Cynthia Paulson. The writers will publish their articles through the following Canadian outlets: Dreamscapes Travel & Lifestyle Magazine, Toronto Star, Canadian Yachting/ Sail-World Cruising Canada, West of the City and Doctors Review.Canadians visit St. Marks 000BK83 Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH PHOTO BY CYNTHIA PAULSON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMadeleine Carr leads a group of Canadian travel writers around Fort St. Marks.Christmas in Panacea Panacea put on its holiday “ nery on Saturday, Dec. 1, in preparation for the Christmas season. There were parade ” oats from the boats on trailers and golf cart parade, plus Santa Claus was there, as well as three mysterious mermaids of merriment who passed out coloring books to the children. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN More photos online at www.thewakullanews.net WILLIAM SNOWDENBig Bend Hospice held its annual Service of Remembrance at Hudson Park on Sunday, Dec. 2. The service, attended by a couple of dozen people, included a candlelighting ceremony and words of comfort and remembrance. Remembering

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A Commissioners Richard Harden, Jerry Moore and Ralph Thomas all agreed that they needed to continue to build up the reserves and would be more inclined to consider decreasing the millage rate before the PST. Harden said there are two misconceptions about this idea: that the commission can just eliminate the tax without having to make up for the budget shortfall it would create and that the amount of money people are paying for this tax is a large amount. For budget reasons, I think we need to leave this alone,Ž Harden said. Thomas felt the best way to approach this idea was to look at all the taxes the county levies and examine them together. But priority No. 1 is making sure the county has an emergency fund, he said. Moore said the reason having a reserve fund is so important is when the county has to pay unexpected costs, such as making repairs to roads and bridges damaged by Tropical Storm Debby. Kessler didnt deny the fact that the county needs to have reserves, but felt people needed some relief. He added that this tax is a tax on things people need and the people on a “ xed income are suffering. Theres too many people hurting out there,Ž Kessler said. County Administrator David Edwards said there are programs they could create to help these people. One possibility is setting aside a fund as the reserves continue to increase to help people in hardship cases Thomas wondered if the county might be able to offer an exemption like it does with the solid waste and “ re protection assessments. Edwards said offering the same type of program wouldnt be allowed because of the type of tax it is, but they could look at offering rebates. Following much discussion, Merritt told Kessler that it didnt seem he would get a second on a motion to eliminate the tax. Hopefully there will be a second,Ž Kessler said. There is not a second commission meeting in December. The next meeting will be Jan. 7, 2013, at 5 p.m.Discussion on Public Service TaxContinued from Page 1A The memorial service for Hutchison was held at River of Life Church in Crawfordville at 11 a.m. Burial followed at Buckhorn cemetery in Sopchoppy. Crouch hoped the funeral would offer some type of closure for those who are mourning. The funeral was standing-room only, “ lled with teachers, school district staff, coaches, students and teammates from the football team, as well as Riversprings Middle School football players. Hutchison wore No. 18 on the JV football team and aspired to get a college scholarship in football out of high school. Those who knew him said he worked hard and was a good football player. He loved sports,Ž said Thurman. Football was his favorite, following in his brothers footsteps.Ž It meant so much to him, she said. He wanted to be just like Markell.Ž Pearce said it isnt about the school, but a family who has suffered a loss. Now is the time to support his family, he said. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family,Ž he said. Thurman said she tries to stay strong by remembering her sons favorite Bible verse: I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.Ž As a result of his death, the Wakulla County Health Department recommended the school offer ” u shots to its students, Pearce said. There was a ” u shot clinic at the high school on Monday, Dec. 3 and will be clinics at each of the schools. Several clinics have also been held at the health department. Hutchison leaves behind his mother, father, Shedrick Garrett, and his siblings, Markell, Shedrick II, Dontavius, Mya, Mia, Mckenzie, Victoria and Lexus, as well as other family members and friends.Wakulla student dies of ” u complicationsContinued from Page 1A € Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub. € Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way. Flu vaccinations are also available by appointment at the health department, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For additional information or to schedule an appointment, call the health departments Immunization Program Of“ ce at (850) 926-0400.Flu shot clinicsStaff reportWith more than 210 families in Wakulla County asking for help through Operation Santa this holiday season, volunteers with the program are looking for some much needed assistance from the community. We have reached capacity,Ž said Bruce Ashley, president of Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, the group behind the program. Operation Santa is in need of non-perishable food items, toiletries, household cleaning products and monetary donations. They are accepting donations until Thursday, Dec. 13, at the Community Center. They are also still in need of clothes for young boys and young men, Ashley said. The group is still receiving requests from families who need help, but Ashley said they are unable to promise anything at this point in the process because of the large amount of families they already have. Last year Operation Santa provided necessity items and Christmas wishes to 141 families. Donated items and monetary donations can be made at the community center, at the corner of Trice Lane and Shadeville Highway, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 926-3526.Donations needed by Operation SantaWeight limit reduced for bridgeSpecial to The NewsWakulla County was recently noti“ ed by the Florida Department of Transportation that three pilings at the Smith Creek Bridge have advanced decay and recommended the weight limit be reduced from 27 tons to 5 tons until repairs can be made. DOT performed an inspection of the bridge and called the county to notify them of the pilings. People are concerned,Ž said Cleve Fleming, public works director. We need to address it at once.Ž School buses are unable to cross the bridge and a van has to be sent to pick up the 20 to 25 children in the area who ride the bus, Fleming said. There is an alternate route through the forest for those vehicles that exceed the weight limit. The county is working with Baskerville Donovan to make the emergency repairs. Contractors should be identi“ ed next week and they are anticipating the bridge repairs will be completed by Jan. 6, 2013. PHOTO BY SUE DAMON/SPECIAL TO THE EWS Sunset at Shell Point Sue Damon snapped this beautiful photo of the sun setting behind a “ sherman pulling his seine nets. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCYThe Department of Homeland Securitys Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has issued a preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), and where applicable, Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report, re”ecting proposed ”ood hazard determinations within Wakulla County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. These ”ood hazard determinations may include the addition or modi“cation of Base Flood Elevations, base ”ood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area boundaries or zone designations, or the regulatory ”oodway. Technical information or comments are solicited on the proposed ”ood hazard determinations shown on the preliminary FIRM and/or FIS report for Wakulla County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. The preliminary FIRM and FIS report can be viewed at http://portal.nwfwmd”oodmaps.com. These ”ood hazard determinations are the basis for the ”oodplain management measures that your community is required to either adopt or show evidence of being already in effect in order to qualify or remain quali“ed for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. However, before these determinations are effective for ”oodplain management purposes, you will be provided an opportunity to appeal the proposed information. For information on the statutory 90-day period provided for appeals, as well as a complete listing of the communities affected and the locations where copies of the FIRM are available for review, please visit FEMAs website at www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fhm/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Information eXchange (FMIX) toll free at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-2627).NOVEMBER 29, 2012 DECEMBER 6, 2012Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations for Wakulla County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage? Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Health department confirms death from flu; holds flu shot clinics • Memorial service for local teen will be Saturday • Paramedic killed in motorcycle crash • Sheriff’s Report for Nov. 29, 2012 • Okay, that wasn’t funny • Senior Center tries to reduce holiday anxiety for seniors • Operation Santa • A new superintendent: Bobby Pearce takes over the post from David Millerthewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.Editors Note: Reader Marj Law and Extension Director Les Harrison had an email exchange over Les column in last weeks paper, Laurel oaks are prone to infestations by gall wasps.ŽHi Les, You write an easy-read and informative column which is fun even though we learn something. Often an oxymoron of ideas. I read your article about gall wasps. My yard is full of gall. OK, now to follow up... How do we get rid of those ugly galls? Marj Law, gallus infortunatus in Wakulla County (marjlj@aol.com) Ms. Law, I cant offer you much hope for eliminating the local gall wasp. The linked publication, http://edis. ifas.u” .edu/in664, suggest pruning and pesticide application. Another, http://edis.ifas. u” .edu/mg325, states contact insecticides such as carbaryl (Sevin), and any pyrethroid insecticide may be effective against adults,Ž but application of pesticides in a tall tree is a challenge. Management of these gall wasps is dif“ cult. Prune infested branches where possible. Systemic insecticides may prove somewhat useful. In several large infestations investigated in Florida, the common variables were extremely high densities of laurel oak growing on sandy soils that are deeply drained, strongly acidic, and with low fertility.Ž In short, its just something we must live with to enjoy all the positive aspects of Wakulla County. And thanks for reading my column in The Wakulla News. Les (harrisog@u” .edu)An exchange over gall wasps FWMA needs all the help it can get Moose Lodge will celebrate founders dayEditor, The News: Some of you who are reading this letter will have brought a distressed animal or bird to Florida Wild Mammal Association. You hopefully know that it will receive immediate compassionate and expert attention until it recovers and is returned to its natural habitat. You may not know that many of the really tiny animals and birds need feeding every 20 minutes during the day and have a couple of feeds during the night. Not all of them will survive but it will not be for lack of trying. FWMA does not give up on any critter easily! This kind of attention takes both time and money. As with humans, food and maintenance costs have soared while donors have given less as the poor economy has affected the majority of families locally and throughout Florida. The variety of wildlife is one of the things that keeps Wakulla beautiful and unique. FWMA is a needed part of that uniqueness. It urgently needs your support to continue its work. No amount is too small … Chris Beatty makes a little go a very long way. She has never taken a penny in salary and it will stay that way. FWMA is a 501(c)3 organization and all donations are tax deductible. Please visit their website at www.wakullawildlife.org which will tell you more about them and also items other than money which would also be very much appreciated. Lastly, there is a donor tree also accessible on the website. Every donor has a leaf in their name added to it. Donors can also give in honor or memory of a loved one and their name will be there as well. If you choose to do this please include the name and address of who is recognised so that they or their family will receive a card of acknowledgement. FWMAs address is 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville FL 32327 or phone (850) 363-2351. Thank you and a very blessed Christmas to you all, Mary ODonnell Wilton Manors Editor, The News: Dec. 12 marks the 14th anniversary of the Wakulla Moose Lodge #2510. To thank the community for its continued support, the lodge is celebrating its Founders Day on Saturday, Dec. 15, with a Community Fun Day. The public is invited to join the festivities. There will be childrens activities such as a bounce house and face painting. The Ochlockonee Volunteer Fire Department will be on site to give “ re truck demonstrations. The Wakulla Sheriffs Of“ ce will provide child identi“ cation kits. A guest speaker will talk about safe internet surfing. The Southeastern Blood Bank will also have a mobile on site for blood donations. Adults making a donation will receive a free hot dog lunch. Children may eat for free. Santa will be making the rounds to hand out goodies. There will also be a large indoor yard sale. So as you can see, there is something for the entire family and this is a good opportunity to enjoy a great afternoon with your friends and neighbors. The Lodge is located at 44 Jer-Be-Lou Blvd. in Panacea. For questions, call 9842510. Wakulla Moose Lodge #2510 Panacea The family of the late Marquis Lamor Hutchison would like to express our sincere love and appreciation to each of you for your many acts of kindness out pouring love and many prayers. During the passing of our loved one your caring support and generosity helped make our burden easier to bear. Felicia Thurman and familyHutchisons family appreciates the caringThe death of Marquis Hutchison was terrible. The 15-year-old freshman at Wakulla High School died suddenly on Monday, Nov. 26, after being LifeFlighted from Tallahassee Memorial Hospital to Shands Hospital in Gainesville. Marquis died of complications from the ” u. He was at school Monday, not feeling well … reportedly suffering a cough and fever and was sent to the school clinic. Several hours later, he passed. The Wakulla County Health Department and school of“ cials responded with a ” u shot clinic at the high school this past Monday, Dec. 3, to get students immunized against this in” uenza. At the funeral for Marquis on Saturday, Dec. 1, River of Life Church was standing-room only, with people lined up all the way around the sanctuarys walls. In addition to family, the church was packed with high school students, friends of the young man, who came to pay their last respects. Marquis was a member of the Wakulla High School JV football team, which had its second undefeated season this year. Marquis was reportedly a good football player … and it was his goal to earn a college scholarship for playing the sport. One uncle described Marquis as someone with great determination, who he directed through football drills and would never give up. Teammates from Wakulla and Riversprings Middle School wore their football jerseys to the funeral … and it was heartbreaking to watch many of them suffering with a grief they seemed unable to express. At his funeral, besides his physical talents as a football player, Marquis was described as a happy kid, always smiling, and always ready to make others laugh. He sounded like a good kid, and what a sad thing to lose him so soon. Minister Derrick Nelson, who gave the eulogy, noted that no one has the promise of tomorrow. He stressed that point for the high school students in the audience … whatever plans you have, whatever dream you pursue … there is no guarantee for tomorrow. Nelson also admitted to being a War Eagle football fan who goes to the games and then quickly goes out to his car when its over to hear Wakulla Head Coach Scott Klees give his post-game interview on local radio station, WAVE 94. Nelson looked out over that sea of people and said, I dont know if Coach Klees is here,Ž but how he wanted to talk about the coachs impact on the young men on his football team. (For the record, Klees was there.) Nelson said its evident in the “ rst thing the coach says on the post-game show, that win or lose he gives credit to God. I respect anybody with sincerely held beliefs who lives according to what they think is right. Klees is one of those people. Klees and his whole coaching staff are aware of their impact in shaping the young lives of the players on their team. At one of the last games of the season, a playoff game in which Wakulla came out and played without enthusiasm in the “ rst half … but then soundly whipped their opponent in the second half. Those of us on the sidelines were wondering what the coaches had said at halftime to motivate the players. Some thought that Klees must have blistered the boys with an angry speech. I asked Klees later what he said. He said that basically he just told them to go out and play their best. Whatever happens, win or lose, do your best … and dont pout if you lose. Just leave it to God, he told his his players. Minister Nelson implored the students to think not just of the future … of playing football or getting a scholarship … because you may not see that future. Its sad that he did not live to see to his future. And a terrible reminder to all of us to get a ” u shot.William Snowden is the editor of The Wakulla News.The tragic loss of a 15-year-old student at WHSREADERS WRITE: William Snowdeneditor@thewakullanews.net A photo of Marquis Hutchison from the program at his funeral. Ill never accept him as the real FSU coach until he runs a puntrooskie.Ž

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 – Page 5A Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Church Briefs Winter Music Festival at Harvest Fellowship Dec. 8A Winter Music Festival is set for Dec. 8 on the outdoor stage of Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. The concert will be held from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Harvest Fellowship Church and Thrift Store is sponsoring this event with the ongoing intent to make Wakulla County a great place to live. Financial donations will be accepted at the event. Interested vendors should call the Harvest Thrift Store at (850) 926-3535. Crawfordville UMC to offer alternative Christmas marketCrawfordville United Methodist Church will hold its third annual Alternative Christmas Market on Saturday, Dec. 8, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the church, located at 176 Ochlockonee Street. The Alternative Christmas Market provides an opportunity to step away from the busy shopping season and give some gifts that represent the true meaning of the Christmas season. Live music will set a festive mood as guests will learn about the local, national and international ministries represented and see a list of “gifts” available to support their missions. Shoppers may choose to honor a favorite teacher with a school kit with basic supplies for children who often go without or give a ock of chickens to provide eggs, meat, and hope to an entire village for the cook in the family. After selecting gifts for the people on their lists, shoppers make a donation in the amount of those gifts and receive a beautiful custom greeting card describing the gift and the charitable organization it supports to send to friends and family. More information is available on the church’s website at www.crawfordvilleumc.org/altchristmas. Online shopping will be also available beginning Saturday for those who can’t make it to the market in person.  Christ Church Anglican to offer soup and bread Christ Church Anglican is on a mission to ght hunger and feed hope in Wakulla County. Christ Church Anglican will host a Soup & Bread Kitchen from noon to 1 p.m. on Dec. 9 at the church. Their goal is to reach out to the hungry in the nearby community and provide a free warm meal. The homemade soup will be ladled into to-go cups and the bread wrapped so that people can pick it up and take it home to eat. 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER I will confess right up front to a certain degree of confusion. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage will corroborate this confession. So many things confuse me; I am not sure where to begin, and once I begin, where in the world will it stop? I have been married for over 41 years but I must confess, not to the same woman. Oh yes, it is the same woman with the same name but it is not the same woman I married 41 years ago. Where is that young woman I married? When first married, I thought I knew everything there was to know about women and wives in particular. I do not know if it is the ensuing years but I am rather confused about this whole matter of being married. I suppose that is the mystery of romance. If you ever “ gure it out it loses its charm. Romance without charm is just an old man and an old woman who have lived together for 41 years. That is just one area of confusion. I harbor no aspiration of unconfusing my level of confusion in that area. There are other areas I could work on that might be a little more productive in this regard. An area particularly that has me greatly confused is the Christmas season with all the Christmas decorations including the ominous Christmas tree. Oh, how I love that old Christmas tree and decorating it and celebrating the whole Christmas spirit. What has been confusing me for the last several years is this uncertainty about the season. Some people do not want to call it the Christmas season; rather they refer to it as the holiday season. What I want to know is, what holiday are we celebrating in December? I know the holiday we celebrate in November, and the other holidays sprinkled throughout the year. In July, for example, nobody calls it a holiday parade.Ž It is the Fourth of July parade, for Petes sake! In February, nobody calls it a holiday banquet.Ž It is a Valentines banquet. Just so everybody knows, nobody will catch me singing a holiday carol.Ž I suppose with all the holidays in this country throughout the year it would be simpler just to call everything a holiday.Ž That would simplify things and help those who cannot keep up with the calendar. I am all for that. It seems the only squabbling that goes on is during the month of December. Actually, the squabbling begins before our turkey dinner has finished digesting. Maybe some people get too much turkey in their system and it clouds their thinking. What I do not get is the level of anger directed in this direction. It would seem that the Christmas season offers a huge threat to our society. We cannot call our Christmas tree a Christmas tree; it has to be called a holiday tree. Everybody knows the word Christmas treeŽ is some kind of code inviting disaster on our society. I have never heard anybody define or describe what that disaster would look like. What amazes me is simply that this is a huge issue in some peoples minds. Nothing is more dangerous to society than this. The word ChristmasŽ carries with it more danger to our society than the ominous “ nancial cliff we are facing, the threat of terrorism in our own country and Lindsay Lohan at 4 a.m. What is more confusing to me is that these people who are trying to protect our society from anything religious wants to substitute the word ChristmasŽ for the word holiday.Ž It just shows the level of education in our country has not kept up with the times. I know it has been a long time since I have been in school, but I do know that certain words have certain de“ nitions. Do the people who object to anything religious understand that the word holiday comes from the phrase holy day?Ž I am not a PhD but I do know that the phrase holy dayŽ has religious roots. So, I am really confused along this line. On the one hand, we are not to use the word ChristmasŽ because of its religious connotations. At the same time, we are supposed to use the word holidayŽ which in every dictionary in the land means holy day.Ž Christmas is a holy day but we are not allowed to think of it as a holy day just use the term holiday.Ž Now I am really confused. Is it a holiday or a holy day? Is it sacred or is it secular? What holiday does a holiday tree really celebrate? I like what the apostle Paul wrote, Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holyday, or of the new moon, or of the Sabbath daysŽ (Colossians 2:16 KJV). I will not allow any mans objections affect my celebration of the Christmas season. To quote from a great secular classic, God bless us, everyone.ŽRev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. OUT TO PASTORWhat holiday does a holiday tree celebrate?Reba Mason, director of Wakulla Community Chorus, conducts the group in a “ nal rehearsal for the 12th performance of Handels Messiah. The concert is free and will be held at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church on Sunday, Dec. 9, at 3 p.m. Everyone is invited to attend. religious views and events ChurchPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPerforming Messiah

