<%BANNER%>
Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00436
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 11-22-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00436
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter 17 years as superintendent of schools, David Miller is handing the reins over to someone who he feels is more than capable to lead the district. Bobby Pearce officially became the new superintendent at 12:01 a.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 20. Kind of like Cinderella, Pearce said. When I wake up, I will be the superintendent of schools. Miller chose not to run for re-election and announced his retirement in April. About his retirement, Miller said he feels good about it. You know when its time, he said. He added that he wanted to go out on a high note. I feel pretty good about the success of our district. Pearce was elected to the position on Nov. 6 over East Gadsden High School Principal Kimball Thomas, receiving an overwhelming percentage of the votes, more than 73 percent. It feels great, Pearce said. Thats a high voter approval rating. Although he did acknowledge the pressure that comes with that approval. He said voters are expecting a top notch system, not a humdrum system. Im just excited to be an even bigger part of it than I have been, Pearce said of the school district. Miller, who has known Pearce for quite some time, retires feeling good about leaving the district in Pearces hands. Everybody pulls together as a team. Thats the key to our success, Miller said. I dont see that changing. He added that hes watched Pearce over the years, as a coach, a teacher, a principal and now assistant superintendent, and knows he will keep that same mentality with everyone working together and supporting one another. Hes got a lot of support out there, Miller said. Their relationship started in the classroom when Miller was Pearces eighth grade science teacher. He has also been his coach and for the last several years, his boss. And Millers mother was Pearces Sunday school teacher. She was the only Sunday school teacher to give out homework, Pearce said. Pearce will now move to Millers office which also happened to be his mothers classroom when she was a teacher. Continued on Page 15A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 45th Issue Wednesday, November 21, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School ...........................................................................Page 15A Senior Citizens ..............................................................Page 16A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 18A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Outdoors .........................................................................Page 6B Water Ways ......................................................................Page 7B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 9B Thinking Outside the Book ............................................Page 10B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 10B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 10B Comics ...........................................................................Page 13BINDEX OBITUARIES Robert J. Keith Sr. John Buford Morrow Jr. John Henry Taylor This issue is being delivered to every household in Wakulla County CHECK IT OUTHappy ThanksgivingSheriff-elect Creel names undersheriffBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWith a little more than a month before he takes over as the new sheriff of Wakulla County, Charlie Creel isnt sitting by simply counting the days. Creel has already starting planning for the transition which will take place on Jan. 8, 2013. Last week, Sheriff Donnie Crum gave him a temporary of ce at the sheriffs of ce to prepare for his new position, as well as sit in on meetings, get to know the employees and learn his way around. Crum has also allowed him to go ahead and start making decisions, however, they will not go into effect until January. Im meeting with coworkers and getting acclimated, Creel said. I want everything to be in place before I take of ce. He added that he wants everything to be ready to be implemented once he of cially starts. Creel beat Major Maurice Langston in the sheriffs race, taking 54 percent of the vote. I want to thank my supporters and the ones who didnt vote for me, I ask them to give me a chance to show them that I can run this department ef ciently and effectively, Creel said. Langston is currently a major with the sheriffs of- ce and when asked about his future following the election, he told The News that he would be looking for an open door. Anytime the good Lord closes one door, he opens another, Langston said after the election. Crum, who will retire at the end of the year, encouraged everyone to form a relationship with Creel and stressed the importance of keeping the community safe. He said, Maurice is a good man and Charlie is a good man and I look forward to Wakulla County getting behind Charlie as he begins the challenge of operating the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. It is a hard job to be asked to do more with less money. Along with getting acclimated to the sheriffs of ce, Creel has also already chosen his undersheriff. On Friday, Creel announced that Lt. Clarence Trey Morrison would serve as his No. 2 once he takes of ce. I wanted the most highly quali ed person, Creel said. When Creel ran in 2008 and lost to then-sheriff David Harvey, Morrison was his pick. So coming into this race, he already knew who his undersheriff would be, if elected. Creel said he wanted to select someone from within the sheriffs of ce who knew the ins and outs. He has known Morrison and his family for a long time and said he looked at Morrisons resume and was impressed. He has worked in every division in the sheriffs of ce, Creel said, except communications and animal control. Morrison said he was humbled by Creels decision. To know that Im the one who he wants to be beside him, Im just as proud as I can be.Continued on Page 10AStudents help promote Diabetes DayA new superintendentJENNIFER JENSENLongtime Superintendent of Schools David Miller says goodbye to students at Medart Elementary last week.Bobby Pearce takes over the post from David MillerBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netNov. 14 was World Diabetes Day and to bring about awareness for this disease and help educate the public, several Wakulla County schools promoted the day in a different way. This is the rst year that we made a real effort to bring awareness, said Lori Lawhon, School Health coordinator. We kind of felt compelled because we are seeing more kids in our schools with diabetes. Lawhon said the goal was to educate the students and their parents, as well as the community. They are educating the public about the signs and symptoms of diabetes so that people can make the connection if their child has these symptoms, which include frequent urination, lack of energy, weight loss and excessive thirst. Continued on Page 11A JENNIFER JENSENSheriff-elect Charlie Creel, foreground, with Lt. Clarence Trey Morrison, Creels choice for undersheriff. New Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce (850) 201-8499 | TCCWakullaEnvironmentalInstitute.com | Online classes and in-the-field trainingTCC Wakulla environmental instituteCLASSES START JANUARY Train for careers in water quality, natural resource management and environmental monitoring.

PAGE 2

Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comMyers Carter shares the tradition of syrup-makingBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netFor the last 15 years, Myers Carter has been making sugar cane syrup the old fashioned way and each year he invites the community to see how its done. We want to keep it the way it used to be, Carter says at his home on Nov. 10. Keep it like grandpa did it. Carters type of syrup is kettle-cooked over a wood re. We do everything the hardest and oldest way we can, Carter says. Prior to going into the kettle, the river cane is stripped and cut down. It then goes through the cane mill that is powered by a lawnmower to grind it down. The cane mill squeezes the juice out of the cane. When he started in 1997, he used a cane mill from the early 1900s and it was powered by a mule. He now uses a different cane mill and switched from a truck-powered cane mill eventually to using the lawn mower. The furnace used to cook the sugar cane juice is the same one from the beginning. The 80-gallons of juice is then moved to the kettle which has a wood re to get it to boil. They use pine wood because it is a good re starter, Carter says. It takes a hot fire to boil 80 gallons of liquid, he says. The cane juice is boiled and cooked down to get all the water out of the sugar, Carter says. This is the easy part, says Roland Revell, who began helping Carter about four years ago and helped his family make syrup years ago. The juice needs to boil over so that the impurities can be removed. After about 4.5 hours of cooking the cane juice, large bubbles begin to form which is an indication the syrup is nearly ready. Once it is nearing completion, Carter will take a bucket and dip it in the center of the kettle to see if the syrup has reached its desired thickness. Once the syrup is done, it is strained and poured in a bucket. Out of 80 gallons, Carter says they will get about 10 percent syrup. He just knows when its done, says Bobby Strickland, who has been helping Carter make syrup for more than 10 years and also helped make syrup with his family. Ive been doing this all my life, he says. I was glad Myers needed some help. Pat Harvey has also been helping Carter for several years. He only pays off in syrup, Harvey says with a laugh. Carter remembers making sugar cane syrup with his father years ago. The rst thing I remembered seeing was syrup making, he says. He continued to make syrup with his father until 1972. Then about 25 years later, he decided to continue that tradition. I grew up doing this, Carter says. I just got away from it. As he got older, he decided he wanted to start doing it again and wanted to keep with the original way of making sugar cane syrup. We didnt want to let the old tradition die, Carter says. Carter holds a public syrup making day every year to share the tradition with the community. People enjoy food and listen to the music being played under the big trees on his property. Carter and his helpers are happy to answer questions about the process from curious onlookers. Carter also holds a family reunion with syrup making each year. Carter, who has been a longtime supporter of the Wakulla County Historical Society, donates proceeds from his annual syrup day sales to the Heritage Village Park project. MAKING CANE SYRUP: Myers Carter, left, watches the cauldron of cane juice boil. The syrup is strained, above, after being boiled. Musicians gather to perform during the traditional syrup-making.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN Please Recycle

PAGE 3

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider:A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.NOVEMBER 21 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING ADOPTION OF LARGE SCALE MAP AMENDMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE MAP Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.NOVEMBER 21, 2012 Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.NOVEMBER 21, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS CONCERNING SMALL SCALE MAP AMENDMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE MAP AND CHANGE OF ZONINGCopies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.NOVEMBER 21, 2012 NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS NOVEMBER 8, 15, 21, 29, 2012 PUBLIC NOTICENorth Florida Child Development, Inc. is recruiting for governing board(s) members. NFCD is a 501(c) (3) organization that provides comprehensive early education and development to the young children and their families in Calhoun, Gulf, Liberty, Madison, and Wakulla Counties. The governing board(s) maintains a formal structure of shared governance through which parents and community representatives can participate in policy making and other decisions. Please contact Sebrina McGill for more information at (850) 639-5080 ext 10 or smcgill@oridachildren.org.NOVEMBER 15, 21, 2012 NOTICE OF PREQUALIFICATION AND PROCUREMENT OF CONSTRUCTION SERVICES WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARDNovember 8, 22, 2012

PAGE 4

Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Confederate Salt Works from St. Andrews Bay to Apalachee Bay • Crawfordville man arrested for drug trafficking • Group seeks to gather waterfronts information • Charlie Creel is new sheriff • County commission: Board creates RESTORE Act committee • 10-0, War Eagles end regular season undefeated • Hot Tamale sets Wakulla CD release party at Posey’s Docksidethewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.Editor, The News: My recent experience has compelled me to bring to light a misunderstanding that must be corrected. Like others, I often donate to charities to do my part to help my community. This fall, I decided to step it up a notch and volunteer for Operation Santa 2012. Initially, I thought Id be helping others; instead I was awakened by the desperation that many people in our community are facing. On my “ rst day, I helped organize applications and I couldnt help but notice key phrases like disabled veteran, laid off from my job,Ž disabling illness,Ž working single parentŽ and raising my grandchildren.Ž Then I saw what sort of gifts they were hoping to receive … a baby blanket, warm coat and used dining table/chairs so her children didnt have to eat sitting on the ” oor. What happened to communities taking care of their own? Like many of your readers, Im proud I live in Wakulla. Ive seen our community work together to help people in need and we need to continue by helping these families, who are only asking for what many of us take for granted. To those like me, who didnt know how much they were needed, come forward, adopt an Operation Santa family, volunteer and make sure no child goes without a gift and a warm meal this season. Call 926-3526 or come by the community center weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. to help our families. Thank you. From a late bloomer whos now wide awake, Layne Davis CrawfordvilleTake a look at The News:Content you can’t get anywhere elseIf youre not a regular subscriber to The Wakulla News, you may be wondering why you got this in the mail. This is the issue we do every year thats delivered to every address in Wakulla County. If youre not a subscriber, we hope this issue shows you why you should be. The main reason is that there is no other source of local news as complete as what you have in your hands. Our lead stories this week were about the transitions with new Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce taking over from longtime Superintendent David Miller, as well as Sheriff-elect Charlie Creel looking at changes in that department, and naming Lt. Clarence TreyŽ Morrison as his undersheriff. Reporter Jennifer Jensen also had a story on students at Crawfordville Elementary School learning about diabetes for World Diabetes Day, as well as feature stories on Myers Carter making cane syrup and the communitywide Thanksgiving feast held Saturday at Hudson Park. The News also typically covers local government ranging from the county commission and the city governments of St. Marks and Sopchoppy. We have local sports: a story this week on the Wakulla High School War Eagles football team beating Gulf Breeze in the playoffs last week and preparing for the regional semi-“ nal against the Godby Cougars. A recent addition to the paper has been Extension Director Les Harrison and his Natural Wakulla column in which he writes about things in nature that capture his fancy. This week he writes about wild turkeys. Other columnists include George Weymouths outdoors column, which alternates with a fishing report by Capt. Jody Campbell and his From the Dock column. We also cover whats happening on the water with the Coast Guard Auxiliary Report by Carolyn Brown Treadon, and a dive column by Gregg Stanton. Other popular features include the Sheriffs Report, with some of the interesting law enforcement activity of the past week, and News Service of Floridas Weekly Roundup, which reports on happenings in state government. Every week of the month, we have a different focus … in this edition, its Senior Citizen news. Other weeks, its the Chamber of Commerce on the “ rst of the month, followed by Green Scene with environmental news, and an Arts & Entertainment section on the third week. On those months when theres a “ fth week, we have the News Extra! … which focuses on special news and reports. Are we missing something youd like to see in the paper? Let me know. You can call me at 9267102 or email at editor@ thewakullanews.net.William Snowden is the editor of The Wakulla News. William Snowdenwsnowden@thewakullanews.netThere are people here in Wakulla who are without food and basic essentials. The good news is that the recent Empty Bowls event created a broader awareness of this issue and, as a result, many efforts of outreach are now at work to address this growing problem. For example, Promise Land Ministries is going to prepare a hot traditional Christmas dinner for all the Operation Santa families. The B&B youth organization over the past month has donated four large bags of groceries. Much of it recently went to a family in crisis. Operation Santa, a signi“ cant outreach during the Christmas season conducted by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, has kicked off and is blessed to have use of the Community Center again this year. There are already 98 families currently in the system and they expect that number to reach 200 before the outreach is completed. There are a few families that have contacted Operation Santa directly because they are aware of the program and need help, however, most of the referrals are coming from local schools and agencies like Healthy Start, Disc Village and the Health Department who work with the families and know their needs. Many of these families have limited incomes, or they face health problems. Some of these families are working, but their modest incomes do not cover lifes essentials, or the ability to join in the holiday spirit. All too often grandparents are raising their grandchildren, many folks cannot “ nd a job or they are under-employment. This is all compounded by the rising cost of living essentials. Operation Santas team prays for giving hearts everyday and there are many in the community that respond, but with the growing number of families in need they need more giving hearts. A great example is Judi King and her team. They will be contacting each family multiple times in the days ahead in an effort to get to know them better, make a heart felt connection to each and to help identify their needs. Families have requested the most basic items such as books, dolls, board games and toys for children. Operation Santa will not be providing bicycles this year as they are focusing on providing for more families than in years past. In the days ahead items of need for these families will be listed on Operation Santas Facebook. Also, we hope to begin the adoption process whereby families will be identi“ ed with a number, their situation described, and the items they most need listed. Last year more than 60 families were adopted of the 141 families assisted. So why are you hearing all this? Operation Santa hopes you will consider a donation this year. These families truly need your help. Especially because one of the grants we obtained last year will not be coming in this year. We do have a “ sh fry planned for early December (led by the Panacea Fire Department, we hope) and that will help, as will donations by others, and we are hopeful the Rotary will take on providing the food boxes and Christmas dinners as we want to preserve Empty Bowls money for the seven church pantries. We have many things working. It is also hoped that individually you will: € Adopt a family or two (basic needs, no high end items). € Help as your time allows at the community center, staffed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., organizing donations, helping “ ll boxes. € Go through your closets for gently used clothing and toys to donate. Bring these things to the community center before Nov. 30. € Pull from the Wal-Mart tree a wishŽ that you then buy and drop into the Operation Santa bin at customer service € Tell everyone you know about Operation Santa and how they can help too. Its a community thing. Call 926-3526 with any questions. Wakulla County Coalition for YouthPlease help Operation SantaEditor, The News: Thank you for being such a voice for the county. I truly enjoyed your election coverage. I thought it was comprehensive, extensive and fair. I also appreciated the coverage you gave our religious community as you covered the 40-day prayer walk while still making room for the individual church coverage. It is beyond me why there would be a household in all of Wakulla County that would not be a subscriber and for those who are not, I feel they are losing an essential connection to their community. The Wakulla News is as much a part of its readers life as are the activities, the interests and the events that you highlight each week. Thank you again for embracing and keeping our neighborhoods in touch with one another. Cyndi Webster CrawfordvilleOperation Santa showed community need E orts to save cedar at beach are good Card of thanks Wakulla News has role in community Appreciate waves from newly elected anks from Riversprings for supportEditor, The News: As I was driving to work on a cold, breezy postelection morning, I was not the least bit surprised to see Commissioner-elect Ralph Thomas standing on the side of the road waving and thanking everyone for their support. And right along beside him, Sheriff-elect Charlie Creel. This reflects the character of these men that Wakulla County chose to lead us into a better future. So many times candidates think it is over once they win an election, but these guys know it has just begun. Whether you voted for them or not, please support these gentlemen and allow them do their hard work. Good work, guys! Did I mention it was cold? S. Roberts Crawfordville The Bradham and Webster families would like to give sincere thanks for the many acts of kindness shown during the loss of our loved one, Robert T. Bradham Jr. (Robbie Love). It has helped the family so much to have caring relatives and friends. He will be greatly missed and may God bless each of you! Editor, The News: An open letter to Commissioner Jerry Moore, and David Edwards, Wakulla County Administrator: Since the old Fishermans JettyŽ was removed by well intentioned, misinformed people several years ago, Shell Point Beach has receded more than 100 feet. The countys recent efforts to temporarily restore a portion of the beach and save the historic cedar tree are to be commended. On behalf of the many, many people in Wakulla County who enjoy Shell Point Beach, I want to thank you and your staff for trying to save this piece of paradise. I understand that this sand/oyster shell addition is only a temporary “ x and that you are seeking FEMA funds and permitting to eventually provide some hardeningŽ that will aid in the natural restoration of our once beautiful beach. By covering the trees roots, perhaps it will survive the winter and bring us all another year of joy. Thank you for again for a job well done. Alan Lamarche Shell Point Editor, The News: Riversprings Middle School wants to thank all of the community members and businesses that donated their time, money and prizes to our annual fun day. It was one of our most successful fun days in several years, raising more than $7,000. The funds will be used for classroom supplies and PE equipment. We thank the parents, teachers and community members who gave their time and donations to make this successful. A special RMS bear hug to the following businesses who donated supplies, gift cards, food, and prizes: Ace Hardware-Crawfordville, Badcock Furniture, Bert Thomas Grocery, Black Gold, Burger King, Busch Gardens, BWs Grill, Capital City Bank, Capital Lanes, Centennial Bank, Dazzles, Disney, Evolution Day Spa, Fun Station, Fun Station Jr., Genghis Grill, Gold Exchange, High Quality Heating and Air, Jimmy Johns, Lindys Chicken, McDonalds, Mikes Marine Supply, Myra Jeans, Next Level Baseball, Pepsi, Publix, Riverside Caf, Sams Club, Sonic, Sonnys Barbecue, Stonecreek Pizza, Subway, Suntrust Bank, Superlube, Tallahassee Jr. Museum, Talquin Electric, Team Wakulla Wrestling, Tn-T Hideaway Inc., Victorias Secret, Wakulla Springs, Walgreens, Wal-mart, WHS Band Boosters, Wild Adventures and Winn-Dixie.Riversprings Middle School

