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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00437
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 11-29-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00437
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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 46th Issue Thursday, November 29, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A News Extra!.....................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 6B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7B Comics ...........................................................................Page 10B Puzzles ...........................................................................Page 11BINDEX OBITUARIES Marshall Wallace Bradford James B. OBryan Richard A. SeybothOperation SantaParamedic killed in motorcycle crashStaff reportA traf c crash around 12:40 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 21, claimed the life of a Wakulla County paramedic, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. Marshall Wallace Bradford, 35, of Crawfordville, was on his Harley Sportster motorcycle traveling northbound on U.S Highway 319 near Hill Greene Road when he drove onto the grass shoulder and struck a tree. He died at the scene, according to the FHP. According to the traf c report, Bradford was not wearing a helmet and it was believed that alcohol was involved. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and Wakulla County Emergency Medical Services assisted FHP. Bradford worked for Wakulla County EMS as a paramedic and was promoted to captain earlier this month after competing against three other paramedics, said Wakulla Fire and Rescue Director Chief Michael Morgan. Continued on Page 2A Marshall Wallace BradfordChristmas in Panacea is this SaturdayBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter the community was devastated by Hurricane Dennis in 2005, people in Panacea were looking for a way to bring some joy back into the holiday season. This community was struggling, spirits were not high, said resident Sherrie Posey Miller. Many residents were left dealing with the effects of Hurricane Dennis even as the holiday season approached. Many in the community were not going to be able to even afford buying a Christmas tree. After hearing this, members of Panacea Waterfronts decided they needed to do something. And so was the start of the Christmas in Panacea celebration. The Waterfronts community thought of an idea that would allow everyone in the community to enjoy the warm feeling of sitting around a beautifully decorated Christmas tree, Miller said. The event begins around 2 p.m. with a Christmas Marketplace featuring local arts and crafts in Panacea. Then at 4 p.m. there is live entertainment. The boat on trailer parade down U.S. Highway 98 begins at 6:30 p.m. Following the parade, the community gathers for the lighting of the 20-foot Christmas tree, which is donated by Waterfronts every year. Along with the events scheduled, many areas businesses and homeowners decorate their homes and storefronts for the celebration. In addition, Santa will also be in town. There will also be face painting, childrens activities, hay ride, story teller, free refreshments and caroling. We want everyone to come and join us and enjoy these events, everything is free, Miller said. For more information, contact Miller at 528-1527. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWith two weeks left until gifts are distributed to families in need in Wakulla County through Operation Santa, volunteers or elves are working overtime to get everything done. The Wakulla County Community Center, at the intersection of Trice Lane and Shadeville Road, serves as a command center for the program and is the place where people can drop off needed items or monetary donations or volunteer their time to help a great cause. So far, 192 families have been identi- ed, according to Layne Davis, Operation Santa volunteer. This equates to 642 people. Last year, 141 families were helped. Out of these 642 people, 474 have been adopted. The stories they hear are heart wrenching, said Gail Campbell, executive director of Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, the group behind the program which provides basic needs and wishes to families who would otherwise go without this holiday season. The families are referred by the school district, senior center, Refuge House, the health department, area churches, Apalachee Center and others. Many of those who have been referred to the coalition are the working poor, she said. Trying to manage in this economy, she added. Continued on Page 2A JENNIFER JENSENPews at the community center are stacked with items as volunteers help sort donations for Operation Santa.Annual e ort underway to help needy Wakulla families PHOTO BY MELISSA STARBUCK/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWhooping cranes arrive in St. Marks Whooping cranes arrive in S t. Marks A group of endangered whooping cranes ew over St. Marks on Saturday morning on their way to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. See story on Page 7A. A group of endangered whooping cranes ew over St. Marks on Saturday morning on their way to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. See story on Page 7A. FILE PHOTOA parade oat in last years boats on trailers parade for Christmas in Panacea. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netSomething a little different this year at Christmas in Panacea is the free citrus that will be given out to the children, along with candy canes. Sherrie Posey Miller of Panacea Waterfronts, the group behind the celebration, said it was an idea brought forward by Ronald Fred Crum, another member of Panacea Waterfronts, who said it was something people did years ago and he wanted to see if they could start it in Panacea. There will be 30 cases of citrus given out at the event.Continued on Page 2ACitrus to be given away this year War Eagles lose to Godby See Page 1B

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage? Continued from Page 1A In the short time I knew him I learned he was an aggressive paramedic that enjoyed his work and was very dedicated to providing advanced life service to all that needed it, Morgan said. I watched him, as I did CPR on a non-breathing new born infant, take him from my arms and literally save his life with his paramedic skills. That is what he was all about. Morgan said Bradford was more than an employee, and he was a dedicated father and husband. Funeral services for Bradford were held this past weekend with a full honor guard. He leaves behind his wife, Glenna, and two children, Chaim and Liam. He was taken too soon from us, Morgan said.Paramedic killed in motorcycle crashContinued from Page 1A Miller contacted Hannah Carter with Wedgworth Leadership Institute for Agriculture and Natural Resources, a leadership development program for individuals from around the state of Florida who are the leaders in agricultural organizations and industries, to see if she could help. I sent an email to all the citrus growers who have participated in this program and within minutes, I had one grower who was willing to donate what Sherrie requested, 10 cases, Carter said. Within the day, I had two other growers willing to do the same. Carter said she even had two other alumni who were willing to transport the citrus from south Florida to Panacea. Miller has had a connection to this program since the early 90s. The founder of the program, Dr. Eugene Trotter, was traveling around Wakulla County as he was setting up the rst seminar in this area and stopped at Poseys restaurant for lunch. There, he met Miller and she volunteered to help him nd speakers in the area for Class I of the program. And she has been doing this for every class of this program, Carter said. When Carter gets ready to bring a class to Wakulla County, she contacts Miller who puts the agenda together and the classes visit with the superintendent of schools, Judge Jill Walker, county commissioners and local shermen. For the majority of our participants, theyve never spent time in Wakulla County, but they learn a great deal and come away with a much greater appreciation of the county, the communities and the issues that you are dealing with, Carter said. All the people who have spoken to the classes over the years and Miller have made an indelible impression, Carter said. And this is our way of giving back to the community that has given so much to this program, she said. The leadership institute is 55 days in length over two years and those days are spent traveling around the state of Florida, the nation and on an 18-day international trip. There are nine study/travel seminars in the state of Florida that are typically 3 to 5 days in length. During all these study/travel seminars, participants are examining the social, economic, political and cultural issues that are occurring in the locations they are visiting. We hope that they will then go back to their own communities with a better understanding of how other individuals and groups are dealing with issues, making decisions and impacting policy, Carter said. The goal of the program is to increase their involvement in the policy decisions that impact their organizations, industries and communities. There have been eight classes so far. For more information about the institute, visit http://wlianr.ifas.u .edu.Citrus to be given away this yearContinued on Page 2A There are also numerous single parents, grandparents taking care of their grandchildren, unemployed people and those who are disabled. Many of the things being asked for from these families are basic needs, including household items, toiletries, winter coats and food. One person asked for a kitchen table so her children didnt have to eat their meals on a sheet on the oor, Davis said. People who are coming to us dont know how they are going to feed their kids on Christmas, she said. You just cant help but open up your heart to them. President of the coalition Bruce Ashley said many people are also asking for help with their medical needs and food. We know there are food de ciencies in many households in this county, Ashley said. The group is asking people in the community to consider adopting a family. Adoptions are No. 1, Campbell said. They are also seeking donations of items or monetary donations and volunteers to help sort the items. Some items they need the most include household items, toiletries, towels, linens, blankets, coats, pots and pans, food and gently worn clothing. Other items are toys, electronics, laundry soap, games, books puzzles, comforters, furniture, kitchenware and socks. One woman asked for a bed because her children are having to sleep on the oor, while another asked for a couch so her six children could have a place to sit in their living room, Davis said. There have also been numerous requests for haircuts. As well as help with handiwork, many which are safety issues. People they have spoken to have also asked for help with their utility bills and rent. In those cases, Operation Santa does it best to reach out to another agency who can help them. Those who wish to help can adopt a family, make a monetary donation, drop off donated items, buy a gift off the wishing tree at Wal-Mart or purchase items from Dollar General off East Ivan and place them in the donation box. Whatever level of income you are, theres something you can do, Davis said. She encouraged groups and co-workers to get together to adopt a family. If people are unable to donate items or adopt a family, they can donate their time, Davis said. Theres something for everybody to do, Davis said. She suggested parents volunteer with their children to teach them about service work and those who are less fortunate than themselves. Theres people out there who dont even have Christmas lists, Davis said. Or there are adults who put down a Christmas wish for themselves that is truly intended for their children, such as a baby blanket, she said. Donations can be dropped off at the Community Center Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Families will be noti ed on or before Dec. 1, with con rmation of acceptance into the program. Operation Santa is coordinating with the Salvation Army, Christmas Connection and area churches to ensure there is no overlap and more families can be helped. When noti ed, families will be given a day to shop for clothes at the center. The clothes will be made part of their Operation Santa gift box for pick up on Dec. 15. Families accepted will pick up gifts on Dec. 15 between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Those who adopt a family are asked to bring their items to the center no later than Dec. 13. For more information, call 926-3526.Operation Santa helps needy familiesStaff reportVisitors were invited to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, Nov. 17 for the annual Outdoors for the Holidays festival hosted by the St. Marks Refuge Photo Club. There were several childrens activities, including crafts, an appearance by the refuges Blue Goose, a chance to take a holiday photo and enjoy free cider and cookies. There was also chili for sale. All donations will go to the Junior Ranger Summer Camp at the refuge. Those at the refuge were also able to get an up close and personal view of an alligator and her babies while standing on the deck at the back of the visitors center overlooking the refuge. PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENOATH ADMINISTERED: Bobby Pearce was sworn-in as Superintendent of Schools on Tuesday, Nov. 20, by retiring Superintendent David Miller. Pearces wife held the Bible as his children looked on.SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS: New school board member Melisa Taylor, left, took the oath of of ce from Superintendent Pearce as her husband held the Bible; and school board member Greg Thomas, re-elected without opposition to another term, takes the oath from Pearce as his wife holds the Bible and his sons look on. JENNIFER JENSENDad Tony Winton helps son Adam, 5, make holiday decorations at the refuges Outdoors for the Holidays on Saturday, Nov. 17.Outdoors for the Holidays is held at the refuge New superintendent sworn 192 642Number of families who have applied for help Number of individuals in those families seeking helpBy the numbers:Operation Santa

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.NOVEMBER 29, 2012 NO FINAL ACTION ADOPTING THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT WILL BE TAKEN AT THESE MEETINGS. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCYThe Department of Homeland Securitys Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has issued a preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), and where applicable, Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report, reecting proposed ood hazard determinations within Wakulla County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. These ood hazard determinations may include the addition or modication of Base Flood Elevations, base ood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area boundaries or zone designations, or the regulatory oodway. Technical information or comments are solicited on the proposed ood hazard determinations shown on the preliminary FIRM and/or FIS report for Wakulla County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. The preliminary FIRM and FIS report can be viewed at http://portal.nwfwmdoodmaps.com. These ood hazard determinations are the basis for the oodplain management measures that your community is required to either adopt or show evidence of being already in effect in order to qualify or remain qualied for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. However, before these determinations are effective for oodplain management purposes, you will be provided an opportunity to appeal the proposed information. For information on the statutory 90-day period provided for appeals, as well as a complete listing of the communities affected and the locations where copies of the FIRM are available for review, please visit FEMAs website at www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fhm/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Information eXchange (FMIX) toll free at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-2627).NOVEMBER 29, 2012 DECEMBER 6, 2012Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations for Wakulla County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS NOVEMBER 8, 15, 21, 29, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOVEMBER 29, 2012 PLEASE RECYCLECOUNTY COMMISSIONNew Board of County Commissioners is sworn-inBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe newest county commissioners elected on Nov. 6 were sworn into of ce on Nov. 20. Commissioners Richard Harden, Howard Kessler and Ralph Thomas took their seats at the dais after being sworn in by Judge Jill Walker. This is always such a privilege, Judge Walker said. First up was Thomas who faced incumbent Alan Brock and Jenny Brock in the race for district 1. Thomas is a native of Wakulla County and graduated from Wakulla High in 1984. After high school, he joined the Navy and now works for AmeriFirst Home Mortgage. Thomas has been involved in the county commission through the Wakulla County Value Adjustment Board, Wakulla County One Cent Sales Tax Committee and the Wakulla County Citizens Advisory Task Force. He has also been vocal at county commission meetings. I have a servants heart, Thomas said. Im just ready to serve the citizens of Wakulla County and make a great county even better. Kessler ran against incumbent Mike Stewart in district 3. Kessler served on the board for eight years, but lost to Commissioner Jerry Moore in the 2010 election. He is a semi-retired board certi ed orthopedic surgeon and moved from Sarasota to Wakulla County in 1999 with his wife, Anne Van Meter. Kessler said, You come back into of ce being out of office with a different perspective. He said he is optimistic that his time and experience will help him and he looks forward to serving with the current board. I hope the board will make their decisions for the good of the people and the county and not any special interests, he said. The last commissioner to be sworn in was Harden who ran against Emily Smith and John Shuff for district 5. Incumbent Lynn Artz chose not to seek another term. Harden brought his family Bible with him to be used during the ceremony. I promised my family I would, Harden said. Harden is a native of Sopchoppy and graduated from Wakulla High. After high school, he enlisted in the U.S. Airforce. He is currently a correctional of cer at Franklin Correctional Institution. He served as a commissioner on the Sopchoppy City Commission for six years and three of those as vice mayor. Im very excited, humbled and grateful, Harden said. Once the newly elected commissioner took their seats, it was time for the commission to select a chair and vice chair. Moore made the motion to select Commissioner Randy Merritt as chairman. The commission voted unanimously to approve the motion. I hope I can do everybody a good job, Merritt said. Merritt was elected to district 2 in 2010. Moore then made a motion to select Harden as vice chair. The commissioners all agreed. I was certainly not expecting that, Harden said. However, having served as vice mayor, he felt con dent he could handle the task. The rst regular county commission meeting of the new board will be held on Dec. 3 at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netOn Monday, Nov. 19, the three outgoing county commissioners said their thanks and their goodbyes to the citizens, their fellow commissioners and county staff. Commissioners Lynn Artz, Alan Brock and Mike Stewart attended their last meeting as commissioners. You guys saw this county through probably some of the toughest times in recent history that weve had, said County Administrator David Edwards. Thank you for your hard work. Artz, who represented district 5 for the last four years, chose not to run for re-election. Instead, she urged a candidate to come forward who had similar beliefs and ideals of her own. She extended her full support to candidate Emily Smith, but Smith was beaten by Richard Harden for the vacant seat. During the meeting, Artz saluted her fellow outgoing commissioners and thanked them for their efforts. To Brock, she said, I personally think your crowning achievement is the solid waste. Thats your legacy. Brock brought forward the idea of mandatory curbside garbage pickup and eventually won the support of the majority of the commission. Artz commended Stewart for being an incredible negotiator and also for having such a strong morality. Ive been very proud to serve on the board with you, Artz said to the commissioners. Brock, who served as the chairman for the last year, ran for re-election, but lost to Ralph Thomas. He spoke of Artzs strong voice on the board and her role as moderator. Of Stewart, he said, Youve always put people over politics. Brock thanked the citizens and his fellow commissioners. It has been an honor, he said. Stewart served on the commission for three terms, not consecutively. He sought a fourth term, but lost to former Commissioner Howard Kessler. Stewart was also appreciative of the other commissioners and citizens and said he was proud of the tough decisions the current commission had to make. This board you see here tonight rolled up its sleeves and did what others refused to do, Stewart said. He added that it was the best combination of commissioners he has ever worked with. Commissioner Randy Merritt agreed and said, Hopefully weve set a standard for civility and how to treat and respect each other even if we dont agree. Commissioner Jerry Moore also spoke a few words about the three commissioners and said both Artz and Brock are two of the nicest people. He was respectful of Stewart and his honesty and morals. If Mr. Mike tells you something, you can take it to the bank, Moore said.Outgoing commissioners give farewell remarks PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENTHE NEW BOARD: Ralph Thomas, Howard Kessler, Chairman Randy Merritt, Jerry Moore,and Richard Harden.SWEARING IN: Wakulla Judge Jill Walker administers the oath to new commissioners Richard Harden, Howard Kessler and Ralph Thomas at the organizational meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 20. ree new commissioners are on the board, and Randy Merritt will serve as chairman

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Traffic crash with fatality on Wednesday morning A new superintendent: Bobby Pearce takes over the post from David Miller Sheriff-elect Creel names undersheriff The great Thanksgiving con Crawfordville man arrested for drug trafficking Wakulla unemployment down Senior Center tries to reduce holiday anxiety for seniorsthewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.Editor, The News:One of my ol Wakulla High School pals just CHALLENGED ME! ITS ON! If we can raise $500 by Dec. 1st for Operation Santa 2012, he will match that $500 dollar for dollar. Im calling it the WHS Class of 7 Challenge. You dont have to be an 7er to participate $1, $5, anything to reach $500. Drop off at Wakullas Community Center, or call (850) 926-3526. Ask for Gail or Layne. And tell em WHS Class of 7 Challenge is what brought you in. We can do something GREAT for those in Wakulla whove been hit by Tropical Storm Debby, unemployment, or may simply be struggling to eat. See the video on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-wIaTV4yLU Thanks, Herb Donaldson CrawfordvilleA couple of perspectives of the Thanksgiving holidayOperation Santa creates challenge A plea to hunters: stop dumping carcasses Please return white elephant to his home No real change with new sheri Editor, The News: Most people who hunt are responsible. They respect the laws and the communities in which they hunt. However, a few irresponsible hunters can sour the season. In my neighborhood there is a small creek which feeds the Sopchoppy River. Walking over the bridge on Sunday afternoon I discovered a problem which was huge last year and looks like it will be again this hunting season. Someone has dumped a deer carcass in the creek. Last year, there were as many as six carcasses in this creek at one time! (It was hard to get an exact count, as the deer were dumped there in pieces.) This irresponsible behavior not only pollutes our rivers, but is a smelly, unsanitary nuisance to the people in our community who walk and bicycle along this road. The sides of the creek are on private property, causing residents to limit where they can walk with their children and dogs. Please hunters: dispose of your carcasses responsibly by burying them on your property. Dont expect the buzzards to take care of your mess before the waterways are polluted by your thoughtlessness. Judith Harriss Sopchoppy Editor, The News:An open letter to whomever took the white elephant: I am writing to ask for the return of the white elephant from in front of The White Elephant store. The vendors and I have come to enjoy the fact that he belongs to us, he disappeared once before and was gone for a week, but was returned to us a little battered, but still returned to again take his place at the front of the shop on his little stump, welcoming all who came down 319. We are asking that anyone seeing him will return him. He has been with us from the opening of the shop in 2006, and its the Christmas season and he would love to be home. We have led a report with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce, we need to nd him. Please look for him and send him home. Hopefully, Ina Ecklund Owner, White Elephant Editor, The News: Isnt it amusing, many people of Wakulla County did not want any more good ole boy Sheriffs Of ce. So they elect a sheriff with a different name with lots of family ties to Wakulla County and the folks who run the show. It is just too funny to comment any further. Seems to me it will be just a different named good ol boy system. What do you think? Jack Collins jajcjrow@aol.com By RITA HANEY It is Thanksgiving and time to gather with friends and family to express our love. Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. All you need is a hearty appetite. Everyone is welcome at the table. Spirits are high. In Alcoholics Anonymous, November is Gratitude month and most meetings relate to this subject. Addicts in recovery have a lot to be grateful for. As do we all. There are the big things, of course, and there are the million and one things we take for granted in this age of fast moving, double-duty lifestyle, One of the basic things taken for granted is breathing. We can, it seems, live days without food and water. We cannot live without air for more than a few minutes and yet we dont think of our breath. Breathing is what keeps us on the planet. In these days of anxiety and overdoing, not just at the holidays, but how we seem to live our lives, we forget to breathe. Breath is what keeps us alive. Challenge yourself to stop and breathe. Breathe from your lower abdomen and ll your lungs from the bottom to the top; release this breath slowly by mouth. Pause. Do this again. Pause. Do this again. An experiment conducted on men with high blood pressure used a combination of deep breathing and gratitude. The men were told to breathe slowly and deeply and to concentrate on someone or something for which they were grateful. This exercise measurably reduced the mens blood pressure. When stressed often we reach for something outside of ourselves to help us get through the anxiety. We overeat, we drink, we smoke, take a pill or we become tense and irritable not enjoying ourselves or anything else. Try breathing. Breathe slowly and deeply. To practice, place your hands on your stomach and feel the breath as it moves from the bottom of the lungs to the top; hold; release slowly. Close your eyes and accompany this action with thoughts of gratitude and feel yourself relax. You can do this exercise as often as you like. It can be practiced almost anywhere. Breathe through the workday. May you eat, drink and be merry this holiday season. And breathe.Rita Haney, MSW, LCSW is a counselor in Crawfordville.I watched Halloween stories on TV the week before the holiday. Nurse Judy, that silly alter ego of mine, made fun of me, saying those stories are not sophisticated. They are just light, uffy movies and do not stimulate the intellect? I think this observation of hers is hilarious, since she does nothing ever to stimulate her intellect. I dont want to ght with her, however, so I just enjoyed myself never caring that I hadnt stimulated my brain. The day after trick or treating, I took down all the jack-o-lanterns, ghosts and goblins and put out the turkeys, pilgrims, Indians and gourds. I was ready to enjoy my favorite holiday. That weekend I turned on the Hallmark channel ready to watch Thanksgiving movies. Guess what? There were none. Sunday night, Nov. 4, there were non-stop Christmas movies. Nurse Judy noticed me ying around checking all my calendars. What are you doing? she asked. You are acting so crazy. Im trying to nd November, I said. Did I sleep through it? I know I turned back the clock, but did I also turn forward the calendar? What are you talking about? she asked pulling out her smart phone. (I dont even have a smart phone, but she always thinks she needs whatever is new and trendy). She glanced at her phone, and then shoved it under my nose. See, she says, This is a smart phone and it says it is Nov. 4th today. You did not lose November. I look at her phone. She must be right for thats what it says. I am confused. I point at the TV where another movie, The Christmas Secret, is just coming on. Why are there Xmas stories now, and not Thanksgiving stories? I ask her. Nurse Judy gives me an exasperated look. We live in a fast moving world she says. Everything gets pushed ahead quicker and quicker because we are just so busy, and there is so little time to get things done. But what about Thanksgiving? I whine. Its my favorite holiday. Where has it gone? It will come, she says. It will come just like always, but all you do is eat and be thankful that day. TV wants to remind you that Christmas is just around the corner; that you must be working on your gift lists; your decorations, both indoors and out; your Christmas cards; your wrapping supplies and schedule, your Christmas menu, your shopping, and and I hold up my hands. Stop, I shout. I dont want my TV reminding me about the holiday rush. I want to relax and smell the turkey baking in the oven, the pumpkin pies cooling on the shelf. I want to sit on the couch and watch football and the Thanksgiving Day parades, I want to be calm and think about all the wonderful things in my life that I have to be thankful for. I am not going to allow this TV to rush my life. I walk over and unplug the TV. Nurse Judy looks surprised and then snickers. Look at the paper, she says. It is full of ads for Christmas. Go in the stores. They are full of Christmas trees and toys. You cant escape this forward push. I put my head in my hands. She may be right about TV, ads, and stores. Still, I am going to have my regular Thanksgiving. None of the Christmas frenzy until after my last bite of turkey and dressing. I am about to tell her my plan, but she is on the oor looking for the TV plug. I sigh, but I guess theres no harm in finding out what The Christmas Secret is all about. No matter what Thanksgiving will come. More later,Judy Conlin is a nurse in Gadsden and Wakulla counties. Her website is www.nursejudyinfo.com. What happened to anksgiving? Judy Conlin Nurse Judys Nook Feel gratitude. And breatheREADERS WRITE:By SLIM RANDLES Coffee always tastes perfect before daylight on the opening day of deer season, Dud Campbell thought as he sat in neartotal darkness in his kitchen. He was being extra quiet so as not to awaken Anita. Turning on a ashlight on the kitchen counter, he wrote: Honey, Ill be up Pine Canyon, hunting up a feeder creek 1.4 miles to the right. The truck will be at the campground. Doc and Steve both know the area Im hunting. Ill be back no later than 10 p.m. unless I call. An hour later, Dud quietly got out of the pickup and left a note under the windshield wiper: Hunting to the west between here and the ridge. Should be back here no later than 9 p.m. Dud was sitting on a rock outcropping as the sun rose, feeling the warmth spread from inside out as another great day of anticipation came. He smiled, and then prayed. He always did during hunting season. His prayer wasnt wishing for success, but simply expressing gratitude for this special time. He got home about 9 p.m. and raved to Anita about the wonders of the day in the woods. You left me that note, Dud, she said, but I dont even know where that is. No. But the sheriffs department does, and search and rescue knows, and both Doc and Steve know. He smiled at her. Hunters have an old saying, Honey. If you take crutches with you, youll never break a leg.Brought to you by the national awardwinning book A Cowboys Guide to Growing Up Right. Read a free sample at www. slimrandles.com. HOME COUNTRYA hunters lesson

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Page 5ACommunity Thanksgiving Dinner Time with friends after a meal. Cuttin a rug, left, to the music. Families dined together and enjoyed desserts that included pumpkin pie, above. And friends gathered together to share Chef Marys Thanksgiving dinner of turkey and all the xings. Sharing a laugh. Pickin n Grinnin perform at the dinner. e Wakulla County Senior Center served a free community anksgiving dinner on Tuesday, Nov. 20, and it was Chef Marys goal to serve 1,000 people during the evening. Besides the anksgiving dinner, there was music from the Pickin n Grinnin Band, who play regularly at the Senior Center, and a chance to visit with friends and neighbors.JoAnne Strickland and Shelly Homan sell treats at the door. Peggy Mackin and Virginia Moore sell raf e tickets.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENMore photos online at thewakullanews.com

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Church Briefs Panacea Congregational Holiness to hold revivalPanacea Congregational Holiness Church will be having a revival on Friday, Nov. 30 through Sunday, Dec. 2. Services will begin at 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Sunday morning services will begin at 11 a.m. and Sunday night at 6 p.m. Guest speaker will be Sister Gert Riley. For more information, call (850) 984-5579 or (850) 508-1895. Winter Music Festival at Harvest Fellowship Dec. 8A Winter Music Festival is set for Dec. 8 on the outdoor stage of Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. The concert will be held from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Everyone is invited to come and sit out on the lawn and enjoy a free musical concert featuring a variety of music styles from blue grass to hip hop, local talent, as well as visiting musicians from around the state. They will have a bouncy house for the little ones, a bon re with marshmallows for roasting and lots of good food. Harvest Fellowship Church and Thrift Store is sponsoring this event with the ongoing intent to make Wakulla County a great place to live. Financial donations will be accepted at the event. Interested vendors should call the Harvest Thrift Store at (850) 926-3535. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER Let me make it very clear right up front that I am in favor of as many ha ha moments as possible. I could not get through a week without my daily dose. I rmly believe that laughter is the appropriate medicine for the soul. Some people, according to their demeanor, need a little more laughter than they are presently getting. That said, let me quickly point out that some things are not funny. Of course, most things in my life and about my person are marvelous targets of humor. I do not take myself very seriously. I am not sure any wise person would take me seriously either. In fact, I would highly suspect a person who took me seriously. I can take a joke as well as the next person and I can give it back as well as the next person. I have had some weeks that if it was not for a little bit of humor I do not know how I would have gotten through. So, if you cant do anything you can at least laugh. I rmly believe that the best laugh is when you can laugh at yourself. You might as well laugh at yourself, everybody else is. Then there are those serious moments in life that beg for no laughing. I would recommend that warning signs are put around these areas reading, Positively No Laughing Zone. With this sign should come a severe penalty for those who violate it. That said; let me explain an area in my life where the sign should be permanently erected. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were having supper with another couple. We try to do this at least once a month and keep up with each others progress or lack thereof. We were having a great meal and as we came to the end, I stopped the waitress and said, I would like some ice cream for dessert. As far as I am concerned, that is a rather reasonable request and quite in keeping with the environment I was in. What kind of ice cream, she queried, would you like? When it comes to ice cream, ice cream is simply ice cream to me. If there is a avor of ice cream I do not like, it has yet to be invented. I love ice cream. My favorite song is, I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream. I remember my grandfathers favorite ice cream was vanilla. He would not eat any other ice cream; he thought they were polluting it with colors. To him an ice cream sundae was as close to blaspheme as he ever would get. Why ruin, he objected, the ice cream with all that slop? He wanted nothing coming between him and the purest experience of ice cream he could get. Me, I love ice cream regardless of the avor or color or slop. I looked at the waitress and simply said, I dont care what avor you bring me. Surprise me. As long as it isnt broccoli. That was supposed to be a joke. Ha ha ha. As the waitress left our table, we resumed our conversation and shortly she returned with the ice cream. Upon her arrival, I looked at her and then the ice cream she was bringing and almost screamed aloud. Of all the blasphemous things to do to a customer, this has to take the cake. First, she had an ice cream bowl with three scoops of ice cream, vanilla, strawberry and chocolate. No problem. However, on the side of the dish in plain view for everybody to see, especially me, was a piece of broccoli. Broccoli! My dining companions thought this was the funniest thing they had ever seen. Particularly, the dining companion who was going to come home with me that night. Not only did they laugh. The waitress laughed. The table next to us began to laugh. The table next to them began to laugh. It was not long before everybody within 173 miles was laughing at my ice cream/broccoli dessert. Actually, not everybody was laughing. I was not laughing. Broccoli, no matter the presentation, is no laughing matter in my book. If matters could not be worse, my wife, through her hilarity spasms, reached over, picked up the broccoli and began eating it in my presence. Talk about adding insult to injury, my injury was vastly insulted. I may have been smiling on the outside, but I assure you I was more than frowning on the inside. Some things are funny; broccoli is not one of those things. Driving home amid the muffled chuckles on the other side of the front seat, I thought of what the apostle Paul said in 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18 (KJV), Rejoice evermore. Pray without ceasing. In every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you. I know that when Paul said, In every thing, it included things like broccoli. I must say that there are some things in life, like broccoli, where the thanksgiving is a matter of faith. I will never learn to love broccoli, but I can muster up enough faith to thank God for all things, including broccoli.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. OUT TO PASTOROkay, that wasnt funnyCommunity Chorus will perform MessiahSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla Community Chorus will perform Handels Messiah on Sunday, Dec. 9, in the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church Sanctuary. The performance is scheduled for 3 p.m. followed by a time of fellowship and refreshment in the social hall. The Messiah, considered by most musical scholars to be the greatest oratorio ever written, was composed by George Frederic Handel, who was born in Halle, Saxony, on Feb. 23, 1685, and died in London April 14, 1759. During his 74 years, Handel wrote music for orchestra and chamber groups, harpsichord, voice, and opera. But he is best known for his oratorios, especially Messiah. Handel conducted the first performance of Messiah in Dublin, Ireland, April 13, 1742, after he and the Messiah had been scorned by Londons musical establishment. It was a resounding success there and Handel insisted that all the proceeds from performances of Messiah be given to charity. Messiah is a composition of enormous scale and has over 50 sections. According to historians, Handel completed this monumental work in a mere 24 days and it continues to grow in popularity with audiences of all ages. It has been recorded that when Handel began the composition, he would not leave his house nor would he allow visitors to distract him, ate very little, and went for long stretches without sleep. One person, privileged to see him work, said that he was aglow with creative genius and composed with a passion that could have only been inspired by God himself. Handel called it a miracle and acknowledged this inspiration by exclaiming to a friend at its completion, The gates of heaven did open for me and God himself was there! Handel wrote the Messiah in three parts: The rst contains prophecy of the coming Messiah followed by the sufferings and death of Christ, with the nal section dealing with the resurrection. The Messiah in abbreviated form as presented by the Wakulla Community Chorus will emphasize the Christmas story and is approximately one hour in length. The 50-voice chorus, interspersed with voice and instrumental solos all under the leadership of veteran director Reba Mason will feature vocal solos by Daryl Langston, Becton Roddenberry, Jana Strain, Laura Hudson, Patsy Roberts, Staci Welch, Edie Brandt and Leah McManus. Musical accompaniment for Messiah includes trumpet, Wayne Watson; timpani, Mike Crouch; utists, Kristin Dow and Laura Hudson; pianist, Chris Hart; organist, Pat Redding; and harp, Corban Scott. A popular highlight of the Messiah is the grand nale rendition of the Hallelujah Chorus that brings the audience to its feet with a crescendo of feeling resounding with the wonderful spirit of Christmas, said Director Reba Mason. 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826)

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Page 7AObituaries Marshall Wallace Bradford James B. OBryan Richard A. SeybothMarshall Wallace Bradford, 35, of Crawfordville, passed away on Wednesday Nov. 21, 2012. He was born Oct. 13, 1977, in Tallahassee and was a resident of Crawfordville for 21 years coming from Tallahassee. He was a paramedic for the Wakulla County Ambulance Service. He loved to hunt and sh, he enjoyed playing his guitar and spending time with his family. He was a loving husband, father and son. He would help anyone anytime. Family received friends Saturday, Nov. 24, 2012, from 10 a.m. until noon at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Funeral services were held Sunday, Nov. 25, 2012, at 2 p.m. at River of Life Church in Crawfordville with burial at St. Elizabeth Cemetery. After the burial a gathering was held at the Shriners Club. He is survived by his wife of 15 years, Glenna Bradford of Crawfordville; one son, Chaim Bradford of Crawfordville; one daughter, Liam Bradford of Crawfordville; his parents, Wallace and Bea Bradford of Crawfordville; one sister, Kerri Posey (Keith) of Crawfordville; two nephews, Devon and Codie; three nieces, Sierra, Jacinta, and Laylah; a paternal grandmother, Joyce Woodyard of Quincy; his father and mother-in-law, Jim and Linda Berkes of Crawfordville; and many loving family and friends, as well as his trusted and loyal canine friend Bailey. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333) www.bevisfh. com).Marshall Wallace BradfordRichard Rick A. Seyboth, 72, a devoted husband and father, passed away peacefully at his home in Crawfordville on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. He was born July 1, 1940, in Albany, N.Y. He was the son of Fred and Agnes Seyboth. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and was in Vietnam. He had lived in Crawfordville for 11 years and lived in the area for 54 years. Services were held at the Central Baptist Church of Crawfordville on Monday, Nov. 26 at 11 a.m. He is survived by his wife and best friend of 17 years, Connie Seyboth; his children, Mary Jane, Diana, Terrance and Mark; his grandchildren, Tyler, Caleb, Jerimiah, Titan, Trinity, Samantha and Little Terry. The family wishes to express a special thank you to all of the staff of Big Bend Hospice. James B. OBryan, 91, of Crawfordville, died on Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2012 in Tallahassee. He was born in Altha on July 4, 1921, to Roy and Della (Thomas) OBryan. He lived in Altha before moving to Crawfordville in the 1960s and was retired from the Florida Division of Forestry. He was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Janet E. (Leber) OBryan; and a brother, Elmer OBryan. Survivors include his long term caregiver, Stacey Brown Larman of Panacea; a brother, J. A. (Marilyn) OBryan of Bristol; a sister, Doris (Percy) Stewart of Bristol; and several nieces and nephews and other extended family. A graveside service was held at 1 p.m. CST on Sunday, Nov. 25, 2012, at Sunny Hill Cemetery near Altha. The family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m. CST at the Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown. Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements (674-5449). Online condolences may be made at www.adamsfh. com.James B. OBryan Richard A. Seyboth EmployFlorida.com1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. HIRED.RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc. Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 Help Big Bend Hospice Honor Those Who Are No Longer With Us Big Bend HospiceTree of Remembrance 2012 2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.orgVisit our Wakulla County Tree at Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial Bank in Crawfordville WAKULLA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH December 1 8 am 1 pm, Christmas Bazaar, crafts, food and fun at the Alford Fellowship Hall, Wakulla United Methodist Church, 1584 Old Woodville Highway. Please call 850 421-5741 for more info. December 14 15, 6:30 8:30 pm -Living Nativity, drive through at 918 Woodville Highway with music and refreshments across the Old Woodville Highway at Wakulla United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall. For more information, please call 850 421-5741. December 24 7 pm, Christmas Eve Service, Wakulla United Methodist Church, 1584 Old Woodville Highway. Please call 850-421-5741. December 25 11 am 4 pm, Free Wakulla Station Community Christmas Dinner sponsored by The Kast Net at the Alford Fellowship Hall, Wakulla United Methodist Church, 1584 Old Woodville Highway. Call 850 421-5741 for more information. For general information and Christmas activities, please call 850-421-5741::: CHRISTMAS CALENDAR ::: 000CV38 Special to The NewsFive endangered whooping cranes arrived Friday on their wintering grounds at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. These cranes are the 12th group to be guided by ultralight aircraft from central Wisconsin to the Gulf coast of Florida. The Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership (WCEP), an international coalition of public and private organizations, is conducting the reintroduction project in an effort to restore this endangered species to part of its historic range in eastern North America. There are now 115 whooping cranes in the wild in eastern North America thanks to WCEPs efforts. This is the earliest the birds have arrived at St. Marks, and we are thrilled to have them here so soon, said Terry Peacock, Refuge Manager at St. Marks NWR. I was in the blind at the pen site to watch the birds arrive. I just have to say that it never gets old watching the birds come to the refuge. It was as touching this time as it was the rst time. In addition to the ve birds led south by WCEP partner Operation Migrations ultralights, six cranes are making their rst southward migration as part of WCEPs Direct Autumn Release (DAR) program. The DAR cranes were hatched and raised by biologists with project partner International Crane Foundation. The six birds were released in the company of older cranes from whom the young birds learn the migration route south. Five of the DAR cranes have completed their migration and are located in Hendry County. The sixth bird is currently located at Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area in Pulaski County, Ind. The ultralight-led and DAR cranes this year are joining two wild-hatched chicks in the 2012 cohort. Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s. Today, there are only about 600 birds in existence, approximately 445 of them in the wild. Aside from the WCEP birds, the only other migratory population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta, Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast. A non-migratory ock of approximately 20 birds lives year-round in the central Florida Kissimmee region, and an additional 14 nonmigratory cranes live in southern Louisiana. WCEP asks anyone who encounters a whooping crane in the wild to please give them the respect and distance they need. Do not approach birds on foot within 200 yards; remain in your vehicle; do not approach in a vehicle any closer than 100 yards. Also, please remain concealed and do not speak loudly enough that the birds can hear you. Finally, do not trespass on private property in an attempt to view or photograph whooping cranes. Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership founding members are the International Crane Foundation, Operation Migration, Inc., Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Geological Surveys Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and National Wildlife Health Center, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin, and the International Whooping Crane Recovery Team. Many other yway states, provinces, private individuals and conservation groups have joined forces with and support WCEP by donating resources, funding and personnel. More than 60 percent of the projects budget comes from private sources in the form of grants, public donations and corporate sponsors. To report whooping crane sightings, visit the WCEP whooping crane observation webpage at www. fws.gov/midwest/whoopingcrane/sightings/sightingform.cfm.Group of whooping cranes arrive in St. Marks OPERATION MIGRATION

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySpecial to The NewsThe Board of the Wakulla Academic Boosters Inc. has recently accepted the substantial, additional contribution to the Frank and Alice Veasman scholarship fund of $1,000 made by Alice Veasman. Frank Veasman, a prominent professional engineer, retired to Sopchoppy with his wife, Alice. The couple initially created their scholarship in 1988 with a $6,000 endowment to the Wakulla Academic Boosters. Although Frank has passed away, Alice continues the couples commitment to the belief that a good education is the path to success. Alice Veasman notes that the increase in the cost of college means that young people need even more help to access a college education. For this reason, she enhanced the Veasman scholarship with the additional donation. Walter Dodson, president of the Wakulla Academic Boosters, and treasurer Chris Kelly, both with Centennial Bank, accepted Alices donation gratefully, and appeal to other scholarship donors to consider enhancing their endowments. A tax-exempt, non-pro t organization, the Wakulla Academic Boosters coordinates scholarships for Wakulla High School graduates to attend Tallahassee Community College. The TCC Foundation invests and administers the approximately $1,000,000 WAB scholarship fund. Because endowments are earning record low interest, the scholarship fund is generating less revenue, thus diminishing the value of the scholarships awarded. All of the scholarship funds managed by the Wakulla Academic Boosters are in need of additional contributions to enhance the student awards. Membership in the Wakulla Academic Boosters is solicited at $100 annually, but any contribution is appreciated. Another way to support the Boosters is for people to arrange their estate to contribute 3 percent of its net value to the Boosters. This can be accomplished by a codicil to a will or a trust amendment. Active Boosters and retired Judge Mike and Andrea Carter have chosen this method of helping Wakulla students obtain a college education. Helping young people realize their dreams and aspirations through education takes all of us and is the best legacy we can leave Judge Carter said. Anyone interested in discussing this option is welcome to contact Judge Carter at 926-3164. The Rand Corporation determined that of all efforts to improve society, education best raises all boats. This is the reason so many members of our community have contributed to the Boosters scholarship fund and helped hundreds of Wakulla County students obtain a college education. Donations may be mailed to the Wakulla Academic Boosters at Centennial Bank, P.O. Box 610, Crawfordville 32326. Veasman adds donation to scholarship fund Mr. and Mrs. Henderson Henderson weds CarltonMichelle Leigh Carlton and Tommy Lamar Henderson were married on Sept. 1 at Bald Point State Park. Pastor John Johnson performed the ceremony. The reception followed at Angelos restaurant. The couple resides in Crawfordville.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAlice Veasman presents her donation to President Walter Dodson. Mentor program trying to increase presence in Wakulla Special to The NewsLast month, more than 250 people came together at Poseys Dockside to support Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bends Wakulla County Mentoring Program. The third annual event raised more than $5,000 to support the mentoring program. The support of the community has been extraordinary,said agency CEO, Louis Garcia. The BIG Catch Charity Fish Fry continues to grow, and this years turnout has been astounding. We are very grateful for the hard work of Alan Brock, Stacy Harvey, Sherrie Posey Miller, and our other community champions who help us to get the word out. The BIG Catch is great for renewing energy within the community, said Garcia. We are continuing to gain momentum in Wakulla County, and we look forward to serving even more children this year, Garcia said. It is important for us to secure sustainable funding each year for continued service and growth. We have to recruit more volunteers as well as identify more children in need of our services. This is why we have dedicated the resources to hire another part-time staff member to focus on our work in Wakulla County. The newly hired Wakulla County community outreach coordinator is Ellyn Scanlan. I am very excited to get the opportunity to help more children in Wakulla County be matched with caring mentors, who can truly make a difference in their lives, said Scanlan. Big Brothers Big Sisters is currently seeking safe adult mentors willing to spend time with a child two to four times monthly for a minimum of 12 months. Volunteers have the opportunity to help shape a childs future for the better by empowering them to achieve. Volunteering just a few hours a month can change the course of a childs life for the better, forever. By simply changing their perspective on what the world can offer, volunteers can literally change lives. For information about how to become a mentor, contact Stacy Harvey at wakulla@bbbsbigbend.org or 366-3865 or visit www. bigbendmentoring.org/ wakulla. Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend helps children facing adversity beat the odds and grow into healthy, happy, and productive adults. The organization depends on donations to help conduct background checks on volunteers to ensure child safety; to provide ongoing support and training for children, families and volunteers; and to build and sustain longlasting relationshipsthe key to successful mentoring. Support for Wakulla Countys Big Brothers Big Sisters Program comes from generous businesses, individuals and the Wakulla County Neighboring County United Way Campaign. Members of the Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend team at the Big Catch. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Josh and Stephanie Hunt of Crawfordville announce the birth of their daughter, Adalyn Jade Hunt on Nov. 19, 2012, at 1:31 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She weighed 5 pounds, 14 ounces and was 18.5 inches. She has an older brother, Aiden, who is 18 months. Her maternal grandparents are Steve and Sherry Waites. Her paternal grandparents are Richard and Shari Hunt.Hunts welcome a baby girlRick and Lisa Russell announce the engagement of their daughter, Brenna Ann Evans to Daniel Laurden Bernabe, son of Daniel T. Bernabe and So a L. Davis. The wedding will be held at the Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort in Miramar Beach on Dec. 16. The bride is a graduate of Florida State University with a Masters Degree and is employed as a Spanish teacher. The groom is also a graduate of Florida State University with a Masters Degree and is a medical student at Florida State University Medical College. The couple will live in Tallahassee.Bernabe to marry Evans Daniel L. Bernabe and Brenna A. Evans Email your community news to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs as space becomes available. Sunday ThursdayALL U CAN EATSpecials Catfish ......$11.95 Shrimp ....,$13.95 Scallops ..$13.95Includes Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies30 SHRIMP 10 Fried 10 Grilled 10 BlackenedServed with Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies$12.95 w Winter hours: Tues. Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 Sunday 4-9 984-5243 1506 COASTAL HWY., SCENIC BIWAY Renance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Ofce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Ofce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Ofce: 850.926.1960