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Delous (Del) Sparkman, 85, of Crawfordville, passed away Sunday, Dec. 2, 2012, in Tallahassee. He was born Aug. 12, 1927, in Medart to Thomas A. and Mary Colvin Sparkman. He graduated from Sopchoppy High School in 1944. He was a 26 year veteran of the U.S. Navy. He served in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. He enlisted as an E-1 and retired at the rank of 0-4, Lt. Commander. He was also a deep sea diver for the U.S. Navy. He worked as superintendent of utilities at Florida State University; as lead preventive maintenance inspector for the Florida Bureau of Maintenance; as maintenance superintendent for Reynold Electrical Engineering Company, at the nuclear test site in Nevada; as manager of the Engineering Division for EG&G Inc. at NASA; and as Chief Mechanical Inspector for the City of Tallahassee; along with being a private inspector of mobile homes being moved. Survivors include his wife of 65 years, Clara Raker Sparkman; son, Donnie R. Sparkman (Rita); grandsons, Tully Sparkman (Paula), Colby Sparkman (Megan) and Troy Sparkman (Lindsay); a granddaughter, Kim Sanders (Andrew); five great-grandchildren; Hayden, Jackson, Walker, Brigham and Reese; and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his son, Dwane Sparkman. The family received friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville. The funeral service was held on Wednesday Dec. 5, 2012, at 10 a.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville with interment at the Duggar Cemetery following the funeral services. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd Tallahassee FL 32308 or Wakulla Shrine Club, P.O. Box 994 Crawfordville FL 32326. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfh. com) Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comObituaries Marquis Lamor Hutchison Frederick Allen Hyatt Sr. Linward W. Kennedy Johnnie ‘Bill’ Donnie Roberts Delous ‘Del’ SparkmanFrederick Allen Hyatt Sr., 58, died on Dec. 1, 2012, at Big Bend Hospice in Tallahassee, following an illness. He is survived by his wife of 36 years, AareyLee Hyatt. He was born in Chipley on Jan. 20, 1954, to Opal and Ted Hyatt. He was raised in Panama City and had resided in Crawfordville for the last 37 years. For many years he was a master plumber and owner of Hyatt Plumbing. He had a passion for “ shing, hunting, grilling and spending time with his family and friends. There will be a viewing on Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Woodville Baptist Church in Woodville. Graveside services will be Friday, Dec. 7, 2012, at Piney Grove Cemetery in Chipley at noon central time/1 p.m. Eastern time. Besides his wife, other survivors include two sons, Fred and Trey Hyatt; two daughters, Nikki and Ashley Hyatt; granddaughter, Haley Hyatt; a brother, Terry Hyatt; and two sisters, Anita Dixon and Betty Sue Allen. He was predeceased by brother, Ted Hyatt Jr.Frederick Allen Hyatt Sr. Lt. Cmdr. (Ret) Delous Richard SparkmanLinward W. Kennedy, 74, of Crawfordville, passed away on Friday, Nov. 30, 2012, in Tallahassee. He was born in Meigs, Ga., and was a resident of Crawfordville for 21 years. He was a member of the VFW, a wonderful father, grandfather and husband. He loved to “ sh. He was a carpenter and a veteran of the U.S. Army. Services were held Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012, at 11 a.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-9263333 or www.bevisfh.com). Survivors include two sons, Lamar Kennedy and Scotty Kennedy; two daughters, Bonnie Edwards and Patricia Kennedy; a brother, Keith Kennedy; one sister, Monteen Kennedy; nine grandchildren; six great-grandchildren, and many loving family and friends. He was predeceased by his wife, Elyse Kennedy; a brother, Lamar Kennedy; and a sister, Linda Parker. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey Young Chapel was in charge of arrangements. Johnnie BillŽ Donald Roberts, 85, passed away on Sunday, Dec. 2, 2012, in Tallahassee. He is survived by his wife of 32 years, Christine Roberts, of Sopchoppy. He was born in Sanborn. He served in the U.S. Navy and served aboard the USS Begor APD-127 in World War II. He worked for Dow Chemical in Lake Jackson, Texas. He was a retired plumber at Brazoria County School System in Texas. He enjoyed going to Friendship Baptist Church in Medart. Visitation will be Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church in Sopchoppy from 10:30 a.m. to noon. Services will be held on Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012 at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church in Sopchoppy at noon with burial at West Sopchoppy Cemetery in Sopchoppy. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Sopchoppy High School Restoration Fund, P.O. Box 43, Sopchoppy FL 32358. Besides his wife, other survivors include his sons, John Roberts (Mitzi) of Crawfordville, Stewart Roberts of Brennam, Texas, and Gene Roberts (Shay) of Angleton, Texas; two brothers, Randolph Roberts (Frances) and Eddie Earl Roberts (Ernestine); sisters, Laveda Raker (Silas), Elizabeth Smith (Wesley), Callie Quigg (Fred) and June Seymour; his granddaughters, Erin and Michelle Roberts of Tallahassee; and grandson, Shawn Roberts of Brennam, Texas. He was predeceased by his parents, John and Delma Raker Roberts; granddaughters, Brittani and Brandi Roberts of Angleton, Texas; and his brothers, M.L. Roberts of Texas and Bud Roberts of Sopchoppy. Marquis Lamor QuiseterŽ Hutchison, 15, a ninth grade student at Wakulla High School died on Monday, Nov. 26, 2012, in Gainesville. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1, at River of Life Church in Crawfordville. Burial followed at Buckhorn cemetery in Sopchoppy. Survivors include his mother, Felicia Thurman (Colby); his father, Shedrick Garrett (Pamela); three brothers, Markell (Megan), Shedrick II, and Dontavius; “ ve sisters, Mya, Mia, Mckenzie, Victoria, Lexus; his grandparents, Deborah McRoy (Willie), Jessie Ransom (Rhonda), Rita Hutchison, Jane Kearse, Donald Wicker (Joyce), Chrissy Daniels (Lou); great-grandparents, Josephine Allen, Blonzie Carter; and a host of other relatives and friends. He was predeceased by a sister, Tekeya; and grandfather, Leroy Allen. Richardson Funeral Home in Tallahassee was in charge of the arrangements.Marquis Lamor Hutchison Linward W. Kennedy Johnnie ‘Bill’ Donnie RobertsBy LILLIAN BROWNChristian CoalitionThe Wakulla County Christian Coalition is accepting applications for its annual African American Heritage Parade in February. To the community, even though we face difficulties of tomorrow and the days that will follow, we all should have a dream. It shall be a dream deeply rooted in the American Dream. We all may dream one day this great nation will come together as one and rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed. The African American Heritage Parade will take place on Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013, at 11 a.m. at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. The registration for the parade is free. Request parade and vendor forms by emailing black00eye@aol.com or fax (850) 926-1820. The deadline is Dec. 31, 2012. Wakulla County Christian Coalition scholarship programs have made it possible to change the lives of many students that come from lower-income families, students that are single parents trying to achieve their educational goal, re-entry adults and many more that couldnt take this important step in life without your help. Without scholarship donation and educational sponsorship many students cant afford the good education that could provide them with a better, brighter future they deserve. This is why our organization created programs that reach out to the general public asking them for a monetary contribution that is later awarded as grants and scholarships for college for deserving students. Many students would not be able to attend college and achieve the lifeenhancing goal of receiving a higher education without your support. Please help maintain scholarships, and keep the scholarship spirit alive and strong. To make a donation or place an ad in the program book contact Lillian Brown (850) 926-8333 for cost of ads. Deadline to place ad is Jan. 15, 2013. We invite marching bands, entertainers, dignitaries, civic groups, nonprofit groups, corporate groups. There will be entertainment and fun for the whole family. This day is marked with a look backward in respect for our ancestors who struggled so that we could be here today. This is a day to re” ect on culture, heritage, history and accomplishments of black Americans in the United States and across the world. Please Recycle Applications being accepted for African American Heritage Parade FILE PHOTOA ” oat in last years Black History Parade.Special to The NewsAngella Lee, vice-president of a local non-pro“ t youth outreach organization called Destinys Legacy Inc, announced the group is holding its second annual If You Believe CampaignŽ Christmas Charity Concert, The event will be held at the Lake Ella American Legion Hall on Sunday, Dec. 9, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. to enjoy great music, dancing, poetry and food. This event is intended to be a source of empowerment and an avenue of resources and help to those in need within the Big Bend and surrounding areas. Anyone who is interested in being considered as a recipient of this years Holiday Help ProgramŽ through Destinys Legacy should send an email to destinyslegacyinc@gmail. com. The email should contain the following information: name, address, phone number or other contact method, number of people in household (including the number of adults, number of dependents), amount of total monthly income in home (specify if no income is available) and specify in detail why there is a need for assistance.Destinys Legacy to hold event at Lake Ella Funeral Home, Inc. 551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Digni“ed Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Open 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. -----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org Promise Land THRIFT STORE y 926-3281 Help Big Bend Hospice Honor Those Who Are No Longer With Us Big Bend HospiceTree of Remembrance 2012 2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.orgVisit our Wakulla County Tree at Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial Bank in Crawfordville What do you give the person who has everything? Honor them with a gift for those who have little.Alternative Christmas MarketJoin us for the Third AnnualCRAWFORDVILLE UNITED METHODIST CHURCHSaturday, December 8, 2012 11am to 2pmCRAWFORDVILLE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 176 Ochlockonee Street (850) 926-7209“Celebrate the true meaning of the season. Give gifts that make a difference in our community and our world.” SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY NIGHT SERVICES6:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study3086 Crawfordville Highway (One block south of Courthouse)850-926-7896www.crawfordvillefbc.com GET TO A BETTER STATE.’ CALL ME TODAY. 1103208 12/11Get a Free Discount Double Check.’ I can help you save like a champion, with discounts that could add up to XX%* and be worth hundreds of dollars. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, State Farm Indemnity Company, Bloomington, IL *Discounts may vary by state. Aaron Rodgers got his. How about you? 40% *Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 – Page 7Ahappenings in our community Community Mr. and Mrs. Brent Thurmond, of Crawfordville, announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Meagan Elizabeth Thurmond, to Travis Michael Cronan. Cronan is the son of Michael Cronan and Tami Cronan, both of Crawfordville. He is the grandson of Evelyn Cronan and the late Earl Cronan and Sandra Pettis. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Thurmond the late Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm McCoy. Cronan is currently in school studying to go into the ministry. Thurmond is an elementary teacher in Wakulla County and a graduate of Florida State University. Both are graduates of Wakulla High School. A wedding is planned for Dec. 22 at Wakulla Springs Baptist Church. The couple will reside in Crawfordville.Cronan to wed urmond Meagan E. Thurmond and Travis M. CronanMartin will marry Petrandis Lila C. Petrandis and William T. Martin Lila Claire Petrandis and William Thomas Martin, both of Forest Hills, N.Y., announce their upcoming wedding. She is the daughter of Angelo and Arline Petrandis of Panacea. He is the son of William and Merri Chris Martin. She obtained an Associate of Arts degree from Tallahassee Community College and is an American College of Sports Medicine Certi“ ed Personal Trainer. She is a personal trainer and facility manager for Focus Integrated Fitness in Manhattan. He obtained his Computer Science and Mathematics degree from University of West Florida and is a support engineer with PubMatic in Manhattan The wedding will be held in Playa Hermosa, Costa Rica, on Dec. 12 at 4:15 p.m. Lions make donation to help those in need The Crawfordville Lions Club recently made a contribution to the Meals on Wheels program at the Senior Center, as well as two local food pantries. Pat Calhoun, of Crawfordville First Baptist Church, Ginger and Lemuel Cooksey of Crawfordville United Methodist Church and R.H. Carter and Pat Phillips of the Senior Center, accept the donation from President of the Crawfordville Lions Club Marc Dickieson. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Reed named as national chaplain for Fleet ReserveSpecial to The NewsEarnest Reed Sr. of Crawfordville, was recently named National Chaplain for the Fleet Reserve Association (FRA) at the organizations 85th National Convention in Reno, Nev. Appointed by FRAs National President Mark Kilgore, Reed will offer spiritual support and guidance to the Associations National Board of Directors (NBOD) and other members. A non-voting member of the NBOD, the National Chaplain assists shipmates who have spiritual needs and sends letters of condolence on behalf of the membership to families who have lost shipmates. He also opens and closes conventions and NBOD meetings with requests for Gods oversight in conducting the Associations business. Reed joined the FRA in 1990 and is currently the president of FRA Branch 34 in Tallahassee, where he recently served as branch vice president. He served eight years of active duty in the U.S. Navy and 21 years in the U.S. Navy Reserve, retiring in 2010 as a Senior Chief Fire Controlman. His military service was followed by six years as an automotive service manager for J.C. Penney and 28 years with the City of Tallahassee Electric Department (Purdom Plant). He currently serves on the Elder Board and is the Sunday School Superintendent and General Coordinator for World Wide Christian Ministry, Inc. Being National Chaplain gives me a great opportunity to not only help my fellow shipmates, but also spread the word about the FRA,Ž said Reed, who embraces his duties as the Associations national chaplain. Be shepherds of Gods ” ock that is under your care, watching over them,Ž he quotes from the Bible (1 Peter 5:2). Im eager to serve.Ž FRA is a congressionally chartered, non-pro“ t organization representing the interests of current and former enlisted personnel of the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. As the collective voice for all Sea Service personnel since 1924, FRA speaks on behalf of its members on Capitol Hill. There is no law protecting military benefits, so FRA is here to stand guard. In addition to its advocacy work on Capitol Hill, FRA also sponsors a national Americanism Essay Contest and assists its members with disaster relief grants. To learn more about FRA, visit www.fra.org; follow us on Twitter at @FRAHQ; or Like us on Facebook at www.fra.org/fb. Porter attends Presidents Reception at Judson College Judson College student Alyssa Porter of Crawfordville recently attended the Presidents Reception for new students. She is the daughter of Jim and Teresa Porter. She is a graduate of Wakulla High School. Porter, at right, attends the reception for new students at Judson College. PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Special Christmas ShowSPONSORED BY: FAIRCLOTH INSURANCE AGENCY PURVIS BROTHERS BAND Call 962-3711 for Ticket Information Country SopchoppyOpry.com 000CV38 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolFood drive is held at Riversprings Riversprings Middle School Student Council and SWAT held a Canned Food Drive at school. It was very successful. Teachers and students alike contributed to the Food Bank of Wakulla County. Mr. Taylors home room collected the most and Mr. MacBrayers collected the second most canned and nonperishable goods. Thanks to all the students and faculty for their caring natures. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWHS talent show is this FridayBy SUSAN SOLBURGWHS Drama teacherIts that time of year when the weather turns cooler and the talented students at Wakulla High heat upŽ for the annual WHS Winter Talent Show. This years show will be filled with fabulous vocal talent: Chelsea Austin, Devon Crockett, Connor Keith, Yese Reyes, Kyla Kerce, Hannah Lanier and Rami McIver will raise the roof with their beautiful voices. We also have wonderful musicians who are playing piano or guitar while singing: Vocalist Melissa Gentry with piano, Alyssa Schubert with guitar, Brett & Mitchell with guitars, vocalist Brianna Marin with piano, vocalist Sean Brannon with guitar and vocalist Ethan Spivey also playing the piano. Our amazing Michael Schnorr will blow your mind with his electrifying dance moves along with the Hamilton SistersŽ who will move you with their beautiful lyrical dance and also the talented mime expressions of David Moss. Something new this year, we have a voice impressionist, Cody Worrill and our own Italian exchange student Alberto Vichi performing monologues. There is a rock classic by new-comer Robbie Collins, and last but not least our Terrific Twirlers,Ž Katie, Brooke & Mackenzie. Whew, what a night it will be! Hunter Wheatcraft and Emily Westmark will be the MCs for the show and the ever popular Santas ElvesŽ will also be part of the holiday fun. The show will be this Friday, Dec. 7 in the high school auditorium. Doors will open at 6 p.m. and elves will also be there to delight and entertain. The show will start at 7 p.m. The cost of tickets will be: students, $4; adults, $6; and senior citizens, $5. Proceeds help qualifying Drama Students from Thespian Troupe # 5036 go to their District Thespian Competition in January at the Northwest Florida State College in Niceville.Medart holds spelling beeSpecial to The NewsThe Medart Elementary School Spelling Bee took place on Wednesday, Nov. 28. Jennifer Anderson organized the event and Michelle Lawhon was the pronouncer. Fourth and “ fth grade teachers judged the competitions. Two competitions resulted in two winners from each grade level. Olivia Harris from Ms. Priscos fourth grade class claimed first place with the word sushi.Ž Placing second in fourth grade was Hannah Ezell, also from Ms. Priscos class. Other fourth graders representing their homerooms included Caroline Barwick, Taylor Burdette, Adison Carraway, Drake Harrison, Sadie Hobby and Bailey Strickland. The fourth grade competition lasted 11 rounds. In “ fth grade, Phoenix Jalbert was the champion spelling campaignŽ as the winning word. Phoenix is in Ms. Paffords homeroom class. Malaysia Thomas placed second. She represented Ms. Watsons class. Other fifth grade participants were Olivia Hutto, Jay Jacob, Kaitlyn Melton, Colton Nichols, Autumn Pearson, and Angel Powell. The “ fth grade competition lasted eight rounds. First and second place winners in each of the grade levels will represent Medart Elementary School in the District Spelling Bee hosted by Wakulla Middle School on Friday, Jan. 11, 2013. The District Spelling Bee will consist of students from all four elementary schools, the middle schools, COAST and home-schooled students grades four through eight. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe fourth graders who participated in the spelling bee with their teachers. The “ fth grade spelling bee participants with their teachers. TCC o ers new classes for Spring 2013Special to The NewsIn the spring of 2013, Tallahassee Community College is expanding its offerings to include a Water Quality Technician Certi“ cate and an Environmental Science Technology associate degree. The new programs represent the first phase of TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute, with the goal of preparing the next generation of environmental professionals. TCCs new certi“ cate and degree programs will qualify students to work in the areas of water quality, natural resource management and environmental monitoring with the local, state and national levels of government and private enterprises. There are online classes, as well as those offered in a classroom. TCC plans to implement additional Wakulla Environmental Institute programs in the coming semesters, including hospitality and tourism management, aquaculture management, parks and leisure technology, and agribusiness management. For more information, visit TCCWakullaEnvironmentalInstitute.com or call (850) 201-8499. School news: Email your news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space is available. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 •Flooring •Carpentry •Painting •Tile Work FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 Cell (850) 570–1968 Re“nance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a ”oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Of“ce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Of“ce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Of“ce: 850.926.1960 The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com F o r l o c a l For local n e w s news a n d and p h o t o s photos v i s i t u s visit us o n l i n e online w w w T h e W a k u l l a N e w s c o m www.TheWakullaNews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 – Page 9Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBy PATTY WILBURSpecial to The NewsLeaves are falling, the air is crisp and people are heading home for the holidays. Likewise, cooler temperatures are bringing manatees back to their winter home at Wakulla Springs State Park. While we may see manatees here any day of the year, they are most numerous and reliably seen in the park from November through January. They come to Wakulla Springs seeking refuge from the cold in its relatively warm waters. As many manatees have distinctive scars that make them recognizable, its always interesting to see who shows up in the fall. Some manatees seem to stay in the general area year-round, while others only seem to visit when the weather cools. Several mothers have arrived with new calves born this summer. Those calves will probably return every winter, and may raise young of their own here some day. A handful of manatees in the region have been outfitted with satellite tags, which allow biologists to track their movements. One old male named Herman has spent the last two winters in the park and was tagged here last December. He left this area on the morning of Feb. 3 and arrived in the Crystal River area on the evening of Feb. 5. Herman continued on to the Homosassa River and eventually journeyed to Tampa Bay. He hadnt been documented there since the year 2000. He headed back north in early summer and hung around Apalachicola for a while. Weve been seeing him in the park fairly regularly since early September. What a traveler! A younger male named Gordo was also tagged here last December. He left the park in late January and surprisingly hung around Ochlockonee Bay for about a month before heading to Crystal River. In June his tag was recovered in the Crooked River. The buoys are designed to break free if they become entangled, so they do not endanger the manatees. Gordos whereabouts were a mystery until Halloween, when he was seen again at Wakulla Springs. Hes been here regularly since. As the belt and tether which connected the buoy to the base of his tail are still in place, it should be relatively easy for biologists to retag him soon. This will be the sixth winter that manatees have congregated at Wakulla Springs, and every year the number seen here has increased. Twelve spent the winter of 2007-08 at the park. Last winter we saw over 50. And from what weve been seeing lately, we may top even that number when the weather turns truly cold.Manatees are wintering at Wakulla Springs SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThis report represents some events the FWC handled over Nov. 16-29 in the Northwest region, but it does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. FRANKLIN COUNTY: While working the illegal night harvest of oysters near West Pass, Of“ cer John Allen spotted a shrimp vessel inside the three-mile line with what appeared to be three nets in the water. The inspection con“ rmed Officer Allens observations, and a misdemeanor citation was issued to the captain of the vessel for the violation. € While on patrol, Of“ cer Matt Gore spotted a vehicle driving through Eastpoint loaded with bags of oysters. Of“ cer Gore did not see any shade over the oysters and initiated a stop to speak with the harvesters about the violation. During the inspection, Of“ cer Gore was assisted by Officer Steven Cook. The inspection revealed not only were the oysters unshaded, but they were also untagged. The of“ cers seized approximately 40 bags of oysters and the two harvesters were issued misdemeanor citations for possession of unshaded oysters and untagged bags. € While conducting “ sheries inspections on the St. George Island Fishing Pier, Of“ cer John Allen found an angler who stated that he had only one “ sh in his cooler. An inspection revealed that the angler was in possession of six spotted sea trout, all of which were undersized. The angler also failed to buy a saltwater “ shing license. The angler was issued a misdemeanor citation for possession of undersized spotted sea trout and warnings for being over the bag limit and possessing no saltwater “ shing license. € Of“ cers Terry Martin, Matt Gore, and Tyler Akos were conducting decoy deer operations in the Tates Hell WMA during the opening four days of general gun season. One of the contacts made was with a hunter who had been cited by Of“ cer Martin during last years general gun season for taking antlerless deer. The hunter failed to appear for his court date on that charge and a warrant had been issued for his arrest. When asked by the of“ cers why he did not appear for his previous court date, he responded that he had forgotten about it. The man was placed under arrest and transported to the Franklin County Jail. € While on patrol at Alligator Point, Of“ cer John Allen stopped to help some anglers who were returning from surf “ shing and had bogged down their vehicle in the sand. After helping the anglers free their vehicle from the sand, Of“ cer Allen asked if they had caught any “ sh during their outing. The anglers replied, Not really.Ž An inspection of their cooler revealed a 37-inch red drum. The anglers stated that the “ sh had just been given to them by someone else. Of“ cer Allen stated he had not seen anyone else “ shing in the area or anyone leaving the area other than them. At that point, one of the anglers assumed responsibility for the “ sh. The angler was issued a misdemeanor citation for possession of oversized red drum and the “ sh was seized. € While on patrol, Of“ cer Matt Gore was traveling behind a truck pulling a boat and trailer. Officer Gore noticed the boat trailer had no brake lights and the tag expired in 2007. Without being directed by Of“ cer Gore, the truck suddenly pulled over onto the shoulder of the road. As Of“ cer Gore pulled in behind the truck, he activated his blue lights and the male operator exited and began walking to the back of the truck. The operator was unsteady and displaying signs of impairment. Of“ cer Gore instructed the operator to stand at the back of the truck. At this time, a female passenger got behind the wheel and attempted to drive away, stalling the truck. As a result of Of“ cer Gores investigation, both the male and female operators were arrested for DUI, as well as driving while license suspended/revoked. A third passenger in the vehicle was arrested on a warrant for possession of undersized oysters. While conducting an inventory of the vehicle and vessel for towing, several open beer cans and an open bottle of whiskey were found. Two large monofilament gill nets were also located in the vessel. Of“ cer Percy Cook responded to assist. € Later in the week, Of“ cer Matt Gore was off duty, duck hunting on Lake Wimico. Of“ cer Gore observed a group of hunters who appeared to be taking over the bag limit of ducks. Without revealing his identity, Of“ cer Gore engaged the hunters in idle conversation and determined that they had launched from the White City boat ramp. Of“ cer Gore contacted an investigator to conduct surveillance at the boat ramp while he returned to his home to go on duty. Of“ cer Gore was able to make it to the White City Boat ramp before the hunters returned. As a result of the efforts of Of“ cer Gore and the investigator, two notices to appear were issued for possession of migratory birds (ducks) without a head and wing attached and obligation to permit search. Twenty-six duck breasts were seized and placed into evidence. Two written warnings were issued for failure to properly tag migratory birds. GADSDEN COUNTY: Lt. Harry Parker issued a citation to a Gadsden County man for possession of over the limit of bream in the Little River area of Lake Talquin. The individual was in possession of 79 “ sh, 29 over the legal limit. € Plain-clothes Of“ cer Chris Jones was on patrol on Little River, working information received about individuals catching undersized and over the bag limit of crappie. Officer Jones observed some individuals “ shing in the river and started a general conversation. During the exchange, he noticed “ sh that were separated. Some were in a bucket and some were behind the “ sherman in a plastic bag and some were thrown into the bushes. It appeared that the “ sherman was trying to conceal certain “ sh. Of“ cer Jones identi“ ed himself and conducted a resource check on the individuals. During the check, “ ve undersized crappie were located. The “ shermen were cited, and one was arrested on an outstanding warrant out of Gadsden County. € Officer Chris Jones was dispatched to a trespass call. During his investigation, he located an unsupervised 13-year-old male hunting deer with a .22 magnum in a neighborhood. The juveniles grandfather (guardian) was contacted, who stated he thought his grandson was hunting squirrels in the backyard. Of“ cer Jones was able to determine that the young man had been hunting by himself for about three hours unsupervised in the neighborhood, and the grandfather did not know where his grandson was. After meeting with the State Attorney, Of“ cer Jones was instructed to issue warrants for the grandfather. 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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com T a k i n g C a r e o f B u s i n e s s Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from New Chamber board, o cers set FROM THE PRESIDENTInn at Wildwood hosts Chamber luncheon By AMY GEIGERChamber PresidentDear Members: A special thanks goes out to all those who let their voices be heard in the general election on Nov. 6. Wakulla County reported an impressive 79.7 percent overall voter turnout. The Chamber of Commerce would like to congratulate and welcome the following local elected of“ cials: Charlie Creel … Sheriff Donnie Sparkman … Property Appraiser Bobby Pearce … Superintendent of Schools Ralph Thomas … County Commissioner District 1 Howard Kessler … County Commissioner District 3 Richard Harden … County Commissioner District 5 NEW CHAMBER OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS Each year the Chamber of Commerce reaches out to its membership in search of individuals who are willing to be an active member in moving the Chamber forward. The following individuals have agreed to serve the businesses of Wakulla County: President … Tammie Bar“ eld President Elect … Kevin Vaughn Vice President … Alan Wise Treasurer … Dustin Grubbs Secretary … Mary Wallace New Board Members: Bob Ballard … Wakulla Environmental Institute TCC Herb Donaldson … Palaver Tree Theater Dan Hinchee … Crawfordville Auto & Tire Courtney Peacock … Capital City Bank I would like to thank these individuals for serving on the board and giving their time, energy and talents to the business community … Susan Brooks Shearer, Guy Revell, Richie Bruce and Ralph Thomas. We appreciate each of you and look forward to your continued support. SHOP LOCAL In 2009, under Paul Johnsons leadership, the Shop Local campaign was kicked off encouraging Wakulla County residents to patronize local merchants for their goods and services. As we all know our local businesses are the backbone of our community and now more than ever they need our support. In fact, Nov. 24 was designated as Shop Small Day and with the assistance of The Wakulla News we were able to assist in spreading the word to take part in helping our small businesses thrive by shopping or dining at one of our many establishments. I ask all Chamber members to consider the many opportunities available locally to give the gift of your new or continued business this holiday season. Keep more of your dollars where they impact our tax rate, support jobs and make our community stronger. Last but not least, the Chamber of Commerce is not a building or a person, but a collaboration of all members in the business community who choose to support a strong voice for the future of economic growth. This holiday season let us celebrate all the families, institutions, non-pro“ ts and businesses that bring us together for the greater good of our community. As always, thank you for allowing me the opportunity to serve as your Chamber President. Yours in service, Amy Geiger.Amy Geiger is president of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce.By PETRA SHUFFof the ChamberOur monthly networking luncheons came to a close for the year at Wildwood Country Club, serving buffet style rosemary chicken, mashed potatoes and gravy, veggies and salad, followed by an array of yummy desserts. We had a nice crowd of 56. The new manager, Jay (JR) Gayle was brought out of retirement after 10 years and now heads up both Summerbrooke and Wildwood. JR introduced his staff, Emily Winston, supervisor, and Jason Morgan, front desk manager of the hotel. As a special treat he also excited golf enthusiasts when he handed out VIP passes with special rates for both golf courses, and invited everyone to tour the Inn at Wildwood. Before our announcements Mary Wallace, our luncheon chair, was presented with a little personal gift to help get the crowds attention, a cowbell, which she promptly put to use. Mary announced seven new members for November: Wakulla County United Fire Fighters Association, Boomerang Restoration Service LLC, WTXL-TV, the Maine Tamers Beauty & Barber Salon, Smokin Vapor Wakulla, Front Porch Creations Florist and our new ladies boutique The Little Black Dress. As is customary at our luncheons, our new members get to introduce themselves and their business. Adam Roland with WTXL covers 19 counties in our surrounding area and the station plans on playing a larger part in our community. Adam has been getting to know our business community rather well through of their Our TownŽ news coverage and commercial shoots, which will air during December. Charlene Poole with Smokin Vapor Wakulla opened its doors Monday, Dec. 3, selling smokeless tobacco products. Charlene married a Wakulla Countian and is eager to meet everyone in the county. Charlene and her husband, Shawn, are true believers in smokeless tobacco and with the help of their products have put cigarettes aside months ago, and would like to help any cigarette smoker quit the habit. Casey Spears, bookkeeper for Bennett Better Built Homes was able to attend her “ rst luncheon and invited everyone to either call Matt Bennett or visit their business to learn more about their manufactured or modular homes. This might be a great referral for realtors selling lots. Marianne Dazevedo, one of our local realtors volunteers for Alzheimers Project of Wakulla County which provides respite care, and shared the program for Alzheimers patients at Lake Ellen Baptist Church in Crawfordville to allow caregivers a weekly break. The program takes place every Monday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., entertains patients with games and other activities and also provides lunch. Recently, patients have been working on a patchwork quilt, which is being raf” ed off Dec. 17. Tickets are $ 1 each or 6 tickets for $5 tickets and are available by calling Marianne 212-1415, Pat Ashley at 9845277, or Mary McMahan 510-1253. Ron Copeland with Oyster & Hitz 106 Radio Stations announced a special promo deal of 108 spots, 54 spots for each station for only $150. Shelley Swenson gave a heartfelt thanks to our Wakulla County Realtors for their generosity and donation of around $400 worth of food contributions which allowed some local families to prepare a nice Thanksgiving dinner. Shelley also shared brochures for the UF/IFAS upcoming cooking school and food preparation classes, and personal sessions for “ nancial assistance. Learn how to prepare healthy soups, seafood, or “ ve ingredient dinners. Pre…registration is required. For more information give Shelley a call at 926-3931. Continued on Page 11A PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENChamber members and guests at the luncheon at the Inn at Wildwood.LUNCHEON: Chamber members and guests, above, socialize before a lunch of rosemary chicken; the new manager at Wildwood, Jay (JR) Gayle, left, welcomes the Chamber. 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com Become a volunteer with Florida’s Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program. The Ombudsman Program is a statewide advocacy organiza on seeking to ensure the health, safety, welfare and rights of Florida’s elders who reside in nursing homes, assisted living facili es and adult family care homes. Bene ts of volunteering with us include: Meet and interact with others who share a passion for volunteering, personal ful llment and growth. Give back to the community and seek to make a posi ve di erence in the lives of long-term care facility residents. Receive mileage reimbursement as well as support from state and local sta Apply today! To learn more call 1-888-831-0404 or visit ombudsman.m orida.com online. Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com“2-Night Free Vacation!”or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 – Page 11A S p o t l i g h t o n B u s i n e s s Spotlight on Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Business: UPS Store #6044Owner: Harry BosmanTell us about your business (include unique facts and history): We are a locally owned and operated family business. We opened our business in 2008 after Harry retired from state government with 30 years of experience in mailing/shipping/printing. Jayne is our manager with 15 years of administrative experience and David is our assistant manager with four years of experience with the store. What services, products do you offer? Mailbox and postal services, shipping, packing, printing, notary, freight. What sets your business apart from the competition? Experience in the industry … we understand small busniess because we are one. We charge UPS retail rates on shipping with no mark up. What should the communitycustomer expect when they visit your business? Excellent customer service. We will work with our customers to give them the best rates and meet their needs. How long have you been a Chamber member? Eight months. Why did you join the Chamber? To enhance network opportunitiesmeeting other small business owners face to face. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? Network luncheon and several events. We will continue to take part in the Chambers services. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? The majority of the jobs and money stay in the community. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Google 6044 or call (850) 576-3333 or email at store6044@ theupsstore.com. Other community involvement: Toys for Tots, literacy program, Jazz for Justice (North Florida Legal Services), Big Bend Postal Customer Council, Juvenile Diabetes, Woodville Volunteer Fire Department, Wounded Warriors. UPS store #6044 is located at 5032 Capital Circle SW Ste 2. The phone number is (850) 576-3333. € Wakulla County United Fire Fighters Association … P.O. Box 1327, Crawfordville. (850) 545-0398. Welcome, Ian Brazier. € Boomerang Restoration Service LLC … specializing in insurance restoration related to “ re, water, wind and storm damage. 3048 W. Tharpe St., Tallahassee FL 32303 (850) 597-9303. Welcome, Kelly Riser. € WTXL-TV … specializing in television advertising. 1620 Commerce Blvd, Midway FL 32343. (850) 893-3127. Welcome, Adam Roland. € The Maine Tamers Beauty & Barber Salon … specializing in multi cultural hair care. 1626 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville. (850) 926-3131. Welcome, Valencia Murray. € Smokin Vapor Wakulla … specializing in smokeless tobacco products. 1626 Crawfordville Hwy, Unit D, Crawfordville. (850) 556-5999. Welcome, Shawn and Charlene Poole. € Front Porch Creations Florist … specializing in ” owers and arrangements for all occasions. 2543 Crawfordville Hwy. Suite 4, Crawfordville. (850) 926-7192. Welcome, Loretta Bar“ eld. € The Little Black Dress … specializing in womens clothing and accessories. 1626„D Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville. (850) 926-4222. Welcome, Tina Brimner. € Front Porch Creations Florist on Wednesday, Dec. 12, at 11:30 a.m., 2543 Crawfordville Hwy Suite 4 … Rose Alley Center. € Smokin Vapor Wakulla on Friday, Dec. 14th, at 11:30 a.m., 1626-D Crawfordville Hwy … North Pointe Center.Continued from Page 10APam Allbritton with Big Bend Hospice reminded and invited everyone to the Service of Remembrance Dec. 2, to honor and remember those lost. Louis Garcia, CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters was excited about the new Wakulla mentoring program gaining traction. Ellyn Scanlyn was recently hired as a second employee, and it will be her job to recruit mentors and take referrals for local youth in need of a mentor. Ellyn, a mentor herself, encouraged attendees to experience the gratifying feeling of making a lasting impression in a youths life. A commercial shoot to attract more mentors was scheduled immediately after the luncheon, followed by a check presentation to the local program later in the afternoon by Capital City Bank. Stone Grable with Vector Security reminded everyone to be mindful of the season. Break-ins have been on the rise due to Christmas gift in homes. Vector Security would be happy to consult on a system. Last and de“ nitely most pressing was a call for help for our Operation Santa program, shared by Charlean Lanier of Harvest Ministry. More than 200 families, which is more than 800 adults and children, have been recommended and vetted by case workers and organizations. Their wishes are very modest, ranging from clothing, toys and games to laundry detergent, toilet paper and personal hygiene items. Most needed is clothing for children through high school. You can help by adopting an individual or a family. On a happier note, Charlene announced that the Empty Bowl Project was a great success and raised $7,000 for local food pantries. Thank you Wakulla! Dalton Hall with Wakulla Realty won the $56 cash prize. It was Daltons “ rst time at one of our luncheons, and somehow newbies seem to be lucky winning the pot.Ž There was a wonderful array of gift items, ranging from homemade jellies and scarves to gift certi“ cates, framed art and more, donated to our drawing and want to thank the following members for their contributions: Cook Insurance, Petra Shuff, The Little Black Dress, Lou Kellenberger Photography, Shell Point Realty, St. Marks Refuge Association, Marianne Dazevedo, Arte Mexico, Owl Caf and Tamaras in Apalachicola through Ron Copeland with Oyster Radio, Serendipity Salon, Susan Schatzman, Wildwood Resort, Vector Security, Catherine Cameron, Big Brothers Big Sisters, and The Wakulla News. Mary closed announcements by stating how happy she is about the success of our luncheons, an idea she brought forward and took on about a year and a half ago. She thanked our members for the great attendance over the months, and the willingness of our local restaurants to host our midday networking. She announced that the format is planned to change slightly next year, and will give the opportunity to spotlight a business.Inn at Wildwood hosts Chamber luncheonChamber ChatterNew members Upcoming Ribbon cuttings: From WORKFORCE PLUSVictoria Ilievia has never let anything get in her way of accomplishing her goals. Originally from Bulgaria, Ilievia had always felt like employers looked at her differently because English was not her “ rst language. But Ilievia never let that stop her. Ilieva studied Design and History of Art in Bulgaria before moving to Toronto. In Toronto she learned English in less than a year, determined to not let any barriers get in her way. Once in the United States she began doing graphic design work until the company she was working with went bankrupt in 2011. I had already been through so much,Ž said Ilievia. There was no way I was going to let this setback stop me now.Ž Ilevia knew she wasnt going to let this bring her down and she began visiting the Workforce Plus Wakulla of“ ce. At Workforce Plus she received helped in critiquing and updating her resume and tips on how to search for jobs. Because of her professional experience, Ilieva was referred to the Executive Center in Tallahassee where she continued to learn how to improve her job search through Employ Florida workshops. The Executive Center is a specialized program offered by Workforce Plus that provides free employment services to business and professional candidates in Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla counties. Everyone there was always so helpful,Ž said Ilievia. They were always making sure I was doing okay and staying positive about my situation.Ž In August, Ilievia was contacted by an employer and decided to come back to Workforce Plus for assistance. With the help of a Workforce Plus employee Ron Knutson, Ilievia received a con“ dence boost and push to revamp her resume and give the interview a shot. Ron really pushed me to go out there and just try,Ž said Ilevia. He was so encouraging and told me to never stop being determined.Ž On Sept. 24, Ilieva started her new job with Superior Uniform Group in Seminole as a Catalog Coordinator. Nothing can stop you if you put your mind to it,Ž said Ilievia. Eighty percent of my job now is communications and I am from a different country with a different “ rst language. Never stop trying and you will get there.Ž For more information on Workforce Plus programs such as the Executive Center please visit our website at www.w” pus.org. Workforce Plus is proud to bring you a series of stories straight from the heart … and hearts … of our community. In partnership with The Wakulla News, well showcase one of our own every six weeks whose journey in their career will serve to inspire, uplift and encourage. This is timely and needed because as we all know, the recent economic downturn has spared no one. From teachers to truck drivers and managers to maintenance workers, weve all felt the weight of the struggling economy. But no matter the challenge, we always strive for excellence. Thats why were bringing you the Real People, Real Stories series as a welcome reminder of that drive to overcome and succeed that is within us all. After all, these are real people, and real stories.REAL STORIES, REAL PEOPLEVictoria Ilievia doesn’t let anything stop her from reaching her goals By JASON ALDERMANLike many other economic measures, charitable donations in the U.S. have yet to bounce back to pre-recession levels. According to Giving USAs Annual Report on Philanthropy, charitable contributions totaled $298.4 billion in 2011 … up 4 percent from 2010, but still 11 percent below 2007 levels. The vast majority of those contributions (73 percent) came from individuals, demonstrating that even during tough economic times, people still “ nd ways to support organizations that help those less fortunate than themselves. Because half of all donations typically are made between Thanksgiving and New Years, this is a good time to highlight precautions you can take to ensure your gift has the biggest possible impact, both on the people you want to help and on your own bottom line; also to remind seniors about a tax policy that has changed since last year: Contribution eligibility. If you itemize expenses on your 2012 income taxes, any charitable contributions you plan to deduct must be made by years end. That means either charging your credit or debit card or postmarking a check by midnight on December 31, 2012. You must have a receipt to claim deductions for cash or property, no matter how small. A cancelled check or credit card statement is “ ne for contributions under $250, but amounts over $250 require a written statement from the charity. See IRS Publication 526 for details (www.irs.gov). Confirm tax-exempt status. For your contribution to be deductible, the organization must be recognized as tax-exempt by the IRS. Its important to note that in recent years the IRS has revoked the tax-exempt status of scores of nonpro“ t organizations because they didnt “ le annual reports for three consecutive years, as required by law. Use the IRS Exempt Organizations Select Check tool to ensure an organizations eligibility. Get bang for your buck. Make sure any nonpro“ t to which you donate is well-run. Ideally the organization applies at least 75 percent of contributions to programs that serve its bene“ ciaries, versus spending on salaries, advertising, fund-raising and other administrative expenses. No more direct IRA distributions. A major tax break for senior citizens regarding charitable contributions expired at the end of 2011. Formerly, people over age 70 could contribute up to $100,000 from their IRAs directly to charity and have it count toward their annual IRA Required Minimum Distribution. This allowed seniors to avoid having to count the funds as adjusted gross income, thereby reaping a tax advantage even if they didnt itemize deductions. And “ nally, if you cant afford a cash donation but still want to help, consider donating your time. Numerous organizations can match you up with local charities that suit your interests, including the governments United We Serve site (www.serve.gov), Network for Good (www. networkforgood.org), and Volunteer Match (www. volunteermatch.org).Jason Alderman directs Visas “ nancial education programs.Tis the season for donating money PRACTICAL MONEY SKILLS Eighty percent of my job now is communications and I am from a di erent country with a di erent “ rst language. Never stop trying and you will get there, says Ilievia.

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comFor many, it is hard to believe that 2012 is coming to a close in just a few short weeks. As members of Flotilla 12 prepare for the end of one year and the beginning of another, we often re” ect back on the previous year and set goals for the coming season. This year, members gathered for our annual holiday party on Dec. 1. While extenuating circumstances kept many away, those who attended had a great time. It is rare that we all come together to relax and enjoy each others company without having a meeting or training to attend. We use this time of year to not only take time for ourselves, but to also thank and celebrate our spouses, children and other signi“ cant people in our lives who support us in our efforts. Despite the celebrating, we still have a month left until the end of the year. Members of Flotilla 12 are organizing a “ nal aids to navigation patrol where we will ensure that the buoys are al where they should be and are all in working order. This involves checking all the buoys during daylight for a visual inspection as well as waiting for the lights to come on at dusk. A lighted marker is critical in navigating the channel as it indicates a turn. For our area, this is extremely important as there are areas that typically are submerged that due to the low tides this time of year become exposed. Tides become lower and areas that may have been safe to cross are “ led with sand bars and oyster beds. Safe navigation is not only something that the Auxiliary promotes, but also the Coast Guard. Earlier this week, four Coast Guardsmen held a navigation class for several auxiliarists. This was a requirement for the Guardsmen who are currently students at Florida State University and are required to participate in course development as part of their studies. Those in attendance were able to provide feedback that will affect the students course development in the future. Apparently you can teach auxiliarists new tricks! As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Be sure to familiarize yourself with the hazards before heading out, and have a current nautical chart with you! Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD a peek into life on and under the water W a t e r W a y s Water Ways Water WaysRebreathers for everyone! Gregg and I have been on the road for the last two weeks, visiting other diving communities to network and “ nd out what is happening in the big world of diving. We do this, while not often enough, on a regular basis. It allows us to step out of the daily quest for detail, and see the bigger picture. The big story is that PADI, the Professional Association of Diving Instructors, the largest recreational training agency in the world, has embraced Rebreathers for everyone! As part of the journey, we met up with former students and potential collaborators, attended parties sponsored by equipment manufacturers and participated in platform upgrade training sessions. While entertaining, it was not quite the events we were accustomed to. The main drink served at socials was an inexpensive light beer, and girls in shorts and cowboy boots danced on the tables. The whole scene reminded us of the movie Coyote Ugly.Ž Any organization or facility ends up attracting likeminded people. The clientele that Wakulla Diving Center usually attracts are people that seek advice and service, as well as collaboration and mentorship. An appropriate party setting for us would much more likely involve wine and live music. So there is, to our surprise, a clear demographic separation between divers. Rough and tough, death-cheating, go-getters are clearly part of the diving community. Strong egos become both a method of survival, as well as social classi“ cation. On the other hand there is the sophisticated enthusiast who ends up doing much more advanced dives by simply involving careful consideration and preparation. At the aforementioned party we encountered the former (to our surprise). In our daily operation we are involved with and prefer the later. This distinction between dive types will merge as the more technical diving equipment, such as rebreathers, become more integrated into the general diving community. Since diving is an act of natural selection, we expect to see what separates the wheat from the chaff. We hope to provide guidance to those who seek the adventure without the hype. UnderwaterWakullaBy Joerg Hess From FWC NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is hosting two webinars in December to gather public testimony and input on the potential creation of saltwater game “ sh and sport “ sh designations. The online meetings are from 6 to 8 p.m. Dec. 10 and 12. To participate in a webinar, visit http://fwc. adobeconnect.com/mfm/ at the start of each meeting. The designation issue will also be a topic of discussion at the Commissions Dec. 5 meeting in Apalachicola. Reasons for considering these changes include helping highlight and protect some of Floridas premier recreational “ sh and encouraging anglers to practice voluntary conservation practices such as catch-and-release. If adopted, these changes could lead to healthier “ sh populations and help Florida market its unique “ shing opportunities to residents and visitors. Suggested parameters for game fish include no commercial harvest, possession or sale; “ sh could be targeted only with hook and line; and captain and crew of forhire vessels such as charter boats would have a bag limit of zero and would not be allowed to take “ sh home for themselves. The sport “ sh designation would offer a higher level of protection than game “ sh by making selected species catch-andrelease only, including no recreational harvest as well as no commercial harvest, possession or sale. Sport “ sh could also be targeted by hook and line only. To learn more about the webinar, visit MyFWC. com/Fishing and click on Saltwater Fishing,Ž RulemakingŽ and Workshops.Ž For those without computers, voice-only access is available. For questions about webinar access, please contact Carly Canion at (850) 617-9627 or Carly. Canion@MyFWC.com. To learn more about the proposed changes, visit MyFWC.com/Commission, Commission MeetingsŽ and the Dec. 5-6 agenda.Game fish, sport fish webinars planned From FWC News The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission recently euthanized an adult black bear in the Wynn Haven Beach community of Mary Esther in Okaloosa County. Because the female bear had killed a pet and livestock, the FWC had to euthanize the animal. The female had raised two litters of cubs and been active in several neighborhoods in the area for a few years. This year, however, she became more bold and protective of her cubs. The easy availability of human-provided foods like trash, bird seed and pet food in neighborhoods caused the bear to completely lose her natural fear of people. In addition, she killed chickens and a dog on separate occasions. After multiple attempts, the FWC was able to trap her on Nov. 29. Her two cubs were captured by the FWC and relocated northwest of Wynn Haven Beach onto Eglin Air Force Base property. While cubs normally stay with their mothers for 18 months, the chances of survival for these cubs are relatively good. The cubs have been with their mother long enough that they are no longer fully dependent on her,Ž FWC Bear Management Program coordinator Dave Telesco said. The 250-pound female and her 100-pound cubs were much heavier than typical Florida bears living in the woods. Bears grow larger and produce more cubs when they have regular access to human-provided foods, which increases the number of bears living in neighborhoods and causing human-bear con” icts.Female bear euthanized in Okaloosa GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Dec 6, 12 Fri Dec 7, 12 Sat Dec 8, 12 Sun Dec 9, 12 Mon Dec 10, 12 Tue Dec 11, 12 Wed Dec 12, 12 D ate 3.7 ft. 12:02 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 1:02 AM 0.7 ft. 2:18 AM 0.3 ft. 3:31 AM -0.2 ft. 4:35 AM -0.6 ft. 5:33 AM -1.0 ft. 6:26 AM -1.3 ft. 7:16 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 6:40 AM 2.5 ft. 8:17 AM 2.6 ft. 9:52 AM 2.9 ft. 11:08 AM 3.1 ft. 12:10 PM 3.2 ft. 1:04 PM 3.3 ft. 1:53 PM Hi g h 0.6 ft. 1:02 PM 0.9 ft. 2:07 PM 1.1 ft. 3:15 PM 1.3 ft. 4:19 PM 1.4 ft. 5:17 PM 1.4 ft. 6:09 PM 1.3 ft. 6:57 PM L ow 3.0 ft. 7:44 PM 3.0 ft. 8:39 PM 3.2 ft. 9:33 PM 3.3 ft. 10:24 PM 3.5 ft. 11:14 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 6, 12 Fri Dec 7, 12 Sat Dec 8, 12 Sun Dec 9, 12 Mon Dec 10, 12 Tue Dec 11, 12 Wed Dec 12, 12 D ate Hi g h 0.7 ft. 1:13 AM 0.5 ft. 2:29 AM 0.2 ft. 3:42 AM -0.1 ft. 4:46 AM -0.5 ft. 5:44 AM -0.8 ft. 6:37 AM -0.9 ft. 7:27 AM L ow 1.9 ft. 6:32 AM 1.9 ft. 8:09 AM 2.0 ft. 9:44 AM 2.1 ft. 11:00 AM 2.3 ft. 12:02 PM 2.4 ft. 12:56 PM 2.5 ft. 1:45 PM Hi g h 0.5 ft. 1:13 PM 0.7 ft. 2:18 PM 0.8 ft. 3:26 PM 0.9 ft. 4:30 PM 1.0 ft. 5:28 PM 1.0 ft. 6:20 PM 1.0 ft. 7:08 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 7:36 PM 2.3 ft. 8:31 PM 2.4 ft. 9:25 PM 2.5 ft. 10:16 PM 2.6 ft. 11:06 PM 2.8 ft. 11:54 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 6, 12 Fri Dec 7, 12 Sat Dec 8, 12 Sun Dec 9, 12 Mon Dec 10, 12 Tue Dec 11, 12 Wed Dec 12, 12 D ate 3.5 ft. 12:38 AM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 2:06 AM 0.7 ft. 3:22 AM 0.3 ft. 4:35 AM -0.2 ft. 5:39 AM -0.6 ft. 6:37 AM -0.9 ft. 7:30 AM -1.2 ft. 8:20 AM L ow 2.4 ft. 7:16 AM 2.3 ft. 8:53 AM 2.4 ft. 10:28 AM 2.7 ft. 11:44 AM 2.9 ft. 12:46 PM 3.0 ft. 1:40 PM 3.1 ft. 2:29 PM Hi g h 0.6 ft. 2:06 PM 0.8 ft. 3:11 PM 1.0 ft. 4:19 PM 1.2 ft. 5:23 PM 1.2 ft. 6:21 PM 1.2 ft. 7:13 PM 1.2 ft. 8:01 PM L ow 2.8 ft. 8:20 PM 2.8 ft. 9:15 PM 2.9 ft. 10:09 PM 3.1 ft. 11:00 PM 3.3 ft. 11:50 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 6, 12 Fri Dec 7, 12 Sat Dec 8, 12 Sun Dec 9, 12 Mon Dec 10, 12 Tue Dec 11, 12 Wed Dec 12, 12 D ate Hi g h 1.0 ft. 12:41 AM 0.7 ft. 1:57 AM 0.3 ft. 3:10 AM -0.2 ft. 4:14 AM -0.6 ft. 5:12 AM -1.0 ft. 6:05 AM -1.3 ft. 6:55 AM L ow 2.0 ft. 6:24 AM 2.0 ft. 8:01 AM 2.0 ft. 9:36 AM 2.2 ft. 10:52 AM 2.4 ft. 11:54 AM 2.5 ft. 12:48 PM 2.6 ft. 1:37 PM Hi g h 0.6 ft. 12:41 PM 0.9 ft. 1:46 PM 1.1 ft. 2:54 PM 1.3 ft. 3:58 PM 1.3 ft. 4:56 PM 1.3 ft. 5:48 PM 1.3 ft. 6:36 PM L ow 2.3 ft. 7:28 PM 2.4 ft. 8:23 PM 2.5 ft. 9:17 PM 2.6 ft. 10:08 PM 2.8 ft. 10:58 PM 2.9 ft. 11:46 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 6, 12 Fri Dec 7, 12 Sat Dec 8, 12 Sun Dec 9, 12 Mon Dec 10, 12 Tue Dec 11, 12 Wed Dec 12, 12 D ate Hi g h 1.1 ft. 12:59 AM 0.8 ft. 2:15 AM 0.4 ft. 3:28 AM -0.2 ft. 4:32 AM -0.7 ft. 5:30 AM -1.1 ft. 6:23 AM -1.4 ft. 7:13 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 6:37 AM 2.6 ft. 8:14 AM 2.7 ft. 9:49 AM 2.9 ft. 11:05 AM 3.1 ft. 12:07 PM 3.3 ft. 1:01 PM 3.4 ft. 1:50 PM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 12:59 PM 1.0 ft. 2:04 PM 1.2 ft. 3:12 PM 1.4 ft. 4:16 PM 1.5 ft. 5:14 PM 1.5 ft. 6:06 PM 1.4 ft. 6:54 PM L ow 3.0 ft. 7:41 PM 3.1 ft. 8:36 PM 3.2 ft. 9:30 PM 3.4 ft. 10:21 PM 3.6 ft. 11:11 PM 3.8 ft. 11:59 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 6, 12 Fri Dec 7, 12 Sat Dec 8, 12 Sun Dec 9, 12 Mon Dec 10, 12 Tue Dec 11, 12 Wed Dec 12, 12 D ate Hi g h 0.9 ft. 12:55 AM 0.6 ft. 2:10 AM 0.3 ft. 3:17 AM -0.1 ft. 4:16 AM -0.5 ft. 5:10 AM -0.7 ft. 6:01 AM -0.9 ft. 6:51 AM L ow 1.7 ft. 6:28 AM 1.6 ft. 8:13 AM 1.6 ft. 10:10 AM 1.8 ft. 12:00 PM 2.0 ft. 1:24 PM 2.2 ft. 2:27 PM 2.2 ft. 3:18 PM Hi g h 0.4 ft. 12:03 PM 0.7 ft. 12:55 PM 1.0 ft. 1:56 PM 1.2 ft. 3:03 PM 1.4 ft. 4:10 PM 1.6 ft. 5:09 PM 1.6 ft. 6:02 PM L ow 2.3 ft. 7:46 PM 2.4 ft. 8:17 PM 2.5 ft. 8:51 PM 2.6 ft. 9:27 PM 2.7 ft. 10:08 PM 2.8 ft. 10:54 PM 2.8 ft. 11:44 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacDec. 6 Dec. 12First Dec. 19 Full Dec. 28 Last Dec. 6 New Dec. 12Major Times 6:23 AM 8:23 AM 6:46 PM 8:46 PM Minor Times 12:03 AM 1:03 AM 12:35 PM 1:35 PM Major Times 7:10 AM 9:10 AM 7:34 PM 9:34 PM Minor Times 1:01 AM 2:01 AM 1:11 PM 2:11 PM Major Times 7:59 AM 9:59 AM 8:25 PM 10:25 PM Minor Times 2:02 AM 3:02 AM 1:49 PM 2:49 PM Major Times 8:52 AM 10:52 AM 9:19 PM 11:19 PM Minor Times 3:05 AM 4:05 AM 2:31 PM 3:31 PM Major Times 9:48 AM 11:48 AM 10:18 PM 12:18 AM Minor Times 4:12 AM 5:12 AM 3:19 PM 4:19 PM Major Times 10:48 AM 12:48 PM 11:20 PM 1:20 AM Minor Times 5:20 AM 6:20 AM 4:12 PM 5:12 PM Major Times --:---:-11:52 AM 1:52 PM Minor Times 6:28 AM 7:28 AM 5:13 PM 6:13 PM Average Average Average+ Average Average Better Best7:19 am 5:37 pm 12:04 am 12:36 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:20 am 5:37 pm 1:02 am 1:12 pm 7:21 am 5:37 pm 2:03 am 1:50 pm 7:22 am 5:37 pm 3:07 am 2:32 pm 7:22 am 5:37 pm 4:13 am 3:20 pm 7:23 am 5:38 pm 5:21 am 4:13 pm 7:24 am 5:38 pm 6:29 am 5:13 pm53% 46% 39% 31% 24% 16% 8% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 – Page 13Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Nov. 26, Christopher J. Doyal of Altha reported a vehicle “ re on a logging road off Curtis Mill Road near Sopchoppy. A log skidder caught “ re in a clear cut logging area. An operator was using the equipment to move logs when he smelled smoke and observed ” ames coming from beneath the cab and engine area. Doyal and the machinery operator attempted to put out the “ re with “ re extinguishers but were unable to get control of the “ re. Fire“ ghters arrived on the scene and extinguished the “ re. The tractor was destroyed in the fire. It is valued at $250,000 and is owned by James McMillan of McMillan Logging in Bristol. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: NOVEMBER 21 € Alika Wolff of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to her mothers home in Crawfordville. Someone entered the victims home and vandalized it. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Bonnie Brinson of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of a “ rearm, tools, currency and jewelry, valued at $1,955. The weapon was entered in the FCIC/NCIC data base as stolen. Persons of interest have been identified. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. NOVEMBER 22 € Harry Harris of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Harris was caring for animals of Crawfordville homeowners when he discovered a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and damage was estimated at $800. The victims are the Robinson and Kingsley families. Coins, jewelry, electronics and a telescope were taken. The stolen property is valued at $3,400. Deputy Randy Phillips, Sgt. Andy Curles and Detective Ryan Muse all investigated. € Carlos Kilpatrick of Crawfordville reported a grass “ re in Wakulla Gardens. A blaze from a “ re pit started an accidental fire that burned the victims property. Kilpatrick and Deputy Sean Wheeler used garden hoses to extinguish the “ re. Wakulla Fire Rescue also arrived on the scene as the “ re was being put out. Talquin Electric was noti“ ed of a power line above a burned tree that was also partially damaged. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Sgt. Jeremy Johnston observed a vehicle on Highway 267 traveling at a high rate of speed with only one operating headlight. Sgt. Johnston conducted a traf“ c stop and Mileo Steven Messer, 18, of Tallahassee was determined to be the driver. Messer did not possess a valid driver license and did not have a tag properly displayed. Deputy Nick Gray performed field sobriety exercises and Messer was charged with DUI and knowingly driving while license was suspended or revoked. NOVEMBER 23 € Wal-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft. Four male subjects were observed taking items from the store and concealing them in their clothing. The subjects were confronted by an asset protection staff member but left the store in a vehicle together. Trey Michael Vanfossen, 18, of Macon, Ga. and Justin Lamar Alligood, 18, of Ashburn, Ga. were charged with retail theft. A 17-yearold and a 14-year-old were turned over to legal guardians. The four males were stopped by Deputy Nick Gray during a traf“ c stop on U.S. Highway 319. The stolen property, valued at approximately $100, was recovered. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € Keyna Elizabeth Brown of Crawfordville suffered a laceration to her forehead after losing control of her vehicle and crashing near 379 Arran Road. The victims vehicle was removed from the scene by a wrecker. She refused medical treatment. Deputy Mike Zimba, Deputy Billy Metcalf and Reserve Deputy David Pienta investigated. € A 35-year-old Crawfordville man was charged with sexual assault on his 6-year-old daughter. He was also charged with lewd or lascivious molestation on a victim under age 12. The victim told detectives that her father touched her genital area which included digital penetration in the suspects bedroom. The suspect was transported to the Wakulla County Jail where he is being held with no bond. Detective Ryan Muse, Detective Rob Giddens, Deputy Clint Beam and a Child Protection Team investigated. NOVEMBER 24 € John Taylor of Panacea reported the theft of a “ eld gate. Someone stole a gate from the victims rental property. The gate is valued at approximately $350. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. € Deputy Clint Beam responded to a disturbance at Wal-Mart. An 18-year-old male victim reported being struck in the face by a 15-year-old female. An altercation took place near the pharmacy. A second 15-year-old female pushed the suspect and knocked her to the ” oor. The case was passed along to the Criminal Investigations Division. NOVEMBER 25 € Betty S. Mullins of Crawfordville reported a vehicle “ re at her home. A burn pile in the victims yard ignited and a Toyota parked near the burn pile caught “ re. Damage to the vehicle was estimated at $5,000. It is owned by Clifford Scott Dudley. There were no signs of arson. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € Stephanie McDowell and Erica Peel, both of Crawfordville, reported the theft of jewelry from their home. The value of the stolen items is estimated at $5,000 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigation Division. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. NOVEMBER 26 € Rosa Mae Scott of Sopchoppy reported a structure fire on Sopchoppy Highway. Deputy Stephen Simmons responded to the “ re and observed smoke coming from a front window and a male subject using a garden hose to knock down the “ re. Robert Scott III was cooking with hot oil in the kitchen when he left the room and the kitchen ignited. Damage was estimated at $5,000. The stove/ oven was destroyed and damage was observed to the wall behind the unit and the ceiling. The “ re was ruled an accident. € Barbara Jenkins of Crawfordville reported a “ re at a power pole and electrical box near her home. The victim heard popping sounds and called emergency personnel. Two electrical boxes were destroyed and the utility pole was also damaged. Damage was estimated at more than $1,500. There was no sign of arson. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € Mendes Williams of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim lost his bank card in northern Georgia. Eight unauthorized charges were observed on the victims account. The charges from North Georgia totaled $654. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € Assistant Principal Michele Baggett of Riversprings Middle School reported a juvenile in possession of a large knife at school. The student showed the knife to other students on his bus. The knife was recovered from the students book bag and he was suspended from school and placed at the Second Chance School. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Ina Ecklund of Crawfordville reported the theft of a white elephant in front of the victims store of the same name. The concrete statute is valued at $65. The victim wrote a letter to the editor to the local newspaper in hopes someone will return the elephant as they did once before when it was stolen. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On Nov. 26, Douglas Britt of Crawfordville and Hale Construction reported the theft of scrap metal from a St. Marks job site. Steel grates, valued at $200, were removed from the site. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € A concerned citizen reported suspicious people at a residence on Hines Street in Crawfordville. The residence has been vacant for several months. The front door was not secured and the home was ransacked. Three African American males were observed taking electronics and furniture out of the residence. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. NOVEMBER 27 € A road crew worker mowing Coastal Highway recovered a wallet and turned it in to the WCSO. The owner of the wallet, Jeffrey L. Davis of Tallahassee, was contacted and arrangements were made for the property owner to recover his wallet. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. € Jessica Lanette Fruggiero, 28, of Crawfordville was charged with two counts of battery on law enforcement/detention staff after refusing to leave the jail library after being asked multiple times. The suspect became unruly and scratched Lt. Cliff Carroll in the face and neck drawing blood and kicked Detention Deputy Jansen Maxwell in the groin. Detention staff asked Fruggiero to leave the library and stop talking with male inmates. Lt, Carroll and Deputy Maxwell subdued the suspect in the jail hallway and she was returned to her cell. Fruggiero has six prior battery arrests/ charges. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € Patricia Owen of Crawfordville reported a grand theft from a friends vessel. The victim was planning a boat trip and loaded personal property into the vessel which was later reported missing. She reported the loss of jewelry, a camera, stamps and DVDs which were valued at $2,995. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € Teresa Burns of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed three unauthorized charges on her bank account. The charges were created at commercial establishments in Sunrise and Miami and were valued at $612.11. Deputy Sean Wheeler and Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Christine Carter of Crawfordville reported a fraud. A $44 charge was observed on the victims bank account out of an Orlando address. Deputy Stephen Simmons determined that the fraud occurred after an ATM withdrawal in Tallahassee. € Patricia Story of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim received a past due bill in the mail for a bank loan. The victim never requested a loan which was in the amount of $2,770. Someone purchased computer products with the money. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. € Brandi Wilkins of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash. The victims juvenile son was struck by a vehicle while in the parking lot near Pizza Hut. The vehicle continued out of the parking lot without stopping. Two females were going through the drive-thru and struck the victim with a vehicle door. The juvenile fell to the ground and received minor injuries. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. NOVEMBER 28 € Charles Parmer of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A pistol was stolen from the vehicle. The pistol and holster are valued at $420. The vehicle was not secured at the time of the theft. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € Christopher Altman of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Fifteen unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank card. The charges were traced throughout South Florida and were valued at $673.75. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. € Caleb Fisher of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A back pack containing a lap top computer was reported missing from a friends vehicle. The missing property is valued at $430. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. € George Gerrell of Tallahassee reported a grand theft in the Wakulla Station area. A pressure washer, video camera and generator, valued at $550, were removed from a Crawfordville home. No forced entry was discovered. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € Curtis Stokes of Blountstown reported a traffic crash at Wakulla Springs State Park. The victim reported striking a deer with his vehicle. There were no injuries and only minor damage to his vehicle. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 973 calls for service during the past week including: 24 residential and business alarms; 15 animal incidents; 75 citizen contacts; 20 disturbances; 62 investigations; 14 loud music/ noise complaints; 62 medical emergencies; 38 special details; 50 subpoena services; 13 suspicious people; 15 suspicious vehicles; 20 traffic enforcements; 51 traf“ c stops; and 11 reckless vehicles.The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce and WCSO Volunteers will host the annual Christmas in the Park celebration on Friday, Dec. 7 at Azalea Park in Crawfordville. The event will begin at 5 p.m. and continue until 8 p.m. with Santa arriving at 6 p.m. Azalea Park will be lit up and ready to welcome Santa and Mrs. Claus as they arrive in a horse drawn carriage. Bring a camera for an opportunity to take pictures of Santa and Mrs. Claus as well as the elves as they visit with the children during the event. There will also be spin art, train rides, Sparky the Fire Dog, McGruff the Crime Dog, concessions and prizes. The event is sponsored by the WCSO, WCSO Volunteers, Centennial Bank and the Wakulla County Park and Recreation Department. No pets please.Christmas in the Park is Dec. 7 “Re-Store”Shadeville Highway926-4544Open Tues. Sat.  9 a.m. 5 p.m. Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Wed. 10-5 Closed Sat. & Sun.Huttons Seafood & More 570-1004We will be closed Monday Dec. 24 Jan. 2 & Re-Open Thursday, January 3 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comScience “ ction has a lot of entertainment value. Imaginative authors are able to take a collection of improbable characteristics and encapsulate them in one being, then place the subject in a foreign location. Contact with the indigenous residents in the new environment always brings con” ict. The alien is considered as an invader with aspirations of conquest, a desire for conquering and is nearly impossible to kill. This is great fun for the reader when the story is “ ction. Unfortunately, this is reality when it comes to Dioscorea bulbifera, better known as air potato. This pest is a dif“ cult to control exotic plant which has caused severe damage to sections of the native environment and costs taxpayers millions of dollars a year to control in the southeastern U.S. The air potato is a member of the yam family. This hearty vine is a native of Asia and sub-Saharan Africa where yams are commonly cultivated for their edible roots. These tasty tubers have long been an important dietary staple. This member of the yam family was brought to the Americas from Africa during early 19th century and introduced to Florida around 1905. It is currently found throughout the state from Escambia County in the Panhandle to the Florida Keys. It is also established in Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Air potato is easy to recognize in the wild. The green leaf is heart shaped and it sharply tapers to a point at the tip. It has twining herbaceous vines with stems growing up to 60 feet in length. The vines are round and tan colored tubers similar to a potato hang from the vine. Unlike edible yams, the tubers on air potatoes are produced on the vine. They may be as large as small Irish potatoes or smaller than the circumference of a dime. Air potato tubers are generally bitter and may even be toxic to mammals. It has little or no value to the native wildlife as a food or shelter source. It grows aggressively in the warm Florida climate covering eight inches per day. It will quickly climb to the tops of trees. Once in the trees crown a mat is formed which weighs down and smothers the tree. Air potatoes will cover and suffocate everything in its path as it colonizes an area. Even though the stems and foliage of the vines are dying back as winter approaches in Wakulla County, the plant is still a problem because of its tubers or bulbs. Each time the vine drops a potato,Ž another plant is likely to grow from it. Once the potatoes drop and are buried under soil or covered with leaf litter, they become difficult to spot and remove. Even air potatoes the size of a pea will start a new plant. With air potato having no natural enemies in Florida and the capability to displace native species, it has been identi“ ed as one of Floridas most invasive plant species. It is on numerous agencies list as a problem plant and is illegal to propagate and relocate. Air potato can be controlled by picking up every bulb hitting the ground before it sprouts. Once the bulbs are removed, the vine can be treated with a broad-leaf herbicide. Typically at least one follow up collection of bulbs will be necessary. To learn more about identi“ cation and control of Air Potato in Wakulla County, contact your UF/ IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce at (850) 926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u” .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” edu or at (850) 926-3931.Air potatoes are an exotic pest, dif cult to control Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAutumn air potato vines, above. Air potato fruit, below. WAKULLA COMMUNITY CHORUS In Handel’s MESSIAH Directed By Reba Mason Featuring a Cast of 60 Singers and Instrumentalists SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9 3:00 PM Sopchoppy United Methodist Church 10 Faith Ave. -Free AdmissionReception In Fellowship Hall Immediately Following WAKULLA COMMUNITY THEATRE Presents CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY Saturday, Dec. 89 A.M. until 4 P.M. “Relaxed Shopping from Arts, Crafts and Food Vendors, and our Local Merchants.”Sponsored by Sopchoppy Preservation and Improvement Association, Inc. For information call our HOTLINE (850) 962-4138 Daytime AT 11 A.M. Christmas Music