PAGE 5

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 5AFree community-wide Thanksgiving feast is heldBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netMembers of several area churches and groups gathered in Hudson Park on Saturday, Nov. 17 to serve a free Thanksgiving feast to those in the community. We wanted to offer a free meal to the citizens of Wakulla County to show caring and love in these times, said Tim Davis, organizer of the event and bishop of Hallowed Be Thy Name Church of God in Crawfordville. Hallowed Be Thy Name has been serving a free Thanksgiving meal for the last ve years and this year, they decided to expand it and see if other churches and groups might be interested in helping and serving an even larger group of people. The support and volunteer service has been overwhelming, Davis said. With the help of Crawfordville United Methodist Church, Charlottes Faith and Deliverance Temple, Spirit Life Church, Promise Land Ministries, Wakulla One, Wakulla County Commission, Sopchoppy United Methodist Church, Thessalonia Missionary Baptist Church, Wakulla Signs, Winn-Dixie, Wal-Mart and Wave 94.1, as well as volunteers from the Cub Scouts, the Florida A&M pharmacy school and others, they had enough food to feed more than 500 people. Its a community-wide effort, Davis said. In exchange for a free meal, those in attendance were asked to bring a canned good to donate to the local food pantries. If there were any leftovers, they planned to take it to the homeless shelter. Davis hopes the event will continue to grow and get bigger every year. Its a lot of work, Davis said. But its worth the effort to see all the smiles. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENMore ham is put out on the serving line at the Thanksgiving feast held Saturday in Hudson Park. Veronica, 8, Trinity, 4, and Travis, 3, play at the community feast. Gregory Jackson II, 2, enjoys the food. Several area churches and businesses came together to make the community feast happen. A free Thanksgiving dinner served up to residents.

PAGE 6

Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Church Briefs Winter Music Festival at Harvest Fellowship Dec. 8A Winter Music Festival is set for Dec. 8 on the outdoor stage of Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. The concert will be held from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. You are invited to come and sit out on the lawn and enjoy a free musical concert featuring a variety of music styles from blue grass to hip hop, local talent, as well as visiting musicians from around the state. Well have a bouncy house for the little ones, a bon re with marshmallows for roasting and lots of good food. Harvest Fellowship Church and Thrift Store is sponsoring this event with the ongoing intent to make Wakulla County a great place to live. Your nancial donations will be accepted at the event. Interested vendors should call the Harvest Thrift Store at (850) 926-3535. Quilt is being raf ed by Christ Church AnglicanChrist Church Quilters are raf ing a beautiful hand quilted queen-king size quilt. The pattern is Star-spangled Four Patch. Raf e tickets are now available, six tickets for $5 or $1 each. The drawing will be held after noon on Dec. 9, at Christ Church Anglican, 3383 Coastal Highway. You may call the church at 745-8412 or Mary Lou Martin 210-1203 for more information or for tickets. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER Let me make it clear right up front that Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays. I admit I am not too fond of many holidays. Can a week go by without some holiday that shuts down everybody? I celebrated Veterans Day, for example, on Sunday and the next day I went to the bank and discovered the bank was celebrating Veterans Day on Monday. Dont they know what day it is? I trust these people with my money? Of all the holidays we have, Thanksgiving is high on my list. I used to have a high regard for my birthday but so many of them have come that I do not like them anymore. I am ready to cancel that holiday. My birthday only means I am one year older and not one whit wiser. I am not thinking just about the scrumptious Thanksgiving dinner. Okay, maybe I am, a little. Down through the years, I have been great fraternity buddies with eating. We have bonded so great throughout the years that even now that bonding is beginning to show. I like Thanksgiving, and so I am a little confused about these Sanity Challenged Buffoons who are allergic to the word Thanksgiving. They want to use names like, Turkey Day, and the latest one T-Day. What the T stands for is anybodys guess. I know what D-Day stands for but all the gray matter has leaked out of my skull trying to gure out what T-Day stands for. Given the rationality of these purveyors of insanity, I can only guess. Looking at what is happening to this great holiday, I have uncovered a con so convert that most people do not know it is going on. I call it the great Thanksgiving con. This is especially true for those who call it Turkey Day. First off, everybody says nice things about the turkey. The more the turkey struts, the more the compliments ow his way. What the turkey does not know is that when these Turkey Day people are looking at the turkey they are also licking their lips. It is not the beautiful feathers that interest them. It is not the way the turkey proudly struts back and forth. The frame these people want to see the turkey in is a roasting pan. They want to get rid of all those feathers that the turkey is so proud of and strip him bare so that he ts nicely in the roasting pan. The last few weeks of the turkeys life are rather remarkable. These people will give the turkey everything it wants. More food than the turkey can gobble up. What the turkey does not know is that there is a destiny in store for him. With all the attention paid him, he has the idea that everybody appreciates him for his looks. If this turkey would ever spend an evening watching television with his human host, he would gather the idea that the most important thing in all the world is how you look. Looking into the mirror the turkey is quite proud of what he sees. He assumes that what he sees looking in the mirror is what his human host sees when they look at him. How wrong can a turkey be? The con begins to unfold. Rumors are ying about that there is a great banquet being prepared in his honor. Any turkey would be proud of this kind of development and look forward to being the guest of honor. In fact, as the turkey struts back-and-forth in front of his human hosts, he hears them saying, Wont that turkey look good at our dinner table? Whose head wouldnt turn hearing this kind of a compliment? What the turkey does not know is that being a guest at a dinner table is a onetime event for a creature like himself. Any turkey worth his feathers does not think beyond this great feast being held in his honor. I can imagine the gobble back in the turkey pen with the other turkeys. This great big, good-looking turkey, is telling all the others how important he is on the other side of the fence. Being the kind of turkey that he is, his gobble wins over the admiration of the other turkeys. Im so special, the turkey gobbles to his inferiors, that those humans are having a special banquet and I am the special guest of honor. The rest of the turkeys are ooohing in his direction for they never seen anyone quite as special as this turkey. The fatal day arrives. People come for the turkey and the rest of the turkeys have gathered around giving him a special turkey sendoff. They cannot wait to hear his report when he gets back from the special banquet. I say this is a con to beat all cons. Wrong messages are being sent to the turkey population. Thinking they are the guest of honor, they turn out to be the main dish on the banquet table. This is why I am against the term Turkey Day. It sends the wrong message. The focus around our table on this special occasion will not be the turkey but rather giving thanks to God who has been so good to us. Enter into his gates with thanksgiving, and into his courts with praise: be thankful unto him, and bless his name (Psalms 100:4 KJV).Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. OUT TO PASTORThe great Thanksgiving conFirst job for husbands is to love GodBy ANDRE WHITEMens Fraternity of WakullaThe role of a husband has two important prerequisites. We must determine in our heart to obey the greatest commandment of loving God with all our heart and the second greatest commandment, loving our neighbor as our selves. Secondly we must make daily prayer a priority in our lives. The rst prerequisite is found in Matthew 22:37-40: 37 Jesus said to him, You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind. [d] 38 This is the rst and great commandment. 39 And the second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. [e] 40 On these two commandments hang all the Law and the Prophets. Husbands, our greatest challenge will be learning how to love, lead, and live with our wives. In marriage husbands and wives will have misunderstandings, disagreements, and unfulfilled expectations, but God expects his people to remain true to their vows. If we love God we will keep his commandments. Below are some dos and donts that will help us in our marriage. 1. Treat your spouse with love as described in 1 Corinthians 13. 2. Care for her as you care for yourself. 3. Love her more than your own life (Hobby, team, friends, etc..). 4. Her needs and concerns are your highest priority. 5. Make whatever sacri ces necessary to ensure her safety and wellbeing. 6. She should be con dent in knowing no one or thing comes before her. 7. You must be committed and faithful to her in both action and heart. 8. Wifes joy and happiness is a high priority. 9. Be gentle and affectionate. 10. Be a Godly husband. 11. Ensure biblical teaching/ learning is taking place in your home. 12. Treat our wives with respect and honor. (Give her the same respect as an important house guest or family member) 13. Set a good example. 14. Strive to provide intimate ful llment. 15. Learn everything about your wife. Joys, pains, concerns, fears, likes, dislikes, etc. 16. The wife is not second to the children, or your parents. 17. Do not be demanding, bossy, overbearing, controlling, coerce or express unrealistic expectations, degrading, belittling, devaluing, unappreciative, critical, fault nding, blaming, harsh, verbally or physically abusive, disrespectful, nor treat her like a slave. Do our wives trust us to be faithful? Do our wives believe we will seek Gods will concerning her, the children, and the home? 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826)