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolTeachers and employee of the month are announced for November Special to The NewsNovember Teachers of the Month are Crawfordville Elementary Schools Chelsea Strickland and Riversprings Middle Schools Catherine Small, who are recognized with Transportations Employee of the Month, veteran school bus driver, Malda Timmons. Superintendent David Miller and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the innovation and enthusiasm these employees bring to the district, as well as the innovation they add to their jobs on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. Chelsea Strickland hit the ground running when she began her teaching career at Crawfordville in 2009, soon after she graduated from Flagler College. Strickland re ected on the year her parents relocated to Wakulla County as a middle school student, so she could attend a high performing school system. She said, I always dreamed of returning and giving back to the county that harnessed my love for learning. Strickland teaches an ESE self-contained classroom of third through fifth grade students. She said, I work with incredible kids. It can take weeks or months to make small advances, but that is okay. When those accomplishments are evident it is a phenomenal reward. Spending summer in Hatchechubbee, Ala., with her Nana and Papa, Strickland was immersed in the training of southern hospitality. That mindset is re ected in her personality as she enjoys making all of those she works with feel like celebrities. Crawfordville Principal Angie Walker recognizes Chelsea Strickland as an, incredible educator, who gives 100 percent to her students every single day. We refer to her class as the Dream Team because she and the other adults she works with makes the dreams of their children come true. She has one of the most exciting classes on campus. Mrs. Strickland is an asset to our cougar team. She is an enthusiastic teacher with a big heart. She loves her students and demonstrates her passion for their success through her unwavering attempts to create an amazing academic and social setting. Also recognized as a November Teacher of the Month is Riversprings Middle Schools Guidance Counselor, Catherine Small. Originally hired as a substitute teacher, Small has served as the Riversprings Guidance Counselor since 2005, but began serving the students of Wakulla County before that time as a volunteer and fall festival coordinator. Small grew up in Tallahassee and graduated from Lincoln High School. She attended and graduated from Tallahassee Community College and Florida State University with a bachelor and masters degree. Small cites the teachers, support staff and administration as a highlight. The diverse talent and skills of the employees at RMS make coming to work a wonderful time, she said. Her dedication to the middle school student is evident in the many ways she serves the school and the students. Small continually contributes to the overall school program in multiple ways that have included or currently include; Junior Optimist Club Sponsor, Student Council, RtI School representative, AVID/Wellness/Calendar Committee, Cheerleading Coach and Spirit Paws Coach She also is a member of the Florida School Counseling Association, Positive Behavior System Committee, Den leader for Cub Scouts Pak Four, Phi Alpha Honor Society and Association of Student Social Workers. RMS Principal Dod Walker said, Mrs. Small gives Riversprings her heart and soul every day. Not only in her capacity as our Guidance Counselor, which she achieves in a fantastic and highly effective manner, but also as our cheerleading coach. Her creation of the Spirit Paws on our campus, which incorporates our severely handicapped students into the cheerleading program, is commendable and appreciated. She is a true bear through and through. The November Employee of the Month is Transportation Departments, Malda Timmons. Timmons has been driving a school bus for the students of Wakulla County for more than twenty years. She said, I have enjoyed my job ever since I started driving in 1991. Timmons is a graduate of Wakulla High School and attended Shadeville and Crawfordville Elementary School. I love working with all the kids. They are precious and the future of our Country. Every day is a new and exciting adventure. Driving a bus is not a routine job, it is a daily adventure, adds Timmons who treats most of the students on her bus like family. Transportation Coordinator Pat Jones said, Mrs. Timmons is and has always been a responsible, enthusiastic and competent bus driver. She has the ability to relate effectively with her students and is always letting them know that their safety comes rst. Mrs. Timmons is innovative and from time to time will even sing to her students on the school bus. Chelsea StricklandCatherine Small Malda Timmons Special to The NewsMedart Elementary School students honored local veterans at an American Pride Day Assembly on Nov. 8. Around 35 local veterans attended the observance. The cafeteria was resplendent in red, white and blue. Kindergarten students painted American ags that covered the walls and students from other grades created banners to thank the veterans for their service to our country. Student Council officers began the program by reading a poem called, What is a Veteran? Kindergarten students then sang America, while each held a small American ag. First grade students recited a poem called, Salute to Veterans and ended it by giving a crisp salute to all of the assembled veterans. Second grade students sang American Tears. Various students read original poems or famous quotes. Medart Elementary principal, Sharon Kemp, read the name, branch of the military, rank, and years of service, of each veteran in attendance. The nal part of the program was a touching and powerful Powerpoint presentation by fourth grade teacher, Angie Nichols, with photographs of veterans which are also family members of Medart faculty and students.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSVeterans recite the Pledge of Allegiance along with students at Medart for the Veterans Day Celebration. Medart Elementary honors veterans Swearing-in ceremony held for o cersSpecial to The NewsOn Tuesday, Nov. 13, a special inauguration breakfast was held at Medart Elementary School in honor of the newlyelected 2012-13 Student Council Of cers and Representatives. Hosted by Student Council Sponsors Laurie Beaton and Laura Lawhon, the teachers and parents were able to witness the swearing-in and pinning of each member by Sheriff Donnie Crum and Beaton. Lawhon read about this idea and worked very hard to bring it to life as everyone enjoyed breakfast, fellowship, beautiful decorations, and encouraging words of leadership from David Miller, Robert Pearce and Crum. After the ceremony, Crum swore-in the group as a whole on the schools closedcircuit TV system so all of the Mustangs could be a part of the ceremony. This years Student Council Of cers and Representatives were elected on Sept. 28 by the third, fourth and fth graders after a few weeks of campaigning and televised speeches. Supervisor of Elections Henry Wells assisted Beaton in the election by providing the countys touch-screen voting machines and supervising the election. He also explained the importance and the privilege of voting to every student. The Mustangs are very grateful for the help of Wells in this important event, and they appreciate the time Crum, Miller, Pearce and Lawhon gave to help make the election results even more special. In fact, the ceremony was so special that it is sure to become a Mustang tradition. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe newly elected of cers and representatives for Medarts Student Council with Sheriff Donnie Crum. Drop o letters to Santa at courthouse mailboxThe mailbox for Santa letters has been put up at the Wakulla County Courthouse. Children can drop off their letters to Santa at this location. Be sure to also include a telephone number with the letter to receive a call from directly from Santa. Email school news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space is available. Holiday Craft BazaarSaturday, December 8at the CRAWFORDVILLE WOMANS CLUBSecond annual holiday bazaar hosted by the Crawfordville Womans Club at the clubhouse located at 64 Ochlockonee Street behind Hudson Park.Numerous vendors will display their wares in indoor comfort.Friday night, December 7 Sneak PreviewTickets are being sold to take a sneak preview to Saturdays event and enjoy delicious hors doeuvres and a wine tasting.9 a.m. 3 p.m. FREE and open to the publicA portion of the proceeds from the bazaar will go to the Crawfordville Womans Club scholarship fund and other civic projects.294-6482 Tickets to the Friday night preview are $10 each for more info please call 300 of the finest artisans from around the country feature everything from fine arts to charming stocking stuffers.

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsI hope you had a good Thanksgiving and didnt eat too much turkey. There were a lot of folks on the water over this way but not a lot of sh caught. The tides didnt move that much over the past weekend and Im hoping that was the problem. I talked with Bucky at Shell Island Fish Camp in St. Marks and he said the shing down there was pretty good over the weekend. Some came in with their limit while others had a tough time. Bucky said he took his daughter and he wanted to catch her a red sh. They went up in a creek and he said the mouth was full of trout. They moved on up into a hole and they caught four nice reds and they managed to catch three nice trout to 21 inches. JR down at the Aucilla said shing was as good right now as he has seen it in years. Last year very few trout were caught up in the river. The water is crystal clear and the trout are in the river south of the ramp and reds are north of the ramp. He said if you want to catch a limit quick sh a hole in the mouth of one of the creeks. He said if you make ve or six casts and dont catch a sh move. He said youll get a limit in the river but its just gonna take a little longer. Last week he said he had shed all week with a family of five. He would take some of them one day and others the next. He said they caught limits of trout on almost every trip and plenty of nice reds. Everything was caught on the Gulp and he said he even switched over to the twin tail chartreuse grub he used to use and they hit it as well. David Fife was over from Destin last week and shed with some of his buddies and he said shing was pretty tough. They did catch some nice reds but said the trout just werent there. Dwayne Broadway from Shell Point said he caught a 40-inch red over near Panacea on Saturday using a Gulp. The week before Thanksgiving I had Kelly Dimon and his buddy Charlie from Pine Mountain, Ga. We spent a lot of time near Panacea and caught lot of silver trout and big whiting using the white Gulp. Kelly caught a 40-inch red and Charlie caught three of them one morning. We lost ve that day that ate our silver trout when we were reeling them in but the hook never went in the reds and they would nally spit them out. We ended the trip anchoring on a bar in Oyster Bay and we caught our limit of speckled trout in about 40 minutes. The day before Thanksgiving I took Murray McLaughlin and Clark Edwards for a half-day and we started at the silver trout hole near Panacea. We shed for about an hour hoping to catch one of those big reds but they didnt bite and neither did the white trout. We shed several other spots that should have been good but nothing. The tide nally started moving a little right before we were going to quit and they turned on. Most were about 14.5 inches long but we managed to get 12 that were legal. For an hour and a half it was every cast. Then on Friday I took John Hays from Crawfordville and we had a terrible day. The morning started good in Panacea when Johns son caught a 40inch red. It went down from there. Dwayne and I went back there on Sunday and did nothing. There was no bait and no sh. Were coming up on a full moon so shing should be good this week. The weather is supposed to be nice so we better go while we can. Remember to take those kids shing and know your limits. Good luck and good shing!A lot of folks were on the water, but not a lot of sh were caught From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Brag book:SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCarlie Coleman, 9, of Crawfordville, shot her rst deer with her sidekick Daddy. The buck was an 11 pointer and weighed 180 pounds. Carlie, who attends Wakulla Christian School, was shining like a Christmas tree. It was a great daddy-daughter moment to remember.Carlies rst deer is an 11-point buckCarlie Coleman with her 11-point, 180 pound buck. The First Sunday at the Refuge Presentation Series will feature Owls and Other Night Birds at St. Marks with Don Morrow of The Trust for Public Lands on Dec. 2 at 2 p.m. Owls arent the only birds that come out at night. Don will tell about birds of the night and share their habits, how to identify them, and where you are likely to nd them. Linger afterward for a short twilight eld trip with Don. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures Classroom at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call (850) 925-6121 for information.First Sunday will feature owls and night birds Florida Bluebird Society adopts code of ethicsThe Florida Bluebird Society has adopted a Code of Ethics outlining principles for interacting with birds and establishing protocols for monitoring bluebird nest boxes. One recommendation included in the Nest Boxes Monitoring Protocol prohibits the handlings of the bluebird nest, eggs, nestlings or parents during the breeding season. FBS principles include always put the interests of the bird rst; consider the impact of all activities on the birds before taking action; obey bird protection laws. Do not touch nests, eggs or birds. The Code of Ethics is available on the FBS website: oridabluebirdsociety.com. From FWC NewsFlorida black bears are being seen with more frequency throughout our area due to the in ux of more people and a growing bear population. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission cautions residents to store their garbage in a manner that denies bears access to it, or bears repeatedly will visit that neighborhood to obtain food. When bears easily obtain food from human sources, they begin to associate communities with a feeding opportunity. In turn, bears develop habits around people that are dif- cult to change and easily obtained food makes it far less likely that a bear will move on to more suitable habitat, said Chad Allison, FWC regional wildlife biologist. The FWC recommends the following steps to prevent human-bear con icts: Feed your pets indoors or bring in dishes after feeding. Secure household garbage in a shed, garage or a wildlife-resistant container. Put household garbage out on the morning of pickup, not the night before. Secure commercial garbage in bear-resistant dumpsters consisting of metal lids or metal-reinforced plastic lids and lock bars. Clean grills and store them in a locked, secure place. Remove wildlife feeders or make them bearresistant. Protect gardens, apiaries, compost and livestock with electric fencing. Pick ripe fruit from trees and remove fallen fruit from the ground. Encourage your homeowners association or local government to institute ordinances on keeping foods secure that would attract wildlife. Ignoring these recommendations greatly increases the chances that a bear will become a nuisance conditioned to visiting neighborhoods, and have to be euthanized. Help conserve wildlife by remembering a fed bear may become a dead bear. If you would like more information on avoiding con icts with bears, visit MyFWC.com/Bear and click on the video titled Living with Florida Black Bears.Bear with us, store your garbage FWC PHOTOA female bear and her cubs. THE DUCK HUNTA friend of mine and his son went duck hunting the other day. They were up way before daylight, drove to their hunting spot, and got the decoys out just as the sun peeked up over the hill. After a day of cold rain, a zillion questions from the boy and no ducks, they drove home. When the dad came through the door I asked him how their hunt was. O.K., he said. Cold, wet, no ducks. The boy never even got to shoot. Kind of disappointing I guess. Then his son came through the door and I also asked him how the hunt was. It was great!, he said. Dad and I spent the whole day together. We didnt get to shoot but we talked a lot. Then he walked off beaming with pride and satisfaction. I guess its all a matter of perspective isnt it? Larry Whiteley is Host of the award-winning Outdoor World Radio For more tips, log onto basspro.com and click on the OutdoorSite Library P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service

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Members of Flotilla 12 have lost a great member and friend to all. John Toliver Denmark Jr. crossed the bar on Nov. 10, 2012, following his long battle with leukemia. John was 71. John joined Flotilla 12 on June 15, 2004 following a very distinguished career. According to his obituary, John began his career in agriculture working for the Florida Department of Agriculture in Winter Haven shortly before he married his wife of 47 years Judy in 1960, who preceded him in death in 2007. John earned his Bachelors and Masters Degrees from the University of Florida. He worked as a vocational agriculture instructor at Fort Meade High School in Polk County, became a regional consultant for the Florida Department of Education in central Florida and in 1981, he became Floridas Director of Agricultural Education. John remained at the Florida Department of Education in Tallahassee until his retirement in 2000. John was conferred with the Honorary American Farmer Degree in 1988. In 2000, the John T. Denmark, Jr. Scholarship was established by the Florida FFA Foundation in his honor and in 2007, he was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award by the National Association of Agriculture Educators. John is survived by his three sons, David (Elizabeth), Patrick (Barbara) and Christopher (Kimberly); five grandchildren, Brittany, Christopher, Vance, Clayton and Hartley; two sisters, Patricia (Ron) McCord and Linda Denmark; and mother-in-law, Christine Hodges. While in the Auxiliary, John was quick to learn as well as share his skills with others. He earned crew quali cation within his rst three months in the Flotilla and spent many hours out on the water. John also became a vessel examiner and program visitor working with local retailers to spread the word on safe boating. He also became involved in teaching in public education classes. In one of the last efforts John was able to provide, he worked to help restore our communications trailer by building relationships with the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge as well as Station Panama City. While in the Auxiliary, John received many awards for recognition of his hard work and efforts including the Presidential Unit Citation for post Katrina work, two Coast Guard Unit Citations, four Sustained Service Awards, the Auxiliary Humanitarian Service Award, the Auxiliary VE/ MDV Service Award (vessel exam/marine dealer visitation), two Coast Guard Meritorious Team Commendation and the Flotillas Gilbert Champion Award. Flotilla 12 lost a great man on Nov. 10. Fair winds and following seas, John! Saturday, Dec. 1, members of Flotilla 12 will come together to celebrate the coming end of another year. We will share stories of members who are no longer with us as well as make new memories to be talked about for years to come. It is the time of year when we all choose one member to receive the Gilbert/Champion Award who has demonstrated throughout the year a dedication to the auxiliary that re ects the dedication of two of our founding members, Don Gilbert and John Champion. And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. A few extra minutes before leaving the dock can make the difference between a great or bad day on the water. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSJohn Denmark Jr. on patrol with the Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12. He died Nov. 10. Diving, its on sale.Its that time of year again when the stores lay out their best pricing on gizmos and gadgets in an effort to compete for your holiday money. Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and of course last minute Christmas Eve specials are all supposed to be too good to pass up. The dive industry has embraced the holiday season as a sales time but perhaps for different reasons than department stores. The Dive Equipment Manufacturers Association convention is held each year just prior to the holiday season. Here the manufacturers dish out their new toys and politely inform their dealers that much of what we have in stock has been discontinued. This year the trend seemed to be ever-increasing in the direction of discontinued items but not because last years model isnt good! From my perspective, the scuba industry is trying to grab new markets so we see an increase in color variety and increases in goods tailored for women. As a result, the regulator with a black ambient pressure cap now has a red and black cap. Everything else is identical but last years model is now available for probably half of the cost of the new one. Just about any piece of equipment is available in pink, in an attempt to attract the female shopper, but more importantly equipment is actually being designed with womens shape and/or needs in mind. The manufacturers often throw a bone to the small dealers and offer promotions or specials for orders placed at DEMA. Things like cylinders and lead are available with free shipping and package deals are at nearly every booth. As a diver, considering owning their rst cylinder, this is de nitely the best time to buy because so much of the cost in cylinders is associated with shipping. DEMA was also out promoting an array of lion sh products. Everything from mini, travel friendly, pole spears to entire cook books. The lion sh has become quite a nuisance and an entire industry has grown around it. Perhaps you will nd lion sh on a few tables this holiday season, right next to the green bean casserole. Equipment specials are not the only thing going for divers, training and travel opportunities abound. This is traditionally a slow time -winter, I mean -for dive stores, but ironically its some of the best time for diving. Visibility usually improves in the winter months and dive sites are not as crowded. New divers often overlook the bene ts of winter diving because cold can be a huge distraction. This means you can often book training for yourself, or as a gift, at enormous discounts and receive more privatized classes. If travel and warm water is what you want, book now for the spring or next winter trips. You will nd the best pricing as the boats are looking to ll their remaining seats for February to May trips. Early booking for next year is often available in installments to lessen the nancial burden. Interestingly enough, the Bahamas is not recognized as a prime dive destination in the winter because its too cold. To me, being from Minnesota, the Bahamas was one of our more popular winter trips because it wasnt too hot. For the Floridian in you its probably best to look a little closer to the equator. We will be offering a trip to Belize, probably, next winter. Its a great time to buy a TV but you will likely get just as much enjoyment out of some fresh scuba equipment or a dive course and the later will help to burn off the calories from the holiday cookies.UnderwaterWakullaBy Travis Kersting Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Nov 29, 12 Fri Nov 30, 12 Sat Dec 1, 12 Sun Dec 2, 12 Mon Dec 3, 12 Tue Dec 4, 12 Wed Dec 5, 12 D ate 3.5 ft. 1:22 AM 3.5 ft. 1:53 AM 3.4 ft. 2:25 AM 3.4 ft. 3:00 AM 3.2 ft. 3:39 AM 3.1 ft. 4:25 AM 2.8 ft. 5:23 AM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 8:31 AM -0.4 ft. 9:02 AM -0.3 ft. 9:32 AM -0.2 ft. 10:04 AM -0.1 ft. 10:38 AM 0.1 ft. 11:18 AM 0.3 ft. 12:05 PM L ow 3.2 ft. 2:59 PM 3.2 ft. 3:32 PM 3.2 ft. 4:07 PM 3.1 ft. 4:43 PM 3.1 ft. 5:22 PM 3.0 ft. 6:05 PM 3.0 ft. 6:52 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 8:11 PM 1.2 ft. 8:47 PM 1.2 ft. 9:25 PM 1.2 ft. 10:07 PM 1.2 ft. 10:55 PM 1.2 ft. 11:53 PM L ow Thu Nov 29, 12 Fri Nov 30, 12 Sat Dec 1, 12 Sun Dec 2, 12 Mon Dec 3, 12 Tue Dec 4, 12 Wed Dec 5, 12 D ate 2.6 ft. 1:14 AM 2.6 ft. 1:45 AM 2.6 ft. 2:17 AM 2.5 ft. 2:52 AM 2.4 ft. 3:31 AM 2.3 ft. 4:17 AM Hi g h -0.3 ft. 8:42 AM -0.3 ft. 9:13 AM -0.2 ft. 9:43 AM -0.2 ft. 10:15 AM -0.1 ft. 10:49 AM 0.1 ft. 11:29 AM 0.8 ft. 12:04 AM L ow 2.4 ft. 2:51 PM 2.4 ft. 3:24 PM 2.4 ft. 3:59 PM 2.3 ft. 4:35 PM 2.3 ft. 5:14 PM 2.3 ft. 5:57 PM 2.1 ft. 5:15 AM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 8:22 PM 0.9 ft. 8:58 PM 0.9 ft. 9:36 PM 0.9 ft. 10:18 PM 0.9 ft. 11:06 PM 0.3 ft. 12:16 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 6:44 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 29, 12 Fri Nov 30, 12 Sat Dec 1, 12 Sun Dec 2, 12 Mon Dec 3, 12 Tue Dec 4, 12 Wed Dec 5, 12 D ate 3.2 ft. 1:58 AM 3.2 ft. 2:29 AM 3.2 ft. 3:01 AM 3.1 ft. 3:36 AM 3.0 ft. 4:15 AM 2.8 ft. 5:01 AM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 9:35 AM -0.3 ft. 10:06 AM -0.3 ft. 10:36 AM -0.2 ft. 11:08 AM -0.1 ft. 11:42 AM 0.1 ft. 12:22 PM 1.1 ft. 12:57 AM L ow 3.0 ft. 3:35 PM 3.0 ft. 4:08 PM 2.9 ft. 4:43 PM 2.9 ft. 5:19 PM 2.8 ft. 5:58 PM 2.8 ft. 6:41 PM 2.6 ft. 5:59 AM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 9:15 PM 1.1 ft. 9:51 PM 1.1 ft. 10:29 PM 1.1 ft. 11:11 PM 1.1 ft. 11:59 PM 0.3 ft. 1:09 PM L ow 2.8 ft. 7:28 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 29, 12 Fri Nov 30, 12 Sat Dec 1, 12 Sun Dec 2, 12 Mon Dec 3, 12 Tue Dec 4, 12 Wed Dec 5, 12 D ate 2.7 ft. 1:06 AM 2.7 ft. 1:37 AM 2.7 ft. 2:09 AM 2.6 ft. 2:44 AM 2.5 ft. 3:23 AM 2.4 ft. 4:09 AM 2.2 ft. 5:07 AM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 8:10 AM -0.4 ft. 8:41 AM -0.3 ft. 9:11 AM -0.2 ft. 9:43 AM -0.1 ft. 10:17 AM 0.1 ft. 10:57 AM 0.3 ft. 11:44 AM L ow 2.5 ft. 2:43 PM 2.5 ft. 3:16 PM 2.5 ft. 3:51 PM 2.4 ft. 4:27 PM 2.4 ft. 5:06 PM 2.3 ft. 5:49 PM 2.3 ft. 6:36 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 7:50 PM 1.2 ft. 8:26 PM 1.2 ft. 9:04 PM 1.2 ft. 9:46 PM 1.2 ft. 10:34 PM 1.1 ft. 11:32 PM L ow Thu Nov 29, 12 Fri Nov 30, 12 Sat Dec 1, 12 Sun Dec 2, 12 Mon Dec 3, 12 Tue Dec 4, 12 Wed Dec 5, 12 D ate 3.5 ft. 1:19 AM 3.5 ft. 1:50 AM 3.5 ft. 2:22 AM 3.4 ft. 2:57 AM 3.3 ft. 3:36 AM 3.1 ft. 4:22 AM 2.9 ft. 5:20 AM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 8:28 AM -0.4 ft. 8:59 AM -0.3 ft. 9:29 AM -0.2 ft. 10:01 AM -0.1 ft. 10:35 AM 0.1 ft. 11:15 AM 0.4 ft. 12:02 PM L ow 3.3 ft. 2:56 PM 3.3 ft. 3:29 PM 3.2 ft. 4:04 PM 3.2 ft. 4:40 PM 3.1 ft. 5:19 PM 3.1 ft. 6:02 PM 3.0 ft. 6:49 PM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 8:08 PM 1.3 ft. 8:44 PM 1.3 ft. 9:22 PM 1.3 ft. 10:04 PM 1.3 ft. 10:52 PM 1.3 ft. 11:50 PM L ow Thu Nov 29, 12 Fri Nov 30, 12 Sat Dec 1, 12 Sun Dec 2, 12 Mon Dec 3, 12 Tue Dec 4, 12 Wed Dec 5, 12 D ate 2.7 ft. 12:55 AM 2.6 ft. 1:36 AM 2.5 ft. 2:19 AM 2.4 ft. 3:06 AM 2.2 ft. 4:00 AM 2.0 ft. 5:05 AM Hi g h -0.5 ft. 8:07 AM -0.4 ft. 8:36 AM -0.4 ft. 9:04 AM -0.3 ft. 9:32 AM -0.2 ft. 10:02 AM -0.1 ft. 10:37 AM 0.1 ft. 11:17 AM L ow 2.3 ft. 4:19 PM 2.3 ft. 4:48 PM 2.3 ft. 5:17 PM 2.3 ft. 5:46 PM 2.3 ft. 6:16 PM 2.3 ft. 6:46 PM 2.3 ft. 7:16 PM Hi g h 1.6 ft. 7:28 PM 1.5 ft. 8:04 PM 1.5 ft. 8:46 PM 1.4 ft. 9:34 PM 1.3 ft. 10:31 PM 1.1 ft. 11:39 PM L ow Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 29 Dec. 5First Dec. 19 Full Dec. 28 Last Dec. 6 New Dec. 12Major Times 12:55 AM 2:55 AM 1:20 PM 3:20 PM Minor Times 7:59 AM 8:59 AM 6:38 PM 7:38 PM Major Times 1:44 AM 3:44 AM 2:08 PM 4:08 PM Minor Times 8:46 AM 9:46 AM 7:29 PM 8:29 PM Major Times 2:32 AM 4:32 AM 2:56 PM 4:56 PM Minor Times 9:30 AM 10:30 AM 8:22 PM 9:22 PM Major Times 3:19 AM 5:19 AM 3:43 PM 5:43 PM Minor Times 10:11 AM 11:11 AM 9:16 PM 10:16 PM Major Times 4:06 AM 6:06 AM 4:29 PM 6:29 PM Minor Times 10:49 AM 11:49 AM 10:10 PM 11:10 PM Major Times 4:52 AM 6:52 AM 5:14 PM 7:14 PM Minor Times 11:26 AM 12:26 PM 11:06 PM 12:06 AM Major Times 5:37 AM 7:37 AM 6:00 PM 8:00 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:00 PM 1:00 PM Better++ Better Good Average Average Average Average7:14 am 5:36 pm 6:40 pm 8:00 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:15 am 5:36 pm 7:30 pm 8:47 am 7:16 am 5:36 pm 8:23 pm 9:31 am 7:16 am 5:36 pm 9:17 pm 10:12 am 7:17 am 5:36 pm 10:12 pm 10:50 am 7:18 am 5:36 pm 11:07 pm 11:27 am 7:19 am 5:36 pm --:-12:02 pm96% 90% 84% 78% 72% 65% 59% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 PLEASE RECYCLE

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comThe Wakulla news EXTRA! By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsNo one calls him by his rst name. Those who know him as a friend, neighbor, or local business owner call him Noah, or Noey Posey. Born and raised in Medart, Poseys antecedents share a common work history with others whose family trees are rmly rooted in Wakulla. Most of my family, he says, were farmers and stuff like that. They shed a lot, mainly mullet. I was about 15, he says, when I started shing with Will Harts eld. Will was the best fisher around and the best crabber, really. He always knew where the sh were. He studied them. He didnt have an education, but from whatever type of weather we were having that morning, hed know right where to go and nd that spot where the fish were banking up. Poseys father, Raymond, like many fathers along the Gulf at that time, found his work among the sheries also. Back then, all of them was fisherman, he says, Daddy worked over at the Bottoms, in the seineyards. He was there for about 12 years. And later he worked for Mr. Tully over at the sawmill. He was there for a long time before he got work with the state. Thats where he retired from. The Bottoms is one of the original seineyards in the area. Between Wakulla and Franklin County, there were as many as 16 seineyards in operation. Some were named after the owner of the property, while other yards were named for the areas in which they were located. The thing most striking is that the seineyards location existed due to the inherent nature of the sh themselves. Just as birds y south for winter, mullet during the later months of the year, function in a similar fashion. During the run season, when the mullet sh would come through, Posey says, they would always keep their right-eye to the bank. Theyd come by West Goose Creek, and when they got through there theyd come on down by Shell Point they had two seineyards around there, I think. Then theyd come down by the Bottoms, and all the way around. But all thats stopped now, he continues, They go to St. George Island and along that way. They dont come around the coast like they used to. When asked why he feels this change within nature has occurred, a witty, yet mysterious speculation is all that he can muster. Ive been trying to gure that out, he laughs, Ive always said its something planted out in the water, and once they ( sh) hit it, they go straight-on across and bypass us. Although Posey enjoyed the close-knit communal culture of the county as young man, he did what most young men and women from small towns tend to do once they come of age. He left. I moved down south. I worked as a surveyor for about eight years, with the state, until my father-in-law, Charles Barwick Sr., asked me to come back and run their crabhouse. So, in 1965 I came home and got into the seafood business. Before the 1930s, Floridas blue crab shery market was similar to that of the mullet. Most things were done on a bartering basis and most of the product was distributed among the local population. By the 1930s, Arthur Tucker, from the Apalachicola area, began his crab-picking operation in Florida. His packed crabmeats were shipped as far away as New York. As large-scale crab processing plants developed, Charles Barwick Sr., a native of Hardaway whod lived in Panacea since his early childhood, opened his own picking plant there in 1949. During their strongest production period, Barwicks would pick, process, and prepare more than 2,200 pounds of crabmeat per day for shipment. Almost four years after Barwick opened his plant, Herman Metcalf followed suit. Other crabhouse owners would grow to include Henry Metcalf, Charles Barwick Jr. and Norman Barwick, and members of the Harts- eld, Blackmon and Sanders families. Less than 30 years ago, Wakullas crab-picking/processing business was so strong that cars and vans were sent to Carrabelle, Quincy and surrounding counties to load in the crab-pickers, and deliver them safely home when the workday ended. When I came back to take the job as manager of Barwick Brothers, says Posey, We had over 120 crab pickers. Any overage crab that we had was sold to Brunswick, Ga. There used to be 14 crab houses in Wakulla County, now we have, maybe, two of them left. Where does an industry that supplies more than 120 jobs in one location disappear to? We really dont know what to gure about that, he says. It dropped off about 10 years ago, there being very few crabs. Things went to the wayside and the crab-pickers started looking for other jobs. He would stay in the crab business for about eight years, before turning to shells. I started buying all the shells off of the backs of the crabs, he explains, I processed them and sold them to deviled-crab factories. That was my big plant that you see up the street, down by the curve? I went as far as North Carolina and Texas bringing shells in on 18-wheelers. At one time had seven 18-wheelers on the road. Thats where I made my money, on the shell business. Business has changed. Other than being crowned the fth King of the Mighty Mullet Festival a few years back, with his wife, Mildred, who was crowned Queen, Posey now considers himself an ex- sherman and restaurateur. His restaurants are, for the most part, managed by his children, and include Poseys Dockside and Poseys Up the Creek Steam Room and Oyster House. Scrunch Porter and Robert Taylor built this place here, says Posey referring to the well-known establishment along the Panacea strip. They ran it for a long time. Then Scrunch bought Robert out. And then Scrunch nally sold it. I believe he sold it to the Thompsons and they sold it to the Whaleys. It went under and I brought it from the bank on foreclosure. Lately, running a restaurant is a tough game. Not only has tourism become slim in the area, but production costs are fluctuating at speedier rates than gas prices at a convenience store. I blame the state for the way oysters are now, says Posey. When the state t hought oil was going to hit here, they let people go out, rob the bars, and sell oysters everywhere. They didnt even check them for size. Now there are no oysters. I have to pay $96 a gallon, and $35 a bushel. Just two weeks ago they were costing me $60 a gallon, and $22 a bushel. But if youre gonna stay in business youve got to have what the people want. I think we are in trouble, he continues. State regulations, size limits, all that stuff is about to put everybody out of business. It hurts tourism. People are not gonna come down here to catch one or two reds, or a trout, or a ounder thats got to be a certain size. When putting the days of the past side-by-side with those of the present, and hopefully, those that lie beyond, Posey appears keenly aware of the change that has occurred not only in the seafood business, but in the daily life of Wakulla. We didnt get to go many places when I was younger, he says. We didnt have a truck, so we walked everywhere we went. We walked to Skippers Bay to go oystering; wade out there and get an oyster, cut us a few swamp cabbage on the way back home. Swamp cabbage: Something similar to an artichoke where you cut down the head of a palm, remove the tender parts, or heart, that lies at the root, and cook it down into a palpable substance. This was once a survival food for quite a few families in the county. Regulations, supposedly, have ended that age-old custom in Wakulla. Theres a regulation on everything, says Posey. It helps in some ways to have them, but sometimes they go overboard. In April 2013, the Healing Arts of Wakulla (HAWC), in association with Palaver Tree Theater, will begin a series of kickoff events for Wakullas Working Waterfronts Photo-Journal Project. Personal interviews that depict the many aspects of the countys sheries and their workers, such as the one above with Posey, are currently being collected and developed. Any old family photos of shers, shrimpers, crabbers, oyster workers, and others that would make a nice addition to the project are welcomed. The photos will be scanned for the building of this ongoing collection. Local professional photographers are also needed to help build the photojournal scheduled to start its full production in June 2013. Wakullas Working Waterfronts ProjectNOAH POSEYFisherman, crab house processor, businessman, restauranteur PHOTO BY HERB DONALDSON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSNoah Posey outside one of the familys Panacea restaurants. 5Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2Go to http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click Continue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click Continue. Register your online account today!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Page 13ABy JO ANN PALMERSpecial to The NewsOn Sunday morning, in spite of the chilly temperatures, 177 motorcycles and riders, young and old, serious and casual, seasoned and novice, gathered to show their support for the 11th Annual Iron Ravens Motorcycle Club Toy Run. This annual run is organized by Wakulla Iron Raven Charlie Davidson and supported by the combined efforts of several local motorcycle clubs and organizations including The Vietnam Vets, Wakulla Free Riders, Legacy Vets, The Remaining Few and the Wakulla Iron Ravens. At 11 a.m., the bikes cranked up and headed south out of the dusty parking lot across from Gulf Coast Lumber in Woodville. They turned south onto Woodville Highway escorted by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and lead by the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Departments Big Red Truck. The route took the parade of bikers and cars down Woodville Highway to Highway 267, over to 98, ending at Ouzts Two Oyster Bar & Grill in Newport. There the riders unloaded their bounty into a trailer that represents Santas sleigh and were thanked with a bag of homemade goodies, and a free chili lunch, complete with fresh cornbread, sweet tea and live music, all provided by the Iron Ravens. The clubs prepared hot chili for 300 participants and at last estimate, were right on target with the count. Of course if you missed the chili, the kitchen at Ouzts Too was open with fresh seafood, barbecue, oysters on the half shell, juicy burgers and much more. All the toys collected during this run stay in Wakulla County and are distributed by the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department. Families and children are identified by schools, neighbors, churches and the WCSO. There are many families in need in our area and this is just one small way to help during the holidays. Everyone wants to see our children grow and flourish and a toy during this season is something these children will appreciate and remember. Thanks to the generosity, the trailer was almost full, and many needy children here in Wakulla County will have a new toy this Christmas. If you missed the run but want to help, the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department will be accepting toys until Dec. 22 at Ouzts Too or a volunteer with the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department will pick items up from you. Families also need nonperishable food items, personal care products, laundry and cleaning supplies and basic clothing needs such as unused socks and underwear, jackets and sweaters. All these items are being accepted and appreciated. Last year 165 families were helped as a result of this run. This year we anticipate an even greater need. Thankfully, some families who were helped in the past are now helping others. This is an encouraging reassurance that small gestures can make a difference. For more information on how you can get involved, or if you know someone who needs assistance, contact Rod Strickland at 631-0269, the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department at 9257969 or Dorothy White at Ouzts Too, 925-6448. Mark your calendar for next year, the Sunday following Thanksgiving. The rewards are worth the ride.Iron Ravens annual toy run is a ride for a cause The long line of bikes on the ride between Gulf Coast Lumber in Woodville and Outzts Too in Newport. On Sunday, the Iron Ravens and other clubs rode from Woodville to Outzts Too in Newport as part of an annual toy run If you missed the run but want to help, the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department will be accepting toys until Dec. 22 at Ouzts Too A stuffed animal with goggles, left, is ready to ride on Sunday. Riders line up with toys at Ouzts Too, below, and get a free bowl of chili for their contribution.PHOTOS BY JO ANN PALMER Special to The News To the People of Floridas Second Congressional District, I would like to express my hear elt gra tude for your support and prayers, and for the con dence that you have placed in me to con nue our work in Congress. It is a privilege and honor to represent you. We have accomplished a lot together over the past two years, but there is s ll much work to be done in our journey to change the culture in Washington, D.C. Thank you again for trus ng me to be a voice for you in Congress. Rest assured, as a lifelong resident of North and Northwest Florida, I will always ght for the people and land that I love. Your partner in freedom and liberty, Steve Southerland, II United States Representa ve 2nd District, Florida Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905.Little Tupper Lake in New Yorks Adirondack State Park.