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Poker Run held to benefit Mark Wiles Page 2B Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012sports news and team views Sports You’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe WakuulanewsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachFormer WHS runner, Stanley Linton, who has been making a name for himself on the road racing circuit in the Tallahassee area and has won a number of races in the last couple of years, outdid himself on Saturday, Dec. 1, by winning the overall title in two different races. He started the morning by lining up for the Gulf Winds 10 Mile Challenge held off North Meridian Road. Just over 56 minutes later he was the “ rst runner, out of 183 “ nishers, to cross the “ nish line, 1:40 ahead of his nearest pursuer. This was the “ nal Gulf Winds Grand Prix event for this year, which guaranteed a quality “ eld of runners and an extremely competitive event. Local runner Ron Christen also had a good outing, “ nishing second in his age group in 1:21:51. Current WHS runner, Aaron Smith, competing in his “ rst real distanceŽ race also ran well, “ nishing 4th in his age group in the good time of 1:09:00. In the accompanying 5-mile race, local standout Duane Evans had a good showing, “ nishing 4th overall and “ rst in his age group, in 33:02. Not content to rest on his laurels, Linton showed up on the starting line of the extremely popular Jingle Bell Run, which is held in downtown Tallahassee and serves as the kick-off event for the annual Christmas Parade. This time, Linton had more company, as over 3,000 other people were entered. Some serious runners and others, not so. This event is a 2K (just short of two miles) and is run after dark on a hilly course that winds through the downtown area. Linton is getting well known enough that the race director sought him out on the starting line and told him to be sure to follow the lead bicycle and/or police motorcycle escorts to ensure that he stayed on the course and didnt miss any of the turns. Linton took his advice to heart, and took an early lead that continued to grow throughout the race and less than 10 minutes later, he again crossed the finish line as the “ rst overall runner. For winning the race, he and his girlfriend, Savanna Harris, got to ride in the lead car in the ensuing Christmas Parade. All in all, his day amounted to a pretty auspicious start to his Christmas season and capped off quite a year for the local speedster. Special to The NewsMadison Metcalf and Tatum Tucker from Wakulla Middle School were two of more than 500 junior high, high school cheerleaders and dancers from across the country that performed in the 2012 UCA/UDA Thanksgiving Tour at the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando on Nov. 22. The girls who were invited to perform in the parade were part of a select group of cheerleaders and dancers chosen as All-Americans during the Universal Cheerleaders Association (UCA) summer camps across the country. Madison and Tatum attended the UCA camp, with Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School cheerleaders, held at University of Georgia in July. All Americans were selected via tryout based on either superior cheerleading or dance skills. Only the top 12 percent of the cheerleaders and dancers from UCA or UDA camps earned the chance to march in a holiday parade of this caliber. The 4-day event included visiting the Disney parks, rehearsals, breakfast at Planet Hollywood and concluded with Thanksgiving Dinner with Mickey following the parade. Im so thankful for all of my friends, classmates, and family that helped me raise the money to go and I will never forget this experienceŽ said Madison Metcalf, who is an eighth grader at WMS.Four Wakulla County athletes competed for the Team Finals of the NFL Punt, Pass and Kick competition on Sunday, Nov. 25. The four athletes arrived at the Jacksonville Jaguars Practice “ eld to compete against other sectional winners. After the morning competition each participant received two tickets to the Jaguars game in which they defeated the Titans. During a Pregame show each athlete was introduced to the fans in the stadium as they threw an exhibition pass. Justice Douglas “ nished third in the 6/7 boys then Sierra Tucker placed second in the girls 12/13 division. Shane Davis came in second in the boys 14/15 age group. Then Taylor Lawhon placed “ rst in the girls 14/15 age group. Taylor will now have her scored compared to other Team championships winners, the top four scores in each age division will advance to the National Finals to be held during a playoff game later in the season. During a fourth quarter timeout, Taylor along with the other winners were introduced as the Jaguars team Champion for the PPK competition. Each competitor received a Jaguars PPK Play 60 jersey, as well as an Under Armor Play 60 shirt, plus the two free tickets into the game. Then they received a football as a trophy with their age division and what place they “ nished. Noreen Britt has been the state chairperson for the Jaguars for the past 12 years. CHEERLEADING2 march in parade at Disney WorldSPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMadison Metcald and Tatum Tucker marched in the Thanksgiving Day Parade at Disney. Taylor Lawhon, Justice Douglas, Shane Davis, and Noreen Britt. A fourth competitor, Sierra Tucker, is not pictured.Four compete in Team FinalsPUNT, PASS AND KICK Cross country The annual end-of-theyear cross country awards banquet is scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 15, 2012, at the WHS cafeteria. The festivities will begin at 5 p.m., with the meal being served at 5:30 p.m. All runners, parents, relatives and siblings are invited. It will be a potluck dinner and all parents are asked to bring a contribution to the meal. Parents should contact either Karen James on Facebook or Patti Broadway (508-7577) to let them know the number of people attending and what they will bring by Dec. 11. All runners are reminded to bring their uniform and any issued team warmups to turn in. These items must be turned in before any season awards are presented to the individual. RMS football The Riversprings football program will be conducting its annual football awards banquet on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013 at 7 p.m. in the RMS cafeteria. The cost of the banquet will be $12 each player and each guest that he may invite. The money for the banquet is due by Friday, Nov. 30. The menu for the banquet features steak, macaroni and cheese, green beans, bread, dessert and drink. The names of the player and each guest that plans on attending the banquet should be listed. Each guest should also indicate how he/she would like their steak prepared (well done, medium well, medium, etc.). Please come join us in paying homage to these young men whom made up the 2012 RMS Bears.RUNNINGLinton wins two racesSports banquets are set TH E Legislature gears up; Citizens under reWeekly Roundup, Page 2B Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator

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By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 30 … Like holiday diners beginning to awaken from tryptophan-induced naps, lawmakers came out of the Thanksgiving weekend and began laying the groundwork for the 2013 legislative session. House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, and Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, began naming leaders and committee members early in the week so that lawmakers at least knew which rooms to go to for next weeks kickoff meetings. Senators began “ ling their bills. And Gov. Rick Scott continued to roll out the beginnings of what looks like an agenda for the session. Meanwhile, a scandal including allegations of sexual impropriety continued to rock one of the least sexy agencies in state government. LEGISLATIVE RUMBLINGS With the organizational session out of the way and lawmakers free to carry out their duties, committee assignments and bills came out of the proverbial starting gate. It was a journey that could extend until the “ rst days of May 2013. At least thats the plan. Weatherford had his committee assignments done by Monday, with the Senate moving at a more casual pace -no surprise to anyone who drops by the respective chambers on a given day. Some of the highestpro“ le picks included Rep. Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala, being tapped to head the Judiciary Committee and Rep. Marlene OToole, RLady Lake, taking over the Education Committee. Rep. Richard Corcoran, R-Trinity, will chair the Health and Human Services Committee. Gaetz, who announced some chairmanships Monday, had all of his appointments wrapped up on Wednesday. One of the more closely watched committees -the panel dealing with gambling -will be headed by Sen. Garrett Richter, a Naples Republican who will also be president pro tempore. Richter said he expected the Senate Gaming Committee to move deliberately to deal with a sensitive issue. It would be very appropriate to try to take a comprehensive look at gaming for the state of Florida,Ž he said. Bills also started whizzing around the Capitol, or at least around the circuitry that handles legislation. Democrats started out by trying to reignite one of the hottest issues of the fall: When and where Floridians should be allowed to cast ballots. Sen. Arthenia Joyner, D-Tampa, and Sen. Gwen Margolis, D-Miami, “ led a pair of bills (SB 80, SB 82) that would expand early voting times and the places where it can occur. The measures would also eliminate a requirement that people who have moved into a community from outside the county vote a provisional ballot on Election Day if they hadnt earlier changed their legal address. Democrats have complained that Republicans, who overwhelmingly control the Legislature, have tried to make it harder for people to vote, particularly those who are more transient, younger, and minorities, all of whom critics say are more likely to vote Democratic. Republicans have countered that measures aimed at making it more dif“ cult to cast a ballot are intended to stop voter fraud. Both bills “ led this week would require early voting to begin 15 days before Election Day, up from 10 days before under current law. Early voting wouldnt end until the Sunday night before the election under the new measures. Current law ended early voting on the Saturday before Election Day. Even with the Election Day dif“ culties, which GOP leaders are eager to explore, its not clear that Republicans will be ready to do that abrupt an about-face on the voting changes. Other bills also got started. Sen. Thad Altman, R-Viera, filed a measure that would require most children under 7 to use a booster seat or other safety seat while riding in cars. Sen. Maria Sachs, D-Delray Beach, “ led a measure barring Floridians from using cell phones in cars unless they use hands-free technology. And Joyner “ led a bill aimed at preventing employers from turning away job applicants because they were unemployed and a measure calling for a study of pay disparities between men and women. DIFFERENT KIND OF $10,000 BET Gov. Rick Scott kicked off the week by challenging Florida state colleges to offer four-year degrees for $10,000 or less. Scott, who has made the affordability of college one of his hallmark issues, came out with his challenge even as state universities have been pushing for higher tuition rates. You should be able to work and go to school and not end up with debt,Ž Scott told WFLA TV on Monday. If these degrees cost so much money, tuition is so high, thats not going to happen. I have put out this challenge to our state colleges … we have 28 great state colleges … and say, Can you come up with degrees where individuals can get jobs that the total degree costs $10,000?Ž By the end of the week, the governors of“ ce said half of Floridas colleges were at least considering the idea, and a number had already announced they would take on the challenge. But not everyone was pleased. Roberto Martinez, vice chairman of the state Board of Education, blasted the change in a letter. The cost of a Bachelors Degree at many of our colleges cost the students on average approximately $12,000,Ž Martinez wrote. Reducing this further, to create a cheap four-year degree, will undermine the quality and value of the education, hurting our students chances to compete successfully in our 21st Century economy.Ž The other six members of the board, which oversees state colleges, issued a statement on Monday supporting the move. Scott also called for the Legislature to double, to $12 million, the funding for Quick Response Training Grants,Ž handed out by the Department of Economic Opportunity for training for new or expanding businesses. And the governor told the Florida Chamber of Commerces insurance summit that reforms were needed for the state-managed Citizens Property Insurance Corp., though he didnt unveil a new policy proposal. To make the dream of home ownership available we must reduce the size of Citizens,Ž Scott said. SPEAKING OF CITIZENS The board of Citizens, meanwhile, arguably had more interesting matters on its mind. Public pressure continued to grow on the company over a series of embarrassing revelations that were being investigated by internal watchdogs before their of“ ce was shuttered by the company. But Citizens President and CEO Barry Gilway hit back during a meeting of the companys governing board Tuesday, acknowledging that a handful of Citizens supervisors behaved inappropriately in some instances but that others faced allegations that were either disproved or remain unsubstantiated. A pair of Citizens employees reported took off their bras and danced at the Coyote Ugly bar in Tampa during a company retreat there in 2009, though they were disciplined. Another was accused of practicing law without a license, though Gilway says that hasnt been substantiated. In all, hundreds of pages of documents released last week alleged misappropriations of funds, sexual harassment, lucrative severance packages and other inappropriate behavior by a handful of Citizens supervisors between 2004 and 2010. Gilway took over the company in June. But while Gilway said he was disgustedŽ at some actions, he pushed back against the idea of Insurance Executives Gone Wild. It is also critically important that the actions of a very, very few people over the course of four years not tarnish the reputation of 1,300 employees who come in every single day and bust their tails, even though they are getting trashed in the press on a daily basis,  Gilway said. Making matters look worse, the companys Of“ ce of Corporate Integrity was disbanded as it looked into the issues. Scott last week asked his inspector general to inspect that action. It wasnt all scandal for Citizens, though; Gilway told the insurance summit that he will brief the companys board in December about an effort requiring Citizens to try to place policies with private carriers before issuing policies itself. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott challenges state colleges to offer fouryear degrees for $10,000 as part of an effort to hold down the cost of higher education. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: The last time I looked around, we were still in the United States of America. We have not been annexed to a communist regime. We still have some basic rights. Those rights include innocent until proven guilty.Ž … Citizens President and CEO Barry Gilway, on allegations against employees of the company Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsOn Saturday, Dec. 1, the Wakulla Free Riders sponsored a bene“ t poker run for Mark Wiles. The registration started at Coyotes Mullet Shuf” e Inn in Panacea, which is owned by Mark and his wife Mary Jo. From there it continued to The Iron Ravens clubhouse, Outzs Too, Skybox and back to Coyotes. More than 50 bikes participated in the run. At the end, there was a meal of barbecue chicken with all the “ xings waiting on the riders who participated in the run. Well over a hundred people participated in the raf” e, which was made possible by numerous local businesses that generously donated prizes. At the end of the day more than $1,600 was raised for Mark and his family. Mark suffered a stroke on Nov. 1 while attending a Wakulla High School football game. He spent a week in Tallahassee Memorial Hospital and another three weeks in rehab. He continues to rehab with Home Health. We are happy to report that he continues to make great strides on his road to recovery. Thank you to everyone who participated and to those who helped with this event.Poker Run held to benefit Mark WilesWEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Legislature gears up; Citizens under re Mary Jo Wiles, wife of Mark Wiles, tossing a beer keg. Some of the riders from Wakulla Free Riders who participated in the poker run. Riders relaxing in the garden.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS www.Ken FieldsPhotography.photoshelter.com

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Dec. 6  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Dec. 7  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Dec. 8  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB (Member of National Button Society) will meet at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594, or email bardon56@aol.com, or Linda Wood at 850-899-0025. Sunday, Dec. 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Dec. 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Dec. 11  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant. Wednesday, Dec. 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE TASK FORCE will hold a meeting at 12:30 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Crawfordville. The director of the Guardian Ad Litem program will be the guest speaker. Lunch is provided. Thursday, Dec. 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsFriday, Dec. 7  HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held at 6 p.m. at the Crawfordville Woman’s Club. This is a preview party for the Saturday event. For $10 enjoy wine and hors d’oeuvres while shopping. The general public day is Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and is free. For more information contact Nita Burke at 294-6482 or Heather Robison at 544-5418. Saturday, Dec. 8  HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Crawfordville Woman’s Club. There will be arts and craft vendors. For more information contact Nita Burke at 294-6482 or Heather Robison at 544-5418.  SOPCHOPPY OPRY CLASSIC COUNTRY CHRISTMAS SHOW will feature the Purvis Brothers at 7 p.m. in historic Sopchoppy High Auditorium. Mike, Frank and Wendall Purvis will be accompanied by ddle player Wayne Martin, steel guitarist Larry Bullock, keyboardist Myron Spainhour and percussionist Ronnie Weeks. Call 962-3711 for ticket information.  ANNUAL CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Sopchoppy. Santa will be there from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. to listen to the children’s Christmas wishes. Enjoy relaxed shopping from more than 50 vendors of arts, crafts and food, as well as Sopchoppy’s own local merchants. There will be games and activities for the children, and Christmas music. For more information, contact Bill Lowrie at billlowrie@embarqmail.com.  FOLK AMERICAN SINGER/SONGWRITER John William Davis will perform at Posh Java at 8 p.m. Davis’ music is rooted in blues and folk genres. For reservations, contact Posh Java at poshjava@gmail.com or phone (850) 9621010. Tickets are $10. Posh Java is located on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. in downtown Sopchoppy. Sunday, Dec. 9  HANDEL’S MESSIAH will be performed by the Wakulla Community Chorus Sunday at 3 p.m. in the sanctuary of Sopchoppy United Methodist Church, 10 Faith Avenue. The 60 member ensemble features a chorus of 50 singers. This is the 12th local performance of Messiah directed by Reba Mason. The concert is free. A reception will follow the concert in the fellowship hall. Everyone is invited to attend. Monday, Dec. 10  WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will hold a public meeting from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. Tuesday, Dec. 11  FOURTH ANNUAL CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE will be held at the Wakulla County Historical Society Museum and Archives from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. Check out the Veteran’s Exhibit in the Betty Oaks Green Room for details, pictures and accounts of events in Europe and in the Paci c. One local mother got telegrams advising that one son was safe and her other son was a prisoner of war. The 2012 Collectible Christmas Ornament featuring Crawfordville High School is now available in the Old Jail Gift Shop. Also, several new books by local authors are now available, including The Greens and Cornbread of Wakulla County—the stories and pictures submitted and told by the people. W ednesday, Dec. 12  CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for Front Porch Creations Florist will be held from 11:30 a.m. at their new location, 2543 Crawfordville Highway, Suite 4, Crawfordville. Friday, Dec. 14  CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for Smokin’ Vapor Wakulla will be held at 11:30 a.m. at 1626 D Crawfordville Highway. Saturday, Dec. 15  HOLIDAY SILENT AUCTION AND BOOK SIGNING will be held by the Florida Wild Mammal Association and Goose Creek Wildlife Sanctuary from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Tallahassee Elks Lodge located at 276 N. Magnolia Drive. Nature writer and photographer John B. Spohrer, Jr. will sign copies of his book, “The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay,” with part of the proceeds going to Goosecreek and FWMA. There will also be a cash bar and raf e. For additional information, go to www.wakullawildlife.org or www. goosecreekwildlifesanctuary.org.  PERSONAL PROTECTION AND FIREARMS SAFETY COURSE will be held from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce Range in Otter Creek, near Sopchoppy. The program is $65 for non-range members and $55 for range members and satis es the requirement for a conceal carry permit. For more information or to register, call the Range at 745-7290 or Lt. Fred Nichols at 251-1676.  COMMUNITY FUN DAY will be held by the Wakulla Moose Lodge to celebrate their Founders Day. The public is invited to join the festivities. There will be children’s activities. The Ochlockonee Volunteer Fire Department will give re truck demonstrations. The Wakulla Sheriff’s Of ce will provide child identi cation kits. A guest speaker will talk about safe internet sur ng. The Southeastern Blood Bank will have also have a mobile on site. Adults making a donation will receive a free hot dog lunch. Children may eat for free. Santa will also be there. There will also be a large indoor yard sale. The Lodge is located at 44 Jer-Be-Lou Boulevard in Panacea. For questions, call 984-2510. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 – Page 3B Government Meetings Thursday, Dec. 6  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a special meeting at 9 a.m. in the commission chambers for a 2012 commissioner educational orientation. Monday, Dec. 10  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Tuesday, Dec. 11  RESTORE ACT ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, Dec. 13  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, Dec. 17  WAKULLA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a special meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorWed like to thank everyone who came out to our Winter Fling Fundraiser last Saturday. Your generous donations raised nearly $600 for the Friends of the Library! Wed also like to thank the Iris Garden Club and the Wakulla County Historical Society for coming out and joining us for all the fun. The Book Extravaganzas this year have raised more than $4,000 for the Friends just on their own so for that once again a huge THANK YOU to all of our great supporters! Operation Santa 2012 This year as part of Wakulla Countys commitment to Operation Santa, the library has adopted a family of two to provide needed items and a good Christmas for them this year. Our family consists of a single grandmother who has been raising her 4-year-old granddaughter since birth and whose only wish is to provide her granddaughter a Merry Christmas. We will have a list of items they need at the library, and will include it in my weekly email, and on our Facebook page. The deadline for the items is Dec. 13 so please donate what you can at the front desk of the library and thank you. Friday Night Movie Our last Friday Night Movie of the year is this Friday, Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. Were showing the “ nal film in the worldwide blockbuster Dark Knight Trilogy. The PG-13 (for intense action) rated “ lm takes place eight years after The Dark KnightŽ with Batman coming out of seclusion to battle against the terrorist leader Bane who is bent on taking over Gotham City and destroying Batman once and for all. Branded an outlaw after the events of the previous “ lm, Batman must save the citizens of Gotham while “ nally coming to terms with who he wants to be and the life he wants to live. Starring Christian Bale, Anne Hathaway and Tom Hardy, among others, this “ lm brings a great ending to what may be the greatest superhero “ lm series of all time. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show and seating will be limited. Ringling Brothers comes to the library Mark your calendars for the afternoon of Friday, Dec. 14, as a laughter ambassador from the Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey Circus will be at the Library at 4:30 p.m. for a fun “ lled reading of Dr. Suess If I Ran the Circus.Ž Please come out and kick off the weekend by welcoming the world wide famous circus to the library. The show begins at 4:30 so please bring out the whole family. Library News... Christmas in the Park from 5 to 8 p.m. at Azalea Park. Christmas in Sopchoppy from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. downtown. Sopchoppy Opry’s Classic County Christmas at 7 p.m. in the auditorium. Handel’s Messiah performance at 3 p.m. at Sopchoppy United Methodist. FridaySaturdaySaturdayMonday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Holiday Events Friday, Dec. 7  CHRISTMAS IN THE PARK will be held by the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce at Azalea Park from 5 to 8 p.m. with Santa arriving at 6 p.m. Bring a camera for an opportunity to take pictures of Santa and Mrs. Claus, as well as the elves. There will also be spin art, train rides, Sparky the Fire Dog, McGruff the Crime Dog, concessions and prizes. Saturday, Dec. 8  ANNUAL CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Sopchoppy. Santa will be there from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Enjoy relaxed shopping from more than 50 vendors of arts, crafts and food. There will be games and activities for the children, and Christmas music. For more information, contact Bill Lowrie at billlowrie@ embarqmail.com.

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A g a t o r s FLORIDA gators F L O R I D A g a t o r s FLORIDA gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102ALLSTATE SUGAR BOWL #3 Florida vs. #21 Louisvilleat Mercedes-Benz Superdome, New Orleans, LA Wednesday, Jan. 2 at 8:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. DISCOVER ORANGE BOWL #13 Florida State vs. #15 Northern Illinois at Sun Life Stadium, Miami Gardens, FL Tuesday, Jan. 1 at 8:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excitedtoo! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Take time to savor ‘Noles’ ACC winGators’ body of work is impressiveBy Tim LinafeltEDITOR OSCEOLA.COMCHARLOTTE, N.C. „ There figures to be plenty to talk about between now and when Florida State takes the “ eld Jan. 1 in the Orange Bowl to close out this football season. Defensive coordinator Mark Stoops is already gone to Kentucky and rumors continue to swirl that hell be taking some current FSU assistants with him. Other staff members names have popped up for other jobs round the country. And, despite his insistence that he intends to be in Tallahassee for a long time, rumors swirled around Jimbo Fishers apparent candidacy at other programs It will likely be a compelling, intriguing and maybe even dramatic December. But it can wait. Its easy for everyone to overlook the Atlantic Coast Conference championship that Florida State won and immediately turn our focus to what lies ahead. But that would be a mistake. It would be a mistake to do that and not give this team, this title and the players and coaches that made it happen their proper respect. We had a culture there for a while that we couldnt win those games, we couldnt win 10 games in a season, now weve won 11,Ž FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. We won the Atlantic, it was the second time weve been here in three years, we now got over the hump and won the “ rst championship.Ž No, the ACC was hardly a meat grinder this season. But, hey, somebody had to win it. And given Florida States title drought, which ended tonight after seven long and sometimes painful years, perhaps now isnt the time to attach any asterisks. No, the Orange Bowl might not be a sexy matchup … Florida State is paired with Northern Illinois … but theres still plenty at stake. FSU hasnt won a BCS Bowl since it won the national championship in 1999 … the same year the Seminoles achieved their only 12-win season. Both of those would be awfully “ ne accomplishments for a senior class that has gone through an awful lot to get to this point. Im honestly at a loss for words right now,Ž quarterback EJ Manuel said. Im just enjoying the moment, Im happy for my teammates, happy for our coaches and happy for our fans. To be able to do this and get Florida State on the right track while Im on my way out of here, Im extremely excited and proud.Ž Speaking of those seniors … it would be a disservice to them to not acknowledge what they did tonight. To recognize that they accomplished what no senior class could accomplish since the days of Leon Washington, Willie Reid and David Castillo. Manuel cemented his “ ve-year legacy as the quarterback that got Florida State over the hump, back to its place at the top of the ACC. Everett Dawkins and Vince Williams, among others, saw FSUs defense go from rags to riches over the course of their careers, culminating in a night where they helped hold Georgia Techs vaunted game to to 140 yards below its season average. And on a night when he became the ACC record-holder for single-season scoring, Dustin Hopkins got to run off the “ eld with a championship hat on his head while the Marching Chiefs chanted his name. There were of course, plenty more … seniors and others alike … who had a hand in this. Bjoern Werner,Xavier Rhodes, Lamarcus Joyner have been stalwarts for their entire careers. Sophomore Karlos Williamsmay have saved the game with his juggling, last-minute interception. Meanwhile, James Wilder Jr. and Devonta Freeman showed themselves to be a “ ne duo at running back while Rashad Greene proved once again that hes the teams most reliable playmaker. Im extremely happy for our players because I know how hard it is and how much ” ak theyve taken,Ž Fisher said. When are you going to be back? When are you going to win a championship? ƒ Im just happy for them, that they can call themselves a champion, because that doesnt happen (easily).Ž And for the ones who couldnt play … Brandon Jenkins, Chris Thompson and Jaccobi McDaniel, among others … Thats their ring, too,Ž Fisher said. This championship means a lot for them. And it should. It means a lot to their coaches, too. It was obvious on Stoops face as he was serenaded with chants of Thank you, CoachŽ after the game. Stoops was quick to de” ect credit to D.J. Eliot, and noted that Eliots experience defending offenses similar to Georgia Techs earlier in his career was crucial in developing the game plan. And, yes, this title also belongs to Jimbo Fisher, who three years ago inherited a mess of a program and went about the business of essentially rebuilding the infrastructure from the ground up. It hasnt always been a smooth ride and there are plenty of signs that not everything is running as smoothly as it ought to be … once again, FSU found itself biting its nails at the end of a game against a clearly overmatched opponent … but Florida State tabbed Fisher because of the belief that he was the right man to lead the program to nights like this one. And he delivered. Once youre a champion, theres a responsibility, to me, of how youve got to act and represent yourself and think,Ž Fisher said. And I think its huge and I think, once you get there, you understand that.Ž Theres a lot that can happen between now and New Years Day, when Florida State closes the book on its 2012 campaign. Some questions will be answered, others will be raised and theres a chance that this program will look a lot different than it does here on Dec. 2. These next four weeks, though, will provide more than enough time to get wrapped up in all of that. But for tonight, perhaps its best for FSU fans to take a step back, take a breath and allow for just a little bit of time to enjoy what these Seminoles have accomplished.By MARTY COHENEDITOR GAITORBAIT.NETOnce again, college football takes a backset to no other sport after yet another terri“ c weekend of action, leading to the culmination of the regular season this weekend. For Florida, it was an amazing trip to Tallahassee that produced as thorough a thumping of Florida State in Doak Campbell Stadium as weve seen in some time. With the exception of a 12-minute stretch, spanning the end of the second quarter to about midway through the third quarter, when Florida experienced a minimeltdown, this was complete domination in all phases of the game. And it showed, clearly in full HD Technicolor, the superiority of the SEC, especially when compared to the powderpuff ACC. Florida manhandled FSU, just like Georgia did to Georgia Tech, South Carolina did to Clemson on the road with a backup quarterback, and like Vanderbilt did to Wake Forest. Before we get to Florida, how about a little props for the best conference in college football? Every year pompous folks like myself try and convince the masses that the SEC is down, which in football, becomes nothing but hot air. Perhaps there isnt a team as dominant as Alabama was last year, or LSU during the regular season last year, but the league wound up with six teams winning 10 or more games. Six teams. There are only 18 teams in Division I-A football who recorded double “ gures in wins, with a chance for as many as four more this weekend, and six are from the SEC. Six of the top 10 teams in the BCS standings are from the SEC. These top six … Alabama, Georgia, Florida, LSU, Texas A&M and South Carolina … are a combined 63-9, with all nine losses coming within the con“ nes of the league six-pack. That means these six teams went 54-0 when facing teams outside the top six in the SEC, which is why this two-team limit from one league in the BCS pool is utterly ridiculous. Anyway, Florida put the “ nishing touches on the nations most impressive resume by blasting the Seminoles, who got exposed for competing and compiling impressive numbers against a pansy schedule. Nations number one defense? Ah, not so much. Give the Florida coaches credit for crafting a creative game plan on offense, coming out throwing to, as Will Muschamp said, loosen em up, get em off of us.Ž Florida scored on its opening possession for just the third time this season … the previous week against Jacksonville State and then a touchdown against South Carolina that really belonged to the defense thanks to a forced turnover inside the Gamecock 5-yard line. But Saturdays opening possession, consuming more than “ ve minutes, set the tone. Certainly the “ rst half was frustrating as well, because the Gators probably should have been up by around 20 at halftime, and then subsequently let FSU seize the momentum with a bad six-minute stint to open the third quarter. The Gators were sloppy, the of“ cials simply werent going to drop a ” ag on FSU and eventually the home side had claimed a 20-13 lead, as FSU fans decided to stop booing their own team and got loud for a few minutes. Then Florida turned in the two biggest plays of the game. The “ rst came on offense, a subtle play but a huge one, a 21-yard middle screen to tight end Jordan Reed on third-and-14 toward the end of the third quarter. The Gators came away with a “ eld goal before cashing in on the games deciding play, when freshman linebacker Antonio Morrison knocked FSU quarterback EJ Manuel into next week. The Gators recovered the fumble, tailback Mike Gillislee scampered 37 yards for a touchdown on the next snap and the Gators never looked back in scoring 24 straight fourth-quarter points. While were at it, lets give some props to the beleaguered and maligned offensive line. Granted they looked lousy for long stretches of the season, especially when missing a few ailing starters, but the line was terri“ c last Saturday. Yes there were a few sacks and right tackle Chaz Green was really having a tough time with standout end Bjoern Werner, but overall these guys manhandled FSU up front. Not counting sacks, Florida rushed for 287 yards in 43 carries, an average of 6.7 yards per carry and Gillislee was terri“ c, rumbling for 140 yards and two touchdowns. And “ nally, “ nally, “ nally we saw the rollout package with quarterback Jeff Driskel. I simply cant understand why it wasnt used in earlier games when the Gators were having trouble protecting the passer, like Georgia. Instead, Driskel stood in the pocket every time. But on Saturday, the rollout package was really effective in limited use, and even produced a touchdown pass to Quinton Dunbar in the fourth quarter that put the game away. And of course, the defense did what it has done all year, creating turnovers (“ ve, with one belonging to the special teams) while ” exing its muscle along the line of scrimmage. FSU scored 17 unanswered points in the third quarter on touchdown drives of 25 and 26 yards and a “ eld goal march where they went 13 yards. For a complete season-long performance, Im not sure if theres been a better Florida defense, and thats saying a mouthful. These guys were simply superb, and the ” ip in turnover margin, from minus-12 last year to a plus-17, a difference of plus-29, is borderline remarkable. And on special teams, the one weakness appears to be solved as it looks like Marcus Roberson should have been the punt returner all along, following up a 31-yard runback against Jacksonville State with a big 50-yarder in the fourth quarter last Saturday. Championship teams stand on their own merit, whether they compare favorably to other elite level title-winners or not. And frankly, Florida is as worthy, and in most cases more worthy, of being in the national championship conversation than just about every other team in the nation. If taken on its surface, Floridas body of workŽ (too bad its not March Madness time) criteria is the most impressive in the nation, regardless of the loss to Georgia. But the eyeball test does come into play, and in combination with the resume, lead to Florida ending up in New Orleans, and not Miami, the “ rst week of January. If Florida “ nds a way to secure win No. 12 in its bowl matchup, the Gators will “ nish the season ranked anywhere from No. 2 to No. 4 in the “ nal standings. Given their starting position at the outset of this enthralling college football season, thats not too shabby. Jimbo Fisher with the ACC championship trophy. Floridas Jordan Reed gets a “ rst down on third and 14.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 – Page 5B YOUR AD HERE Acted Alarms April Ashes Astonishment Awakened Bench Birds Bunks Cheer Cloud Detail Dotted DrownEnthusiasticEntry ErrorsExperimentalExtra Fewer Grain Helmet Inland Joins Lamps Measure Needle Of“ ce Orange Pedal Period Pilot Played Preparation Recess This page sponsored in part by: Ri” e Sacred Salad Scale Spells Steep Threads Trial Utter Vague Washed Wasnt