PAGE 7

By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsTheres an old gospel tune that says there is A leak in this old building / And my soul has got to move. Theres no doubt the Macedonia Church of Christ Written in Heaven congregation are taking those words to heart. The effects of Tropical Storm Debby this past June caused historic ooding in areas of the county. Sopchoppy and Buckhorn where Macedonia Church is located were hard hit. A number of residents and business owners are still in the throes of digging out from under. Before the storm, Macedonia spent upwards of $25,000 to remodel their entire facility. No room was left untouched in this effort, but as Debby touched down, the church kitchen and basement suffered major ooding, and the roof, literally, shifted. That roof has now begun to separate. We were doing renovations, says member Delores Nelson. Putting down new carpet, redoing the pews, air conditioning. Our plan was to add to the structure that we now have by extending the sides and moving the bathrooms up front, and also reworking the roof. But the storm hit before we could put that phase of our plan in motion. Like many, they are currently involved with the paperwork for FEMA and the insurance company. They are now reaching out for the communitys support to help save as much of the original structure as possible while undergoing this unexpected chapter of rebuilding. Were doing everything we can to get the community involved, says church Secretary Bobbery Smith Rosier, We plan to have a Saints Night Out fundraising dinner soon. But we need the help of those in the community. This church is an historic location, and a number of churches in the area are spin-offs from this one. Deacon George Washington Green and Mary Eliza Green donated the land for the church back in 1934. Before this, services were held at the Greens home, or locations such as the site of where the Old Buckhorn School once stood. There were also bush harbor services, where the faithful would gather beneath a temporary structure. Often in these types of gatherings, wooden barrels were covered with cloth and used as the lectern, or pulpit, while baptisms took place in whatever area was open to Negroes from rivers, to ditches. The rst pastor of the church was Elder Moses Brown, from Indian Pass, between Apalachicola and Port St. Joe. As the story goes, the Greens and the daughter of another family went to a Pentecostal meeting in the Apalachicola area held by a Mother Dukes. She was, in turn, invited to come to Crawfordville to hold similar meetings. She would go on to visit the Bethel community, and then Hype Park. This was the beginning of the First Born Church. Eventually, a few members of the FBC broke off and formed a Written in Heaven organization. Macedonia was the rst church built in the area (and most likely in the state), under the Church of Christ Written in Heaven charter. The building was constructed by Elder J.D. Musgray, with Bishop Thomas Brown, who cut down the trees donated by the Green family for the window sills. Hamp Rosier donated bricks and blocks for the building. Averaging approximately 75 members in attendance for its services, a large majority are family descendants of those who started the original church, such as the Rosier, Green and Skipper families, to name few. This is a common built frame church, says Pastor Alfred Nelson, It doesnt have trusses, but a common frame instead, so most everything is nailed together. A lot of those nails came apart in the roof area and is now causing pressure on the rest of the building. We need funding for a different pitch to support the structure and fortify the walls, he continues, A retaining wall out back is also needed to protect us from other storms. The oors are old wood plank oors. Theres not a block foundation underneath, but cut pine trees. Thats how they built them in the old days, so what were dealing with is a true classic. We hope to rework the building while maintaining as much of its historic quality as possible. Adding to this woe is the necessity of nding a place of worship. An appreciation program was scheduled to take place this month. Knowing out of state visitors would be in attendance, services in the building were to be suspended directly afterwards so renovations could begin in December. It was a surprise for us, says Pastor Nelson. Our engineer told us that if nothing else happened like another storm this building should last for another three years. It was sturdy enough that it wouldnt just collapse on its own. We understand the county has concerns, he adds, and were not arguing that at all. Wed planned to halt services at the end of the month. That end just came a few weeks earlier than expected. My number one concern is that the spiritual wellbeing of our members and parishioners be taken care of in this time. All other things are secondary. We want people to know that we have a need. If they can donate a facility for worship, nances, or have expertise in an area, or can provide manpower, or organization skills to help get the word out, we would gladly accept. The Bible says you have not, because you ask not. Were working with that principle in mind. For more information on how you can donate or help, contact Pastor Nelson at (850) 264-6621 or secretary, Rosier at (850) 962-2884. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 7AObituaries Robert J. Keith Sr. John Buford Morrow Jr. John Henry TaylorJohn Henry Taylor, 73, of Crawfordville, passed away on Sunday, Nov. 18, 2012, in Tallahassee. He was born on May 13, 1939, in Wakulla County and had lived in this area his entire life. He retired as a captain from the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. He served in the U.S. Army. He was a Baptist and an avid commercial sherman. He was a loving father and family man. Visitation was held Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2012, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Funeral services will be Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2012, at 1 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Burial will follow at Bonnett Pond Cemetery. Survivors include two sons, Cricket Taylor (Patty) of Panacea and Darrell Taylor (Carolyn) of Crawfordville; three sisters, Irene Nichols, Corky Crum and Tenny Spears; nine grandchildren; one great-grandchild; and many other loving family and friends. He is predeceased by a son, Danny Taylor; and his parents, Nelson and Susie Taylor. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 www.bevisfh. com). John Henry TaylorRobert J. Keith Sr., 63, went home to be with his mother, Edna Keith, and brother, Edward Keith, on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012. He was born Feb. 9, 1949, in Tallahassee. He raised his family working as a commercial sherman while living in Panacea. He was of the Christian faith. His memorial service was held at Panacea Full Gospel Church on Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2012. Survivors include his wife of 33 years, Tammie D. Keith; two sons, Robert J. Keith Jr. (Adela) and Richard A. Keith, all of Panacea; one daughter, Angela Hutchinson; four brothers, Vernon L. Keith (Doris Ann) of Tallahassee, Arnell Keith (Lois) of Crawfordville, Johnnie Keith (Dianna) of Butler, Ga., and Andrew Keith; a sister, Linda Trice (Everett Griggs) of Sopchoppy; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 www.bevisfh. com) John Buford Morrow Jr., 62, died Friday, Oct. 26, 2012, at his home in Perry. Born in Las Vegas, he moved to Perry from Tallahassee in 1983. He was a U.S. Army veteran, having served in Vietnam. He worked as a paint and body repairman for over 30 years. He was preceded in death by his father, John Buford Morrow Sr. Survivors include his wife of 23 years, Kathleen Morrow of Perry; mother and stepfather, Jeanne and Carl Johnson of Edgewater; a son, Michael Pridmore of Gaffney, S.C.; a stepson, John V. Ross of Tallahassee; four step-daughters, Robin Ross of Kings Park, N.Y., Kimberly Burr of Augusta, Ga., Michelle Hanson and Joy-lyn Tuten, both of Perry; one sister, Joan Couture of Edgewater; 14 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. A memorial service was held Tuesday, Oct. 30, at Beggs Funeral Home in Perry. His remains will be laid to rest at his family cemetery in Sopchoppy.John Buford Morrow Jr. Robert J. Keith Sr.Historic Macedonia Church seeking help for storm damage PHOTO BY HERB DONALDSON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMacedonia Church had structural damage as a result of Tropical Storm Debby. Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage? Help Big Bend Hospice Honor Those Who Are No Longer With Us Big Bend HospiceTree of Remembrance 2012 2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.orgVisit our Wakulla County Tree at Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial Bank in Crawfordville LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE

PAGE 8

Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community Community Special to The NewsBig Bend Hospice staff and members of the Big Bend Hospice Wakulla County Advisory Council joined Alan Brock, chair of the Wakulla County Board of Commissioners, for a Proclamation reading on Oct. 15, declaring November as National Hospice Month. County Commission Chair Alan Brock presents the proclamation to Pam Allbritton, Community Resources coordinator of Big Bend Hospice.Lions present awards to peace poster winners SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMembers of the Sopchoppy Lions Club visit Wakulla Middle School to hand out checks to this years Imagine Peace contest winners, Shelby Weeks, Gracie Barwick, Olivia Tillman and Emily McMillan. By MARJ LAWSopchoppy LionFor the third year in a row, the Sopchoppy Lions Club and Wakulla Middle School students have worked together to celebrate world peace. Lion Marshall Catoe and Wakulla Middle School art teacher Carol Belancsik encouraged students to create posters depicting this theme. The contest is a 23-year International Lions Club project entitled Imagine Peace. Once a student wins a local poster contest, his or her poster is submitted to the next highest level. Sopchoppy Lions had more than 20 posters from which to choose, and every single poster received votes. This year, Shelby Weeks won the first prize of $50. Shelbys poster featured a central dove and a child blowing bubbles having peace symbols within the bubbles. To me, peace is love and happiness, said Shelby. It is just having fun with friends and family. Second prize of $35 went to Gracie Alex Barwick. Olivia Tillman and Emily McMillan won third and fourth prizes of $25 and $20. Each year, Imagine Peace attracts more and more students. The Lions were surprised at how well they are able to draw, and at how complex their minds work. Principal Mike Barwick announced the winners over the school intercom Thursday morning. Then, Lions Club President Elaine Herndon and Project Chairman Marshall Catoe passed out winners checks and certi cates. Lion Marshall Catoe started up Imagine Peace for Sopchoppy Lions three years ago. We, as Lions, want to be actively involved with the youth in our area, he said, and I want to thank Principal Barwick and Art Teacher Carol Belancsik for joining with us. Maybe one day, a Wakulla Middle School student might win the International Contest.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCommission recognizes National Hospice MonthBrodhead chosen to receive citizen appreciation awardSpecial to The NewsThe Concerned Citizens of Wakulla, Inc. (CCOW) announces the winner of this years Leon Nettles Citizen Appreciation Award is Jeannie Brodhead of Wakulla County selected out of a eld of well-quali ed candidates. The Leon Nettles Citizen Award was established by the CCOW to recognize and honor a citizen highly engaged in the Wakulla County community and who best exempli es the principles of honesty and integrity that former County Commissioner Leon Nettles demonstrated while serving the county. Selection of the awardee can be based on a single good citizen deed or accomplishment, deeds or accomplishments over a period of years, or lifetime contribution to the welfare of Wakulla County. Brodhead grew up in the Myers park neighborhood of Tallahassee, graduated from Leon High, and earned a bachelors degree in Elementary education from FSU. She taught elementary school in West Homestead, where she was elected Teacher of the Year. She moved to Wakulla County in 1997 and taught four years in Leon County. Presently, Brodhead is COASTs librarian, president of the Wakulla Iris Garden Club,and very active in the Native Plant Society Wakullas Sarracenia Chapter. As a volunteer, she is deeply involved in Youth Gardening Programs with COAST and teaching Coast Charter school students about gardening, the beauty of our natural landscapes and the workings of our natural plant communities. Brodhead has worked vigorously to beautify the county and has motivated many others to do likewise through her examples. She has been very instrumental in the landscaping of the library and very active in Wakullas Arbor Day activities. Brodhead has unlimited energy, a very big heart, and sincerely cares about Wakulla, its youth and its natural beauty. She accomplishes so much with very little fanfare and much humility. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMary Cortese, of CCOW, presents the Leon Nettles Citizen Appreciation Award to Jeannie Brodhead. Email community news to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar. Do You Need a Ride toLicensed, Insured, Local*one way trip Flat rate for groups of up to six persons availableRates as low as $6*Now serving Crawfordville, Woodville, St. Marks, Medart, Panacea, Sopchoppy, Ochlockonee Bay and the Tallahassee area.Call Brandy in Wakulla: 850-567-8485TALLAHASSE OFFICE: 850-228-9669 Monday Saturday Sunday by appointment.

PAGE 9

Special to The NewsThe weather has been getting cooler and that usually heralds the arrival of the young whooping cranes, migrating south. They have traveled 53 days and over 914 miles from Wisconsin, leaving on Sept. 28. They have three more stops until they reach Jefferson County. They will rest there before the nal ight to St. Marks. All ve cranes will spend the winter at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. People will be able to view the cranes and the ultralights at a yover event in St. Marks. The exact date in unknown, but refuge staff are guessing they might arrive on Saturday, Nov. 24. If interested, visit www. operationmigration.org. Plan on arriving at the yover site around 8 a.m. The flyover should occur around 8:45 am. Operation Migration and the St. Marks Refuge Association will have crane merchandise to sell and volunteers will be there to answer questions. It was a disappointment last year when the migration was halted in northern Alabama, said Refuge Manager Terry Peacock. This year, the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge will be the only Florida refuge to host young cranes and we are excited to be a part of this incredible project. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 9AOptimist Club holds installation Special to The NewsThe Coastal Optimist Club of Wakulla held their installation of of cers on Nov. 1 at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. The swearing in was done by Clerk of the Court Brent Thurmond. The of cers for 2012-2013 are President Bill Versiga, Secretary Jo Ann Daniels, Treasurer Susan Payne Turner and Vice President Sally Gandy (not pictured).Photo SPECIAL: TO THE NEWSAmeris Bank helps to ght hunger SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSupporters of President Obama march in a rally to encourage citizens to vote early. Obama supporters march for early votesSpecial to The NewsA large number of supporters of the re-election campaign for President Barack Obama turned out on Saturday, Oct. 27, for an Early Voting Kickoff Rally in Azalea Park. While some waived signs, others enjoyed a covered dish barbecue picnic luncheon and talks from community leaders. Local Obama volunteer Kim Kramer stressed the importance of early voting and discussed the improving economy, the importance of the Affordable Health Care Act and the forward thinking policies on education, womens rights, the environment and the return of manufacturing jobs. County Commissioner Alan Brock also spoke about the importance of voting for Democrats to make sure they have someone ghting for them at every level of government. Following the luncheon, supporters joined together for a march to the Supervisor of Elections of ce where they cast their votes in the election. Ameris Bank held its third Annual Helping Fight Hunger food drive during the month of October, and bankwide collected more than 297,000 non-perishable food items. In Crawfordville, 1,611 items were collected. The donation will be delivered to First Baptist Church of Crawfordville and Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Throughout October, customers, bank employees, and members of the community were encouraged to donate non-perishable food items. e whooping cranes are coming OPERATION MIGRATION For that Special & Unique Gift:Lots of educational gifts & toys for children & adults. We have a great selection of natural history Books for all ages, books by Jack and Anne Rudloe, beautiful jewelry, home decor, prints, cards, ornaments. We have added many items to our collection. Great Stocking Stuffers Too! Open: Mon. Fri. 9am 5pm www.gulfspecimen.org Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Aquarium Your generous support helps us to continue our mission to educate and inspire. S S Visit the Gift Shopat Open 7 Days