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Nov. 18, Adam Kendall Joseph, 20, of Apalachicola was arrested for DUI after crashing his vehicle into the Spring Creek Highway home of Willie and Annie Spears. The driver was south on Spring Creek Highway when he crashed the vehicle and it became wedged under the pilings creating approximately $1,000 worth of damage. Deputy Mike Crum and FHP Trooper Richard Elliott conducted sobriety exercises and administered breath tests. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: NOVEMBER 15 Tabbatha Lynn Houck, 33, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of drugs without a prescription as she was entering the WCSO Detention Facility. During the processing of the incoming inmate, Detention Deputy Vicki Hughes discovered prescription pills. The pills were con scated. Deputy Richard Moon and Deputy Leif Sparby also investigated. A 39-year-old Crawfordville victim reported that she was receiving multiple obscene and harassing telephone calls. The victim received 11 calls late in the evening. Contact was made with Verizon Wireless in an attempt to determine the identity of the caller. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Riversprings Middle School Assistant Principal Michelle Baggett reported a student in possession of a homemade electric device. The device was capable of shocking individuals. Sgt. Ray Johnson confronted the 13-year-old student and con scated the device. Sgt. Johnsons investigation continues and a determination of punishment for the student is still to be determined. A 29-year-old Sopchoppy victim reported receiving obscene and harassing telephone calls at her place of employment. The calls have been occurring on a regular basis. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. NOVEMBER 16 Wanda Lynn of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Coins and currency was removed from the home and a suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. Tonya Montague of Crawfordville reported the theft of two pieces of jewelry from her home. The property is valued at $2,400 and was recovered from an area pawn shop. A suspect has been identi ed. Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. NOVEMBER 17 Daniel Long of Sopchoppy reported a fraud. Money was removed from the victims bank account. The victim noticed 104 fraudulent transactions worth approximately $6,000. The transactions took place in Europe and Asia. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. Jessica Slusher of Crawfordville reported an animal incident. Slusher was walking out of Wal-Mart when she observed an ill cat in the back of a truck. The cat was very malnourished. The cage that contained the cage did not contain water or food. Contact was made with the vehicle owner who reported that she took several feral cats to the animal shelter and thought the kitten was already deceased. Wakulla Animal Control took possession of the kitten to be euthanized. The truck owner was planning to bury the kitten. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. Benjamin D. Millership of Crawfordville was involved in a traf c stop after Sgt. Jeremy Johnston allegedly observed him driving a vehicle with no working tail lights. The driver was unable to produce a valid driver license due to it being suspended. Sgt. Johnston arrested the driver for driving while license is suspended or revoked. The vehicle was towed due to not having proper registration and no proof of insurance. Luciana Ward of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash. The victim reported that she was parked at Hudson Park when someone struck her vehicle and left the scene. The vehicle appeared to have been backed into by another motorist on the back left portion of the vehicle. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. NOVEMBER 18 George D. Mathers of Crawfordville was pulling into the parking lot of Dux Discount Liquors drive through when the left front of the vehicle hit the side of the building. The damage to the building was estimated at $5,000 and the damage to the vehicle was estimated at $500. Sgt. Andy Curles investigated. Leo Spears, park manager for the City of Sopchoppy, reported a criminal mischief to the mens room at City Park. An oval mirror was broken in the mens room. Damage was estimated at $20. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. Andria Baird of Crawfordville reported the theft of her wallet from a fast food restaurant. The wallet and contents are valued at $40. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. Raymonde R. Bergholz of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of fishing equipment, a camera and comforter from her storage area near her home. The property was valued at $300 and a suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. Robert Amodeo of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A vehicle was broken into and a rearm was stolen. Two vehicles had tires that were flattened. The rearm is valued at $250 and a suspect has been identified. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. Michael Bradley of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim heard a vehicle strike an object outside his home. The crash knocked the victims mailbox and post to the ground. Damage was estimated at $200. Reserve Deputy Roy Gunnarsson investigated. NOVEMBER 19 Dorothy Hall of Crawfordville reported the theft of $5,500 worth of jewelry from her home. Two suspects have been developed during the investigation. Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a vehicle without a tag and conducted a traffic stop. Larry Steven Mosley, 53, of Panacea was the driver and he failed to produce a valid driver license. Mosley was arrested for knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license is suspended or revoked. Reserve Deputy David Pienta also investigated. Tamara Ingram of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief as a 14-year-old was observed shooting a BB gun at her home. The home suffered damage to the siding. The juvenile was issued a notice to appear in court for criminal mischief and use of a BB gun by a minor under age 16. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. A criminal mischief was reported at Wildwood Country Club after two golfers crashed a Wildwood golf cart into a tree on the 17th hole. Witnesses observed the suspects ee the scene and jump into a vehicle at the club. Suspects have been identi ed. Damage to the golf cart was estimated at $500. Deputy Mike Zimba and Reserve Deputy David Pienta investigated. NOVEMBER 20 Wendell A. Harrell of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash involving a deer on Woodville Highway just north of Wakulla Station. There were no injuries or road obstruction. The vehicle was towed from the scene. Deputy Mike Zimba and Reserve Deputy David Pienta investigated. Hollie Brantley of St. Marks reported a possible criminal mischief at her home. A privacy fence was damaged during the early morning hours. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Scott Joyner of the Wakulla County Public Library reported the theft of a wireless internet card. Technical support staff noted that the wireless card was missing from one of the library computers. A 15-year-old suspect was identified and a trespass warning was issued for the juvenile. The card is valued at $20. Deputy Mike Zimba and Reserve Deputy David Pienta investigated. Helen Posey and Beatrice Motsinger, both of Crawfordville, reported the theft of jewelry from their home. The stolen property is valued at $4,000. A suspect has been identified. Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. Aaron Wiggins of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his vehicle. The victim was at a convenience store when a juvenile acquaintance approached his vehicle and punched it. The vehicle suffered a dent in the fender. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated the incident and turned the case over to Wakulla High School SRO Deputy Scott Rojas. Sandra Smith-Herrin of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victim left the vehicle at a friends home for safe keeping. When she returned to retrieve the vehicle she observed dent damage. Damage was estimated at $500. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Shawn Yorks of Crawfordville and Hardees reported a grand theft of mone y. A deposit was short of the proper amount of money. The case investigation continues. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 721 calls for service during the past week including 11 residential and commercial alarms; 64 citizen contacts; 13 disturbances; 11 abandoned E-911 calls; 12 regular E-911 calls; 33 investigations; 10 loud music/noise complaints; 44 medical emergencies; 130 residential and commercial security checks; 16 special details; 31 subpoena services; 13 suspicious vehicles; 10 traf c crashes; 11 traf c enforcements; 21 traffic stops; 10 reckless vehicles; 12 wanted people; and 18 watch orders.Special to The NewsTwo Wakulla County residential homes were destroyed following house res during the early morning hours of Wednesday, Nov. 21, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. At 12:37 a.m., Celeste Sutherland reported a house re at 1634 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road in Crawfordville. Deputy Gibby Gibson responded to the blaze and observed heavy smoke coming from the home and siding falling to the ground. The re originated in the kitchen of the home and the single occupant of the home, Sutherland, was able to get outside safely. Wakulla re ghters were able to put out the blaze, but the blaze destroyed the majority of the home. The victim told investigators that she was cooking with grease in the kitchen and brie y left the room. When she returned to the kitchen she observed the entire kitchen on re. Some bedrooms in the home survived the blaze. A second occupant of the home was in Tallahassee at the time of the incident. There were no injuries and the American Red Cross was noti ed of the situation to provide assistance to the victims. Smoke and re damage was estimated at $150,000. The re was ruled an accident. At 1:10 a.m., Russell M. Lawler of Ochlockonee Bay reported a structure re at 11 Joe Drive. The residents of the home were able to escape the re with no injuries but the residence was fully engulfed when Deputy Ward Kromer arrived. Wakulla Fire ghters were on scene attempting to put out the re when Deputy Kromer arrived. The residence was a total loss as a result of the re and a 2004 GMC truck parked under the home on stilts was also destroyed. A 2012 Chevrolet truck and a vessel in the yard received heat damage. Lawler, his wife and two children escaped the home. The re is believed to have been caused by an accidental overload in the breaker box. The State Fire Marshal is investigating. The re damage to the home and vehicles is expected to exceed $100,000. The American Red Cross was contacted to assist the family. Fires destroy two Wakulla homesICE inspection completed successfullySpecial to The NewsInspectors representing the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency visited the Wakulla County Jail from Wednesday, Nov. 14 to Friday, Nov. 16 to conduct the annual ICE inspection. The inspection is a requirement to allow the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce to house federal ICE detainees in the jail. In exchange for the bed space, ICE provides Wakulla County with approximately $75 per day per detainee for bed rental. The ICE agreement has brought in millions of federal dollars to the Wakulla County budget over the years. The inspection team reviewed 38 standards which included more than 800 components including the areas of security, safety, medical and administration. ICE inspects the entire jail even though the federal detainees occupy only one section of the facility. Wakulla County houses between 100 and 105 male ICE detainees on average and no areas of concern were established by the inspectors. The jail bed revenue raised $3.2 million in scal year 2010-11 and raised $2.8 million in 2011-12. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce will host a Personal Protection and Firearms Safety Course on Saturday, Dec. 15 from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the WCSO Range in Otter Creek, near Sopchoppy. The program is $65 for non-range members and $55 for range members and satis es the requirement for a conceal carry permit. For more information or to register, call the Range at 745-7290 or Lt. Fred Nichols at 251-1676.Concealed weapon class will be o ered Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 blessedare those whomourn 2012 Service of RemembranceSunday, December 2nd at 4:00pm Hudson Park21 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville Please call Pam at 850-926-9308 for more information. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA The Wakulla News For local news and photos visit us online For local news and photos visit us online www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Page 15A ADOPT A FAMILY by Dec. 7 Ask your friends, neighbors, co-workers or civic group to adopt a family with you. You tell us the size family /families you would like to adopt and we will give you their wish. Most families are asking for the VERY BASIC NEEDS of living such as blankets, towels, etc. The children may also ask for a special toy. DONATE FUNDS by Dec. 15 Donate funds so that we may do the shopping and provide the NEEDS that may not have been provided.VOLUNTEER Recruit others, assist in collecting needed items, funds, shopping, volunteers needed at the Community Center or helping hands. Weekend hours are available.~ DROP OFF LOCATIONS ~CHECKS CAN BE MAILED TO Wakulla County Coalition for Youth Post Ofce Box 1688 Crawfordville, Florida 32326 Please make checks payable to Wakulla County Coalition for YouthWe expect the families needing assistance to be high this year. We need your Caring Hands and Hearts more than Ever Before to reach out and HELP OUR COMMUNITY! 200 FAMILIES ARE IN NEED For more information please call 850-926-3526BE A SANTA ... BE AN ELF ... BE AN ANGEL Operation Santa 2012~ Ways to Help ~Coordinated by The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth WE NEED YOUR HELP!So that NO CHILD IS HUNGRY or EMPTY HANDED this HOLIDAY SEASON! Clean gently worn or new clothes of all sizes Toys Small Electronics Laundry soap Games Books Puzzles Household cleaning products Canned goods and non perishables ( please check expiration dates ) Baby blankets Comforters Warm coats Linens Furniture ( Please call for instructions on where to deliver ) Pictures Kitchenware SocksWe welcome youth groups, civic organizations, churches, neighborhoods and individuals Our local families are requesting items such as:DONATIONS of GENTLY USED CLOTHING & TOYS by December 3 Need Elementary, Middle, and High School Youth Sizes WAKULLA COUNTY COMMUNITY CENTER 318 Shadeville Rd. Crawfordville Corner of Trice Lane & Hwy 61 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For New and Gently Used Items DOLLAR GENERAL EAST IVAN ROAD THE WAKULLA NEWS 3119 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville 9 a.m. 5 p.m. WAL-MARTSelect an ornament from the Wal-Mart Christmas tree that will name the wish of a child, buy the item and drop it in the Operation Santa bin at customer service. This advertisement sponsored in part by

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The thinning leaves of autumn unveil and expose many of the trees in Wakulla County which have been concealed by their green cloak during the warmer months. Oaks, both deciduous and evergreen, may reveal a collection of knotty, hard tumor-like growths on twigs, branches and limbs. These rounded growths offer a stark contrast to the straight thin twigs and branches which shoot off at angles forming a porous maze for supporting leaves. The bulbous lumps may be few and scattered or come in heavy concentrations. To the uninitiated these arboreal blisters may appear to be retained acorns. If in thick stands of trees, it can be dif cult to tell which tree species is producing these galls. The culprit causing these eruptions is the gall wasp, Callirhytis. Locally, the two tiny members of this insect family use oaks as part of their reproductive process. The life cycle of these wasps is a bit of a mystery as they have not been studied extensively. The process begins when the female wasps emerge from twig galls in late spring to early summer. These females quickly lay eggs on the veins on the undersides of leaves. Small vein galls appear within a few weeks in early summer with male and female wasps quickly emerging from the vein galls. Mated females then oviposits eggs in young oak twigs. Twig galls appear in the spring of the following year. Two or more years are required for the immature gall wasps to complete development in the twig galls. The galls provide shelter, protection, and food for the immature wasps. Inside a gall, the larvae are surrounded by tissues rich in nutrients. As the larvae reach maturity small spines or horns become evident on the gall. An adult wasp emerges from each horn. These wasps are barely visible at 2 millimeters in length which is about the thickness of a half-dollar coin. The wasps petite size notwithstanding, the individual galls can be almost a foot in length. The gall formation is a result of bark cell hypertrophy (over-growth) and hyperplasia (cell proliferation) after the eggs are laid. Individual trees or small groups of trees usually experience a slight to moderate infestation of these wasp galls, depending on the annual environmental factors. However, severe gall wasp infestations have been observed in several north and central Florida counties, including Wakulla County. Extremely high numbers of twig galls have occurred on thousands of laurel oaks in these locations. These infestations have affected young to mature trees in woodlands and residential areas. The overabundance of twig galls has resulted in notable levels of branch dieback, crown thinning, and in rare cases, tree mortality. Young galls are slight, tumor-like swellings of trees periderm tissue, the innermost living area of the bark. Bark color of young galls is a greenishbrown and bark surfaces are smooth except for protruding lenticels which act as pores for the tree. Mature twig galls persist as distinct bulges or form massive compound galls more than two inched in diameter and may cover a majority of branches. Older galls become very woody and discolored. The horns which are used for new wasp to emerge will have deteriorated and be missing by this time. To learn more about Gall Wasp in Wakulla County, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u .edu/Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u edu or at (850) 926-3931. Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comLaurel oaks are prone to infestations by gall wasps Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison For more information Call 210-8831 or 528-1527 The News Wakulla s s CENTENNIALBANK Member FDICwww.my100bank.comA Home BancShares Company Kids Come Visit Santa 4 p.m. 8 p.m. Boat On Trailer Parade Panacea Market Place 2pm 8pmNEXT TO BIG TOP SUPERMARKETLocal Arts & Crafts Vendors Saturday, Dec. 1 st The 8th Annual t t s t s t t s t st t s t Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Free Admission from 2-6 p.m.This Advertisement Sponsored by Some things get better with age. Capital Health Plan is one of them. Plan to attend a SEMINAR to LEARN MORE about CHP Advantage Plus (HMO) and CHP Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-8708943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Paid Endorsement. Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 to RSVP or for more information. (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/medicareSeminars will be held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center 1491 Governors Square Blvd.H5938_DP 121 File & Use 09242011Anna Johnson says....Join me and become a member of a Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO) Plan. SMThursday, November 29 Friday, November 30 Wednesday, December 5 Thursday, December 6 PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSGalls visible in the branches of a tree, above. A closer look at a gall wasp nest, below.

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netHead coach Scott Klees was obviously disappointed about the loss in the playoffs to Godby on Friday night, and said as much. But, a few days after the game, Klees admitted he couldnt bring himself to watch the game lm. I probably never will, he said. He heard from the other coaches who did watch the lm that it con rmed that fumble into and through the end zone at the start of the second quarter appeared to be a blown call by the referees. The Wakulla runner crossed the goal line with the ball before his own knee jarred it loose and it rolled through the back of the end zone. If it had been called a touchdown, Wakulla would have been up 14-6, and maybe the game would have been different. As it was, it was called a touchback and Godby got the ball at the 20. Klees doesnt make excuses for the loss. Youve got to play well all the way through the playoffs and youve got to get some breaks. As it was, Wakulla had a lot of injuries including two players on the field getting over 103-degree fevers. But Wakulla was undone by its own mistakes. Five times we were in the red zone and came away with just one touchdown, he said. There were penalties three penalties that erased three big runs. But Klees also credited Godbys play. They put nine men in the box and dared us to throw, he said. Most of those passes fell incomplete. There was a heartbreaking interception at the goal line. They deserved to win, Klees said. We didnt play well enough to win. Still, amidst the disappointment, Klees noted that just a few years ago, when this senior class was starting, the goal was to make the playoffs. Nowadays, he said, the football program has progressed to the point where Everybody is disappointed that we didnt make the championship. Klees thanked those seniors for their play and their grace. Of the high expectations of excellence in the program, he said, A lot of that is due to this senior class. Klees also thanked the fans and his assistant coaches, as well as school administration for support. They make my job very pleasant, he said. Klees also thanked the churches that fed the team before the games. GAME RECAP The stands were packed on a chilly night at J.D. Jones stadium, The War Eagle defense held Godby on its first series and, after a punt, running back Dequon Simmons scampered 40 yards to set up a run by quarterback Caleb Stephens two plays later for an 11-yard touchdown. The extra point was good. Later in the rst quarter, a Wakulla fumble deep in their own territory gave Godby good eld position and they scored a touchdown on the next play. The extra point was blocked, however, and Wakulla was still up, 7-6 with 1:33 remaining in the period. The War Eagles mounted a drive down to the Cougar goal line, but there was a controversial call in which referees ruled the ball was fumbled through the end zone. Some sideline observers believed it should have been a touchdown for Wakulla. Ruled a touchback, Godby took over on its own 20. They drove down the eld to the Wakulla 25, attempted a eld goal but it was blocked. Wakulla was stymied on its next offensive series and punted. Godby took over at its 45. Facing a fourth down and 1 at the War Eagle 20, the Cougars went for it and scoared a touchdown. Twopoint conversion was good, putting Godby up 14-7. With under 2 minutes, Wakulla drove down the eld, but pass was intercepted at the goal line. Godby mounted an efficient 2-minute offense and drove down the eld, but the half ended without a score. During the second half, Mikal Cromartie intercepted a Cougar pass to stop a threat, and the special teams blocked another eld goal attempt by Godby. A punt was partially blocked by Dequon Simmons to give Wakulla the ball at mid eld. That drive died when the War Eagles, facing a fourth and 1, had a pass fall incomplete. With 2:32 remaining, Godby got a couple of rst downs to run out the clock and end Wakullas undefeated season. Wakulla had beat Godby just four weeks earlier to win the district crown, and had won the last three meetings of the teams until Friday night.Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012sports news and team views SportsWar Eagles lose to GodbyWakullas perfect season comes to end with 14-7 loss in playo s WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN CONNOR HARRISON/WAKULLASPORTS.COM Players, coaches, band members and students, above, take the eld one more time to sing the school song. Brandon Nichols, left, runs behind the block of Dequon Simmons. Wakulla fans, below packed the stands for Friday nights playoff game. More photos online at thewakullanews.com Gray and Smith run at the Footlocker South Regional Page 2BLady War Eagles fall to Godby, 53-21Page 2BWar Eagle wrestlers win at Lincoln DualsPage 4B Expert physicians.Quality obstetrical & gynecological care. 2770 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 110, Tallahassee, FL 32308 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comOfce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. Next-day appointments available. Dr. Stephanie Cruz Lee is an OB/GYN who is uent in both English and Spanish. She is accepting new patients. In addition to delivering babies, Dr. Lees areas of clinical interests are abnormal menstrual bleeding, minimally invasive gynecological surgery, infertility and menopausal hormone therapy. Dr. Lee received her medical degree from the Florida State University College of Medicine. She completed her residency at the University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville.To schedule an appointment with Dr. Lee, call (850) 877-5589. Capital Regional Medical Center Welcomes Dr. Stephanie Cruz Lee Specializing in Gynecology & Obstetrics For that Special & Unique Gift:Lots of educational gifts & toys for children & adults. We have a great selection of natural history Books for all ages, books by Jack and Anne Rudloe, beautiful jewelry, home decor, prints, cards, ornaments. We have added many items to our collection. Great Stocking Stuffers Too! Open: Mon. Fri. 9am 5pm www.gulfspecimen.org Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Aquarium Your generous support helps us to continue our mission to educate and inspire. S S Visit the Gift Shopat Open 7 Days Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator

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Special to The NewsUrban Disturbance combines the fundamentals of running with the thrill and challenge of an obstacle course. Social Design Group, in partnership with Operation One Voice, will host Tallahassees second annual urban obstacle event. The Urban Disturbance obstacle race and festival will begin at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 8, at Kleman Plaza in downtown Tallahassee. Interested racers can check out the course and register online at www. theUrbanDisturbance. com. The five mile course incorporates 15 obstacles that racers must jump over, crawl under, weave around, and climb through, all while at race-pace. The course is designed to incorporate and showcase a number of the revitalization projects across Tallahassee and will take runners through areas such as All Saints, Downtown and Gaines Street. Race highlights include hurdling barricades in the streets, army crawling along the back side of All Saints Hop Yard and heroically leaping over the rewall. It is designed for provide an entertaining event for participants at all levels of tness. Volunteers will be stationed along the route to provide assistance to racers as necessary. To accompany the race, a festival Victory Park will be open to all throughout the race and until 2 p.m. at Kleman Plaza. Victory Park is for racers and spectators alike and will feature live entertainment, interactive tness zones and concessions, as well as a hospitality tent. Some volunteer positions for the race include Packet Pickup Host, Course Marshal, Obstacle Crew, Hydration Station Crew, Finisher Medal Distributor, Athlete Hospitality Crew, Award Ceremony Assistant and others. Cost is $75 Nov. 20 through Dec. 3. Registration closes at 11:59 p.m. on 12/3. Come and join us as a runner, volunteer or spectator. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach WHS cross country runners Raychel Gray and Aaron Smith closed out the 2012 cross country season by traveling to Charlotte, N.C., to compete in the prestigious Footlocker South Regional Meet on Saturday, Nov. 24. This meet is a quali er for the National Finals in California and attracts almost all of the top runners from all over the southern U.S. For the last several years, Coach Chris Sumner, currently the girls coach at Leon High School, has organized the trip for runners from the Big Bend area. It provides one nal chance for the cross country runners to compete in a high school or middle school event and run against the nest runners in the southeast. Gray, competing in the senior girls race, was looking for one last chance to reach a goal she had set for her senior season, but had not quite accomplished. She had an excellent senior season and had improved her personal record (PR) to 21:40, establishing herself as the solid No. 2 runner on the WHS team, but her goals for the season included running a State Elite time of 21:30 or faster. Until Saturday, that goal had eluded her. However, she took full advantage of her nal opportunity, the excellent course and erce competition at the Footlocker Meet and turned in her best performance to date, setting a new PR of 21:26 which eclipsed the State Elite Standard. Mission accomplished! Smith also made the trip and ran a very solid race, nishing in the time of 17:46. Although he didnt set a new PR, Smith still ran an excellent race and extended his string of consecutive sub-18:00 minute performances on cross country courses to ve races. This race topped off an excellent season for the junior runner, one that saw him lower his PR from last year by right at 3 minutes over the 5K distance, which at the level he was running, is a tremendous improvement. Both runners were very excited about the opportunity to travel to the race and expressed gratitude to Coach Sumner for organizing the trip. The annual Turkey Trot races (5K,10K and15K) held in Southwood in Tallahassee have become something of an annual happening, with over 6,000 runners gathering on Thanksgiving morning to burn a few calories before retiring to their homes for the traditional Thanksgiving meal. Not only do a lot of people compete, but the races also attract most of the top runners from this area, looking to post fast times on the relatively at and fast courses. This year the 10K was also a Gulf Winds Track Club Grand Prix event, thereby guaranteeing a top notch eld. The 2012 WHS graduate and former high school cross country and track star, Stanley Linton, was on the starting line of this years 10K, ready to mix it up with the areas best, just 10 days after running his rst marathon in Pensacola. In that debut race he nished 4th overall in 2:55.50, an excellent time for his rst try at the 26.2 mile distance. In the Turkey Trot, Linton and three time Canadian Olympian Kevin Sullivan, took it out hard and opened an early lead on the rest of the eld, with Linton running just off Sullivans shoulder. At approximately three miles, Sullivan was forced to drop out with an injury, leaving Linton alone in front of the pursing pack of runners. He never looked back and continued to build on the lead, nishing in rst place in 33:15, almost two minutes ahead of the second place nisher. There were 775 nishers in the 10K race. Another former War Eagle runner and current FSU runner, Cora Atkinson, also ran the 10K and nished as the 8th woman overall in the excellent time of 43:43, nishing rst in her age group. From examining the results, it also appears that the following Wakulla residents won their respective age groups: Duane Evans (45-49), 19:10 in the 5K and former WHS cross country coach and really tough old guy Ron Christen (65-69) 47:45 in the 10K. Current and former WHS runners known to nish one of the three races included: Travis Parks (10K), Mitchell Atkinson (15K), Nathan Green (5K), David Sloan (10K), Sydney Nutting (5K) and Josh Dismuke (5K). WHS runners, parents and coaches also manned a water station and the turn around on the 15K course and everyones help was sincerely appreciated.RUNNINGGray and Smith run at the Footlocker South RegionalWakullas Stanley Linton wins Turkey TrotUrban Disturbance obstacle race set for Dec. 8 in Tallahassee WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDENLady War Eagle Janay Gavin drives to the goal against the Lady Cougars. Lady War Eagle Maya Simmons goes to the free throw line after being fouled.BASKETBALLLady War Eagles fall to Godby, 53-21By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Lady Cougars of Godby High School had superior ball-handling skills, but the Wakulla Lady War Eagles played hard in a disappointing 53-21 loss at home on Monday, Nov. 26. Godby opened the game with an 8-point run in the rst period before Ashley Carr put up the rst points for the Lady War Eagles, a 3-point shot. Janay Gavin scored and, at the end of the rst period, the Lady War Eagles trailed 15-7. At halftime, the score was 30-13, with Godby leading. At the start of the fourth quarter, Godbys lead was 46-16. JV GIRLS: The junior varsity girls game was a lot closer, with the Lady War Eagles JV falling 27-24. With the nal minutes ticking down, Godby had a 1 point lead, 25-24, and the Lady War Eagles struggled to get a basket and pull out the game but couldnt.Staff ReportThe War Eagles boys basketball team lost their season opener in overtime to Maclay, 60-57. Top scorers for Wakulla were Zach Nordlot with 22 points, Clay Greene with 10, and Caleb Fell with 6. The game was tied at 20 at half, and then knotted at 47 at the end of regulation. In the overtime period, Maclay added 13 points while the War Eagles scored 10.Boys lose season opener in overtime (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926685 or 510Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Nov. 29 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Nov. 30 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Dec. 1 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Dec. 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Dec. 3 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Dec. 4 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Wednesday, Dec. 5 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Dec. 6 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsFriday, Nov. 30 AZIZA will perform music from the Middle East and they are bringing along a belly dancer at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Aziza is a multi-talented, Tallahassee based group, featuring music from Egypt, Turkey, Lebanon and other Middle Eastern regions. This group will bring at least six musicians and they will perform on violin, drums, and accordion, along with their vocalist who will be singing in native Arabic, Turkish, and perhaps other languages. Tickets are $10. For reservations, contact poshjava@gmail.com or phone: (850) 962-1010. Saturday, Dec. 1 BOOK SALE EXTRAVAGANZA FUNDRAISER will be held at the library from 9 a.m. to noon. There are thousands of books, audio, video and more. Proceeds bene t childrens programs at the library. NICK ANNIS will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Annis has won multiple songwriting awards across the U.S. and his storytelling and humor is a real treat to witness. Annis, who kind of sounds like James Taylor, writes thoughtprovoking songs that contain a touch of humor, for effect. He can be heard at nickannis.com. For reservations, contact poshjava@gmail.com or phone: (850) 962-1010. Seats are $10. Baked goods, coffee, tea and drinks will be available for purchase. Byob. Posh is located on the corner of Rose Street and Winthrop Avenue in downtown Sopchoppy. Sunday, Dec. 2 SERVICE OF REMEMBRANCE will be held by Big Bend Hospice at 4 p.m. at Hudson Park. Big Bend Hospices Service of Remembrance is a non-denominational service that brings together those in the community to honor the memories of loved ones at this very special time of year. Everyone who attends shares a common purpose to honor and to remember a loved one who has died, to be surrounded by others who are on a similar journey and to connect with loved ones. For additional information, contact Pam Mezzina at (850) 878-5310, ext. 799. FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE presentation series will feature Owls and Other Night Birds at St. Marks with Don Morrow of The Trust for Public Lands at 2 p.m. He will tell about birds of the night and share their habits, how to identify them and where you are likely to nd them. Linger afterward for a short twilight eld trip. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures Classroom, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 925-6121 for more information. Monday, Dec. 3 ANNUAL HOLIDAY MEETING AND DINNER will be held by NAMI WAkulla at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club, There will be a discussion with Daina Gold, and her life with Bipolar Disorder. All are invited to attend. Upcoming EventsFriday, Dec. 7 HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held at 6 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club. This is a preview party for the Saturday event. For $10 enjoy wine and hors doeuvres while shopping. The general public day is Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and is free. For more information contact Nita Burke at 294-6482 or Heather Robison at 544-5418. Saturday, Dec. 8 HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club. There will be arts and craft vendors. For more information contact Nita Burke at 294-6482 or Heather Robison at 544-5418. SOPCHOPPY OPRY CLASSIC COUNTRY CHRISTMAS SHOW will feature the Purvis Brothers at 7 p.m. in historic Sopchoppy High Auditorium. Mike, Frank and Wendall Purvis will be accompanied by ddle player Wayne Martin, steel guitarist Larry Bullock, keyboardist Myron Spainhour and percussionsit Ronnie Weeks. Call 962-3711 for ticket information. Sunday, Dec. 9 THE MESSIAH will be performed by the Tallahassee Florida Stake of The Church of Jesus at 7 p.m. at Chiles High School in Tallahassee. Messiah features a choir and orchestra comprised of members of the community. Tickets are free, but limited. They can be ordered online at www. tallahasseemessiah.com. Wednesday, Dec. 12 CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for Front Porch Creations Florist will be held from 11:30 a.m. at their new location, 2543 Crawfordville Highway, Suite 4, Crawfordville. Friday, Dec. 14 CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for Smokin Vapor Wakulla will be held at 11:30 a.m. at 1626 D Crawfordville Highway. Saturday, Dec. 15 HOLIDAY SILENT AUCTION AND BOOK SIGNING will be held by the Florida Wild Mammal Association and Goose Creek Wildlife Sanctuary from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Tallahassee Elks Lodge located at 276 N. Magnolia Drive. Nature writer and photographer John B. Spohrer, Jr. will sign copies of his new book, The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay, with part of the proceeds going to Goosecreek and FWMA. There will also be a cash bar and raf e. For additional information, go to www.wakullawildlife.org or www. goosecreekwildlifesanctuary.org. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Page 3B Government Meetings Thursday, Nov. 29 WAKULLA COUNTY INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY will hold a public meeting at 11 a.m. in the BOCC Administration Conference Room. Monday, Dec. 3 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.Tuesday, Dec. 4 RESTORE ACT ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold its rst public meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, Dec. 6 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a special meeting at 9 a.m. in the commission chambers for a 2012 commissioner educational orientation. BY SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorWinter Fling Fundraiser this Saturday! Our annual December Book Extravaganza is being expanded into what were calling a Winter Fling to bene t the Friends of the Library this Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon. In addition to the thousands of books, audio and video available for you to browse, were also being joined by the Iris Garden Club and the Wakulla County Historical Society who will have great holiday gifts for you to buy. In addition to nding some great bargains for the holidays, you can help support three great Wakulla County community organizations. This is our biggest Extravaganza of the year so we expect a big crowd so get here early for all the best items. Hope to see you there! Computer Classes for the Rest of the Year We still have some great free computer classes on tap for the rest of the year including: Digital Photography: Camera Operation & Photo Organization on Thursday, Nov. 29 at 12:30 p.m. In December were offering Computer Basics: Copy & Paste on Dec. 4 at 12:30 p.m., Digital Photography: Edit Your Photos on Dec. 6 at 12:30 p.m., and Computer Basics: Sur ng the Internet on Dec. 12 at 12:30 p.m. While all these great classes are free they all require early registration so sign up today by calling us at 926-7415. More awesome classes will be offered next year so keep an eye on us and if you have any particular classes youd like to see offered please contact us. E-Book Update We are extremely happy to tell everyone that so far this month we are approaching 90 e-book checkouts. Its very encouraging to us that this service is proving to be popular from the very beginning and we assure you that we will continue to build our e-book collection so that the greatest number of people can take advantage of this service. All you need is a library card with us to use this service and enjoy an e-book on your Kindle, Nook, iPad, PC or many other devices. So please come by and sign up today! Again if you have any questions on how to check out e-books to your device please come by and well assist you. We can also help you over the phone but its much easier if the device is in front of us. Library News... Aziza at 8 p.m. at Posh Java in Sopchoppy. Christmas in Panacea from 2 to 8 p.m. Parade starts at 6:30 p.m. Service of Remembrance by Big Bend Hospice at 4 p.m. at Hudson Park. NAMI Annual Holiday Meeting and Dinner at 6 p.m. at Crawfordville Womans Club. FridaySaturdaySundayMonday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Holiday Events Friday, Nov. 30 ANNUAL WINTER HOLIDAY FESTIVAL will be held at Medart Elementary School from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. All funds raised will go towards needed items for the school. There will be games, prizes, bingo, cake walk, in atable obstacle course, jousting, giant slides, go-cart racing, face painting, sno-cones and food. Come visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus. The school is located at 2558 Coastal Highway. For more information, call 962-4881. Saturday, Dec. 1 CHRISTMAS IN PANACEA will be held from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. There will be a Panacea Market Place with arts and craft vendors starting at 2 p.m. Entertainment will be from 4 to 8 p.m. The boat on trailer parade begins at 6:30 p.m. The tree lighting will take place following the parade. There will also be free refreshments and popcorns, as well as children activities, games, hay ride, face painting and a story teller. Children can also visit with Santa. For more information, call Michelle Crum at 210-8831 or Sherrie Miller at 528-1527. Saturday, Dec. 8 ANNUAL CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Sopchoppy. Santa will be there from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Enjoy relaxed shopping from more than 50 vendors of arts, crafts and food. There will be games and activities for the children, and Christmas music. For more information, contact Bill Lowrie at billlowrie@ embarqmail.com.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views Sports Special to The NewsCoach Will Pafford and his War Eagle Wrestling Team started the 2012-2013 season with an all-out victory at the Lincoln Duals Saturday, Nov. 17th at Lincoln High School in Tallahassee. Wakulla began the dual against Fort Walton Beach and won (51-25). Next up for the War Eagles were the Lowndes County Vikings which Wakulla won (48-27), followed by wins over Chiles High School (42-36), Lincoln High (42-35), and the Seminoles of Florida High (70-12). The War Eagle varsity lineup at the tournament and their dual records are as follows: 106-Austin Runyan(4-1); 113-Zach Malik(5-0); 120-Dyjuan Carney(5-0); 126-Bill Morgan(5-0); 132-Kevon White(5-0); 138-Carl Atkinson(3-2); 145-Cody Davis(3-2); 152-Dillon Rathel(1-4); 160-Josh Strickland(2-3); 182-Drew Delong(5-0); 195-Nathan Tyre(3-1); 220-Keith Godden(2-3) and Hwt-Wesley Jones(2-3). The War Eagles will host their annual tournament this Saturday, Dec. 1, at Wakulla High. A special thanks to assistant coaches Freebeau Swindel and Shannon Smith and also our stat girls Rachel Woofter and Kurstin Douin.PHOTO BY WILLIAM STRICKLAND/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWRESTLING THE COOL DOWN LAP SWIMMING GYMNASTICSWar Eagles win at Lincoln DualsJoey Briggs signs swim scholarship with FloridaIGG team nishes in second place in state competitionWHS sports schedule:Swimmer Joey Briggs, who lives in Crawfordville but attends Rickards High School in Tallahassee, signed a swim scholarship to attend the University of Florida on Tuesday, Nov. 20. The signing was held at the Rickards High School Media Center. Because there is no swim program in Wakulla, Briggs transferred to the IB program at Rickards to continue swimming through high school. Joey Briggs Special to The NewsThe Level 3 International Gold Gymnastics (IGG) Competitive Team brought home a second place nish from the state competition in Deer eld Beach on Nov. 17-18. The competition was erce as 40 teams with over 400 gymnasts competed in four divisions and 25 age groups. Each of the nine IGG team members nished in the top 10 in their respective age groups. Level 3 team members are Caroline Barwick, Aubree Bushee, Riley Davis, Jewell Fondo, Hannah Francis, Annika Matlock, Hailey Quick, Makenna Schissler, and Lillie Steinle. The team is coached by Yasmin Belhaj. They nished out their season with three rst place nishes and two second place nishes.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBy ALAN ROSSThe 2012 Sprint Cup campaign was highlighted, certainly, by Brad Keselowskis consistent runs and ve wins, climaxed by his points swing at the penultimate race at Phoenix. But it is the car manufacturer Dodge that gets to laugh heartily at winning team owner Roger Penskes expense. Thats because Penskes No. 2 Miller Lite will be moving to Ford next season, a change announced at the beginning of the season. At the time, few gured that Dodge even with the talented Keselowski behind the wheel would claim the Cup title. Its somewhat reminiscent of last years championship scenario involving Darian Grubb, Tony Stewarts former crew chief. Grubb, canned by Stewart following the drivers championship run last fall, ultimately found perhaps a better situation with Denny Hamlin and Joe Gibbs Racing, taking his championship credentials with him and guiding his driver to a sixth-place overall nish (to Stewarts ninth). Keselowski displayed just the right blend of moxie, talent, and temperament to take the title. But ve-time champion Jimmie Johnson seemed to be everybodys pick heading into the nal two races of The Chase coming off his 2012 series-leading sixth win, at Texas. But Johnsons bubble burst out in the desert with an untimely date with the Turn Four wall, and while there was a brief run during the season nale at Homestead, the unforced error ended JJs sixth title quest. Another driver in his sayonara season, Matt Kenseth, leaves Roush Fenway Racing to take the former seat of Joey Logano at Joe Gibbs Racing. Kenseth took his second Daytona 500 last February and won at Talladega in the fall, collecting three victories total in 2012. Dale Earnhardt Jr. showed a consistency that had been absent in his overall Cup performance since the earlyto mid-2000s, even breaking into the win column at Michigan. But it was Earnhardts solid Top 10 array (20 Top 10s, for a 10.85 average nish) throughout the year that earned him a legitimate shot at the big prize in only his second Chase appearance in the last ve years. One of the biggest names in the sport fueled a pair of highlights. Jeff Gordon was the unlikeliest of post-race combatants in Phoenix, where he was momentarily devoured by Clint Bowyers pit crew following Gordons intentional he-crashedme-so-I-crashed-him-back takeout of Bowyer late in the race. On a much higher note, the four-time champion who notched his 86th and 87th career victories in 2012 produced the singlebest driving performance of the season, in the nal pre-Chase race at Richmond. Gordon hurtled like a rocket through the pack to nose out Kyle Busch for the nal spot in the 12-man Chase field, the performance of a man possessed. You had to see it to appreciate its power. 2013 anyone? It begins with Johnson. The 48 team is simply the most together out t on the track, and will likely emerge as the preseason favorite. As the sport now hibernates for winter, the eye already looks down the road: Just 13 weeks till Daytona! VETTEL CAPTURES THIRD STRAIGHT WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP: Surviving steady rain and an early spinout that dropped him to the rear of the field, Red Bull Racings Sebastian Vettel became the youngest driver in Formula One history to grab back-to-back-to-back world championships, joining legends Juan Manuel Fangio and Michael Schumacher as the sports only three-time consecutive world champions. In the drizzle and later downpour at Sao Paulo, Brazils Autoromo Juan Carlos Pace the former Interlagos circuit Fernando Alonso hoped to put enough distance between himself and Vettel to capture his third F1 crown, but the superb Ferrari driver could nish no higher than second, ending up three points behind Vettel in the nal standings. Vettel placed sixth in the Brazilian race. McLarens Jenson Button drove masterfully in the wet, most notably during an early stretch in which he stayed out on slicks, to take his third checkered flag of the 2012 season and 15th career grand prix win. Alan Ross is the author of Away from the Ball: The NFLs Off-the-Field Heroes. E-mail him at alanross_sports@yahoo. com. Sportland 2012Keselowski crown, Gordon escapades top 2012 Cup highlights; Vettels 3rd world title THURSDAY, Nov. 26 Boys basketball vs. Lincoln High School at WHS, 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. FRIDAY, Nov. 27 Boys basketball vs. FAMU High School at WHS, 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. SATURDAY, Dec. 1 Girls basketball vs. Madison High School at Madison 1:30 p.m. JV, 3:30 p.m. varsity. Wrestling, Wakulla Duals at Wakulla with weigh-in at 9 a.m. and wrestling at 10 a.m. MONDAY, Dec. 3 Girls basketball vs. Godby High School at Godby, 6 p.m. JV, 7:30 p.m. varsity. Boys basketball vs. North Florida Christian at WHS, 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. The Wakulla News For local news and photos visit us online For local news and photos visit us online www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Page 5B FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLESFLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102#4 Florida Bowl game TBD. ACC Championship #13 Florida State vs. Georgia Tech at Charlotte N.C. Saturday, Dec. 1 at 8 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. UF RUN OFFENSE VS. FSU RUN DEFENSE The picture is not going to be very rosy for Florida on this side of the ball. The Gators have been struggling for weeks to get any consistent rhythm established, and did not fare well against the mediocretoweak defenses of Missouri, LouisianaLafayette and Jacksonville State this month. Now comes Florida State, leading the nation in a number of defensive categories, with a unit that resembles SEC powerhouses LSU and South Carolina. Without the threat of a passing attack, defenses have been crowding the line of scrimmage and concentrating on sti ing Floridas run game. FSU, which only gives up 70 yards a game, will likely employ the same strategy, making life dif cult for tailback Mike Gillislee. The Gators will bene t from the return of quarterback Jeff Driskel, but how much he plays and how effective he will be on a bum ankle wont be known until Saturday. EDGE: FLORIDA STATE UF PASS OFFENSE VS. FSU PASS DEFENSE Another mismatch since the Gators havent developed any semblance of a throwing game all season. Whether its Driskel or strong-armed Jacoby Brissett under center, there is little reason to believe the Gators will get much going through the air. Florida will also have to tangle with another terri c pair of passrushing defensive ends, after facing LSUs slew of talented ends plus South Carolinas Jadeveon Clowney and Georgias Jarvis Jones. FSUs pair of Cornelius Carradine and Bjoern Werner have combined for 20 sacks and even though tackles Xavier Nixon and Chaz Green should be healthy, it will be a tall order to protect either UF quarterback. The Gators need somebody to step up here and make some plays, with tight end Jordan Reed, the teams leading receiver, the likely candidate. EDGE: FLORIDA STATE FSU RUN OFFENSE VS. UF RUN DEFENSE The Seminoles offensive numbers are pretty healthy, but they basically have not played a strong defense all season. They will on Saturday against a Gator bunch that has really carried the torch for the team all season. The Seminoles were hurt when top runner Chris Thompson (687 yards in a little more than eight games) was lost for the season with a knee injury, but they still sport a quality one-two punch in Davonta Freeman (534 yards, seven touchdowns and a 7.0-yard per carry average) and James Wilder, Jr. (501 yards and nine touchdowns in just 86 carries). The Gators have been strong all season against the run, allowing just one 100-yard rusher all season (Georgias Todd Gurley). The Seminoles offensive line is relatively young, starting three sophomores, but averages 6-5, 319 pounds a man. Although UF had had great success with liberal substitution up front all season, this may be a day to go with the big dogs for most of the game, since there is nothing to hold back for next week. EDGE: FLORIDA FSU PASS OFFENSE VS. UF PASS DEFENSE Forget the uky 76-yard catch-andrun on the rst play last week against Jacksonville State, that was an aberration the fact is, the Gator secondary has yielded scant long pass plays all season, a reason they lead the nation in pass ef ciency defense. While the pressure on the quarterback has been sporadic, the coverage has been top-notch. Quarterback EJ Manuel is completing 68.8 percent of his throws, for 2,785 yards with 21 touchdowns against just six interceptions. Six different players have caught at least 20 passes and eight different players have at least one touchdown catch. The key is making Manuel uncomfortable in the pocket and not letting him hurt the defense with his legs. It will be another huge challenge for the Gator secondary, but so far the back end has been up to the task. SLIGHT EDGE: FLORIDA SPECIAL TEAMS Few teams match up with Florida in this phase of the game, but Florida State comes close. Both UF kicker Caleb Sturgis (20 of 24 eld goals) and FSUs Dustin Hopkins (22 of 26) are nalists for the Lou Groza Award, and both are long-range specialists, each connecting on all three of their attempts from beyond 50 yards. The Gators hold a big edge at punter, with Ray Guy Award nalist Kyle Christy (46.3-yard average with 25 boots inside the 20 and two dozen longer than 50 yards) decidedly more advanced than Seminole freshman Cason Beatty (a 37.6-yard average). The Seminoles return game has been better, as Rashad Greene and Tyler Hunter have returned three punts for touchdowns and Lamarcus Joyner turned in a critical 90-yard kickoff return in the win over Clemson. EDGE: FLORIDA MARTYS PREDICTION: Florida 13, Florida State 10Breakin It Down Florida vs Florida State Hit, fumble sinks FSU against GatorsBy Tim LinafeltEven after the fateful one-two punch had been delivered, there still remained 11:01 in the game. Plenty of time for Florida State to bounce back once again, to answer Floridas haymaker and once more swing momentum in a game where momentum bounced back and forth like a rubber ball. The damage, though, had been done. One moment, Florida State led by a touchdown early in the fourth quarter, having survived a disastrous rst-half to wrestle control from the Gators and inch toward a third straight victory over its arch-rival. A moment later, senior quarterback EJ Manuel was on the ground, and the ball was loose, recovered by Florida. And a moment after that, UF running back Mike Gillislee ripped off a 37-yard touchdown run, part of 24 consecutive fourth-quarter points in a 37-26 win for Florida. That game was all momentum, FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. In the third quarter, we changed it and they got momentum back in the fourth quarter and we still had opportunities. On the heels of a 17-point third quarter, Florida State led, 20-16, early in the fourth quarter and was driving to extend the lead when Manuel took off on a scramble. He didnt notice Florida linebacker Antonio Morrison speeding toward him didnt see him at all until the two collided, apparently helmet-to-helmet. The quarterback and the ball both fell to the ground. Floridas Dominique Easley recovered the fumble Manuels fourth turnover of the day and Manuel stayed down. I thought they had the outside routes out wide covered, so I just tried to nd a lane and get up eld and get some positive yards, Manuel said after the game. Got hit in the head, so just kind of knocked the wind out of me. A small chant of EJ! EJ! echoed throughout Doak Campbell Stadium before Manuel was helped to his feet and walked off the eld. Me and (Devonta) Freeman, we prayed, FSU running back James Wilder Jr. said. We were hoping it was nothing serious. It was a hard hit. The ball did come out. Fisher said that Manuel suffered from a stomach injury, but Manuel con rmed that he was also hit in the head. Trainers talked to Manuel about remaining out of the game, but he eventually was cleared to return. They did, but I wasnt trying to hear it. After the game, Florida coach Will Muschamp praised Morrison, a reserve player thrust into action only because of an injury to starter Jelani Jenkins. Antonios a violent, physical football player, Muschamp said. Hes a guy that knocks the ball off a lot of people. FSUs bad got a whole lot worse when play resumed. On UFs rst play after the turnover, Gillislee found a hole up the middle and ran, untouched, for a 37-yard, goahead touchdown. Gillislee nished with 140 yards, part of 244yard rushing effort for the Gators, by far the most that Florida State allowed this season. We werent expecting that to happen, defensive tackle Everett Dawkins said. I dont what it is but were going to get it xed. Weve got to get it fixed. Theres no way that a Florida State defense is going to let that happen again. With Manuel sidelined, third-year sophomore Clint Trickett entered and Florida State promptly went three-and-out. Marcus Roberson then returned Cason Beattys punt 50 yards to the FSU 32-yard line. Five plays later, the Gators were in the end zone again on a 14-yard touchdown pass from Jeff Driskel to Quinton Dunbar. The gas just went away after [EJ] went down, FSU receiver Kenny Shaw said. It was a big momentum shifter in the game. Manuel eventually returned and both teams traded touchdowns Manuels a 22yard scramble on the games nal play. Afterward, Manuel took the blame for four of Florida States ve turnovers and insisted that he needs to improve before FSU meets Georgia Tech in next weeks ACC Championship Game. I always look at myself in the mirror, he said Ive got to get better these next two games. This is hard right now.GATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSONThe Gators didnt take too many deep shots with quarterback JACOBY BRISSETT against Jacksonville State. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! The following are the major matchups in this past weeks game Photo by COLIN HACKLEY/OSCEOLAUFs Antonio Morrison collides with FSU Quarterback EJ Manuel during the last game of the regular season.