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Did you know?When you shop with local merchants more of your money stays closer to home; suppor ng your local parks, recrea on centers, libraries and other things that make this community a great place to live. Shopping local can s mulate and help restore a poor economy!Local ownership means that important decisions are made locally by people who live in the community and who will feel the impacts of those decisions. Your dollars spent in locally owned businesses have three times the impact on your community as dollars spent at national chains. When shopping locally, you simultaneously create jobs, fund more services through sales tax, invest in neighborhood improvement and promote community development.Locally owned businesses create more jobs locally and, in some sectors, provide better wages and bene ts Locally owned businesses build strong neighborhoods by giving back to the community, linking neighbors, and by contributing more to local causes.Shop local and keep your local dollars circulating in your home town! Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pe t Phone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. Holistic Select WellnessC L P A ALL Y P N.Special Orders AvailableStocking Stuffers for Pets Gift Certificates 301 C S G i Construction Cleanup, Commercial, ResidentialLICENSED AND INSURED ConstructionCleanupCommercial R Re Re Re Re R R R R R R R s si si sid id ential Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly Nicholspray like its up to God, Work like its up to youŽMany Thanks for Many Blessings. Have a wonderful Christmas! Across the street from the courthouse, downtown Crawfordville926-3338Open 10AM-5PM or call for later appointment.15 Vendors 2 Floors The White Elephant DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PET STOP3010 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. ANTIQUES C ARRIE’S C OVEC ARRIE’S C OVE C HRISTMAS ATC HRISTMAS AT Toys Dolls Antiques Collectibles Jewelry Ornaments Decorations One-of-kinds Etc. A Cabin of Treasures~ Vera Bradley ~ ~ Dot’s Jewels ~ ~ Greenleaf Scents ~ ~ 16 Vendors ~ ~ Gifts ~ ~ Collectibles ~ ~ Jewelry ~ ~ Custom Wood Items ~ & much more... PICK A TREASURE FROM OUR TREASURE BOX w/purchase!850926-8381M-S 10-5 • Downtown Crawfordville, Next to Subwa y 27 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA Hair Place That 850-926-6020Gift Certi“cates Available t C C e C C FULL SERVICE HAIR SALONStyles for Men, Women & ChildrenCutsUpDo’sColor • Perms • HighlightsFacial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • Flat TopsMirandaTues-Sat545-2905RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MavisAppt. Only962-2171 SHOP DOWNTOWN LATE Fri., Dec. 7 OPEN til 9PM Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Across the street from the courthouse, downtown Crawfordville926-3338Open 10AM-5PM or call for later appointment.White Elephant Gift with purchase thru Dec. The White Elephant SATURDAY, DEC. 8THRefreshments Shop Local Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 – Page 7B Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce OPEN Mon.Sat. 8-6(850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSBAIT SHOP(850) 926-1162Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart• Oyster Knives • Gloves • Hand Held VHF Radios • Rubber Boots • Cast Nets • Gift Certi cates• Create A Basket or Bucket for ALL Your Outdoor Fun! HUNTING H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U N N N N T T T I I N N G G G G BOOTS Field Blazer Muck Boots GIFT SHOP LOCATED: Angelos & Sons Seafood Restaurant Overlooking Ochlockonee Bay Panacea 984-4746 A Few of My Favorite Things SPORT S PENDANTS T S A NT T S S SPORT S WRIS TBAND S & KEYRING S RING S CHARM S ANKLET S K LE T S TOERING S C RI NG S S CHAINS R ING S BRA C ELET S A C C EL ET E S S EARRING S 20%to40% JEWELRY SHOW & SALE SAVE on Entire Stock Support Your Local Business WE ACCEPT: r r s ....................$10 .....................$7 ..................$5 .......................$4 ......................$19 .....................$12 ......$29 .....................$20 $ $ $1 $1 0 0 PRICES STARTING AT $ $ $7 $7 SALEAt Angelo & Son’s Seafood Restaurant The Jewelry Man The J ewelry Man InvitesYou 850745-8414 850 745-8414 HAIR SALON Merry Christmas, Happy New Year& Thank You for Another Great Year!DOREEN AND NIKKI ATFULL SERVICE FAMILY SALON 3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) For that Special & Unique Gift:Lots of educational gifts & toys for children & adults. We have a great selection of natural history Books for all ages, books by Jack and Anne Rudloe, beautiful jewelry, home decor, prints, cards, ornaments. We have added many items to our collection. Great Stocking St uffers Too! Open: Mon. Fri. 9am 5pm www.gulfspecimen.org Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Aquarium Your generous support helps us to continue our mission to educate and inspire. S S Visit the Gift Shopat Open 7 Days Holiday Craft Bazaar Saturday, December 8 at the CRAWFORDVILLE WOMAN’S CLUBSecond annual holiday bazaar hosted by the Crawfordville Womans Club at the clubhouse located at 64 Ochlockonee Street behind Hudson Park.Numerous vendors will display their wares in indoor comfort. Friday night, December 7 Sneak Preview Tickets are being sold to take a sneak preview to Saturdays event and enjoy delicious hors doeuvres and a wine tasting.9 a.m. 3 p.m. FREE and open to the publicA portion of the proceeds from the bazaar will go to the Crawfordville Womans Club scholarship fund and other civic projects. 294-6482 Tickets to the Friday night preview are $10 each for more info please call Tips when buying a natural Christmas treeSpecial to The NewsMany people harbor strong opinions with regard to which type of Christmas tree they want to purchase. Some cannot live without a natural, freshly-cut Christmas tree, while others prefer the convenience of arti“ cial trees. Those who insist on a natural tree might want to consider the following tips when buying whats likely their biggest decorative item of the holiday season. € Ask when the tree was cut down. Precut trees may be cut down weeks before theyre sold. So if youre buying a precut tree, chances are the tree was cut down much earlier than you think. This doesnt mean the tree wont make it through the holiday season, but a tree that was cut several weeks ago should have some of its bottom trunk removed before its placed in the stand. This will make it easier for the tree to consume water. This step likely isnt necessary if the tree was cut down the same day you bring it home. € Have the tree shaken before taking it home. A tree should be shaken in a shaker before you put it in your car and bring it home. A shaker removes any debris or dead needles from the tree, which can save you the trouble of cleaning up all of those dead needles from your living room ” oor later on. € Have the tree wrapped before taking it home. A tree should also be wrapped in twine before taking it home. The twine should be tight enough to keep the trees branches from blowing in the wind when you attach the tree to the top of your vehicle. If possible, keep the tree wrapped in twine as you place it in the stand. This makes the tree easier to control. € Choose the right location. When looking for the right place to set up your natural tree, its best to choose a spot thats cool and free of drafts. The tree should not be placed near heat sources, including appliances, “ replaces or vents, because such heat sources create a safety hazard and can make it dif“ cult for the tree to retain moisture. There should also be ample space between the top of the tree and the ceiling. € Place some covering on the ground beneath the tree. Even a freshly cut natural tree will shed needles over the course of the holiday season. Before placing the stand in the location youve chosen, put some type of covering, such as a tree bag, beneath the stand so its easier to gather all those needles once the holiday season has ended. € Remember that natural trees are thirsty. Men and women who have never had a natural Christmas tree in the past might be surprised at just how thirsty natural trees get. The stands reservoir should have lots of water, which should never dip below the stump. If the water dips below the stump, you might be forced to cut a little more off the bottom of the trunk to ensure the tree will make it through the holiday season. That can be a hassle once the tree has been decorated, so be sure to check the water in the reservoir at least once per day to maintain adequate water levels. You’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe Wakuulanews Please Recycle

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SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements Todays New Ads SECURITY GUARD WANTEDLicensed Class G security guard positions available at PETEYS INTERNET CAFE -460 Coastal Hwy.Panacea Email resume to lyndara@gmail.com call 850-491-6313 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements CONSIGNMENTART AUCTION on Dec 15, 2012 (Saturday) at 4pm. 9101 International Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, FL 32819. Artworks below $100, complimentary hors doeuvres and FREE ARTPRINTfor attending. Artists include Picasso, Dali, Chagall, Max and local artists. Call (866)537-1013 or visit www .Baterbys.com for more information or to RSVP. Medical MEDICALBILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Medical Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Professional AIRLINE CAREERS-Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 Trades/ Skills DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDLTraining. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Trades/ Skills DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. HOME EVERYWEEKEND! Pay 37/mi, Both ways, FULLBENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, Fl Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE SECURITY GUARD WANTEDLicensed Class G security guard positions available at PETEYS INTERNET CAFE -460 Coastal Hwy.Panacea Email resume to lyndara@gmail.com call 850-491-6313 TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 20 12 Employment Info Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed. Top 5% Pay & Late Model Equipment. Guaranteed Home for Xmas. Need CDLClass ADriving Exp (877)258-8782 www .ad drivers.com Schools/ Instruction Can Your Dig It?Ž Heavy Equipment School. 3wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benefits Approved. 2 National Certifications. (866)362-6497 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality Job placement assistance.Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call www .Centura Online.com 888-203-3179 General 2002 MOBILE HOME 28X76 4Bedroom/2Bath Master Suite with Office, Walk-in Closet, Garden Tub, Shower. Family Room w/Fireplace and separate Living Room. Large kitchen w/Island and Breakfast Nook. $33,000. Call Billy (850)962-3884 Wanted to Buy $100 each for FLORIDA LICENSE PLATES FROM WAKULLA COUNTY THAT BEGIN WITH THE NUMBER 65 for years 1943, 1949, 1950, 1951,1954,1955. Up to $2000 for any Florida Wakulla porcelain license plate dated 1911-1917 Any condition accepted, so long as they are readable. Jeff Francis 727 424 1576 email gobucs13@aol.com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3/2 Doublewide MH For Lease or Lease Purchase Lake Ellen $695 + deposit. fenced yard 850-524-4090 CRAWFORDVILLEN. Wakulla county 2/1 Central air, gas heat, new flooring, clean. Move-in Ready! $495. $350 dep., $25 app fee. (850)-228-7197 PANACEAClean SW 3/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $500/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 SOPCHOPPY2 BR, 1 BA, w/ Screened Porch, on paved road, on 3 lots, possible sale with owner finance to qualified buyer $475. Mo. + Dep. (850) 566-4124 Rental Houses SOPCHOPPY AREAwaterfront cottage 1br/1ba, exc. cond. cath. ceiling, sep storage/laundry, Clear filtered water $590. month. 84 Mt. Beasor Rd. off Persimmon850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Baths 1,200 sq. ft., $800 mo. $500 sec. 145 Rehwinkle Rd. 850-766-0170 North WakullaCty, 3 bdrms, on 3 wooded acres, c/h/a large front porch, $675 plus security Brenda Hicks Realty (850) 251-1253 Vacation Rentals ALLIGATOR POINT2/Bedroom, 2/Bath 1,200 sf, Gulf Front, Vacation Rental 3 blks to white sandy beach, 75ft. to Gulf of Mexico. Beautiful Sunsets $1,000. Wk. (904)687-3397 Real Estate For Sale 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www .sunsetranches.com Citrus County Homes PINE RIDGE-THIS IS THE PROPERTY YOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3.5 w/7 car garage/workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded with large back yard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community. www .centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352.249.9164 Roofing FREE ESTIMATES 850-889 -0989 Licensed and Insured #CCC1328414 www.a2zroof.com Fictitious Name Notices 5453-1206 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Doing business as: The Mayors Loft at 44 Mayberry Rd., Fictitious Name Notices Fictitious Name Notices Crawfordville, Florida 32327, with a mailing address of 44 Mayberry Rd., Crawfordville, Florida 32327,desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 27th day of November, 2012 /s/Glenn May Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News December 6, 2012 5456-1206 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The North Florida Broadband Authority (NFBA) Board of Directors announces its regular monthly public meeting to which all interested persons are invited. The NFBA is a public body created by Interlocal Agreement pursuant to Section 163.01, Florida Statutes. The Wednesday, December 12, 2012 meeting will be held at Ravine Gardens State Park, 1600 Twigg Street, Palatka, FL 32177 in the South conference room at 2:00 p.m. The meeting agenda will be posted to the NFBA website at least 48 hours prior to the scheduled meeting. The Board will address general operating matters of the NFBA. If a person decides to appeal any decision of the NFBA Board made at the meeting, such person may need a record of the proceedings, including the testimony and evidence upon which the decision was made. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations or an interpreter to participate in this meeting should contact Springfield Law, P.A. at (352) 371-9909 at least two business days prior to the date of the meeting. December 6, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5451-1206 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOL BOARD OFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE:School Board Policy 4.11*+ Student Progression Plan PURPOSE AND EFFECT:To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures. LEGAL AUTHORITY:1001.41, 1001.45, Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED:1001.43, 1003.43, 1003.437, 1003.49, F.S.. ECONOMIC IMPACT:None REVISION ORIGINATED BY:Beth ODonnell Assistant Superintendent for Instruction REVISION APPROVED BY:Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Schools Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, A HEARING WILL BE HELD TIME:5:45 p.m. PLACE:Administrative Offices Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE:January 22, 2013 A COPY OF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAY BE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board Post Office Box 100 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100 December 6, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5448-1206 TWN vs. Gray Services 1, Inc. Case No. 2011-318-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 5449-1206 TWN vs. Anderson, Brandon Case No. 65-2012-CA-000293 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000293 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, v. BRANDON L. ANDERSON AKA BRANDON ANDERSON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FOR FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING PROPER TY TO: Brandon L. Anderson AKA Brandon Anderson, ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 105 King Bee Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendant(s) are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant(s) as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOTS 67 AND 68, BLOCK AŽ, MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TOGETHER WITH A 2003 SCHU MOBILE HOME WITH VIN NUMBERS HIGA20K04288A AND HIGA20K04288B AND TITLE NUMBERS 86614381 AND 86614505 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 105 KING BEE DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, such Morris Hardwick Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 120, Tampa, FL 33634 on or before December 29, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff`s attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 16th of November, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this hearing, should contact ADA Coordinator not later than 1 (one) day prior to the proceeding at Internal Revenue Service (FL -Northern), 400 West Bay Street, Stop 5710, Jacksonville, FL 32202 904-665-0832 and for the hearing and voice impaired 800-955-8770.Ž November 29 and December 6, 2012 5450-1206 TWN vs. Taylor, Donnie Case No. 652010CA000100CAXXXX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652010CA000100CAXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF POPULAR ABS, INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-5, Plaintiff, v. DONNIE L TAYLOR; BILL THOMAS A/K/A W.A. THOMAS III; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR ACCREDITED HOME LENDERS, INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 1, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 652010CA000100CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 13th day of December, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. at the front Lobbyof the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 49, BLOCK 4, LAKE ELLEN ESTATES UNIT ONE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 (850) 577-4401at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA THIS 1st DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net A-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16Ž .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE. CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 GOT FALLIN G L E A VES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help! Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h a a a a v e e A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l t h e e M M o o o o o o d d e e e e e e r r n E q q q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m e n n t t to H e C C C ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f f f t ! PAT GR EE N ’ S L AWN S E R V IC E Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT 4Br 2Ba Hs. $850 mo. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650 mo. 3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs $850 mo. 2Br 2.5Ba Twnhs $775 mo. 2Br 2.5Ba Twnhs $750 mo. 2Br 1Ba Hs. $595 mo. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550 mo. 1,000 sf Commercial Bldg $800 mo. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 – Page 9B IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO: 2011-318-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, v. GRAY SERVICES 1, INC., F/K/A GRAY SERVICES, INC.; RAY E. GRAY; JODY M. GRAY; ALBERT L. HARTSFIELD; KATHY A. HARTSFIELD; WOODLAND PARK HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; WAKULLA RESERVATION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT in accordance with the Final Judgment dated October 30, 2012, in the above-styled case, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 on Thursday, January 17, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. in accordance with Florida Statutes §45.031, the following described real properties situated in Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida: PARCEL 1 -276 CAJER POSEY: BEGIN AT THE INT ERSECT ION OF THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF THE OLD OCHLOCKNEE ROAD AND THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA THENCE RUN SOUTHERLY ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD 168 FEET, THENCE RUN WESTERLY AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 TO THE WEST BOUNDARY OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND CONVEYED TO WRIGHT ALEXANDER FROM DOLLIE VICKERS BY DEED DATED APRIL 1, 1942 AND RECORDED ON PAGE 6 OF DEED BOOK 26 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTHERLY ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID DOLLIE VICKERS TO WRIGHT ALEXANDER TRACT OF LAND TO THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY, THENCE RUN EASTERLY ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND BEING SITUATE IN LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY A SURVEY PREPARED BY EDWIN G. BROWN AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED MARCH 8, 1990, JOB NO. 90-031, AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 A DISTANCE OF 343.46 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF CAJER POSEY ROAD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY 263.58 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 95.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 218.55 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID CAJER POSEY ROAD, SAID MONUMENT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS 2529.45 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 80.57 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 10 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 80.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2024.99 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 20 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 89.14 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 10 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 89.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1984 SUMM MOBILE HOME ID # H37407G, TITLE # 18056384 PARCEL 3 -154 ELIZABETH DRIVE: SOUTH ONE-HALF OF LOT 11, OF EVERGREEN ACRES, UNIT II, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 77, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1985 BRIG MOBILE HOME ID # 14601487, TITLE # 41380323 PARCEL 4 -53 BREAM FOUNTAIN: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16, ISOLATED BLOCK AŽ OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN DEED BOOK C-DŽ, PAGE 572, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF TALLAHASSEE STREET, (U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 319) 100.95 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OR-WAY BOUNDARY OF A GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 726.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 88.03 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 210.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 186.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 9.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 93.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 200.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1980 FIES MOBILE HOME ID # FDGAS1070, TITLE #63390829. PARCEL 5 -93 STANLEY DRIVE: LOTS 29, 30 AND 31, BLOCK 3 OF LAKE ELLEN ESTATES, UNIT ONE, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1992 FLEE MOBILE HOME ID # GAFLN75A15782WE, TITLE # 63458581. PARCEL 6 -108 WOODLAND: LOT 12, OF WOODLAND PARK, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1990 FLEE MOBILE HOME ID # GAFLL34A13240SH AND ID # GAFLL34B13240SH, TITLE # 49296110 AND 48964997. PARCEL 7 -31 HARVEY PITTMAN: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 14, BLOCK Q OF HUDSON HEIGHTS, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AT PAGE 38 OF PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN IN AN EASTERLY DIRECTION ALONG AN EXTENSION OF THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT NO. 14 ACROSS RAKER LANE, WHICH IS A 50 FOOT DEDICATED STREET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF RAKER LANE, WHICH IS POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE TO RUN IN THE SAME DIRECTION 120 FEET, THENCE RUN IN THE SOUTHERLY DIRECTION AND AT RIGHT ANGLES TO THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 14, THE DISTANCE OF 220 FEET, THENCE RUN IN A WESTERLY DIRECTION AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 14, THE DISTANCE OF 120 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF RAKER LANE, THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE EASTERN BOUNDARY OF RAKER LANE, 220 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING SITUATE IN THE EAST HALF OF NO. 76 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1976 NORM MOBILE HOME ID # L0880NA AND L0880NB, TITLE # 13502704 AND 13502703. PARCEL 8 -47 BREAM FOUNTAIN ROAD: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16 OF ISOLATED BLOCK AŽ OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID BLOCK AŽ 198.0 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 13 OF SAID BLOCK AŽ, THENCE SOUTH 109.18 FEET, THENCE EAST 435.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE SOUTH 200.0 FEET, THENCE EAST 93.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH 200.0 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE SPRING CREEK ROAD, THENCE WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SPRING CREEK ROAD 93.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND BEING SITUATED IN LOT NO. 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PORTION LYING WITHIN THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: (AS CONVEYED BY QUIT CLAIM IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 167, PAGE 112, TO LEE WILLIAMS AND HELEN WILLIAMS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16, ISOLAT ED BLOCK AŽ OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN DEED BOOK C-DŽ PAGE 572, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF TALLAHASSEE STREET (U.S. HIGHWAY NO.319) 103.43 FEET TO A SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED BOUNDARY OF A GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY 394.96 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED BOUNDARY 239.01 FEET, THENCE Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 208.83 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 31 -MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 234.68 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 206.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATED, LYING AND BEING IN LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BEING MORE RECENTLY BY EDWIN BROWN ASSOCIATES INC. DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16, OF ISOLATED BLOCK AŽ OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN EAST 198.00 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 13, OF SAID BLOCK AŽ; THENCE RUN SOUTH 109.18 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF BREAM FOUNTAIN ROAD; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY EAST 435.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE EAST 93.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 208.73 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 94.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 209.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT A STRIP OF LAND 9.30 FEET WIDE ACROSS THE SOUTHERLY PORTION OF SUBJECT PROPERTY. PARCEL 9 -88 ROBERT/WILLIAMS ROAD: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 659.83 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 219.70 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 490.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 185.98 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 337.90 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY GRADED ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 82 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 16.85 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 87 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 182.26 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 344.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE WESTERLY 60.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH 1971 GREA MOBILE HOME ID # KG6024F6N15861R AND KG6024F6N15861L, TITLE # 4694512 AND 4694511. PARCEL 10 -LOT 10 -56 EASTGATE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 2365.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 74.93 FEET TO A REBAR; FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 197.84 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST 149.90 FEET TO A REBAR LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF EASTGATE WAY; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 20 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 12.31 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST 65.30 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 36 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 240.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1986 PEAR MOBILE HOME ID #SHS8PGA39850391, TITLE # 42986775. PARCEL 11 -LOT 12 EASTGATE -70 EASTGATE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 2365.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 74.93 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 197.84 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 100.08 FEET TO A REBAR FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 99.85 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 150.41 FEET TO A REBAR LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF EASTGATE WAY; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 101.44 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 150.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1986 BEAC MOBILE HOME ID #SSMFLAD93268, TITLE # 50440146. PARCEL 12 -436 RAVENSVIEW & 403 BIG RICHARD & 407 BIG RICHARD: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN NORTH 615.12 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES EAST 337.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES EAST 233.72 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 301.67 FEET TO A POINT THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES WEST 231.80 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 300.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1998 COUG DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID NUMBERS: GMHGA4119819757A AND GMHGA4119819757B, TITLE NUMBERS: 79387367 AND 79386939 TOGETHER WITH A 1985 ROSE MOBILE HOME ID NUMBER: 21G10868D, TITLE NUMBER 40651489. TOGETHER WITH A 1981 SOUT DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID NUMBERS: COSGART011255A AND COSGART011255B, TITLE NUMBERS: 19617948 AND 19617949. PARCEL 14 -558 ROCK ROAD: BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. 267 AND THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF THE ROCK ROAD AND RUN WESTERLY ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID STATE ROAD, 397 FEET TO AN OLD FENCE LINE, THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG SAID OLD FENCE LINE 233 FEET, THENCE RUN EAST ALONG A FENCE LINE 197 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF ROCK ROAD, THENCE RUN IN A NORTHERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ROCK ROAD 256 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID PROPERTY LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST. BEING MORE RECENTLY DESCRIBED BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES INC., JOB #96007 DATED JUNE 22, 2004 AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A 6 INCH BY 6 INCH ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 9 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1990.02 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 267, THENCE LEAVING SAID WEST BOUNDARY LINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1216.69 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST ALONG AN OLD FENCE LINE 234.87 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 81 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 197.48 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF ROCK ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 168.73 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 60 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 89.59 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF ROCK ROAD WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF AFOREMENTIONED STATE ROAD 267, THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 75 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY 398.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL # 15 TRACT AŽ; 94 DWIGHT SANDERS ROAD: COMMENCE AT AN OLD AXLE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 7 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 288.00 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY 144.06 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 302.31 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 144.01 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #799), THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 302.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL # 16 TRACT BŽ; 98 DWIGHT SANDERS ROAD: COMMENCE AT AN OLD AXLE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 7 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 432.06 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY 144.05 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #799), THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 302.28 FEET TO A RE-ROD, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 144.01 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 302.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1983 ALLA MOBILE HOME ID # AAFLA2828, TITLE # 22941917. PARCEL 18 -137 TAFFINGER: LOTS 21 AND 30, BLOCK Q OF MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1987 VEGAŽ DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ID #KH4026D31K8647GAA, TITLE # 45453562 AND ID #KH4026D31K8647GAB, TITLE # 45464840. PARCEL A: LOTS 34 AND 35, BLOCK 37 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT III, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 43, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1996 HORTON SINGLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID#H203274G, TITLE # 70561763. PARCEL B: LOT 10 AND THE SOUTHEAST HALF OF LOT 9, BLOCK 44 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL C: LOT 8 AND THE NORTHWEST HALF OF LOT 9, BLOCK 44 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, WAKULLA COUNTY (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 5444-1206 TWN Vs. Cook, Bobby 65-2012-CA-000379 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTYCIVILDIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000379 LPPMORTGAGE LTD., Plaintiff, vs. BOBBYCOOK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BOBBYCOOK; JAN COOK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAN COOK; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKINOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:BOBBYCOOK; JAN COOK; Whose residence(s) is/are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBYrequired to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL33619-1328, 5445-1206 TWN vs. Eichler, Christopher Case No 12000333CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION, CASE NO.: 12000333CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff vs. CHRISTOPHER W. EICHLER, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPER TY TO: CHRISTOPHER W. EICHLER : ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 4016 COLLETON COURT, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32311 CONNIE EICHLER : ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 9107 WAUKEENAH HIGHWAY, MONTICELLO, FL 32344 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: LOT 15, BLOCK AŽ OF WAKULLA FOREST, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 54, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2000 JACOBSEN MOBILE HOME, TITLE NO. 80910726, 80910919, 80910982, I.D. NO. JACFL20876A, JACFL20876B, JACFL20876C. more commonly known as: 218 DOROTHY LOOP ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiff`s attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due by dECEMBER 29, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff`s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 8th day of November, 2012. Clerk of the Court, WAKULLA County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 CA12-02491 5447-1206 TWN vs. Avery, Roy Case No. 2011-299-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 2011-299-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, v. ROY L. AVERY, III, as personal representative for THE ESTATE OF COLLENE CRAWFORD AVERY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF COLLENE C. AVERY; AND UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT in accordance with the Final Judgment dated November 9, 2012, in the above-styled case, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 on Thursday, December 13, 2012, at 11:00 a.m ., in accordance with Florida Statutes §45.031, the following described real properties situated in Sopchoppy, Wakulla County, Florida: LOTS 181, 182, 183, 184, 185 AND 186, BLOCK 35, OF THE TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY, EAST SIDE, AS SHOWN BY MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, WAKULLA COUNTY (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!77 Strattonwood Road Off of Wakulla Springs Hwy. 5 minute commute to Tallahassee. Large 3BR/2BA home on 5 acres. Large workshop with outbuilding. $1100. mo No Pets, no smoking. 2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/3BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 3BR/1BA New carpet throughout $590 mo. No Pets, No Smoking RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities • 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit • 31 Magpie 3BR/2BA $1400 mo. $1400 sec. dep. Outside pets okay with approval • 137 Shephard Easement 3BR/2BA MH on 6+ acres $900 mo. $900 security Lease with OPTION TO BUY! • 5 Albin Live Oak Island 2BR/2BA with Lost and Dock. $950. mo. $950 Security Deposit.

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit: LOTS 15 AND 16, BLOCK 55 OF WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT FIVE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA If you fail to file your response or answer, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Dr., Tampa, Florida 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. DATED at WAKULLACounty this 13th day of November, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact : Danny Davis, Office of Court Administration, 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL32303, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5446-1206 TWN Estate of Lola Mae Johnson Case No. 12-102-CP Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION, FILE NO.: 12-102-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF LOLA MAE JOHNSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LOLA MAE JOHNSON, deceased, whose date of death was April 1, 2012, Aand whose Social Security Number is ***-**-8063, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327-0337. The names and adNotices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 29 and December 6, 2012 dresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives Attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 29, 2012. Personal Representative: By:/s/ JEHOVAH DAVIS 102 Riverview Dr., Knifley, KY 42753 Attorney for Personal Representative: RICHARD L. ROGERS of RICHARD L. ROGERS, P.A. Florida Bar No. 320269 1135 South Washington Ave., Suite A Titusville, FL 32780, Telephone (321) 268-5173 November 29 and December 6, 2012 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 27 29 35 38 43 48 50 57 60 2 22 44 3 23 45 4 24 41 5 20 39 18 36 51 58 61 6 15 30 52 7 31 46 49 8 25 28 47 9 26 42 21 40 59 62 10 16 19 37 53 11 32 54 12 33 55 13 34 56 ACROSS 1. Croc's kin 6. "Just the facts, __" 10. Belgrade native 14. Where you live 15. __ breve (cut time) 16. Eggs order 17. Correspondence sometimes marked "SWAK" 19. Handle, so to speak 20. Choir voice 21. Quinn of "Reckless" 22. Common tip amount 27. "Yes __, Bob!" 28. They try harder 29. Affixed one's John Hancock to 30. Bar fare 32. Ducked the seeker 35. Owner's certificate 36. Basilica areas 37. Declare untrue 38. Byrnes of old TV 39. Long green 40. Sacagawea was one 41. Sudden burst 42. Hoe wielder 43. Common rifle round, familiarly 48. Spine-tingling 49. Thumbs-downs 50. Send sprawling 51. Quick snooze 57. Baseball's "Charlie Hustle" 58. Touched down 59. Upper crust 60. Curbside-stand drinks 61. Tune from Shankar 62. Keyed upDOWN1. Eight pts. 2. Blood-typing letters 3. "Mazel __!" 4. Laudatory lines 5. In the family 6. Photo finish 7. Illinois city 8. Drink on draft 9. Bang up 10. Onetime Seattle hoopsters, for short 11. Give the slip to 12. Staff anew 13. Sportscaster Musburger 18. Gen. Robert __ 21. Like the Gobi 22. Punished for littering, maybe 23. Teed off 24. Ricky's landlord 25. CBS exec William 26. Spacewalks, in NASA lingo 27. "Us" or "them" 30. __ Domingo 31. Forum greeting 32. Johanna Spyri heroine 33. The Dow, e.g. 34. Henna user 36. Like a buttinsky 37. Cost of belonging 39. Remote control button 40. Is caught in the rain, say 41. Acts the bellyacher 42. Fare for Muffet 43. Pentaminus one 44. Judean king 45. Maya Angelou's "Still __" 46. Disassemble, aboard ship 47. Must, informally 51. Wide partner 52. Briber y suffix 53. Suffix with project 54. "The House of Incest" writer 55. Horsehead-shaped pcs. 56. "Told you so!" American Prole Hometown Content 12/2/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 12 34 54673 328 3 41 29 754 6 94 85176 1423 200 9 HometownContent 126 3584 9 7 548697231 379142685 835 479162 214836759 697215348 762 983514 483521976 951764823 G A L S I D E T E T R A A B O F I N E D H E R O D T O V I R K E D I R I S E O D E F R E D G R I P E S R E L A T E D M U T E E L E E N O S Y F A R M A T T E S A N T O O L A A L T O N A V E U N R I G A L E P A L E Y G O T T A M A R E V A S W H E Y A R I D G E T S W E T S O N I C S D U E S I L E E V A D E H E I D I N I N R E M A N I N D E X K T S B R E N T D Y E R S E E Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 – Page 11B 1. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is a philographist? 2. TELEVISION: Which actor played the character of FonzieŽ on Happy DaysŽ? 3. LITERATURE: Who wrote the childrens book MatildaŽ? 4. GEOGRAPHY: What tiny principality lies between Spain and France? 5. MYTHOLOGY: In Greek mythology, what was the Hydra? 6. FOOD & DRINK: What is muesli? 7. ART: Where is the Uffizi museum? 8. MEASUREMENTS: What does a kelvin measure? 9. MOVIES: What spell is used to disarm opponents in the Harry PotterŽ movies? 10. ANATOMY: Where is the latissimus dorsi muscle located on the human body? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Someone who collects autographs 2. Henry Winkler 3. Roald Dahl 4. Andorra 5. A many-headed monster whose heads could grow back if they were cut off 6. Breakfast cereal with fruit and nuts 7. Florence, Italy 8. Temperature 9. Expelliarmus!Ž 10. Back YOUR AD HERE

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet By TAMAR HASPAL Contributor, Relish magazinePumpkin is a squash „ a giant, orange squash. Its a little disheartening to think that such an American institution is second cousin to zucchini, but there it is. Although the kind you make Jack OLanterns out of makes lousy eating, small sugar pumpkins are excellent „ sweet and rich. They are, however, laborintensive. Enter, canned pumpkin, arguably the best canned vegetable there is. You get consistent, smooth, ” avorful pure, with no slicing, scraping or baking. Besides being versatile and tasty, pumpkins also good for you. Its rich in “ ber and beta-carotene and has almost no fat. And all that nutrition will cost you only 42 calories in a half-cup serving. When you think pumpkin,Ž you usually think pie,Ž but thats not all its good for. Here are some quick and easy uses for canned pumpkin. Mix canned pumpkin into softened ice cream and then refreeze for a quick pumpkin dessert. Make a simple soup by sauting an onion and adding about 4 cups of chicken broth and a 28-ounce can of pumpkin. Stir in 2 to 3 ounces of goat cheese, and season with salt, pepper and a pinch of nutmeg. Use canned pumpkin as a thickener. Add a cup to vegetable chili to round out the ” avor and beef up the texture. Try substituting canned pumpkin for half the fat in quick breads. It will add color and ” avor and pairs well with cinnamon, citrus and even chocolate. PUMPKIN MACARONI AND CHEESE 3 cups mostaccioli or penne pasta, uncooked 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 tablespoons ” our 2 cups 2 percent reduced fat milk 3/4 cup canned pumpkin puree 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded Monterey Jack Cheese 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded Comte or Gruyere cheese 1/2 cup (2 ounces) grated Parmesan cheese 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/8 t easpoon nutmeg (optional) 1/8 teas poon black pepper 1. Preheat oven to 375F. Grease a 13 x 9-inch baking pan. 2. Cook pasta in salted water according to package directions. Drain. 3. Melt butter in saucepan over medium heat until foamy. Whisk in ” our and cook 2 minutes. Slowly whisk in milk, making sure there are no lumps. Add pumpkin puree and mix well. Remove from heat. Add cheeses, salt, nutmeg and black pepper. 4. When cheese is melted combine with drained noodles. Pour into baking pan. Bake uncovered 25 to 30 minutes or until golden and bubbly. Serves 8. Recipe by Jill Melton. Per serving: 411 calories, 19g fat, 59mg chol., 21g prot., 38g carbs., 2g “ ber, 302mg sodium. For more Relish recipes and to sign up for our newsletters, log on to relish.com. To download our new Relish digital editions and Relish Daily Dish phone app, go to relish.com/mobile RELISH THE AMERICAN TABLECanned pumpkin is an indispensable ingredientMARK BOUGHTON PHOTOGRAPHY By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 3, … The first meeting of a Senate select committee on the federal Affordable Care Act turned raucous Monday, with a group of speakers saying the state should not carry out the law … and jeering Senate Minority Leader Chris Smith after he defended the role of the federal government. Members of the group, including tea-partyŽ activists, said the law known as ObamacareŽ is an unconstitutional overreach by Washington. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld most of the law in June, which has led to state lawmakers considering whether to carry out portions such as an expansion of Medicaid eligibility and creation of a healthinsurance exchange. KrisAnne Hall, a North Florida lawyer who was a chief spokeswoman for the group, described the federal law as a trainwreck.Ž You have to stand now in defense of the constitution, in honor of your oath, she told members of the Senate Select Committee on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. But a short time later, Smith, a Fort Lauderdale Democrat, offered a different view of the federal governments role, saying, Its hard to sit here and be silent and listen to some of this. Smith said, for example, the federal government had to play a large role in the past on issues such as integrating schools. Also, he pointed to part of the U.S. Constitution that originally treated black people as less than white people for representation purposes. The federal government had to step in because our constitution is an imperfect document, Smith said, drawing boos from the health-law opponents. If it was perfect, you would not have amendments to it.Ž Committee Chairman Joe Negron, R-Stuart, tried to stem the booing. I would ask everyone, show courteousness and decorum, Negron said. Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, formed the select committee to make recommendations about issues confronting the state, as major pieces of the federal health law get ready to take effect in January 2014. Florida Republican leaders fought the law in the courts and politically for more than two years, but now are grappling with the realization that the Affordable Care Act likely will take full effect after the Supreme Court decision and President Obamas re-election in November. Negron said he is not sure when the committee will make recommendations and that Mondays meeting was largely about starting to gather information. He said his priorities include protecting individual choice in health-care matters, limiting regulations on businesses that are subject to the law and promoting competition and value as Floridians make decisions about buying coverage. One important piece of the law … increasing payments to primary-care physicians who treat Medicaid patients … appears likely to take effect Jan. 1. The federal government would pay the full cost of the increase in 2013 and 2014, though Florida would have to pick up part of the tab in later years if it decides to keep the increase in place. The health law requires the physician-payment increase, and Negron said lawmakers are looking at how the increase can take effect Jan. 1 without the Legislature having to act on it. The increase would reimburse physicians at rates paid in the Medicare program, which are higher than the rates paid by Florida Medicaid. But the more-contentious issues center on whether to expand Medicaid eligibility to include more Floridians and whether to set up a state health-insurance exchange, a type of online marketplace that federal of“ cials see as an important part of trying to help people get coverage. If Florida does not set up an exchange, the Obama administration will do it for the state --though Florida also could enter into a partnership with the federal government. Another issue facing lawmakers is whether the state will offer health coverage to employees who work in what are considered temporary positions. Some workers stay in the jobs … known as other personal servicesŽ jobs … for long periods of time. Under the law, the state could be forced to pay “ nancial penalties if it doesnt offer coverage to them. Members of the committee listened to the staff presentations on such issues Monday and gave little indication about how they want to move forward. But Sen. Eleanor Sobel, D-Hollywood, said Florida has one of the highest rates of uninsured people in the country, which she said needs to be reckoned with.Ž We have to abide by the law and do whats best for the people of Florida in terms of their health care, Sobel said.Federal health law touches off brouhaha 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS At HealthSouth, we understand that recovering from a stroke can be challenging. But no matter where a patient is in his/her recovery process, or how long ago the stroke occurred, our Second Chance Stroke Program could help maximize functional ability, increase independence and improve quality of life. This includes areas of mobility, speech or written communication, swallowing, cognitive functions and activities of daily living. Our program oers: € Physical/occupational/speech therapy € Certi“ed rehabilitation nurses € Therapist trained in neuro developmental treatment € Patient/family education € Support groups Admission is by referral for a free in-home evaluation. For more information contact us. YOU DESERVE A SECOND CHANCE 2012:HealthSouth Corporation:551344