PAGE 10

Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1AMorrison, 43, is from Wakulla County and is the son of Wilhelmina and Clarence Morrison. He started with the sheriffs of ce in 1991 as a correctional of- cer after graduating from TCC and the Lively Law Enforcement Academy. He then returned to Lively and became a certi ed law enforcement of cer. He has worked in the detention facility, narcotics unit and road patrol division. He is currently a lieutenant with the criminal investigations division. He is also a eld training of cer. Morrison also has a connection to the sheriffs office through his family members. His greatgrandfather, James Smith, was the sheriff from 1901 to 1912 and his great-uncle Angus Morrison served as sheriff from 1912 to 1933. Creels main goal is bringing the respect back to the agency. I want the community to respect this agency, Creel said. I want them to trust this agency. Creel, who campaigned on the need for a fresh start at the sheriffs of ce, said there will de nitely be changes once he is at the helm, but he stressed that there will not be massive rings. Im not a hatchet man, Creel said. But, he added that there will be some restructuring and a staff analysis performed to ensure that all employees of the sheriffs of ce are in a position where they feel comfortable and are quali- ed to be there. Both Creel and Morrison also acknowledged that some people will choose to leave the sheriffs of ce, while others will stay. We would be naive to think everything would stay the same, Morrison said. He added that any time the sheriffs office changes hands, there are people who decide to go and others would choose to stay. Creel plans to bring in a transition team later this month to look at the organization of the entire of ce and perform a review from the top to the bottom. The team consists of a retired auditor, retired sheriff, retired banker, retired law enforcement of- cer and a member of the Wakulla Christian Coalition. Once he takes office, he plans to also perform an audit to ensure that the funds are being spent the most effectively and ef ciently. A lot of county funds are spent at this department, he said. And he wants to make the budget process as transparent as possible for the citizens. He is also going to create a citizens advisory committee that will be tasked with bringing concerns of the community to the sheriffs of ce. I dont want them to tell us what we want to hear, I want them to tell us what we need to know, Creel said. The sheriffs of ce will also be aggressively attacking the drug problem in the county, he said. The crime rate is up because of burglaries and drugs and burglaries go hand in hand, he said. The only people who are going to lose their jobs in this county are the drug dealers, he said.Sheri -elect Creel names undersheri By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 16 Floridas jobless rate fell in October to 8.5 percent, its lowest level since December 2008, the states unemployment office reported Friday. Florida still lags behind the nation but closed the gap a bit. The national rate stood last month at 7.9 percent. If discouraged workers and part-time employees seeking full-time jobs are added, Floridas unemployment rate for October was 16.4 percent down from 18.2 percent a year ago. We are creating an environment that fosters job creation, economic development and provides a skilled workforce, Gov. Rick Scott said in a statement. My number one goal is to create jobs for Florida families and get this state back to work. There is still more work that needs to be done, but Im con dent were on the right path. Non agricultural employment reached 7,371,500, the 27th straight month that the number of employed residents increased year to year, according to DEO estimates. Floridas labor force also grew in October, inching up 0.7 percent from October 2011. Non-farm employment has grown by 67,600 jobs over the past 12 months, with professional services, health care, transportation and utilities sectors providing most new jobs over the year. Total government employment fell by 12,900, driven by a decrease in state government work, which fell 2.1 percent. Floridas construction sector also continued its slump, falling 4,900 jobs from an already anemic October 2011. Crestview/Fort Walton/ Destin had the lowest unemployment rate in the state at 5.7 percent. Tallahassee came in second at 6.2 percent. Counties with a high percentage of government employees continued to enjoy some of the lowest jobless rates in the state, with Walton, Okaloosa, Wakulla and Franklin counties in the top ve. Speaking to the Federalist Society in Washington Friday morning, Scott said in prepared remarks that the drop in unemployment combined with increases in the labor pool were testament to the wisdom of austere state spending and other Republican-led efforts. Our economic turnaround for Florida families is well underway and we are proof that conservative solutions work, Scott said. Democrats were quick to question whether all was good news, noting Floridas rate remains higher than the national average, and has been worse than the nation as a whole since mid-2008.Florida jobless rate down againIn October, Wakulla County saw a major decrease in unemployment to 5.9 percent from 6.6 percent in September, a .7 percent drop. Wakullas jobless rate has fallen 2.1 percent over the past year from a high of 8.0 percent. Gadsden Countys jobless rate in October was 8.2 percent, down from 8.7 percent in September. Leon County also saw a decrease moving from 7.1 to 6.4 percent over the month. Staff reportWakulla down JENNIFER JENSENLt. Trey Morrison and Sheriff-elect Charlie Creel. DECEMBER Power up the holidays with great products at stock up prices. Find the right products for your project and expert advice at True Value. Sale ends 12/31/2012 3361 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville 926-5559 Mon Fri 7am 6pm Sat 7:30am 5pm GULF COAST GULF COAST Lumber & Supply Inc. Lumber & Supply Inc. SAVE 40%899reg. 14.99Your choice B. 3 RemoteControlled Outdoor Outlets A. 2 Remote-Controlled Indoor Outlets B. A. SPECIAL PURCHASE997Floodlight Holder and 8' Extension Cord Value Pack SPECIAL PURCHASE12975-Pc. Bonus Pliers Set BONUS PACK299reg. 3.996-Outlet White or Green Power Strip Your choice SPECIAL PURCHASE197M & M Holiday Ornament $3reg. 4.193-Pk. Invisible Tape SAVE 38%3999reg. 64.99Battery Charger SAVE 30% 899reg. 12.9916-Pk. AA or AAA Alkaline Batteries Your choice SAVE 25% 899reg. 11.994-Pk. AA or AAA Lithium Batteries Your choice SPECIAL PURCHASE497Scented Musical Soap Dispenser Your choice SAVE 30%6999reg. 99.994,000/9,000 BTU Portable Buddy Heater SPECIAL PURCHASE4997Electric Stove Heater SAVE 33%9999reg. 149.99120V/1500W Infrared Heater with Remote SAVE 25%1499reg. 19.994V Lithium-Ion Cordless Screwdriver HOT DEAL 599reg. 7.498-Pk. AA or AAA Alkaline Batteries Your choice SAVE 47%899reg. 16.99105-Ct. LED Icicle Light Set Your choice SAVE 50% 1999reg. 39.99 100-Pc. Rotary Tool KitSPECIAL PURCHASE149717-Pc. Drill Bit and 40-Pc. Screwdriver Bit Combo Pack SAVE $153999reg. 54.994-Step Aluminum Step Ladder Over $50 value Gary & Shari EdingtonShort Sale/Foreclosure Resource 850-933-6364 or 850-556-4736We wish you a Blessed and Happy Holiday SeasonServing Leon, Wakulla and Franklin Counties for all your Real Estate Needs for 8 years and counting visit us at www.ShariEdington.com Realtors Who CareGary & Shari Edington Shell Point Realty

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 11AContinued from Page 1A By the time they gure it out, their child may be really sick, Lawhon said. We may help one parent see it before that happens. Students in Wakulla High Schools TV production class produced a short video about diabetes featuring one of their fellow students who has type 1 diabetes. At Crawfordville Elementary School, they chose to show students this video and have the three students at the school who have type 1 diabetes share their experiences. The students were very eager and willing to promote it, Lawhon said. We wanted to empower them too. Its a powerful message coming from a student. Lawhon commended the three students, Hayden Betz, Carson Goodwin and Sydney Andrews, at Crawfordville for having to deal with this disease every single day of their lives, and many from when they were just a baby. Theyre just tremendous kids, Lawhon said. I dont know many adults who could handle it as well. Betz and Goodwin spoke numerous times to students during their lunch period explaining diabetes and what they have to do every day and how it impacts their lives. Betz, a third grader, told the students that he has to get a shot of insulin four times a day and said if his blood sugar gets too high, he starts to have blurred vision and is extremely thirsty. Goodwin, a fourth grader, has an insulin pump and showed it to the students. Both of them are extremely brave boys, said Principal Angie Walker. We kind of want to honor them. Lawhon said they were also looking to educate the community about type 2 diabetes, which is preventable. Years ago, those who had type 2 diabetes were usually older people, she said. But now, they are seeing students with type 2. In addition to promoting the day at the schools, the health department performed diabetic screenings and health education in their lobby. Diabetes is such a growing problem, said Grace Keith, health educator at the health department. The big this is bringing about awareness and educating the public, she said. Its a whole body disease, Keith said. We have to get folks to eat better to at least delay it from occurring. Diabetes is the only chronic medical problem with its own world day, Lawhon said. In Wakulla County, there are 16 students with diabetes, that they know of, said Dr. Larry Deeb Pediatric Endocrinologist in Tallahasse. Ten years ago we didnt have a single student in Wakulla schools that had diabetes. Eleven of those students have to test their blood sugar three or four times a day and receive insulin one or two times a day. According to Dr. Deeb, they are seeing a 3 percent increase per year in children worldwide and a 5 percent increase in children under 5 each year.Students help promote World Diabetes Day JENNIFER JENSENThree students at Crawfordville Elementary who suffer from diabetes: Carson Goodwin, Sidney Andrews and Hayden Betz. At 1 a.m. on Sunday morning, Wakulla EMS and Wakulla Fire responded to a report of an accident on re in the area of Brooks Concrete in Panacea where a pickup truck was on re. The lone occupant had escaped the vehicle, after the southbound truck struck a utility pole and then careened into the plumbing of the main of ce of the concrete company before striking a second utility pole and breaking it also. Later it was discovered that a re had occurred in the of ce of the concrete company, caused by the downed power lines shorting computer equipment caused additional damage. Once the lines were de-energized that re self-extinguished. PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPanacea wreck In-Home Assessments and Referrals Offered for Comfort and Convenience If falls, weakness or inability to participate in activities become a concern for your loved one, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Tallahassee is here to help. We oer free inhome assessments with no physician orders needed. Once an evaluation is approved, HealthSouths team of professionals develop comprehensive, individualized treatment plans for a safe return home. If you have any questions or need more information contact us.IS YOUR LOVED ONE SAFE AT HOME?:HealthSouth Corporation:551345 At HealthSouth, we understand that recovering from a stroke can be challenging. But no matter where a patient is in his/her recovery process, or how long ago the stroke occurred, our Second Chance Stroke Program could help maximize functional ability, increase independence and improve quality of life. This includes areas of mobility, speech or written communication, swallowing, cognitive functions and activities of daily living. Our program oers: Physical/occupational/speech therapy Certied rehabilitation nurses Therapist trained in neuro developmental treatment Patient/family education Support groups Admission is by referral for a free in-home evaluation. For more information contact us.YOU DESERVE A SECOND CHANCE:HealthSouth Corporation:551344

PAGE 12

By JO ANN PALMERKWCB DirectorOn Saturday night, Nov. 17, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful held its Blue Jeans and Fast Machines fundraiser. The event kicked off at 5 p.m. with a wheels show. The show was open to all categories of vehicles such as trucks, bog trucks, off road vehicles, classics, new, rare, and restored or in progress, motorcycles and tricked-out rides, basically anything you wanted to show. There were a total of 22 vehicles, including the Purple Frog Race Teams Reynard SF200, a 1954 Cushman Scooter, an Quartershot T3R Rave Boat, two custom bog trucks, a Willys Jeep CJ2A, a 4 Chevy Nova Drag racer and six motorcycles. The trophy for Best in Show went to Sean and Rachel Wheeler for an 4 Big Dog Pitbull motorcycle with a custom red, white and blue paint job and ground effects of ashing blue lights. The Peoples Choice was Brad McKenzies Chevrolet Chevelle, the Sponsors Choice was Fred Martins 4 Chevrolet Corvette and the Presidents Choice was Woody Palmers Barracuda. All the awards were based on the total highest score among all entries and were scored by those in attendance. We also had the Lively Technical alternative fuel car and truck, and Red Hills Powersports showcased their line of electric motorcycles and ATV equipment. At 6 p.m. the band Local Motion from Gadsden County cranked up the music with an outstanding live performance that got everybody on their feet dancing and moving around to stay warm against the cold November evening. John Posey, Noah Posey and Sherrie Posey-Miller served up a delicious dinner of fresh shrimp and sh and the party continued with lots of door prizes donated by ACE Hardware, Auto Zone, Advanced Auto. The silent auction had several items autographed by FSU Coach Jimbo Fisher, a ReNu U Medical Spa gift certificate for a TriPollar Skin Tightening Treatment, coffee mugs from Mullet Girls at The White Elephant and a certi cate for services from Serendipity Salon. The lucky high bidders when home with great deals on holiday gifts. Over the past two years, the KWCB board has developed a projected plan that will enhance our existing mission to include the completion of several beauti cation projects such as the mural along U.S. Highway 98 in Panacea, supporting the renovation of the stairs at the Historical Society Museum and Archives and developing a green space on the grounds of the property, initiating an Adopt-A-Shore program, expanding the coastal and forest cleanups, hosting a hazardous waste amnesty day in the spring and fall, and to develop an educational program. We hope to also be initiating a small grants program to assist classroom teachers fund environmental education projects such as container gardens. All these things require funding and especially community support. Thank you to our sponsors who make this and other events possible. The Wakulla County Historical Society, Revell Electric & Automated Access Systems, Marpan Recycling, Veolia Environmental, 3Y Ranch & 3 Y Outdoor Equipment, Red Hills Powersports, Wakulla Realty, A New Look Painting of N.F., Inc., Refreshment Services PEPSI, The Wakulla News, Air-Con of Wakulla, Traci B. Cash CPA, JoAnne and Larry Strickland, Capital City Bank, ReNu U Spa, Wakulla County Sheriffs Office, Wakulla County Commissioners, St. Marks Refuge Association, Rotary Club of Wakulla, Paul G. Johnson & Associates, Flag Credit Union, Progress Energy, Wal-Mart, Waste Pro, the Naumann Group Realty and Centennial Bank. We are already beginning plans for our second Annual Blue Jeans & Fast Machines. Follow us on Facebook, log onto our website, kwcb.org or email us at helpkwcb@ gmail.com for updates. We look forward to continuing this new tradition and building on the foundation for bringing something new and different to Wakulla County. Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comKWCB holds Blue Jeans and Fast Machines fundraiser PHOTOS BY JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSClassic cars, motorcycles, race cars and bog trucks were on display at 3Y Farm for KWCBs fundraiser. For more information Call 210-8831 or 528-1527 4 p.m. 8 p.m. Boat On Trailer Parade This Advertisement Sponsored by The News Wakulla ertisement Spons or r ed ed ed ed ed ed ed ed b y s s CENTENNIALBANK Member FDICwww.my100bank.comA Home BancShares Company Kids Come Visit Santa Crums Mini Mall Wakulla Discount Liquor Mikes Marine Supply East Coast Connections at Angelos My-Way Seafood Mineral Springs Seafood Big Top Supermarket Dollar General Sea-Tow Two Blondes Yasmania Sheer Expressions Hair Salon Tropical Trader Seafood Brooks Concrete Rock Landing Marina Angelos Coastal Restaurant Poseys Steam Room Poseys Dockside Coyote Mullet Shufe Stevens Seafood & Chicken Restaurant Coastal Corner Barwicks Seafood & Deli Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Free Admission from 2-6p.m. Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea Maritime Center Panacea Market Place 2pm 8pmNEXT TO BIG TOP SUPERMARKETLocal Arts & Crafts Vendors Saturday, Dec. 1 st The 8th Annual LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t