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Also Away Cans Cards Casual Classi cationCommunicationsCoral Crush Data Debt Drowns Dull Earthquakes Enters Even Evil Fall Fans Firm Full Glue Grant Hairs Hero Ices Inland Lawn Laws Locks Maid Mail Meal More Multiplication Need News Nice Omit Only Open Organs Owls Pear Planet Plates Plays Plug This page sponsored in part by: Pond Reds Safe Sees Sigh Sits Skim Stir Suit Talk Tear Tend Till Total Tree Tummy Well Weve Wires Wore

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Call Billy (850)962-3884 SHELLPOINTRoyster Dr-follow signs Saturday, Dec 1st 8am-3pm Twin bed set, elec dryer, chairs, toys, new child bike, household goods, doorknobs, paddle boat, misc xmas, picture frames,much more Lost LOSTDOG 8 yr old female Shih pzu. Wearing a pink collar with silver bones answers to Cinnamon. Lost from St Theresa beach on 11/9 (850) 545-8256 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements CONSIGNMENTART AUCTION on Dec 15, 2012 (Saturday) at 4pm. 9101 International Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, FL 32819. Artworks below $100, complimentary hors doeuvres and FREE ARTPRINTfor attending. Artists include Picasso, Dali, Chagall, Max and local artists. Call (866)537-1013 or visit www .Baterbys.com for more information or to RSVP. Medical MEDICALBILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Professional AIRLINE CAREERS-Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Professional AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 WANTED: Licensed Real Estate Agents for local offices. Please Contact 850-926-7811. Trades/ Skills DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDLTraining. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. HOME EVERYWEEKEND! Pay 37/mi, Both ways, FULLBENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, Fl Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED /INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. -Tanker Training Available. Call Today! (877)882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Part-time Help Part Time Marketing AssistantThe Wakulla County Tourist Development Council is seeking resumes for a part-time Marketing Assistant. The position will be a contract position for 20 hours a week through September 2013. Applicants should have a high school diploma or equivalent, good writing/ communication skills, office/ clerical experience, and a working knowledge of social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube. Email resumes to pportwood@ mywakulla.com or mail to Wakulla County TDC, P. O. Box 67, Panacea, FL 32346. Resumes must be received no later than December 12, 2012. Employment Info Apply Now, 13 Drivers, Top 5% Pay & Benefits. Credential, Fuel, & Referral Bonus Avail. Need CDLClass A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www .ad drivers.com Schools/ Instruction Can Your Dig It? Heavy Equipment School. 3wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benefits Approved. 2 National Certifications. (866)362-6497 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality Job placement assistance.Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call www .Centura Online.com 888-203-3179 Business Opportunities STARTNOW! OPEN RED HOTDOLLAR, DOLLAR PLUS, MAILBOX, DISCOUNT PARTY, $10 CLOTHING STORE, TEEN STORE, FITNESS CENTER FROM $51,900 WORLDWIDE! WWW .DRSS20.COM (800)518-3064 Garage/ Yard Sales PANACEA Big Yard Sale Saturday 1st, 8am-4pm Wakulla Moose Lodge 44 Jer-be-lou SHELLPOINTRoyster Dr-follow signs Saturday, Dec 1st 8am-3pm Twin bed set, elec dryer, chairs, toys, new child bike, household goods, doorknobs, paddle boat, misc xmas, picture frames,much more General 2002 MOBILE HOME 28X76 4Bedroom/2Bath Master Suite with Office, Walk-in Closet, Garden Tub, Shower. Family Room w/Fireplace and separate Living Room. Large kitchen w/Island and Breakfast Nook. $33,000. Call Billy (850)962-3884 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3/2 Doublewide MH For Lease or Lease Purchase Lake Ellen $695 + deposit. fenced yard 850-524-4090 CRAWFORDVILLEN. Wakulla county 2/1 Central air, gas heat, new flooring, clean. Move-in Ready! $495. $350 dep., $25 app fee. (850)-228-7197 PANACEAClean SW 3/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $500/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 Rental Houses SOPCHOPPY AREAwaterfront cottage 1br/1ba, exc. cond. cath. ceiling, sep storage/laundry, Clear filtered water $590. month. 84 Mt. Beasor Rd. off Persimmon850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Baths 1,200 sq. ft., $800 mo. $500 sec. 145 Rehwinkle Rd. 850-766-0170 CRAWFORDVILLEResidential/ Commercial House for Rent in the Center of Crawfordville For More Details Call (850) 926-9782 Rent: Houses Unfurnished North WakullaCty, 2 bdrms, on 3 wooded acres, c/h/a large front porch, $675 plus security Brenda Hicks Realty (850) 251-1253 Citrus Hills Homes Forest Ridge Villages Updated, move in ready, 2/2/2, Private lot 352-746-0002 Out of Town Real Estate WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA LIQUIDATION SALE! Somersby Park is an established community in Hendersonville, NC offering homesites starting in the mid-$20s. Call Today! (828)489-6760 or SomersbyPark.net Waterfront Homes Coastal Cottage! DeepwaterOcean Access with boat slips only $69,900. SALE Sat 12/1. New ready to finish cottage. Prime coastal Georgia location. Gated entrance, paved roads, underground utilities. FREE water/sewertap. Historically lowest financing. Call now (866)952-5303. x 1641 Cars CHEVY1994, S10 Blazer 167K miles, Automatic, V6, Cruise, AM/FM Care for, $1,995 (850) 962-4492 Roofing FREE ESTIMATES 850-889 -0989 Licensed and Insured #CCC1328414 www.a2zroof.com Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5447-1206 TWN vs. Avery, Roy Case No. 2011-299-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 2011-299-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, v. ROY L. AVERY, III, as personal representative for THE ESTATE OF COLLENE CRAWFORD AVERY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF COLLENE C. AVERY; AND UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT in accordance with the Final Judgment dated November 9, 2012, in the above-styled case, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 on Thursday, December 13, 2012, at 11:00 a.m ., in accordance with Florida Statutes .031, the following described real properties situated in Sopchoppy, Wakulla County, Florida: 5449-1206 TWN vs. Anderson, Brandon Case No. 65-2012-CA-000293 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000293 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, v. BRANDON L. ANDERSON AKA BRANDON ANDERSON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FOR FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING PROPER TY TO: Brandon L. Anderson AKA Brandon Anderson, ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 105 King Bee Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendant(s) are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant(s) as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOTS 67 AND 68, BLOCK A, MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TOGETHER WITH A 2003 SCHU MOBILE HOME WITH VIN NUMBERS HIGA20K04288A AND HIGA20K04288B AND TITLE NUMBERS 86614381 AND 86614505 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 105 KING BEE DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, such Morris Hardwick Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 120, Tampa, FL 33634 on or before December 29, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff`s attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 16th of November, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this hearing, should contact ADA Coordinator not later than 1 (one) day prior to the proceeding at Internal Revenue Service (FL -Northern), 400 West Bay Street, Stop 5710, Jacksonville, FL 32202 904-665-0832 and for the hearing and voice impaired 800-955-8770. November 29, 2012 5450-1206 TWN vs. Taylor, Donnie Case No. 652010CA000100CAXXXX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652010CA000100CAXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF POPULAR ABS, INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-5, Plaintiff, v. DONNIE L TAYLOR; BILL THOMAS A/K/A W.A. THOMAS III; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR ACCREDITED HOME LENDERS, INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 1, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 652010CA000100CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 13th day of December, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. at the front Lobbyof the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 49, BLOCK 4, LAKE ELLEN ESTATES UNIT ONE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 (850) 577-4401at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA THIS 1st DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 1br 1ba Cottage $550 mo. 2br 1ba Hs. $595 mo. 2br 2.5ba Twnhs $775 mo. 2br 2.5ba Twnhs $750 mo. 3br 2.5 ba Twnhs $850 mo. 3br 2ba DWMH $650 mo. 3br 2ba DWMH $850 mo. 3br 2ba Hs. $775 mo. 3br 2ba Hs. $1100 mo. 4br 2ba Hs. $850 mo. Commercial Space 1100 sf $800 mo. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker Christmas decorations, games, toys, books, tapes, dishes, household items, small kitchen appliances, clothes, new & used items. Something for everyone! Rain or Shine Super Yard Sale Christmas Bazaar and Bake SaleFirst Baptist Church of Wakulla Station 945 Woodville Hwy. Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Please Recycle

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5448-1206 TWN vs. Gray Services 1, Inc. Case No. 2011-318-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO: 2011-318-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, v. GRAY SERVICES 1, INC., F/K/A GRAY SERVICES, INC.; RAY E. GRAY; JODY M. GRAY; ALBERT L. HARTSFIELD; KATHY A. HARTSFIELD; WOODLAND PARK HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; WAKULLA RESERVATION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT in accordance with the Final Judgment dated October 30, 2012, in the above-styled case, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 on Thursday, January 17, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. in accordance with Florida Statutes .031, the following described real properties situated in Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida: PARCEL 1 -276 CAJER POSEY: BEGIN AT THE INT ERSECT ION OF THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF THE OLD OCHLOCKNEE ROAD AND THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA THENCE RUN SOUTHERLY ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD 168 FEET, THENCE RUN WESTERLY AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 TO THE WEST BOUNDARY OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND CONVEYED TO WRIGHT ALEXANDER FROM DOLLIE VICKERS BY DEED DATED APRIL 1, 1942 AND RECORDED ON PAGE 6 OF DEED BOOK 26 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTHERLY ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID DOLLIE VICKERS TO WRIGHT ALEXANDER TRACT OF LAND TO THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY, THENCE RUN EASTERLY ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND BEING SITUATE IN LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY A SURVEY PREPARED BY EDWIN G. BROWN AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED MARCH 8, 1990, JOB NO. 90-031, AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 A DISTANCE OF 343.46 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF CAJER POSEY ROAD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY 263.58 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 95.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 218.55 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID CAJER POSEY ROAD, SAID MONUMENT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS 2529.45 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 80.57 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 10 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 80.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2024.99 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 20 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 89.14 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 10 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 89.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1984 SUMM MOBILE HOME ID # H37407G, TITLE # 18056384 PARCEL 3 -154 ELIZABETH DRIVE: SOUTH ONE-HALF OF LOT 11, OF EVERGREEN ACRES, UNIT II, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 77, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1985 BRIG MOBILE HOME ID # 14601487, TITLE # 41380323 PARCEL 4 -53 BREAM FOUNTAIN: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16, ISOLATED BLOCK A OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN DEED BOOK C-D, PAGE 572, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF TALLAHASSEE STREET, (U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 319) 100.95 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OR-WAY BOUNDARY OF A GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 726.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 88.03 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 210.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 186.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 9.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 93.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 200.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1980 FIES MOBILE HOME ID # FDGAS1070, TITLE #63390829. PARCEL 5 -93 STANLEY DRIVE: LOTS 29, 30 AND 31, BLOCK 3 OF LAKE ELLEN ESTATES, UNIT ONE, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1992 FLEE MOBILE HOME ID # GAFLN75A15782WE, TITLE # 63458581. PARCEL 6 -108 WOODLAND: LOT 12, OF WOODLAND PARK, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1990 FLEE MOBILE HOME ID # GAFLL34A13240SH AND ID # GAFLL34B13240SH, TITLE # 49296110 AND 48964997. PARCEL 7 -31 HARVEY PITTMAN: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 14, BLOCK Q OF HUDSON HEIGHTS, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AT PAGE 38 OF PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN IN AN EASTERLY DIRECTION ALONG AN EXTENSION OF THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT NO. 14 ACROSS RAKER LANE, WHICH IS A 50 FOOT DEDICATED STREET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF RAKER LANE, WHICH IS POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE TO RUN IN THE SAME DIRECTION 120 FEET, THENCE RUN IN THE SOUTHERLY DIRECTION AND AT RIGHT ANGLES TO THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 14, THE DISTANCE OF 220 FEET, THENCE RUN IN A WESTERLY DIRECTION AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 14, THE DISTANCE OF 120 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF RAKER LANE, THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE EASTERN BOUNDARY OF RAKER LANE, 220 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING SITUATE IN THE EAST HALF OF NO. 76 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1976 NORM MOBILE HOME ID # L0880NA AND L0880NB, TITLE # 13502704 AND 13502703. PARCEL 8 -47 BREAM FOUNTAIN ROAD: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16 OF ISOLATED BLOCK A OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID BLOCK A 198.0 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 13 OF SAID BLOCK A, THENCE SOUTH 109.18 FEET, THENCE EAST 435.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE SOUTH 200.0 FEET, THENCE EAST 93.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH 200.0 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE SPRING CREEK ROAD, THENCE WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SPRING CREEK LOTS 181, 182, 183, 184, 185 AND 186, BLOCK 35, OF THE TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY, EAST SIDE, AS SHOWN BY MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, WAKULLA COUNTY (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices ROAD 93.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND BEING SITUATED IN LOT NO. 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PORTION LYING WITHIN THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: (AS CONVEYED BY QUIT CLAIM IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 167, PAGE 112, TO LEE WILLIAMS AND HELEN WILLIAMS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16, ISOLAT ED BLOCK A OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN DEED BOOK C-D PAGE 572, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF TALLAHASSEE STREET (U.S. HIGHWAY NO.319) 103.43 FEET TO A SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED BOUNDARY OF A GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY 394.96 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED BOUNDARY 239.01 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 208.83 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 31 -MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 234.68 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 206.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATED, LYING AND BEING IN LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BEING MORE RECENTLY BY EDWIN BROWN ASSOCIATES INC. DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16, OF ISOLATED BLOCK A OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN EAST 198.00 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 13, OF SAID BLOCK A; THENCE RUN SOUTH 109.18 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF BREAM FOUNTAIN ROAD; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY EAST 435.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE EAST 93.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 208.73 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 94.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 209.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT A STRIP OF LAND 9.30 FEET WIDE ACROSS THE SOUTHERLY PORTION OF SUBJECT PROPERTY. PARCEL 9 -88 ROBERT/WILLIAMS ROAD: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 659.83 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 219.70 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 490.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 185.98 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 337.90 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY GRADED ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 82 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 16.85 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 87 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 182.26 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 344.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE WESTERLY 60.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH 1971 GREA MOBILE HOME ID # KG6024F6N15861R AND KG6024F6N15861L, TITLE # 4694512 AND 4694511. PARCEL 10 -LOT 10 -56 EASTGATE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 2365.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 74.93 FEET TO A REBAR; FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 197.84 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST 149.90 FEET TO A REBAR LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF EASTGATE WAY; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 20 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 12.31 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST 65.30 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 36 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 240.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1986 PEAR MOBILE HOME ID #SHS8PGA39850391, TITLE # 42986775. PARCEL 11 -LOT 12 EASTGATE -70 EASTGATE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 2365.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 74.93 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 197.84 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 100.08 FEET TO A REBAR FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 99.85 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 150.41 FEET TO A REBAR LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF EASTGATE WAY; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 101.44 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 150.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1986 BEAC MOBILE HOME ID #SSMFLAD93268, TITLE # 50440146. PARCEL 12 -436 RAVENSVIEW & 403 BIG RICHARD & 407 BIG RICHARD: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN NORTH 615.12 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES EAST 337.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES EAST 233.72 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 301.67 FEET TO A POINT THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES WEST 231.80 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 300.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1998 COUG DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID NUMBERS: GMHGA4119819757A AND GMHGA4119819757B, TITLE NUMBERS: 79387367 AND 79386939 TOGETHER WITH A 1985 ROSE MOBILE HOME ID NUMBER: 21G10868D, TITLE NUMBER 40651489. TOGETHER WITH A 1981 SOUT DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID NUMBERS: COSGART011255A AND COSGART011255B, TITLE NUMBERS: 19617948 AND 19617949. PARCEL 14 -558 ROCK ROAD: BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. 267 AND THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF THE ROCK ROAD AND RUN WESTERLY ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID STATE ROAD, 397 FEET TO AN OLD FENCE LINE, THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG SAID OLD FENCE LINE 233 FEET, THENCE RUN EAST ALONG A FENCE LINE 197 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF ROCK ROAD, THENCE RUN IN A NORTHERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ROCK ROAD 256 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID PROPERTY LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST. BEING MORE RECENTLY DESCRIBED BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES INC., JOB #96007 DATED JUNE 22, 2004 AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A 6 INCH BY 6 INCH ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 9 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1990.02 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 267, THENCE LEAVING SAID WEST BOUNDARY LINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1216.69 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST ALONG AN OLD FENCE LINE 234.87 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 81 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 197.48 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF ROCK ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 168.73 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 60 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 89.59 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF ROCK ROAD WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF AFOREMENTIONED STATE ROAD 267, THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 75 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY 398.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL # 15 TRACT A; 94 DWIGHT SANDERS ROAD: COMMENCE AT AN OLD AXLE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP5SOUTH,RANGE2WEST,WAKULLACOUNTY,FLORIDAANDRUNWEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 7 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 288.00 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY 144.06 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 302.31 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 144.01 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #799), THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 302.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL # 16 TRACT B; 98 DWIGHT SANDERS ROAD: COMMENCE AT AN OLD AXLE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 7 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 432.06 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY 144.05 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #799), THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 302.28 FEET TO A RE-ROD, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 144.01 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 302.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1983 ALLA MOBILE HOME ID # AAFLA2828, TITLE # 22941917. PARCEL 18 -137 TAFFINGER: LOTS 21 AND 30, BLOCK Q OF MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1987 VEGA DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ID #KH4026D31K8647GAA, TITLE # 45453562 AND ID #KH4026D31K8647GAB, TITLE # 45464840. PARCEL A: LOTS 34 AND 35, BLOCK 37 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT III, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 43, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1996 HORTON SINGLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID#H203274G, TITLE # 70561763. PARCEL B: LOT 10 AND THE SOUTHEAST HALF OF LOT 9, BLOCK 44 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL C: LOT 8 AND THE NORTHWEST HALF OF LOT 9, BLOCK 44 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, WAKULLA COUNTY (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 5444-1206 TWN Vs. Cook, Bobby 65-2012-CA-000379 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTYCIVILDIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000379 LPPMORTGAGE LTD., Plaintiff, vs. BOBBYCOOK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BOBBYCOOK; JAN COOK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAN COOK; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKINOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:BOBBYCOOK; JAN COOK; Whose residence(s) is/are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBYrequired to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit: LOTS 15 AND 16, BLOCK 55 OF WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT FIVE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA If you fail to file your response or answer, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Dr., Tampa, Florida 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. DATED at WAKULLACounty this 13th day of November, 2012. 5445-1206 TWN vs. Eichler, Christopher Case No 12000333CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION, CASE NO.: 12000333CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff vs. CHRISTOPHER W. EICHLER, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPER TY TO: CHRISTOPHER W. EICHLER : ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 4016 COLLETON COURT, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32311 CONNIE EICHLER : ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 9107 WAUKEENAH HIGHWAY, MONTICELLO, FL 32344 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: LOT 15, BLOCK A OF WAKULLA FOREST, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 54, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2000 JACOBSEN MOBILE HOME, TITLE NO. 80910726, 80910919, 80910982, I.D. NO. JACFL20876A, JACFL20876B, JACFL20876C. more commonly known as: 218 DOROTHY LOOP ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiff`s attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due by dECEMBER 29, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff`s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 8th day of November, 2012. Clerk of the Court, WAKULLA County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 CA12-02491 Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/3BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 3BR/1BA New carpet throughout $590 mo. No Pets, No Smoking RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit 31 Magpie 3BR/2BA $1400 mo. $1400 sec. dep. Outside pets okay with approval 137 Shephard Easement 3BR/2BA MH on 6+ acres $900 mo. $900 security Lease with OPTION TO BUY! 5 Albin Live Oak Island 2BR/2BA with Lost and Dock. $950. mo. $950 Security Deposit.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Page 9B MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON NOVEMBER 19, 2012NOVEMBER 29, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact : Danny Davis, Office of Court Administration, 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL32303, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 29 and December 6, 2012 5441-1129 TWN vs. The Estate of Altamease Cole Case No. 65-2012-CA-000165 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000165 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC., TRUST 2004-WMC3, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-WMC3, Plaintiff, vs. THE ESTATE OF ALTAMEASE COLE, DECEASED, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To The Estate of Altamease Cole, Deceased 41 Tharpe Lane Crawfordville, FL 32327 : YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: Commence at a U.S. Government concrete monument and a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Lot 5 of the Hartsfield survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence runs North 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East along the North boundary of said Lot 5, a distance of 343.98 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 10 seconds East 199.94 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, thence run North 72 degrees 32 minutes 01 seconds East 190.70 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run South 17 degrees 14 minutes 40 seconds East 200.47 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run South 72 degrees 36 minutes 25 seconds West 190.71 feet to a 3 inch concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run North 17 degrees 14 minutes 28 seconds West 200.22 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.88 of an acre, more or less. SUBJECT TO an access easement over and across the Westerly 10.00 feet thereof., commonly known as: 41 Tharpe Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jacob A. Thomas, c/o Johnson & Freedman, LLC, the Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 400 Northridge Road, Suite 1100 M/S 27, Sandy Springs, Georgia 30350, within 30 days after the first publication date: November 22, 2012 and file the original with the Clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED: November 6, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond as Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy November 22 & 29, 2012 5433-1122 TWN vs. Fedorak, Louise Case No. 2012-72-CANotice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-72-CA CENTENNIALBANK, as Successor in Interest to Wakulla Bank Plaintiff, vs. LOUISE B. FEDORAK, ET AL., CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL32327 on January 24, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: COMMENCING AT APOINT WHERE THE NORTHEASTERLYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD 372-A(100 FOOT) RIGHT OF WAYINTERSECTS THE WEST BOUNDARYOF RANGE 1 WEST, SAID POINT BEING 274.32 FEET NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST AND CONTINUE NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARYOF SAID RANGE 1 WEST 314.69 FEET TO ALIGHTWOOD HUB APPROXIMATELYIN THE CENTER OF THE OLD RAKER FISHERYROAD, NOW ABANDONED, THENCE ALONG THE APPROXIMATE CENTER OF SAID ROAD AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 34 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 378.81 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 417.03 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 383.5 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 147.83 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE SOUTH 41 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 296.45 FEET TO THE NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT OF WAYLIMITS OF STATE ROAD 372-A, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 595.73 FEET ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYLIMITS TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 250.75 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 59.4 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 383.5 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 147.83 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID LAND IN AN UNNUMBERED LOT OF HARTSFIELD SURVEYEAST OF THE WEST BOUNDARYLINE OF RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. MORE RECENTLYDESCRIBED BYSURVEYPREPARED BYJAMES THURMAN RODDENBERRYPROFESSIONALLAND SURVEYOR DATED MARCH 14, 2000 JOB #00.142 AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 372-A(BOTTOMS ROAD) WITH THE WESTERLY BOUNDARYOF RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT LYING NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 274.32 FEET FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 314.69 FEET TO AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 373.54 FEET TO APOINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 422.56 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 383.56 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 150.51 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 41 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 297.65 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE LYING ON THE NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF BOTTOMS READ (STATE ROAD NO. 372-A), THENCE RUN NORTH 47 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY594.15 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 250.34 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 59.42 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 383.56 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 150.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Date: October 31, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By:/s/Desiree Willis, Deputy Clerk Wakulla County November 22 & 29, 2012 5439-1129 TWN Vs. Atkins, Deborah 12-14-CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO: 12-14-CA HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-4, Plaintiff, vs. Deborah S. Atkins; Jaime B. Williams; James L. Williams; Unknown Spouse of Deborah S. Atkins; Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under or against the Estate of James L. Williams, whether said Unknown Parties claim as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, trustees or other claimants; Unknown Tenant #1, and Unknown Tenant #2, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under or against the Estate of James L. Williams, whether said Unknown Parties claim as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, trustees or other claimants YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Wakulla County, Florida: Per Schedule A attached hereto Street Address: 45 Stoney Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Clarfield, Okon, Salomone & Pincus, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, within 30 days after the date of the first publication of this notice, on or before December 22 and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on November 2, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of said Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk Clarfield, Okon, Salomone & Pincus, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Avenue, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Telephone: (561) 713-1400 Schedule A COMMENCE AT A U.S. GOVERNMENT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION II, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION II, A DISTANCE OF 1208.23 FEET TO AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 47 WEST 363.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 47 52 WEST 346.00 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 50.00 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 607.69 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 26 18 EAST 346.01 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 609.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 4.84 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. November 22 & 29, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5440-1129 TWN Estate of Whetstone, Katie Case # 12-95-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE # 12-95-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF KATIE WHETSTONE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of KATIE WHETSTONE, deceased, whose date of death was December 13, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 22, 2012 Personal Representative: KATHY L. RICHARDSON 832 Cordele Avenue, Port Charlotte, Florida 33948 Attorney for Personal Representative: MICHAEL M. WILSON, Attorney for KATHY L. RICHARDSON Florida Bar Number: 076244, Olmsted & Wilson, P.A. 17801 Murdock Circle, Suite A, Port Charlotte, Florida 33948 Telephone: (941) 624-2700, Fax: (941) 624-5151 November 22 & 29, 2012 5443-1129 TWN Estate of Rona Hawkins Case No. 12-100 CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA COURT CASE NO.:12-100 CP Probate Division IN RE: THE ESTATE OF RONA LAVON HAWKINS, JR. Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS INTESTATE The administration of the estate of Rona Lavon Hawkins, Jr., Case Number 12-100 CP is pending in the 2nd Judicial Circuit Court, In and For Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. The estate is intestate. Any interested person upon whom this notice is served who may be entitled to exempt property under s. 732.402, Fla. St. must file a petition for determination of exempt property or a petition must be filed on behalf of that person WITHIN FOUR (4) MONTHS OF SERVICE OF FORMAL NOTICE OR 40 DAYS AFTER THE TERMINATION OF ANY PROCEEDING OF ANY MATTER AFFECTING ANY PART OF THE EXEMPT PROPERTY or the right to exempt property is deemed waived. All interested persons on whom a copy of this notice is served who intend to challenge the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or jurisdiction of the court must file an objection on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on that person, and all creditors having claims against this estate who are required to be served with a copy of this notice, are required to file with this court such claim WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors and other persons having claims or demands against the estate who are not known to the personal representative and whose names or addresses are not reasonably ascertainable must file their claims against the estate WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. ALL PETITIONS, CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS THE 22nd DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012. Personal Representative: COLLEEN Q. SKIPPER 18 Charlotte Rosier Road, Sopchoppy, FL 32358 Attorney for Personal Representative: HAROLD E. REGAN, FL BAR #124559 2520-2 Barrington Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32308 Telephone: (850) 681-7883, FAX: (850) 383-6604 November 22 & 29, 2012 5446-1206 TWN Estate of Lola Mae Johnson Case No. 12-102-CP Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION, FILE NO.: 12-102-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF LOLA MAE JOHNSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LOLA MAE JOHNSON, deceased, whose date of death was April 1, 2012, Aand whose Social Security Number is ***-**-8063, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327-0337. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives Attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 29, 2012. Personal Representative: By:/s/ JEHOVAH DAVIS 102 Riverview Dr., Knifley, KY 42753 Attorney for Personal Representative: Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5438-1129 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON NOVEMBER 30, 2012 at 11:00 a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: JENNIFER BABCOCK BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF NOVEMBER 30 ,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. November 22 & 29, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration RICHARD L. ROGERS of RICHARD L. ROGERS, P.A. Florida Bar No. 320269 1135 South Washington Ave., Suite A Titusville, FL 32780, Telephone (321) 268-5173 November 29 and December 6, 2012 Have something on your mind?Send it to William Snowden, Editoreditor@thewakullanews.net 5Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2Go to http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click Continue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click Continue. Register your online account today!

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 1. TELEVISION: What famous politician did Alex P. Keaton idolize on the show Family Ties? 2. MUSIC: Which 1970s song featured the line, Jeremiah was a bullfrog? 3. LITERATURE: What literary figure had a loyal companion named Sancho Panza? 4. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capital of Iowa? 5. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What are omnivores? 6. LANGUAGE: How many letters are in the Greek alphabet? 7. ANATOMY: How many pairs of ribs does a human body normally have? 8. HISTORY: In which year did the U.S. space shuttle first fly into orbit? 9. FOOD: What kind of food is mortadella? 11. GAMES: What is the movable device used in the game Ouija to spell out messages? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Richard Nixon 2. Joy to the World, by Three Dog Night 3. Don Quixote 4. Des Moines 5. Animals that eat meat and vegetables 6. 24 7. 12 8. 1981 9. Italian sausage 10. A planchette YOUR AD HERE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Page 11B IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GET READY FOR HUNTING P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pet Phone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. Holistic Select WellnessC Lbt n Pfr tf Ab n ALL Yr P Nf.Special Orders AvailableStocking Stuffers for Pets Gift Certificates 301 C S G i Construction Cleanup, Commercial, ResidentialLICENSED AND INSURED ConstructionCleanupCommercial R Re Re Re Re R R R R R R R s si si sid sid ential Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly Nicholspray like its up to God, Work like its up to youMany Thanks for Many Blessings. Have a wonderful Christmas! Across the street from the courthouse, downtown Crawfordville926-3338Open 10AM-5PM or call for later appointment.15 Vendors 2 Floors The White Elephant DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PET STOP3010 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. ANTIQUES C ARRIES C OVEC ARRIES C OVE C HRISTMAS ATC HRISTMAS ATToys Dolls Antiques Collectibles Jewelry Ornaments Decorations One-of-kinds Etc. A Cabin of Treasures~ Vera Bradley ~ ~ Dots Jewels ~ ~ Greenleaf Scents ~ ~ 16 Vendors ~ ~ Gifts ~ ~ Collectibles ~ ~ Jewelry ~ ~ Custom Wood Items ~ & much more... PICK A TREASURE FROM OUR TREASURE BOX w/purchase!850926-8381M-S 10-5 Downtown Crawfordville, Next to Subwa y 27 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA Hair Place That 850-926-6020Gift Certicates Available t C C e C C FULL SERVICE HAIR SALONStyles for Men, Women & ChildrenCutsUpDosColor P erms HighlightsFacial Waxings Specialty Cuts Flat Top s MirandaTues-Sat545-2905RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MavisAppt. Only962-2171 Shop Downtown LATE Fri., Dec. 7 OPEN til 9PM Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A A A A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews The Wakul la News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce 1 14 17 20 23 33 40 43 46 57 63 66 69 2 34 58 3 35 59 4 36 50 21 26 47 5 15 18 44 6 27 37 41 51 60 64 67 70 7 28 48 61 8 24 38 62 25 29 49 52 9 16 19 22 42 45 10 39 53 65 68 71 11 30 54 12 31 55 13 32 56 ACROSS 1. Bull artist 5. Short shot to the green 9. Filled to overflowing 14. Pot starter 15. Give a new look to 16. Organic fertilizer 17. Goblet part 18. "Exodus" author 19. Prefix with physics 20. Prepare for an AKC show 22. Oktoberfest vessel 23. Liquored up 24. Lohengrin's love 26. Fireballer Nolan 29. Chicken gizzard, e.g. 33. Use TNT 37. One-liner, e.g. 39. Timber wolf 40. Lomond et al. 41. Blood-typing letters 42. Avoider of meat products 43. High: Abbr. 44. Leap for Sarah Hughes 45. In uni son 46. Fastened, in a way 48. Mermaid feature 50. G-men and T-men 52. The heart is largely this 57. Problem for Pauline 60. Do some carpentry 63. Author Zola 64. Man Friday 65. Low-pH stuff 66. "Jurassic Park" DNA preserver 67. "Jurassic Park" beast 68. Singer Braxton 69. Fresh-mouthed 70. Faxed, say 71. Manuscript encl.DOWN1. Goes the distance 2. Emcee's task 3. Bothered incessantly 4. Word on an invoice 5. Caked with dirt 6. Life saver 7. Beatnik's "Gotcha!" 8. Oater band 9. Sam pras foe 10. Work at the diner 11. Do a critic's job 12. Calvary letters 13. Mullins of the comics 21. "Dang it!" 25. T-shirt size: Abbr. 27. Trojan War warrior 28. "I pass," in poker 30. Apple's apple, e.g. 31. Abba of Israel 32. Physical fitness 33. Dull as dishwater 34. "Damn Yankees" vamp 35. Circus lineup 36. Upload data, say 38. Caffeine-laden nut 42. Market price 44. Throw in 47. Where morays are caught 49. Cry from the first in line 51. Tiffs 53. Whacks sharply 54. Aprs-ski beverage 55. Pork cuts 56. Ace Rickenback er 57. Spherical veggies 58. Rachel's baby in "Friends" 59. Barbecue fare 61. Some euro predecessors 62. Yemeni portAmerican Prole Hometown Content 11/25/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 12 345 623 716 8 974 32 4651 5 64 643 91867 2009 HometownContent 162 9348 7 5 845672913 379518462 518 296734 793841256 426357189 251 769348 687423591 934185627 L A S T S B L A H P E A S I N T R O L O L A E M M A A T E A T A C T S R I B S R E M I T S H I P F I L E S N E R T S E E L E R Y C R U D D Y A D D H E R O A J A X S P A T S I D I G N O B E T L I R E P O S S E K O L A A D E N L G E I M N E X T A G A S S I V A L U E B U S T A B L E S S W A T S R A T E L O G O C O C O A I N R I E B A N L O I N S M O O N T O N E E D D I E

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet By JEAN KRESSYContributor, Relish magazineA can of this and a jar of that is not our idea of cooking. But sometimes we come across a recipe that combines cans and packages with start-from-scratch ingredients in such a way that it takes the recipe out of the realm of short-cut convenience and into bona de cooking. Braised Pork with Cannellini Beans is that kind of a dish. Granted, its made with a handful of so-called ready-to-use ingredients: peppercorn pork tenderloin, marinated artichoke hearts and basil-garlic polenta. But instead of putting everything in a pot and hoping for the best, the cooking is a two-step process called braising. The rst step is sauting, to sear the meat and vegetables, and the next is simmering, to keep the main ingredients juicy and make a tasty sauce. Braising, one of the oldest ways of cooking, originated as a method of preparing food on an open hearth. The food was cooked in a tightly covered pan, a braisiere, which was put directly on the hot embers and covered with coals. Ordinarily, braising is a long, slow process, but we know long and slow are out of the question for many home cooks. Our recipe starts as a braise by browning the onion and pork in a large skillet. Next, in the interest of saving time, we switch gears and instead of a long, slow simmer, we have cut the cooking time to minutes. When someone else has seasoned the pork, marinated the artichoke hearts, and added basil and garlic to the polenta, its like having a crew of helpers in the kitchen. Braised Pork with Cannellini Beans and Artichokes Look for tubes of cooked and seasoned polenta in the produce section of the supermarket. This dish can be assembled ahead of time, making it great for a party. 2 tablespoons olive oil 3/4 cup chopped onion 1 (1 1/4-pound) package marinated peppercorn pork tenderloin, cut into 1 1/2-inch chunks 1 (15-ounce) can cannellini beans, rinsed and drained 1 (15-ounce) can diced stewed tomatoes, undrained 1 (12-ounce) jar marinated artichoke hearts, drained 1 (1-pound) tube basil-garlic polenta, sliced 1/4-inch thick 1. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion. Cook 2 minutes. Scrape onion to the side. Add pork. Cook 4 minutes, turning once, or until browned on all sides. Add beans, tomatoes and artichokes. Scrape up browned bits on the bottom of the skillet. 2. Lay polenta slices over mixture. Cover and cook 5 minutes, or until polenta is heated through. Serves 6. Recipe by Sharon Sanders. Per serving: 480 calories, 11g fat, 45mg chol., 29g prot., 70g carbs., 11g ber, 1120mg sodium. For more Relish recipes and to sign up for our newsletters, log on to relish.com. To download our new Relish digital editions and Relish Daily Dish phone app, go to relish.com/mobile RELISH THE AMERICAN TABLEEasy beyond convenient: Braised pork with cannellini MARK BOUGHTON PHOTOGRAPHYBy DAVID WHITE Legend has it that a renowned British wine taster was once presented with a ight of wines while wearing a blindfold. He nailed each wine, correctly identifying the grape and the region in which it was grown. Toward the end of the challenge was a glass of water. Upon smelling and sampling it, the taster expressed bewilderment. I have no idea what this is, he exclaimed, but I can assure you its something Ive never had before! Traditionally, this story has been used to spark a conversation about the futility of blind tasting. The wine worlds smart alecks, however, have taken to replying back with a joke: Why didnt he peg it as Pinot Grigio? Sadly, theres some truth to this retort. All too often, Pinot Grigio is simply a substitute for water. Massmarket bottlings are refreshing and fruity and deliver a buzz but theyre never very compelling. Pinot Grigio gained a foothold in America in 1979, when wine importer Tony Terlato visited Milan in search of the next great white wine. Terlato tasted a Pinot Grigio and was taken by its fresh aromas, its crispness, freshness and the way it paired effortlessly with foods. The next day, he drove to northern Italys Alto Adige region, where Italys best Pinot Grigio is grown. Upon arriving, he visited a local restaurant and ordered every Pinot Grigio on the wine list. Of the 18 bottles, Terlato most enjoyed the offering from Santa Margherita. He visited the winery the following day and returned to the United States as its sole importer. Santa Margherita Pinot Grigio took off. Today, its Americas most popular imported restaurant wine. Over the past 33 years, however, Pinot Grigio has become a victim of its own success. Santa Margherita isnt cheap it retails for $25. So the market has been flooded with cheap alternatives, led by brands like Cavit, Ruf no, and Ecco Domani. There are better wines for the money. More grape varieties are planted in Italy than any other country in the world. Thousands of Italian wines make their way to the United States. The most exciting whites come from northeast Italy, particularly the regions of Alto Adige, a neighbor to Austria and Switzerland, and Friuli-Venezia Giulia, which borders Slovenia to the east and Austria to the north. Alto Adige is still home to the worlds best Pinot Grigio, but dozens of varieties ourish there. Pinot Bianco, for example, is more oral and mineral-driven than Pinot Grigio. Gewurztraminer, Muller Thurgau, and Kerner are exceptionally aromatic and display enough sweetness and acidity to complement cream sauces and even spicy foods. In recent months, Ive become obsessed with Kerner, as it seems to work with everything. Top producers include Kofererhof and Abbazia Di Novacella, which both make bottlings for under $20. Friuli-Venezia Giulia, commonly shortened to Friuli, is home to a host of obscure, fun, and versatile grapes like Ribolla Gialla and Friuliano. Southern Italy also generates delicious whites. My favorites come from Campania, where a grape called Fiano thrives. At rst, Fiano typically comes across as an easy-drinking quaffer. But it can hold its own at any table and the better examples gain complexity with age. One of my favorites, Feudi di San Gregorios Fiano di Avellino, runs less than $20. Its no secret that Italy produces some of the nest red wines in the world. Top Barolo and Brunello di Montalcino easily command hundreds of dollars per bottle. But too many consumers disregard Italys whites thanks to the ood of cheap Pinot Grigio thats come ashore. They shouldnt. Italy produces more distinctive wines than any other nation and its whites are positively electric. David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. WHITES WINES e electric white wines of Italy Ace tools make the perfect gift for the do-it-yourselfer. Theyve been engineered to the highest standards of durability and performance and theyre guaranteed to equal or exceed the quality of the big national brands. So stock their workshop with the tools they can always count on Ace. Ace Home Center / NAPA2709 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, FL 323272158 (850) 926-3141 www.acehardware.comStore Hours: Mon-Fri 8-7, Sat 8-6, Sun 10-5