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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 47th Issue Thursday, December 6, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 5A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Outdoors ........................................................................Page 9A Taking Care of Business.....................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 5B Holiday Guide ..................................................................Page 6B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11BINDEX OBITUARIES Marquis Lamor Hutchison Frederick Allen Hyatt Sr. Linward W. Kennedy Johnnie Bill Donnie Roberts Delous Del SparkmanChristmas in PanaceaPhotos, Page 2A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn keeping with one of his campaign promises, newly elected County Commissioner Howard Kessler brought forward the idea of eliminating the Public Service Tax (PST) at the rst regular meeting of the county commission. Kessler proposed the idea as a discussion item and informed the other commissioners at the Dec. 3 meeting that he would be presenting it as an agenda item in the future. After some discussion from each commissioner, it became apparent that Kessler had little support for the repeal. Chairman Randy Merritt asked Kessler if he had a plan to replace the revenues if the tax of 7-percent on the purchase of electricity, metered or bottle gas, fuel oils and water, was eliminated. How would the county make up the nearly $1 million the tax generates, he asked. Kessler said he had a few ideas of areas where he would cut, but said it was more about slowing down or eliminating the accumulation of reserves. The taxes that were implemented or increased in 2011 are too much for the citizens, he said. Merritt pointed out that the average bill from Talquin Electric is $150 and with the 500-kilowatt exemption in place, the tax equates to a $7 increase, which was not substantial, he said. He felt the PST was one of the fairest taxes. The more you use, the more you pay, he said. He added that he would rather the commission look at reducing the millage rate. Continued on Page 3ACommission has discussion on Public Service TaxWakulla student dies By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Health Department con rmed a death related to the in uenza virus on Thursday, Nov. 29. We are deeply saddened as a community to hear of this tragedy, and send our sincerest condolences, said health department Administrator Padraic Juarez. The Wakulla County Health Department along with our neighboring health partners are committed to helping our community learn more about the u virus and its potential impact on a persons overall health. Juarez is not able to release the name or any speci c information related to the death, but did say it was caused by complications from the flu. Very few people die from the u, he said. Your immunity is so low it allows other diseases to come in, Juarez said. The u is preventable, he said. The important message out of this is to get the u shot. The health department held a u shot clinic last week, as well as one at the high school on Monday. They will hold clinics at Wakulla Middle School and Riversprings Middle School on Thursday and Friday. Next week the clinics will be offered at the elementary schools. All students and staff can receive a shot at the schools. There is no cost to students. The health department also holds a u shot clinic at their of ce every Wednesday from 2 to 4 p.m. There is no cost for adults who are on Medicaid or have a CHP plan card. Otherwise, the cost is $25. There is a big push right now for people to get a u shot because of the death, but also because holiday season is fast approaching which means a lot of close interaction with people, Juarez said. It takes about two weeks for a person to reach full immunity from the virus after getting the vaccine, he added. Each year, the vaccine covers three strains of the u, including the one that is going around in this area, he said. Juarez said people do not have to come to the health department to get the u shot. Other places also offer the vaccination. He simply stressed the importance of getting the shot. To avoid catching the u, the WCHD urges two prevention methods: getting a flu shot and being alert to spreading germs. The CDC offers the following tips: Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue away after use and wash your hands. If a tissue is not available, cover your mouth and nose with your sleeve, not your hand. Continued on Page 3AMarquis Hutchison, 15, succumbs to complications from the u on Monday, Nov. 26FILE PHOTOMarquis Hutchison in his JV football photo from this fall.1 death attributed to the flu; health department holds flu shot clinics By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA well-known and loved Wakulla High School freshman lost his life on Nov. 26. Marquis Hutchison, 15, passed away on Monday night at Shands Hospital in Gainesville after being LifeFlighted there from Tallahassse Memorial Hospital. Hutchison had the flu and then developed pneumonia in both of his lungs that eventually led to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, which is what caused his death, according to his mother, Felicia Thurman. Hutchison went to the high school football game on Friday, Nov. 23 and was ne, but started to get sick on Saturday. He went to school on Monday, Nov. 26 and wasnt feeling well so he was sent to the clinic. His mother was then called and he was taken to TMH and eventually to Shands. He died later that night. He is one of a kind and will truly be missed, said Thurman. That smile he always had, his jokes, his dancing. Its just going to be hard to forget him. Those who came in contact with Hutchison all describe him the same way, that he was always smiling, a happy kid. I did not know him personally, but I know he was well known and well loved by lots of people, Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce said. Im sad I didnt get to know him. Wakulla High School Principal Michael Crouch said its been a tough week at the high school, but the students, faculty and staff have done a great job sticking together and supporting one another. Crouch did not know Hutchison well, but said every time he saw him in the hallways, Hutchison had a smile on his face. Crouch said he was told Hutchison wasnt a complainer and let things go on longer than they should have. Its a tragedy, absolutely, Crouch said. Were going to miss him. Hutchison had perfect attendance in middle school at Riversprings, as well as at the high school. He loved school and never wanted to miss it, Thurman said. Continued on Page 3A Padraic Juarez Riversprings will be held Thursday, Dec. 6 Wakulla Middle will be held on Friday, Dec. 7. Elementary schools will be held next week. There is a walk-in u shot clinic at the health department on Wednesdays from 2 to 4 p.m.School u shot clinics set300The number of u shots given at the health department on Friday, Nov. 30, and to students and teachers at Wakulla High School on Monday, Dec. 3By the numbers:Snowden: The tragic loss of a 15-year-old student, The Opinion Page, 4A.Fatal car crash on Surf Road near SopchoppySpecial to The NewsWakulla County EMS and Wakulla County Fire Rescue responded, along with Wakulla County Sheriff Of- ce, to a fatal traf c accident on Monday Dec. 3. The accident occurred near 42 Surf Road in the Sopchoppy area. First Responders and volunteer re ghters from Sopchoppy VFD arrived just moments after the crash. A deputy from WCSO was nearby and arrived within two minutes after the accident was reported. Apparently, the northbound station wagon ran off the west wide of the highway and struck a tree. No other vehicles were involved. Personnel from all agencies extricated the lone driver of the vehicle and transported him to Tallahassee Regional Hospital, where he later died. Florida Highway Patrol investigated the accident. Florida Highway Patrol troopers conducting an investigation into a car crash on Monday, Dec. 3.PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Howard Kessler

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsCanadian writers visited St. Marks last week for a guided Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalache tour at the historic Spanish fort. Wakulla historian Madeleine H. Carr and Johnathan Grandage from the Florida State Archives interpreted the state parks early Spanish history and continued their explanations on Joe Tilmans Wakulla Excursions boat tour, looking at the outside of the 17th century fort area. Their short visit was part of a quick St. Augustine/Tallahasse (St. Marks)/Pensacola research trip organized to prepare for next years Viva Florida 500 celebrations. The Conquistadors tour, which was introduced to Visit Florida and Visit Tallahassee staff last spring, is part of a schedule of tours each April during Wild About Wakulla Week. The tours can be booked online at palmettoexpeditions.com, a local company owned by certified green guide Cynthia Paulson. The writers will publish their articles through the following Canadian outlets: Dreamscapes Travel & Lifestyle Magazine, Toronto Star, Canadian Yachting/ Sail-World Cruising Canada, West of the City and Doctors Review.Canadians visit St. Marks 000BK83 Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926685 or 510Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH PHOTO BY CYNTHIA PAULSON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMadeleine Carr leads a group of Canadian travel writers around Fort St. Marks.Christmas in Panacea Panacea put on its holiday nery on Saturday, Dec. 1, in preparation for the Christmas season. There were parade oats from the boats on trailers and golf cart parade, plus Santa Claus was there, as well as three mysterious mermaids of merriment who passed out coloring books to the children. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENMore photos online at www.thewakullanews.net WILLIAM SNOWDENBig Bend Hospice held its annual Service of Remembrance at Hudson Park on Sunday, Dec. 2. The service, attended by a couple of dozen people, included a candlelighting ceremony and words of comfort and remembrance. Remembering

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A Commissioners Richard Harden, Jerry Moore and Ralph Thomas all agreed that they needed to continue to build up the reserves and would be more inclined to consider decreasing the millage rate before the PST. Harden said there are two misconceptions about this idea: that the commission can just eliminate the tax without having to make up for the budget shortfall it would create and that the amount of money people are paying for this tax is a large amount. For budget reasons, I think we need to leave this alone, Harden said. Thomas felt the best way to approach this idea was to look at all the taxes the county levies and examine them together. But priority No. 1 is making sure the county has an emergency fund, he said. Moore said the reason having a reserve fund is so important is when the county has to pay unexpected costs, such as making repairs to roads and bridges damaged by Tropical Storm Debby. Kessler didnt deny the fact that the county needs to have reserves, but felt people needed some relief. He added that this tax is a tax on things people need and the people on a xed income are suffering. Theres too many people hurting out there, Kessler said. County Administrator David Edwards said there are programs they could create to help these people. One possibility is setting aside a fund as the reserves continue to increase to help people in hardship cases Thomas wondered if the county might be able to offer an exemption like it does with the solid waste and re protection assessments. Edwards said offering the same type of program wouldnt be allowed because of the type of tax it is, but they could look at offering rebates. Following much discussion, Merritt told Kessler that it didnt seem he would get a second on a motion to eliminate the tax. Hopefully there will be a second, Kessler said. There is not a second commission meeting in December. The next meeting will be Jan. 7, 2013, at 5 p.m.Discussion on Public Service TaxContinued from Page 1A The memorial service for Hutchison was held at River of Life Church in Crawfordville at 11 a.m. Burial followed at Buckhorn cemetery in Sopchoppy. Crouch hoped the funeral would offer some type of closure for those who are mourning. The funeral was standing-room only, lled with teachers, school district staff, coaches, students and teammates from the football team, as well as Riversprings Middle School football players. Hutchison wore No. 18 on the JV football team and aspired to get a college scholarship in football out of high school. Those who knew him said he worked hard and was a good football player. He loved sports, said Thurman. Football was his favorite, following in his brothers footsteps. It meant so much to him, she said. He wanted to be just like Markell. Pearce said it isnt about the school, but a family who has suffered a loss. Now is the time to support his family, he said. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family, he said. Thurman said she tries to stay strong by remembering her sons favorite Bible verse: I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. As a result of his death, the Wakulla County Health Department recommended the school offer u shots to its students, Pearce said. There was a u shot clinic at the high school on Monday, Dec. 3 and will be clinics at each of the schools. Several clinics have also been held at the health department. Hutchison leaves behind his mother, father, Shedrick Garrett, and his siblings, Markell, Shedrick II, Dontavius, Mya, Mia, Mckenzie, Victoria and Lexus, as well as other family members and friends.Wakulla student dies of u complicationsContinued from Page 1A Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way. Flu vaccinations are also available by appointment at the health department, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For additional information or to schedule an appointment, call the health departments Immunization Program Of ce at (850) 926-0400.Flu shot clinicsStaff reportWith more than 210 families in Wakulla County asking for help through Operation Santa this holiday season, volunteers with the program are looking for some much needed assistance from the community. We have reached capacity, said Bruce Ashley, president of Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, the group behind the program. Operation Santa is in need of non-perishable food items, toiletries, household cleaning products and monetary donations. They are accepting donations until Thursday, Dec. 13, at the Community Center. They are also still in need of clothes for young boys and young men, Ashley said. The group is still receiving requests from families who need help, but Ashley said they are unable to promise anything at this point in the process because of the large amount of families they already have. Last year Operation Santa provided necessity items and Christmas wishes to 141 families. Donated items and monetary donations can be made at the community center, at the corner of Trice Lane and Shadeville Highway, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 926-3526.Donations needed by Operation SantaWeight limit reduced for bridgeSpecial to The NewsWakulla County was recently noti ed by the Florida Department of Transportation that three pilings at the Smith Creek Bridge have advanced decay and recommended the weight limit be reduced from 27 tons to 5 tons until repairs can be made. DOT performed an inspection of the bridge and called the county to notify them of the pilings. People are concerned, said Cleve Fleming, public works director. We need to address it at once. School buses are unable to cross the bridge and a van has to be sent to pick up the 20 to 25 children in the area who ride the bus, Fleming said. There is an alternate route through the forest for those vehicles that exceed the weight limit. The county is working with Baskerville Donovan to make the emergency repairs. Contractors should be identi ed next week and they are anticipating the bridge repairs will be completed by Jan. 6, 2013. PHOTO BY SUE DAMON/SPECIAL TO THE EWSSunset at Shell PointSue Damon snapped this beautiful photo of the sun setting behind a sherman pulling his seine nets. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCYThe Department of Homeland Securitys Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has issued a preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), and where applicable, Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report, reecting proposed ood hazard determinations within Wakulla County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. These ood hazard determinations may include the addition or modication of Base Flood Elevations, base ood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area boundaries or zone designations, or the regulatory oodway. Technical information or comments are solicited on the proposed ood hazard determinations shown on the preliminary FIRM and/or FIS report for Wakulla County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. The preliminary FIRM and FIS report can be viewed at http://portal.nwfwmdoodmaps.com. These ood hazard determinations are the basis for the oodplain management measures that your community is required to either adopt or show evidence of being already in effect in order to qualify or remain qualied for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. However, before these determinations are effective for oodplain management purposes, you will be provided an opportunity to appeal the proposed information. For information on the statutory 90-day period provided for appeals, as well as a complete listing of the communities affected and the locations where copies of the FIRM are available for review, please visit FEMAs website at www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fhm/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Information eXchange (FMIX) toll free at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-2627).NOVEMBER 29, 2012 DECEMBER 6, 2012Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations for Wakulla County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage? Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Health department confirms death from flu; holds flu shot clinics Memorial service for local teen will be Saturday Paramedic killed in motorcycle crash Sheriffs Report for Nov. 29, 2012 Okay, that wasnt funny Senior Center tries to reduce holiday anxiety for seniors Operation Santa A new superintendent: Bobby Pearce takes over the post from David Millerthewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.Editors Note: Reader Marj Law and Extension Director Les Harrison had an email exchange over Les column in last weeks paper, Laurel oaks are prone to infestations by gall wasps.Hi Les, You write an easy-read and informative column which is fun even though we learn something. Often an oxymoron of ideas. I read your article about gall wasps. My yard is full of gall. OK, now to follow up... How do we get rid of those ugly galls? Marj Law, gallus infortunatus in Wakulla County (marjlj@aol.com) Ms. Law, I cant offer you much hope for eliminating the local gall wasp. The linked publication, http://edis. ifas.u .edu/in664, suggest pruning and pesticide application. Another, http://edis.ifas. u .edu/mg325, states contact insecticides such as carbaryl (Sevin), and any pyrethroid insecticide may be effective against adults, but application of pesticides in a tall tree is a challenge. Management of these gall wasps is dif cult. Prune infested branches where possible. Systemic insecticides may prove somewhat useful. In several large infestations investigated in Florida, the common variables were extremely high densities of laurel oak growing on sandy soils that are deeply drained, strongly acidic, and with low fertility. In short, its just something we must live with to enjoy all the positive aspects of Wakulla County. And thanks for reading my column in The Wakulla News. Les (harrisog@u .edu)An exchange over gall wasps FWMA needs all the help it can get Moose Lodge will celebrate founders dayEditor, The News: Some of you who are reading this letter will have brought a distressed animal or bird to Florida Wild Mammal Association. You hopefully know that it will receive immediate compassionate and expert attention until it recovers and is returned to its natural habitat. You may not know that many of the really tiny animals and birds need feeding every 20 minutes during the day and have a couple of feeds during the night. Not all of them will survive but it will not be for lack of trying. FWMA does not give up on any critter easily! This kind of attention takes both time and money. As with humans, food and maintenance costs have soared while donors have given less as the poor economy has affected the majority of families locally and throughout Florida. The variety of wildlife is one of the things that keeps Wakulla beautiful and unique. FWMA is a needed part of that uniqueness. It urgently needs your support to continue its work. No amount is too small Chris Beatty makes a little go a very long way. She has never taken a penny in salary and it will stay that way. FWMA is a 501(c)3 organization and all donations are tax deductible. Please visit their website at www.wakullawildlife.org which will tell you more about them and also items other than money which would also be very much appreciated. Lastly, there is a donor tree also accessible on the website. Every donor has a leaf in their name added to it. Donors can also give in honor or memory of a loved one and their name will be there as well. If you choose to do this please include the name and address of who is recognised so that they or their family will receive a card of acknowledgement. FWMAs address is 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville FL 32327 or phone (850) 363-2351. Thank you and a very blessed Christmas to you all, Mary ODonnell Wilton Manors Editor, The News: Dec. 12 marks the 14th anniversary of the Wakulla Moose Lodge #2510. To thank the community for its continued support, the lodge is celebrating its Founders Day on Saturday, Dec. 15, with a Community Fun Day. The public is invited to join the festivities. There will be childrens activities such as a bounce house and face painting. The Ochlockonee Volunteer Fire Department will be on site to give re truck demonstrations. The Wakulla Sheriffs Of ce will provide child identi cation kits. A guest speaker will talk about safe internet surfing. The Southeastern Blood Bank will also have a mobile on site for blood donations. Adults making a donation will receive a free hot dog lunch. Children may eat for free. Santa will be making the rounds to hand out goodies. There will also be a large indoor yard sale. So as you can see, there is something for the entire family and this is a good opportunity to enjoy a great afternoon with your friends and neighbors. The Lodge is located at 44 Jer-Be-Lou Blvd. in Panacea. For questions, call 9842510. Wakulla Moose Lodge #2510 Panacea The family of the late Marquis Lamor Hutchison would like to express our sincere love and appreciation to each of you for your many acts of kindness out pouring love and many prayers. During the passing of our loved one your caring support and generosity helped make our burden easier to bear. Felicia Thurman and familyHutchisons family appreciates the caringThe death of Marquis Hutchison was terrible. The 15-year-old freshman at Wakulla High School died suddenly on Monday, Nov. 26, after being LifeFlighted from Tallahassee Memorial Hospital to Shands Hospital in Gainesville. Marquis died of complications from the u. He was at school Monday, not feeling well reportedly suffering a cough and fever and was sent to the school clinic. Several hours later, he passed. The Wakulla County Health Department and school of cials responded with a u shot clinic at the high school this past Monday, Dec. 3, to get students immunized against this in uenza. At the funeral for Marquis on Saturday, Dec. 1, River of Life Church was standing-room only, with people lined up all the way around the sanctuarys walls. In addition to family, the church was packed with high school students, friends of the young man, who came to pay their last respects. Marquis was a member of the Wakulla High School JV football team, which had its second undefeated season this year. Marquis was reportedly a good football player and it was his goal to earn a college scholarship for playing the sport. One uncle described Marquis as someone with great determination, who he directed through football drills and would never give up. Teammates from Wakulla and Riversprings Middle School wore their football jerseys to the funeral and it was heartbreaking to watch many of them suffering with a grief they seemed unable to express. At his funeral, besides his physical talents as a football player, Marquis was described as a happy kid, always smiling, and always ready to make others laugh. He sounded like a good kid, and what a sad thing to lose him so soon. Minister Derrick Nelson, who gave the eulogy, noted that no one has the promise of tomorrow. He stressed that point for the high school students in the audience whatever plans you have, whatever dream you pursue there is no guarantee for tomorrow. Nelson also admitted to being a War Eagle football fan who goes to the games and then quickly goes out to his car when its over to hear Wakulla Head Coach Scott Klees give his post-game interview on local radio station, WAVE 94. Nelson looked out over that sea of people and said, I dont know if Coach Klees is here, but how he wanted to talk about the coachs impact on the young men on his football team. (For the record, Klees was there.) Nelson said its evident in the rst thing the coach says on the post-game show, that win or lose he gives credit to God. I respect anybody with sincerely held beliefs who lives according to what they think is right. Klees is one of those people. Klees and his whole coaching staff are aware of their impact in shaping the young lives of the players on their team. At one of the last games of the season, a playoff game in which Wakulla came out and played without enthusiasm in the rst half but then soundly whipped their opponent in the second half. Those of us on the sidelines were wondering what the coaches had said at halftime to motivate the players. Some thought that Klees must have blistered the boys with an angry speech. I asked Klees later what he said. He said that basically he just told them to go out and play their best. Whatever happens, win or lose, do your best and dont pout if you lose. Just leave it to God, he told his his players. Minister Nelson implored the students to think not just of the future of playing football or getting a scholarship because you may not see that future. Its sad that he did not live to see to his future. And a terrible reminder to all of us to get a u shot.William Snowden is the editor of The Wakulla News.The tragic loss of a 15-year-old student at WHSREADERS WRITE: William Snowdeneditor@thewakullanews.net A photo of Marquis Hutchison from the program at his funeral. Ill never accept him as the real FSU coach until he runs a puntrooskie.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Page 5A Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Church Briefs Winter Music Festival at Harvest Fellowship Dec. 8A Winter Music Festival is set for Dec. 8 on the outdoor stage of Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. The concert will be held from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Harvest Fellowship Church and Thrift Store is sponsoring this event with the ongoing intent to make Wakulla County a great place to live. Financial donations will be accepted at the event. Interested vendors should call the Harvest Thrift Store at (850) 926-3535. Crawfordville UMC to offer alternative Christmas marketCrawfordville United Methodist Church will hold its third annual Alternative Christmas Market on Saturday, Dec. 8, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the church, located at 176 Ochlockonee Street. The Alternative Christmas Market provides an opportunity to step away from the busy shopping season and give some gifts that represent the true meaning of the Christmas season. Live music will set a festive mood as guests will learn about the local, national and international ministries represented and see a list of gifts available to support their missions. Shoppers may choose to honor a favorite teacher with a school kit with basic supplies for children who often go without or give a ock of chickens to provide eggs, meat, and hope to an entire village for the cook in the family. After selecting gifts for the people on their lists, shoppers make a donation in the amount of those gifts and receive a beautiful custom greeting card describing the gift and the charitable organization it supports to send to friends and family. More information is available on the churchs website at www.crawfordvilleumc.org/altchristmas. Online shopping will be also available beginning Saturday for those who cant make it to the market in person. Christ Church Anglican to offer soup and bread Christ Church Anglican is on a mission to ght hunger and feed hope in Wakulla County. Christ Church Anglican will host a Soup & Bread Kitchen from noon to 1 p.m. on Dec. 9 at the church. Their goal is to reach out to the hungry in the nearby community and provide a free warm meal. The homemade soup will be ladled into to-go cups and the bread wrapped so that people can pick it up and take it home to eat. 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER I will confess right up front to a certain degree of confusion. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage will corroborate this confession. So many things confuse me; I am not sure where to begin, and once I begin, where in the world will it stop? I have been married for over 41 years but I must confess, not to the same woman. Oh yes, it is the same woman with the same name but it is not the same woman I married 41 years ago. Where is that young woman I married? When first married, I thought I knew everything there was to know about women and wives in particular. I do not know if it is the ensuing years but I am rather confused about this whole matter of being married. I suppose that is the mystery of romance. If you ever gure it out it loses its charm. Romance without charm is just an old man and an old woman who have lived together for 41 years. That is just one area of confusion. I harbor no aspiration of unconfusing my level of confusion in that area. There are other areas I could work on that might be a little more productive in this regard. An area particularly that has me greatly confused is the Christmas season with all the Christmas decorations including the ominous Christmas tree. Oh, how I love that old Christmas tree and decorating it and celebrating the whole Christmas spirit. What has been confusing me for the last several years is this uncertainty about the season. Some people do not want to call it the Christmas season; rather they refer to it as the holiday season. What I want to know is, what holiday are we celebrating in December? I know the holiday we celebrate in November, and the other holidays sprinkled throughout the year. In July, for example, nobody calls it a holiday parade. It is the Fourth of July parade, for Petes sake! In February, nobody calls it a holiday banquet. It is a Valentines banquet. Just so everybody knows, nobody will catch me singing a holiday carol. I suppose with all the holidays in this country throughout the year it would be simpler just to call everything a holiday. That would simplify things and help those who cannot keep up with the calendar. I am all for that. It seems the only squabbling that goes on is during the month of December. Actually, the squabbling begins before our turkey dinner has finished digesting. Maybe some people get too much turkey in their system and it clouds their thinking. What I do not get is the level of anger directed in this direction. It would seem that the Christmas season offers a huge threat to our society. We cannot call our Christmas tree a Christmas tree; it has to be called a holiday tree. Everybody knows the word Christmas tree is some kind of code inviting disaster on our society. I have never heard anybody define or describe what that disaster would look like. What amazes me is simply that this is a huge issue in some peoples minds. Nothing is more dangerous to society than this. The word Christmas carries with it more danger to our society than the ominous nancial cliff we are facing, the threat of terrorism in our own country and Lindsay Lohan at 4 a.m. What is more confusing to me is that these people who are trying to protect our society from anything religious wants to substitute the word Christmas for the word holiday. It just shows the level of education in our country has not kept up with the times. I know it has been a long time since I have been in school, but I do know that certain words have certain de nitions. Do the people who object to anything religious understand that the word holiday comes from the phrase holy day? I am not a PhD but I do know that the phrase holy day has religious roots. So, I am really confused along this line. On the one hand, we are not to use the word Christmas because of its religious connotations. At the same time, we are supposed to use the word holiday which in every dictionary in the land means holy day. Christmas is a holy day but we are not allowed to think of it as a holy day just use the term holiday. Now I am really confused. Is it a holiday or a holy day? Is it sacred or is it secular? What holiday does a holiday tree really celebrate? I like what the apostle Paul wrote, Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holyday, or of the new moon, or of the Sabbath days (Colossians 2:16 KJV). I will not allow any mans objections affect my celebration of the Christmas season. To quote from a great secular classic, God bless us, everyone.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. OUT TO PASTORWhat holiday does a holiday tree celebrate?Reba Mason, director of Wakulla Community Chorus, conducts the group in a nal rehearsal for the 12th performance of Handels Messiah. The concert is free and will be held at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church on Sunday, Dec. 9, at 3 p.m. Everyone is invited to attend. religious views and events ChurchPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPerforming Messiah