PAGE 13

By HERB DONALDSON Building a theatre in Wakulla County is not easy. A lot depends on who you know; who knows certain members of your church and/or social circle; and who is willing to possibly help you achieve a home an actual building that can be used for the purposes of theatre. All the worlds a stage. And all the men and women merely players, as Shakespeare says in As You Like It. We all play a part. And for some, theatre, lmmaking, dance, music and other forms of artistry provide them with both a sense of peace and torment. These feelings are not unlike those of a true-believer who, having witnessed a powerful sermon, steps out the church doors and into the vast world. They may feel renewed in their beliefs and faith. But a terrible dread lingers, because there is work to do and minds to change before the message he carries within can ever be accepted or believed. All one can ever truly do, is try. The mission of the Palaver Tree Theater is steeped in the belief that theatre is an instrument of transformation. That instrument is put to use by providing our community the opportunity to engage in productions, forums, and events that validate and re ect our human experiences. Earlier this year, one of Palaver Trees board members introduced me to a woman from Tallahassee. Shed come across a play titled The Left Hand Singing and wanted to know if we could mount it during Black History Month in February. I was unsure about attempting such a strong work in Wakulla. To speak of race here can easily turn into an almost silent exchange of accusations and guilt, instead of an opportunity to embrace our history, so that we may take control of our future without being chained to, or controlled by the actions of our ancestral past. The trick is how not to become vili ed for the attempt. The play, written by Barbara Lebow, is about three students who decide to participate in a voter registration drive for AfricanAmericans in Mississippi during the Freedom Summer of 1964. They suddenly go missing. Their parents, now left with questions of what may have happened to them, are the key triggers of the story. We see their inward change when faced with a communitys fear of the unknown, disguised as racism and bigotry, and how that fear eventually manages to kill something within the human spirit, and possibly their three children along with it. The story is based on true events and is set for a one-night-only staged reading here in February. Recently, Wakullas Historical Society managed to receive a gift conveyance of land from the Boynton family on which to build their Heritage Village. During the signing over of the property, members Murray McLaughlin and Brent Thurmond were asked by a bystander if the county was doing anything to celebrate Floridas 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leons arrival on the east coast, to be recognized in 2013. I later received a call from Thurmond with the idea of developing a play centered around the Forbes Purchase, and the receiving of Indian lands through socalled debts and cessions, that led to the Panton, Leslie & Company merchant business coming into 1.2 million acres between the Apalachicola and St. Marks River in 1804. After a few meetings, Thurmond and Madeleine Carr agreed to work on the play together, and a modern-day version of the story will be performed in the main courtroom of the Wakulla County Courthouse this coming March. This will serve as the latest installment of WakullaStory and is being done in association with the Historical Society. Not long ago, Rodney Letchworth spoke at Wakullas Rotary Club meeting about his Uncle Mike, who had passed some years earlier. After the death, Letchworths brother approached him about his uncles extracurricular activities through the years epecially his hunting and shing trips. It was revealed that their Uncle Mike was involved in more than simple weekend jaunts with ri e and shing pole. He was, in fact, seeking buried treasure. There has long been the legend of pirate gold buried somewhere in Wakulla County. Letchworths truelife tale of murder, greed, and a family secret, is based on personal accounts and actual facts regarding a dead mans treasure stored somewhere, On an island, up a river, near a volcano, in Wakulla County. The Wakulla Volcano takes place in April as part of Wild About Wakulla Week, at the Sopchoppy School. Palaver Tree is also involved in the Working Waterfronts Photo-Journal project with the Healing Arts of Wakulla County (HAWC), and is developing the Wakulla 50 documentary in which 50 Wakulla residents ages 50 and older are being interviewed and recorded to capture their living histories. Both Waterfronts and Wakulla 50 are ongoing projects that are in continual need of subjects to interview. Volunteers, no matter their talent capacity, are also needed to help see these projects through. One of the more exciting endeavors that Palaver Tree will undertake this year is the SCENE in WAKULLA New Plays/Films Festival. SCENE will bring playwrights, lmmakers, actors and directors together for staged readings and lm screenings from emerging writers and directors in Wakulla and surrounding counties. The hope is to develop an annual visual and performance arts festival presented in an out-of-town, Southern comfort-type way where artists of different genres and locations can connect and eventually work together on projects. The submission fee for the festival is $10 and is non-refundable. The deadline to submit work is March 31, 2013. All screenings and readings will be free and open to the public, with donations accepted to help grow the festival in the years to come. SCENE in Wakulla is co-sponsored by Best Western Plus / Wakulla Inn & Suites, and will take place in June. Palaver Tree encourages all in Wakulla who are interested in participating in the productions or behind the scenes to get involved in something thats fun, challenging, and transformative. Contact us at (718) 682-3870 or palavertreetheater@gmail.com. Visit us at palavertreetheater.org, and like us on Facebook. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 13APalaver Tree Theater announces its 2012-13 season DR. DAVID A. KEEN, M.D., M.P.H.BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PRACTICE ELIZABETH HEULER, ARNP-C VALERIE RUSSELL, ARNP-C2615 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, SUITE 103, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327PH 850-926-3140 FX 850-926-3163 (Next to the Winn-Dixie Shopping Plaza) www.wakullaurgentcare.comCOME VISIT US FOR ALL OF YOUR HEALTHCARE NEEDS WE NOW ACCEPT We are an approved Medically Supervised Weight Loss ProgramFAMILY PRIMARY CARE URGENT CARE/WALK INS Pulmonary Function Testing Pediatrics/Immunizations X-Ray, EKG, Labs Sleep Study DEXA Bone Density Testing Workers Comp Injury Overnight Pulse Ox Holter/Event Monitor Pre-Employment Drug Screening School/Bus/DOT/Sports Physicals ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991

PAGE 14

Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy CYNTHIA PAULSON Wild about Wakulla Week showcases Wakulla County, the Natural Place to be. This years extended week from April 12-21, 2013, highlights the heritage, outdoor recreational opportunities and enterprise of Wakulla County. Events of the week are still in the formative stages, but residents and guests will want to stay tuned for details which should be available at www.WildAboutWakulla.com by midJanuary. The Kick-Off event is the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival held on Saturday, April 13. The event celebrates the heritage and art of worm gruntin the act of pounding a stake (stob) into the ground and rubbing a at piece of iron rhythmically across its top. This creates vibrations that drive earthworms up from the ground to the surface where they are collected for sh bait. The practice borders on mystical, but for some local folks it has provided a way of life for over 50 years. The worm gruntin demonstrations captivate both young and old. The festival is held along the picturesque downtown streets of Sopchoppy. Events begin at 9 a.m. and offer over 80 vendors providing food, arts and crafts. The day concludes with the Worm Grunters Ball. There is no admission to the event and it is loaded with family oriented activities. Please visit www. wormgruntinfestival.com for more information. Plan to visit the Gulf Specimen Marine Aquarium in Panacea with your children or grandchildren to experience the glee of hands-on discovery. This do-not-miss opportunity can be experienced anytime the explorer inside you is looking to create vivid memories, but specials will be offered during Wild About Wakulla Week. Visit www.gulfspecimen.org to get started on your family adventure. St. Marks, Americas Oldest River Town, exempli es the hospitality of a cozy gulf side village. Although any day is a good day to visit this coastal community, its welcoming arms will offer guests special hometown opportunities and a special Viva Florida 500 tour will celebrate the 500th anniversary of Spanish in uence on Florida. Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee event will dramatically capture the rich history at the con uence of the St. Marks and Wakulla Rivers with informative boat cruises along with museum and fort tours at San Marcos de Apalache State Park. Visit www.palmettoexpeditions.com for a wide selection of tours suited to varying tastes and activity levels. The fun continues on Saturday, April 20 at Wakulla Springs State Park as the Wakulla Wildlife Festival goes into high gear offering inspiring local musicians, knowledgeable exhibitors, dazzling presentations, convincing living history demonstrators, and special premium guided tours. Fine art, ne food and ne music mingle in the historic Wakulla Springs Lodge as Art on the Terrace, another aspect of the festival, features the work of gifted local talent. Visit www. WakullaWildlifeFestival.org for more information. Please visit www.WildAboutWakulla.com to guide you to more of what makes Wakulla County a destination for heritage and outdoor recreational activities and adventure.Wild About Wakulla Week will be celebrated April 12-21 FILE PHOTOThe Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival kicks off Wild About Wakulla Week. R E S T A U R A N T S PR REE C K G IN For 35 Years, Serving Only Fresh, Local Seafood, A n d M u c h M o r e . . P R I M E R I B thursday nights A l l Y o u C a n E a tFried Quail & Catfish What you will find is really fresh seafood, simply prepared and seasoned with the taste of Florida as it used to be. Southern Living Magazine, August, 2009 Tomato Pie with Grilled Shrimp REEK C P RIN G S C A T E R I N G When you want only the best for your special event,Spring Creek will come to you. Contact us for more information,850-926-2751 www.SpringCreekFL.com Tuesday Friday 5-9 pm Saturday & Sunday 12-9 pm WAKULLA LP GAS 850-926-7670 LP GAS & APPLIANCESSee US for ALL Your Stoves Water Heaters Space Heaters Gas Log Heaterswith remote control 850 926-76702725 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordvillewww.wakullaLPGas.com Pat Greens Lawn ServiceHOLIDAY CHORE LIST (850) 528-2371 today for a free quote!Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredLeaf Removal Trim Trees Clean Flower Beds Hang Lights RUNNING OUT OF TIME?We have all the equipment to take care of that fall chore list. New From SYP Publishing!THE GREENS AND CORNBREAD OF WAKULLA COUNTY Historical Stories Told by the People This delightful book is a collection of stories depicting the history of Wakulla County. The stories were written and submitted by different authors and families. The text includes a wide variety of topics and time periods. Many of the stories contain photos that were included by the author. Available NOW!! $29.95As a publisher, we are constantly searching for authors and groups that wish to have works of a historical or regional signicance published. You may have a local book of stories and lore, a genealogy study, or a text on any specic historical, collectible or unique item. If you are looking for a publisher, consider contacting us.In Search Of The Diamond Brooch In Search of The Diamond Brooch is a southern historical saga starting with the migration of the pioneer families to the North Florida area. This is the story of a family that settled in North Florida in the early 1800s in Wakulla and Leon Counties. Written by Pete Gerrell & Terri Gerrell $24.95SYP Publishing 4351 Natural Bridge Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32305 www.syppublishing.com 850-421-7420 New F

PAGE 15

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 15Aeducation news from local schools SchoolContinued on Page 10A For the last nine months, Pearce has worked directly under Miller as principal on special assignment and then as assistant superintendent. I am very thankful that I have gotten to know him even better in these last nine months, Pearce said. Theres a really strong bond there. He added that he hopes to live up to Millers expectations. He set the bar pretty high. Miller said there will be a transition period, but that Pearce comes into the position with more preparation than he had when he rst started in 1995. Miller was appointed by Gov. Lawton Chiles after the sudden death of Roger Stokley. Stokley passed away on a Thursday and that following Wednesday Miller was appointed. I didnt have much preparation, Miller said. He added that Pearce has been able to see things from the district perspective. Pearce is also older than Miller was when he took of ce. Hes got a few more years under his belt, Miller said. Pearce commended Millers leadership style and felt he was better prepared because of it. Hes very informative, Pearce said. Hes very transparent. As a principal and assistant superintendent, Pearce said Miller always kept him up to speed on changes coming from the state and national level. He made all principals and district-level administration aware and informed, he said. Thats what has made us so successful, Pearce said. The district does not wait to take on new initiatives, but meets them head on, Pearce said. If you look, Wakulla is pioneering a lot of these initiatives, he said. Pearce said the district will continue to do that and move forward. Meeting those new initiatives head on is our key to success, he said. Both Miller and Pearce acknowledge these new initiatives as challenging, including the conversion to digital technology. Theres no way that its going to be as economical to operate as textbooks, Miller said. It sounds like a good idea, but it is going to be costly and it will not be able to provide things that textbooks can, he added. Pearce said there is a lot of concern with the switch to digital text, such as how much of the mandate will be funded by the state. There is also some concern over decreasing student enrollment and merit pay for teachers. However, Pearce said the management of the budget and finance is excellent and will continue to stay that way. We will continue to have great management, he said. Pearce said there will de nitely be some changes at the school district, but that is mainly because he isnt Miller. Changes will happen, Pearce said. In his rst six to eight months, Pearce plans to listen and pay attention so that he can tweak areas where needed. He added that he wants to break down any barriers that make parents or students feel like the school district is not able to meet their needs. He wants to ensure that every student has the same opportunities and is made aware of these opportunities. He wants to focus heavily on informing students and parents of their options. Our job is to make sure they dont miss that opportunity because of a lack of education, Pearce said. He will look at expanding the career education and college counseling offered to students. We need to build on what we are already doing, Pearce said. Miller said students are provided with a world class education in Wakulla County that starts at prekindergarten. It goes from the littlest learners all the way until they graduate, he said. And he added that it will only continue to get better. Being elected as superintendent has been a humbling experience for Pearce and he said he has great respect for the of ce and what it stands for. He added that he serves the public. They trust us to do the right thing by their kids every day, he said. That cant be taken lightly. Pearce plans to use stay in touch with Miller and reach out to him when needed. Its kind of like having an in-house mentor, Pearce said.A new superintendent: Bobby Pearce takes over the post from Miller New programs at TCCSpecial to The NewsIn the spring of 2013, Tallahassee Community College is expanding its offerings to include a Water Quality Technician Certi cate and an Environmental Science Technology A.S. Degree. The new programs represent the rst phase of TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute, with the goal of preparing the next generation of environmental professionals. TCCs new certi cate and degree programs will qualify students to work in the technical areas of water quality, natural resource management and environmental monitoring with the local, state and national levels of government and private enterprises such as environmental consulting rms. Environmental science technology careers offer opportunities to make a difference in the community and to work in a variety of settings from laboratories to the eld. TCCs environmental science technology programs are ideal for working students that require exible class schedules, with courses offered online and in the classroom. These programs combine TCCs academics with the incredible biodiversity and natural resources of Wakulla County, said Pamela MacRae, assistant professor of biology at TCC. TCC plans to implement additional Wakulla Environmental Institute programs in the coming semesters, including hospitality and tourism management, aquaculture management, parks and leisure technology, and agribusiness management. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRiversprings Middle School eighth grade art students proudly show off the bowls they made and donated to the Empty Bowls project held on Nov. 3 to raise money for the local food pantries. RMS students make bowls to help Empty Bowl project 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 blessedare those whomourn 2012 Service of RemembranceSunday, December 2nd at 4:00pm Hudson Park21 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville Please call Pam at 850-926-9308 for more information. FridayNovember 30Medart Elementary School4pm 8pmAll funds raised will go towards needed items for the school.Winter Holiday Festival Come visit with Santa and decorate Christmas cookies with Mrs. Claus!Annualgames, prizes, bingo, cake walk, inatable obstacle course, jump house, paintball, jousting and giant slides, go-cart racing, face painting, sno-cones and lots of delicious food.2558 Coastal Highway. For more information, call 962-4881.Home Of The StingraysCALL 925-6344WAKULLA COAST CHARTER SCHOOLAlyssa Higgins Principalalyssa.higgins@wcsb.us48 Shell Island Rd. P.O. Box 338 St. Marks, FL. 32355Wakullas C.O.A.S.T. Charter SchoolA WINNING TEAM!wakullaschooldistrict.org Grades K-8 Free Public School & VPK Strong Academic Support Character Development Art Music Technology Marine Aquarium & Buttery Gardens Junior Garden Club Bus Transportation Available National School Lunch Program Free or Reduced Breakfast & LunchENROLLMENT APPLICATIONS AVAILABLEOPENINGS AVAILABLE ENROLL NOW! AFTER-SCHOOL HOMEWORK CENTERGRADES 3RD 6TH Introductory rate for the rst twenty students to respond to this ad! 850926-9977 Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408