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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 46th Issue Thursday, November 29, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A News Extra!.....................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 6B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7B Comics ...........................................................................Page 10B Puzzles ...........................................................................Page 11B INDEX OBITUARIES Marshall Wallace Bradford James B. O’Bryan Richard A. SeybothOperation SantaParamedic killed in motorcycle crashStaff reportA traf“ c crash around 12:40 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 21, claimed the life of a Wakulla County paramedic, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. Marshall Wallace Bradford, 35, of Crawfordville, was on his Harley Sportster motorcycle traveling northbound on U.S Highway 319 near Hill Greene Road when he drove onto the grass shoulder and struck a tree. He died at the scene, according to the FHP. According to the traf“ c report, Bradford was not wearing a helmet and it was believed that alcohol was involved. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and Wakulla County Emergency Medical Services assisted FHP. Bradford worked for Wakulla County EMS as a paramedic and was promoted to captain earlier this month after competing against three other paramedics, said Wakulla Fire and Rescue Director Chief Michael Morgan. Continued on Page 2A Marshall Wallace BradfordChristmas in Panacea is this SaturdayBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter the community was devastated by Hurricane Dennis in 2005, people in Panacea were looking for a way to bring some joy back into the holiday season. This community was struggling, spirits were not high,Ž said resident Sherrie Posey Miller. Many residents were left dealing with the effects of Hurricane Dennis even as the holiday season approached.Ž Many in the community were not going to be able to even afford buying a Christmas tree. After hearing this, members of Panacea Waterfronts decided they needed to do something. And so was the start of the Christmas in Panacea celebration. The Waterfronts community thought of an idea that would allow everyone in the community to enjoy the warm feeling of sitting around a beautifully decorated Christmas tree,Ž Miller said. The event begins around 2 p.m. with a Christmas Marketplace featuring local arts and crafts in Panacea. Then at 4 p.m. there is live entertainment. The boat on trailer parade down U.S. Highway 98 begins at 6:30 p.m. Following the parade, the community gathers for the lighting of the 20-foot Christmas tree, which is donated by Waterfronts every year. Along with the events scheduled, many areas businesses and homeowners decorate their homes and storefronts for the celebration. In addition, Santa will also be in town. There will also be face painting, childrens activities, hay ride, story teller, free refreshments and caroling. We want everyone to come and join us and enjoy these events, everything is free,Ž Miller said. For more information, contact Miller at 528-1527. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWith two weeks left until gifts are distributed to families in need in Wakulla County through Operation Santa, volunteers or elvesŽ are working overtime to get everything done. The Wakulla County Community Center, at the intersection of Trice Lane and Shadeville Road, serves as a command center for the program and is the place where people can drop off needed items or monetary donations or volunteer their time to help a great cause. So far, 192 families have been identi“ ed, according to Layne Davis, Operation Santa volunteer. This equates to 642 people. Last year, 141 families were helped. Out of these 642 people, 474 have been adopted. The stories they hear are heart wrenching, said Gail Campbell, executive director of Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, the group behind the program which provides basic needs and wishes to families who would otherwise go without this holiday season. The families are referred by the school district, senior center, Refuge House, the health department, area churches, Apalachee Center and others. Many of those who have been referred to the coalition are the working poor, she said. Trying to manage in this economy,Ž she added. Continued on Page 2A JENNIFER JENSENPews at the community center are stacked with items as volunteers help sort donations for Operation Santa.Annual e ort underway to help needy Wakulla families PHOTO BY MELISSA STARBUCK/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWhooping cranes arrive in St. Marks Whooping cranes arrive in St. Marks A group of endangered whooping cranes ew over St. Marks on Saturday morning on their way to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. See story on Page 7A. A group of endangered whooping cranes ew over St. Marks on Saturday morning on their way to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. See story on Page 7A. FILE PHOTOA parade ” oat in last years boats on trailers parade for Christmas in Panacea. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netSomething a little different this year at Christmas in Panacea is the free citrus that will be given out to the children, along with candy canes. Sherrie Posey Miller of Panacea Waterfronts, the group behind the celebration, said it was an idea brought forward by Ronald Fred Crum, another member of Panacea Waterfronts, who said it was something people did years ago and he wanted to see if they could start it in Panacea. There will be 30 cases of citrus given out at the event.Continued on Page 2ACitrus to be given away this year War Eagles lose to Godby See Page 1B

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage? Continued from Page 1A In the short time I knew him I learned he was an aggressive paramedic that enjoyed his work and was very dedicated to providing advanced life service to all that needed it,Ž Morgan said. I watched him, as I did CPR on a non-breathing new born infant, take him from my arms and literally save his life with his paramedic skills. That is what he was all about.Ž Morgan said Bradford was more than an employee, and he was a dedicated father and husband. Funeral services for Bradford were held this past weekend with a full honor guard. He leaves behind his wife, Glenna, and two children, Chaim and Liam. He was taken too soon from us,Ž Morgan said.Paramedic killed in motorcycle crashContinued from Page 1A Miller contacted Hannah Carter with Wedgworth Leadership Institute for Agriculture and Natural Resources, a leadership development program for individuals from around the state of Florida who are the leaders in agricultural organizations and industries, to see if she could help. I sent an email to all the citrus growers who have participated in this program and within minutes, I had one grower who was willing to donate what Sherrie requested, 10 cases,Ž Carter said. Within the day, I had two other growers willing to do the same.Ž Carter said she even had two other alumni who were willing to transport the citrus from south Florida to Panacea. Miller has had a connection to this program since the early 90s. The founder of the program, Dr. Eugene Trotter, was traveling around Wakulla County as he was setting up the “ rst seminar in this area and stopped at Poseys restaurant for lunch. There, he met Miller and she volunteered to help him “ nd speakers in the area for Class I of the program. And she has been doing this for every class of this program,Ž Carter said. When Carter gets ready to bring a class to Wakulla County, she contacts Miller who puts the agenda together and the classes visit with the superintendent of schools, Judge Jill Walker, county commissioners and local “ shermen. For the majority of our participants, theyve never spent time in Wakulla County, but they learn a great deal and come away with a much greater appreciation of the county, the communities and the issues that you are dealing with,Ž Carter said. All the people who have spoken to the classes over the years and Miller have made an indelible impression, Carter said. And this is our way of giving back to the community that has given so much to this program,Ž she said. The leadership institute is 55 days in length over two years and those days are spent traveling around the state of Florida, the nation and on an 18-day international trip. There are nine study/travel seminars in the state of Florida that are typically 3 to 5 days in length. During all these study/travel seminars, participants are examining the social, economic, political and cultural issues that are occurring in the locations they are visiting. We hope that they will then go back to their own communities with a better understanding of how other individuals and groups are dealing with issues, making decisions and impacting policy,Ž Carter said. The goal of the program is to increase their involvement in the policy decisions that impact their organizations, industries and communities. There have been eight classes so far. For more information about the institute, visit http://wlianr.ifas.u” .edu.Citrus to be given away this yearContinued on Page 2A There are also numerous single parents, grandparents taking care of their grandchildren, unemployed people and those who are disabled. Many of the things being asked for from these families are basic needs, including household items, toiletries, winter coats and food. One person asked for a kitchen table so her children didnt have to eat their meals on a sheet on the ” oor, Davis said. People who are coming to us dont know how they are going to feed their kids on Christmas,Ž she said. You just cant help but open up your heart to them.Ž President of the coalition Bruce Ashley said many people are also asking for help with their medical needs and food. We know there are food de“ ciencies in many households in this county,Ž Ashley said. The group is asking people in the community to consider adopting a family. Adoptions are No. 1,Ž Campbell said. They are also seeking donations of items or monetary donations and volunteers to help sort the items. Some items they need the most include household items, toiletries, towels, linens, blankets, coats, pots and pans, food and gently worn clothing. Other items are toys, electronics, laundry soap, games, books puzzles, comforters, furniture, kitchenware and socks. One woman asked for a bed because her children are having to sleep on the ” oor, while another asked for a couch so her six children could have a place to sit in their living room, Davis said. There have also been numerous requests for haircuts. As well as help with handiwork, many which are safety issues. People they have spoken to have also asked for help with their utility bills and rent. In those cases, Operation Santa does it best to reach out to another agency who can help them. Those who wish to help can adopt a family, make a monetary donation, drop off donated items, buy a gift off the wishing tree at Wal-Mart or purchase items from Dollar General off East Ivan and place them in the donation box. Whatever level of income you are, theres something you can do,Ž Davis said. She encouraged groups and co-workers to get together to adopt a family. If people are unable to donate items or adopt a family, they can donate their time, Davis said. Theres something for everybody to do,Ž Davis said. She suggested parents volunteer with their children to teach them about service work and those who are less fortunate than themselves. Theres people out there who dont even have Christmas lists,Ž Davis said. Or there are adults who put down a Christmas wish for themselves that is truly intended for their children, such as a baby blanket, she said. Donations can be dropped off at the Community Center Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Families will be noti“ ed on or before Dec. 1, with con“ rmation of acceptance into the program. Operation Santa is coordinating with the Salvation Army, Christmas Connection and area churches to ensure there is no overlap and more families can be helped. When noti“ ed, families will be given a day to shop for clothes at the center. The clothes will be made part of their Operation Santa gift box for pick up on Dec. 15. Families accepted will pick up gifts on Dec. 15 between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Those who adopt a family are asked to bring their items to the center no later than Dec. 13. For more information, call 926-3526.Operation Santa helps needy familiesStaff reportVisitors were invited to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, Nov. 17 for the annual Outdoors for the Holidays festival hosted by the St. Marks Refuge Photo Club. There were several childrens activities, including crafts, an appearance by the refuges Blue Goose, a chance to take a holiday photo and enjoy free cider and cookies. There was also chili for sale. All donations will go to the Junior Ranger Summer Camp at the refuge. Those at the refuge were also able to get an up close and personal view of an alligator and her babies while standing on the deck at the back of the visitors center overlooking the refuge. PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENOATH ADMINISTERED: Bobby Pearce was sworn-in as Superintendent of Schools on Tuesday, Nov. 20, by retiring Superintendent David Miller. Pearces wife held the Bible as his children looked on.SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS: New school board member Melisa Taylor, left, took the oath of of“ ce from Superintendent Pearce as her husband held the Bible; and school board member Greg Thomas, re-elected without opposition to another term, takes the oath from Pearce as his wife holds the Bible and his sons look on. JENNIFER JENSENDad Tony Winton helps son Adam, 5, make holiday decorations at the refuges Outdoors for the Holidays on Saturday, Nov. 17.Outdoors for the Holidays is held at the refuge New superintendent sworn 192 642Number of families who have applied for help Number of individuals in those families seeking helpBy the numbers:Operation Santa

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.NOVEMBER 29, 2012 NO FINAL ACTION ADOPTING THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT WILL BE TAKEN AT THESE MEETINGS. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCYThe Department of Homeland Securitys Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has issued a preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), and where applicable, Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report, re”ecting proposed ”ood hazard determinations within Wakulla County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. These ”ood hazard determinations may include the addition or modi“cation of Base Flood Elevations, base ”ood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area boundaries or zone designations, or the regulatory ”oodway. Technical information or comments are solicited on the proposed ”ood hazard determinations shown on the preliminary FIRM and/or FIS report for Wakulla County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. The preliminary FIRM and FIS report can be viewed at http://portal.nwfwmd”oodmaps.com. These ”ood hazard determinations are the basis for the ”oodplain management measures that your community is required to either adopt or show evidence of being already in effect in order to qualify or remain quali“ed for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. However, before these determinations are effective for ”oodplain management purposes, you will be provided an opportunity to appeal the proposed information. For information on the statutory 90-day period provided for appeals, as well as a complete listing of the communities affected and the locations where copies of the FIRM are available for review, please visit FEMAs website at www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fhm/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Information eXchange (FMIX) toll free at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-2627).NOVEMBER 29, 2012 DECEMBER 6, 2012Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations for Wakulla County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS NOVEMBER 8, 15, 21, 29, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOVEMBER 29, 2012 PLEASE RECYCLE COUNTY COMMISSIONNew Board of County Commissioners is sworn-inBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe newest county commissioners elected on Nov. 6 were sworn into of“ ce on Nov. 20. Commissioners Richard Harden, Howard Kessler and Ralph Thomas took their seats at the dais after being sworn in by Judge Jill Walker. This is always such a privilege,Ž Judge Walker said. First up was Thomas who faced incumbent Alan Brock and Jenny Brock in the race for district 1. Thomas is a native of Wakulla County and graduated from Wakulla High in 1984. After high school, he joined the Navy and now works for AmeriFirst Home Mortgage. Thomas has been involved in the county commission through the Wakulla County Value Adjustment Board, Wakulla County One Cent Sales Tax Committee and the Wakulla County Citizens Advisory Task Force. He has also been vocal at county commission meetings. I have a servants heart,Ž Thomas said. Im just ready to serve the citizens of Wakulla County and make a great county even better.Ž Kessler ran against incumbent Mike Stewart in district 3. Kessler served on the board for eight years, but lost to Commissioner Jerry Moore in the 2010 election. He is a semi-retired board certi“ ed orthopedic surgeon and moved from Sarasota to Wakulla County in 1999 with his wife, Anne Van Meter. Kessler said, You come back into of“ ce being out of office with a different perspective.Ž He said he is optimistic that his time and experience will help him and he looks forward to serving with the current board. I hope the board will make their decisions for the good of the people and the county and not any special interests,Ž he said. The last commissioner to be sworn in was Harden who ran against Emily Smith and John Shuff for district 5. Incumbent Lynn Artz chose not to seek another term. Harden brought his family Bible with him to be used during the ceremony. I promised my family I would,Ž Harden said. Harden is a native of Sopchoppy and graduated from Wakulla High. After high school, he enlisted in the U.S. Airforce. He is currently a correctional of“ cer at Franklin Correctional Institution. He served as a commissioner on the Sopchoppy City Commission for six years and three of those as vice mayor. Im very excited, humbled and grateful,Ž Harden said. Once the newly elected commissioner took their seats, it was time for the commission to select a chair and vice chair. Moore made the motion to select Commissioner Randy Merritt as chairman. The commission voted unanimously to approve the motion. I hope I can do everybody a good job,Ž Merritt said. Merritt was elected to district 2 in 2010. Moore then made a motion to select Harden as vice chair. The commissioners all agreed. I was certainly not expecting that,Ž Harden said. However, having served as vice mayor, he felt con“ dent he could handle the task. The “ rst regular county commission meeting of the new board will be held on Dec. 3 at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netOn Monday, Nov. 19, the three outgoing county commissioners said their thanks and their goodbyes to the citizens, their fellow commissioners and county staff. Commissioners Lynn Artz, Alan Brock and Mike Stewart attended their last meeting as commissioners. You guys saw this county through probably some of the toughest times in recent history that weve had,Ž said County Administrator David Edwards. Thank you for your hard work.Ž Artz, who represented district 5 for the last four years, chose not to run for re-election. Instead, she urged a candidate to come forward who had similar beliefs and ideals of her own. She extended her full support to candidate Emily Smith, but Smith was beaten by Richard Harden for the vacant seat. During the meeting, Artz saluted her fellow outgoing commissioners and thanked them for their efforts. To Brock, she said, I personally think your crowning achievement is the solid waste. Thats your legacy.Ž Brock brought forward the idea of mandatory curbside garbage pickup and eventually won the support of the majority of the commission. Artz commended Stewart for being an incredible negotiator and also for having such a strong morality. Ive been very proud to serve on the board with you,Ž Artz said to the commissioners. Brock, who served as the chairman for the last year, ran for re-election, but lost to Ralph Thomas. He spoke of Artzs strong voice on the board and her role as moderator. Of Stewart, he said, Youve always put people over politics.Ž Brock thanked the citizens and his fellow commissioners. It has been an honor,Ž he said. Stewart served on the commission for three terms, not consecutively. He sought a fourth term, but lost to former Commissioner Howard Kessler. Stewart was also appreciative of the other commissioners and citizens and said he was proud of the tough decisions the current commission had to make. This board you see here tonight rolled up its sleeves and did what others refused to do,Ž Stewart said. He added that it was the best combination of commissioners he has ever worked with. Commissioner Randy Merritt agreed and said, Hopefully weve set a standard for civility and how to treat and respect each other even if we dont agree.Ž Commissioner Jerry Moore also spoke a few words about the three commissioners and said both Artz and Brock are two of the nicest people. He was respectful of Stewart and his honesty and morals. If Mr. Mike tells you something, you can take it to the bank,Ž Moore said.Outgoing commissioners give farewell remarks PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENTHE NEW BOARD: Ralph Thomas, Howard Kessler, Chairman Randy Merritt, Jerry Moore,and Richard Harden.SWEARING IN: Wakulla Judge Jill Walker administers the oath to new commissioners Richard Harden, Howard Kessler and Ralph Thomas at the organizational meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 20. ree new commissioners are on the board, and Randy Merritt will serve as chairman

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Traffic crash with fatality on Wednesday morning • A new superintendent: Bobby Pearce takes over the post from David Miller • Sheriff-elect Creel names undersheriff • The great Thanksgiving con • Crawfordville man arrested for drug trafficking • Wakulla unemployment down • Senior Center tries to reduce holiday anxiety for seniorsthewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.Editor, The News:One of my ol Wakulla High School pals just CHALLENGED ME! … ITS ON! If we can raise $500 by Dec. 1st for Operation Santa 2012, he will match that $500 dollar for dollar. Im calling it the WHS Class of 87 Challenge. You dont have to be an 87er to participate … $1, $5, anything to reach $500. Drop off at Wakullas Community Center, or call (850) 926-3526. Ask for Gail or Layne. And tell em WHS Class of 87 Challenge is what brought you in. We can do something GREAT for those in Wakulla whove been hit by Tropical Storm Debby, unemployment, or may simply be struggling to eat. See the video on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-wIaTV4yLU Thanks, Herb Donaldson CrawfordvilleA couple of perspectives of the Thanksgiving holidayOperation Santa creates challenge A plea to hunters: stop dumping carcasses Please return white elephant to his home No real change with new sheri Editor, The News: Most people who hunt are responsible. They respect the laws and the communities in which they hunt. However, a few irresponsible hunters can sour the season. In my neighborhood there is a small creek which feeds the Sopchoppy River. Walking over the bridge on Sunday afternoon I discovered a problem which was huge last year and looks like it will be again this hunting season. Someone has dumped a deer carcass in the creek. Last year, there were as many as six carcasses in this creek at one time! (It was hard to get an exact count, as the deer were dumped there in pieces.) This irresponsible behavior not only pollutes our rivers, but is a smelly, unsanitary nuisance to the people in our community who walk and bicycle along this road. The sides of the creek are on private property, causing residents to limit where they can walk with their children and dogs. Please hunters: dispose of your carcasses responsibly by burying them on your property. Dont expect the buzzards to take care of your mess before the waterways are polluted by your thoughtlessness. Judith Harriss Sopchoppy Editor, The News:An open letter to whomever took the white elephant: I am writing to ask for the return of the white elephant from in front of The White Elephant store. The vendors and I have come to enjoy the fact that he belongs to us, he disappeared once before and was gone for a week, but was returned to us … a little battered, but still returned to again take his place at the front of the shop on his little stump, welcoming all who came down 319. We are asking that anyone seeing him will return him. He has been with us from the opening of the shop in 2006, and its the Christmas season and he would love to be home. We have “ led a report with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce, we need to “ nd him. Please look for him and send him home. Hopefully, Ina Ecklund Owner, White Elephant Editor, The News: Isnt it amusing, many people of Wakulla County did not want any more good ole boy Sheriffs Of“ ce. So they elect a sheriff with a different name with lots of family ties to Wakulla County and the folks who run the show. It is just too funny to comment any further. Seems to me it will be just a different named good ol boy system. What do you think? Jack Collins jajcjrow@aol.com By RITA HANEY It is Thanksgiving and time to gather with friends and family to express our love. Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. All you need is a hearty appetite. Everyone is welcome at the table. Spirits are high. In Alcoholics Anonymous, November is Gratitude month and most meetings relate to this subject. Addicts in recovery have a lot to be grateful for. As do we all. There are the big things, of course, and there are the million and one things we take for granted in this age of fast moving, double-duty lifestyle, One of the basic things taken for granted is breathing. We can, it seems, live days without food and water. We cannot live without air for more than a few minutes and yet we dont think of our breath. Breathing is what keeps us on the planet. In these days of anxiety and overdoing, not just at the holidays, but how we seem to live our lives, we forget to breathe. Breath is what keeps us alive. Challenge yourself to stop and breathe. Breathe from your lower abdomen and “ ll your lungs from the bottom to the top; release this breath slowly by mouth. Pause. Do this again. Pause. Do this again. An experiment conducted on men with high blood pressure used a combination of deep breathing and gratitude. The men were told to breathe slowly and deeply and to concentrate on someone or something for which they were grateful. This exercise measurably reduced the mens blood pressure. When stressed often we reach for something outside of ourselves to help us get through the anxiety. We overeat, we drink, we smoke, take a pill … or we become tense and irritable not enjoying ourselves or anything else. Try breathing. Breathe slowly and deeply. To practice, place your hands on your stomach and feel the breath as it moves from the bottom of the lungs to the top; hold; release slowly. Close your eyes and accompany this action with thoughts of gratitude and feel yourself relax. You can do this exercise as often as you like. It can be practiced almost anywhere. Breathe through the workday. May you eat, drink and be merry this holiday season. And breathe.Rita Haney, MSW, LCSW is a counselor in Crawfordville.I watched Halloween stories on TV the week before the holiday. Nurse Judy, that silly alter ego of mine, made fun of me, saying those stories are not sophisticated. They are just light, ” uffy movies and do not stimulate the intellect? I think this observation of hers is hilarious, since she does nothing ever to stimulate her intellect. I dont want to “ ght with her, however, so I just enjoyed myself never caring that I hadnt stimulated my brain. The day after trick or treating, I took down all the jack-o-lanterns, ghosts and goblins and put out the turkeys, pilgrims, Indians and gourds. I was ready to enjoy my favorite holiday. That weekend I turned on the Hallmark channel ready to watch Thanksgiving movies. Guess what? There were none. Sunday night, Nov. 4, there were non-stop Christmas movies. Nurse Judy noticed me ” ying around checking all my calendars. What are you doing?Ž she asked. You are acting so crazy.Ž Im trying to “ nd November,Ž I said. Did I sleep through it? I know I turned back the clock, but did I also turn forward the calendar?Ž What are you talking about?Ž she asked pulling out her smart phone. (I dont even have a smart phone, but she always thinks she needs whatever is new and trendy). She glanced at her phone, and then shoved it under my nose. See,Ž she says, This is a smart phone and it says it is Nov. 4th today. You did not lose November.Ž I look at her phone. She must be right for thats what it says. I am confused. I point at the TV where another movie, The Christmas Secret,Ž is just coming on. Why are there Xmas stories now, and not Thanksgiving stories?Ž I ask her. Nurse Judy gives me an exasperated look. We live in a fast moving worldŽ she says. Everything gets pushed ahead quicker and quicker because we are just so busy, and there is so little time to get things done.Ž But what about Thanksgiving?Ž I whine. Its my favorite holiday. Where has it gone?Ž It will come,Ž she says. It will come just like always, but all you do is eat and be thankful that day. TV wants to remind you that Christmas is just around the corner; that you must be working on your gift lists; your decorations, both indoors and out; your Christmas cards; your wrapping supplies and schedule, your Christmas menu, your shopping, and and …Ž I hold up my hands. Stop,Ž I shout. I dont want my TV reminding me about the holiday rush. I want to relax and smell the turkey baking in the oven, the pumpkin pies cooling on the shelf. I want to sit on the couch and watch football and the Thanksgiving Day parades, I want to be calm and think about all the wonderful things in my life that I have to be thankful for. I am not going to allow this TV to rush my life.Ž I walk over and unplug the TV. Nurse Judy looks surprised and then snickers. Look at the paper,Ž she says. It is full of ads for Christmas. Go in the stores. They are full of Christmas trees and toys. You cant escape this forward push.Ž I put my head in my hands. She may be right about TV, ads, and stores. Still, I am going to have my regular Thanksgiving. None of the Christmas frenzy until after my last bite of turkey and dressing. I am about to tell her my plan, but she is on the ” oor looking for the TV plug. I sigh, but I guess theres no harm in finding out what The Christmas Secret is all about. No matter what … Thanksgiving will come. More later,Judy Conlin is a nurse in Gadsden and Wakulla counties. Her website is www.nursejudyinfo.com. What happened to anksgiving? Judy Conlin Nurse Judy’s Nook Feel gratitude. And breatheREADERS WRITE:By SLIM RANDLES Coffee always tastes perfect before daylight on the opening day of deer season, Dud Campbell thought as he sat in neartotal darkness in his kitchen. He was being extra quiet so as not to awaken Anita. Turning on a ” ashlight on the kitchen counter, he wrote: Honey, Ill be up Pine Canyon, hunting up a feeder creek 1.4 miles to the right. The truck will be at the campground. Doc and Steve both know the area Im hunting. Ill be back no later than 10 p.m. unless I call.Ž An hour later, Dud quietly got out of the pickup and left a note under the windshield wiper: Hunting to the west between here and the ridge. Should be back here no later than 9 p.m.Ž Dud was sitting on a rock outcropping as the sun rose, feeling the warmth spread from inside out as another great day of anticipation came. He smiled, and then prayed. He always did during hunting season. His prayer wasnt wishing for success, but simply expressing gratitude for this special time. He got home about 9 p.m. and raved to Anita about the wonders of the day in the woods. You left me that note, Dud,Ž she said, but I dont even know where that is.Ž No. But the sheriffs department does, and search and rescue knows, and both Doc and Steve know.Ž He smiled at her. Hunters have an old saying, Honey. If you take crutches with you, youll never break a leg.ŽBrought to you by the national awardwinning book A Cowboys Guide to Growing Up Right.Ž Read a free sample at www. slimrandles.com. HOME COUNTRYA hunters lesson

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 – Page 5ACommunity Thanksgiving Dinner Time with friends after a meal. Cuttin a rug, left, to the music. Families dined together and enjoyed desserts that included pumpkin pie, above. And friends gathered together to share Chef Marys Thanksgiving dinner of turkey and all the “ xings. Sharing a laugh. Pickin n Grinnin perform at the dinner. e Wakulla County Senior Center served a free community anksgiving dinner on Tuesday, Nov. 20, and it was Chef Marys goal to serve 1,000 people during the evening. Besides the anksgiving dinner, there was music from the Pickin n Grinnin Band, who play regularly at the Senior Center, and a chance to visit with friends and neighbors.JoAnne Strickland and Shelly Homan sell treats at the door. Peggy Mackin and Virginia Moore sell raf” e tickets.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN More photos online at thewakullanews.com

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Church Briefs Panacea Congregational Holiness to hold revivalPanacea Congregational Holiness Church will be having a revival on Friday, Nov. 30 through Sunday, Dec. 2. Services will begin at 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Sunday morning services will begin at 11 a.m. and Sunday night at 6 p.m. Guest speaker will be Sister Gert Riley. For more information, call (850) 984-5579 or (850) 508-1895. Winter Music Festival at Harvest Fellowship Dec. 8A Winter Music Festival is set for Dec. 8 on the outdoor stage of Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. The concert will be held from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Everyone is invited to come and sit out on the lawn and enjoy a free musical concert featuring a variety of music styles from blue grass to hip hop, local talent, as well as visiting musicians from around the state. They will have a bouncy house for the little ones, a bon re with marshmallows for roasting and lots of good food. Harvest Fellowship Church and Thrift Store is sponsoring this event with the ongoing intent to make Wakulla County a great place to live. Financial donations will be accepted at the event. Interested vendors should call the Harvest Thrift Store at (850) 926-3535. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER Let me make it very clear right up front that I am in favor of as many ha ha momentsŽ as possible. I could not get through a week without my daily dose. I “ rmly believe that laughter is the appropriate medicine for the soul. Some people, according to their demeanor, need a little more laughter than they are presently getting. That said, let me quickly point out that some things are not funny. Of course, most things in my life and about my person are marvelous targets of humor. I do not take myself very seriously. I am not sure any wise person would take me seriously either. In fact, I would highly suspect a person who took me seriously. I can take a joke as well as the next person and I can give it back as well as the next person. I have had some weeks that if it was not for a little bit of humor I do not know how I would have gotten through. So, if you cant do anything you can at least laugh. I “ rmly believe that the best laugh is when you can laugh at yourself. You might as well laugh at yourself, everybody else is. Then there are those serious moments in life that beg for no laughing. I would recommend that warning signs are put around these areas reading, Positively No Laughing Zone.Ž With this sign should come a severe penalty for those who violate it. That said; let me explain an area in my life where the sign should be permanently erected. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were having supper with another couple. We try to do this at least once a month and keep up with each others progress or lack thereof. We were having a great meal and as we came to the end, I stopped the waitress and said, I would like some ice cream for dessert.Ž As far as I am concerned, that is a rather reasonable request and quite in keeping with the environment I was in. What kind of ice cream,Ž she queried, would you like?Ž When it comes to ice cream, ice cream is simply ice cream to me. If there is a ” avor of ice cream I do not like, it has yet to be invented. I love ice cream. My favorite song is, I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream.Ž I remember my grandfathers favorite ice cream was vanilla. He would not eat any other ice cream; he thought they were polluting it with colors. To him an ice cream sundae was as close to blaspheme as he ever would get. Why ruin,Ž he objected, the ice cream with all that slop?Ž He wanted nothing coming between him and the purest experience of ice cream he could get. Me, I love ice cream regardless of the ” avor or color or slop.Ž I looked at the waitress and simply said, I dont care what ” avor you bring me. Surprise me. As long as it isnt broccoli.Ž That was supposed to be a joke. Ha ha ha. As the waitress left our table, we resumed our conversation and shortly she returned with the ice cream. Upon her arrival, I looked at her and then the ice cream she was bringing and almost screamed aloud. Of all the blasphemous things to do to a customer, this has to take the cake. First, she had an ice cream bowl with three scoops of ice cream, vanilla, strawberry and chocolate. No problem. However, on the side of the dish in plain view for everybody to see, especially me, was a piece of broccoli. Broccoli! My dining companions thought this was the funniest thing they had ever seen. Particularly, the dining companion who was going to come home with me that night. Not only did they laugh. The waitress laughed. The table next to us began to laugh. The table next to them began to laugh. It was not long before everybody within 173 miles was laughing at my ice cream/broccoli dessert. Actually, not everybody was laughing. I was not laughing. Broccoli, no matter the presentation, is no laughing matter in my book. If matters could not be worse, my wife, through her hilarity spasms, reached over, picked up the broccoli and began eating it in my presence. Talk about adding insult to injury, my injury was vastly insulted. I may have been smiling on the outside, but I assure you I was more than frowning on the inside. Some things are funny; broccoli is not one of those things. Driving home amid the muffled chuckles on the other side of the front seat, I thought of what the apostle Paul said in 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18 (KJV), Rejoice evermore. Pray without ceasing. In every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you.Ž I know that when Paul said, In every thing,Ž it included things like broccoli. I must say that there are some things in life, like broccoli, where the thanksgiving is a matter of faith. I will never learn to love broccoli, but I can muster up enough faith to thank God for all things, including broccoli.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. OUT TO PASTOROkay, that wasn’t funnyCommunity Chorus will perform MessiahSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla Community Chorus will perform Handels Messiah on Sunday, Dec. 9, in the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church Sanctuary. The performance is scheduled for 3 p.m. followed by a time of fellowship and refreshment in the social hall. The Messiah, considered by most musical scholars to be the greatest oratorio ever written, was composed by George Frederic Handel, who was born in Halle, Saxony, on Feb. 23, 1685, and died in London April 14, 1759. During his 74 years, Handel wrote music for orchestra and chamber groups, harpsichord, voice, and opera. But he is best known for his oratorios, especially Messiah. Handel conducted the first performance of Messiah in Dublin, Ireland, April 13, 1742, after he and the Messiah had been scorned by Londons musical establishment. It was a resounding success there and Handel insisted that all the proceeds from performances of Messiah be given to charity. Messiah is a composition of enormous scale and has over 50 sections. According to historians, Handel completed this monumental work in a mere 24 days and it continues to grow in popularity with audiences of all ages. It has been recorded that when Handel began the composition, he would not leave his house nor would he allow visitors to distract him, ate very little, and went for long stretches without sleep. One person, privileged to see him work, said that he was aglow with creative genius and composed with a passion that could have only been inspired by God himself.Ž Handel called it a miracle and acknowledged this inspiration by exclaiming to a friend at its completion, The gates of heaven did open for me and God himself was there!Ž Handel wrote the Messiah in three parts: The “ rst contains prophecy of the coming Messiah followed by the sufferings and death of Christ, with the “ nal section dealing with the resurrection. The Messiah in abbreviated form as presented by the Wakulla Community Chorus will emphasize the Christmas story and is approximately one hour in length. The 50-voice chorus, interspersed with voice and instrumental solos … all under the leadership of veteran director Reba Mason … will feature vocal solos by Daryl Langston, Becton Roddenberry, Jana Strain, Laura Hudson, Patsy Roberts, Staci Welch, Edie Brandt and Leah McManus. Musical accompaniment for Messiah includes trumpet, Wayne Watson; timpani, Mike Crouch; ” utists, Kristin Dow and Laura Hudson; pianist, Chris Hart; organist, Pat Redding; and harp, Corban Scott. A popular highlight of the Messiah is the grand “ nale rendition of the Hallelujah Chorus that brings the audience to its feet with a crescendo of feeling resounding with the wonderful spirit of Christmas,Ž said Director Reba Mason. 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826)

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 – Page 7AObituaries Marshall Wallace Bradford James B. O’Bryan Richard A. SeybothMarshall Wallace Bradford, 35, of Crawfordville, passed away on Wednesday Nov. 21, 2012. He was born Oct. 13, 1977, in Tallahassee and was a resident of Crawfordville for 21 years coming from Tallahassee. He was a paramedic for the Wakulla County Ambulance Service. He loved to hunt and “ sh, he enjoyed playing his guitar and spending time with his family. He was a loving husband, father and son. He would help anyone anytime. Family received friends Saturday, Nov. 24, 2012, from 10 a.m. until noon at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Funeral services were held Sunday, Nov. 25, 2012, at 2 p.m. at River of Life Church in Crawfordville with burial at St. Elizabeth Cemetery. After the burial a gathering was held at the Shriners Club. He is survived by his wife of 15 years, Glenna Bradford of Crawfordville; one son, Chaim Bradford of Crawfordville; one daughter, Liam Bradford of Crawfordville; his parents, Wallace and Bea Bradford of Crawfordville; one sister, Kerri Posey (Keith) of Crawfordville; two nephews, Devon and Codie; three nieces, Sierra, Jacinta, and Laylah; a paternal grandmother, Joyce Woodyard of Quincy; his father and mother-in-law, Jim and Linda Berkes of Crawfordville; and many loving family and friends, as well as his trusted and loyal canine friend Bailey. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333) www.bevisfh. com).Marshall Wallace BradfordRichard RickŽ A. Seyboth, 72, a devoted husband and father, passed away peacefully at his home in Crawfordville on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. He was born July 1, 1940, in Albany, N.Y. He was the son of Fred and Agnes Seyboth. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and was in Vietnam. He had lived in Crawfordville for 11 years and lived in the area for 54 years. Services were held at the Central Baptist Church of Crawfordville on Monday, Nov. 26 at 11 a.m. He is survived by his wife and best friend of 17 years, Connie Seyboth; his children, Mary Jane, Diana, Terrance and Mark; his grandchildren, Tyler, Caleb, Jerimiah, Titan, Trinity, Samantha and Little Terry. The family wishes to express a special thank you to all of the staff of Big Bend Hospice. James B. OBryan, 91, of Crawfordville, died on Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2012 in Tallahassee. He was born in Altha on July 4, 1921, to Roy and Della (Thomas) OBryan. He lived in Altha before moving to Crawfordville in the 1960s and was retired from the Florida Division of Forestry. He was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Janet E. (Leber) OBryan; and a brother, Elmer OBryan. Survivors include his long term caregiver, Stacey Brown Larman of Panacea; a brother, J. A. (Marilyn) OBryan of Bristol; a sister, Doris (Percy) Stewart of Bristol; and several nieces and nephews and other extended family. A graveside service was held at 1 p.m. CST on Sunday, Nov. 25, 2012, at Sunny Hill Cemetery near Altha. The family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m. CST at the Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown. Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements (674-5449). Online condolences may be made at www.adamsfh. com.James B. O’Bryan Richard A. Seyboth EmployFlorida.com1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me “nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. HIRED.RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc. Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 Help Big Bend Hospice Honor Those Who Are No Longer With Us Big Bend HospiceTree of Remembrance 2012 2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.orgVisit our Wakulla County Tree at Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial Bank in Crawfordville WAKULLA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH December 1 8 am – 1 pm Christmas Bazaar, crafts, food and fun at the Alford Fellowship Hall, Wakulla United Methodist Church, 1584 Old Woodville Highway. Please call 850 421-5741 for more info. December 14 15, 6:30 – 8:30 pm -Living Nativity, drive through at 918 Woodville Highway with music and refreshments across the Old Woodville Highway at Wakulla United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall. For more information, please call 850 421-5741. December 24 7 pm Christmas Eve Service, Wakulla United Methodist Church, 1584 Old Woodville Highway. Please call 850-421-5741. December 25 11 am – 4 pm Free Wakulla Station Community Christmas Dinner sponsored by The Kast Net at the Alford Fellowship Hall, Wakulla United Methodist Church, 1584 Old Woodville Highway. Call 850 421-5741 for more information. For general information and Christmas activities, please call 850-421-5741::: CHRISTMAS CALENDAR ::: 000CV38 Special to The NewsFive endangered whooping cranes arrived Friday on their wintering grounds at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. These cranes are the 12th group to be guided by ultralight aircraft from central Wisconsin to the Gulf coast of Florida. The Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership (WCEP), an international coalition of public and private organizations, is conducting the reintroduction project in an effort to restore this endangered species to part of its historic range in eastern North America. There are now 115 whooping cranes in the wild in eastern North America thanks to WCEPs efforts. This is the earliest the birds have arrived at St. Marks, and we are thrilled to have them here so soon,Ž said Terry Peacock, Refuge Manager at St. Marks NWR. I was in the blind at the pen site to watch the birds arrive. I just have to say that it never gets old watching the birds come to the refuge. It was as touching this time as it was the “ rst time.Ž In addition to the “ ve birds led south by WCEP partner Operation Migrations ultralights, six cranes are making their “ rst southward migration as part of WCEPs Direct Autumn Release (DAR) program. The DAR cranes were hatched and raised by biologists with project partner International Crane Foundation. The six birds were released in the company of older cranes from whom the young birds learn the migration route south. Five of the DAR cranes have completed their migration and are located in Hendry County. The sixth bird is currently located at Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area in Pulaski County, Ind. The ultralight-led and DAR cranes this year are joining two wild-hatched chicks in the 2012 cohort. Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s. Today, there are only about 600 birds in existence, approximately 445 of them in the wild. Aside from the WCEP birds, the only other migratory population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta, Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast. A non-migratory ” ock of approximately 20 birds lives year-round in the central Florida Kissimmee region, and an additional 14 nonmigratory cranes live in southern Louisiana. WCEP asks anyone who encounters a whooping crane in the wild to please give them the respect and distance they need. Do not approach birds on foot within 200 yards; remain in your vehicle; do not approach in a vehicle any closer than 100 yards. Also, please remain concealed and do not speak loudly enough that the birds can hear you. Finally, do not trespass on private property in an attempt to view or photograph whooping cranes. Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership founding members are the International Crane Foundation, Operation Migration, Inc., Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Geological Surveys Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and National Wildlife Health Center, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin, and the International Whooping Crane Recovery Team. Many other ” yway states, provinces, private individuals and conservation groups have joined forces with and support WCEP by donating resources, funding and personnel. More than 60 percent of the projects budget comes from private sources in the form of grants, public donations and corporate sponsors. To report whooping crane sightings, visit the WCEP whooping crane observation webpage at www. fws.gov/midwest/whoopingcrane/sightings/sightingform.cfm.Group of whooping cranes arrive in St. Marks OPERATION MIGRATION

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySpecial to The NewsThe Board of the Wakulla Academic Boosters Inc. has recently accepted the substantial, additional contribution to the Frank and Alice Veasman scholarship fund of $1,000 made by Alice Veasman. Frank Veasman, a prominent professional engineer, retired to Sopchoppy with his wife, Alice. The couple initially created their scholarship in 1988 with a $6,000 endowment to the Wakulla Academic Boosters. Although Frank has passed away, Alice continues the couples commitment to the belief that a good education is the path to success. Alice Veasman notes that the increase in the cost of college means that young people need even more help to access a college education. For this reason, she enhanced the Veasman scholarship with the additional donation. Walter Dodson, president of the Wakulla Academic Boosters, and treasurer Chris Kelly, both with Centennial Bank, accepted Alices donation gratefully, and appeal to other scholarship donors to consider enhancing their endowments. A tax-exempt, non-pro“ t organization, the Wakulla Academic Boosters coordinates scholarships for Wakulla High School graduates to attend Tallahassee Community College. The TCC Foundation invests and administers the approximately $1,000,000 WAB scholarship fund. Because endowments are earning record low interest, the scholarship fund is generating less revenue, thus diminishing the value of the scholarships awarded. All of the scholarship funds managed by the Wakulla Academic Boosters are in need of additional contributions to enhance the student awards. Membership in the Wakulla Academic Boosters is solicited at $100 annually, but any contribution is appreciated. Another way to support the Boosters is for people to arrange their estate to contribute 3 percent of its net value to the Boosters. This can be accomplished by a codicil to a will or a trust amendment. Active Boosters and retired Judge Mike and Andrea Carter have chosen this method of helping Wakulla students obtain a college education. Helping young people realize their dreams and aspirations through education takes all of us and is the best legacy we can leaveŽ Judge Carter said. Anyone interested in discussing this option is welcome to contact Judge Carter at 926-3164. The Rand Corporation determined that of all efforts to improve society, education best raises all boats. This is the reason so many members of our community have contributed to the Boosters scholarship fund and helped hundreds of Wakulla County students obtain a college education. Donations may be mailed to the Wakulla Academic Boosters at Centennial Bank, P.O. Box 610, Crawfordville 32326. Veasman adds donation to scholarship fund Mr. and Mrs. Henderson Henderson weds CarltonMichelle Leigh Carlton and Tommy Lamar Henderson were married on Sept. 1 at Bald Point State Park. Pastor John Johnson performed the ceremony. The reception followed at Angelos restaurant. The couple resides in Crawfordville.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAlice Veasman presents her donation to President Walter Dodson. Mentor program trying to increase presence in Wakulla Special to The NewsLast month, more than 250 people came together at Poseys Dockside to support Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bends Wakulla County Mentoring Program. The third annual event raised more than $5,000 to support the mentoring program. The support of the community has been extraordinary,Žsaid agency CEO, Louis Garcia. The BIG Catch Charity Fish Fry continues to grow, and this years turnout has been astounding. We are very grateful for the hard work of Alan Brock, Stacy Harvey, Sherrie Posey Miller, and our other community champions who help us to get the word out.Ž The BIG Catch is great for renewing energy within the community, said Garcia. We are continuing to gain momentum in Wakulla County, and we look forward to serving even more children this year,Ž Garcia said. It is important for us to secure sustainable funding each year for continued service and growth. We have to recruit more volunteers as well as identify more children in need of our services. This is why we have dedicated the resources to hire another part-time staff member to focus on our work in Wakulla County.Ž The newly hired Wakulla County community outreach coordinator is Ellyn Scanlan. I am very excited to get the opportunity to help more children in Wakulla County be matched with caring mentors, who can truly make a difference in their lives,Ž said Scanlan. Big Brothers Big Sisters is currently seeking safe adult mentors willing to spend time with a child two to four times monthly for a minimum of 12 months. Volunteers have the opportunity to help shape a childs future for the better by empowering them to achieve. Volunteering just a few hours a month can change the course of a childs life for the better, forever. By simply changing their perspective on what the world can offer, volunteers can literally change lives. For information about how to become a mentor, contact Stacy Harvey at wakulla@bbbsbigbend.org or 366-3865 or visit www. bigbendmentoring.org/ wakulla. Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend helps children facing adversity beat the odds and grow into healthy, happy, and productive adults. The organization depends on donations to help conduct background checks on volunteers to ensure child safety; to provide ongoing support and training for children, families and volunteers; and to build and sustain longlasting relationships„the key to successful mentoring. Support for Wakulla Countys Big Brothers Big Sisters Program comes from generous businesses, individuals and the Wakulla County Neighboring County United Way Campaign. Members of the Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend team at the Big Catch. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Josh and Stephanie Hunt of Crawfordville announce the birth of their daughter, Adalyn Jade Hunt on Nov. 19, 2012, at 1:31 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She weighed 5 pounds, 14 ounces and was 18.5 inches. She has an older brother, Aiden, who is 18 months. Her maternal grandparents are Steve and Sherry Waites. Her paternal grandparents are Richard and Shari Hunt.Hunts welcome a baby girlRick and Lisa Russell announce the engagement of their daughter, Brenna Ann Evans to Daniel Laurden Bernabe, son of Daniel T. Bernabe and So“ a L. Davis. The wedding will be held at the Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort in Miramar Beach on Dec. 16. The bride is a graduate of Florida State University with a Masters Degree and is employed as a Spanish teacher. The groom is also a graduate of Florida State University with a Masters Degree and is a medical student at Florida State University Medical College. The couple will live in Tallahassee.Bernabe to marry Evans Daniel L. Bernabe and Brenna A. Evans Email your community news to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs as space becomes available. Sunday ThursdayALL U CAN EATSpecials Catfish ......$11.95 Shrimp ....,$13.95 Scallops ..$13.95Includes Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies30 SHRIMP• 10 Fried • 10 Grilled • 10 BlackenedServed with Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies$12.95 w Winter hours: Tues. Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 Sunday 4-9 984-5243 1506 COASTAL HWY., SCENIC BIWAY Re“nance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a ”oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Of“ce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Of“ce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Of“ce: 850.926.1960