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Delous (Del) Sparkman, 85, of Crawfordville, passed away Sunday, Dec. 2, 2012, in Tallahassee. He was born Aug. 12, 1927, in Medart to Thomas A. and Mary Colvin Sparkman. He graduated from Sopchoppy High School in 1944. He was a 26 year veteran of the U.S. Navy. He served in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. He enlisted as an E-1 and retired at the rank of 0-4, Lt. Commander. He was also a deep sea diver for the U.S. Navy. He worked as superintendent of utilities at Florida State University; as lead preventive maintenance inspector for the Florida Bureau of Maintenance; as maintenance superintendent for Reynold Electrical Engineering Company, at the nuclear test site in Nevada; as manager of the Engineering Division for EG&G Inc. at NASA; and as Chief Mechanical Inspector for the City of Tallahassee; along with being a private inspector of mobile homes being moved. Survivors include his wife of 65 years, Clara Raker Sparkman; son, Donnie R. Sparkman (Rita); grandsons, Tully Sparkman (Paula), Colby Sparkman (Megan) and Troy Sparkman (Lindsay); a granddaughter, Kim Sanders (Andrew); five great-grandchildren; Hayden, Jackson, Walker, Brigham and Reese; and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his son, Dwane Sparkman. The family received friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville. The funeral service was held on Wednesday Dec. 5, 2012, at 10 a.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville with interment at the Duggar Cemetery following the funeral services. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd Tallahassee FL 32308 or Wakulla Shrine Club, P.O. Box 994 Crawfordville FL 32326. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfh. com) Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comObituaries Marquis Lamor Hutchison Frederick Allen Hyatt Sr. Linward W. Kennedy Johnnie Bill Donnie Roberts Delous Del SparkmanFrederick Allen Hyatt Sr., 58, died on Dec. 1, 2012, at Big Bend Hospice in Tallahassee, following an illness. He is survived by his wife of 36 years, AareyLee Hyatt. He was born in Chipley on Jan. 20, 1954, to Opal and Ted Hyatt. He was raised in Panama City and had resided in Crawfordville for the last 37 years. For many years he was a master plumber and owner of Hyatt Plumbing. He had a passion for shing, hunting, grilling and spending time with his family and friends. There will be a viewing on Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Woodville Baptist Church in Woodville. Graveside services will be Friday, Dec. 7, 2012, at Piney Grove Cemetery in Chipley at noon central time/1 p.m. Eastern time. Besides his wife, other survivors include two sons, Fred and Trey Hyatt; two daughters, Nikki and Ashley Hyatt; granddaughter, Haley Hyatt; a brother, Terry Hyatt; and two sisters, Anita Dixon and Betty Sue Allen. He was predeceased by brother, Ted Hyatt Jr.Frederick Allen Hyatt Sr. Lt. Cmdr. (Ret) Delous Richard SparkmanLinward W. Kennedy, 74, of Crawfordville, passed away on Friday, Nov. 30, 2012, in Tallahassee. He was born in Meigs, Ga., and was a resident of Crawfordville for 21 years. He was a member of the VFW, a wonderful father, grandfather and husband. He loved to sh. He was a carpenter and a veteran of the U.S. Army. Services were held Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012, at 11 a.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-9263333 or www.bevisfh.com). Survivors include two sons, Lamar Kennedy and Scotty Kennedy; two daughters, Bonnie Edwards and Patricia Kennedy; a brother, Keith Kennedy; one sister, Monteen Kennedy; nine grandchildren; six great-grandchildren, and many loving family and friends. He was predeceased by his wife, Elyse Kennedy; a brother, Lamar Kennedy; and a sister, Linda Parker. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey Young Chapel was in charge of arrangements. Johnnie Bill Donald Roberts, 85, passed away on Sunday, Dec. 2, 2012, in Tallahassee. He is survived by his wife of 32 years, Christine Roberts, of Sopchoppy. He was born in Sanborn. He served in the U.S. Navy and served aboard the USS Begor APD-127 in World War II. He worked for Dow Chemical in Lake Jackson, Texas. He was a retired plumber at Brazoria County School System in Texas. He enjoyed going to Friendship Baptist Church in Medart. Visitation will be Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church in Sopchoppy from 10:30 a.m. to noon. Services will be held on Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012 at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church in Sopchoppy at noon with burial at West Sopchoppy Cemetery in Sopchoppy. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Sopchoppy High School Restoration Fund, P.O. Box 43, Sopchoppy FL 32358. Besides his wife, other survivors include his sons, John Roberts (Mitzi) of Crawfordville, Stewart Roberts of Brennam, Texas, and Gene Roberts (Shay) of Angleton, Texas; two brothers, Randolph Roberts (Frances) and Eddie Earl Roberts (Ernestine); sisters, Laveda Raker (Silas), Elizabeth Smith (Wesley), Callie Quigg (Fred) and June Seymour; his granddaughters, Erin and Michelle Roberts of Tallahassee; and grandson, Shawn Roberts of Brennam, Texas. He was predeceased by his parents, John and Delma Raker Roberts; granddaughters, Brittani and Brandi Roberts of Angleton, Texas; and his brothers, M.L. Roberts of Texas and Bud Roberts of Sopchoppy. Marquis Lamor Quiseter Hutchison, 15, a ninth grade student at Wakulla High School died on Monday, Nov. 26, 2012, in Gainesville. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1, at River of Life Church in Crawfordville. Burial followed at Buckhorn cemetery in Sopchoppy. Survivors include his mother, Felicia Thurman (Colby); his father, Shedrick Garrett (Pamela); three brothers, Markell (Megan), Shedrick II, and Dontavius; ve sisters, Mya, Mia, Mckenzie, Victoria, Lexus; his grandparents, Deborah McRoy (Willie), Jessie Ransom (Rhonda), Rita Hutchison, Jane Kearse, Donald Wicker (Joyce), Chrissy Daniels (Lou); great-grandparents, Josephine Allen, Blonzie Carter; and a host of other relatives and friends. He was predeceased by a sister, Tekeya; and grandfather, Leroy Allen. Richardson Funeral Home in Tallahassee was in charge of the arrangements.Marquis Lamor Hutchison Linward W. Kennedy Johnnie Bill Donnie RobertsBy LILLIAN BROWNChristian CoalitionThe Wakulla County Christian Coalition is accepting applications for its annual African American Heritage Parade in February. To the community, even though we face difficulties of tomorrow and the days that will follow, we all should have a dream. It shall be a dream deeply rooted in the American Dream. We all may dream one day this great nation will come together as one and rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed. The African American Heritage Parade will take place on Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013, at 11 a.m. at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. The registration for the parade is free. Request parade and vendor forms by emailing black00eye@aol.com or fax (850) 926-1820. The deadline is Dec. 31, 2012. Wakulla County Christian Coalition scholarship programs have made it possible to change the lives of many students that come from lower-income families, students that are single parents trying to achieve their educational goal, re-entry adults and many more that couldnt take this important step in life without your help. Without scholarship donation and educational sponsorship many students cant afford the good education that could provide them with a better, brighter future they deserve. This is why our organization created programs that reach out to the general public asking them for a monetary contribution that is later awarded as grants and scholarships for college for deserving students. Many students would not be able to attend college and achieve the lifeenhancing goal of receiving a higher education without your support. Please help maintain scholarships, and keep the scholarship spirit alive and strong. To make a donation or place an ad in the program book contact Lillian Brown (850) 926-8333 for cost of ads. Deadline to place ad is Jan. 15, 2013. We invite marching bands, entertainers, dignitaries, civic groups, nonprofit groups, corporate groups. There will be entertainment and fun for the whole family. This day is marked with a look backward in respect for our ancestors who struggled so that we could be here today. This is a day to re ect on culture, heritage, history and accomplishments of black Americans in the United States and across the world. Please Recycle Applications being accepted for African American Heritage Parade FILE PHOTOA oat in last years Black History Parade.Special to The NewsAngella Lee, vice-president of a local non-pro t youth outreach organization called Destinys Legacy Inc, announced the group is holding its second annual If You Believe Campaign Christmas Charity Concert, The event will be held at the Lake Ella American Legion Hall on Sunday, Dec. 9, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. to enjoy great music, dancing, poetry and food. This event is intended to be a source of empowerment and an avenue of resources and help to those in need within the Big Bend and surrounding areas. Anyone who is interested in being considered as a recipient of this years Holiday Help Program through Destinys Legacy should send an email to destinyslegacyinc@gmail. com. The email should contain the following information: name, address, phone number or other contact method, number of people in household (including the number of adults, number of dependents), amount of total monthly income in home (specify if no income is available) and specify in detail why there is a need for assistance.Destinys Legacy to hold event at Lake Ella Funeral Home, Inc. 551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Dignied Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Open 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. -----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org Promise Land THRIFT STORE y 926-3281 Help Big Bend Hospice Honor Those Who Are No Longer With Us Big Bend HospiceTree of Remembrance 2012 2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.orgVisit our Wakulla County Tree at Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial Bank in Crawfordville What do you give the person who has everything? Honor them with a gift for those who have little.Alternative Christmas MarketJoin us for the Third AnnualCRAWFORDVILLE UNITED METHODIST CHURCHSaturday, December 8, 2012 11am to 2pmCRAWFORDVILLE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 176 Ochlockonee Street (850) 926-7209Celebrate the true meaning of the season. Give gifts that make a difference in our community and our world. SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY NIGHT SERVICES6:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study3086 Crawfordville Highway (One block south of Courthouse)850-926-7896www.crawfordvillefbc.com GET TO A BETTER STATE. CALL ME TODAY.1103208 12/11Get a Free Discount Double Check. I can help you save like a champion, with discounts that could add up to XX%* and be worth hundreds of dollars. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, State Farm Indemnity Company, Bloomington, IL *Discounts may vary by state. Aaron Rodgers got his. How about you? 40% *Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Page 7Ahappenings in our community Community Mr. and Mrs. Brent Thurmond, of Crawfordville, announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Meagan Elizabeth Thurmond, to Travis Michael Cronan. Cronan is the son of Michael Cronan and Tami Cronan, both of Crawfordville. He is the grandson of Evelyn Cronan and the late Earl Cronan and Sandra Pettis. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Thurmond the late Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm McCoy. Cronan is currently in school studying to go into the ministry. Thurmond is an elementary teacher in Wakulla County and a graduate of Florida State University. Both are graduates of Wakulla High School. A wedding is planned for Dec. 22 at Wakulla Springs Baptist Church. The couple will reside in Crawfordville.Cronan to wed urmond Meagan E. Thurmond and Travis M. CronanMartin will marry Petrandis Lila C. Petrandis and William T. Martin Lila Claire Petrandis and William Thomas Martin, both of Forest Hills, N.Y., announce their upcoming wedding. She is the daughter of Angelo and Arline Petrandis of Panacea. He is the son of William and Merri Chris Martin. She obtained an Associate of Arts degree from Tallahassee Community College and is an American College of Sports Medicine Certi ed Personal Trainer. She is a personal trainer and facility manager for Focus Integrated Fitness in Manhattan. He obtained his Computer Science and Mathematics degree from University of West Florida and is a support engineer with PubMatic in Manhattan The wedding will be held in Playa Hermosa, Costa Rica, on Dec. 12 at 4:15 p.m. Lions make donation to help those in need The Crawfordville Lions Club recently made a contribution to the Meals on Wheels program at the Senior Center, as well as two local food pantries. Pat Calhoun, of Crawfordville First Baptist Church, Ginger and Lemuel Cooksey of Crawfordville United Methodist Church and R.H. Carter and Pat Phillips of the Senior Center, accept the donation from President of the Crawfordville Lions Club Marc Dickieson. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Reed named as national chaplain for Fleet ReserveSpecial to The NewsEarnest Reed Sr. of Crawfordville, was recently named National Chaplain for the Fleet Reserve Association (FRA) at the organizations 85th National Convention in Reno, Nev. Appointed by FRAs National President Mark Kilgore, Reed will offer spiritual support and guidance to the Associations National Board of Directors (NBOD) and other members. A non-voting member of the NBOD, the National Chaplain assists shipmates who have spiritual needs and sends letters of condolence on behalf of the membership to families who have lost shipmates. He also opens and closes conventions and NBOD meetings with requests for Gods oversight in conducting the Associations business. Reed joined the FRA in 1990 and is currently the president of FRA Branch 34 in Tallahassee, where he recently served as branch vice president. He served eight years of active duty in the U.S. Navy and 21 years in the U.S. Navy Reserve, retiring in 2010 as a Senior Chief Fire Controlman. His military service was followed by six years as an automotive service manager for J.C. Penney and 28 years with the City of Tallahassee Electric Department (Purdom Plant). He currently serves on the Elder Board and is the Sunday School Superintendent and General Coordinator for World Wide Christian Ministry, Inc. Being National Chaplain gives me a great opportunity to not only help my fellow shipmates, but also spread the word about the FRA, said Reed, who embraces his duties as the Associations national chaplain. Be shepherds of Gods ock that is under your care, watching over them, he quotes from the Bible (1 Peter 5:2). Im eager to serve. FRA is a congressionally chartered, non-pro t organization representing the interests of current and former enlisted personnel of the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. As the collective voice for all Sea Service personnel since 1924, FRA speaks on behalf of its members on Capitol Hill. There is no law protecting military benefits, so FRA is here to stand guard. In addition to its advocacy work on Capitol Hill, FRA also sponsors a national Americanism Essay Contest and assists its members with disaster relief grants. To learn more about FRA, visit www.fra.org; follow us on Twitter at @FRAHQ; or Like us on Facebook at www.fra.org/fb. Porter attends Presidents Reception at Judson College Judson College student Alyssa Porter of Crawfordville recently attended the Presidents Reception for new students. She is the daughter of Jim and Teresa Porter. She is a graduate of Wakulla High School. Porter, at right, attends the reception for new students at Judson College. PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Special Christmas ShowSPONSORED BY: FAIRCLOTH INSURANCE AGENCY PURVIS BROTHERS BANDCall 962-3711 for Ticket Information Country SopchoppyOpry.com 000CV38 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolFood drive is held at Riversprings Riversprings Middle School Student Council and SWAT held a Canned Food Drive at school. It was very successful. Teachers and students alike contributed to the Food Bank of Wakulla County. Mr. Taylors home room collected the most and Mr. MacBrayers collected the second most canned and nonperishable goods. Thanks to all the students and faculty for their caring natures. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWHS talent show is this FridayBy SUSAN SOLBURGWHS Drama teacherIts that time of year when the weather turns cooler and the talented students at Wakulla High heat up for the annual WHS Winter Talent Show. This years show will be filled with fabulous vocal talent: Chelsea Austin, Devon Crockett, Connor Keith, Yese Reyes, Kyla Kerce, Hannah Lanier and Rami McIver will raise the roof with their beautiful voices. We also have wonderful musicians who are playing piano or guitar while singing: Vocalist Melissa Gentry with piano, Alyssa Schubert with guitar, Brett & Mitchell with guitars, vocalist Brianna Marin with piano, vocalist Sean Brannon with guitar and vocalist Ethan Spivey also playing the piano. Our amazing Michael Schnorr will blow your mind with his electrifying dance moves along with the Hamilton Sisters who will move you with their beautiful lyrical dance and also the talented mime expressions of David Moss. Something new this year, we have a voice impressionist, Cody Worrill and our own Italian exchange student Alberto Vichi performing monologues. There is a rock classic by new-comer Robbie Collins, and last but not least our Terrific Twirlers, Katie, Brooke & Mackenzie. Whew, what a night it will be! Hunter Wheatcraft and Emily Westmark will be the MCs for the show and the ever popular Santas Elves will also be part of the holiday fun. The show will be this Friday, Dec. 7 in the high school auditorium. Doors will open at 6 p.m. and elves will also be there to delight and entertain. The show will start at 7 p.m. The cost of tickets will be: students, $4; adults, $6; and senior citizens, $5. Proceeds help qualifying Drama Students from Thespian Troupe # 5036 go to their District Thespian Competition in January at the Northwest Florida State College in Niceville.Medart holds spelling beeSpecial to The NewsThe Medart Elementary School Spelling Bee took place on Wednesday, Nov. 28. Jennifer Anderson organized the event and Michelle Lawhon was the pronouncer. Fourth and fth grade teachers judged the competitions. Two competitions resulted in two winners from each grade level. Olivia Harris from Ms. Priscos fourth grade class claimed first place with the word sushi. Placing second in fourth grade was Hannah Ezell, also from Ms. Priscos class. Other fourth graders representing their homerooms included Caroline Barwick, Taylor Burdette, Adison Carraway, Drake Harrison, Sadie Hobby and Bailey Strickland. The fourth grade competition lasted 11 rounds. In fth grade, Phoenix Jalbert was the champion spelling campaign as the winning word. Phoenix is in Ms. Paffords homeroom class. Malaysia Thomas placed second. She represented Ms. Watsons class. Other fifth grade participants were Olivia Hutto, Jay Jacob, Kaitlyn Melton, Colton Nichols, Autumn Pearson, and Angel Powell. The fth grade competition lasted eight rounds. First and second place winners in each of the grade levels will represent Medart Elementary School in the District Spelling Bee hosted by Wakulla Middle School on Friday, Jan. 11, 2013. The District Spelling Bee will consist of students from all four elementary schools, the middle schools, COAST and home-schooled students grades four through eight. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe fourth graders who participated in the spelling bee with their teachers. The fth grade spelling bee participants with their teachers. TCC o ers new classes for Spring 2013Special to The NewsIn the spring of 2013, Tallahassee Community College is expanding its offerings to include a Water Quality Technician Certi cate and an Environmental Science Technology associate degree. The new programs represent the first phase of TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute, with the goal of preparing the next generation of environmental professionals. TCCs new certi cate and degree programs will qualify students to work in the areas of water quality, natural resource management and environmental monitoring with the local, state and national levels of government and private enterprises. There are online classes, as well as those offered in a classroom. TCC plans to implement additional Wakulla Environmental Institute programs in the coming semesters, including hospitality and tourism management, aquaculture management, parks and leisure technology, and agribusiness management. For more information, visit TCCWakullaEnvironmentalInstitute.com or call (850) 201-8499. School news: Email your news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space is available. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Flooring Carpentry Painting Tile Work FREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 Renance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Ofce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Ofce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Ofce: 850.926.1960 The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.comFor local For local news news and and photos photos visit us visit us online onlinewww.TheWakullaNews.com www.TheWakullaNews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Page 9Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBy PATTY WILBURSpecial to The NewsLeaves are falling, the air is crisp and people are heading home for the holidays. Likewise, cooler temperatures are bringing manatees back to their winter home at Wakulla Springs State Park. While we may see manatees here any day of the year, they are most numerous and reliably seen in the park from November through January. They come to Wakulla Springs seeking refuge from the cold in its relatively warm waters. As many manatees have distinctive scars that make them recognizable, its always interesting to see who shows up in the fall. Some manatees seem to stay in the general area year-round, while others only seem to visit when the weather cools. Several mothers have arrived with new calves born this summer. Those calves will probably return every winter, and may raise young of their own here some day. A handful of manatees in the region have been outfitted with satellite tags, which allow biologists to track their movements. One old male named Herman has spent the last two winters in the park and was tagged here last December. He left this area on the morning of Feb. 3 and arrived in the Crystal River area on the evening of Feb. 5. Herman continued on to the Homosassa River and eventually journeyed to Tampa Bay. He hadnt been documented there since the year 2000. He headed back north in early summer and hung around Apalachicola for a while. Weve been seeing him in the park fairly regularly since early September. What a traveler! A younger male named Gordo was also tagged here last December. He left the park in late January and surprisingly hung around Ochlockonee Bay for about a month before heading to Crystal River. In June his tag was recovered in the Crooked River. The buoys are designed to break free if they become entangled, so they do not endanger the manatees. Gordos whereabouts were a mystery until Halloween, when he was seen again at Wakulla Springs. Hes been here regularly since. As the belt and tether which connected the buoy to the base of his tail are still in place, it should be relatively easy for biologists to retag him soon. This will be the sixth winter that manatees have congregated at Wakulla Springs, and every year the number seen here has increased. Twelve spent the winter of 2007-08 at the park. Last winter we saw over 50. And from what weve been seeing lately, we may top even that number when the weather turns truly cold.Manatees are wintering at Wakulla Springs SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThis report represents some events the FWC handled over Nov. 16-29 in the Northwest region, but it does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. FRANKLIN COUNTY: While working the illegal night harvest of oysters near West Pass, Of cer John Allen spotted a shrimp vessel inside the three-mile line with what appeared to be three nets in the water. The inspection con rmed Officer Allens observations, and a misdemeanor citation was issued to the captain of the vessel for the violation. While on patrol, Of- cer Matt Gore spotted a vehicle driving through Eastpoint loaded with bags of oysters. Of cer Gore did not see any shade over the oysters and initiated a stop to speak with the harvesters about the violation. During the inspection, Of cer Gore was assisted by Officer Steven Cook. The inspection revealed not only were the oysters unshaded, but they were also untagged. The of cers seized approximately 40 bags of oysters and the two harvesters were issued misdemeanor citations for possession of unshaded oysters and untagged bags. While conducting sheries inspections on the St. George Island Fishing Pier, Of cer John Allen found an angler who stated that he had only one sh in his cooler. An inspection revealed that the angler was in possession of six spotted sea trout, all of which were undersized. The angler also failed to buy a saltwater shing license. The angler was issued a misdemeanor citation for possession of undersized spotted sea trout and warnings for being over the bag limit and possessing no saltwater shing license. Of cers Terry Martin, Matt Gore, and Tyler Akos were conducting decoy deer operations in the Tates Hell WMA during the opening four days of general gun season. One of the contacts made was with a hunter who had been cited by Of cer Martin during last years general gun season for taking antlerless deer. The hunter failed to appear for his court date on that charge and a warrant had been issued for his arrest. When asked by the of cers why he did not appear for his previous court date, he responded that he had forgotten about it. The man was placed under arrest and transported to the Franklin County Jail. While on patrol at Alligator Point, Of cer John Allen stopped to help some anglers who were returning from surf shing and had bogged down their vehicle in the sand. After helping the anglers free their vehicle from the sand, Of cer Allen asked if they had caught any sh during their outing. The anglers replied, Not really. An inspection of their cooler revealed a 37-inch red drum. The anglers stated that the sh had just been given to them by someone else. Of cer Allen stated he had not seen anyone else shing in the area or anyone leaving the area other than them. At that point, one of the anglers assumed responsibility for the sh. The angler was issued a misdemeanor citation for possession of oversized red drum and the sh was seized. While on patrol, Of- cer Matt Gore was traveling behind a truck pulling a boat and trailer. Officer Gore noticed the boat trailer had no brake lights and the tag expired in 2007. Without being directed by Of cer Gore, the truck suddenly pulled over onto the shoulder of the road. As Of- cer Gore pulled in behind the truck, he activated his blue lights and the male operator exited and began walking to the back of the truck. The operator was unsteady and displaying signs of impairment. Of cer Gore instructed the operator to stand at the back of the truck. At this time, a female passenger got behind the wheel and attempted to drive away, stalling the truck. As a result of Of cer Gores investigation, both the male and female operators were arrested for DUI, as well as driving while license suspended/revoked. A third passenger in the vehicle was arrested on a warrant for possession of undersized oysters. While conducting an inventory of the vehicle and vessel for towing, several open beer cans and an open bottle of whiskey were found. Two large monofilament gill nets were also located in the vessel. Of cer Percy Cook responded to assist. Later in the week, Of cer Matt Gore was off duty, duck hunting on Lake Wimico. Of cer Gore observed a group of hunters who appeared to be taking over the bag limit of ducks. Without revealing his identity, Of cer Gore engaged the hunters in idle conversation and determined that they had launched from the White City boat ramp. Of cer Gore contacted an investigator to conduct surveillance at the boat ramp while he returned to his home to go on duty. Of cer Gore was able to make it to the White City Boat ramp before the hunters returned. As a result of the efforts of Of cer Gore and the investigator, two notices to appear were issued for possession of migratory birds (ducks) without a head and wing attached and obligation to permit search. Twenty-six duck breasts were seized and placed into evidence. Two written warnings were issued for failure to properly tag migratory birds. GADSDEN COUNTY: Lt. Harry Parker issued a citation to a Gadsden County man for possession of over the limit of bream in the Little River area of Lake Talquin. The individual was in possession of 79 sh, 29 over the legal limit. Plain-clothes Of cer Chris Jones was on patrol on Little River, working inf ormation received about individuals catching undersized and over the bag limit of crappie. Officer Jones observed some individuals shing in the river and started a general conversation. During the exchange, he noticed sh that were separated. Some were in a bucket and some were behind the sherman in a plastic bag and some were thrown into the bushes. It appeared that the sherman was trying to conceal certain sh. Of cer Jones identi ed himself and conducted a resource check on the individuals. During the check, ve undersized crappie were located. The shermen were cited, and one was arrested on an outstanding warrant out of Gadsden County. Officer Chris Jones was dispatched to a trespass call. During his investigation, he located an unsupervised 13-year-old male hunting deer with a .22 magnum in a neighborhood. The juveniles grandfather (guardian) was contacted, who stated he thought his grandson was hunting squirrels in the backyard. Of cer Jones was able to determine that the young man had been hunting by himself for about three hours unsupervised in the neighborhood, and the grandfather did not know where his grandson was. After meeting with the State Attorney, Of- cer Jones was instructed to issue warrants for the grandfather. 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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Taking Care of Business Taking Care of BusinessBusiness News from Business News from New Chamber board, o cers set FROM THE PRESIDENTInn at Wildwood hosts Chamber luncheon By AMY GEIGERChamber PresidentDear Members: A special thanks goes out to all those who let their voices be heard in the general election on Nov. 6. Wakulla County reported an impressive 79.7 percent overall voter turnout. The Chamber of Commerce would like to congratulate and welcome the following local elected of cials: Charlie Creel Sheriff Donnie Sparkman Property Appraiser Bobby Pearce Superintendent of Schools Ralph Thomas County Commissioner District 1 Howard Kessler County Commissioner District 3 Richard Harden County Commissioner District 5 NEW CHAMBER OFFICERS AND BOARD MEMBERS Each year the Chamber of Commerce reaches out to its membership in search of individuals who are willing to be an active member in moving the Chamber forward. The following individuals have agreed to serve the businesses of Wakulla County: President Tammie Bar eld President Elect Kevin Vaughn Vice President Alan Wise Treasurer Dustin Grubbs Secretary Mary Wallace New Board Members: Bob Ballard Wakulla Environmental Institute TCC Herb Donaldson Palaver Tree Theater Dan Hinchee Crawfordville Auto & Tire Courtney Peacock Capital City Bank I would like to thank these individuals for serving on the board and giving their time, energy and talents to the business community Susan Brooks Shearer, Guy Revell, Richie Bruce and Ralph Thomas. We appreciate each of you and look forward to your continued support. SHOP LOCAL In 2009, under Paul Johnsons leadership, the Shop Local campaign was kicked off encouraging Wakulla County residents to patronize local merchants for their goods and services. As we all know our local businesses are the backbone of our community and now more than ever they need our support. In fact, Nov. 24 was designated as Shop Small Day and with the assistance of The Wakulla News we were able to assist in spreading the word to take part in helping our small businesses thrive by shopping or dining at one of our many establishments. I ask all Chamber members to consider the many opportunities available locally to give the gift of your new or continued business this holiday season. Keep more of your dollars where they impact our tax rate, support jobs and make our community stronger. Last but not least, the Chamber of Commerce is not a building or a person, but a collaboration of all members in the business community who choose to support a strong voice for the future of economic growth. This holiday season let us celebrate all the families, institutions, non-pro ts and businesses that bring us together for the greater good of our community. As always, thank you for allowing me the opportunity to serve as your Chamber President. Yours in service, Amy Geiger.Amy Geiger is president of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce.By PETRA SHUFFof the ChamberOur monthly networking luncheons came to a close for the year at Wildwood Country Club, serving buffet style rosemary chicken, mashed potatoes and gravy, veggies and salad, followed by an array of yummy desserts. We had a nice crowd of 56. The new manager, Jay (JR) Gayle was brought out of retirement after 10 years and now heads up both Summerbrooke and Wildwood. JR introduced his staff, Emily Winston, supervisor, and Jason Morgan, front desk manager of the hotel. As a special treat he also excited golf enthusiasts when he handed out VIP passes with special rates for both golf courses, and invited everyone to tour the Inn at Wildwood. Before our announcements Mary Wallace, our luncheon chair, was presented with a little personal gift to help get the crowds attention, a cowbell, which she promptly put to use. Mary announced seven new members for November: Wakulla County United Fire Fighters Association, Boomerang Restoration Service LLC, WTXL-TV, the Maine Tamers Beauty & Barber Salon, Smokin Vapor Wakulla, Front Porch Creations Florist and our new ladies boutique The Little Black Dress. As is customary at our luncheons, our new members get to introduce themselves and their business. Adam Roland with WTXL covers 19 counties in our surrounding area and the station plans on playing a larger part in our community. Adam has been getting to know our business community rather well through of their Our Town news coverage and commercial shoots, which will air during December. Charlene Poole with Smokin Vapor Wakulla opened its doors Monday, Dec. 3, selling smokeless tobacco products. Charlene married a Wakulla Countian and is eager to meet everyone in the county. Charlene and her husband, Shawn, are true believers in smokeless tobacco and with the help of their products have put cigarettes aside months ago, and would like to help any cigarette smoker quit the habit. Casey Spears, bookkeeper for Bennett Better Built Homes was able to attend her rst luncheon and invited everyone to either call Matt Bennett or visit their business to learn more about their manufactured or modular homes. This might be a great referral for realtors selling lots. Marianne Dazevedo, one of our local realtors volunteers for Alzheimers Project of Wakulla County which provides respite care, and shared the program for Alzheimers patients at Lake Ellen Baptist Church in Crawfordville to allow caregivers a weekly break. The program takes place every Monday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., entertains patients with games and other activities and also provides lunch. Recently, patients have been working on a patchwork quilt, which is being raf ed off Dec. 17. Tickets are $ 1 each or 6 tickets for $5 tickets and are available by calling Marianne 212-1415, Pat Ashley at 9845277, or Mary McMahan 510-1253. Ron Copeland with Oyster & Hitz 106 Radio Stations announced a special promo deal of 108 spots, 54 spots for each station for only $150. Shelley Swenson gave a heartfelt thanks to our Wakulla County Realtors for their generosity and donation of around $400 worth of food contributions which allowed some local families to prepare a nice Thanksgiving dinner. Shelley also shared brochures for the UF/IFAS upcoming cooking school and food preparation classes, and personal sessions for nancial assistance. Learn how to prepare healthy soups, seafood, or ve ingredient dinners. Preregistration is required. For more information give Shelley a call at 926-3931. Continued on Page 11A PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENChamber members and guests at the luncheon at the Inn at Wildwood.LUNCHEON: Chamber members and guests, above, socialize before a lunch of rosemary chicken; the new manager at Wildwood, Jay (JR) Gayle, left, welcomes the Chamber. 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com Become a volunteer with Floridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program. The Ombudsman Program is a statewide advocacy organiza on seeking to ensure the health, safety, welfare and rights of Floridas elders who reside in nursing homes, assisted living facili es and adult family care homes. Bene ts of volunteering with us include: Meet and interact with others who share a passion for volunteering, personal ful llment and growth. Give back to the community and seek to make a posi ve di erence in the lives of long-term care facility residents. Receive mileage reimbursement as well as support from state and local sta Apply today! To learn more call 1-888-831-0404 or visit ombudsman.m orida.com online. Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Page 11A Spotlight on Business Spotlight on BusinessBusiness News from Business News from Business: UPS Store #6044Owner: Harry BosmanTell us about your business (include unique facts and history): We are a locally owned and operated family business. We opened our business in 2008 after Harry retired from state government with 30 years of experience in mailing/shipping/printing. Jayne is our manager with 15 years of administrative experience and David is our assistant manager with four years of experience with the store. What services, products do you offer? Mailbox and postal services, shipping, packing, printing, notary, freight. What sets your business apart from the competition? Experience in the industry we understand small busniess because we are one. We charge UPS retail rates on shipping with no mark up. What should the communitycustomer expect when they visit your business? Excellent customer service. We will work with our customers to give them the best rates and meet their needs. How long have you been a Chamber member? Eight months. Why did you join the Chamber? To enhance network opportunitiesmeeting other small business owners face to face. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? Network luncheon and several events. We will continue to take part in the Chambers services. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? The majority of the jobs and money stay in the community. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Google 6044 or call (850) 576-3333 or email at store6044@ theupsstore.com. Other community involvement: Toys for Tots, literacy program, Jazz for Justice (North Florida Legal Services), Big Bend Postal Customer Council, Juvenile Diabetes, Woodville Volunteer Fire Department, Wounded Warriors. UPS store #6044 is located at 5032 Capital Circle SW Ste 2. The phone number is (850) 576-3333. Wakulla County United Fire Fighters Association P.O. Box 1327, Crawfordville. (850) 545-0398. Welcome, Ian Brazier. Boomerang Restoration Service LLC specializing in insurance restoration related to re, water, wind and storm damage. 3048 W. Tharpe St., Tallahassee FL 32303 (850) 597-9303. Welcome, Kelly Riser. WTXL-TV specializing in television advertising. 1620 Commerce Blvd, Midway FL 32343. (850) 893-3127. Welcome, Adam Roland. The Maine Tamers Beauty & Barber Salon specializing in multi cultural hair care. 1626 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville. (850) 926-3131. Welcome, Valencia Murray. Smokin Vapor Wakulla specializing in smokeless tobacco products. 1626 Crawfordville Hwy, Unit D, Crawfordville. (850) 556-5999. Welcome, Shawn and Charlene Poole. Front Porch Creations Florist specializing in owers and arrangements for all occasions. 2543 Crawfordville Hwy. Suite 4, Crawfordville. (850) 926-7192. Welcome, Loretta Bar eld. The Little Black Dress specializing in womens clothing and accessories. 1626D Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville. (850) 926-4222. Welcome, Tina Brimner. Front Porch Creations Florist on Wednesday, Dec. 12, at 11:30 a.m., 2543 Crawfordville Hwy Suite 4 Rose Alley Center. Smokin Vapor Wakulla on Friday, Dec. 14th, at 11:30 a.m., 1626-D Crawfordville Hwy North Pointe Center.Continued from Page 10APam Allbritton with Big Bend Hospice reminded and invited everyone to the Service of Remembrance Dec. 2, to honor and remember those lost. Louis Garcia, CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters was excited about the new Wakulla mentoring program gaining traction. Ellyn Scanlyn was recently hired as a second employee, and it will be her job to recruit mentors and take referrals for local youth in need of a mentor. Ellyn, a mentor herself, encouraged attendees to experience the gratifying feeling of making a lasting impression in a youths life. A commercial shoot to attract more mentors was scheduled immediately after the luncheon, followed by a check presentation to the local program later in the afternoon by Capital City Bank. Stone Grable with Vector Security reminded everyone to be mindful of the season. Break-ins have been on the rise due to Christmas gift in homes. Vector Security would be happy to consult on a system. Last and de nitely most pressing was a call for help for our Operation Santa program, shared by Charlean Lanier of Harvest Ministry. More than 200 families, which is more than 800 adults and children, have been recommended and vetted by case workers and organizations. Their wishes are very modest, ranging from clothing, toys and games to laundry detergent, toilet paper and personal hygiene items. Most needed is clothing for children through high school. You can help by adopting an individual or a family. On a happier note, Charlene announced that the Empty Bowl Project was a great success and raised $7,000 for local food pantries. Thank you Wakulla! Dalton Hall with Wakulla Realty won the $56 cash prize. It was Daltons rst time at one of our luncheons, and somehow newbies seem to be lucky winning the pot. There was a wonderful array of gift items, ranging from homemade jellies and scarves to gift certi cates, framed art and more, donated to our drawing and want to thank the following members for their contributions: Cook Insurance, Petra Shuff, The Little Black Dress, Lou Kellenberger Photography, Shell Point Realty, St. Marks Refuge Association, Marianne Dazevedo, Arte Mexico, Owl Caf and Tamaras in Apalachicola through Ron Copeland with Oyster Radio, Serendipity Salon, Susan Schatzman, Wildwood Resort, Vector Security, Catherine Cameron, Big Brothers Big Sisters, and The Wakulla News. Mary closed announcements by stating how happy she is about the success of our luncheons, an idea she brought forward and took on about a year and a half ago. She thanked our members for the great attendance over the months, and the willingness of our local restaurants to host our midday networking. She announced that the format is planned to change slightly next year, and will give the opportunity to spotlight a business.Inn at Wildwood hosts Chamber luncheonChamber ChatterNew members Upcoming Ribbon cuttings: From WORKFORCE PLUSVictoria Ilievia has never let anything get in her way of accomplishing her goals. Originally from Bulgaria, Ilievia had always felt like employers looked at her differently because English was not her rst language. But Ilievia never let that stop her. Ilieva studied Design and History of Art in Bulgaria before moving to Toronto. In Toronto she learned English in less than a year, determined to not let any barriers get in her way. Once in the United States she began doing graphic design work until the company she was working with went bankrupt in 2011. I had already been through so much, said Ilievia. There was no way I was going to let this setback stop me now. Ilevia knew she wasnt going to let this bring her down and she began visiting the Workforce Plus Wakulla of ce. At Workforce Plus she received helped in critiquing and updating her resume and tips on how to search for jobs. Because of her professional experience, Ilieva was referred to the Executive Center in Tallahassee where she continued to learn how to improve her job search through Employ Florida workshops. The Executive Center is a specialized program offered by Workforce Plus that provides free employment services to business and professional candidates in Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla counties. Everyone there was always so helpful, said Ilievia. They were always making sure I was doing okay and staying positive about my situation. In August, Ilievia was contacted by an employer and decided to come back to Workforce Plus for assistance. With the help of a Workforce Plus employee Ron Knutson, Ilievia received a con dence boost and push to revamp her resume and give the interview a shot. Ron really pushed me to go out there and just try, said Ilevia. He was so encouraging and told me to never stop being determined. On Sept. 24, Ilieva started her new job with Superior Uniform Group in Seminole as a Catalog Coordinator. Nothing can stop you if you put your mind to it, said Ilievia. Eighty percent of my job now is communications and I am from a different country with a different rst language. Never stop trying and you will get there. For more information on Workforce Plus programs such as the Executive Center please visit our website at www.w pus.org. Workforce Plus is proud to bring you a series of stories straight from the heart and hearts of our community. In partnership with The Wakulla News, well showcase one of our own every six weeks whose journey in their career will serve to inspire, uplift and encourage. This is timely and needed because as we all know, the recent economic downturn has spared no one. From teachers to truck drivers and managers to maintenance workers, weve all felt the weight of the struggling economy. But no matter the challenge, we always strive for excellence. Thats why were bringing you the Real People, Real Stories series as a welcome reminder of that drive to overcome and succeed that is within us all. After all, these are real people, and real stories.REAL STORIES, REAL PEOPLEVictoria Ilievia doesnt let anything stop her from reaching her goals By JASON ALDERMANLike many other economic measures, charitable donations in the U.S. have yet to bounce back to pre-recession levels. According to Giving USAs Annual Report on Philanthropy, charitable contributions totaled $298.4 billion in 2011 up 4 percent from 2010, but still 11 percent below 2007 levels. The vast majority of those contributions (73 percent) came from individuals, demonstrating that even during tough economic times, people still nd ways to support organizations that help those less fortunate than themselves. Because half of all donations typically are made between Thanksgiving and New Years, this is a good time to highlight precautions you can take to ensure your gift has the biggest possible impact, both on the people you want to help and on your own bottom line; also to remind seniors about a tax policy that has changed since last year: Contribution eligibility. If you itemize expenses on your 2012 income taxes, any charitable contributions you plan to deduct must be made by years end. That means either charging your credit or debit card or postmarking a check by midnight on December 31, 2012. You must have a receipt to claim deductions for cash or property, no matter how small. A cancelled check or credit card statement is ne for contributions under $250, but amounts over $250 require a written statement from the charity. See IRS Publication 526 for details (www.irs.gov). Confirm tax-exempt status. For your contribution to be deductible, the organization must be recognized as tax-exempt by the IRS. Its important to note that in recent years the IRS has revoked the tax-exempt status of scores of nonpro t organizations because they didnt le annual reports for three consecutive years, as required by law. Use the IRS Exempt Organizations Select Check tool to ensure an organizations eligibility. Get bang for your buck. Make sure any nonpro t to which you donate is well-run. Ideally the organization applies at least 75 percent of contributions to programs that serve its bene ciaries, versus spending on salaries, advertising, fund-raising and other administrative expenses. No more direct IRA distributions. A major tax break for senior citizens regarding charitable contributions expired at the end of 2011. Formerly, people over age 70 could contribute up to $100,000 from their IRAs directly to charity and have it count toward their annual IRA Required Minimum Distribution. This allowed seniors to avoid having to count the funds as adjusted gross income, thereby reaping a tax advantage even if they didnt itemize deductions. And nally, if you cant afford a cash donation but still want to help, consider donating your time. Numerous organizations can match you up with local charities that suit your interests, including the governments United We Serve site (www.serve.gov), Network for Good (www. networkforgood.org), and Volunteer Match (www. volunteermatch.org).Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs.Tis the season for donating money PRACTICAL MONEY SKILLS Eighty percent of my job now is communications and I am from a di erent country with a di erent rst language. Never stop trying and you will get there, says Ilievia.

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comFor many, it is hard to believe that 2012 is coming to a close in just a few short weeks. As members of Flotilla 12 prepare for the end of one year and the beginning of another, we often re ect back on the previous year and set goals for the coming season. This year, members gathered for our annual holiday party on Dec. 1. While extenuating circumstances kept many away, those who attended had a great time. It is rare that we all come together to relax and enjoy each others company without having a meeting or training to attend. We use this time of year to not only take time for ourselves, but to also thank and celebrate our spouses, children and other signi cant people in our lives who support us in our efforts. Despite the celebrating, we still have a month left until the end of the year. Members of Flotilla 12 are organizing a nal aids to navigation patrol where we will ensure that the buoys are al where they should be and are all in working order. This involves checking all the buoys during daylight for a visual inspection as well as waiting for the lights to come on at dusk. A lighted marker is critical in navigating the channel as it indicates a turn. For our area, this is extremely important as there are areas that typically are submerged that due to the low tides this time of year become exposed. Tides become lower and areas that may have been safe to cross are led with sand bars and oyster beds. Safe navigation is not only something that the Auxiliary promotes, but also the Coast Guard. Earlier this week, four Coast Guardsmen held a navigation class for several auxiliarists. This was a requirement for the Guardsmen who are currently students at Florida State University and are required to participate in course development as part of their studies. Those in attendance were able to provide feedback that will affect the students course development in the future. Apparently you can teach auxiliarists new tricks! As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Be sure to familiarize yourself with the hazards before heading out, and have a current nautical chart with you! Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Water WaysRebreathers for everyone! Gregg and I have been on the road for the last two weeks, visiting other diving communities to network and nd out what is happening in the big world of diving. We do this, while not often enough, on a regular basis. It allows us to step out of the daily quest for detail, and see the bigger picture. The big story is that PADI, the Professional Association of Diving Instructors, the largest recreational training agency in the world, has embraced Rebreathers for everyone! As part of the journey, we met up with former students and potential collaborators, attended parties sponsored by equipment manufacturers and participated in platform upgrade training sessions. While entertaining, it was not quite the events we were accustomed to. The main drink served at socials was an inexpensive light beer, and girls in shorts and cowboy boots danced on the tables. The whole scene reminded us of the movie Coyote Ugly. Any organization or facility ends up attracting likeminded people. The clientele that Wakulla Diving Center usually attracts are people that seek advice and service, as well as collaboration and mentorship. An appropriate party setting for us would much more likely involve wine and live music. So there is, to our surprise, a clear demographic separation between divers. Rough and tough, death-cheating, go-getters are clearly part of the diving community. Strong egos become both a method of survival, as well as social classi cation. On the other hand there is the sophisticated enthusiast who ends up doing much more advanced dives by simply involving careful consideration and preparation. At the aforementioned party we encountered the former (to our surprise). In our daily operation we are involved with and prefer the later. This distinction between dive types will merge as the more technical diving equipment, such as rebreathers, become more integrated into the general diving community. Since diving is an act of natural selection, we expect to see what separates the wheat from the chaff. We hope to provide guidance to those who seek the adventure without the hype. UnderwaterWakullaBy Joerg Hess From FWC NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is hosting two webinars in December to gather public testimony and input on the potential creation of saltwater game sh and sport sh designations. The online meetings are from 6 to 8 p.m. Dec. 10 and 12. To participate in a webinar, visit http://fwc. adobeconnect.com/mfm/ at the start of each meeting. The designation issue will also be a topic of discussion at the Commissions Dec. 5 meeting in Apalachicola. Reasons for considering these changes include helping highlight and protect some of Floridas premier recreational sh and encouraging anglers to practice voluntary conservation practices such as catch-and-release. If adopted, these changes could lead to healthier sh populations and help Florida market its unique shing opportunities to residents and visitors. Suggested parameters for game fish include no commercial harvest, possession or sale; sh could be targeted only with hook and line; and captain and crew of forhire vessels such as charter boats would have a bag limit of zero and would not be allowed to take sh home for themselves. The sport sh designation would offer a higher level of protection than game sh by making selected species catch-andrelease only, including no recreational harvest as well as no commercial harvest, possession or sale. Sport sh could also be targeted by hook and line only. To learn more about the webinar, visit MyFWC. com/Fishing and click on Saltwater Fishing, Rulemaking and Workshops. For those without computers, voice-only access is available. For questions about webinar access, please contact Carly Canion at (850) 617-9627 or Carly. Canion@MyFWC.com. To learn more about the proposed changes, visit MyFWC.com/Commission, Commission Meetings and the Dec. 5-6 agenda.Game fish, sport fish webinars planned From FWC News The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission recently euthanized an adult black bear in the Wynn Haven Beach community of Mary Esther in Okaloosa County. Because the female bear had killed a pet and livestock, the FWC had to euthanize the animal. The female had raised two litters of cubs and been active in several neighborhoods in the area for a few years. This year, however, she became more bold and protective of her cubs. The easy availability of human-provided foods like trash, bird seed and pet food in neighborhoods caused the bear to completely lose her natural fear of people. In addition, she killed chickens and a dog on separate occasions. After multiple attempts, the FWC was able to trap her on Nov. 29. Her two cubs were captured by the FWC and relocated northwest of Wynn Haven Beach onto Eglin Air Force Base property. While cubs normally stay with their mothers for 18 months, the chances of survival for these cubs are relatively good. The cubs have been with their mother long enough that they are no longer fully dependent on her, FWC Bear Management Program coordinator Dave Telesco said. The 250-pound female and her 100-pound cubs were much heavier than typical Florida bears living in the woods. Bears grow larger and produce more cubs when they have regular access to human-provided foods, which increases the number of bears living in neighborhoods and causing human-bear con icts.Female bear euthanized in Okaloosa GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Dec 6, 12 Fri Dec 7, 12 Sat Dec 8, 12 Sun Dec 9, 12 Mon Dec 10, 12 Tue Dec 11, 12 Wed Dec 12, 12 D ate 3.7 ft. 12:02 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 1:02 AM 0.7 ft. 2:18 AM 0.3 ft. 3:31 AM -0.2 ft. 4:35 AM -0.6 ft. 5:33 AM -1.0 ft. 6:26 AM -1.3 ft. 7:16 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 6:40 AM 2.5 ft. 8:17 AM 2.6 ft. 9:52 AM 2.9 ft. 11:08 AM 3.1 ft. 12:10 PM 3.2 ft. 1:04 PM 3.3 ft. 1:53 PM Hi g h 0.6 ft. 1:02 PM 0.9 ft. 2:07 PM 1.1 ft. 3:15 PM 1.3 ft. 4:19 PM 1.4 ft. 5:17 PM 1.4 ft. 6:09 PM 1.3 ft. 6:57 PM L ow 3.0 ft. 7:44 PM 3.0 ft. 8:39 PM 3.2 ft. 9:33 PM 3.3 ft. 10:24 PM 3.5 ft. 11:14 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 6, 12 Fri Dec 7, 12 Sat Dec 8, 12 Sun Dec 9, 12 Mon Dec 10, 12 Tue Dec 11, 12 Wed Dec 12, 12 D ate Hi g h 0.7 ft. 1:13 AM 0.5 ft. 2:29 AM 0.2 ft. 3:42 AM -0.1 ft. 4:46 AM -0.5 ft. 5:44 AM -0.8 ft. 6:37 AM -0.9 ft. 7:27 AM L ow 1.9 ft. 6:32 AM 1.9 ft. 8:09 AM 2.0 ft. 9:44 AM 2.1 ft. 11:00 AM 2.3 ft. 12:02 PM 2.4 ft. 12:56 PM 2.5 ft. 1:45 PM Hi g h 0.5 ft. 1:13 PM 0.7 ft. 2:18 PM 0.8 ft. 3:26 PM 0.9 ft. 4:30 PM 1.0 ft. 5:28 PM 1.0 ft. 6:20 PM 1.0 ft. 7:08 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 7:36 PM 2.3 ft. 8:31 PM 2.4 ft. 9:25 PM 2.5 ft. 10:16 PM 2.6 ft. 11:06 PM 2.8 ft. 11:54 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 6, 12 Fri Dec 7, 12 Sat Dec 8, 12 Sun Dec 9, 12 Mon Dec 10, 12 Tue Dec 11, 12 Wed Dec 12, 12 D ate 3.5 ft. 12:38 AM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 2:06 AM 0.7 ft. 3:22 AM 0.3 ft. 4:35 AM -0.2 ft. 5:39 AM -0.6 ft. 6:37 AM -0.9 ft. 7:30 AM -1.2 ft. 8:20 AM L ow 2.4 ft. 7:16 AM 2.3 ft. 8:53 AM 2.4 ft. 10:28 AM 2.7 ft. 11:44 AM 2.9 ft. 12:46 PM 3.0 ft. 1:40 PM 3.1 ft. 2:29 PM Hi g h 0.6 ft. 2:06 PM 0.8 ft. 3:11 PM 1.0 ft. 4:19 PM 1.2 ft. 5:23 PM 1.2 ft. 6:21 PM 1.2 ft. 7:13 PM 1.2 ft. 8:01 PM L ow 2.8 ft. 8:20 PM 2.8 ft. 9:15 PM 2.9 ft. 10:09 PM 3.1 ft. 11:00 PM 3.3 ft. 11:50 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 6, 12 Fri Dec 7, 12 Sat Dec 8, 12 Sun Dec 9, 12 Mon Dec 10, 12 Tue Dec 11, 12 Wed Dec 12, 12 D ate Hi g h 1.0 ft. 12:41 AM 0.7 ft. 1:57 AM 0.3 ft. 3:10 AM -0.2 ft. 4:14 AM -0.6 ft. 5:12 AM -1.0 ft. 6:05 AM -1.3 ft. 6:55 AM L ow 2.0 ft. 6:24 AM 2.0 ft. 8:01 AM 2.0 ft. 9:36 AM 2.2 ft. 10:52 AM 2.4 ft. 11:54 AM 2.5 ft. 12:48 PM 2.6 ft. 1:37 PM Hi g h 0.6 ft. 12:41 PM 0.9 ft. 1:46 PM 1.1 ft. 2:54 PM 1.3 ft. 3:58 PM 1.3 ft. 4:56 PM 1.3 ft. 5:48 PM 1.3 ft. 6:36 PM L ow 2.3 ft. 7:28 PM 2.4 ft. 8:23 PM 2.5 ft. 9:17 PM 2.6 ft. 10:08 PM 2.8 ft. 10:58 PM 2.9 ft. 11:46 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 6, 12 Fri Dec 7, 12 Sat Dec 8, 12 Sun Dec 9, 12 Mon Dec 10, 12 Tue Dec 11, 12 Wed Dec 12, 12 D ate Hi g h 1.1 ft. 12:59 AM 0.8 ft. 2:15 AM 0.4 ft. 3:28 AM -0.2 ft. 4:32 AM -0.7 ft. 5:30 AM -1.1 ft. 6:23 AM -1.4 ft. 7:13 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 6:37 AM 2.6 ft. 8:14 AM 2.7 ft. 9:49 AM 2.9 ft. 11:05 AM 3.1 ft. 12:07 PM 3.3 ft. 1:01 PM 3.4 ft. 1:50 PM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 12:59 PM 1.0 ft. 2:04 PM 1.2 ft. 3:12 PM 1.4 ft. 4:16 PM 1.5 ft. 5:14 PM 1.5 ft. 6:06 PM 1.4 ft. 6:54 PM L ow 3.0 ft. 7:41 PM 3.1 ft. 8:36 PM 3.2 ft. 9:30 PM 3.4 ft. 10:21 PM 3.6 ft. 11:11 PM 3.8 ft. 11:59 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 6, 12 Fri Dec 7, 12 Sat Dec 8, 12 Sun Dec 9, 12 Mon Dec 10, 12 Tue Dec 11, 12 Wed Dec 12, 12 D ate Hi g h 0.9 ft. 12:55 AM 0.6 ft. 2:10 AM 0.3 ft. 3:17 AM -0.1 ft. 4:16 AM -0.5 ft. 5:10 AM -0.7 ft. 6:01 AM -0.9 ft. 6:51 AM L ow 1.7 ft. 6:28 AM 1.6 ft. 8:13 AM 1.6 ft. 10:10 AM 1.8 ft. 12:00 PM 2.0 ft. 1:24 PM 2.2 ft. 2:27 PM 2.2 ft. 3:18 PM Hi g h 0.4 ft. 12:03 PM 0.7 ft. 12:55 PM 1.0 ft. 1:56 PM 1.2 ft. 3:03 PM 1.4 ft. 4:10 PM 1.6 ft. 5:09 PM 1.6 ft. 6:02 PM L ow 2.3 ft. 7:46 PM 2.4 ft. 8:17 PM 2.5 ft. 8:51 PM 2.6 ft. 9:27 PM 2.7 ft. 10:08 PM 2.8 ft. 10:54 PM 2.8 ft. 11:44 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacDec. 6 Dec. 12First Dec. 19 Full Dec. 28 Last Dec. 6 New Dec. 12Major Times 6:23 AM 8:23 AM 6:46 PM 8:46 PM Minor Times 12:03 AM 1:03 AM 12:35 PM 1:35 PM Major Times 7:10 AM 9:10 AM 7:34 PM 9:34 PM Minor Times 1:01 AM 2:01 AM 1:11 PM 2:11 PM Major Times 7:59 AM 9:59 AM 8:25 PM 10:25 PM Minor Times 2:02 AM 3:02 AM 1:49 PM 2:49 PM Major Times 8:52 AM 10:52 AM 9:19 PM 11:19 PM Minor Times 3:05 AM 4:05 AM 2:31 PM 3:31 PM Major Times 9:48 AM 11:48 AM 10:18 PM 12:18 AM Minor Times 4:12 AM 5:12 AM 3:19 PM 4:19 PM Major Times 10:48 AM 12:48 PM 11:20 PM 1:20 AM Minor Times 5:20 AM 6:20 AM 4:12 PM 5:12 PM Major Times --:---:-11:52 AM 1:52 PM Minor Times 6:28 AM 7:28 AM 5:13 PM 6:13 PM Average Average Average+ Average Average Better Best7:19 am 5:37 pm 12:04 am 12:36 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:20 am 5:37 pm 1:02 am 1:12 pm 7:21 am 5:37 pm 2:03 am 1:50 pm 7:22 am 5:37 pm 3:07 am 2:32 pm 7:22 am 5:37 pm 4:13 am 3:20 pm 7:23 am 5:38 pm 5:21 am 4:13 pm 7:24 am 5:38 pm 6:29 am 5:13 pm53% 46% 39% 31% 24% 16% 8% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Page 13Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Nov. 26, Christopher J. Doyal of Altha reported a vehicle re on a logging road off Curtis Mill Road near Sopchoppy. A log skidder caught re in a clear cut logging area. An operator was using the equipment to move logs when he smelled smoke and observed ames coming from beneath the cab and engine area. Doyal and the machinery operator attempted to put out the re with re extinguishers but were unable to get control of the re. Fire ghters arrived on the scene and extinguished the re. The tractor was destroyed in the fire. It is valued at $250,000 and is owned by James McMillan of McMillan Logging in Bristol. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: NOVEMBER 21 Alika Wolff of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to her mothers home in Crawfordville. Someone entered the victims home and vandalized it. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. Bonnie Brinson of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of a rearm, tools, currency and jewelry, valued at $1,955. The weapon was entered in the FCIC/NCIC data base as stolen. Persons of interest have been identified. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. NOVEMBER 22 Harry Harris of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Harris was caring for animals of Crawfordville homeowners when he discovered a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and damage was estimated at $800. The victims are the Robinson and Kingsley families. Coins, jewelry, electronics and a telescope were taken. The stolen property is valued at $3,400. Deputy Randy Phillips, Sgt. Andy Curles and Detective Ryan Muse all investigated. Carlos Kilpatrick of Crawfordville reported a grass re in Wakulla Gardens. A blaze from a re pit started an accidental fire that burned the victims property. Kilpatrick and Deputy Sean Wheeler used garden hoses to extinguish the re. Wakulla Fire Rescue also arrived on the scene as the re was being put out. Talquin Electric was noti ed of a power line above a burned tree that was also partially damaged. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston observed a vehicle on Highway 267 traveling at a high rate of speed with only one operating headlight. Sgt. Johnston conducted a traf- c stop and Mileo Steven Messer, 18, of Tallahassee was determined to be the driver. Messer did not possess a valid driver license and did not have a tag properly displayed. Deputy Nick Gray performed field sobriety exercises and Messer was charged with DUI and knowingly driving while license was suspended or revoked. NOVEMBER 23 Wal-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft. Four male subjects were observed taking items from the store and concealing them in their clothing. The subjects were confronted by an asset protection staff member but left the store in a vehicle together. Trey Michael Vanfossen, 18, of Macon, Ga. and Justin Lamar Alligood, 18, of Ashburn, Ga. were charged with retail theft. A 17-yearold and a 14-year-old were turned over to legal guardians. The four males were stopped by Deputy Nick Gray during a traf c stop on U.S. Highway 319. The stolen property, valued at approximately $100, was recovered. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. Keyna Elizabeth Brown of Crawfordville suffered a laceration to her forehead after losing control of her vehicle and crashing near 379 Arran Road. The victims vehicle was removed from the scene by a wrecker. She refused medical treatment. Deputy Mike Zimba, Deputy Billy Metcalf and Reserve Deputy David Pienta investigated. A 35-year-old Crawfordville man was charged with sexual assault on his 6-year-old daughter. He was also charged with lewd or lascivious molestation on a victim under age 12. The victim told detectives that her father touched her genital area which included digital penetration in the suspects bedroom. The suspect was transported to the Wakulla County Jail where he is being held with no bond. Detective Ryan Muse, Detective Rob Giddens, Deputy Clint Beam and a Child Protection Team investigated. NOVEMBER 24 John Taylor of Panacea reported the theft of a eld gate. Someone stole a gate from the victims rental property. The gate is valued at approximately $350. A suspect has been identi ed. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. Deputy Clint Beam responded to a disturbance at Wal-Mart. An 18-year-old male victim reported being struck in the face by a 15-year-old female. An altercation took place near the pharmacy. A second 15-year-old female pushed the suspect and knocked her to the oor. The case was passed along to the Criminal Investigations Division. NOVEMBER 25 Betty S. Mullins of Crawfordville reported a vehicle re at her home. A burn pile in the victims yard ignited and a Toyota parked near the burn pile caught re. Damage to the vehicle was estimated at $5,000. It is owned by Clifford Scott Dudley. There were no signs of arson. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Stephanie McDowell and Erica Peel, both of Crawfordville, reported the theft of jewelry from their home. The value of the stolen items is estimated at $5,000 and a suspect has been identi ed. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigation Division. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. NOVEMBER 26 Rosa Mae Scott of Sopchoppy reported a structure fire on Sopchoppy Highway. Deputy Stephen Simmons responded to the re and observed smoke coming from a front window and a male subject using a garden hose to knock down the re. Robert Scott III was cooking with hot oil in the kitchen when he left the room and the kitchen ignited. Damage was estimated at $5,000. The stove/ oven was destroyed and damage was observed to the wall behind the unit and the ceiling. The re was ruled an accident. Barbara Jenkins of Crawfordville reported a re at a power pole and electrical box near her home. The victim heard popping sounds and called emergency personnel. Two electrical boxes were destroyed and the utility pole was also damaged. Damage was estimated at more than $1,500. There was no sign of arson. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Mendes Williams of Crawfordville reported a cr edit card offense. The victim lost his bank card in northern Georgia. Eight unauthorized charges were observed on the victims account. The charges from North Georgia totaled $654. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. Assistant Principal Michele Baggett of Riversprings Middle School reported a juvenile in possession of a large knife at school. The student showed the knife to other students on his bus. The knife was recovered from the students book bag and he was suspended from school and placed at the Second Chance School. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Ina Ecklund of Crawfordville reported the theft of a white elephant in front of the victims store of the same name. The concrete statute is valued at $65. The victim wrote a letter to the editor to the local newspaper in hopes someone will return the elephant as they did once before when it was stolen. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On Nov. 26, Douglas Britt of Crawfordville and Hale Construction reported the theft of scrap metal from a St. Marks job site. Steel grates, valued at $200, were removed from the site. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. A concerned citizen reported suspicious people at a residence on Hines Street in Crawfordville. The residence has been vacant for several months. The front door was not secured and the home was ransacked. Three African American males were observed taking electronics and furniture out of the residence. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. NOVEMBER 27 A road crew worker mowing Coastal Highway recovered a wallet and turned it in to the WCSO. The owner of the wallet, Jeffrey L. Davis of Tallahassee, was contacted and arrangements were made for the property owner to recover his wallet. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. Jessica Lanette Fruggiero, 28, of Crawfordville was charged with two counts of battery on law enforcement/detention staff after refusing to leave the jail library after being asked multiple times. The suspect became unruly and scratched Lt. Cliff Carroll in the face and neck drawing blood and kicked Detention Deputy Jansen Maxwell in the groin. Detention staff asked Fruggiero to leave the library and stop talking with male inmates. Lt, Carroll and Deputy Maxwell subdued the suspect in the jail hallway and she was returned to her cell. Fruggiero has six prior battery arrests/ charges. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Patricia Owen of Crawfordville reported a grand theft from a friends vessel. The victim was planning a boat trip and loaded personal property into the vessel which was later reported missing. She reported the loss of jewelry, a camera, stamps and DVDs which were valued at $2,995. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. Teresa Burns of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed three unauthorized charges on her bank account. The charges were created at commercial establishments in Sunrise and Miami and were valued at $612.11. Deputy Sean Wheeler and Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. Christine Carter of Crawfordville reported a fraud. A $44 charge was observed on the victims bank account out of an Orlando address. Deputy Stephen Simmons determined that the fraud occurred after an ATM withdrawal in Tallahassee. Patricia Story of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim received a past due bill in the mail for a bank loan. The victim never requested a loan which was in the amount of $2,770. Someone purchased computer products with the money. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. Brandi Wilkins of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash. The victims juvenile son was struck by a vehicle while in the parking lot near Pizza Hut. The vehicle continued out of the parking lot without stopping. Two females were going through the drive-thru and struck the victim with a vehicle door. The juvenile fell to the ground and received minor injuries. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. NOVEMBER 28 Charles Parmer of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A pistol was stolen from the vehicle. The pistol and holster are valued at $420. The vehicle was not secured at the time of the theft. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Christopher Altman of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Fifteen unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank card. The charges were traced throughout South Florida and were valued at $673.75. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. Caleb Fisher of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A back pack containing a lap top computer was reported missing from a friends vehicle. The missing property is valued at $430. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. George Gerrell of Tallahassee reported a grand theft in the Wakulla Station area. A pressure washer, video camera and generator, valued at $550, were removed from a Crawfordville home. No forced entry was discovered. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Curtis Stokes of Blountstown reported a traffic crash at Wakulla Springs State Park. The victim reported striking a deer with his vehicle. There were no injuries and only minor damage to his vehicle. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 973 calls for service during the past week including: 24 residential and business alarms; 15 animal incidents; 75 citizen contacts; 20 disturbances; 62 investigations; 14 loud music/ noise complaints; 62 medical emergencies; 38 special details; 50 subpoena services; 13 suspicious people; 15 suspicious vehicles; 20 traffic enforcements; 51 traf c stops; and 11 reckless vehicles.The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce and WCSO Volunteers will host the annual Christmas in the Park celebration on Friday, Dec. 7 at Azalea Park in Crawfordville. The event will begin at 5 p.m. and continue until 8 p.m. with Santa arriving at 6 p.m. Azalea Park will be lit up and ready to welcome Santa and Mrs. Claus as they arrive in a horse drawn carriage. Bring a camera for an opportunity to take pictures of Santa and Mrs. Claus as well as the elves as they visit with the children during the event. There will also be spin art, train rides, Sparky the Fire Dog, McGruff the Crime Dog, concessions and prizes. The event is sponsored by the WCSO, WCSO Volunteers, Centennial Bank and the Wakulla County Park and Recreation Department. No pets please.Christmas in the Park is Dec. 7 Re-StoreShadeville Highway926-4544Open Tues. Sat. 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Wed. 10-5 Closed Sat. & Sun.Huttons Seafood & More 570-1004We will be closed Monday Dec. 24 Jan. 2 & Re-Open Thursday, January 3 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comScience ction has a lot of entertainment value. Imaginative authors are able to take a collection of improbable characteristics and encapsulate them in one being, then place the subject in a foreign location. Contact with the indigenous residents in the new environment always brings con ict. The alien is considered as an invader with aspirations of conquest, a desire for conquering and is nearly impossible to kill. This is great fun for the reader when the story is ction. Unfortunately, this is reality when it comes to Dioscorea bulbifera, better known as air potato. This pest is a dif cult to control exotic plant which has caused severe damage to sections of the native environment and costs taxpayers millions of dollars a year to control in the southeastern U.S. The air potato is a member of the yam family. This hearty vine is a native of Asia and sub-Saharan Africa where yams are commonly cultivated for their edible roots. These tasty tubers have long been an important dietary staple. This member of the yam family was brought to the Americas from Africa during early 19th century and introduced to Florida around 1905. It is currently found throughout the state from Escambia County in the Panhandle to the Florida Keys. It is also established in Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Air potato is easy to recognize in the wild. The green leaf is heart shaped and it sharply tapers to a point at the tip. It has twining herbaceous vines with stems growing up to 60 feet in length. The vines are round and tan colored tubers similar to a potato hang from the vine. Unlike edible yams, the tubers on air potatoes are produced on the vine. They may be as large as small Irish potatoes or smaller than the circumference of a dime. Air potato tubers are generally bitter and may even be toxic to mammals. It has little or no value to the native wildlife as a food or shelter source. It grows aggressively in the warm Florida climate covering eight inches per day. It will quickly climb to the tops of trees. Once in the trees crown a mat is formed which weighs down and smothers the tree. Air potatoes will cover and suffocate everything in its path as it colonizes an area. Even though the stems and foliage of the vines are dying back as winter approaches in Wakulla County, the plant is still a problem because of its tubers or bulbs. Each time the vine drops a potato, another plant is likely to grow from it. Once the potatoes drop and are buried under soil or covered with leaf litter, they become difficult to spot and remove. Even air potatoes the size of a pea will start a new plant. With air potato having no natural enemies in Florida and the capability to displace native species, it has been identi ed as one of Floridas most invasive plant species. It is on numerous agencies list as a problem plant and is illegal to propagate and relocate. Air potato can be controlled by picking up every bulb hitting the ground before it sprouts. Once the bulbs are removed, the vine can be treated with a broad-leaf herbicide. Typically at least one follow up collection of bulbs will be necessary. To learn more about identi cation and control of Air Potato in Wakulla County, contact your UF/ IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at (850) 926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u edu or at (850) 926-3931.Air potatoes are an exotic pest, dif cult to control Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAutumn air potato vines, above. Air potato fruit, below. WAKULLA COMMUNITY CHORUS In Handels MESSIAH Directed By Reba Mason Featuring a Cast of 60 Singers and Instrumentalists SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9 3:00 PM Sopchoppy United Methodist Church 10 Faith Ave. -Free AdmissionReception In Fellowship Hall Immediately Following WAKULLA COMMUNITY THEATRE Presents CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY Saturday, Dec. 89 A.M. until 4 P.M. Relaxed Shopping from Arts, Crafts and Food Vendors, and our Local Merchants.Sponsored by Sopchoppy Preservation and Improvement Association, Inc. For information call our HOTLINE (850) 962-4138 Daytime AT 11 A.M. Christmas Music