PAGE 16

Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate LifeThe greatest holiday season of the year is here. We have feasts and gift sharing that we enjoy. However, many older Americans experience stress and depression during the holidays. The Senior Center strives to reduce these anxieties and make each day brighter for every client. Every service is based on individual assessments of each client. The board and staff recognize the unhealthy conditions created by the feelings of isolation and loneliness. We strive to keep the senior citizens engaged in the Senior Center and our community to combat these threats to their health. The Wakulla County Senior Center provides in-home services such as housekeeping, personal care, meals-on-wheels, telephone reassurance, emergency alert response systems, utilities, etc. The center also provides daily congregate meals, music, art, exercise, many educational programs and a variety of health screenings. The senior programs actively strive to enable our older population to age in place in a secure, safe and senior friendly environment while helping them to be more engaged in our community. This bene t helps all of us by reducing early admission to nursing homes and other institutions that are so expensive. Nationwide, people are becoming disconnected from their community and this results in reduced support of family and neighbors in need. However, Wakulla County continues to be a loving and caring community that is proud to support our youth and our senior citizens. We take advantage of every holiday and also invent ways to turn an ordinary day into a special celebration. This Holiday Season provides many opportunities to celebrate. Thanksgiving was celebrated with a free County Wide Thanksgiving Dinner on Nov. 20. Hundreds showed up for the happy occasion. The next morning Chef Mary charmed the seniors with a brunch. There was a wonderful buffet spread as Chef Mary prepared omelets as ordered while each senior observed her adding all the individually selected ingredients. There were two Santa quilts raf ed which added to the party atmosphere. The shared happiness continues throughout the holiday season. Our staff has selected a grandmother that cares for three small grandchildren that we, as employees of the Senior Center, plan to bring happiness to their home on Christmas morning. We are not alone. The Christmas Connection, Area Agency on Aging, Christ Church Anglican, Catholic Charities, and Home Insteads Senior Santa Program began preparation to give to the Senior Centers clients long before Thanksgiving. There will be many churches and organizations to add to this list before Christmas. Christmas will be celebrated on Friday, Dec. 21. The Band will be playing while Chef Mary serves individually prepared omelets with unlimited smiles to the seniors. We will raffle a camcorder and a crocheted Afghan. Santa will arrive bearing gifts. Christmas is not taken lightly. We recognize the reason for the season and see Gods gift of love that the seniors share with each other, with smiles, gifts and many other acts of kindness. Seniors caring for seniors occurs daily, but it appears more visible during the Christmas season. We enjoy sharing with close friends and family during Christmas. Take some time to visit someone you know that is alone. Give a gift to someone that may not have a close friend or family to visit during Christmas. Giving your time and resources to someone that cannot give back can be the most rewarding experience of the season. During this Holiday Season please consider a contribution to the Senior Center at 33 Michael Drive. Your contribution will enhance the lives of friends and neighbors. If you are more closely associated with another non-pro t service organization, consider sending a gift to them. During recent years it has been dif cult for these organizations to get enough funding to adequately meet their needs. We wish you a Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year. R.H. Carter is executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizen Center. R.H. Carter Senior Center tries to reduce holiday anxiety for seniorsBy MICHELLE HUNTEROctober came, the weather changed, and the holiday festivities are beginning. Our Tuesday craft class started making holiday cards for Halloween, and Thanksgiving, as well decorations went up for a Halloween Party. Many of the seniors participated by dressing up in fun and very creative costumes. The group that plays cards daily decided to dress as a deck of cards. About 20 players participated; you might say we were not playing with a full deck. There were princesses, witches, vampires, kings and pirates. Prizes were given for best costumes in several categories. The seniors enjoyed a cakewalk, with several homemade cakes as prizes. On Halloween day the Wakulla Wigglers performed to Halloweenthemed music. Members of the Wakulla Wigglers participate in the line dancing classes provided on Mondays at 1:30 p.m. and Wednesday at 2 p.m. Representatives for Area Agency and SHINE came to help the seniors with decision making on any changes they might want during open enrollment for Medicare. Open enrollment is through Dec. 7 this year. A representative from SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders) will be at the senior center on Fridays at 10:30 a.m. If you would like to make an appointment please call the center at 926-7145 or 1-800-963-5337, or just stop by.Continued on Page 17A Seniors celebrate Halloween, enjoy crafts, dance, touch tanks and more PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe group that plays cards decided to dress as a deck of cards for Halloween. Special Christmas ShowSPONSORED BY: FAIRCLOTH INSURANCE AGENCY PURVIS BROTHERS BANDCall 962-3711 for Ticket Information Country SopchoppyOpry.com

PAGE 17

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 17AContinued from Page 16A Gulf Specimen Marine Lab of Panacea brought their new mobile unit touch tank. It was enjoyed by the seniors as well as the children of the Before and After School Program. Both groups were taught about the living creatures of the sea and how to protect the waters that they live in. Kimberly Davis of FAMU brought a display to demonstrate how our ground water becomes part of the watershed, and how we must protect it from pollution. The activities at the center vary daily and include topics from health and recreation to fun. Nutrition is taught by Shelley Swenson of the Wakulla County Extension of ce, and Cynthia Christen, who is a volunteer. Cynthia also teaches a chair exercise class. Diabetes Support is provided twice a month by Grace Keith, who is a health educator from the Wakulla County Health Department. Grace has been providing recipes of healthy alternatives for holidays, and educational materials for diabetes and arthritis. Brain Gym, taught by Elaine Webb, is a combination of chair exercises and mental calisthenics which help with balance, coordination and linguistics. Now that the weather is getting cooler, the seniors are able to go out walking on the nature trail just outside the center. Seniors enjoy staying busy with activities and learning new things. The seniors were treated to a wonderful musical performance by Carolyn and Joey Grubbs. The songs ranged from numbers by Ann Murray, Johnny Cash, Etta James, The Beatles, gospel, pop and rock. Seniors danced and sang along and a good time was had by all. On Friday, Oct. 26, many wore pink in recognition of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Individuals spoke that day of their own personal stories of how they have been affected directly or indirectly by beast cancer. Also that day, Buddy Wells, Supervisor of Elections, came to speak to the seniors who had questions regarding the election and the large amount of amendments on the ballot. We sure appreciated the help and information. If anyone is interested in assisting the seniors with computer help, we are looking for a volunteer who can help with this. Please contact the center at 926-7145 if you are interested. Any donations of yarn would be appreciated for a hat making project for the seniors. It can be dropped off at the center.Seniors celebrate Halloween, enjoy crafts, dance, touch tanks and more PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Gulf Specimen Marine Lab touch tank visits the Senior Center. The Wakulla Wigglers dance class. Kimberly Davis of FAMU shares a display about groundwater. More seniors from the card-playing group who dressed as a deck of cards. About 20 seniors dressed as cards, meaning they werent playing with a full deck. St. MarksRIVER CANTINA We Have The Best Hamburgers AroundPrize for Best Dressed Golf Kart Dress Up Your Golf Kart & Join The Parade Call for FREE registration925-9908 6th Annual Golf Kart Christmas ParadeFriday, Dec. 14 @ 6:30 p.m. St. Marks Toy DriveBring an unwrapped giftgifts will be distributed by St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department Join the Cantina for Thanksgiving Dinner on Thanksgiving at 1 p.m. Bring a covered dish If you cant Join us Anyway! HOWARD KESSLER County Commissioner, Dist. 3Extends a heartfelt thank you and looks forward to working for a better Wakulla County. g for a bette r Thank You! Gracias!Merci!Vielen Dank!Dhnnabad!

PAGE 18

Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Nov. 12, Bryan Jenkins of Wakulla Pawn in Crawfordville reported receiving a law enforcement Taser believed to be stolen. The Taser, cartridge and charger are valued at $665. It was determined that the Taser is owned by the Gadsden County Sheriffs Of ce and the individual who attempted to pawn the item was identified. The Taser was confiscated and the case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: NOVEMBER 8 Michael Foster of Live Oak reported a felony criminal mischief in Crawfordville. A tractor tire on equipment owned by Musgrove Construction was damaged at Springhill Road and New Light Church Road. The tire was found to have a bullet hole in it. A suspect has been identi ed. Damage is estimated at $2,350. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. Tonya Michelle Goelz, 41, of Crawfordville was involved in a one vehicle traffic crash on Hilliardville Road. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated and observed Goelz and her automobile disabled in the middle of the road with damage to the vehicle. EMS checked the victim who declined to be transported to the hospital. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated a bridge on Hilliardville Road where the motorist struck a pine tree and the bridge railing before becoming disabled. Damage to the bridge was estimated at $25,000. Damage to the vehicle was estimated at $15,000. The accident is still under investigation. Deputy Will Hudson also investigated. Steve Walker of Crawfordville reported a burglary to his shed. A marine battery and light were removed from the property following a similar incident in August. The property is valued at $125. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. A retail theft was reported at Two Blondes Liquors and Gifts in Panacea. A customer entered the store and purchased a bottle of liquor while failing to pay for a second bottle that was hidden in his clothing. The theft is valued at $14. The suspect is an unshaven white male who weighs approximately 240 pounds and had multiple tattoos including initials on his neck. He left the scene in a Dodge Intrepid with a Florida tag. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. Beatriz Salquero of Tallahassee reported the loss of her dog. The location of the dog was identi ed through a microchip and the victim went to the home and saw the dog. But the animal was no longer at the home when Deputy Sean Wheeler spoke to the homeowner involved. Cecilia D. McClain of Sopchoppy was a passenger in a vehicle driven by Corey Lee of Crawfordville when she fell out of the vehicle through an open door onto Lonesome Road. The victim refused transportation to the hospital by Wakulla EMS. She was transported to the hospital by Lee. Sgt. Andy Curles investigated. NOVEMBER 9 A concerned citizen from Panacea reported that a subject was attempting to break into a shed. The subject was startled by the concerned citizen and left the area. It has not been determined if anything was taken. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Rex Wilson of Panacea reported a hit-and-run traf- c crash while eating at a Panacea restaurant. A witness observed a Ford truck strike the victims vehicle while backing up. Damage to the Wilson vehicle was estimated at $2,500. The witness was able to secure suspect information. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. A Wakulla High School student from Crawfordville reported the theft of cash and an iPod Touch from her book bag. The bag was located inside the girls locker room while the victim attended physical education class. The stolen property is valued at $270. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. NOVEMBER 10 Bailey Burgin of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A stroller and cash were removed from the victims unsecured vehicle. The value of the stolen items is estimated at $330. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. Deputy Gibby Gibson issued a notice to appear in court to Kelwin Nathaniel Rosier, 21, of Crawfordville after Rosier, on a bicycle, came across Deputy Gibsons travel lane. Deputy Gibson checked on the safety of the subject who advised he was out exercising. When Deputy Gibson smelled the odor of an alcoholic beverage, he was granted permission to check Rosiers bag. Deputy Gibson found drug paraphernalia with a digital scale, plastic bags and green leafy substance. The grinder and scale were seized as evidence and Rosier was issued a NTA for possession of narcotics equipment. Chansamone Bryant of Columbus, Ga., reported a criminal mischief in Crawfordville. Damage was reported to the victims home by previous tenants. A screen was damaged and walls and tiles were damaged. An entertainment center and a dog kennel were also reported stolen. The missing items are valued at $550. Suspects have been identified. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. NOVEMBER 11 Annie Boyd of Panacea reported a credit card offense. The victim reported the use of her grocery card on multiple occasions. A suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Angelo Petrandis of Panacea reported a trespass on his property. The victim stated that someone has been coming on his property and discharging rearms and frightening his horses. Two sections of his fence were damaged. Damage to the fence was estimated at $100. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Ivan Farmer of Tallahassee reported a traf c crash. The victim reported that someone hit his vehicle while he was working at St. Marks Powder. Damage is estimated at $1,500. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Antwan Brinson, 18, of Tallahassee was charged with battery by a person detained in a jail facility in the Wakulla County Jail after striking a 35-year-old inmate in the face. The victim was transported to a Tallahassee hospital for treatment of a laceration to his face. Deputy Jerry Morgan investigated. Jason Gibson of Crawfordville reported the theft of a wallet on Shadeville Highway. The victim was riding a four wheeler when he lost the wallet. It was recovered but a credit card was missing from the wallet. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Leigha Shirley of Crawfordville reported the theft of currency from her wallet. The wallet was recovered at the victims place of business but $12 was reported missing. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. NOVEMBER 12 Deputy Mike Zimba and Reserve Deputy David Pienta responded to a welfare check of a pedestrian on U.S. Highway 319. Once they arrived on scene they asked the female subject to identify herself and were given a false name. Deputy Zimba recognized the subject as someone with active warrants in Wakulla County. Christina Lee Mills, 38, of Tallahassee admitted she gave the deputies a false name. During the arrest process a homemade crack pipe was recovered. Mills was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia and resisting an of cer by a disguised person, in addition to the two active warrants for violation of probation. Francella Wilson of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Tools, valued at $700, were reported missing from a home that was used as storage. The house was not secured at the time of the theft. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. A business burglary was reported at Dollar General on Crawfordville Highway. The stores propane tank cage locking mechanism was cut but nothing was taken from the cage. Damage to the cage was estimated at $1,000. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. Hamaknockers BBQ in Crawfordville reported a structure re. A barbecue smoker with grease nearby caught fire. The smoker shed and equipment suffered $3,000 worth of damage. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. Amanda Schram of Crawfordville reported the theft of clothing from her home. The clothing is valued at $240 and a suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. NOVEMBER 13 A business burglary was reported at Shell Point Spirits. Glass in the front door was broken out and store items were rummaged through by a subject or subjects. Two bottles of liquor were stolen. They are valued at $125. A pry bar was used to gain entry into the building and damage to the door was estimated at $500. Detective Derek Lawhon and Deputy Nick Gray investigated. Marcus Beard of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary in reference to the theft of guns stolen from his vehicle. The rearms are valued at $1,100. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Duc Tran of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim was washing his boat when he realized a tackle box was missing. The tackle box and contents are valued at $400. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. James Watson of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the loss of a GPS unit from his vehicle. The unit is valued at $99. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. Wal-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft. Four individuals were allegedly observed stealing items from the store. When they were approached by store staff they fled the store and left the items behind. Suspects were identi- ed but the store assistant manager refused to sign t he prosecution affidavit. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. NOVEMBER 14 Maria Caso of Crawfordville reported a fraud and passing of forged checks. The victim reported seven checks being stolen for a total value of $713. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Richard Moon and Deputy Ryan Muse investigated. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated a traf c crash at the Wakulla County Courthouse. Jessica L. Fincher of Tallahassee reported striking a parked vehicle owned by Michelle L. Christensen of Crawfordville. Finchers vehicle suffered $1,000 worth of damage and the Christensen vehicle suffered $3,500 worth of damage. There were no injuries. Ronald Collins of Crawfordville reported glass breaking at his home. Someone shot the window of the victims home with a rearm. A projectile was recovered inside the home. Deputy Mike Zimba and Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated and determined that the gun incident may have been an accident as the shot came from a distance. FWC was noti ed in the event that poachers are illegally hunting in the area. Damage was estimated at $50. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 904 calls for service during the past week. Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 19ASpecial to The NewsA 58-year-old Crawfordville man died in a camper trailer fire reported by a witness at 9:19 a.m. Friday, Nov. 16 in Crawfordville, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. Witnesses reported the trailer engulfed in ames. WCSO investigators arrived at 9:26 a.m. and discovered the burned remains of Louis Felipe Jordan in what was left of the camper trailer. The trailer was located behind a home at 88 Sam Smith Circle in northeastern Wakulla County. Wakulla County re ghters and volunteer re ghters from Wakulla Station and Crawfordville responded to the blaze and put out the camper re. There was no other damage to nearby structures. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) and State Fire Marshal were called to the scene to assist with the investigation. Preliminary ndings indicated that the re may have been electrical in nature and the death does not appear to be suspicious. The 1970s era trailer was destroyed by the blaze. State of cials and WCSO deputies and detectives are still working to determine the exact point of origin of the re as the investigation continues. This is the rst case of an individual dying in a Wakulla County residential re in approximately two years. PHOTO BY KEITH BLACKMAR/WCSOThe camper, in the distance, after the re in which a 58-year-old man died.Man dies in camper-trailer re on Friday morningThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce will host a Personal Protection and Firearms Safety Course on Saturday, Dec. 15 from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the WCSO Range in Otter Creek, near Sopchoppy. The program is $65 for non-range members and $55 for range members and satis- es the requirement for a conceal carry permit. For more information or to register, call the Range at 745-7290 or Lt. Fred Nichols at 251-1676.Concealed weapon class to be o ered NEED CASH FOR CHRISTMAS?Tallahassee-Leon FCUs Fairy Loanmaker Can Grant Your Wish! HOLIDAY LOANS 2.99% APR on your Christmas ........ purchases for 6 monthsPlus, visit TLFCU.org for details on how to submit your Wish List to the Fairy Loanmaker. She may pick up the tab for you this year!FACEBOOK.COM/TLFCU TWITTER.COM/TLFCU PINTEREST.COM/TLFCU *APR is Annual Percentage Rate. Promotional rate is good for 6 statement billing cycles for TLFCU.org ank You! Political adertisement paid for and approved by Halsey Beshears, Republican for State Representative.