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolTeachers and employee of the month are announced for November Special to The NewsNovember Teachers of the Month are Crawfordville Elementary Schools Chelsea Strickland and Riversprings Middle Schools Catherine Small, who are recognized with Transportations Employee of the Month, veteran school bus driver, Malda Timmons. Superintendent David Miller and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the innovation and enthusiasm these employees bring to the district, as well as the innovation they add to their jobs on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. Chelsea Strickland hit the ground running when she began her teaching career at Crawfordville in 2009, soon after she graduated from Flagler College. Strickland re” ected on the year her parents relocated to Wakulla County as a middle school student, so she could attend a high performing school system. She said, I always dreamed of returning and giving back to the county that harnessed my love for learning.Ž Strickland teaches an ESE self-contained classroom of third through fifth grade students. She said, I work with incredible kids. It can take weeks or months to make small advances, but that is okay. When those accomplishments are evident it is a phenomenal reward.Ž Spending summer in Hatchechubbee, Ala., with her Nana and Papa, Strickland was immersed in the training of southern hospitality. That mindset is re” ected in her personality as she enjoys making all of those she works with feel like celebrities. Crawfordville Principal Angie Walker recognizes Chelsea Strickland as an, incredible educator, who gives 100 percent to her students every single day. We refer to her class as the Dream Team because she and the other adults she works with makes the dreams of their children come true. She has one of the most exciting classes on campus. Mrs. Strickland is an asset to our cougar team. She is an enthusiastic teacher with a big heart. She loves her students and demonstrates her passion for their success through her unwavering attempts to create an amazing academic and social setting.Ž Also recognized as a November Teacher of the Month is Riversprings Middle Schools Guidance Counselor, Catherine Small. Originally hired as a substitute teacher, Small has served as the Riversprings Guidance Counselor since 2005, but began serving the students of Wakulla County before that time as a volunteer and fall festival coordinator. Small grew up in Tallahassee and graduated from Lincoln High School. She attended and graduated from Tallahassee Community College and Florida State University with a bachelor and masters degree. Small cites the teachers, support staff and administration as a highlight. The diverse talent and skills of the employees at RMS make coming to work a wonderful time,Ž she said. Her dedication to the middle school student is evident in the many ways she serves the school and the students. Small continually contributes to the overall school program in multiple ways that have included or currently include; Junior Optimist Club Sponsor, Student Council, RtI School representative, AVID/Wellness/Calendar Committee, Cheerleading Coach and Spirit Paws Coach She also is a member of the Florida School Counseling Association, Positive Behavior System Committee, Den leader for Cub Scouts Pak Four, Phi Alpha Honor Society and Association of Student Social Workers. RMS Principal Dod Walker said, Mrs. Small gives Riversprings her heart and soul every day. Not only in her capacity as our Guidance Counselor, which she achieves in a fantastic and highly effective manner, but also as our cheerleading coach. Her creation of the Spirit Paws on our campus, which incorporates our severely handicapped students into the cheerleading program, is commendable and appreciated. She is a true bear through and through.Ž The November Employee of the Month is Transportation Departments, Malda Timmons. Timmons has been driving a school bus for the students of Wakulla County for more than twenty years. She said, I have enjoyed my job ever since I started driving in 1991.Ž Timmons is a graduate of Wakulla High School and attended Shadeville and Crawfordville Elementary School. I love working with all the kids. They are precious and the future of our Country. Every day is a new and exciting adventure. Driving a bus is not a routine job, it is a daily adventure,Ž adds Timmons who treats most of the students on her bus like family. Transportation Coordinator Pat Jones said, Mrs. Timmons is and has always been a responsible, enthusiastic and competent bus driver. She has the ability to relate effectively with her students and is always letting them know that their safety comes “ rst. Mrs. Timmons is innovative and from time to time will even sing to her students on the school bus.Ž Chelsea StricklandCatherine Small Malda Timmons Special to The NewsMedart Elementary School students honored local veterans at an American Pride Day Assembly on Nov. 8. Around 35 local veterans attended the observance. The cafeteria was resplendent in red, white and blue. Kindergarten students painted American ” ags that covered the walls and students from other grades created banners to thank the veterans for their service to our country. Student Council officers began the program by reading a poem called, What is a Veteran?Ž Kindergarten students then sang America,Ž while each held a small American ” ag. First grade students recited a poem called, Salute to VeteransŽ and ended it by giving a crisp salute to all of the assembled veterans. Second grade students sang American Tears.Ž Various students read original poems or famous quotes. Medart Elementary principal, Sharon Kemp, read the name, branch of the military, rank, and years of service, of each veteran in attendance. The “ nal part of the program was a touching and powerful Powerpoint presentation by fourth grade teacher, Angie Nichols, with photographs of veterans which are also family members of Medart faculty and students.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSVeterans recite the Pledge of Allegiance along with students at Medart for the Veterans Day Celebration. Medart Elementary honors veterans Swearing-in ceremony held for o cersSpecial to The NewsOn Tuesday, Nov. 13, a special inauguration breakfast was held at Medart Elementary School in honor of the newlyelected 2012-13 Student Council Of“ cers and Representatives. Hosted by Student Council Sponsors Laurie Beaton and Laura Lawhon, the teachers and parents were able to witness the swearing-in and pinning of each member by Sheriff Donnie Crum and Beaton. Lawhon read about this idea and worked very hard to bring it to life as everyone enjoyed breakfast, fellowship, beautiful decorations, and encouraging words of leadership from David Miller, Robert Pearce and Crum. After the ceremony, Crum swore-in the group as a whole on the schools closedcircuit TV system so all of the Mustangs could be a part of the ceremony. This years Student Council Of“ cers and Representatives were elected on Sept. 28 by the third, fourth and “ fth graders after a few weeks of campaigning and televised speeches. Supervisor of Elections Henry Wells assisted Beaton in the election by providing the countys touch-screen voting machines and supervising the election. He also explained the importance and the privilege of voting to every student. The Mustangs are very grateful for the help of Wells in this important event, and they appreciate the time Crum, Miller, Pearce and Lawhon gave to help make the election results even more special. In fact, the ceremony was so special that it is sure to become a Mustang tradition. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe newly elected of“ cers and representatives for Medarts Student Council with Sheriff Donnie Crum. Drop o letters to Santa at courthouse mailboxThe mailbox for Santa letters has been put up at the Wakulla County Courthouse. Children can drop off their letters to Santa at this location. Be sure to also include a telephone number with the letter to receive a call from directly from Santa. Email school news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space is available. Holiday Craft Bazaar Saturday, December 8 at the CRAWFORDVILLE WOMAN’S CLUBSecond annual holiday bazaar hosted by the Crawfordville Womans Club at the clubhouse located at 64 Ochlockonee Street behind Hudson Park.Numerous vendors will display their wares in indoor comfort. Friday night, December 7 Sneak Preview Tickets are being sold to take a sneak preview to Saturdays event and enjoy delicious hors doeuvres and a wine tasting.9 a.m. 3 p.m. FREE and open to the publicA portion of the proceeds from the bazaar will go to the Crawfordville Womans Club scholarship fund and other civic projects. 294-6482 Tickets to the Friday night preview are $10 each for more info please call 300 of the finest artisans from around the country feature everything from fine arts to charming stocking stuffers.

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsI hope you had a good Thanksgiving and didnt eat too much turkey. There were a lot of folks on the water over this way but not a lot of “ sh caught. The tides didnt move that much over the past weekend and Im hoping that was the problem. I talked with Bucky at Shell Island Fish Camp in St. Marks and he said the “ shing down there was pretty good over the weekend. Some came in with their limit while others had a tough time. Bucky said he took his daughter and he wanted to catch her a red“ sh. They went up in a creek and he said the mouth was full of trout. They moved on up into a hole and they caught four nice reds and they managed to catch three nice trout to 21 inches. JR down at the Aucilla said “ shing was as good right now as he has seen it in years. Last year very few trout were caught up in the river. The water is crystal clear and the trout are in the river south of the ramp and reds are north of the ramp. He said if you want to catch a limit quick “ sh a hole in the mouth of one of the creeks. He said if you make “ ve or six casts and dont catch a “ sh move. He said youll get a limit in the river but its just gonna take a little longer. Last week he said he had “ shed all week with a family of five. He would take some of them one day and others the next. He said they caught limits of trout on almost every trip and plenty of nice reds. Everything was caught on the Gulp and he said he even switched over to the twin tail chartreuse grub he used to use and they hit it as well. David Fife was over from Destin last week and “ shed with some of his buddies and he said “ shing was pretty tough. They did catch some nice reds but said the trout just werent there. Dwayne Broadway from Shell Point said he caught a 40-inch red over near Panacea on Saturday using a Gulp. The week before Thanksgiving I had Kelly Dimon and his buddy Charlie from Pine Mountain, Ga. We spent a lot of time near Panacea and caught lot of silver trout and big whiting using the white Gulp. Kelly caught a 40-inch red and Charlie caught three of them one morning. We lost “ ve that day that ate our silver trout when we were reeling them in but the hook never went in the reds and they would “ nally spit them out. We ended the trip anchoring on a bar in Oyster Bay and we caught our limit of speckled trout in about 40 minutes. The day before Thanksgiving I took Murray McLaughlin and Clark Edwards for a half-day and we started at the silver trout hole near Panacea. We “ shed for about an hour hoping to catch one of those big reds but they didnt bite and neither did the white trout. We “ shed several other spots that should have been good but nothing. The tide “ nally started moving a little right before we were going to quit and they turned on. Most were about 14.5 inches long but we managed to get 12 that were legal. For an hour and a half it was every cast. Then on Friday I took John Hays from Crawfordville and we had a terrible day. The morning started good in Panacea when Johns son caught a 40inch red. It went down from there. Dwayne and I went back there on Sunday and did nothing. There was no bait and no “ sh. Were coming up on a full moon so “ shing should be good this week. The weather is supposed to be nice so we better go while we can. Remember to take those kids “ shing and know your limits. Good luck and good “ shing!A lot of folks were on the water, but not a lot of sh were caught From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Brag book:SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCarlie Coleman, 9, of Crawfordville, shot her “ rst deer with her sidekick Daddy. The buck was an 11 pointer and weighed 180 pounds. Carlie, who attends Wakulla Christian School, was shining like a Christmas tree. It was a great daddy-daughter moment to remember.Carlies “ rst deer is an 11-point buckCarlie Coleman with her 11-point, 180 pound buck. The First Sunday at the Refuge Presentation Series will feature Owls and Other Night Birds at St. MarksŽ with Don Morrow of The Trust for Public Lands on Dec. 2 at 2 p.m. Owls arent the only birds that come out at night. Don will tell about birds of the night and share their habits, how to identify them, and where you are likely to “ nd them. Linger afterward for a short twilight “ eld trip with Don. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures ClassroomŽ at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call (850) 925-6121 for information.First Sunday will feature owls and night birds Florida Bluebird Society adopts code of ethicsThe Florida Bluebird Society has adopted a Code of Ethics outlining principles for interacting with birds and establishing protocols for monitoring bluebird nest boxes. One recommendation included in the Nest Boxes Monitoring Protocol prohibits the handlings of the bluebird nest, eggs, nestlings or parents during the breeding season. FBS principles include always put the interests of the bird “ rst; consider the impact of all activities on the birds before taking action; obey bird protection laws. Do not touch nests, eggs or birds. The Code of Ethics is available on the FBS website: ” oridabluebirdsociety.com. From FWC NewsFlorida black bears are being seen with more frequency throughout our area due to the in” ux of more people and a growing bear population. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission cautions residents to store their garbage in a manner that denies bears access to it, or bears repeatedly will visit that neighborhood to obtain food. When bears easily obtain food from human sources, they begin to associate communities with a feeding opportunity. In turn, bears develop habits around people that are dif“ cult to change … and easily obtained food makes it far less likely that a bear will move on to more suitable habitat,Ž said Chad Allison, FWC regional wildlife biologist. The FWC recommends the following steps to prevent human-bear con” icts: € Feed your pets indoors or bring in dishes after feeding. € Secure household garbage in a shed, garage or a wildlife-resistant container. € Put household garbage out on the morning of pickup, not the night before. € Secure commercial garbage in bear-resistant dumpsters consisting of metal lids or metal-reinforced plastic lids and lock bars. € Clean grills and store them in a locked, secure place. € Remove wildlife feeders or make them bearresistant. € Protect gardens, apiaries, compost and livestock with electric fencing. € Pick ripe fruit from trees and remove fallen fruit from the ground. € Encourage your homeowners association or local government to institute ordinances on keeping foods secure that would attract wildlife. Ignoring these recommendations greatly increases the chances that a bear will become a nuisance … conditioned to visiting neighborhoods, and have to be euthanized. Help conserve wildlife by remembering a fed bear may become a dead bear. If you would like more information on avoiding con” icts with bears, visit MyFWC.com/Bear and click on the video titled Living with Florida Black Bears.Ž‘Bear’ with us, store your garbage FWC PHOTOA female bear and her cubs. THE DUCK HUNTA friend of mine and his son went duck hunting the other day. They were up way before daylight, drove to their hunting spot, and got the decoys out just as the sun peeked up over the hill. After a day of cold rain, a zillion questions from the boy and no ducks, they drove home. When the dad came through the door I asked him how their hunt was. O.K.Ž, he said. Cold, wet, no ducks. The boy never even got to shoot. Kind of disappointing I guessŽ. Then his son came through the door and I also asked him how the hunt was. It was great!Ž, he said. Dad and I spent the whole day together. We didnt get to shoot but we talked a lot.Ž Then he walked off beaming with pride and satisfaction. I guess its all a matter of perspective isnt it? Larry Whiteley is Host of the award-winning Outdoor World Radio For more tips, log onto basspro.com and click on the OutdoorSite Library P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service

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Members of Flotilla 12 have lost a great member and friend to all. John Toliver Denmark Jr. crossed the bar on Nov. 10, 2012, following his long battle with leukemia. John was 71. John joined Flotilla 12 on June 15, 2004 following a very distinguished career. According to his obituary, John began his career in agriculture working for the Florida Department of Agriculture in Winter Haven shortly before he married his wife of 47 years Judy in 1960, who preceded him in death in 2007. John earned his Bachelors and Masters Degrees from the University of Florida. He worked as a vocational agriculture instructor at Fort Meade High School in Polk County, became a regional consultant for the Florida Department of Education in central Florida and in 1981, he became Floridas Director of Agricultural Education. John remained at the Florida Department of Education in Tallahassee until his retirement in 2000. John was conferred with the Honorary American Farmer Degree in 1988. In 2000, the John T. Denmark, Jr. Scholarship was established by the Florida FFA Foundation in his honor and in 2007, he was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award by the National Association of Agriculture Educators. John is survived by his three sons, David (Elizabeth), Patrick (Barbara) and Christopher (Kimberly); five grandchildren, Brittany, Christopher, Vance, Clayton and Hartley; two sisters, Patricia (Ron) McCord and Linda Denmark; and mother-in-law, Christine Hodges. While in the Auxiliary, John was quick to learn as well as share his skills with others. He earned crew quali“ cation within his “ rst three months in the Flotilla and spent many hours out on the water. John also became a vessel examiner and program visitor working with local retailers to spread the word on safe boating. He also became involved in teaching in public education classes. In one of the last efforts John was able to provide, he worked to help restore our communications trailer by building relationships with the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge as well as Station Panama City. While in the Auxiliary, John received many awards for recognition of his hard work and efforts including the Presidential Unit Citation for post Katrina work, two Coast Guard Unit Citations, four Sustained Service Awards, the Auxiliary Humanitarian Service Award, the Auxiliary VE/ MDV Service Award (vessel exam/marine dealer visitation), two Coast Guard Meritorious Team Commendation and the Flotillas Gilbert Champion Award. Flotilla 12 lost a great man on Nov. 10. Fair winds and following seas, John! Saturday, Dec. 1, members of Flotilla 12 will come together to celebrate the coming end of another year. We will share stories of members who are no longer with us as well as make new memories to be talked about for years to come. It is the time of year when we all choose one member to receive the Gilbert/Champion Award who has demonstrated throughout the year a dedication to the auxiliary that re” ects the dedication of two of our founding members, Don Gilbert and John Champion. And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. A few extra minutes before leaving the dock can make the difference between a great or bad day on the water. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSJohn Denmark Jr. on patrol with the Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12. He died Nov. 10. Diving, its on sale.Its that time of year again when the stores lay out their best pricing on gizmos and gadgets in an effort to compete for your holiday money. Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and of course last minute Christmas Eve specials are all supposed to be too good to pass up. The dive industry has embraced the holiday season as a sales time but perhaps for different reasons than department stores. The Dive Equipment Manufacturers Association convention is held each year just prior to the holiday season. Here the manufacturers dish out their new toys and politely inform their dealers that much of what we have in stock has been discontinued. This year the trend seemed to be ever-increasing in the direction of discontinued items but not because last years model isnt good! From my perspective, the scuba industry is trying to grab new markets so we see an increase in color variety and increases in goods tailored for women. As a result, the regulator with a black ambient pressure cap now has a red and black cap. Everything else is identical but last years model is now available for probably half of the cost of the new one. Just about any piece of equipment is available in pink, in an attempt to attract the female shopper, but more importantly equipment is actually being designed with womens shape and/or needs in mind. The manufacturers often throw a bone to the small dealers and offer promotions or specials for orders placed at DEMA. Things like cylinders and lead are available with free shipping and package deals are at nearly every booth. As a diver, considering owning their “ rst cylinder, this is de“ nitely the best time to buy because so much of the cost in cylinders is associated with shipping. DEMA was also out promoting an array of lion “ sh products. Everything from mini, travel friendly, pole spears to entire cook books. The lion “ sh has become quite a nuisance and an entire industry has grown around it. Perhaps you will “ nd lion “ sh on a few tables this holiday season, right next to the green bean casserole. Equipment specials are not the only thing going for divers, training and travel opportunities abound. This is traditionally a slow time -winter, I mean -for dive stores, but ironically its some of the best time for diving. Visibility usually improves in the winter months and dive sites are not as crowded. New divers often overlook the bene“ ts of winter diving because cold can be a huge distraction. This means you can often book training for yourself, or as a gift, at enormous discounts and receive more privatized classes. If travel and warm water is what you want, book now for the spring or next winter trips. You will “ nd the best pricing as the boats are looking to “ ll their remaining seats for February to May trips. Early booking for next year is often available in installments to lessen the “ nancial burden. Interestingly enough, the Bahamas is not recognized as a prime dive destination in the winter because its too cold. To me, being from Minnesota, the Bahamas was one of our more popular winter trips because it wasnt too hot. For the Floridian in you its probably best to look a little closer to the equator. We will be offering a trip to Belize, probably, next winter. Its a great time to buy a TV but you will likely get just as much enjoyment out of some fresh scuba equipment or a dive course and the later will help to burn off the calories from the holiday cookies.UnderwaterWakullaBy Travis Kersting Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Nov 29, 12 Fri Nov 30, 12 Sat Dec 1, 12 Sun Dec 2, 12 Mon Dec 3, 12 Tue Dec 4, 12 Wed Dec 5, 12 D ate 3.5 ft. 1:22 AM 3.5 ft. 1:53 AM 3.4 ft. 2:25 AM 3.4 ft. 3:00 AM 3.2 ft. 3:39 AM 3.1 ft. 4:25 AM 2.8 ft. 5:23 AM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 8:31 AM -0.4 ft. 9:02 AM -0.3 ft. 9:32 AM -0.2 ft. 10:04 AM -0.1 ft. 10:38 AM 0.1 ft. 11:18 AM 0.3 ft. 12:05 PM L ow 3.2 ft. 2:59 PM 3.2 ft. 3:32 PM 3.2 ft. 4:07 PM 3.1 ft. 4:43 PM 3.1 ft. 5:22 PM 3.0 ft. 6:05 PM 3.0 ft. 6:52 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 8:11 PM 1.2 ft. 8:47 PM 1.2 ft. 9:25 PM 1.2 ft. 10:07 PM 1.2 ft. 10:55 PM 1.2 ft. 11:53 PM L ow Thu Nov 29, 12 Fri Nov 30, 12 Sat Dec 1, 12 Sun Dec 2, 12 Mon Dec 3, 12 Tue Dec 4, 12 Wed Dec 5, 12 D ate 2.6 ft. 1:14 AM 2.6 ft. 1:45 AM 2.6 ft. 2:17 AM 2.5 ft. 2:52 AM 2.4 ft. 3:31 AM 2.3 ft. 4:17 AM Hi g h -0.3 ft. 8:42 AM -0.3 ft. 9:13 AM -0.2 ft. 9:43 AM -0.2 ft. 10:15 AM -0.1 ft. 10:49 AM 0.1 ft. 11:29 AM 0.8 ft. 12:04 AM L ow 2.4 ft. 2:51 PM 2.4 ft. 3:24 PM 2.4 ft. 3:59 PM 2.3 ft. 4:35 PM 2.3 ft. 5:14 PM 2.3 ft. 5:57 PM 2.1 ft. 5:15 AM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 8:22 PM 0.9 ft. 8:58 PM 0.9 ft. 9:36 PM 0.9 ft. 10:18 PM 0.9 ft. 11:06 PM 0.3 ft. 12:16 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 6:44 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 29, 12 Fri Nov 30, 12 Sat Dec 1, 12 Sun Dec 2, 12 Mon Dec 3, 12 Tue Dec 4, 12 Wed Dec 5, 12 D ate 3.2 ft. 1:58 AM 3.2 ft. 2:29 AM 3.2 ft. 3:01 AM 3.1 ft. 3:36 AM 3.0 ft. 4:15 AM 2.8 ft. 5:01 AM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 9:35 AM -0.3 ft. 10:06 AM -0.3 ft. 10:36 AM -0.2 ft. 11:08 AM -0.1 ft. 11:42 AM 0.1 ft. 12:22 PM 1.1 ft. 12:57 AM L ow 3.0 ft. 3:35 PM 3.0 ft. 4:08 PM 2.9 ft. 4:43 PM 2.9 ft. 5:19 PM 2.8 ft. 5:58 PM 2.8 ft. 6:41 PM 2.6 ft. 5:59 AM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 9:15 PM 1.1 ft. 9:51 PM 1.1 ft. 10:29 PM 1.1 ft. 11:11 PM 1.1 ft. 11:59 PM 0.3 ft. 1:09 PM L ow 2.8 ft. 7:28 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 29, 12 Fri Nov 30, 12 Sat Dec 1, 12 Sun Dec 2, 12 Mon Dec 3, 12 Tue Dec 4, 12 Wed Dec 5, 12 D ate 2.7 ft. 1:06 AM 2.7 ft. 1:37 AM 2.7 ft. 2:09 AM 2.6 ft. 2:44 AM 2.5 ft. 3:23 AM 2.4 ft. 4:09 AM 2.2 ft. 5:07 AM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 8:10 AM -0.4 ft. 8:41 AM -0.3 ft. 9:11 AM -0.2 ft. 9:43 AM -0.1 ft. 10:17 AM 0.1 ft. 10:57 AM 0.3 ft. 11:44 AM L ow 2.5 ft. 2:43 PM 2.5 ft. 3:16 PM 2.5 ft. 3:51 PM 2.4 ft. 4:27 PM 2.4 ft. 5:06 PM 2.3 ft. 5:49 PM 2.3 ft. 6:36 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 7:50 PM 1.2 ft. 8:26 PM 1.2 ft. 9:04 PM 1.2 ft. 9:46 PM 1.2 ft. 10:34 PM 1.1 ft. 11:32 PM L ow Thu Nov 29, 12 Fri Nov 30, 12 Sat Dec 1, 12 Sun Dec 2, 12 Mon Dec 3, 12 Tue Dec 4, 12 Wed Dec 5, 12 D ate 3.5 ft. 1:19 AM 3.5 ft. 1:50 AM 3.5 ft. 2:22 AM 3.4 ft. 2:57 AM 3.3 ft. 3:36 AM 3.1 ft. 4:22 AM 2.9 ft. 5:20 AM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 8:28 AM -0.4 ft. 8:59 AM -0.3 ft. 9:29 AM -0.2 ft. 10:01 AM -0.1 ft. 10:35 AM 0.1 ft. 11:15 AM 0.4 ft. 12:02 PM L ow 3.3 ft. 2:56 PM 3.3 ft. 3:29 PM 3.2 ft. 4:04 PM 3.2 ft. 4:40 PM 3.1 ft. 5:19 PM 3.1 ft. 6:02 PM 3.0 ft. 6:49 PM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 8:08 PM 1.3 ft. 8:44 PM 1.3 ft. 9:22 PM 1.3 ft. 10:04 PM 1.3 ft. 10:52 PM 1.3 ft. 11:50 PM L ow Thu Nov 29, 12 Fri Nov 30, 12 Sat Dec 1, 12 Sun Dec 2, 12 Mon Dec 3, 12 Tue Dec 4, 12 Wed Dec 5, 12 D ate 2.7 ft. 12:55 AM 2.6 ft. 1:36 AM 2.5 ft. 2:19 AM 2.4 ft. 3:06 AM 2.2 ft. 4:00 AM 2.0 ft. 5:05 AM Hi g h -0.5 ft. 8:07 AM -0.4 ft. 8:36 AM -0.4 ft. 9:04 AM -0.3 ft. 9:32 AM -0.2 ft. 10:02 AM -0.1 ft. 10:37 AM 0.1 ft. 11:17 AM L ow 2.3 ft. 4:19 PM 2.3 ft. 4:48 PM 2.3 ft. 5:17 PM 2.3 ft. 5:46 PM 2.3 ft. 6:16 PM 2.3 ft. 6:46 PM 2.3 ft. 7:16 PM Hi g h 1.6 ft. 7:28 PM 1.5 ft. 8:04 PM 1.5 ft. 8:46 PM 1.4 ft. 9:34 PM 1.3 ft. 10:31 PM 1.1 ft. 11:39 PM L ow Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 29 Dec. 5First Dec. 19 Full Dec. 28 Last Dec. 6 New Dec. 12Major Times 12:55 AM 2:55 AM 1:20 PM 3:20 PM Minor Times 7:59 AM 8:59 AM 6:38 PM 7:38 PM Major Times 1:44 AM 3:44 AM 2:08 PM 4:08 PM Minor Times 8:46 AM 9:46 AM 7:29 PM 8:29 PM Major Times 2:32 AM 4:32 AM 2:56 PM 4:56 PM Minor Times 9:30 AM 10:30 AM 8:22 PM 9:22 PM Major Times 3:19 AM 5:19 AM 3:43 PM 5:43 PM Minor Times 10:11 AM 11:11 AM 9:16 PM 10:16 PM Major Times 4:06 AM 6:06 AM 4:29 PM 6:29 PM Minor Times 10:49 AM 11:49 AM 10:10 PM 11:10 PM Major Times 4:52 AM 6:52 AM 5:14 PM 7:14 PM Minor Times 11:26 AM 12:26 PM 11:06 PM 12:06 AM Major Times 5:37 AM 7:37 AM 6:00 PM 8:00 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:00 PM 1:00 PM Better++ Better Good Average Average Average Average7:14 am 5:36 pm 6:40 pm 8:00 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:15 am 5:36 pm 7:30 pm 8:47 am 7:16 am 5:36 pm 8:23 pm 9:31 am 7:16 am 5:36 pm 9:17 pm 10:12 am 7:17 am 5:36 pm 10:12 pm 10:50 am 7:18 am 5:36 pm 11:07 pm 11:27 am 7:19 am 5:36 pm --:-12:02 pm96% 90% 84% 78% 72% 65% 59% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 PLEASE RECYCLE

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comThe Wakulla news EXTRA! By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsNo one calls him by his “ rst name. Those who know him as a friend, neighbor, or local business owner call him Noah, or NoeyŽ Posey. Born and raised in Medart, Poseys antecedents share a common work history with others whose family trees are “ rmly rooted in Wakulla. Most of my family,Ž he says, were farmers and stuff like that. They “ shed a lot, mainly mullet.Ž I was about 15,Ž he says, when I started “ shing with Will Harts“ eld. Will was the best fisher around … and the best crabber, really. He always knew where the “ sh were. He studied them. He didnt have an education, but from whatever type of weather we were having that morning, hed know right where to go and “ nd that spot where the fish were banking up.Ž Poseys father, Raymond, like many fathers along the Gulf at that time, found his work among the “ sheries also. Back then, all of them was fisherman,Ž he says, Daddy worked over at the Bottoms, in the seineyards. He was there for about 12 years. And later he worked for Mr. Tully over at the sawmill. He was there for a long time before he got work with the state. Thats where he retired from.Ž The Bottoms is one of the original seineyards in the area. Between Wakulla and Franklin County, there were as many as 16 seineyards in operation. Some were named after the owner of the property, while other yards were named for the areas in which they were located. The thing most striking is that the seineyards location existed due to the inherent nature of the “ sh themselves. Just as birds ” y south for winter, mullet during the later months of the year, function in a similar fashion. During the run season, when the mullet “ sh would come through,Ž Posey says, they would always keep their right-eye to the bank. Theyd come by West Goose Creek, and when they got through there theyd come on down by Shell Point … they had two seineyards around there, I think. Then theyd come down by the Bottoms, and all the way around.Ž But all thats stopped now,Ž he continues, They go to St. George Island and along that way. They dont come around the coast like they used to.Ž When asked why he feels this change within nature has occurred, a witty, yet mysterious speculation is all that he can muster. Ive been trying to “ gure that out,Ž he laughs,Ž Ive always said its something planted out in the water, and once they (“ sh) hit it, they go straight-on across and bypass us.Ž Although Posey enjoyed the close-knit communal culture of the county as young man, he did what most young men and women from small towns tend to do once they come of age. He left. I moved down south. I worked as a surveyor for about eight years, with the state, until my father-in-law, Charles Barwick Sr., asked me to come back and run their crabhouse. So, in 1965 I came home and got into the seafood business.Ž Before the 1930s, Floridas blue crab “ shery market was similar to that of the mullet. Most things were done on a bartering basis and most of the product was distributed among the local population. By the 1930s, Arthur Tucker, from the Apalachicola area, began his crab-picking operation in Florida. His packed crabmeats were shipped as far away as New York. As large-scale crab processing plants developed, Charles Barwick Sr., a native of Hardaway whod lived in Panacea since his early childhood, opened his own picking plant there in 1949. During their strongest production period, Barwicks would pick, process, and prepare more than 2,200 pounds of crabmeat per day for shipment. Almost four years after Barwick opened his plant, Herman Metcalf followed suit. Other crabhouse owners would grow to include Henry Metcalf, Charles Barwick Jr. and Norman Barwick, and members of the Harts“ eld, Blackmon and Sanders families. Less than 30 years ago, Wakullas crab-picking/processing business was so strong that cars and vans were sent to Carrabelle, Quincy and surrounding counties to load in the crab-pickers, and deliver them safely home when the workday ended. When I came back to take the job as manager of Barwick Brothers,Ž says Posey, We had over 120 crab pickers. Any overage crab that we had was sold to Brunswick, Ga. There used to be 14 crab houses in Wakulla County, now we have, maybe, two of them left.Ž Where does an industry that supplies more than 120 jobs in one location disappear to? We really dont know what to “ gure about that,Ž he says. It dropped off about 10 years ago, there being very few crabs. Things went to the wayside and the crab-pickers started looking for other jobs.Ž He would stay in the crab business for about eight years, before turning to shells. I started buying all the shells off of the backs of the crabs,Ž he explains, I processed them and sold them to deviled-crab factories. That was my big plant that you see up the street, down by the curve? I went as far as North Carolina and Texas bringing shells in on 18-wheelers. At one time had seven 18-wheelers on the road. Thats where I made my money, on the shell business.Ž Business has changed. Other than being crowned the “ fth King of the Mighty Mullet Festival a few years back, with his wife, Mildred, who was crowned Queen, Posey now considers himself an ex-“ sherman and restaurateur. His restaurants are, for the most part, managed by his children, and include Poseys Dockside and Poseys Up the Creek Steam Room and Oyster House. Scrunch Porter and Robert Taylor built this place here,Ž says Posey referring to the well-known establishment along the Panacea strip. They ran it for a long time. Then Scrunch bought Robert out. And then Scrunch “ nally sold it. I believe he sold it to the Thompsons and they sold it to the Whaleys. It went under and I brought it from the bank on foreclosure.Ž Lately, running a restaurant is a tough game. Not only has tourism become slim in the area, but production costs are fluctuating at speedier rates than gas prices at a convenience store. I blame the state for the way oysters are now,Ž says Posey. When the state thought oil was going to hit here, they let people go out, rob the bars, and sell oysters everywhere. They didnt even check them for size. Now there are no oysters. I have to pay $96 a gallon, and $35 a bushel. Just two weeks ago they were costing me $60 a gallon, and $22 a bushel. But if youre gonna stay in business youve got to have what the people want.Ž I think we are in trouble,Ž he continues. State regulations, size limits, all that stuff is about to put everybody out of business. It hurts tourism. People are not gonna come down here to catch one or two reds, or a trout, or a ” ounder … thats got to be a certain size.Ž When putting the days of the past side-by-side with those of the present, and hopefully, those that lie beyond, Posey appears keenly aware of the change that has occurred not only in the seafood business, but in the daily life of Wakulla. We didnt get to go many places when I was younger,Ž he says. We didnt have a truck, so we walked everywhere we went. We walked to Skippers Bay to go oystering; wade out there and get an oyster, cut us a few swamp cabbage on the way back home.Ž Swamp cabbage: Something similar to an artichoke where you cut down the head of a palm, remove the tender parts, or heart, that lies at the root, and cook it down into a palpable substance. This was once a survival food for quite a few families in the county. Regulations, supposedly, have ended that age-old custom in Wakulla. Theres a regulation on everything,Ž says Posey. It helps in some ways to have them, but sometimes they go overboard.Ž In April 2013, the Healing Arts of Wakulla (HAWC), in association with Palaver Tree Theater, will begin a series of kickoff events for Wakullas Working Waterfronts Photo-Journal Project. Personal interviews that depict the many aspects of the countys “ sheries and their workers, such as the one above with Posey, are currently being collected and developed. Any old family photos of “ shers, shrimpers, crabbers, oyster workers, and others that would make a nice addition to the project are welcomed. The photos will be scanned for the building of this ongoing collection. Local professional photographers are also needed to help build the photojournal scheduled to start its full production in June 2013. Wakullas Working Waterfronts ProjectNOAH POSEYFisherman, crab house processor, businessman, restauranteur PHOTO BY HERB DONALDSON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSNoah Posey outside one of the familys Panacea restaurants. 5 Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2 Go to http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click ContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ. Register your online account today!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 – Page 13ABy JO ANN PALMERSpecial to The NewsOn Sunday morning, in spite of the chilly temperatures, 177 motorcycles and riders, young and old, serious and casual, seasoned and novice, gathered to show their support for the 11th Annual Iron Ravens Motorcycle Club Toy Run. This annual run is organized by Wakulla Iron Raven Charlie Davidson and supported by the combined efforts of several local motorcycle clubs and organizations including The Vietnam Vets, Wakulla Free Riders, Legacy Vets, The Remaining Few and the Wakulla Iron Ravens. At 11 a.m., the bikes cranked up and headed south out of the dusty parking lot across from Gulf Coast Lumber in Woodville. They turned south onto Woodville Highway escorted by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and lead by the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Departments Big Red Truck.Ž The route took the parade of bikers and cars down Woodville Highway to Highway 267, over to 98, ending at Ouzts Two Oyster Bar & Grill in Newport. There the riders unloaded their bounty into a trailer that represents Santas sleigh and were thanked with a bag of homemade goodies, and a free chili lunch, complete with fresh cornbread, sweet tea and live music, all provided by the Iron Ravens. The clubs prepared hot chili for 300 participants and at last estimate, were right on target with the count. Of course if you missed the chili, the kitchen at Ouzts Too was open with fresh seafood, barbecue, oysters on the half shell, juicy burgers and much more. All the toys collected during this run stay in Wakulla County and are distributed by the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department. Families and children are identified by schools, neighbors, churches and the WCSO. There are many families in need in our area and this is just one small way to help during the holidays. Everyone wants to see our children grow and flourish and a toy during this season is something these children will appreciate and remember. Thanks to the generosity, the trailer was almost full, and many needy children here in Wakulla County will have a new toy this Christmas. If you missed the run but want to help, the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department will be accepting toys until Dec. 22 at Ouzts Too or a volunteer with the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department will pick items up from you. Families also need nonperishable food items, personal care products, laundry and cleaning supplies and basic clothing needs such as unused socks and underwear, jackets and sweaters. All these items are being accepted and appreciated. Last year 165 families were helped as a result of this run. This year we anticipate an even greater need. Thankfully, some families who were helped in the past are now helping others. This is an encouraging reassurance that small gestures can make a difference. For more information on how you can get involved, or if you know someone who needs assistance, contact Rod Strickland at 631-0269, the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department at 9257969 or Dorothy White at Ouzts Too, 925-6448. Mark your calendar for next year, the Sunday following Thanksgiving. The rewards are worth the ride.Iron Ravens annual toy run is a ride for a cause The long line of bikes on the ride between Gulf Coast Lumber in Woodville and Outzts Too in Newport. On Sunday, the Iron Ravens and other clubs rode from Woodville to Outzts Too in Newport as part of an annual toy run If you missed the run but want to help, the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department will be accepting toys until Dec. 22 at Ouzts Too A stuffed animal with goggles, left, is ready to ride on Sunday. Riders line up with toys at Ouzts Too, below, and get a free bowl of chili for their contribution.PHOTOS BY JO ANN PALMER Special to The News To the People of Florida’s Second Congressional District, I would like to express my hear elt gra tude for your support and prayers, and for the con dence that you have placed in me to con nue our work in Congress. It is a privilege and honor to represent you. We have accomplished a lot together over the past two years, but there is s ll much work to be done in our journey to change the culture in Washington, D.C. Thank you again for trus ng me to be a voice for you in Congress. Rest assured, as a lifelong resident of North and Northwest Florida, I will always ght for the people and land that I love. Your partner in freedom and liberty, Steve Southerland, II United States Representa ve 2nd District, Florida Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905.Little Tupper Lake in New Yorks Adirondack State Park.