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Poker Run held to benefit Mark WilesPage 2BSection B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012sports news and team views Sports Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe WakuulanewsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachFormer WHS runner, Stanley Linton, who has been making a name for himself on the road racing circuit in the Tallahassee area and has won a number of races in the last couple of years, outdid himself on Saturday, Dec. 1, by winning the overall title in two different races. He started the morning by lining up for the Gulf Winds 10 Mile Challenge held off North Meridian Road. Just over 56 minutes later he was the rst runner, out of 183 nishers, to cross the nish line, 1:40 ahead of his nearest pursuer. This was the nal Gulf Winds Grand Prix event for this year, which guaranteed a quality eld of runners and an extremely competitive event. Local runner Ron Christen also had a good outing, nishing second in his age group in 1:21:51. Current WHS runner, Aaron Smith, competing in his rst real distance race also ran well, nishing 4th in his age group in the good time of 1:09:00. In the accompanying 5-mile race, local standout Duane Evans had a good showing, nishing 4th overall and rst in his age group, in 33:02. Not content to rest on his laurels, Linton showed up on the starting line of the extremely popular Jingle Bell Run, which is held in downtown Tallahassee and serves as the kick-off event for the annual Christmas Parade. This time, Linton had more company, as over 3,000 other people were entered. Some serious runners and others, not so. This event is a 2K (just short of two miles) and is run after dark on a hilly course that winds through the downtown area. Linton is getting well known enough that the race director sought him out on the starting line and told him to be sure to follow the lead bicycle and/or police motorcycle escorts to ensure that he stayed on the course and didnt miss any of the turns. Linton took his advice to heart, and took an early lead that continued to grow throughout the race and less than 10 minutes later, he again crossed the finish line as the rst overall runner. For winning the race, he and his girlfriend, Savanna Harris, got to ride in the lead car in the ensuing Christmas Parade. All in all, his day amounted to a pretty auspicious start to his Christmas season and capped off quite a year for the local speedster. Special to The NewsMadison Metcalf and Tatum Tucker from Wakulla Middle School were two of more than 500 junior high, high school cheerleaders and dancers from across the country that performed in the 2012 UCA/UDA Thanksgiving Tour at the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando on Nov. 22. The girls who were invited to perform in the parade were part of a select group of cheerleaders and dancers chosen as All-Americans during the Universal Cheerleaders Association (UCA) summer camps across the country. Madison and Tatum attended the UCA camp, with Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School cheerleaders, held at University of Georgia in July. All Americans were selected via tryout based on either superior cheerleading or dance skills. Only the top 12 percent of the cheerleaders and dancers from UCA or UDA camps earned the chance to march in a holiday parade of this caliber. The 4-day event included visiting the Disney parks, rehearsals, breakfast at Planet Hollywood and concluded with Thanksgiving Dinner with Mickey following the parade. Im so thankful for all of my friends, classmates, and family that helped me raise the money to go and I will never forget this experience said Madison Metcalf, who is an eighth grader at WMS.Four Wakulla County athletes competed for the Team Finals of the NFL Punt, Pass and Kick competition on Sunday, Nov. 25. The four athletes arrived at the Jacksonville Jaguars Practice eld to compete against other sectional winners. After the morning competition each participant received two tickets to the Jaguars game in which they defeated the Titans. During a Pregame show each athlete was introduced to the fans in the stadium as they threw an exhibition pass. Justice Douglas nished third in the 6/7 boys then Sierra Tucker placed second in the girls 12/13 division. Shane Davis came in second in the boys 14/15 age group. Then Taylor Lawhon placed rst in the girls 14/15 age group. Taylor will now have her scored compared to other Team championships winners, the top four scores in each age division will advance to the National Finals to be held during a playoff game later in the season. During a fourth quarter timeout, Taylor along with the other winners were introduced as the Jaguars team Champion for the PPK competition. Each competitor received a Jaguars PPK Play 60 jersey, as well as an Under Armor Play 60 shirt, plus the two free tickets into the game. Then they received a football as a trophy with their age division and what place they nished. Noreen Britt has been the state chairperson for the Jaguars for the past 12 years. CHEERLEADING2 march in parade at Disney WorldSPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMadison Metcald and Tatum Tucker marched in the Thanksgiving Day Parade at Disney. Taylor Lawhon, Justice Douglas, Shane Davis, and Noreen Britt. A fourth competitor, Sierra Tucker, is not pictured.Four compete in Team FinalsPUNT, PASS AND KICK Cross country The annual end-of-theyear cross country awards banquet is scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 15, 2012, at the WHS cafeteria. The festivities will begin at 5 p.m., with the meal being served at 5:30 p.m. All runners, parents, relatives and siblings are invited. It will be a potluck dinner and all parents are asked to bring a contribution to the meal. Parents should contact either Karen James on Facebook or Patti Broadway (508-7577) to let them know the number of people attending and what they will bring by Dec. 11. All runners are reminded to bring their uniform and any issued team warmups to turn in. These items must be turned in before any season awards are presented to the individual. RMS football The Riversprings football program will be conducting its annual football awards banquet on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013 at 7 p.m. in the RMS cafeteria. The cost of the banquet will be $12 each player and each guest that he may invite. The money for the banquet is due by Friday, Nov. 30. The menu for the banquet features steak, macaroni and cheese, green beans, bread, dessert and drink. The names of the player and each guest that plans on attending the banquet should be listed. Each guest should also indicate how he/she would like their steak prepared (well done, medium well, medium, etc.). Please come join us in paying homage to these young men whom made up the 2012 RMS Bears.RUNNINGLinton wins two racesSports banquets are set TH E Legislature gears up; Citizens under reWeekly Roundup, Page 2B Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111 Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator

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By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 30 Like holiday diners beginning to awaken from tryptophan-induced naps, lawmakers came out of the Thanksgiving weekend and began laying the groundwork for the 2013 legislative session. House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, and Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, began naming leaders and committee members early in the week so that lawmakers at least knew which rooms to go to for next weeks kickoff meetings. Senators began ling their bills. And Gov. Rick Scott continued to roll out the beginnings of what looks like an agenda for the session. Meanwhile, a scandal including allegations of sexual impropriety continued to rock one of the least sexy agencies in state government. LEGISLATIVE RUMBLINGS With the organizational session out of the way and lawmakers free to carry out their duties, committee assignments and bills came out of the proverbial starting gate. It was a journey that could extend until the rst days of May 2013. At least thats the plan. Weatherford had his committee assignments done by Monday, with the Senate moving at a more casual pace -no surprise to anyone who drops by the respective chambers on a given day. Some of the highestpro le picks included Rep. Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala, being tapped to head the Judiciary Committee and Rep. Marlene OToole, RLady Lake, taking over the Education Committee. Rep. Richard Corcoran, R-Trinity, will chair the Health and Human Services Committee. Gaetz, who announced some chairmanships Monday, had all of his appointments wrapped up on Wednesday. One of the more closely watched committees -the panel dealing with gambling -will be headed by Sen. Garrett Richter, a Naples Republican who will also be president pro tempore. Richter said he expected the Senate Gaming Committee to move deliberately to deal with a sensitive issue. It would be very appropriate to try to take a comprehensive look at gaming for the state of Florida, he said. Bills also started whizzing around the Capitol, or at least around the circuitry that handles legislation. Democrats started out by trying to reignite one of the hottest issues of the fall: When and where Floridians should be allowed to cast ballots. Sen. Arthenia Joyner, D-Tampa, and Sen. Gwen Margolis, D-Miami, led a pair of bills (SB 80, SB 82) that would expand early voting times and the places where it can occur. The measures would also eliminate a requirement that people who have moved into a community from outside the county vote a provisional ballot on Election Day if they hadnt earlier changed their legal address. Democrats have complained that Republicans, who overwhelmingly control the Legislature, have tried to make it harder for people to vote, particularly those who are more transient, younger, and minorities, all of whom critics say are more likely to vote Democratic. Republicans have countered that measures aimed at making it more dif cult to cast a ballot are intended to stop voter fraud. Both bills led this week would require early voting to begin 15 days before Election Day, up from 10 days before under current law. Early voting wouldnt end until the Sunday night before the election under the new measures. Current law ended early voting on the Saturday before Election Day. Even with the Election Day dif culties, which GOP leaders are eager to explore, its not clear that Republicans will be ready to do that abrupt an about-face on the voting changes. Other bills also got started. Sen. Thad Altman, R-Viera, filed a measure that would require most children under 7 to use a booster seat or other safety seat while riding in cars. Sen. Maria Sachs, D-Delray Beach, led a measure barring Floridians from using cell phones in cars unless they use hands-free technology. And Joyner led a bill aimed at preventing employers from turning away job applicants because they were unemployed and a measure calling for a study of pay disparities between men and women. DIFFERENT KIND OF $10,000 BET Gov. Rick Scott kicked off the week by challenging Florida state colleges to offer four-year degrees for $10,000 or less. Scott, who has made the affordability of college one of his hallmark issues, came out with his challenge even as state universities have been pushing for higher tuition rates. You should be able to work and go to school and not end up with debt, Scott told WFLA TV on Monday. If these degrees cost so much money, tuition is so high, thats not going to happen. I have put out this challenge to our state colleges we have 28 great state colleges and say, Can you come up with degrees where individuals can get jobs that the total degree costs $10,000? By the end of the week, the governors of ce said half of Floridas colleges were at least considering the idea, and a number had already announced they would take on the challenge. But not everyone was pleased. Roberto Martinez, vice chairman of the state Board of Education, blasted the change in a letter. The cost of a Bachelors Degree at many of our colleges cost the students on average approximately $12,000, Martinez wrote. Reducing this further, to create a cheap four-year degree, will undermine the quality and value of the education, hurting our students chances to compete successfully in our 21st Century economy. The other six members of the board, which oversees state colleges, issued a statement on Monday supporting the move. Scott also called for the Legislature to double, to $12 million, the funding for Quick Response Training Grants, handed out by the Department of Economic Opportunity for training for new or expanding businesses. And the governor told the Florida Chamber of Commerces insurance summit that reforms were needed for the state-managed Citizens Property Insurance Corp., though he didnt unveil a new policy proposal. To make the dream of home ownership available we must reduce the size of Citizens, Scott said. SPEAKING OF CITIZENS The board of Citizens, meanwhile, arguably had more interesting matters on its mind. Public pressure continued to grow on the company over a series of embarrassing revelations that were being investigated by internal watchdogs before their of ce was shuttered by the company. But Citizens President and CEO Barry Gilway hit back during a meeting of the companys governing board Tuesday, acknowledging that a handful of Citizens supervisors behaved inappropriately in some instances but that others faced allegations that were either disproved or remain unsubstantiated. A pair of Citizens employees reported took off their bras and danced at the Coyote Ugly bar in Tampa during a company retreat there in 2009, though they were disciplined. Another was accused of practicing law without a license, though Gilway says that hasnt been substantiated. In all, hundreds of pages of documents released last week alleged misappropr iations of funds, sexual harassment, lucrative severance packages and other inappropriate behavior by a handful of Citizens supervisors between 2004 and 2010. Gilway took over the company in June. But while Gilway said he was disgusted at some actions, he pushed back against the idea of Insurance Executives Gone Wild. It is also critically important that the actions of a very, very few people over the course of four years not tarnish the reputation of 1,300 employees who come in every single day and bust their tails, even though they are getting trashed in the press on a daily basis, Gilway said. Making matters look worse, the companys Of ce of Corporate Integrity was disbanded as it looked into the issues. Scott last week asked his inspector general to inspect that action. It wasnt all scandal for Citizens, though; Gilway told the insurance summit that he will brief the companys board in December about an effort requiring Citizens to try to place policies with private carriers before issuing policies itself. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott challenges state colleges to offer fouryear degrees for $10,000 as part of an effort to hold down the cost of higher education. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: The last time I looked around, we were still in the United States of America. We have not been annexed to a communist regime. We still have some basic rights. Those rights include innocent until proven guilty. Citizens President and CEO Barry Gilway, on allegations against employees of the company Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsOn Saturday, Dec. 1, the Wakulla Free Riders sponsored a bene t poker run for Mark Wiles. The registration started at Coyotes Mullet Shuf e Inn in Panacea, which is owned by Mark and his wife Mary Jo. From there it continued to The Iron Ravens clubhouse, Outzs Too, Skybox and back to Coyotes. More than 50 bikes participated in the run. At the end, there was a meal of barbecue chicken with all the xings waiting on the riders who participated in the run. Well over a hundred people participated in the raf e, which was made possible by numerous local businesses that generously donated prizes. At the end of the day more than $1,600 was raised for Mark and his family. Mark suffered a stroke on Nov. 1 while attending a Wakulla High School football game. He spent a week in Tallahassee Memorial Hospital and another three weeks in rehab. He continues to rehab with Home Health. We are happy to report that he continues to make great strides on his road to recovery. Thank you to everyone who participated and to those who helped with this event.Poker Run held to benefit Mark WilesWEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Legislature gears up; Citizens under re Mary Jo Wiles, wife of Mark Wiles, tossing a beer keg. Some of the riders from Wakulla Free Riders who participated in the poker run. Riders relaxing in the garden.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS www.Ken FieldsPhotography.photoshelter.com

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Dec. 6 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Dec. 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Dec. 8 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB (Member of National Button Society) will meet at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594, or email bardon56@aol.com, or Linda Wood at 850-899-0025. Sunday, Dec. 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Dec. 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Dec. 11 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Wednesday, Dec. 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE TASK FORCE will hold a meeting at 12:30 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Crawfordville. The director of the Guardian Ad Litem program will be the guest speaker. Lunch is provided. Thursday, Dec. 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsFriday, Dec. 7 HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held at 6 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club. This is a preview party for the Saturday event. For $10 enjoy wine and hors doeuvres while shopping. The general public day is Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and is free. For more information contact Nita Burke at 294-6482 or Heather Robison at 544-5418. Saturday, Dec. 8 HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club. There will be arts and craft vendors. For more information contact Nita Burke at 294-6482 or Heather Robison at 544-5418. SOPCHOPPY OPRY CLASSIC COUNTRY CHRISTMAS SHOW will feature the Purvis Brothers at 7 p.m. in historic Sopchoppy High Auditorium. Mike, Frank and Wendall Purvis will be accompanied by ddle player Wayne Martin, steel guitarist Larry Bullock, keyboardist Myron Spainhour and percussionist Ronnie Weeks. Call 962-3711 for ticket information. ANNUAL CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Sopchoppy. Santa will be there from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. to listen to the childrens Christmas wishes. Enjoy relaxed shopping from more than 50 vendors of arts, crafts and food, as well as Sopchoppys own local merchants. There will be games and activities for the children, and Christmas music. For more information, contact Bill Lowrie at billlowrie@embarqmail.com. FOLK AMERICAN SINGER/SONGWRITER John William Davis will perform at Posh Java at 8 p.m. Davis music is rooted in blues and folk genres. For reservations, contact Posh Java at poshjava@gmail.com or phone (850) 9621010. Tickets are $10. Posh Java is located on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. in downtown Sopchoppy. Sunday, Dec. 9 HANDELS MESSIAH will be performed by the Wakulla Community Chorus Sunday at 3 p.m. in the sanctuary of Sopchoppy United Methodist Church, 10 Faith Avenue. The 60 member ensemble features a chorus of 50 singers. This is the 12th local performance of Messiah directed by Reba Mason. The concert is free. A reception will follow the concert in the fellowship hall. Everyone is invited to attend. Monday, Dec. 10 WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will hold a public meeting from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. Tuesday, Dec. 11 FOURTH ANNUAL CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE will be held at the Wakulla County Historical Society Museum and Archives from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. Check out the Veterans Exhibit in the Betty Oaks Green Room for details, pictures and accounts of events in Europe and in the Paci c. One local mother got telegrams advising that one son was safe and her other son was a prisoner of war. The 2012 Collectible Christmas Ornament featuring Crawfordville High School is now available in the Old Jail Gift Shop. Also, several new books by local authors are now available, including The Greens and Cornbread of Wakulla Countythe stories and pictures submitted and told by the people. W ednesday, Dec. 12 CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for Front Porch Creations Florist will be held from 11:30 a.m. at their new location, 2543 Crawfordville Highway, Suite 4, Crawfordville. Friday, Dec. 14 CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for Smokin Vapor Wakulla will be held at 11:30 a.m. at 1626 D Crawfordville Highway. Saturday, Dec. 15 HOLIDAY SILENT AUCTION AND BOOK SIGNING will be held by the Florida Wild Mammal Association and Goose Creek Wildlife Sanctuary from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Tallahassee Elks Lodge located at 276 N. Magnolia Drive. Nature writer and photographer John B. Spohrer, Jr. will sign copies of his book, The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay, with part of the proceeds going to Goosecreek and FWMA. There will also be a cash bar and raf e. For additional information, go to www.wakullawildlife.org or www. goosecreekwildlifesanctuary.org. PERSONAL PROTECTION AND FIREARMS SAFETY COURSE will be held from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range in Otter Creek, near Sopchoppy. The program is $65 for non-range members and $55 for range members and satis es the requirement for a conceal carry permit. For more information or to register, call the Range at 745-7290 or Lt. Fred Nichols at 251-1676. COMMUNITY FUN DAY will be held by the Wakulla Moose Lodge to celebrate their Founders Day. The public is invited to join the festivities. There will be childrens activities. The Ochlockonee Volunteer Fire Department will give re truck demonstrations. The Wakulla Sheriffs Of ce will provide child identi cation kits. A guest speaker will talk about safe internet sur ng. The Southeastern Blood Bank will have also have a mobile on site. Adults making a donation will receive a free hot dog lunch. Children may eat for free. Santa will also be there. There will also be a large indoor yard sale. The Lodge is located at 44 Jer-Be-Lou Boulevard in Panacea. For questions, call 984-2510. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Page 3B Government Meetings Thursday, Dec. 6 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a special meeting at 9 a.m. in the commission chambers for a 2012 commissioner educational orientation. Monday, Dec. 10 SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Tuesday, Dec. 11 RESTORE ACT ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, Dec. 13 ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, Dec. 17 WAKULLA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a special meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorWed like to thank everyone who came out to our Winter Fling Fundraiser last Saturday. Your generous donations raised nearly $600 for the Friends of the Library! Wed also like to thank the Iris Garden Club and the Wakulla County Historical Society for coming out and joining us for all the fun. The Book Extravaganzas this year have raised more than $4,000 for the Friends just on their own so for that once again a huge THANK YOU to all of our great supporters! Operation Santa 2012 This year as part of Wakulla Countys commitment to Operation Santa, the library has adopted a family of two to provide needed items and a good Christmas for them this year. Our family consists of a single grandmother who has been raising her 4-year-old granddaughter since birth and whose only wish is to provide her granddaughter a Merry Christmas. We will have a list of items they need at the library, and will include it in my weekly email, and on our Facebook page. The deadline for the items is Dec. 13 so please donate what you can at the front desk of the library and thank you. Friday Night Movie Our last Friday Night Movie of the year is this Friday, Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. Were showing the nal film in the worldwide blockbuster Dark Knight Trilogy. The PG-13 (for intense action) rated lm takes place eight years after The Dark Knight with Batman coming out of seclusion to battle against the terrorist leader Bane who is bent on taking over Gotham City and destroying Batman once and for all. Branded an outlaw after the events of the previous lm, Batman must save the citizens of Gotham while nally coming to terms with who he wants to be and the life he wants to live. Starring Christian Bale, Anne Hathaway and Tom Hardy, among others, this lm brings a great ending to what may be the greatest superhero lm series of all time. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show and seating will be limited. Ringling Brothers comes to the library Mark your calendars for the afternoon of Friday, Dec. 14, as a laughter ambassador from the Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey Circus will be at the Library at 4:30 p.m. for a fun lled reading of Dr. Suess If I Ran the Circus. Please come out and kick off the weekend by welcoming the world wide famous circus to the library. The show begins at 4:30 so please bring out the whole family. Library News... Christmas in the Park from 5 to 8 p.m. at Azalea Park. Christmas in Sopchoppy from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. downtown. Sopchoppy Oprys Classic County Christmas at 7 p.m. in the auditorium. Handels Messiah performance at 3 p.m. at Sopchoppy United Methodist. FridaySaturdaySaturdayMonday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Holiday Events Friday, Dec. 7 CHRISTMAS IN THE PARK will be held by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce at Azalea Park from 5 to 8 p.m. with Santa arriving at 6 p.m. Bring a camera for an opportunity to take pictures of Santa and Mrs. Claus, as well as the elves. There will also be spin art, train rides, Sparky the Fire Dog, McGruff the Crime Dog, concessions and prizes. Saturday, Dec. 8 ANNUAL CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Sopchoppy. Santa will be there from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Enjoy relaxed shopping from more than 50 vendors of arts, crafts and food. There will be games and activities for the children, and Christmas music. For more information, contact Bill Lowrie at billlowrie@ embarqmail.com.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLESFLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102ALLSTATE SUGAR BOWL #3 Florida vs. #21 Louisvilleat Mercedes-Benz Superdome, New Orleans, LA Wednesday, Jan. 2 at 8:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. DISCOVER ORANGE BOWL #13 Florida State vs. #15 Northern Illinois at Sun Life Stadium, Miami Gardens, FL Tuesday, Jan. 1 at 8:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excitedtoo! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Take time to savor Noles ACC winGators body of work is impressiveBy Tim LinafeltEDITOR OSCEOLA.COMCHARLOTTE, N.C. There figures to be plenty to talk about between now and when Florida State takes the eld Jan. 1 in the Orange Bowl to close out this football season. Defensive coordinator Mark Stoops is already gone to Kentucky and rumors continue to swirl that hell be taking some current FSU assistants with him. Other staff members names have popped up for other jobs round the country. And, despite his insistence that he intends to be in Tallahassee for a long time, rumors swirled around Jimbo Fishers apparent candidacy at other programs It will likely be a compelling, intriguing and maybe even dramatic December. But it can wait. Its easy for everyone to overlook the Atlantic Coast Conference championship that Florida State won and immediately turn our focus to what lies ahead. But that would be a mistake. It would be a mistake to do that and not give this team, this title and the players and coaches that made it happen their proper respect. We had a culture there for a while that we couldnt win those games, we couldnt win 10 games in a season, now weve won 11, FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. We won the Atlantic, it was the second time weve been here in three years, we now got over the hump and won the rst championship. No, the ACC was hardly a meat grinder this season. But, hey, somebody had to win it. And given Florida States title drought, which ended tonight after seven long and sometimes painful years, perhaps now isnt the time to attach any asterisks. No, the Orange Bowl might not be a sexy matchup Florida State is paired with Northern Illinois but theres still plenty at stake. FSU hasnt won a BCS Bowl since it won the national championship in 1999 the same year the Seminoles achieved their only 12-win season. Both of those would be awfully ne accomplishments for a senior class that has gone through an awful lot to get to this point. Im honestly at a loss for words right now, quarterback EJ Manuel said. Im just enjoying the moment, Im happy for my teammates, happy for our coaches and happy for our fans. To be able to do this and get Florida State on the right track while Im on my way out of here, Im extremely excited and proud. Speaking of those seniors it would be a disservice to them to not acknowledge what they did tonight. To recognize that they accomplished what no senior class could accomplish since the days of Leon Washington, Willie Reid and David Castillo. Manuel cemented his ve-year legacy as the quarterback that got Florida State over the hump, back to its place at the top of the ACC. Everett Dawkins and Vince Williams, among others, saw FSUs defense go from rags to riches over the course of their careers, culminating in a night where they helped hold Georgia Techs vaunted game to to 140 yards below its season average. And on a night when he became the ACC record-holder for single-season scoring, Dustin Hopkins got to run off the eld with a championship hat on his head while the Marching Chiefs chanted his name. There were of course, plenty more seniors and others alike who had a hand in this. Bjoern Werner,Xavier Rhodes, Lamarcus Joyner have been stalwarts for their entire careers. Sophomore Karlos Williamsmay have saved the game with his juggling, last-minute interception. Meanwhile, James Wilder Jr. and Devonta Freeman showed themselves to be a ne duo at running back while Rashad Greene proved once again that hes the teams most reliable playmaker. Im extremely happy for our players because I know how hard it is and how much ak theyve taken, Fisher said. When are you going to be back? When are you going to win a championship? Im just happy for them, that they can call themselves a champion, because that doesnt happen (easily). And for the ones who couldnt play Brandon Jenkins, Chris Thompson and Jaccobi McDaniel, among others Thats their ring, too, Fisher said. This championship means a lot for them. And it should. It means a lot to their coaches, too. It was obvious on Stoops face as he was serenaded with chants of Thank you, Coach after the game. Stoops was quick to de ect credit to D.J. Eliot, and noted that Eliots experience defending offenses similar to Georgia Techs earlier in his career was crucial in developing the game plan. And, yes, this title also belongs to Jimbo Fisher, who three years ago inherited a mess of a program and went about the business of essentially rebuilding the infrastructure from the ground up. It hasnt always been a smooth ride and there are plenty of signs that not everything is running as smoothly as it ought to be once again, FSU found itself biting its nails at the end of a game against a clearly overmatched opponent but Florida State tabbed Fisher because of the belief that he was the right man to lead the program to nights like this one. And he delivered. Once youre a champion, theres a responsibility, to me, of how youve got to act and represent yourself and think, Fisher said. And I think its huge and I think, once you get there, you understand that. Theres a lot that can happen between now and New Years Day, when Florida State closes the book on its 2012 campaign. Some questions will be answered, others will be raised and theres a chance that this program will look a lot different than it does here on Dec. 2. These next four weeks, though, will provide more than enough time to get wrapped up in all of that. But for tonight, perhaps its best for FSU fans to take a step back, take a breath and allow for just a little bit of time to enjoy what these Seminoles have accomplished.By MARTY COHENEDITOR GAITORBAIT.NETOnce again, college football takes a backset to no other sport after yet another terri c weekend of action, leading to the culmination of the regular season this weekend. For Florida, it was an amazing trip to Tallahassee that produced as thorough a thumping of Florida State in Doak Campbell Stadium as weve seen in some time. With the exception of a 12-minute stretch, spanning the end of the second quarter to about midway through the third quarter, when Florida experienced a minimeltdown, this was complete domination in all phases of the game. And it showed, clearly in full HD Technicolor, the superiority of the SEC, especially when compared to the powderpuff ACC. Florida manhandled FSU, just like Georgia did to Georgia Tech, South Carolina did to Clemson on the road with a backup quarterback, and like Vanderbilt did to Wake Forest. Before we get to Florida, how about a little props for the best conference in college football? Every year pompous folks like myself try and convince the masses that the SEC is down, which in football, becomes nothing but hot air. Perhaps there isnt a team as dominant as Alabama was last year, or LSU during the regular season last year, but the league wound up with six teams winning 10 or more games. Six teams. There are only 18 teams in Division I-A football who recorded double gures in wins, with a chance for as many as four more this weekend, and six are from the SEC. Six of the top 10 teams in the BCS standings are from the SEC. These top six Alabama, Georgia, Florida, LSU, Texas A&M and South Carolina are a combined 63-9, with all nine losses coming within the con nes of the league six-pack. That means these six teams went 54-0 when facing teams outside the top six in the SEC, which is why this two-team limit from one league in the BCS pool is utterly ridiculous. Anyway, Florida put the nishing touches on the nations most impressive resume by blasting the Seminoles, who got exposed for competing and compiling impressive numbers against a pansy schedule. Nations number one defense? Ah, not so much. Give the Florida coaches credit for crafting a creative game plan on offense, coming out throwing to, as Will Muschamp said, loosen em up, get em off of us. Florida scored on its opening possession for just the third time this season the previous week against Jacksonville State and then a touchdown against South Carolina that really belonged to the defense thanks to a forced turnover inside the Gamecock 5-yard line. But Saturdays opening possession, consuming more than ve minutes, set the tone. Certainly the rst half was frustrating as well, because the Gators probably should have been up by around 20 at halftime, and then subsequently let FSU seize the momentum with a bad six-minute stint to open the third quarter. The Gators were sloppy, the of cials simply werent going to drop a ag on FSU and eventually the home side had claimed a 20-13 lead, as FSU fans decided to stop booing their own team and got loud for a few minutes. Then Florida turned in the two biggest plays of the game. The rst came on offense, a subtle play but a huge one, a 21-yard middle screen to tight end Jordan Reed on third-and-14 toward the end of the third quarter. The Gators came away with a eld goal before cashing in on the games deciding play, when freshman linebacker Antonio Morrison knocked FSU quarterback EJ Manuel into next week. The Gators recovered the fumble, tailback Mike Gillislee scampered 37 yards for a touchdown on the next snap and the Gators never looked back in scoring 24 straight fourth-quarter points. While were at it, lets give some props to the beleaguered and maligned offensive line. Granted they looked lousy for long stretches of the season, especially when missing a few ailing starters, but the line was terri c last Saturday. Yes there were a few sacks and right tackle Chaz Green was really having a tough time with standout end Bjoern Werner, but overall these guys manhandled FSU up front. Not counting sacks, Florida rushed for 287 yards in 43 carries, an average of 6.7 yards per carry and Gillislee was terri c, rumbling for 140 yards and two touchdowns. And nally, nally, nally we saw the rollout package with quarterback Jeff Driskel. I simply cant understand why it wasnt used in earlier games when the Gators were having trouble protecting the passer, like Georgia. Instead, Driskel stood in the pocket every time. But on Saturday, the rollout package was really effective in limited use, and even produced a touchdown pass to Quinton Dunbar in the fourth quarter that put the game away. And of course, the defense did what it has done all year, creating turnovers ( ve, with one belonging to the special teams) while exing its muscle along the line of scrimmage. FSU scored 17 unanswered points in the third quarter on touchdown drives of 25 and 26 yards and a eld goal march where they went 13 yards. For a complete season-long performance, Im not sure if theres been a better Florida defense, and thats saying a mouthful. These guys were simply superb, and the ip in turnover margin, from minus-12 last year to a plus-17, a difference of plus-29, is borderline remarkable. And on special teams, the one weakness appears to be solved as it looks like Marcus Roberson should have been the punt returner all along, following up a 31-yard runback against Jacksonville State with a big 50-yarder in the fourth quarter last Saturday. Championship teams stand on their own merit, whether they compare favorably to other elite level title-winners or not. And frankly, Florida is as worthy, and in most cases more worthy, of being in the national championship conversation than just about every other team in the nation. If taken on its surface, Floridas body of work (too bad its not March Madness time) criteria is the most impressive in the nation, regardless of the loss to Georgia. But the eyeball test does come into play, and in combination with the resume, lead to Florida ending up in New Orleans, and not Miami, the rst week of January. If Florida nds a way to secure win No. 12 in its bowl matchup, the Gators will nish the season ranked anywhere from No. 2 to No. 4 in the nal standings. Given their starting position at the outset of this enthralling college football season, thats not too shabby. Jimbo Fisher with the ACC championship trophy. Floridas Jordan Reed gets a rst down on third and 14.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Page 5B YOUR AD HERE Acted Alarms April Ashes Astonishment Awakened Bench Birds Bunks Cheer Cloud Detail Dotted DrownEnthusiasticEntry ErrorsExperimentalExtra Fewer Grain Helmet Inland Joins Lamps Measure Needle Of ce Orange Pedal Period Pilot Played Preparation Recess This page sponsored in part by: Ri e Sacred Salad Scale Spells Steep Threads Trial Utter Vague Washed Wasnt