PAGE 20

Page 20A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comThe Currier and Ives image of late November has hunters returning with a turkey for Thanksgiving dinner. A great feast was implied for all attending the meal, except, of course, for the turkey. To this day the Eastern Wild Turkey is hunted in Wakulla County and much of the eastern United States. The birds range extends from north Florida to southern Canada. This is the same turkey species Squanto of the Patuxet tribe used to help the Pilgrim survive the wilderness perils of 1621. Thanksgiving was established with the turkey as the perennial guest of honor. Even the likes of founding father Benjamin Franklin believed the turkeys qualities so enviable as to suggest it be the avian emblem for the young nation. He wrote the turkey was a respectable bird of courage that would not hesitate to attack a Grenadier of the British Guards who should presume to invade his farm yard with a red coat on. The Eastern Wild Turkeys popularity almost proved to be its downfall. Pressure from hunting and habitat destruction reduced the turkeys to dangerously low number and the threat of extinction by the early 20th century. Aggressive game management and hunting regulations eventually alleviated the annihilation menace from humanity. The turkey once again became a holiday favorite. Life in the 21st century has changed the hunt for a turkey from the woods to the supermarket meat case. Domestic turkey production is concentrated, for the most part, in states also known for producing large volumes of grain. Curiously, the commercially produced domestic turkeys are not descendants of the Eastern Wild Turkey in Wakullas woods. These gobblers and hens trace their lineage back to southern Mexico and the Aztec Empire. After looting and pillaging southern Mexico, enterprising Spanish conquistadores took these tamed birds back to Europe during the 16th century along with the gold and silver. If the food supplies ran out or spoiled during the return voyage to Spain, turkey was on the menu but without the cranberry sauce. In the decades following, propagation of the domesticated turkeys reached France, Britain and other European countries and provinces. The tasty birds were a prized novelty on the estates of royalty and the landed gentry. The lucky aristocratic diners enjoyed the plumage and culinary aspects of the turkey. Ultimately, European turkey producers were successful enough to export the live birds to the North American colonies to feed the settlers who did not have the time or inclination to hunt the Eastern Wild Turkey. The human population is not alone in its enjoyment of turkey as a main dish. Every hunter knows the Eastern Wild Turkey is legendary for its guile and wariness, and for good reason. Many native omnivores enjoy the turkeys eggs and poults. Additionally, larger carnivores dine on the adult turkeys, except for the mature males or toms. The toms are equipped with several effective defensive tools. Wild Eastern Turkeys feed on the berries, acorns, seed and occasionally small reptiles. In autumn, the diets of wild turkey can be comprised of up to 70% acorns. Acorn production varies by locality, oak species, and between individual oaks of the same species. Turkey hunters are wise to consider this. To learn more about Wakulla Countys Eastern Wild Turkeys, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Eastern wild turkey is part of traditional Thanksgiving Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTurkey hens, above, and a tom and hen below. WAKULLA COMMUNITY CHORUS In Handels MESSIAH Directed By Reba Mason Featuring a Cast of 60 Singers and Instrumentalists SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9 3:00 PM Sopchoppy United Methodist Church 10 Faith Ave. -Free AdmissionReception In Fellowship Hall Immediately Following WAKULLA COMMUNITY THEATRE Presents Some things get better with age. Capital Health Plan is one of them. Plan to attend a SEMINAR to LEARN MORE about CHP Advantage Plus (HMO) and CHP Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-8708943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Paid Endorsement. Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 to RSVP or for more information. (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/medicareSeminars will be held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center 1491 Governors Square Blvd.H5938_DP 121 File & Use 09242011Anna Johnson says....Join me and become a member of a Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO) Plan. SMFriday, November 23 Thursday, November 29 Friday, November 30 Wednesday, December 5 Thursday, December 6

PAGE 21

Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 sports news and team views Sports Giving thanks.1101000.1 State Farm, Home Oce, Bloomington, ILI thank you for your continued business. Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL ME TODAY. Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com WAR EAGLES WIN, 42-19 PLAYOFFS: The War Eagles face Godby in the district seminal at home at J.D. Jones Stadium on Friday, Nov. 23, at 7:30 p.m. PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDENDown 19-7 to Gulf Breeze at halftime, Wakulla comes back in the second half with 35 unanswered pointsRunning back Demetrius Lindsey, above, hurdles a would-be tackler. Brandon Nichols, a cornerback and sometime receiver converted to running back because of injuries, bounces off a tackler and goes into the end zone for a touchdown that marked the War Eagles second half comeback. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt was a tale of two halfs. In the rst half, Wakulla was down to Gulf Breeze 19-7. Despite an opening scoring drive, the War Eagle offense couldnt move the ball. The defense couldnt stop the Dolphins. In the second half, the War Eagles played like the team fans have come to expect speedy backs who slash up opposing defenses and tear off long runs, and a dominating, hard-hitting defense. In the opening round of the regional playoffs on Friday night, the secondhalf War Eagles scored 35 unanswered points and kept the Dolphins scoreless to win 42-19. The win sets up a district showdown against Godby in the regional semi- nals. The War Eagles have beat the Cougars in their last three meetings, going back to last year when they won in the regular season and in the playoffs. Of the victory over Gulf Breeze, Head Coach Scott Klees chuckled that he had warned the game was going to be a tough one. I told you Gulf Breeze was very good up front and very big. He attributed Wakullas slow start in the rst half to all new players playing because of injuries to regular starters. They havent had the time or the reps to play well. At halftime, Klees said he and other coaches made some adjustments and changed some things around. We helped them understand what theyre facing and how to overcome it. Continued on Page 4B Purple Frog Racing wins Road Race of ChampionsPage 2BWater WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary Underwater Wakulla Page 7B

PAGE 22

Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com OUR PAP SAYS Thank You for your Support! (and He Loves US! Brigs, Walker & Reese)Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, for Property Appraiser DONNIE SPARKMAN, WAKULLA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER Special to The NewsOn Nov. 3, Mike Eakin of Crawfordville won the American Road Race of Champions race at Road Atlanta. Road Atlanta is a challenging 2.7 mile, 12 turn, very hilly road race course just outside Flowery Branch, Ga. Eakin was driving a Club Formula Continental race car entered by Purple Frog Racing which is based in Crawfordville. Eakin, the technical director of the F2000 Championship Series, took the opportunity provided by his sponsor, Hoosier Race Tires, to run this national championship event. This was the nal event of the 2012 season, a race for the national championship in his class of cars. This is the third time he has won this national championship, having won it twice before in 2006 and 2011. The success of the team is due much in part to services provided by many businesses local to Wakulla County. This victory was dedicated to wishing Kevin Roberts at Kevins Machine a speedy recovery from his accident. Dallas Beckett at Moonlight Welding painted the Reynard SF2000 its bright metallic purple and silver. Dave Boudreau at S&D Machine machined many custom chassis parts. Custom Design and Trim provided all the graphics on the car and Mikes helmet. The car was on display at the Blue Jeans and Fast Machines car show sponsored by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful at HarveyYoung Farm on Nov. 17. By JOE JACOBSRMS CoachAfter a shaky start to the 2012 campaign, the Riversprings Bears ended the season on a hot streak, winning four straight games, giving RMS a 5-3 record. Riversprings final opponent of the season was the Warriors of Kingdom Life. Riding a strong defensive performance, the Bears cruised to a 30-14 victory. The Bears were led defensively by Kody Zanco, who paced all defenders with ve solo tackles, two tackles for loss, and one assist. Jake McCarl also added two quarterback sacks. Andrew Harrison, Demarcus Lindsey, Jacob Austin and Tyrone Williams also played solid defense. RMS was led offensively by the running of Jacob Austin and Demarcus Lindsey, and the passing of Zach Norman. Lindsey had 85 yards rushing on four carries and a touchdown, while Austin added 34 yards on seven carries. Norman had an ef- cient game, going 4 of 5 for 63 yards and two touchdowns, with no interceptions. Lindsey and Zanco had 1 TD reception apiece. Riversprings ends the season 5-3, with another Wakulla County Middles School Football Championship under its belt. The coaches are already looking forward to next season. With the loss of 23 8th graders and the prospects of returning only one starter on offense and perhaps two on defense, RMS will be in a de nite rebuilding year. By CONNOR HARRISONWakullaSports.comThe Wakulla War Eagle boys basketball team is due to open on Tuesday, Nov. 20 when they head over to play the Maclay Marauders at 7 p.m. Their rst district game will be at Rickards on Dec. 6. Their other district games include Rickards one more time and Suwannee twice. Other big games are against Godby and Lincoln. They also have two games against North Florida Christian which will present a couple of great challenges. Last year the NFC Eagles had a record of 21 wins and six losses. The Suwannee Bulldogs will also present a stiff challenge, coming in from a season which they made it to the playoffs with a 20-7 record. Wakulla has already tipped off in the pre-season with losses against both Lincoln and Godby. In the game against Godby, the Cougars won 67-44. The War Eagles fell 56-41 to Lincoln. The War Eagles would like to avenge these losses with a win in the regular season. Wakulla does have a stretch of four straight away games from Dec. 6 to the 13 and then another stretch from Jan. 10 to 22. They also have a tournament in Bainbridge on Dec. 14 and 15. Following that is the Chipley Christmas Tourney on Dec. 27 and 28. The teams to play have yet to be determined, but with a few wins Wakulla could pull out a victory in these tourneys. They also have a long distance game in Panama City against Rutherford on the Jan. 26. The War Eagles will hope to improve from game to game working their way to the playoffs for a chance to make a run to the championship game.sports news and team views SportsPHOTO BY ROB BODLE/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMike Eakin of Purple Frog Racing at Road Atlanta.Purple Frog Racing wins American Road Race of ChampionsRACING BOYS BASKETBALL FOOTBALLWar Eagles ready to startRMS ends season 5-3 CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY Saturday, Dec. 89 A.M. until 4 P.M. Relaxed Shopping from Arts, Crafts and Food Vendors, and our Local Merchants.Sponsored by Sopchoppy Preservation and Improvement Association, Inc. For information call our HOTLINE (850) 962-4138 Daytime AT 11 A.M. Christmas Music

PAGE 23

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Nov. 22 Happy Thanksgiving Friday, Nov. 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Nov. 24 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Nov. 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Nov. 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Nov. 27 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Wednesday, Nov. 28 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Nov. 29 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsFriday, Nov. 23 CD RELEASE PARTY for the musical duo Hot Tamale at Poseys Dockside Cafe in Panacea. The show will start at 7:30 p.m. Hot Tamale, a Tallahassee-based group made up of Adrian Fogelin and Craig Reeder, has deep roots in Wakulla County. Hot Tamale recently released their CD, titled Made from Scratch. BLACK FRIDAY BABYSITTING FUNDRAISER will be held by The Purplettes Relay for Life Team. Let them take care of the children while the adults shop from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. All proceeds bene t the American Cancer Society, which serves cancer survivors. For more information, contact Jillian Richardson or Nancy Floyd Richardson at 933-1083 or CreativFlo@comcast.net. Tuesday, Nov. 27 WAKULLA EUROTRIP MEETING will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Those interested in the next Wakulla Eurotrip through the educational travel company, Explorica, lead by Wakulla High School AP Art History/ Art Teacher and Watercolor painter, Cassie Tucker, are invited to the next information meeting. Enrollment is open for the Summer 2014 trip that includes London, Paris, Monaco, Florence, Rome and Sorrento. For questions, call 926-2394. Wednesday, Nov. 28 CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held at the Bistro at Wildwood Country Club from noon to 1:15 p.m. Cost is $12 per person and includes a buffet style lunch of rosemary lemon chicken, assorted vegetables, salad, rolls, dessert and drink. RSVP to the chamber at 926-1848.Upcoming EventsFriday, Nov. 30 ANNUAL WINTER HOLIDAY FESTIVAL will be held at Medart Elementary School from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. All funds raised will go towards needed items for the school. There will be games, prizes, bingo, cake walk, in atable obstacle course, jousting, giant slides, go-cart racing, face painting, sno-cones and food, Come and visit with Santa and decorate Christmas cookies with Mrs. Claus. The school is located at 2558 Coastal Highway. For more information, call 962-4881. Saturday, Dec. 1 BOOK SALE EXTRAVAGANZA FUNDRAISER will be held at the library from 9 a.m. to noon. There are thousands of books, audio, video and more. Proceeds bene t childrens programs at the library. CHRISTMAS IN PANACEA will be held from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. There will be a Panacea Market Place with arts and craft vendors starting at 2 p.m. Entertainment will be from 4 to 8 p.m. The boat on trailer parade begins at 6:30 p.m. The tree lighting will take place following the parade. There will also be free refreshments and popcorn, as well as children activities, games, hay ride, face painting and a story teller. Children can also visit with Santa. For more information, call Michelle Crum at 210-8831 or Sherrie Miller at 528-1527. Sunday, Dec. 2 SERVICE OF REMEMBRANCE will be held by Big Bend Hospice at 4 p.m. at Hudson Park. Big Bend Hospices Service of Remembrance is a non-denominational service that brings together those in the community to honor the memories of loved ones at this very special time of year. Everyone who attends shares a common purpose to honor and to remember a loved one who has died, to be surrounded by others who are on a similar journey and to connect with loved ones. For additional information about Big Bend Hospices bereavement services, contact Pam Mezzina at (850) 878-5310, ext. 799. FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE presentation series will feature Owls and Other Night Birds at St. Marks with Don Morrow of The Trust for Public Lands at 2 p.m. He will tell about birds of the night and share their habits, how to identify them and where you are likely to nd them. Linger afterward for a short twilight eld trip. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures Classroom, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 925-6121 for more information. Friday, Dec. 7 HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held at 6 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club. This is a preview party for the Saturday event. For $10 enjoy wine and hors doeuvres while shopping. The general public day is Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and is free. For more information contact Nita Burke at 294-6482 or Heather Robison at 544-5418. Saturday, Dec. 8 HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club. There will be arts and craft vendors. For more information contact Nita Burke at 294-6482 or Heather Robison at 544-5418. Sunday, Dec. 9 THE MESSIAH will be performed by the Tallahassee Florida Stake of The Church of Jesus at 7 p.m. at Chiles High School in Tallahassee. Messiah features a choir and orchestra comprised of members of the community. Tickets are free, but limited. They can be ordered online at www.tallahasseemessiah.com. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 3B Government Meetings Monday, Nov. 26 WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Monday, Dec. 3 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorFor those of you who arent regular subscribers of The Wakulla News, Im Scott Joyner the director of the Wakulla County Public Library. Were proud to have more than 14,000 card holders who take advantage of the more than 42,000 books, 1,500 audio books and 3,000 videotapes and DVDs that we provide for free. We have also recently begun offering e-books to checkout to your Kindle, iPad, laptop or similar devices. In addition to providing many things for you and your family to check out, we offer so much more! We have 12 public computers with high speed internet, computer classes on a wide range of subjects, childrens programs and regular showings of movies. Not to mention all of the great community organizations that meet here, including the Wakulla County Historical Society, Iris Garden Club, Concerned Citizens of Wakulla, among many others. We offer childrens programs for infants and preschoolers year around with Summer Programs for kids through middle school each summer. Were able to do all this through the help of the Friends of the Library. The Friends pay for our annual Summer Program of Events for the children of Wakulla County, a portion of our book budget, as well as other expenses taxpayers dont have to pay for. This group over the past three years has saved county taxpayers more than $75,000. This is done through an annual silent auction, book sales every other month, as well as donations accepted year round. For those interested in joining this organization, please contact us or come by the monthly meeting of the Friends the fourth Thursday of each month at the library. We also have a great volunteer program for those who are interested in helping us at the library. This is a great way to get involved in the community, as well as a way to earn community services hours for scholarships for students. Those interested can contact our Volunteer Coordinator Pam Mueller. We are happy to provide all of the above free of cost to our patrons and encourage everyone who isnt already a member of the library to come by and see all we have to offer. We are proud to provide a place for children and families to go to learn and entertain themselves. For those interested in more details on all that we do please check out our website at wakullalibrary.org or call us at 926-7415. I also send out a weekly email newsletter, as well as an article here in The Wakulla News most weeks. We have many great plans for the great citizens of Wakulla County over the next year so please come join us!Library News... Happy Thanksgiving! CD release party for Hot Tamale at Poseys Dockside at 7:30 p.m. Black Friday Babysitting Fundraiser for Relay for Life from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Chamber Networking Luncheon from noon to 1:15 at Wildwood Bistro.ThursdayFridayFridayWednesday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net The next informational meeting for the Wakulla High School Eurotrip will be on Nov. 27 at at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Students, above, in London on last years trip.