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Nov. 18, Adam Kendall Joseph, 20, of Apalachicola was arrested for DUI after crashing his vehicle into the Spring Creek Highway home of Willie and Annie Spears. The driver was south on Spring Creek Highway when he crashed the vehicle and it became wedged under the pilings creating approximately $1,000 worth of damage. Deputy Mike Crum and FHP Trooper Richard Elliott conducted sobriety exercises and administered breath tests. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: NOVEMBER 15 € Tabbatha Lynn Houck, 33, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of drugs without a prescription as she was entering the WCSO Detention Facility. During the processing of the incoming inmate, Detention Deputy Vicki Hughes discovered prescription pills. The pills were con“ scated. Deputy Richard Moon and Deputy Leif Sparby also investigated. € A 39-year-old Crawfordville victim reported that she was receiving multiple obscene and harassing telephone calls. The victim received 11 calls late in the evening. Contact was made with Verizon Wireless in an attempt to determine the identity of the caller. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Riversprings Middle School Assistant Principal Michelle Baggett reported a student in possession of a homemade electric device. The device was capable of shocking individuals. Sgt. Ray Johnson confronted the 13-year-old student and con“ scated the device. Sgt. Johnsons investigation continues and a determination of punishment for the student is still to be determined. € A 29-year-old Sopchoppy victim reported receiving obscene and harassing telephone calls at her place of employment. The calls have been occurring on a regular basis. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. NOVEMBER 16 € Wanda Lynn of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Coins and currency was removed from the home and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. € Tonya Montague of Crawfordville reported the theft of two pieces of jewelry from her home. The property is valued at $2,400 and was recovered from an area pawn shop. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. NOVEMBER 17 € Daniel Long of Sopchoppy reported a fraud. Money was removed from the victims bank account. The victim noticed 104 fraudulent transactions worth approximately $6,000. The transactions took place in Europe and Asia. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € Jessica Slusher of Crawfordville reported an animal incident. Slusher was walking out of Wal-Mart when she observed an ill cat in the back of a truck. The cat was very malnourished. The cage that contained the cage did not contain water or food. Contact was made with the vehicle owner who reported that she took several feral cats to the animal shelter and thought the kitten was already deceased. Wakulla Animal Control took possession of the kitten to be euthanized. The truck owner was planning to bury the kitten. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € Benjamin D. Millership of Crawfordville was involved in a traf“ c stop after Sgt. Jeremy Johnston allegedly observed him driving a vehicle with no working tail lights. The driver was unable to produce a valid driver license due to it being suspended. Sgt. Johnston arrested the driver for driving while license is suspended or revoked. The vehicle was towed due to not having proper registration and no proof of insurance. € Luciana Ward of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash. The victim reported that she was parked at Hudson Park when someone struck her vehicle and left the scene. The vehicle appeared to have been backed into by another motorist on the back left portion of the vehicle. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. NOVEMBER 18 € George D. Mathers of Crawfordville was pulling into the parking lot of Dux Discount Liquors drive through when the left front of the vehicle hit the side of the building. The damage to the building was estimated at $5,000 and the damage to the vehicle was estimated at $500. Sgt. Andy Curles investigated. € Leo Spears, park manager for the City of Sopchoppy, reported a criminal mischief to the mens room at City Park. An oval mirror was broken in the mens room. Damage was estimated at $20. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. € Andria Baird of Crawfordville reported the theft of her wallet from a fast food restaurant. The wallet and contents are valued at $40. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € Raymonde R. Bergholz of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of fishing equipment, a camera and comforter from her storage area near her home. The property was valued at $300 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € Robert Amodeo of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A vehicle was broken into and a “ rearm was stolen. Two vehicles had tires that were flattened. The “ rearm is valued at $250 and a suspect has been identified. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € Michael Bradley of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim heard a vehicle strike an object outside his home. The crash knocked the victims mailbox and post to the ground. Damage was estimated at $200. Reserve Deputy Roy Gunnarsson investigated. NOVEMBER 19 € Dorothy Hall of Crawfordville reported the theft of $5,500 worth of jewelry from her home. Two suspects have been developed during the investigation. Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. € Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a vehicle without a tag and conducted a traffic stop. Larry Steven Mosley, 53, of Panacea was the driver and he failed to produce a valid driver license. Mosley was arrested for knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license is suspended or revoked. Reserve Deputy David Pienta also investigated. € Tamara Ingram of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief as a 14-year-old was observed shooting a BB gun at her home. The home suffered damage to the siding. The juvenile was issued a notice to appear in court for criminal mischief and use of a BB gun by a minor under age 16. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € A criminal mischief was reported at Wildwood Country Club after two golfers crashed a Wildwood golf cart into a tree on the 17th hole. Witnesses observed the suspects ” ee the scene and jump into a vehicle at the club. Suspects have been identi“ ed. Damage to the golf cart was estimated at $500. Deputy Mike Zimba and Reserve Deputy David Pienta investigated. NOVEMBER 20 € Wendell A. Harrell of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash involving a deer on Woodville Highway just north of Wakulla Station. There were no injuries or road obstruction. The vehicle was towed from the scene. Deputy Mike Zimba and Reserve Deputy David Pienta investigated. € Hollie Brantley of St. Marks reported a possible criminal mischief at her home. A privacy fence was damaged during the early morning hours. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € Scott Joyner of the Wakulla County Public Library reported the theft of a wireless internet card. Technical support staff noted that the wireless card was missing from one of the library computers. A 15-year-old suspect was identified and a trespass warning was issued for the juvenile. The card is valued at $20. Deputy Mike Zimba and Reserve Deputy David Pienta investigated. € Helen Posey and Beatrice Motsinger, both of Crawfordville, reported the theft of jewelry from their home. The stolen property is valued at $4,000. A suspect has been identified. Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. € Aaron Wiggins of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his vehicle. The victim was at a convenience store when a juvenile acquaintance approached his vehicle and punched it. The vehicle suffered a dent in the fender. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated the incident and turned the case over to Wakulla High School SRO Deputy Scott Rojas. € Sandra Smith-Herrin of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victim left the vehicle at a friends home for safe keeping. When she returned to retrieve the vehicle she observed dent damage. Damage was estimated at $500. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € Shawn Yorks of Crawfordville and Hardees re-ported a grand theft of money. A deposit was short of the proper amount of money. The case investigation continues. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 721 calls for service during the past week including 11 residential and commercial alarms; 64 citizen contacts; 13 disturbances; 11 abandoned E-911 calls; 12 regular E-911 calls; 33 investigations; 10 loud music/noise complaints; 44 medical emergencies; 130 residential and commercial security checks; 16 special details; 31 subpoena services; 13 suspicious vehicles; 10 traf“ c crashes; 11 traf“ c enforcements; 21 traffic stops; 10 reckless vehicles; 12 wanted people; and 18 watch orders.Special to The NewsTwo Wakulla County residential homes were destroyed following house “ res during the early morning hours of Wednesday, Nov. 21, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. At 12:37 a.m., Celeste Sutherland reported a house “ re at 1634 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road in Crawfordville. Deputy Gibby Gibson responded to the blaze and observed heavy smoke coming from the home and siding falling to the ground. The “ re originated in the kitchen of the home and the single occupant of the home, Sutherland, was able to get outside safely. Wakulla “ re“ ghters were able to put out the blaze, but the blaze destroyed the majority of the home. The victim told investigators that she was cooking with grease in the kitchen and brie” y left the room. When she returned to the kitchen she observed the entire kitchen on “ re. Some bedrooms in the home survived the blaze. A second occupant of the home was in Tallahassee at the time of the incident. There were no injuries and the American Red Cross was noti“ ed of the situation to provide assistance to the victims. Smoke and “ re damage was estimated at $150,000. The “ re was ruled an accident. At 1:10 a.m., Russell M. Lawler of Ochlockonee Bay reported a structure “ re at 11 Joe Drive. The residents of the home were able to escape the “ re with no injuries but the residence was fully engulfed when Deputy Ward Kromer arrived. Wakulla Fire“ ghters were on scene attempting to put out the “ re when Deputy Kromer arrived. The residence was a total loss as a result of the “ re and a 2004 GMC truck parked under the home on stilts was also destroyed. A 2012 Chevrolet truck and a vessel in the yard received heat damage. Lawler, his wife and two children escaped the home. The “ re is believed to have been caused by an accidental overload in the breaker box. The State Fire Marshal is investigating. The “ re damage to the home and vehicles is expected to exceed $100,000. The American Red Cross was contacted to assist the family. Fires destroy two Wakulla homesICE inspection completed successfullySpecial to The NewsInspectors representing the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency visited the Wakulla County Jail from Wednesday, Nov. 14 to Friday, Nov. 16 to conduct the annual ICE inspection. The inspection is a requirement to allow the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce to house federal ICE detainees in the jail. In exchange for the bed space, ICE provides Wakulla County with approximately $75 per day per detainee for bed rental. The ICE agreement has brought in millions of federal dollars to the Wakulla County budget over the years. The inspection team reviewed 38 standards which included more than 800 components including the areas of security, safety, medical and administration. ICE inspects the entire jail even though the federal detainees occupy only one section of the facility. Wakulla County houses between 100 and 105 male ICE detainees on average and no areas of concern were established by the inspectors. The jail bed revenue raised $3.2 million in “ scal year 2010-11 and raised $2.8 million in 2011-12. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce will host a Personal Protection and Firearms Safety Course on Saturday, Dec. 15 from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the WCSO Range in Otter Creek, near Sopchoppy. The program is $65 for non-range members and $55 for range members and satis“ es the requirement for a conceal carry permit. For more information or to register, call the Range at 745-7290 or Lt. Fred Nichols at 251-1676.Concealed weapon class will be o ered Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 blessedare those whomourn 2012 Service of RemembranceSunday, December 2nd at 4:00pm Hudson Park21 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville Please call Pam at 850-926-9308 for more information. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA The Wakulla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s v i s i t u s o n l i n e For local news and photos visit us online w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 – Page 15A ADOPT A FAMILY by Dec. 7 Ask your friends, neighbors, co-workers or civic group to adopt a family with you. You tell us the size family /families you would like to adopt and we will give you their wish. Most families are asking for the VERY BASIC NEEDS of living such as blankets, towels, etc. The children may also ask for a special toy. DONATE FUNDS by Dec. 15 Donate funds so that we may do the shopping and provide the NEEDS that may not have been provided.VOLUNTEER Recruit others, assist in collecting needed items, funds, shopping, volunteers needed at the Community Center or helping hands. Weekend hours are available.~ DROP OFF LOCATIONS ~CHECKS CAN BE MAILED TO Wakulla County Coalition for Youth Post Of“ce Box 1688 Crawfordville, Florida 32326 Please make checks payable to Wakulla County Coalition for YouthWe expect the families needing assistance to be high this year. We need your Caring Hands and Hearts more than Ever Before to reach out and HELP OUR COMMUNITY! 200 FAMILIES ARE IN NEED For more information please call 850-926-3526BE A SANTA ... BE AN ELF ... BE AN ANGEL Operation Santa 2012~ Ways to Help ~Coordinated by The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth WE NEED YOUR HELP!So that NO CHILD IS HUNGRY or EMPTY HANDED this HOLIDAY SEASON! • Clean gently worn or new clothes of all sizes • Toys • Small Electronics • Laundry soap • Games • Books • Puzzles • Household cleaning products • Canned goods and non perishables ( please check expiration dates ) • Baby blankets • Comforters • Warm coats • Linens • Furniture ( Please call for instructions on where to deliver ) • Pictures • Kitchenware • SocksWe welcome youth groups, civic organizations, churches, neighborhoods and individuals Our local families are requesting items such as:DONATIONS of GENTLY USED CLOTHING & TOYS by December 3 Need Elementary, Middle, and High School Youth Sizes WAKULLA COUNTY COMMUNITY CENTER 318 Shadeville Rd. Crawfordville Corner of Trice Lane & Hwy 61 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For New and Gently Used Items DOLLAR GENERAL EAST IVAN ROAD THE WAKULLA NEWS 3119 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville 9 a.m. 5 p.m. WAL-MARTSelect an ornament from the Wal-Mart Christmas tree that will name the wish of a child, buy the item and drop it in the Operation Santa bin at customer service. This advertisement sponsored in part by

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The thinning leaves of autumn unveil and expose many of the trees in Wakulla County which have been concealed by their green cloak during the warmer months. Oaks, both deciduous and evergreen, may reveal a collection of knotty, hard tumor-like growths on twigs, branches and limbs. These rounded growths offer a stark contrast to the straight thin twigs and branches which shoot off at angles forming a porous maze for supporting leaves. The bulbous lumps may be few and scattered or come in heavy concentrations. To the uninitiated these arboreal blisters may appear to be retained acorns. If in thick stands of trees, it can be dif“ cult to tell which tree species is producing these galls. The culprit causing these eruptions is the gall wasp, Callirhytis. Locally, the two tiny members of this insect family use oaks as part of their reproductive process. The life cycle of these wasps is a bit of a mystery as they have not been studied extensively. The process begins when the female wasps emerge from twig galls in late spring to early summer. These females quickly lay eggs on the veins on the undersides of leaves. Small vein galls appear within a few weeks in early summer with male and female wasps quickly emerging from the vein galls. Mated females then oviposits eggs in young oak twigs. Twig galls appear in the spring of the following year. Two or more years are required for the immature gall wasps to complete development in the twig galls. The galls provide shelter, protection, and food for the immature wasps. Inside a gall, the larvae are surrounded by tissues rich in nutrients. As the larvae reach maturity small spines or horns become evident on the gall. An adult wasp emerges from each horn. These wasps are barely visible at 2 millimeters in length which is about the thickness of a half-dollar coin. The wasps petite size notwithstanding, the individual galls can be almost a foot in length. The gall formation is a result of bark cell hypertrophy (over-growth) and hyperplasia (cell proliferation) after the eggs are laid. Individual trees or small groups of trees usually experience a slight to moderate infestation of these wasp galls, depending on the annual environmental factors. However, severe gall wasp infestations have been observed in several north and central Florida counties, including Wakulla County. Extremely high numbers of twig galls have occurred on thousands of laurel oaks in these locations. These infestations have affected young to mature trees in woodlands and residential areas. The overabundance of twig galls has resulted in notable levels of branch dieback, crown thinning, and in rare cases, tree mortality. Young galls are slight, tumor-like swellings of trees periderm tissue, the innermost living area of the bark. Bark color of young galls is a greenishbrown and bark surfaces are smooth except for protruding lenticels which act as pores for the tree. Mature twig galls persist as distinct bulges or form massive compound galls more than two inched in diameter and may cover a majority of branches. Older galls become very woody and discolored. The horns which are used for new wasp to emerge will have deteriorated and be missing by this time. To learn more about Gall Wasp in Wakulla County, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u” .edu/Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” edu or at (850) 926-3931. Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comLaurel oaks are prone to infestations by gall wasps Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison For more information Call 210-8831 or 528-1527 The News Wakulla s s CENTENNIALBANK Member FDICwww.my100bank.comA Home BancShares Company Kids… Come Visit Santa 4 p.m. 8 p.m. “Boat On Trailer Parade” “Panacea Market Place” 2pm 8pmNEXT TO BIG TOP SUPERMARKETLocal Arts & Crafts Vendors Saturday, Dec. 1 st The 8th Annual t t s t s t t s t st t s t Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Free Admission from 2-6 p.m.This Advertisement Sponsored by Some things get better with age. Capital Health Plan is one of them. Plan to attend a SEMINAR to LEARN MORE about CHP Advantage Plus (HMO) and CHP Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-8708943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Paid Endorsement. Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 to RSVP or for more information. (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/medicare Seminars will be held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center 1491 Governors Square Blvd.H5938_DP 121 File & Use 09242011 Anna Johnson says.... Join me and become a member of a Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO) Plan.Ž SM Thursday, November 29 Friday, November 30 Wednesday, December 5 Thursday, December 6 PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSGalls visible in the branches of a tree, above. A closer look at a gall wasp nest, below.

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netHead coach Scott Klees was obviously disappointed about the loss in the playoffs to Godby on Friday night, and said as much. But, a few days after the game, Klees admitted he couldnt bring himself to watch the game “ lm. I probably never will,Ž he said. He heard from the other coaches who did watch the “ lm that it con“ rmed that fumble into and through the end zone at the start of the second quarter appeared to be a blown call by the referees. The Wakulla runner crossed the goal line with the ball before his own knee jarred it loose and it rolled through the back of the end zone. If it had been called a touchdown, Wakulla would have been up 14-6, and maybe the game would have been different. As it was, it was called a touchback and Godby got the ball at the 20. Klees doesnt make excuses for the loss. Youve got to play well all the way through the playoffs … and youve got to get some breaks.Ž As it was, Wakulla had a lot of injuries … including two players on the field getting over 103-degree fevers. But Wakulla was undone by its own mistakes. Five times we were in the red zone and came away with just one touchdown,Ž he said. There were penalties … three penalties that erased three big runs. But Klees also credited Godbys play. They put nine men in the box and dared us to throw,Ž he said. Most of those passes fell incomplete. There was a heartbreaking interception at the goal line. They deserved to win,Ž Klees said. We didnt play well enough to win.Ž Still, amidst the disappointment, Klees noted that just a few years ago, when this senior class was starting, the goal was to make the playoffs. Nowadays, he said, the football program has progressed to the point where Everybody is disappointed that we didnt make the championship.Ž Klees thanked those seniors for their play and their grace. Of the high expectations of excellence in the program, he said, A lot of that is due to this senior class.Ž Klees also thanked the fans and his assistant coaches, as well as school administration for support. They make my job very pleasant,Ž he said. Klees also thanked the churches that fed the team before the games. GAME RECAP The stands were packed on a chilly night at J.D. Jones stadium, The War Eagle defense held Godby on its first series and, after a punt, running back Dequon Simmons scampered 40 yards to set up a run by quarterback Caleb Stephens two plays later for an 11-yard touchdown. The extra point was good. Later in the “ rst quarter, a Wakulla fumble deep in their own territory gave Godby good “ eld position and they scored a touchdown on the next play. The extra point was blocked, however, and Wakulla was still up, 7-6 with 1:33 remaining in the period. The War Eagles mounted a drive down to the Cougar goal line, but there was a controversial call in which referees ruled the ball was fumbled through the end zone. Some sideline observers believed it should have been a touchdown for Wakulla. Ruled a touchback, Godby took over on its own 20. They drove down the “ eld to the Wakulla 25, attempted a “ eld goal but it was blocked. Wakulla was stymied on its next offensive series and punted. Godby took over at its 45. Facing a fourth down and 1 at the War Eagle 20, the Cougars went for it and scoared a touchdown. Twopoint conversion was good, putting Godby up 14-7. With under 2 minutes, Wakulla drove down the “ eld, but pass was intercepted at the goal line. Godby mounted an efficient 2-minute offense and drove down the “ eld, but the half ended without a score. During the second half, Mikal Cromartie intercepted a Cougar pass to stop a threat, and the special teams blocked another “ eld goal attempt by Godby. A punt was partially blocked by Dequon Simmons to give Wakulla the ball at mid“ eld. That drive died when the War Eagles, facing a fourth and 1, had a pass fall incomplete. With 2:32 remaining, Godby got a couple of “ rst downs to run out the clock … and end Wakullas undefeated season. Wakulla had beat Godby just four weeks earlier to win the district crown, and had won the last three meetings of the teams until Friday night.Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012sports news and team views SportsWar Eagles lose to GodbyWakullas perfect season comes to end with 14-7 loss in playo s WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN CONNOR HARRISON/WAKULLASPORTS.COM Players, coaches, band members and students, above, take the “ eld one more time to sing the school song. Brandon Nichols, left, runs behind the block of Dequon Simmons. Wakulla fans, below packed the stands for Friday nights playoff game. More photos online at thewakullanews.com Gray and Smith run at the Footlocker South Regional Page 2B Lady War Eagles fall to Godby, 53-21 Page 2B War Eagle wrestlers win at Lincoln Duals Page 4B Expert physicians.Quality obstetrical & gynecological care. 2770 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 110, Tallahassee, FL 32308 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comOf“ce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. … 5 p.m. Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. Next-day appointments available. Dr. Stephanie Cruz Lee is an OB/GYN who is ”uent in both English and Spanish. She is accepting new patients. In addition to delivering babies, Dr. Lees areas of clinical interests are abnormal menstrual bleeding, minimally invasive gynecological surgery, infertility and menopausal hormone therapy. Dr. Lee received her medical degree from the Florida State University College of Medicine. She completed her residency at the University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville.To schedule an appointment with Dr. Lee, call (850) 877-5589 Capital Regional Medical Center Welcomes Dr. Stephanie Cruz Lee Specializing in Gynecology & Obstetrics For that Special & Unique Gift:Lots of educational gifts & toys for children & adults. We have a great selection of natural history Books for all ages, books by Jack and Anne Rudloe, beautiful jewelry, home decor, prints, cards, ornaments. We have added many items to our collection. Great Stocking St uffers Too! Open: Mon. Fri. 9am 5pm www.gulfspecimen.org Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Aquarium Your generous support helps us to continue our mission to educate and inspire. S S Visit the Gift Shopat Open 7 Days Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator

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Special to The NewsUrban Disturbance combines the fundamentals of running with the thrill and challenge of an obstacle course. Social Design Group, in partnership with Operation One Voice, will host Tallahassees second annual urban obstacle event. The Urban Disturbance obstacle race and festival will begin at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 8, at Kleman Plaza in downtown Tallahassee. Interested racers can check out the course and register online at www. theUrbanDisturbance. com. The five mile course incorporates 15 obstacles that racers must jump over, crawl under, weave around, and climb through, all while at race-pace. The course is designed to incorporate and showcase a number of the revitalization projects across Tallahassee and will take runners through areas such as All Saints, Downtown and Gaines Street. Race highlights include hurdling barricades in the streets, army crawling along the back side of All Saints Hop Yard and heroically leaping over the “ rewall. It is designed for provide an entertaining event for participants at all levels of “ tness. Volunteers will be stationed along the route to provide assistance to racers as necessary. To accompany the race, a festival Victory ParkŽ will be open to all throughout the race and until 2 p.m. at Kleman Plaza. Victory Park is for racers and spectators alike and will feature live entertainment, interactive “ tness zones and concessions, as well as a hospitality tent. Some volunteer positions for the race include Packet Pickup Host, Course Marshal, Obstacle Crew, Hydration Station Crew, Finisher Medal Distributor, Athlete Hospitality Crew, Award Ceremony Assistant and others. Cost is $75 Nov. 20 through Dec. 3. Registration closes at 11:59 p.m. on 12/3. Come and join us as a runner, volunteer or spectator. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach WHS cross country runners Raychel Gray and Aaron Smith closed out the 2012 cross country season by traveling to Charlotte, N.C., to compete in the prestigious Footlocker South Regional Meet on Saturday, Nov. 24. This meet is a quali“ er for the National Finals in California and attracts almost all of the top runners from all over the southern U.S. For the last several years, Coach Chris Sumner, currently the girls coach at Leon High School, has organized the trip for runners from the Big Bend area. It provides one “ nal chance for the cross country runners to compete in a high school or middle school event and run against the “ nest runners in the southeast. Gray, competing in the senior girls race, was looking for one last chance to reach a goal she had set for her senior season, but had not quite accomplished. She had an excellent senior season and had improved her personal record (PR) to 21:40, establishing herself as the solid No. 2 runner on the WHS team, but her goals for the season included running a State Elite time of 21:30 or faster. Until Saturday, that goal had eluded her. However, she took full advantage of her “ nal opportunity, the excellent course and “ erce competition at the Footlocker Meet and turned in her best performance to date, setting a new PR of 21:26 which eclipsed the State Elite Standard. Mission accomplished! Smith also made the trip and ran a very solid race, “ nishing in the time of 17:46. Although he didnt set a new PR, Smith still ran an excellent race and extended his string of consecutive sub-18:00 minute performances on cross country courses to “ ve races. This race topped off an excellent season for the junior runner, one that saw him lower his PR from last year by right at 3 minutes over the 5K distance, which at the level he was running, is a tremendous improvement. Both runners were very excited about the opportunity to travel to the race and expressed gratitude to Coach Sumner for organizing the trip. The annual Turkey Trot races (5K,10K and15K) held in Southwood in Tallahassee have become something of an annual happening,Ž with over 6,000 runners gathering on Thanksgiving morning to burn a few calories before retiring to their homes for the traditional Thanksgiving meal. Not only do a lot of people compete, but the races also attract most of the top runners from this area, looking to post fast times on the relatively ” at and fast courses. This year the 10K was also a Gulf Winds Track Club Grand Prix event, thereby guaranteeing a top notch “ eld. The 2012 WHS graduate and former high school cross country and track star, Stanley Linton, was on the starting line of this years 10K, ready to mix it up with the areas best, just 10 days after running his “ rst marathon in Pensacola. In that debut race he “ nished 4th overall in 2:55.50, an excellent time for his “ rst try at the 26.2 mile distance. In the Turkey Trot, Linton and three time Canadian Olympian Kevin Sullivan, took it out hard and opened an early lead on the rest of the “ eld, with Linton running just off Sullivans shoulder. At approximately three miles, Sullivan was forced to drop out with an injury, leaving Linton alone in front of the pursing pack of runners. He never looked back and continued to build on the lead, “ nishing in “ rst place in 33:15, almost two minutes ahead of the second place “ nisher. There were 775 “ nishers in the 10K race. Another former War Eagle runner and current FSU runner, Cora Atkinson, also ran the 10K and “ nished as the 8th woman overall in the excellent time of 43:43, “ nishing “ rst in her age group. From examining the results, it also appears that the following Wakulla residents won their respective age groups: Duane Evans (45-49), 19:10 in the 5K and former WHS cross country coach and really tough old guyŽ Ron Christen (65-69) 47:45 in the 10K. Current and former WHS runners known to “ nish one of the three races included: Travis Parks (10K), Mitchell Atkinson (15K), Nathan Green (5K), David Sloan (10K), Sydney Nutting (5K) and Josh Dismuke (5K). WHS runners, parents and coaches also manned a water station and the turn around on the 15K course and everyones help was sincerely appreciated.RUNNINGGray and Smith run at the Footlocker South RegionalWakulla’s Stanley Linton wins Turkey TrotUrban Disturbance obstacle race set for Dec. 8 in Tallahassee WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDENLady War Eagle Janay Gavin drives to the goal against the Lady Cougars. Lady War Eagle Maya Simmons goes to the free throw line after being fouled.BASKETBALLLady War Eagles fall to Godby, 53-21By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Lady Cougars of Godby High School had superior ball-handling skills, but the Wakulla Lady War Eagles played hard in a disappointing 53-21 loss at home on Monday, Nov. 26. Godby opened the game with an 8-point run in the “ rst period before Ashley Carr put up the “ rst points for the Lady War Eagles, a 3-point shot. Janay Gavin scored and, at the end of the “ rst period, the Lady War Eagles trailed 15-7. At halftime, the score was 30-13, with Godby leading. At the start of the fourth quarter, Godbys lead was 46-16. JV GIRLS: The junior varsity girls game was a lot closer, with the Lady War Eagles JV falling 27-24. With the “ nal minutes ticking down, Godby had a 1 point lead, 25-24, and the Lady War Eagles struggled to get a basket and pull out the game … but couldnt.Staff ReportThe War Eagles boys basketball team lost their season opener in overtime to Maclay, 60-57. Top scorers for Wakulla were Zach Nordlot with 22 points, Clay Greene with 10, and Caleb Fell with 6. The game was tied at 20 at half, and then knotted at 47 at the end of regulation. In the overtime period, Maclay added 13 points while the War Eagles scored 10.Boys lose season opener in overtime (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Nov. 29  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Nov. 30  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Dec. 1  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Dec. 2  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Dec. 3  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Dec. 4  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant. Wednesday, Dec. 5  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Dec. 6  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsFriday, Nov. 30  AZIZA will perform music from the Middle East and they are bringing along a belly dancer at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Aziza is a multi-talented, Tallahassee based group, featuring music from Egypt, Turkey, Lebanon and other Middle Eastern regions. This group will bring at least six musicians and they will perform on violin, drums, and accordion, along with their vocalist who will be singing in native Arabic, Turkish, and perhaps other languages. Tickets are $10. For reservations, contact poshjava@gmail.com or phone: (850) 962-1010. Saturday, Dec. 1  BOOK SALE EXTRAVAGANZA FUNDRAISER will be held at the library from 9 a.m. to noon. There are thousands of books, audio, video and more. Proceeds bene t children’s programs at the library.  NICK ANNIS will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Annis has won multiple songwriting awards across the U.S. and his storytelling and humor is a real treat to witness. Annis, who kind of sounds like James Taylor, writes thoughtprovoking songs that contain a touch of humor, for effect. He can be heard at nickannis.com. For reservations, contact poshjava@gmail.com or phone: (850) 962-1010. Seats are $10. Baked goods, coffee, tea and drinks will be available for purchase. Byob. Posh is located on the corner of Rose Street and Winthrop Avenue in downtown Sopchoppy. Sunday, Dec. 2  SERVICE OF REMEMBRANCE will be held by Big Bend Hospice at 4 p.m. at Hudson Park. Big Bend Hospice’s Service of Remembrance is a non-denominational service that brings together those in the community to honor the memories of loved ones at this very special time of year. Everyone who attends shares a common purpose – to honor and to remember a loved one who has died, to be surrounded by others who are on a similar journey and to connect with loved ones. For additional information, contact Pam Mezzina at (850) 878-5310, ext. 799.  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE presentation series will feature “Owls and Other Night Birds at St. Marks” with Don Morrow of The Trust for Public Lands at 2 p.m. He will tell about birds of the night and share their habits, how to identify them and where you are likely to nd them. Linger afterward for a short twilight eld trip. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Nature’s Classroom, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 925-6121 for more information. Monday, Dec. 3  ANNUAL HOLIDAY MEETING AND DINNER will be held by NAMI WAkulla at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Woman’s Club, There will be a discussion with Daina Gold, and her life with Bipolar Disorder. All are invited to attend. Upcoming EventsFriday, Dec. 7  HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held at 6 p.m. at the Crawfordville Woman’s Club. This is a preview party for the Saturday event. For $10 enjoy wine and hors d’oeuvres while shopping. The general public day is Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and is free. For more information contact Nita Burke at 294-6482 or Heather Robison at 544-5418. Saturday, Dec. 8  HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Crawfordville Woman’s Club. There will be arts and craft vendors. For more information contact Nita Burke at 294-6482 or Heather Robison at 544-5418.  SOPCHOPPY OPRY CLASSIC COUNTRY CHRISTMAS SHOW will feature the Purvis Brothers at 7 p.m. in historic Sopchoppy High Auditorium. Mike, Frank and Wendall Purvis will be accompanied by ddle player Wayne Martin, steel guitarist Larry Bullock, keyboardist Myron Spainhour and percussionsit Ronnie Weeks. Call 962-3711 for ticket information. Sunday, Dec. 9  THE MESSIAH will be performed by the Tallahassee Florida Stake of The Church of Jesus at 7 p.m. at Chiles High School in Tallahassee. Messiah features a choir and orchestra comprised of members of the community. Tickets are free, but limited. They can be ordered online at www. tallahasseemessiah.com. Wednesday, Dec. 12  CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for Front Porch Creations Florist will be held from 11:30 a.m. at their new location, 2543 Crawfordville Highway, Suite 4, Crawfordville. Friday, Dec. 14  CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for Smokin Vapor Wakulla will be held at 11:30 a.m. at 1626 D Crawfordville Highway. Saturday, Dec. 15  HOLIDAY SILENT AUCTION AND BOOK SIGNING will be held by the Florida Wild Mammal Association and Goose Creek Wildlife Sanctuary from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Tallahassee Elks Lodge located at 276 N. Magnolia Drive. Nature writer and photographer John B. Spohrer, Jr. will sign copies of his new book, “The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay,” with part of the proceeds going to Goosecreek and FWMA. There will also be a cash bar and raf e. For additional information, go to www.wakullawildlife.org or www. goosecreekwildlifesanctuary.org. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 – Page 3B Government Meetings Thursday, Nov. 29  WAKULLA COUNTY INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY will hold a public meeting at 11 a.m. in the BOCC Administration Conference Room. Monday, Dec. 3  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.Tuesday, Dec. 4  RESTORE ACT ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold its rst public meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, Dec. 6  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a special meeting at 9 a.m. in the commission chambers for a 2012 commissioner educational orientation. BY SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorWinter Fling Fundraiser this Saturday! Our annual December Book Extravaganza is being expanded into what were calling a Winter Fling to bene“ t the Friends of the Library this Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon. In addition to the thousands of books, audio and video available for you to browse, were also being joined by the Iris Garden Club and the Wakulla County Historical Society who will have great holiday gifts for you to buy. In addition to “ nding some great bargains for the holidays, you can help support three great Wakulla County community organizations. This is our biggest Extravaganza of the year so we expect a big crowd so get here early for all the best items. Hope to see you there! Computer Classes for the Rest of the Year We still have some great free computer classes on tap for the rest of the year including: Digital Photography: Camera Operation & Photo Organization on Thursday, Nov. 29 at 12:30 p.m. In December were offering Computer Basics: Copy & Paste on Dec. 4 at 12:30 p.m., Digital Photography: Edit Your Photos on Dec. 6 at 12:30 p.m., and Computer Basics: Sur“ ng the Internet on Dec. 12 at 12:30 p.m. While all these great classes are free they all require early registration so sign up today by calling us at 926-7415. More awesome classes will be offered next year so keep an eye on us and if you have any particular classes youd like to see offered please contact us. E-Book Update We are extremely happy to tell everyone that so far this month we are approaching 90 e-book checkouts. Its very encouraging to us that this service is proving to be popular from the very beginning and we assure you that we will continue to build our e-book collection so that the greatest number of people can take advantage of this service. All you need is a library card with us to use this service and enjoy an e-book on your Kindle, Nook, iPad, PC or many other devices. So please come by and sign up today! Again if you have any questions on how to check out e-books to your device please come by and well assist you. We can also help you over the phone but its much easier if the device is in front of us. Library News... Aziza at 8 p.m. at Posh Java in Sopchoppy. Christmas in Panacea from 2 to 8 p.m. Parade starts at 6:30 p.m. Service of Remembrance by Big Bend Hospice at 4 p.m. at Hudson Park. NAMI Annual Holiday Meeting and Dinner at 6 p.m. at Crawfordville Woman’s Club. FridaySaturdaySundayMonday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Holiday Events Friday, Nov. 30  ANNUAL WINTER HOLIDAY FESTIVAL will be held at Medart Elementary School from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. All funds raised will go towards needed items for the school. There will be games, prizes, bingo, cake walk, in atable obstacle course, jousting, giant slides, go-cart racing, face painting, sno-cones and food. Come visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus. The school is located at 2558 Coastal Highway. For more information, call 962-4881. Saturday, Dec. 1  CHRISTMAS IN PANACEA will be held from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. There will be a Panacea Market Place with arts and craft vendors starting at 2 p.m. Entertainment will be from 4 to 8 p.m. The boat on trailer parade begins at 6:30 p.m. The tree lighting will take place following the parade. There will also be free refreshments and popcorns, as well as children activities, games, hay ride, face painting and a story teller. Children can also visit with Santa. For more information, call Michelle Crum at 210-8831 or Sherrie Miller at 528-1527. Saturday, Dec. 8  ANNUAL CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Sopchoppy. Santa will be there from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Enjoy relaxed shopping from more than 50 vendors of arts, crafts and food. There will be games and activities for the children, and Christmas music. For more information, contact Bill Lowrie at billlowrie@ embarqmail.com.

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views Sports Special to The NewsCoach Will Pafford and his War Eagle Wrestling Team started the 2012-2013 season with an all-out victory at the Lincoln Duals Saturday, Nov. 17th at Lincoln High School in Tallahassee. Wakulla began the dual against Fort Walton Beach and won (51-25). Next up for the War Eagles were the Lowndes County Vikings which Wakulla won (48-27), followed by wins over Chiles High School (42-36), Lincoln High (42-35), and the Seminoles of Florida High (70-12). The War Eagle varsity lineup at the tournament and their dual records are as follows: 106-Austin Runyan(4-1); 113-Zach Malik(5-0); 120-Dyjuan Carney(5-0); 126-Bill Morgan(5-0); 132-Kevon White(5-0); 138-Carl Atkinson(3-2); 145-Cody Davis(3-2); 152-Dillon Rathel(1-4); 160-Josh Strickland(2-3); 182-Drew Delong(5-0); 195-Nathan Tyre(3-1); 220-Keith Godden(2-3) and Hwt-Wesley Jones(2-3). The War Eagles will host their annual tournament this Saturday, Dec. 1, at Wakulla High. A special thanks to assistant coaches Freebeau Swindel and Shannon Smith and also our stat girls Rachel Woofter and Kurstin Douin.PHOTO BY WILLIAM STRICKLAND/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWRESTLING THE COOL DOWN LAP SWIMMING GYMNASTICSWar Eagles win at Lincoln DualsJoey Briggs signs swim scholarship with FloridaIGG team “ nishes in second place in state competitionWHS sports schedule:Swimmer Joey Briggs, who lives in Crawfordville but attends Rickards High School in Tallahassee, signed a swim scholarship to attend the University of Florida on Tuesday, Nov. 20. The signing was held at the Rickards High School Media Center. Because there is no swim program in Wakulla, Briggs transferred to the IB program at Rickards to continue swimming through high school. Joey Briggs Special to The NewsThe Level 3 International Gold Gymnastics (IGG) Competitive Team brought home a second place “ nish from the state competition in Deer“ eld Beach on Nov. 17-18. The competition was “ erce as 40 teams with over 400 gymnasts competed in four divisions and 25 age groups. Each of the nine IGG team members “ nished in the top 10 in their respective age groups. Level 3 team members are Caroline Barwick, Aubree Bushee, Riley Davis, Jewell Fondo, Hannah Francis, Annika Matlock, Hailey Quick, Makenna Schissler, and Lillie Steinle. The team is coached by Yasmin Belhaj. They “ nished out their season with three “ rst place “ nishes and two second place “ nishes.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBy ALAN ROSSThe 2012 Sprint Cup campaign was highlighted, certainly, by Brad Keselowskis consistent runs and “ ve wins, climaxed by his points swing at the penultimate race at Phoenix. But it is the car manufacturer Dodge that gets to laugh heartily at winning team owner Roger Penskes expense. Thats because Penskes No. 2 Miller Lite will be moving to Ford next season, a change announced at the beginning of the season. At the time, few “ gured that Dodge … even with the talented Keselowski behind the wheel … would claim the Cup title. Its somewhat reminiscent of last years championship scenario involving Darian Grubb, Tony Stewarts former crew chief. Grubb, canned by Stewart following the drivers championship run last fall, ultimately found perhaps a better situation with Denny Hamlin and Joe Gibbs Racing, taking his championship credentials with him and guiding his driver to a sixth-place overall “ nish (to Stewarts ninth). Keselowski displayed just the right blend of moxie, talent, and temperament to take the title. But “ ve-time champion Jimmie Johnson seemed to be everybodys pick heading into the “ nal two races of The Chase coming off his 2012 series-leading sixth win, at Texas. But Johnsons bubble burst out in the desert with an untimely date with the Turn Four wall, and while there was a brief run during the season “ nale at Homestead, the unforced error ended JJs sixth title quest. Another driver in his sayonara season, Matt Kenseth, leaves Roush Fenway Racing to take the former seat of Joey Logano at Joe Gibbs Racing. Kenseth took his second Daytona 500 last February and won at Talladega in the fall, collecting three victories total in 2012. Dale Earnhardt Jr. showed a consistency that had been absent in his overall Cup performance since the earlyto mid-2000s, even breaking into the win column at Michigan. But it was Earnhardts solid Top 10 array (20 Top 10s, for a 10.85 average “ nish) throughout the year that earned him a legitimate shot at the big prize in only his second Chase appearance in the last “ ve years. One of the biggest names in the sport fueled a pair of highlights. Jeff Gordon was the unlikeliest of post-race combatants in Phoenix, where he was momentarily devoured by Clint Bowyers pit crew following Gordons intentional he-crashedme-so-I-crashed-him-back takeout of Bowyer late in the race. On a much higher note, the four-time champion who notched his 86th and 87th career victories in 2012 produced the singlebest driving performance of the season, in the “ nal pre-Chase race at Richmond. Gordon hurtled like a rocket through the pack to nose out Kyle Busch for the “ nal spot in the 12-man Chase field, the performance of a man possessed. You had to see it to appreciate its power. 2013 anyone? It begins with Johnson. The 48 team is simply the most together out“ t on the track, and will likely emerge as the preseason favorite. As the sport now hibernates for winter, the eye already looks down the road: Just 13 weeks till Daytona! VETTEL CAPTURES THIRD STRAIGHT WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP: Surviving steady rain and an early spinout that dropped him to the rear of the field, Red Bull Racings Sebastian Vettel became the youngest driver in Formula One history to grab back-to-back-to-back world championships, joining legends Juan Manuel Fangio and Michael Schumacher as the sports only three-time consecutive world champions. In the drizzle and later downpour at Sao Paulo, Brazils Autoromo Juan Carlos Pace … the former Interlagos circuit … Fernando Alonso hoped to put enough distance between himself and Vettel to capture his third F1 crown, but the superb Ferrari driver could “ nish no higher than second, ending up three points behind Vettel in the “ nal standings. Vettel placed sixth in the Brazilian race. McLarens Jenson Button drove masterfully in the wet, most notably during an early stretch in which he stayed out on slicks, to take his third checkered flag of the 2012 season and 15th career grand prix win. Alan Ross is the author of Away from the Ball: The NFLs Off-the-Field Heroes.Ž E-mail him at alanross_sports@yahoo. com. Sportland 2012Keselowski crown, Gordon escapades top 2012 Cup highlights; Vettels 3rd world title THURSDAY, Nov. 26 € Boys basketball vs. Lincoln High School at WHS, 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. FRIDAY, Nov. 27 € Boys basketball vs. FAMU High School at WHS, 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. SATURDAY, Dec. 1 € Girls basketball vs. Madison High School at Madison 1:30 p.m. JV, 3:30 p.m. varsity. €Wrestling, Wakulla Duals at Wakulla with weigh-in at 9 a.m. and wrestling at 10 a.m. MONDAY, Dec. 3 € Girls basketball vs. Godby High School at Godby, 6 p.m. JV, 7:30 p.m. varsity. € Boys basketball vs. North Florida Christian at WHS, 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. The Wakulla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s v i s i t u s o n l i n e For local news and photos visit us online w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com“2-Night Free Vacation!”or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 – Page 5B F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A g a t o r s FLORIDA gators F L O R I D A g a t o r s FLORIDA gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102#4 Florida Bowl game TBD. ACC Championship #13 Florida State vs. Georgia Tech at Charlotte N.C. Saturday, Dec. 1 at 8 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. UF RUN OFFENSE VS. FSU RUN DEFENSE The picture is not going to be very rosy for Florida on this side of the ball. The Gators have been struggling for weeks to get any consistent rhythm established, and did not fare well against the mediocretoweak defenses of Missouri, LouisianaLafayette and Jacksonville State this month. Now comes Florida State, leading the nation in a number of defensive categories, with a unit that resembles SEC powerhouses LSU and South Carolina. Without the threat of a passing attack, defenses have been crowding the line of scrimmage and concentrating on sti” ing Floridas run game. FSU, which only gives up 70 yards a game, will likely employ the same strategy, making life dif“ cult for tailback Mike Gillislee. The Gators will bene“ t from the return of quarterback Jeff Driskel, but how much he plays and how effective he will be on a bum ankle wont be known until Saturday. EDGE: FLORIDA STATE UF PASS OFFENSE VS. FSU PASS DEFENSE Another mismatch since the Gators havent developed any semblance of a throwing game all season. Whether its Driskel or strong-armed Jacoby Brissett under center, there is little reason to believe the Gators will get much going through the air. Florida will also have to tangle with another terri“ c pair of passrushing defensive ends, after facing LSUs slew of talented ends plus South Carolinas Jadeveon Clowney and Georgias Jarvis Jones. FSUs pair of Cornelius Carradine and Bjoern Werner have combined for 20 sacks and even though tackles Xavier Nixon and Chaz Green should be healthy, it will be a tall order to protect either UF quarterback. The Gators need somebody to step up here and make some plays, with tight end Jordan Reed, the teams leading receiver, the likely candidate. EDGE: FLORIDA STATE FSU RUN OFFENSE VS. UF RUN DEFENSE The Seminoles offensive numbers are pretty healthy, but they basically have not played a strong defense all season. They will on Saturday against a Gator bunch that has really carried the torch for the team all season. The Seminoles were hurt when top runner Chris Thompson (687 yards in a little more than eight games) was lost for the season with a knee injury, but they still sport a quality one-two punch in Davonta Freeman (534 yards, seven touchdowns and a 7.0-yard per carry average) and James Wilder, Jr. (501 yards and nine touchdowns in just 86 carries). The Gators have been strong all season against the run, allowing just one 100-yard rusher all season (Georgias Todd Gurley). The Seminoles offensive line is relatively young, starting three sophomores, but averages 6-5, 319 pounds a man. Although UF had had great success with liberal substitution up front all season, this may be a day to go with the big dogs for most of the game, since there is nothing to hold back for next week. EDGE: FLORIDA FSU PASS OFFENSE VS. UF PASS DEFENSE Forget the ” uky 76-yard catch-andrun on the “ rst play last week against Jacksonville State, that was an aberration … the fact is, the Gator secondary has yielded scant long pass plays all season, a reason they lead the nation in pass ef“ ciency defense. While the pressure on the quarterback has been sporadic, the coverage has been top-notch. Quarterback EJ Manuel is completing 68.8 percent of his throws, for 2,785 yards with 21 touchdowns against just six interceptions. Six different players have caught at least 20 passes and eight different players have at least one touchdown catch. The key is making Manuel uncomfortable in the pocket and not letting him hurt the defense with his legs. It will be another huge challenge for the Gator secondary, but so far the back end has been up to the task. SLIGHT EDGE: FLORIDA SPECIAL TEAMS Few teams match up with Florida in this phase of the game, but Florida State comes close. Both UF kicker Caleb Sturgis (20 of 24 “ eld goals) and FSUs Dustin Hopkins (22 of 26) are “ nalists for the Lou Groza Award, and both are long-range specialists, each connecting on all three of their attempts from beyond 50 yards. The Gators hold a big edge at punter, with Ray Guy Award “ nalist Kyle Christy (46.3-yard average with 25 boots inside the 20 and two dozen longer than 50 yards) decidedly more advanced than Seminole freshman Cason Beatty (a 37.6-yard average). The Seminoles return game has been better, as Rashad Greene and Tyler Hunter have returned three punts for touchdowns and Lamarcus Joyner turned in a critical 90-yard kickoff return in the win over Clemson. EDGE: FLORIDA MARTYS PREDICTION: Florida 13, Florida State 10Breakin’ It Down Florida vs Florida State Hit, fumble sinks FSU against GatorsBy Tim LinafeltEven after the fateful one-two punch had been delivered, there still remained 11:01 in the game. Plenty of time for Florida State to bounce back once again, to answer Floridas haymaker and once more swing momentum in a game where momentum bounced back and forth like a rubber ball. The damage, though, had been done. One moment, Florida State led by a touchdown early in the fourth quarter, having survived a disastrous “ rst-half to wrestle control from the Gators and inch toward a third straight victory over its arch-rival. A moment later, senior quarterback EJ Manuel was on the ground, and the ball was loose, recovered by Florida. And a moment after that, UF running back Mike Gillislee ripped off a 37-yard touchdown run, part of 24 consecutive fourth-quarter points in a 37-26 win for Florida. That game was all momentum,Ž FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. In the third quarter, we changed it and they got momentum back in the fourth quarter and we still had opportunities.Ž On the heels of a 17-point third quarter, Florida State led, 20-16, early in the fourth quarter and was driving to extend the lead when Manuel took off on a scramble. He didnt notice Florida linebacker Antonio Morrison speeding toward him … didnt see him at all until the two collided, apparently helmet-to-helmet. The quarterback and the ball both fell to the ground. Floridas Dominique Easley recovered the fumble … Manuels fourth turnover of the day … and Manuel stayed down. I thought they had the outside routes out wide covered, so I just tried to “ nd a lane and get up“ eld and get some positive yards,Ž Manuel said after the game. Got hit in the head, so just kind of knocked the wind out of me.Ž A small chant of EJ! EJ!Ž echoed throughout Doak Campbell Stadium before Manuel was helped to his feet and walked off the “ eld. Me and (Devonta) Freeman, we prayed,Ž FSU running back James Wilder Jr. said. We were hoping it was nothing serious. It was a hard hit. The ball did come out.Ž Fisher said that Manuel suffered from a stomach injury, but Manuel con“ rmed that he was also hit in the head. Trainers talked to Manuel about remaining out of the game, but he eventually was cleared to return. They did, but I wasnt trying to hear it.Ž After the game, Florida coach Will Muschamp praised Morrison, a reserve player thrust into action only because of an injury to starter Jelani Jenkins. Antonios a violent, physical football player,Ž Muschamp said. Hes a guy that knocks the ball off a lot of people.Ž FSUs bad got a whole lot worse when play resumed. On UFs “ rst play after the turnover, Gillislee found a hole up the middle and ran, untouched, for a 37-yard, goahead touchdown. Gillislee “ nished with 140 yards, part of 244yard rushing effort for the Gators, by far the most that Florida State allowed this season. We werent expecting that to happen,Ž defensive tackle Everett Dawkins said. I dont what it is but were going to get it “ xed. Weve got to get it fixed. Theres no way that a Florida State defense is going to let that happen again.Ž With Manuel sidelined, third-year sophomore Clint Trickett entered and Florida State promptly went three-and-out. Marcus Roberson then returned Cason Beattys punt 50 yards to the FSU 32-yard line. Five plays later, the Gators were in the end zone again on a 14-yard touchdown pass from Jeff Driskel to Quinton Dunbar. The gas just went away after [EJ] went down,Ž FSU receiver Kenny Shaw said. It was a big momentum shifter in the game.Ž Manuel eventually returned and both teams traded touchdowns … Manuels a 22yard scramble on the games “ nal play. Afterward, Manuel took the blame for four of Florida States “ ve turnovers and insisted that he needs to improve before FSU meets Georgia Tech in next weeks ACC Championship Game. I always look at myself in the mirror,Ž he said Ive got to get better these next two games. This is hard right now.ŽGATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSONThe Gators didnt take too many deep shots with quarterback JACOBY BRISSETT against Jacksonville State. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! The following are the major matchups in this past weeks game Photo by COLIN HACKLEY/OSCEOLAUFs Antonio Morrison collides with FSU Quarterback EJ Manuel during the last game of the regular season.