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Did you know?When you shop with local merchants more of your money stays closer to home; suppor ng your local parks, recrea on centers, libraries and other things that make this community a great place to live. Shopping local can s mulate and help restore a poor economy!Local ownership means that important decisions are made locally by people who live in the community and who will feel the impacts of those decisions. Your dollars spent in locally owned businesses have three times the impact on your community as dollars spent at national chains. When shopping locally, you simultaneously create jobs, fund more services through sales tax, invest in neighborhood improvement and promote community development.Locally owned businesses create more jobs locally and, in some sectors, provide better wages and bene ts Locally owned businesses build strong neighborhoods by giving back to the community, linking neighbors, and by contributing more to local causes.Shop local and keep your local dollars circulating in your home town! Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pe t Phone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. Holistic Select WellnessC Lbt n Pfr tf Ab n ALL Yr P Nf.Special Orders AvailableStocking Stuffers for Pets Gift Certificates 301 C S G i Construction Cleanup, Commercial, ResidentialLICENSED AND INSURED ConstructionCleanupCommercial R Re Re Re Re R R R R R R R s si si sid id ential Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly Nicholspray like its up to God, Work like its up to youMany Thanks for Many Blessings. Have a wonderful Christmas! Across the street from the courthouse, downtown Crawfordville926-3338Open 10AM-5PM or call for later appointment.15 Vendors 2 Floors The White Elephant DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PET STOP3010 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. ANTIQUES C ARRIES C OVEC ARRIES C OVE C HRISTMAS ATC HRISTMAS ATToys Dolls Antiques Collectibles Jewelry Ornaments Decorations One-of-kinds Etc. A Cabin of Treasures~ Vera Bradley ~ ~ Dots Jewels ~ ~ Greenleaf Scents ~ ~ 16 Vendors ~ ~ Gifts ~ ~ Collectibles ~ ~ Jewelry ~ ~ Custom Wood Items ~ & much more... PICK A TREASURE FROM OUR TREASURE BOX w/purchase!850926-8381M-S 10-5 Downtown Crawfordville, Next to Subwa y 27 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA Hair Place That 850-926-6020Gift Certicates Available t C C e C C FULL SERVICE HAIR SALONStyles for Men, Women & ChildrenCutsUpDosColor Perms HighlightsFacial Waxings Specialty Cuts Flat TopsMirandaTues-Sat545-2905RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MavisAppt. Only962-2171 SHOP DOWNTOWN LATE Fri., Dec. 7 OPEN til 9PM Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Across the street from the courthouse, downtown Crawfordville926-3338Open 10AM-5PM or call for later appointment.White Elephant Gift with purchase thru Dec. The White Elephant SATURDAY, DEC. 8THRefreshments Shop Local Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Page 7B Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce OPEN Mon.Sat. 8-6(850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSBAIT SHOP(850) 926-1162Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart Oyster Knives Gloves Hand Held VHF Radios Rubber Boots Cast Nets Gift Certicates Create A Basket or Bucket for ALL Your Outdoor Fun! HUNTING H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U N N N N T T T I I N N G G G G BOOTS Field Blazer Muck Boots GIFT SHOP LOCATED: Angelos & Sons Seafood Restaurant Overlooking Ochlockonee Bay Panacea 984-4746 A Few of My Favorite Things SPORT S PENDANTS T S A NT T S S SPORT S WRIS TBAND S & KEYRING S RING S CHARM S ANKLET S K LE T S TOERING S C RI NG S S CHAINS R ING S BRA C ELET S A C C EL ET E S S EARRING S 20%to40% JEWELRY SHOW & SALE SAVE on Entire Stock Support Your Local Business WE ACCEPT: rr s ....................$10 .....................$7 ..................$5 .......................$4 ......................$19 .....................$12 ......$29 .....................$20 $ $ $1 $1 0 0 PRICES STARTING AT $ $ $7 $7 SALEAt Angelo & Sons Seafood Restaurant The Jewelry Man The J ewelry Man InvitesYou 850745-8414 850 745-8414 HAIR SALON Merry Christmas, Happy New Year& Thank You for Another Great Year!DOREEN AND NIKKI ATFULL SERVICE FAMILY SALON3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) For that Special & Unique Gift:Lots of educational gifts & toys for children & adults. We have a great selection of natural history Books for all ages, books by Jack and Anne Rudloe, beautiful jewelry, home decor, prints, cards, ornaments. We have added many items to our collection. Great Stocking Stuffers Too! Open: Mon. Fri. 9am 5pm www.gulfspecimen.org Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Aquarium Your generous support helps us to continue our mission to educate and inspire. S S Visit the Gift Shopat Open 7 Days Holiday Craft BazaarSaturday, December 8at the CRAWFORDVILLE WOMANS CLUBSecond annual holiday bazaar hosted by the Crawfordville Womans Club at the clubhouse located at 64 Ochlockonee Street behind Hudson Park.Numerous vendors will display their wares in indoor comfort.Friday night, December 7 Sneak PreviewTickets are being sold to take a sneak preview to Saturdays event and enjoy delicious hors doeuvres and a wine tasting.9 a.m. 3 p.m. FREE and open to the publicA portion of the proceeds from the bazaar will go to the Crawfordville Womans Club scholarship fund and other civic projects.294-6482 Tickets to the Friday night preview are $10 each for more info please call Tips when buying a natural Christmas treeSpecial to The NewsMany people harbor strong opinions with regard to which type of Christmas tree they want to purchase. Some cannot live without a natural, freshly-cut Christmas tree, while others prefer the convenience of arti cial trees. Those who insist on a natural tree might want to consider the following tips when buying whats likely their biggest decorative item of the holiday season. Ask when the tree was cut down. Precut trees may be cut down weeks before theyre sold. So if youre buying a precut tree, chances are the tree was cut down much earlier than you think. This doesnt mean the tree wont make it through the holiday season, but a tree that was cut several weeks ago should have some of its bottom trunk removed before its placed in the stand. This will make it easier for the tree to consume water. This step likely isnt necessary if the tree was cut down the same day you bring it home. Have the tree shaken before taking it home. A tree should be shaken in a shaker before you put it in your car and bring it home. A shaker removes any debris or dead needles from the tree, which can save you the trouble of cleaning up all of those dead needles from your living room oor later on. Have the tree wrapped before taking it home. A tree should also be wrapped in twine before taking it home. The twine should be tight enough to keep the trees branches from blowing in the wind when you attach the tree to the top of your vehicle. If possible, keep the tree wrapped in twine as you place it in the stand. This makes the tree easier to control. Choose the right location. When looking for the right place to set up your natural tree, its best to choose a spot thats cool and free of drafts. The tree should not be placed near heat sources, including appliances, replaces or vents, because such heat sources create a safety hazard and can make it dif cult for the tree to retain moisture. There should also be ample space between the top of the tree and the ceiling. Place some covering on the ground beneath the tree. Even a freshly cut natural tree will shed needles over the course of the holiday season. Before placing the stand in the location youve chosen, put some type of covering, such as a tree bag, beneath the stand so its easier to gather all those needles once the holiday season has ended. Remember that natural trees are thirsty. Men and women who have never had a natural Christmas tree in the past might be surprised at just how thirsty natural trees get. The stands reservoir should have lots of water, which should never dip below the stump. If the water dips below the stump, you might be forced to cut a little more off the bottom of the trunk to ensure the tree will make it through the holiday season. That can be a hassle once the tree has been decorated, so be sure to check the water in the reservoir at least once per day to maintain adequate water levels. Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews Please Recycle

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SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEmploymentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements Todays New Ads SECURITY GUARD WANTEDLicensed Class G security guard positions available at PETEYS INTERNET CAFE -460 Coastal Hwy.Panacea Email resume to lyndara@gmail.com call 850-491-6313 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements CONSIGNMENTART AUCTION on Dec 15, 2012 (Saturday) at 4pm. 9101 International Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, FL 32819. Artworks below $100, complimentary hors doeuvres and FREE ARTPRINTfor attending. Artists include Picasso, Dali, Chagall, Max and local artists. Call (866)537-1013 or visit www .Baterbys.com for more information or to RSVP. Medical MEDICALBILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Medical Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Professional AIRLINE CAREERS-Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 Trades/ Skills DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDLTraining. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Trades/ Skills DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. HOME EVERYWEEKEND! Pay 37/mi, Both ways, FULLBENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, Fl Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE SECURITY GUARD WANTEDLicensed Class G security guard positions available at PETEYS INTERNET CAFE -460 Coastal Hwy.Panacea Email resume to lyndara@gmail.com call 850-491-6313 TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Employment Info Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed. Top 5% Pay & Late Model Equipment. Guaranteed Home for Xmas. Need CDLClass ADriving Exp (877)258-8782 www .ad drivers.com Schools/ Instruction Can Your Dig It? Heavy Equipment School. 3wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benefits Approved. 2 National Certifications. (866)362-6497 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality Job placement assistance.Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call www .Centura Online.com 888-203-3179 General 2002 MOBILE HOME 28X76 4Bedroom/2Bath Master Suite with Office, Walk-in Closet, Garden Tub, Shower. Family Room w/Fireplace and separate Living Room. Large kitchen w/Island and Breakfast Nook. $33,000. Call Billy (850)962-3884 Wanted to Buy $100 each for FLORIDA LICENSE PLATES FROM WAKULLA COUNTY THAT BEGIN WITH THE NUMBER 65 for years 1943, 1949, 1950, 1951,1954,1955. Up to $2000 for any Florida Wakulla porcelain license plate dated 1911-1917 Any condition accepted, so long as they are readable. Jeff Francis 727 424 1576 email gobucs13@aol.com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3/2 Doublewide MH For Lease or Lease Purchase Lake Ellen $695 + deposit. fenced yard 850-524-4090 CRAWFORDVILLEN. Wakulla county 2/1 Central air, gas heat, new flooring, clean. Move-in Ready! $495. $350 dep., $25 app fee. (850)-228-7197 PANACEAClean SW 3/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $500/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 SOPCHOPPY2 BR, 1 BA, w/ Screened Porch, on paved road, on 3 lots, possible sale with owner finance to qualified buyer $475. Mo. + Dep. (850) 566-4124 Rental Houses SOPCHOPPY AREAwaterfront cottage 1br/1ba, exc. cond. cath. ceiling, sep storage/laundry, Clear filtered water $590. month. 84 Mt. Beasor Rd. off Persimmon850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Baths 1,200 sq. ft., $800 mo. $500 sec. 145 Rehwinkle Rd. 850-766-0170 North WakullaCty, 3 bdrms, on 3 wooded acres, c/h/a large front porch, $675 plus security Brenda Hicks Realty (850) 251-1253 Vacation Rentals ALLIGATOR POINT2/Bedroom, 2/Bath, 1,200 sf, Gulf Front, Vacation Rental 3 blks to white sandy beach, 75ft. to Gulf of Mexico. Beautiful Sunsets $1,000. Wk. (904)687-3397 Real Estate For Sale 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www .sunsetranches.com Citrus County Homes PINE RIDGE-THIS IS THE PROPERTY YOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3.5 w/7 car garage/workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded with large back yard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community. www .centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352.249.9164 Roofing FREE ESTIMATES 850-889 -0989 Licensed and Insured #CCC1328414 www.a2zroof.com Fictitious Name Notices 5453-1206 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Doing business as: The Mayors Loft at 44 Mayberry Rd., Fictitious Name Notices Fictitious Name Notices Crawfordville, Florida 32327, with a mailing address of 44 Mayberry Rd., Crawfordville, Florida 32327,desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 27th day of November, 2012 /s/Glenn May Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News December 6, 2012 5456-1206 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The North Florida Broadband Authority (NFBA) Board of Directors announces its regular monthly public meeting to which all interested persons are invited. The NFBA is a public body created by Interlocal Agreement pursuant to Section 163.01, Florida Statutes. The Wednesday, December 12, 2012 meeting will be held at Ravine Gardens State Park, 1600 Twigg Street, Palatka, FL 32177 in the South conference room at 2:00 p.m. The meeting agenda will be posted to the NFBA website at least 48 hours prior to the scheduled meeting. The Board will address general operating matters of the NFBA. If a person decides to appeal any decision of the NFBA Board made at the meeting, such person may need a record of the proceedings, including the testimony and evidence upon which the decision was made. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations or an interpreter to participate in this meeting should contact Springfield Law, P.A. at (352) 371-9909 at least two business days prior to the date of the meeting. December 6, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5451-1206 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOL BOARD OFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE:School Board Policy 4.11*+ Student Progression Plan PURPOSE AND EFFECT:To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures. LEGAL AUTHORITY:1001.41, 1001.45, Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED:1001.43, 1003.43, 1003.437, 1003.49, F.S.. ECONOMIC IMPACT:None REVISION ORIGINATED BY:Beth ODonnell Assistant Superintendent for Instruction REVISION APPROVED BY:Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Schools Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, A HEARING WILL BE HELD TIME:5:45 p.m. PLACE:Administrative Offices Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE:January 22, 2013 A COPY OF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAY BE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board Post Office Box 100 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100 December 6, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5448-1206 TWN vs. Gray Services 1, Inc. Case No. 2011-318-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 5449-1206 TWN vs. Anderson, Brandon Case No. 65-2012-CA-000293 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000293 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, v. BRANDON L. ANDERSON AKA BRANDON ANDERSON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FOR FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING PROPER TY TO: Brandon L. Anderson AKA Brandon Anderson, ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 105 King Bee Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendant(s) are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant(s) as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOTS 67 AND 68, BLOCK A, MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TOGETHER WITH A 2003 SCHU MOBILE HOME WITH VIN NUMBERS HIGA20K04288A AND HIGA20K04288B AND TITLE NUMBERS 86614381 AND 86614505 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 105 KING BEE DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, such Morris Hardwick Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 120, Tampa, FL 33634 on or before December 29, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff`s attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 16th of November, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this hearing, should contact ADA Coordinator not later than 1 (one) day prior to the proceeding at Internal Revenue Service (FL -Northern), 400 West Bay Street, Stop 5710, Jacksonville, FL 32202 904-665-0832 and for the hearing and voice impaired 800-955-8770. November 29 and December 6, 2012 5450-1206 TWN vs. Taylor, Donnie Case No. 652010CA000100CAXXXX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652010CA000100CAXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF POPULAR ABS, INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-5, Plaintiff, v. DONNIE L TAYLOR; BILL THOMAS A/K/A W.A. THOMAS III; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR ACCREDITED HOME LENDERS, INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 1, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 652010CA000100CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 13th day of December, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. at the front Lobbyof the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 49, BLOCK 4, LAKE ELLEN ESTATES UNIT ONE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 (850) 577-4401at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA THIS 1st DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net A-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16 .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE.CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 GOT FALLIN G LE A VES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help!Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h a a a a v e e A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l t h e e M M o o o o o o d d e e e e e e r r n E q q q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m e n n t t to H e C C C ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f f f t ! PAT GR EEN S L AWN S ER VICE Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT 4Br 2Ba Hs. $850 mo. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650 mo. 3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs $850 mo. 2Br 2.5Ba Twnhs $775 mo. 2Br 2.5Ba Twnhs $750 mo. 2Br 1Ba Hs. $595 mo. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550 mo. 1,000 sf Commercial Bldg $800 mo. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Page 9B IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO: 2011-318-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, v. GRAY SERVICES 1, INC., F/K/A GRAY SERVICES, INC.; RAY E. GRAY; JODY M. GRAY; ALBERT L. HARTSFIELD; KATHY A. HARTSFIELD; WOODLAND PARK HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; WAKULLA RESERVATION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT, in accordance with the Final Judgment dated October 30, 2012, in the above-styled case, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 on Thursday, January 17, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. in accordance with Florida Statutes .031, the following described real properties situated in Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida: PARCEL 1 -276 CAJER POSEY: BEGIN AT THE INT ERSECT ION OF THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF THE OLD OCHLOCKNEE ROAD AND THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA THENCE RUN SOUTHERLY ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD 168 FEET, THENCE RUN WESTERLY AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 TO THE WEST BOUNDARY OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND CONVEYED TO WRIGHT ALEXANDER FROM DOLLIE VICKERS BY DEED DATED APRIL 1, 1942 AND RECORDED ON PAGE 6 OF DEED BOOK 26 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTHERLY ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID DOLLIE VICKERS TO WRIGHT ALEXANDER TRACT OF LAND TO THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY, THENCE RUN EASTERLY ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND BEING SITUATE IN LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY A SURVEY PREPARED BY EDWIN G. BROWN AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED MARCH 8, 1990, JOB NO. 90-031, AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 A DISTANCE OF 343.46 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF CAJER POSEY ROAD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY 263.58 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 95.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 218.55 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID CAJER POSEY ROAD, SAID MONUMENT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS 2529.45 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 80.57 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 10 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 80.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2024.99 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 20 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 89.14 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 10 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 89.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1984 SUMM MOBILE HOME ID # H37407G, TITLE # 18056384 PARCEL 3 -154 ELIZABETH DRIVE: SOUTH ONE-HALF OF LOT 11, OF EVERGREEN ACRES, UNIT II, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 77, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1985 BRIG MOBILE HOME ID # 14601487, TITLE # 41380323 PARCEL 4 -53 BREAM FOUNTAIN: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16, ISOLATED BLOCK A OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN DEED BOOK C-D, PAGE 572, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF TALLAHASSEE STREET, (U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 319) 100.95 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OR-WAY BOUNDARY OF A GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 726.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 88.03 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 210.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 186.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 9.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 93.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 200.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1980 FIES MOBILE HOME ID # FDGAS1070, TITLE #63390829. PARCEL 5 -93 STANLEY DRIVE: LOTS 29, 30 AND 31, BLOCK 3 OF LAKE ELLEN ESTATES, UNIT ONE, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1992 FLEE MOBILE HOME ID # GAFLN75A15782WE, TITLE # 63458581. PARCEL 6 -108 WOODLAND: LOT 12, OF WOODLAND PARK, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1990 FLEE MOBILE HOME ID # GAFLL34A13240SH AND ID # GAFLL34B13240SH, TITLE # 49296110 AND 48964997. PARCEL 7 -31 HARVEY PITTMAN: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 14, BLOCK Q OF HUDSON HEIGHTS, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AT PAGE 38 OF PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN IN AN EASTERLY DIRECTION ALONG AN EXTENSION OF THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT NO. 14 ACROSS RAKER LANE, WHICH IS A 50 FOOT DEDICATED STREET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF RAKER LANE, WHICH IS POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE TO RUN IN THE SAME DIRECTION 120 FEET, THENCE RUN IN THE SOUTHERLY DIRECTION AND AT RIGHT ANGLES TO THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 14, THE DISTANCE OF 220 FEET, THENCE RUN IN A WESTERLY DIRECTION AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 14, THE DISTANCE OF 120 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF RAKER LANE, THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE EASTERN BOUNDARY OF RAKER LANE, 220 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING SITUATE IN THE EAST HALF OF NO. 76 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1976 NORM MOBILE HOME ID # L0880NA AND L0880NB, TITLE # 13502704 AND 13502703. PARCEL 8 -47 BREAM FOUNTAIN ROAD: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16 OF ISOLATED BLOCK A OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID BLOCK A 198.0 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 13 OF SAID BLOCK A, THENCE SOUTH 109.18 FEET, THENCE EAST 435.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE SOUTH 200.0 FEET, THENCE EAST 93.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH 200.0 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE SPRING CREEK ROAD, THENCE WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SPRING CREEK ROAD 93.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND BEING SITUATED IN LOT NO. 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PORTION LYING WITHIN THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: (AS CONVEYED BY QUIT CLAIM IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 167, PAGE 112, TO LEE WILLIAMS AND HELEN WILLIAMS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16, ISOLAT ED BLOCK A OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN DEED BOOK C-D PAGE 572, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF TALLAHASSEE STREET (U.S. HIGHWAY NO.319) 103.43 FEET TO A SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED BOUNDARY OF A GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY 394.96 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED BOUNDARY 239.01 FEET, THENCE Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 208.83 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 31 -MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 234.68 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 206.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATED, LYING AND BEING IN LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BEING MORE RECENTLY BY EDWIN BROWN ASSOCIATES INC. DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16, OF ISOLATED BLOCK A OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN EAST 198.00 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 13, OF SAID BLOCK A; THENCE RUN SOUTH 109.18 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF BREAM FOUNTAIN ROAD; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY EAST 435.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE EAST 93.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 208.73 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 94.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 209.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT A STRIP OF LAND 9.30 FEET WIDE ACROSS THE SOUTHERLY PORTION OF SUBJECT PROPERTY. PARCEL 9 -88 ROBERT/WILLIAMS ROAD: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 659.83 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 219.70 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 490.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 185.98 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 337.90 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY GRADED ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 82 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 16.85 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 87 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 182.26 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 344.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE WESTERLY 60.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH 1971 GREA MOBILE HOME ID # KG6024F6N15861R AND KG6024F6N15861L, TITLE # 4694512 AND 4694511. PARCEL 10 -LOT 10 -56 EASTGATE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 2365.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 74.93 FEET TO A REBAR; FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 197.84 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST 149.90 FEET TO A REBAR LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF EASTGATE WAY; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 20 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 12.31 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST 65.30 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 36 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 240.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1986 PEAR MOBILE HOME ID #SHS8PGA39850391, TITLE # 42986775. PARCEL 11 -LOT 12 EASTGATE -70 EASTGATE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 2365.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 74.93 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 197.84 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 100.08 FEET TO A REBAR FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 99.85 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 150.41 FEET TO A REBAR LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF EASTGATE WAY; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 101.44 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 150.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1986 BEAC MOBILE HOME ID #SSMFLAD93268, TITLE # 50440146. PARCEL 12 -436 RAVENSVIEW & 403 BIG RICHARD & 407 BIG RICHARD: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN NORTH 615.12 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES EAST 337.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES EAST 233.72 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 301.67 FEET TO A POINT THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES WEST 231.80 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 300.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1998 COUG DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID NUMBERS: GMHGA4119819757A AND GMHGA4119819757B, TITLE NUMBERS: 79387367 AND 79386939 TOGETHER WITH A 1985 ROSE MOBILE HOME ID NUMBER: 21G10868D, TITLE NUMBER 40651489. TOGETHER WITH A 1981 SOUT DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID NUMBERS: COSGART011255A AND COSGART011255B, TITLE NUMBERS: 19617948 AND 19617949. PARCEL 14 -558 ROCK ROAD: BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. 267 AND THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF THE ROCK ROAD AND RUN WESTERLY ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID STATE ROAD, 397 FEET TO AN OLD FENCE LINE, THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG SAID OLD FENCE LINE 233 FEET, THENCE RUN EAST ALONG A FENCE LINE 197 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF ROCK ROAD, THENCE RUN IN A NORTHERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ROCK ROAD 256 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID PROPERTY LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST. BEING MORE RECENTLY DESCRIBED BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES INC., JOB #96007 DATED JUNE 22, 2004 AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A 6 INCH BY 6 INCH ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 9 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1990.02 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 267, THENCE LEAVING SAID WEST BOUNDARY LINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1216.69 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST ALONG AN OLD FENCE LINE 234.87 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 81 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 197.48 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF ROCK ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 168.73 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 60 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 89.59 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF ROCK ROAD WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF AFOREMENTIONED STATE ROAD 267, THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 75 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY 398.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL # 15 TRACT A; 94 DWIGHT SANDERS ROAD: COMMENCE AT AN OLD AXLE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 7 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 288.00 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY 144.06 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 302.31 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 144.01 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #799), THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 302.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL # 16 TRACT B; 98 DWIGHT SANDERS ROAD: COMMENCE AT AN OLD AXLE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 7 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 432.06 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY 144.05 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #799), THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 302.28 FEET TO A RE-ROD, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 144.01 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 302.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1983 ALLA MOBILE HOME ID # AAFLA2828, TITLE # 22941917. PARCEL 18 -137 TAFFINGER: LOTS 21 AND 30, BLOCK Q OF MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1987 VEGA DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ID #KH4026D31K8647GAA, TITLE # 45453562 AND ID #KH4026D31K8647GAB, TITLE # 45464840. PARCEL A: LOTS 34 AND 35, BLOCK 37 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT III, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 43, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1996 HORTON SINGLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID#H203274G, TITLE # 70561763. PARCEL B: LOT 10 AND THE SOUTHEAST HALF OF LOT 9, BLOCK 44 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL C: LOT 8 AND THE NORTHWEST HALF OF LOT 9, BLOCK 44 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, WAKULLA COUNTY (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 5444-1206 TWN Vs. Cook, Bobby 65-2012-CA-000379 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTYCIVILDIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000379 LPPMORTGAGE LTD., Plaintiff, vs. BOBBYCOOK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BOBBYCOOK; JAN COOK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAN COOK; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKINOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:BOBBYCOOK; JAN COOK; Whose residence(s) is/are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBYrequired to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL33619-1328, 5445-1206 TWN vs. Eichler, Christopher Case No 12000333CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION, CASE NO.: 12000333CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff vs. CHRISTOPHER W. EICHLER, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPER TY TO: CHRISTOPHER W. EICHLER : ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 4016 COLLETON COURT, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32311 CONNIE EICHLER : ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 9107 WAUKEENAH HIGHWAY, MONTICELLO, FL 32344 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: LOT 15, BLOCK A OF WAKULLA FOREST, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 54, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2000 JACOBSEN MOBILE HOME, TITLE NO. 80910726, 80910919, 80910982, I.D. NO. JACFL20876A, JACFL20876B, JACFL20876C. more commonly known as: 218 DOROTHY LOOP ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiff`s attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due by dECEMBER 29, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff`s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 8th day of November, 2012. Clerk of the Court, WAKULLA County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 CA12-02491 5447-1206 TWN vs. Avery, Roy Case No. 2011-299-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 2011-299-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, v. ROY L. AVERY, III, as personal representative for THE ESTATE OF COLLENE CRAWFORD AVERY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF COLLENE C. AVERY; AND UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT, in accordance with the Final Judgment dated November 9, 2012, in the above-styled case, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 on Thursday, December 13, 2012, at 11:00 a.m ., in accordance with Florida Statutes .031, the following described real properties situated in Sopchoppy, Wakulla County, Florida: LOTS 181, 182, 183, 184, 185 AND 186, BLOCK 35, OF THE TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY, EAST SIDE, AS SHOWN BY MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, WAKULLA COUNTY (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!77 Strattonwood Road Off of Wakulla Springs Hwy. 5 minute commute to Tallahassee. Large 3BR/2BA home on 5 acres. Large workshop with outbuilding. $1100. mo No Pets, no smoking. 2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/3BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 3BR/1BA New carpet throughout $590 mo. No Pets, No Smoking RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit 31 Magpie 3BR/2BA $1400 mo. $1400 sec. dep. Outside pets okay with approval 137 Shephard Easement 3BR/2BA MH on 6+ acres $900 mo. $900 security Lease with OPTION TO BUY! 5 Albin Live Oak Island 2BR/2BA with Lost and Dock. $950. mo. $950 Security Deposit.

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit: LOTS 15 AND 16, BLOCK 55 OF WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT FIVE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA If you fail to file your response or answer, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Dr., Tampa, Florida 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. DATED at WAKULLACounty this 13th day of November, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact : Danny Davis, Office of Court Administration, 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL32303, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5446-1206 TWN Estate of Lola Mae Johnson Case No. 12-102-CP Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION, FILE NO.: 12-102-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF LOLA MAE JOHNSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LOLA MAE JOHNSON, deceased, whose date of death was April 1, 2012, Aand whose Social Security Number is ***-**-8063, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327-0337. The names and adNotices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 29 and December 6, 2012 dresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives Attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 29, 2012. Personal Representative: By:/s/ JEHOVAH DAVIS 102 Riverview Dr., Knifley, KY 42753 Attorney for Personal Representative: RICHARD L. ROGERS of RICHARD L. ROGERS, P.A. Florida Bar No. 320269 1135 South Washington Ave., Suite A Titusville, FL 32780, Telephone (321) 268-5173 November 29 and December 6, 2012 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 27 29 35 38 43 48 50 57 60 2 22 44 3 23 45 4 24 41 5 20 39 18 36 51 58 61 6 15 30 52 7 31 46 49 8 25 28 47 9 26 42 21 40 59 62 10 16 19 37 53 11 32 54 12 33 55 13 34 56 ACROSS 1. Croc's kin 6. "Just the facts, __" 10. Belgrade native 14. Where you live 15. __ breve (cut time) 16. Eggs order 17. Correspondence sometimes marked "SWAK" 19. Handle, so to speak 20. Choir voice 21. Quinn of "Reckless" 22. Common tip amount 27. "Yes __, Bob!" 28. They try harder 29. Affixed one's John Hancock to 30. Bar fare 32. Ducked the seeker 35. Owner's certificate 36. Basilica areas 37. Declare untrue 38. Byrnes of old TV 39. Long green 40. Sacagawea was one 41. Sudden burst 42. Hoe wielder 43. Common rifle round, familiarly 48. Spine-tingling 49. Thumbs-downs 50. Send sprawling 51. Quick snooze 57. Baseball's "Charlie Hustle" 58. Touched down 59. Upper crust 60. Curbside-stand drinks 61. Tune from Shankar 62. Keyed upDOWN1. Eight pts. 2. Blood-typing letters 3. "Mazel __!" 4. Laudatory lines 5. In the family 6. Photo finish 7. Illinois city 8. Drink on draft 9. Bang up 10. Onetime Seattle hoopsters, for short 11. Give the slip to 12. Staff anew 13. Sportscaster Musburger 18. Gen. Robert __ 21. Like the Gobi 22. Punished for littering, maybe 23. Teed off 24. Ricky's landlord 25. CBS exec William 26. Spacewalks, in NASA lingo 27. "Us" or "them" 30. __ Domingo 31. Forum greeting 32. Johanna Spyri heroine 33. The Dow, e.g. 34. Henna user 36. Like a buttinsky 37. Cost of belonging 39. Remote control button 40. Is caught in the rain, say 41. Acts the bellyacher 42. Fare for Muffet 43. Pentaminus one 44. Judean king 45. Maya Angelou's "Still __" 46. Disassemble, aboard ship 47. Must, informally 51. Wide partner 52. Briber y suffix 53. Suffix with project 54. "The House of Incest" writer 55. Horsehead-shaped pcs. 56. "Told you so!"American Prole Hometown Content 12/2/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 12 34 54673 328 3 41 29 754 6 94 85176 1423 2009 HometownContent 126 3584 9 7 548697231 379142685 835 479162 214836759 697215348 762 983514 483521976 951764823 G A L S I D E T E T R A A B O F I N E D H E R O D T O V I R K E D I R I S E O D E F R E D G R I P E S R E L A T E D M U T E E L E E N O S Y F A R M A T T E S A N T O O L A A L T O N A V E U N R I G A L E P A L E Y G O T T A M A R E V A S W H E Y A R I D G E T S W E T S O N I C S D U E S I L E E V A D E H E I D I N I N R E M A N I N D E X K T S B R E N T D Y E R S E E Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 Page 11B 1. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is a philographist? 2. TELEVISION: Which actor played the character of Fonzie on Happy Days? 3. LITERATURE: Who wrote the childrens book Matilda? 4. GEOGRAPHY: What tiny principality lies between Spain and France? 5. MYTHOLOGY: In Greek mythology, what was the Hydra? 6. FOOD & DRINK: What is muesli? 7. ART: Where is the Uffizi museum? 8. MEASUREMENTS: What does a kelvin measure? 9. MOVIES: What spell is used to disarm opponents in the Harry Potter movies? 10. ANATOMY: Where is the latissimus dorsi muscle located on the human body? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Someone who collects autographs 2. Henry Winkler 3. Roald Dahl 4. Andorra 5. A many-headed monster whose heads could grow back if they were cut off 6. Breakfast cereal with fruit and nuts 7. Florence, Italy 8. Temperature 9. Expelliarmus! 10. Back YOUR AD HERE

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet By TAMAR HASPAL Contributor, Relish magazinePumpkin is a squash a giant, orange squash. Its a little disheartening to think that such an American institution is second cousin to zucchini, but there it is. Although the kind you make Jack OLanterns out of makes lousy eating, small sugar pumpkins are excellent sweet and rich. They are, however, laborintensive. Enter, canned pumpkin, arguably the best canned vegetable there is. You get consistent, smooth, avorful pure, with no slicing, scraping or baking. Besides being versatile and tasty, pumpkins also good for you. Its rich in ber and beta-carotene and has almost no fat. And all that nutrition will cost you only 42 calories in a half-cup serving. When you think pumpkin, you usually think pie, but thats not all its good for. Here are some quick and easy uses for canned pumpkin. Mix canned pumpkin into softened ice cream and then refreeze for a quick pumpkin dessert. Make a simple soup by sauting an onion and adding about 4 cups of chicken broth and a 28-ounce can of pumpkin. Stir in 2 to 3 ounces of goat cheese, and season with salt, pepper and a pinch of nutmeg. Use canned pumpkin as a thickener. Add a cup to vegetable chili to round out the avor and beef up the texture. Try substituting canned pumpkin for half the fat in quick breads. It will add color and avor and pairs well with cinnamon, citrus and even chocolate. PUMPKIN MACARONI AND CHEESE 3 cups mostaccioli or penne pasta, uncooked 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 tablespoons our 2 cups 2 percent reduced fat milk 3/4 cup canned pumpkin puree 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded Monterey Jack Cheese 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded Comte or Gruyere cheese 1/2 cup (2 ounces) grated Parmesan cheese 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/8 t easpoon nutmeg (optional) 1/8 teas poon black pepper 1. Preheat oven to 375F. Grease a 13 x 9-inch baking pan. 2. Cook pasta in salted water according to package directions. Drain. 3. Melt butter in saucepan over medium heat until foamy. Whisk in our and cook 2 minutes. Slowly whisk in milk, making sure there are no lumps. Add pumpkin puree and mix well. Remove from heat. Add cheeses, salt, nutmeg and black pepper. 4. When cheese is melted combine with drained noodles. Pour into baking pan. Bake uncovered 25 to 30 minutes or until golden and bubbly. Serves 8. Recipe by Jill Melton. Per serving: 411 calories, 19g fat, 59mg chol., 21g prot., 38g carbs., 2g ber, 302mg sodium. For more Relish recipes and to sign up for our newsletters, log on to relish.com. To download our new Relish digital editions and Relish Daily Dish phone app, go to relish.com/mobile RELISH THE AMERICAN TABLECanned pumpkin is an indispensable ingredientMARK BOUGHTON PHOTOGRAPHY By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 3, The first meeting of a Senate select committee on the federal Affordable Care Act turned raucous Monday, with a group of speakers saying the state should not carry out the law and jeering Senate Minority Leader Chris Smith after he defended the role of the federal government. Members of the group, including tea-party activists, said the law known as Obamacare is an unconstitutional overreach by Washington. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld most of the law in June, which has led to state lawmakers considering whether to carry out portions such as an expansion of Medicaid eligibility and creation of a healthinsurance exchange. KrisAnne Hall, a North Florida lawyer who was a chief spokeswoman for the group, described the federal law as a trainwreck. You have to stand now in defense of the constitution, in honor of your oath, she told members of the Senate Select Committee on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. But a short time later, Smith, a Fort Lauderdale Democrat, offered a different view of the federal governments role, saying, Its hard to sit here and be silent and listen to some of this. Smith said, for example, the federal government had to play a large role in the past on issues such as integrating schools. Also, he pointed to part of the U.S. Constitution that originally treated black people as less than white people for representation purposes. The federal government had to step in because our constitution is an imperfect document, Smith said, drawing boos from the health-law opponents. If it was perfect, you would not have amendments to it. Committee Chairman Joe Negron, R-Stuart, tried to stem the booing. I would ask everyone, show courteousness and decorum, Negron said. Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, formed the select committee to make recommendations about issues confronting the state, as major pieces of the federal health law get ready to take effect in January 2014. Florida Republican leaders fought the law in the courts and politically for more than two years, but now are grappling with the realization that the Affordable Care Act likely will take full effect after the Supreme Court decision and President Obamas re-election in November. Negron said he is not sure when the committee will make recommendations and that Mondays meeting was largely about starting to gather information. He said his priorities include protecting individual choice in health-care matters, limiting regulations on businesses that are subject to the law and promoting competition and value as Floridians make decisions about buying coverage. One important piece of the law increasing payments to primary-care physicians who treat Medicaid patients appears likely to take effect Jan. 1. The federal government would pay the full cost of the increase in 2013 and 2014, though Florida would have to pick up part of the tab in later years if it decides to keep the increase in place. The health law requires the physician-payment increase, and Negron said lawmakers are looking at how the increase can take effect Jan. 1 without the Legislature having to act on it. The increase would reimburse physicians at rates paid in the Medicare program, which are higher than the rates paid by Florida Medicaid. But the more-contentious issues center on whether to expand Medicaid eligibility to include more Floridians and whether to set up a state health-insurance exchange, a type of online marketplace that federal of cials see as an important part of trying to help people get coverage. If Florida does not set up an exchange, the Obama administration will do it for the state --though Florida also could enter into a partnership with the federal government. Another issue facing lawmakers is whether the state will offer health coverage to employees who work in what are considered temporary positions. Some workers stay in the jobs known as other personal services jobs for long periods of time. Under the law, the state could be forced to pay nancial penalties if it doesnt offer coverage to them. Members of the committee listened to the staff presentations on such issues Monday and gave little indication about how they want to move forward. But Sen. Eleanor Sobel, D-Hollywood, said Florida has one of the highest rates of uninsured people in the country, which she said needs to be reckoned with. We have to abide by the law and do whats best for the people of Florida in terms of their health care, Sobel said.Federal health law touches off brouhaha 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... 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