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Also Away Cans Cards Casual Classi cationCommunicationsCoral Crush Data Debt Drowns Dull Earthquakes Enters Even Evil Fall Fans Firm Full Glue Grant Hairs Hero Ices Inland Lawn Laws Locks Maid Mail Meal More Multiplication Need News Nice Omit Only Open Organs Owls Pear Planet Plates Plays Plug This page sponsored in part by: Pond Reds Safe Sees Sigh Sits Skim Stir Suit Talk Tear Tend Till Total Tree Tummy Well We've Wires Wore

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 – Page 7B A-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16Ž .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE. CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 GOT FALLIN G L E A VES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help! Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h h h a a a a v e e A A A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l t h e e M M o o o o o o d d e e e e e r r n E q q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m m e n n t t t o H e C C C ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f t ! PAT GR EE N ’ S L AWN S E R V IC E Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements Todays New Ads 2002 MOBILE HOME 28X76 4Bedroom/2Bath Master Suite with Office, Walk-in Closet, Garden Tub, Shower. Family Room w/Fireplace and separate Living Room. Large kitchen w/Island and Breakfast Nook. $33,000. Call Billy (850)962-3884 SHELLPOINTRoyster Dr-follow signs Saturday, Dec 1st 8am-3pm Twin bed set, elec dryer, chairs, toys, new child bike, household goods, doorknobs, paddle boat, misc xmas, picture frames,much more Lost LOSTDOG 8 yr old female Shih pzu. Wearing a pink collar with silver bones answers to Cinnamon. Lost from St Theresa beach on 11/9 (850) 545-8256 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements CONSIGNMENTART AUCTION on Dec 15, 2012 (Saturday) at 4pm. 9101 International Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, FL 32819. Artworks below $100, complimentary hors doeuvres and FREE ARTPRINTfor attending. Artists include Picasso, Dali, Chagall, Max and local artists. Call (866)537-1013 or visit www .Baterbys.com for more information or to RSVP. Medical MEDICALBILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Professional AIRLINE CAREERS-Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Professional AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 WANTED: Licensed Real Estate Agents for local offices. Please Contact 850-926-7811. Trades/ Skills DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDLTraining. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. HOME EVERYWEEKEND! Pay 37/mi, Both ways, FULLBENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, Fl Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED /INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. -Tanker Training Available. Call Today! (877)882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 20 12 Part-time Help Part Time Marketing AssistantThe Wakulla County Tourist Development Council is seeking resumes for a part-time Marketing Assistant. The position will be a contract position for 20 hours a week through September 2013. Applicants should have a high school diploma or equivalent, good writing/ communication skills, office/ clerical experience, and a working knowledge of social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube. Email resumes to pportwood@ mywakulla.com or mail to Wakulla County TDC, P. O. Box 67, Panacea, FL 32346. Resumes must be received no later than December 12, 2012. Employment Info Apply Now, 13 Drivers, Top 5% Pay & Benefits. Credential, Fuel, & Referral Bonus Avail. Need CDLClass A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www .ad drivers.com Schools/ Instruction Can Your Dig It?Ž Heavy Equipment School. 3wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benefits Approved. 2 National Certifications. (866)362-6497 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality Job placement assistance.Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call www .Centura Online.com 888-203-3179 Business Opportunities STARTNOW! OPEN RED HOTDOLLAR, DOLLAR PLUS, MAILBOX, DISCOUNT PARTY, $10 CLOTHING STORE, TEEN STORE, FITNESS CENTER FROM $51,900 WORLDWIDE! WWW .DRSS20.COM (800)518-3064 Garage/ Yard Sales PANACEA Big Yard Sale Saturday 1st, 8am-4pm Wakulla Moose Lodge 44 Jer-be-lou SHELLPOINTRoyster Dr-follow signs Saturday, Dec 1st 8am-3pm Twin bed set, elec dryer, chairs, toys, new child bike, household goods, doorknobs, paddle boat, misc xmas, picture frames,much more General 2002 MOBILE HOME 28X76 4Bedroom/2Bath Master Suite with Office, Walk-in Closet, Garden Tub, Shower. Family Room w/Fireplace and separate Living Room. Large kitchen w/Island and Breakfast Nook. $33,000. Call Billy (850)962-3884 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3/2 Doublewide MH For Lease or Lease Purchase Lake Ellen $695 + deposit. fenced yard 850-524-4090 CRAWFORDVILLEN. Wakulla county 2/1 Central air, gas heat, new flooring, clean. Move-in Ready! $495. $350 dep., $25 app fee. (850)-228-7197 PANACEAClean SW 3/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $500/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 Rental Houses SOPCHOPPY AREAwaterfront cottage 1br/1ba, exc. cond. cath. ceiling, sep storage/laundry, Clear filtered water $590. month. 84 Mt. Beasor Rd. off Persimmon850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Baths 1,200 sq. ft., $800 mo. $500 sec. 145 Rehwinkle Rd. 850-766-0170 CRAWFORDVILLEResidential/ Commercial House for Rent in the Center of Crawfordville For More Details Call (850) 926-9782 Rent: Houses Unfurnished North WakullaCty, 2 bdrms, on 3 wooded acres, c/h/a large front porch, $675 plus security Brenda Hicks Realty (850) 251-1253 Citrus Hills Homes Forest Ridge Villages Updated, move in ready, 2/2/2, Private lot 352-746-0002 Out of Town Real Estate WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA LIQUIDATION SALE! Somersby Park is an established community in Hendersonville, NC offering homesites starting in the mid-$20s. Call Today! (828)489-6760 or SomersbyPark.net Waterfront Homes Coastal Cottage! DeepwaterOcean Access with boat slips only $69,900. SALE Sat 12/1. New ready to finish cottage. Prime coastal Georgia location. Gated entrance, paved roads, underground utilities. FREE water/sewertap. Historically lowest financing. Call now (866)952-5303. x 1641 Cars CHEVY1994, S10 Blazer 167K miles, Automatic, V6, Cruise, AM/FM Care for, $1,995 (850) 962-4492 Roofing FREE ESTIMATES 850-889 -0989 Licensed and Insured #CCC1328414 www.a2zroof.com Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5447-1206 TWN vs. Avery, Roy Case No. 2011-299-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 2011-299-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, v. ROY L. AVERY, III, as personal representative for THE ESTATE OF COLLENE CRAWFORD AVERY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF COLLENE C. AVERY; AND UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT in accordance with the Final Judgment dated November 9, 2012, in the above-styled case, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 on Thursday, December 13, 2012, at 11:00 a.m ., in accordance with Florida Statutes §45.031, the following described real properties situated in Sopchoppy, Wakulla County, Florida: 5449-1206 TWN vs. Anderson, Brandon Case No. 65-2012-CA-000293 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000293 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, v. BRANDON L. ANDERSON AKA BRANDON ANDERSON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FOR FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING PROPER TY TO: Brandon L. Anderson AKA Brandon Anderson, ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 105 King Bee Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendant(s) are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant(s) as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOTS 67 AND 68, BLOCK AŽ, MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TOGETHER WITH A 2003 SCHU MOBILE HOME WITH VIN NUMBERS HIGA20K04288A AND HIGA20K04288B AND TITLE NUMBERS 86614381 AND 86614505 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 105 KING BEE DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, such Morris Hardwick Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 120, Tampa, FL 33634 on or before December 29, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff`s attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 16th of November, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this hearing, should contact ADA Coordinator not later than 1 (one) day prior to the proceeding at Internal Revenue Service (FL -Northern), 400 West Bay Street, Stop 5710, Jacksonville, FL 32202 904-665-0832 and for the hearing and voice impaired 800-955-8770.Ž November 29, 2012 5450-1206 TWN vs. Taylor, Donnie Case No. 652010CA000100CAXXXX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652010CA000100CAXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF POPULAR ABS, INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-5, Plaintiff, v. DONNIE L TAYLOR; BILL THOMAS A/K/A W.A. THOMAS III; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR ACCREDITED HOME LENDERS, INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 1, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 652010CA000100CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 13th day of December, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. at the front Lobbyof the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 49, BLOCK 4, LAKE ELLEN ESTATES UNIT ONE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 (850) 577-4401at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA THIS 1st DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 1br 1ba Cottage $550 mo. 2br 1ba Hs. $595 mo. 2br 2.5ba Twnhs $775 mo. 2br 2.5ba Twnhs $750 mo. 3br 2.5 ba Twnhs $850 mo. 3br 2ba DWMH $650 mo. 3br 2ba DWMH $850 mo. 3br 2ba Hs. $775 mo. 3br 2ba Hs. $1100 mo. 4br 2ba Hs. $850 mo. Commercial Space 1100 sf $800 mo. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker Christmas decorations, games, toys, books, tapes, dishes, household items, small kitchen appliances, clothes, new & used items. Something for everyone! Rain or Shine Super Yard Sale Christmas Bazaar and Bake SaleFirst Baptist Church of Wakulla Station • 945 Woodville Hwy. Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Please Recycle

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5448-1206 TWN vs. Gray Services 1, Inc. Case No. 2011-318-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO: 2011-318-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, v. GRAY SERVICES 1, INC., F/K/A GRAY SERVICES, INC.; RAY E. GRAY; JODY M. GRAY; ALBERT L. HARTSFIELD; KATHY A. HARTSFIELD; WOODLAND PARK HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; WAKULLA RESERVATION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT in accordance with the Final Judgment dated October 30, 2012, in the above-styled case, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 on Thursday, January 17, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. in accordance with Florida Statutes §45.031, the following described real properties situated in Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida: PARCEL 1 -276 CAJER POSEY: BEGIN AT THE INT ERSECT ION OF THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF THE OLD OCHLOCKNEE ROAD AND THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA THENCE RUN SOUTHERLY ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD 168 FEET, THENCE RUN WESTERLY AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 TO THE WEST BOUNDARY OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND CONVEYED TO WRIGHT ALEXANDER FROM DOLLIE VICKERS BY DEED DATED APRIL 1, 1942 AND RECORDED ON PAGE 6 OF DEED BOOK 26 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTHERLY ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID DOLLIE VICKERS TO WRIGHT ALEXANDER TRACT OF LAND TO THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY, THENCE RUN EASTERLY ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND BEING SITUATE IN LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY A SURVEY PREPARED BY EDWIN G. BROWN AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED MARCH 8, 1990, JOB NO. 90-031, AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 59 A DISTANCE OF 343.46 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF CAJER POSEY ROAD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY 263.58 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 95.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 218.55 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID CAJER POSEY ROAD, SAID MONUMENT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS 2529.45 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 80.57 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 10 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 80.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2024.99 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 20 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 89.14 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 10 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 89.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1984 SUMM MOBILE HOME ID # H37407G, TITLE # 18056384 PARCEL 3 -154 ELIZABETH DRIVE: SOUTH ONE-HALF OF LOT 11, OF EVERGREEN ACRES, UNIT II, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 77, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1985 BRIG MOBILE HOME ID # 14601487, TITLE # 41380323 PARCEL 4 -53 BREAM FOUNTAIN: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16, ISOLATED BLOCK AŽ OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN DEED BOOK C-DŽ, PAGE 572, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF TALLAHASSEE STREET, (U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 319) 100.95 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OR-WAY BOUNDARY OF A GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 726.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 88.03 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 210.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 186.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 9.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 93.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 200.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1980 FIES MOBILE HOME ID # FDGAS1070, TITLE #63390829. PARCEL 5 -93 STANLEY DRIVE: LOTS 29, 30 AND 31, BLOCK 3 OF LAKE ELLEN ESTATES, UNIT ONE, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1992 FLEE MOBILE HOME ID # GAFLN75A15782WE, TITLE # 63458581. PARCEL 6 -108 WOODLAND: LOT 12, OF WOODLAND PARK, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1990 FLEE MOBILE HOME ID # GAFLL34A13240SH AND ID # GAFLL34B13240SH, TITLE # 49296110 AND 48964997. PARCEL 7 -31 HARVEY PITTMAN: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 14, BLOCK Q OF HUDSON HEIGHTS, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AT PAGE 38 OF PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN IN AN EASTERLY DIRECTION ALONG AN EXTENSION OF THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT NO. 14 ACROSS RAKER LANE, WHICH IS A 50 FOOT DEDICATED STREET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF RAKER LANE, WHICH IS POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE TO RUN IN THE SAME DIRECTION 120 FEET, THENCE RUN IN THE SOUTHERLY DIRECTION AND AT RIGHT ANGLES TO THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 14, THE DISTANCE OF 220 FEET, THENCE RUN IN A WESTERLY DIRECTION AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 14, THE DISTANCE OF 120 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF RAKER LANE, THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE EASTERN BOUNDARY OF RAKER LANE, 220 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING SITUATE IN THE EAST HALF OF NO. 76 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1976 NORM MOBILE HOME ID # L0880NA AND L0880NB, TITLE # 13502704 AND 13502703. PARCEL 8 -47 BREAM FOUNTAIN ROAD: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16 OF ISOLATED BLOCK AŽ OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID BLOCK AŽ 198.0 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 13 OF SAID BLOCK AŽ, THENCE SOUTH 109.18 FEET, THENCE EAST 435.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE SOUTH 200.0 FEET, THENCE EAST 93.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH 200.0 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE SPRING CREEK ROAD, THENCE WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SPRING CREEK LOTS 181, 182, 183, 184, 185 AND 186, BLOCK 35, OF THE TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY, EAST SIDE, AS SHOWN BY MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, WAKULLA COUNTY (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices ROAD 93.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND BEING SITUATED IN LOT NO. 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PORTION LYING WITHIN THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: (AS CONVEYED BY QUIT CLAIM IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 167, PAGE 112, TO LEE WILLIAMS AND HELEN WILLIAMS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16, ISOLAT ED BLOCK AŽ OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN DEED BOOK C-DŽ PAGE 572, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF TALLAHASSEE STREET (U.S. HIGHWAY NO.319) 103.43 FEET TO A SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED BOUNDARY OF A GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY 394.96 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY MAINTAINED BOUNDARY 239.01 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 208.83 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 31 -MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 234.68 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 206.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATED, LYING AND BEING IN LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BEING MORE RECENTLY BY EDWIN BROWN ASSOCIATES INC. DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 16, OF ISOLATED BLOCK AŽ OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN EAST 198.00 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 13, OF SAID BLOCK AŽ; THENCE RUN SOUTH 109.18 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF BREAM FOUNTAIN ROAD; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY EAST 435.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE EAST 93.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 208.73 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 94.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 209.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT A STRIP OF LAND 9.30 FEET WIDE ACROSS THE SOUTHERLY PORTION OF SUBJECT PROPERTY. PARCEL 9 -88 ROBERT/WILLIAMS ROAD: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 659.83 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 219.70 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 490.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 185.98 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 337.90 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY GRADED ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 82 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 16.85 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 87 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 182.26 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 344.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE WESTERLY 60.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH 1971 GREA MOBILE HOME ID # KG6024F6N15861R AND KG6024F6N15861L, TITLE # 4694512 AND 4694511. PARCEL 10 -LOT 10 -56 EASTGATE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 2365.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 74.93 FEET TO A REBAR; FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 197.84 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST 149.90 FEET TO A REBAR LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF EASTGATE WAY; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 20 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 12.31 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST 65.30 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 36 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 240.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1986 PEAR MOBILE HOME ID #SHS8PGA39850391, TITLE # 42986775. PARCEL 11 -LOT 12 EASTGATE -70 EASTGATE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 2365.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 74.93 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 197.84 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 100.08 FEET TO A REBAR FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 99.85 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 150.41 FEET TO A REBAR LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF EASTGATE WAY; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 101.44 FEET TO A REBAR; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 150.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1986 BEAC MOBILE HOME ID #SSMFLAD93268, TITLE # 50440146. PARCEL 12 -436 RAVENSVIEW & 403 BIG RICHARD & 407 BIG RICHARD: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN NORTH 615.12 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES EAST 337.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES EAST 233.72 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 301.67 FEET TO A POINT THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES WEST 231.80 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 300.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1998 COUG DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID NUMBERS: GMHGA4119819757A AND GMHGA4119819757B, TITLE NUMBERS: 79387367 AND 79386939 TOGETHER WITH A 1985 ROSE MOBILE HOME ID NUMBER: 21G10868D, TITLE NUMBER 40651489. TOGETHER WITH A 1981 SOUT DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID NUMBERS: COSGART011255A AND COSGART011255B, TITLE NUMBERS: 19617948 AND 19617949. PARCEL 14 -558 ROCK ROAD: BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. 267 AND THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF THE ROCK ROAD AND RUN WESTERLY ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID STATE ROAD, 397 FEET TO AN OLD FENCE LINE, THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG SAID OLD FENCE LINE 233 FEET, THENCE RUN EAST ALONG A FENCE LINE 197 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF ROCK ROAD, THENCE RUN IN A NORTHERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ROCK ROAD 256 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID PROPERTY LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST. BEING MORE RECENTLY DESCRIBED BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES INC., JOB #96007 DATED JUNE 22, 2004 AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A 6 INCH BY 6 INCH ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 9 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1990.02 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 267, THENCE LEAVING SAID WEST BOUNDARY LINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1216.69 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST ALONG AN OLD FENCE LINE 234.87 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 81 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 197.48 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF ROCK ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 168.73 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 60 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 89.59 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF ROCK ROAD WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF AFOREMENTIONED STATE ROAD 267, THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 75 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY 398.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL # 15 TRACT AŽ; 94 DWIGHT SANDERS ROAD: COMMENCE AT AN OLD AXLE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP5SOUTH,RANGE2WEST,WAKULLACOUNTY,FLORIDAANDRUNWEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 7 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 288.00 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY 144.06 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 302.31 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 144.01 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #799), THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 302.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL # 16 TRACT BŽ; 98 DWIGHT SANDERS ROAD: COMMENCE AT AN OLD AXLE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 7 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 432.06 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY 144.05 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #799), THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 302.28 FEET TO A RE-ROD, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 144.01 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 302.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 1983 ALLA MOBILE HOME ID # AAFLA2828, TITLE # 22941917. PARCEL 18 -137 TAFFINGER: LOTS 21 AND 30, BLOCK Q OF MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1987 VEGAŽ DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ID #KH4026D31K8647GAA, TITLE # 45453562 AND ID #KH4026D31K8647GAB, TITLE # 45464840. PARCEL A: LOTS 34 AND 35, BLOCK 37 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT III, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 43, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1996 HORTON SINGLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID#H203274G, TITLE # 70561763. PARCEL B: LOT 10 AND THE SOUTHEAST HALF OF LOT 9, BLOCK 44 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL C: LOT 8 AND THE NORTHWEST HALF OF LOT 9, BLOCK 44 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, WAKULLA COUNTY (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 5444-1206 TWN Vs. Cook, Bobby 65-2012-CA-000379 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTYCIVILDIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000379 LPPMORTGAGE LTD., Plaintiff, vs. BOBBYCOOK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BOBBYCOOK; JAN COOK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAN COOK; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKINOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:BOBBYCOOK; JAN COOK; Whose residence(s) is/are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBYrequired to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit: LOTS 15 AND 16, BLOCK 55 OF WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT FIVE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA If you fail to file your response or answer, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Dr., Tampa, Florida 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. DATED at WAKULLACounty this 13th day of November, 2012. 5445-1206 TWN vs. Eichler, Christopher Case No 12000333CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION, CASE NO.: 12000333CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff vs. CHRISTOPHER W. EICHLER, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPER TY TO: CHRISTOPHER W. EICHLER : ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 4016 COLLETON COURT, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32311 CONNIE EICHLER : ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 9107 WAUKEENAH HIGHWAY, MONTICELLO, FL 32344 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: LOT 15, BLOCK AŽ OF WAKULLA FOREST, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 54, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2000 JACOBSEN MOBILE HOME, TITLE NO. 80910726, 80910919, 80910982, I.D. NO. JACFL20876A, JACFL20876B, JACFL20876C. more commonly known as: 218 DOROTHY LOOP ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiff`s attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due by dECEMBER 29, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff`s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 8th day of November, 2012. Clerk of the Court, WAKULLA County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 29 and December 6, 2012 CA12-02491 Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/3BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 3BR/1BA New carpet throughout $590 mo. No Pets, No Smoking RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities • 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit • 31 Magpie 3BR/2BA $1400 mo. $1400 sec. dep. Outside pets okay with approval • 137 Shephard Easement 3BR/2BA MH on 6+ acres $900 mo. $900 security Lease with OPTION TO BUY! • 5 Albin Live Oak Island 2BR/2BA with Lost and Dock. $950. mo. $950 Security Deposit.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 – Page 9B MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON NOVEMBER 19, 2012NOVEMBER 29, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact : Danny Davis, Office of Court Administration, 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL32303, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 29 and December 6, 2012 5441-1129 TWN vs. The Estate of Altamease Cole Case No. 65-2012-CA-000165 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000165 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC., TRUST 2004-WMC3, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-WMC3, Plaintiff, vs. THE ESTATE OF ALTAMEASE COLE, DECEASED, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To The Estate of Altamease Cole, Deceased 41 Tharpe Lane Crawfordville, FL 32327 : YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: Commence at a U.S. Government concrete monument and a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Lot 5 of the Hartsfield survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence runs North 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East along the North boundary of said Lot 5, a distance of 343.98 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 10 seconds East 199.94 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, thence run North 72 degrees 32 minutes 01 seconds East 190.70 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run South 17 degrees 14 minutes 40 seconds East 200.47 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run South 72 degrees 36 minutes 25 seconds West 190.71 feet to a 3 inch concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run North 17 degrees 14 minutes 28 seconds West 200.22 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.88 of an acre, more or less. SUBJECT TO an access easement over and across the Westerly 10.00 feet thereof., commonly known as: 41 Tharpe Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jacob A. Thomas, c/o Johnson & Freedman, LLC, the Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 400 Northridge Road, Suite 1100 M/S 27, Sandy Springs, Georgia 30350, within 30 days after the first publication date: November 22, 2012 and file the original with the Clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED: November 6, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond as Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy November 22 & 29, 2012 5433-1122 TWN vs. Fedorak, Louise Case No. 2012-72-CANotice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-72-CA CENTENNIALBANK, as Successor in Interest to Wakulla Bank Plaintiff, vs. LOUISE B. FEDORAK, ET AL., CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL32327 on January 24, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: COMMENCING AT APOINT WHERE THE NORTHEASTERLYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD 372-A(100 FOOT) RIGHT OF WAYINTERSECTS THE WEST BOUNDARYOF RANGE 1 WEST, SAID POINT BEING 274.32 FEET NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST AND CONTINUE NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARYOF SAID RANGE 1 WEST 314.69 FEET TO ALIGHTWOOD HUB APPROXIMATELYIN THE CENTER OF THE OLD RAKER FISHERYROAD, NOW ABANDONED, THENCE ALONG THE APPROXIMATE CENTER OF SAID ROAD AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 34 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 378.81 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 417.03 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 383.5 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 147.83 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE SOUTH 41 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 296.45 FEET TO THE NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT OF WAYLIMITS OF STATE ROAD 372-A, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 595.73 FEET ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYLIMITS TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 250.75 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 59.4 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 383.5 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 147.83 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID LAND IN AN UNNUMBERED LOT OF HARTSFIELD SURVEYEAST OF THE WEST BOUNDARYLINE OF RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. MORE RECENTLYDESCRIBED BYSURVEYPREPARED BYJAMES THURMANŽ RODDENBERRYPROFESSIONALLAND SURVEYOR DATED MARCH 14, 2000 JOB #00.142 AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 372-A(BOTTOMS ROAD) WITH THE WESTERLY BOUNDARYOF RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT LYING NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 274.32 FEET FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 314.69 FEET TO AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 373.54 FEET TO APOINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 422.56 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 383.56 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 150.51 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 41 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 297.65 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE LYING ON THE NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF BOTTOMS READ (STATE ROAD NO. 372-A), THENCE RUN NORTH 47 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY594.15 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 250.34 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 59.42 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 383.56 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 150.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Date: October 31, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By:/s/Desiree Willis, Deputy Clerk Wakulla County November 22 & 29, 2012 5439-1129 TWN Vs. Atkins, Deborah 12-14-CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO: 12-14-CA HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-4, Plaintiff, vs. Deborah S. Atkins; Jaime B. Williams; James L. Williams; Unknown Spouse of Deborah S. Atkins; Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under or against the Estate of James L. Williams, whether said Unknown Parties claim as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, trustees or other claimants; Unknown Tenant #1, and Unknown Tenant #2, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under or against the Estate of James L. Williams, whether said Unknown Parties claim as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, trustees or other claimants YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Wakulla County, Florida: Per Schedule A attached heretoŽ Street Address: 45 Stoney Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Clarfield, Okon, Salomone & Pincus, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, within 30 days after the date of the first publication of this notice, on or before December 22 and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on November 2, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of said Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk Clarfield, Okon, Salomone & Pincus, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Avenue, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Telephone: (561) 713-1400 Schedule A COMMENCE AT A U.S. GOVERNMENT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION II, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION II, A DISTANCE OF 1208.23 FEET TO AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 4752Ž WEST 363.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 47 52Ž WEST 346.00 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 50.00 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 607.69 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 26 18Ž EAST 346.01 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 609.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 4.84 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. November 22 & 29, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5440-1129 TWN Estate of Whetstone, Katie Case # 12-95-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE # 12-95-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF KATIE WHETSTONE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of KATIE WHETSTONE, deceased, whose date of death was December 13, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 22, 2012 Personal Representative: KATHY L. RICHARDSON 832 Cordele Avenue, Port Charlotte, Florida 33948 Attorney for Personal Representative: MICHAEL M. WILSON, Attorney for KATHY L. RICHARDSON Florida Bar Number: 076244, Olmsted & Wilson, P.A. 17801 Murdock Circle, Suite A, Port Charlotte, Florida 33948 Telephone: (941) 624-2700, Fax: (941) 624-5151 November 22 & 29, 2012 5443-1129 TWN Estate of Rona Hawkins Case No. 12-100 CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA COURT CASE NO.:12-100 CP Probate Division IN RE: THE ESTATE OF RONA LAVON HAWKINS, JR. Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS INTESTATE The administration of the estate of Rona Lavon Hawkins, Jr., Case Number 12-100 CP is pending in the 2nd Judicial Circuit Court, In and For Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. The estate is intestate. Any interested person upon whom this notice is served who may be entitled to exempt property under s. 732.402, Fla. St. must file a petition for determination of exempt property or a petition must be filed on behalf of that person WITHIN FOUR (4) MONTHS OF SERVICE OF FORMAL NOTICE OR 40 DAYS AFTER THE TERMINATION OF ANY PROCEEDING OF ANY MATTER AFFECTING ANY PART OF THE EXEMPT PROPERTY or the right to exempt property is deemed waived. All interested persons on whom a copy of this notice is served who intend to challenge the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or jurisdiction of the court must file an objection on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on that person, and all creditors having claims against this estate who are required to be served with a copy of this notice, are required to file with this court such claim WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors and other persons having claims or demands against the estate who are not known to the personal representative and whose names or addresses are not reasonably ascertainable must file their claims against the estate WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. ALL PETITIONS, CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS THE 22nd DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012. Personal Representative: COLLEEN Q. SKIPPER 18 Charlotte Rosier Road, Sopchoppy, FL 32358 Attorney for Personal Representative: HAROLD E. REGAN, FL BAR #124559 2520-2 Barrington Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32308 Telephone: (850) 681-7883, FAX: (850) 383-6604 November 22 & 29, 2012 5446-1206 TWN Estate of Lola Mae Johnson Case No. 12-102-CP Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION, FILE NO.: 12-102-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF LOLA MAE JOHNSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LOLA MAE JOHNSON, deceased, whose date of death was April 1, 2012, Aand whose Social Security Number is ***-**-8063, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327-0337. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives Attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 29, 2012. Personal Representative: By:/s/ JEHOVAH DAVIS 102 Riverview Dr., Knifley, KY 42753 Attorney for Personal Representative: Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5438-1129 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON NOVEMBER 30, 2012 at 11:00 a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: JENNIFER BABCOCK BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF NOVEMBER 30 ,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. November 22 & 29, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration RICHARD L. ROGERS of RICHARD L. ROGERS, P.A. Florida Bar No. 320269 1135 South Washington Ave., Suite A Titusville, FL 32780, Telephone (321) 268-5173 November 29 and December 6, 2012 Have something on your mind?Send it to William Snowden, Editoreditor@thewakullanews.net 5 Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2 Go to http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click ContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ. Register your online account today!

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 1. TELEVISION: What famous politician did Alex P. Keaton idolize on the show Family TiesŽ? 2. MUSIC: Which 1970s song featured the line, Jeremiah was a bullfrogŽ? 3. LITERATURE: What literary figure had a loyal companion named Sancho Panza? 4. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capital of Iowa? 5. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What are omnivores? 6. LANGUAGE: How many letters are in the Greek alphabet? 7. ANATOMY: How many pairs of ribs does a human body normally have? 8. HISTORY: In which year did the U.S. space shuttle first fly into orbit? 9. FOOD: What kind of food is mortadella? 11. GAMES: What is the movable device used in the game Ouija to spell out messages? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Richard Nixon 2. Joy to the World,Ž by Three Dog Night 3. Don Quixote 4. Des Moines 5. Animals that eat meat and vegetables 6. 24 7. 12 8. 1981 9. Italian sausage 10. A planchette YOUR AD HERE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 – Page 11B IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GET READY FOR HUNTING P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pet Phone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. Holistic Select WellnessC L P A ALL Y P N.Special Orders AvailableStocking Stuffers for Pets Gift Certificates 301 C S G i Construction Cleanup, Commercial, ResidentialLICENSED AND INSURED ConstructionCleanupCommercial R Re Re Re Re R R R R R R R s si si sid sid ential Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly Nicholspray like its up to God, Work like its up to youŽMany Thanks for Many Blessings. Have a wonderful Christmas! Across the street from the courthouse, downtown Crawfordville926-3338Open 10AM-5PM or call for later appointment.15 Vendors 2 Floors The White Elephant DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PET STOP3010 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. ANTIQUES C ARRIE’S C OVEC ARRIE’S C OVE C HRISTMAS ATC HRISTMAS AT Toys Dolls Antiques Collectibles Jewelry Ornaments Decorations One-of-kinds Etc. A Cabin of Treasures~ Vera Bradley ~ ~ Dot’s Jewels ~ ~ Greenleaf Scents ~ ~ 16 Vendors ~ ~ Gifts ~ ~ Collectibles ~ ~ Jewelry ~ ~ Custom Wood Items ~ & much more... PICK A TREASURE FROM OUR TREASURE BOX w/purchase!850926-8381M-S 10-5 • Downtown Crawfordville, Next to Subwa y 27 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA Hair Place That 850-926-6020Gift Certi“cates Available t C C e C C FULL SERVICE HAIR SALONStyles for Men, Women & ChildrenCutsUpDo’sColor • P erms • HighlightsFacial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • Flat Top s MirandaTues-Sat545-2905RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MavisAppt. Only962-2171 Shop Downtown LATE Fri., Dec. 7 OPEN til 9PM You’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A A A A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe Wakuulanews The Waku l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce 1 14 17 20 23 33 40 43 46 57 63 66 69 2 34 58 3 35 59 4 36 50 21 26 47 5 15 18 44 6 27 37 41 51 60 64 67 70 7 28 48 61 8 24 38 62 25 29 49 52 9 16 19 22 42 45 10 39 53 65 68 71 11 30 54 12 31 55 13 32 56 ACROSS 1. Bull artist 5. Short shot to the green 9. Filled to overflowing 14. Pot starter 15. Give a new look to 16. Organic fertilizer 17. Goblet part 18. "Exodus" author 19. Prefix with physics 20. Prepare for an AKC show 22. Oktoberfest vessel 23. Liquored up 24. Lohengrin's love 26. Fireballer Nolan 29. Chicken gizzard, e.g. 33. Use TNT 37. One-liner, e.g. 39. Timber wolf 40. Lomond et al. 41. Blood-typing letters 42. Avoider of meat products 43. High: Abbr. 44. Leap for Sarah Hughes 45. In uni son 46. Fastened, in a way 48. Mermaid feature 50. G-men and T-men 52. The heart is largely this 57. Problem for Pauline 60. Do some carpentry 63. Author Zola 64. Man Friday 65. Low-pH stuff 66. "Jurassic Park" DNA preserver 67. "Jurassic Park" beast 68. Singer Braxton 69. Fresh-mouthed 70. Faxed, say 71. Manuscript encl.DOWN1. Goes the distance 2. Emcee's task 3. Bothered incessantly 4. Word on an invoice 5. Caked with dirt 6. Life saver 7. Beatnik's "Gotcha!" 8. Oater band 9. Sam pras foe 10. Work at the diner 11. Do a critic's job 12. Calvary letters 13. Mullins of the comics 21. "Dang it!" 25. T-shirt size: Abbr. 27. Trojan War warrior 28. "I pass," in poker 30. Apple's apple, e.g. 31. Abba of Israel 32. Physical fitness 33. Dull as dishwater 34. "Damn Yankees" vamp 35. Circus lineup 36. Upload data, say 38. Caffeine-laden nut 42. Market price 44. Throw in 47. Where morays are caught 49. Cry from the first in line 51. Tiffs 53. Whacks sharply 54. Aprs-ski beverage 55. Pork cuts 56. Ace Rickenback er 57. Spherical veggies 58. Rachel's baby in "Friends" 59. Barbecue fare 61. Some euro predecessors 62. Yemeni port American Prole Hometown Content 11/25/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 12 345 623 716 8 974 32 4651 5 64 643 91867 200 9 HometownContent 162 9348 7 5 845672913 379518462 518 296734 793841256 426357189 251 769348 687423591 934185627 L A S T S B L A H P E A S I N T R O L O L A E M M A A T E A T A C T S R I B S R E M I T S H I P F I L E S N E R T S E E L E R Y C R U D D Y A D D H E R O A J A X S P A T S I D I G N O B E T L I R E P O S S E K O L A A D E N L G E I M N E X T A G A S S I V A L U E B U S T A B L E S S W A T S R A T E L O G O C O C O A I N R I E B A N L O I N S M O O N T O N E E D D I E

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet By JEAN KRESSYContributor, Relish magazineA can of this and a jar of that is not our idea of cooking. But sometimes we come across a recipe that combines cans and packages with start-from-scratch ingredients in such a way that it takes the recipe out of the realm of short-cut convenienceŽ and into bona “ de cooking. Braised Pork with Cannellini Beans is that kind of a dish. Granted, its made with a handful of so-called ready-to-use ingredients: peppercorn pork tenderloin, marinated artichoke hearts and basil-garlic polenta. But instead of putting everything in a pot and hoping for the best, the cooking is a two-step process called braising.Ž The “ rst step is sauting, to sear the meat and vegetables, and the next is simmering, to keep the main ingredients juicy and make a tasty sauce. Braising, one of the oldest ways of cooking, originated as a method of preparing food on an open hearth. The food was cooked in a tightly covered pan, a braisiere, which was put directly on the hot embers and covered with coals. Ordinarily, braising is a long, slow process, but we know long and slowŽ are out of the question for many home cooks. Our recipe starts as a braise by browning the onion and pork in a large skillet. Next, in the interest of saving time, we switch gears and instead of a long, slow simmer, we have cut the cooking time to minutes. When someone else has seasoned the pork, marinated the artichoke hearts, and added basil and garlic to the polenta, its like having a crew of helpers in the kitchen. Braised Pork with Cannellini Beans and Artichokes Look for tubes of cooked and seasoned polenta in the produce section of the supermarket. This dish can be assembled ahead of time, making it great for a party. 2 tablespoons olive oil 3/4 cup chopped onion 1 (1 1/4-pound) package marinated peppercorn pork tenderloin, cut into 1 1/2-inch chunks 1 (15-ounce) can cannellini beans, rinsed and drained 1 (15-ounce) can diced stewed tomatoes, undrained 1 (12-ounce) jar marinated artichoke hearts, drained 1 (1-pound) tube basil-garlic polenta, sliced 1/4-inch thick 1. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion. Cook 2 minutes. Scrape onion to the side. Add pork. Cook 4 minutes, turning once, or until browned on all sides. Add beans, tomatoes and artichokes. Scrape up browned bits on the bottom of the skillet. 2. Lay polenta slices over mixture. Cover and cook 5 minutes, or until polenta is heated through. Serves 6. Recipe by Sharon Sanders. Per serving: 480 calories, 11g fat, 45mg chol., 29g prot., 70g carbs., 11g “ ber, 1120mg sodium. For more Relish recipes and to sign up for our newsletters, log on to relish.com. To download our new Relish digital editions and Relish Daily Dish phone app, go to relish.com/mobile RELISH THE AMERICAN TABLEEasy beyond convenient: Braised pork with cannellini MARK BOUGHTON PHOTOGRAPHYBy DAVID WHITE Legend has it that a renowned British wine taster was once presented with a ” ight of wines while wearing a blindfold. He nailed each wine, correctly identifying the grape and the region in which it was grown. Toward the end of the challenge was a glass of water. Upon smelling and sampling it, the taster expressed bewilderment. I have no idea what this is,Ž he exclaimed, but I can assure you its something Ive never had before!Ž Traditionally, this story has been used to spark a conversation about the futility of blind tasting. The wine worlds smart alecks, however, have taken to replying back with a joke: Why didnt he peg it as Pinot Grigio?Ž Sadly, theres some truth to this retort. All too often, Pinot Grigio is simply a substitute for water. Massmarket bottlings are refreshing and fruity … and deliver a buzz …but theyre never very compelling. Pinot Grigio gained a foothold in America in 1979, when wine importer Tony Terlato visited Milan in search of the next great white wine.Ž Terlato tasted a Pinot Grigio and was taken by its fresh aromas, its crispness, freshness and the way it paired effortlessly with foods.Ž The next day, he drove to northern Italys Alto Adige region, where Italys best Pinot Grigio is grown. Upon arriving, he visited a local restaurant and ordered every Pinot Grigio on the wine list. Of the 18 bottles, Terlato most enjoyed the offering from Santa Margherita. He visited the winery the following day … and returned to the United States as its sole importer. Santa Margherita Pinot Grigio took off. Today, its Americas most popular imported restaurant wine. Over the past 33 years, however, Pinot Grigio has become a victim of its own success. Santa Margherita isnt cheap … it retails for $25. So the market has been flooded with cheap alternatives, led by brands like Cavit, Ruf“ no, and Ecco Domani. There are better wines for the money. More grape varieties are planted in Italy than any other country in the world. Thousands of Italian wines make their way to the United States. The most exciting whites come from northeast Italy, particularly the regions of Alto Adige, a neighbor to Austria and Switzerland, and Friuli-Venezia Giulia, which borders Slovenia to the east and Austria to the north. Alto Adige is still home to the worlds best Pinot Grigio, but dozens of varieties ” ourish there. Pinot Bianco, for example, is more ” oral and mineral-driven than Pinot Grigio. Gewurztraminer, Muller Thurgau, and Kerner are exceptionally aromatic … and display enough sweetness and acidity to complement cream sauces and even spicy foods. In recent months, Ive become obsessed with Kerner, as it seems to work with everything. Top producers include Kofererhof and Abbazia Di Novacella, which both make bottlings for under $20. Friuli-Venezia Giulia, commonly shortened to Friuli, is home to a host of obscure, fun, and versatile grapes like Ribolla Gialla and Friuliano. Southern Italy also generates delicious whites. My favorites come from Campania, where a grape called Fiano thrives. At “ rst, Fiano typically comes across as an easy-drinking quaffer. But it can hold its own at any table … and the better examples gain complexity with age. One of my favorites, Feudi di San Gregorios Fiano di Avellino, runs less than $20. Its no secret that Italy produces some of the “ nest red wines in the world. Top Barolo and Brunello di Montalcino easily command hundreds of dollars per bottle. But too many consumers disregard Italys whites thanks to the ” ood of cheap Pinot Grigio thats come ashore. They shouldnt. Italy produces more distinctive wines than any other nation … and its whites are positively electric. David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. WHITES WINES e electric white wines of Italy Ace tools make the perfect gift for the do-it-yourselfer. Theyve been engineered to the highest standards of durability and performance and theyre guaranteed to equal or exceed the quality of the big national brands. So stock their workshop with the tools they can always count on … Ace. Ace Home Center / NAPA2709 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, FL 323272158 (850) 926-3141 www.acehardware.comStore Hours: Mon-Fri 8-7, Sat 8-6, Sun 10-5