PAGE 24

Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Sunday ThursdayALL U CAN EATSpecials Catfish ......$11.95 Shrimp ....,$13.95 Scallops ..$13.95Includes Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies30 SHRIMP 10 Fried 10 Grilled 10 BlackenedServed with Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies$12.95 w Winter hours: Tues. Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 Sunday 4-9 984-5243 1506 COASTAL HWY., SCENIC BIWAY www.Ken FieldsPhotography.photoshelter.com HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926685 or 510Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH Players of the WeekDEQUON SIMMONS Running back 102 yards on 12 carries and a touchdown MONTERIOUS LOGGINS He ew around the eld on kickoffs, Coach Klees said. FRED CUMMINGS Linebacker 14 tackles, including two for a lossO ense Defense Special Teams WAR EAGLES WIN, 42-19 WILLIAM SNOWDENIn a halftime ceremony, local Centennial Bank of cials presented a check for $51,000 to Superintendent of Schools David Miller to mark the a new scoreboard at J.D. Jones Stadium. The scoreboard is twice the size of the old scoreboard and includes a LCD display where messages can ash. The gift from the bank also included 25-second play clocks in the north and south end zones.Centennial Bank presents new scoreboard at J.D. Jones StadiumContinued from Page 1B Klees said he told his players at halftime: Win or lose, were gonna do it the right way. Were not gonna come out here and pout or take cheap shots. Well put our faith where it needs to be and move forward. Klees praised the three running backs who gained some big yards in the second half Demetrius Lindsey, Brandon Nichols and Dequon Simmons. Lindsey gained 95 yards and scored two touchdowns. Nichols gained 72 yards on three carries and scored twice. Simmons gained 101 yards and scored once. Klees also praised freshman running back Monterious Loggins and quarter back Caleb Stephens. They also ran the ball very well. The War Eagles continued to suffer injuries: guard Brett Buckridge was hurt on the last play of the game. Dalton Norman suffered a knee injury and will likely join twin brother Dillon Norman as out for the year. And Brandon Nichols, who electrified with his running to ll in for Dillon Norman has been sick with the u. Klees was hopeful he could recover by Friday night. UP NEXT: GODBY AGAIN Facing district rival Godby Cougars for the second time this year, Klees warned: Theyre gonna make some adjustments especially because defensively we did some things that hurt them. He also expected that his War Eagles would be different if only because of going with different players because of injury. Klees was hopeful that safety Mikal Cromartie and lineman John Cole would be well enough to play against Godby. The Lords been good to us and the kids have been challenged and come through it, he said. KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTOS BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDequon Simmons, above, stumbles on a hard run on his way to a 100-yard game. Receiver Jordan Franks, left, with the ball. The scoreboard at the end of the game showing the 42-19 nal score.

PAGE 25

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 5BBy TIM LINAFELTWith its goal of an ACC Atlantic Division title achieved, the Florida State Seminoles can now focus their efforts on another preseason goal: the unof cial state championship that would come with a win over the Florida Gators next week at Doak Campbell Stadium (3:30, ABC). This years FSU-UF matchup could carry the rivalrys heaviest national signi cance in years. Both schools are ranked in the Top Ten of the BCS standings, both carry identical 10-1 records and both are hoping that an impressive win over the other might potentially vault them back into the national championship conversation. Its the rst time the Seminoles and Gators will meet with each school having just one loss since 2000, when Florida State was ranked No. 3 and UF No. 4. FSU won that contest, 30-7, and went on to play in its fourth national championship game in ve seasons. Its a big game and a very important one, said FSU quarterback EJ Manuel, who owns a 1-1 record against Florida. Were both 10-1 and we just need to play our game. They have a great defense, but that one they had when I was a redshirt freshman was pretty good too. We just have to stay focused. Manuel was referring to the 2009 meeting, when, as a redshirt freshman, he started for the injured Christian Ponder. That was also the last time that Florida beat Florida State, capping off a streak of six straight UF victories. Florida State meanwhile, will be going for its third straight win over the Gators, a 3-0 record over UF for Jimbo Fisher and 6-0 record over in-state rivals Florida and Miami during Fishers tenure. Thats why you come to Florida State, to play in a game against a school with the history and tradition of Florida, Fisher said. Those are the rivalry games that you take pride in. Its a very important game for them and us. If they were 1-10 and we were 1-10 it would be a very important game. Its one of the great rivalries in college football. FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M No game. #4 Florida at #10 Florida State Saturday, Nov. 24 at 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ABC. Wide receiver Rashad Greene takes it into the end zone for a touchdown. PHOTO BY BILL BRIDE/OSCEOLA UF No. 4 in UF No. 4 in BCS, back BCS, back in title race in title raceBy THOMAS GOLDKAMPGatorbait.net writerOne night after wild upsets rocked the college football world, the Florida Gators found themselves even closer to being back on top of it. The Gators checked in at No. 4 in the BCS Standings unveiled Sunday night. Florida coach Will Muschamp had a lot to cheer about over the weekend, as the Gators took care of business with a win and vaulted up the BCS standings. Even better, at least one of the teams in front of Florida must lose, with No. 2 Alabama and No. 3 Georgia set to meet in the SEC Championship Game in two weeks. That puts the Gators in position to potentially play for a national title if just one more upset goes its way -and, of course, Florida takes care of business against No. 10 Florida State in Tallahassee next weekend. Florida needs No. 1 Notre Dame to lose. And theres only one more chance for the Irish to do so: against a likely Matt Barkley-less USC team coached by Lane Kif n. If Notre Dame does lose, theres still a slim chance Florida misses out on the title game. The Gators checked in at No. 5 in the Harris Poll and No. 6 in the Coaches Poll on Sunday, the polls that make up two-thirds of the BCS. Florida ranks much better in the computers, at No. 2, behind only the Irish. Should Notre Dame lose and Florida win next weekend, the Gators would be virtually assured of the No. 1 computer ranking in the nal BCS standings. But what the human voters do with Florida is another story. In the Harris Poll, Florida still sits one spot behind No. 4 Oregon. The Gators will likely move past the SEC title game loser (No. 2 Alabama or No. 3 Georgia). But will Harris Poll voters drop No. 1 Notre Dame past Florida with a loss to USC, especially if its, say, a tight loss in overtime like Oregons? Thats up for debate, particularly with fans and media grumbling about the possibility of another all-SEC title game. The same is true in the Coaches Poll, where Florida sits at No. 6, also behind No. 4 Oregon and No. 5 Florida State. The Gators will be in virtually the exact same position as the Coaches Poll, vaulting past FSU with a win but still not sure if theyd make it past Notre Dame. In all probability, the Gators jump the Irish with a win over Florida State and a Notre Dame loss. Oregon could be the bigger threat, though. The Ducks watched their computer ranking tumble to No. 7 after slipping to Stanford. But assuming Oregon takes care of business and beats Oregon State in its season nale, the Ducks will be no worse than No. 3 in the human polls. If Notre Dame falls, the voters will likely have Oregon at No. 2, meaning it would be a battle of numbers between Florida and Oregon for the allimportant No. 2 spot in the BCS. Florida also needs to hope Oregon doesnt sneak its way into the Pac12 title game, a chance to pick up another big win. The Ducks can get into the Pac-12 championship game with a UCLA win over Stanford this weekend. The extra game would give Oregon an added boost in the computers, which for now, are certainly on Floridas side. The voters, on the other hand, are already rmly in the Ducks corner. I dont really worry about the perception of what might be out there, coach Will Muschamp said Monday. Unfortunately, in our profession, sometimes perception becomes reality. I dont apologize for being 3-1 (against the BCS Top 10) and the only team in the BCS Top 10 that has that record and a better record than anyone else and has a tougher schedule than anyone else in the country. The problem for Florida right now is that the perception of the Gators is not kind. Muschamps team plays an ugly brand of football, while the Ducks dazzle voters with a high- ying offense. Muschamp and the Gators wont want to be shy about campaigning at this point. They might very well need the help, despite having the most impressive resume in the country.FSU turns focus to Gators Like us on newsThe Wakulla 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Managemen Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. G G Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Joint and Muscle soreness Arthritis Back aches THG-12902 FL Seniors Now Qualify for FREE Easy-to-Use Mobile Phone A new statewide program offers a free mobile phone for those 55 and older. Seniors are now entitled to a free mobile phone with built in help button. These phones are designed for seniors and have a huge display & large dial buttons & feature a one-touch panic button that will notify first responders and up to four friends if you have an emergency. No contracts, no credit checks, no pers onal information required. Call our toll-free 24-hour info line for details. Credit card required for activation. 1-888-670-3103 M a n a t e e T i m e s Adversing Networks of Florida Statewide advertisingone low price Reach a wide audience (866)742-1373

PAGE 26

Ever wonder why the birds we mostly eat have white and dark meat too? When gallinatious birds (those grain eaters like chickens and our Thanksgiving turkey) take off, the energy used to get the bird off the ground, comes directly from the muscle. This is why our Bobwhite quail and turkeys only y for short distances. They take off with a roar, then set their wings, and glide to a landing, as far from a predator as possible. But if the predator is fast, and ushes them again before the ight muscles get replenished with blood-energy, then after about three flushes, the bird hasnt the energy to get airborne again! On the other hand, a turkey can run and run, if they need, because those leg muscles are supplied with energy, mostly drawn from reserves (stored fat) during emergencies, and the veins are bigger to allow for lots of energy rich blood to keep the muscles like the Duracell batteries going and going. So the leg muscles are dark due to the veins, and larger amounts of blood, while the breast muscles are lighter in coloration due to the lack of blood. Now a hummingbird would be just the opposite, because they beat their wings hundreds of beats per second, their breast meat is extremely dark while the leg meat is very light for their legs are used only for perching. On the other hand a duck/goose swims for hours and ies during migration for hours and hours, so their meat is dark all through. Got it? If we ew, the muscles in our arms (serving as wings) would be pulled up with our back muscles, and down with our chest muscles, right? But, birds are set up differently. Both their raising muscles and lowering muscles of the wings are attached to that big breast bone. If you think about it there are no muscles hardly on the back of a chicken. So you have both flight muscles attached to the breast bone. The main mass of muscle is to pull the wing down and it is attached to the wing as wed figure, but the muscle that raises the wing has tendons going up through the shoulder, and over the base of the wing bone, to lift the wing for the next down stroke. As a bird ies these two muscle masses alternate contracting, resulting in a heat build up and friction, and so birds have developed hollow ight bones, and air sacs (seven to nine, roughly) to keep the bird from overheating. Theyve also got no teeth, which means they dont have teeth weight, plus the jawbones to hold the teeth, nor the muscles needed to chew with. So enjoy your Thanksgiving and your white and dark steamed turkey too.Editors Note: This column originally appeared in 2010. Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors Thank You for 5 Years In A Row Readers Choice 2009 Readers Choice 2008 Readers Choice 2010 Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice 2012 24 HR EMERGENCY SERVICEEstablished 2000 KAYAKS CHRISTMAS SALE6527 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 at the Wakulla River & Hwy. 982013 Kayaks Just Arrived!~2012 Kayaks Deeply Discounted~T~n~T Hide-a-way, Inc.850-925-6412Gift Certicates Available for Eco-Tours, Kayak Fishing and Rentals www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service This report represents some events the FWC handled in the Northwest Region the week of Nov. 9 through 15. GADSDEN COUNTY: Of cer Benjamin Johnson worked complaints at the Little River area, which involved the taking of over the limit and undersized striped bass and speckled perch. Fishing activity was very heavy. Johnson located two individuals in possession of the undersized perch and undersized bass and issued citations to both individuals. BAY COUNTY: Of cers on patrol in St. Andrews Bay inspected a commercial shing vessel. The captain of the vessel was charged for possession of reef sh not maintained or landed in whole condition.From the NWTF Here are some tips from the National Wild Turkey Federation to consider when youre in the woods this fall: Know your states hunting regulations and follow them. Keep your rearm pointed in a safe direction, and leave the safety on until you are ready to shoot. Positively identify your target, and know what is beyond your target before you shoot. Avoid wearing white, red, black or blue since these are the colors of a gobblers head and body. Select a spot that is in open timber rather than thick brush. Eliminating movement and camou age is more critical to success than heavy cover. Sit against a large stump, blow-down, tree trunk or rock that is wider than your shoulders and higher than your head when calling wild turkeys. If you imitate the sound of a gobbling turkey, you could call in other hunters. You should always be cautious, but especially when hunting public land. Leave the area if you suspect theres another hunter already working the same bird.Some tips for safe turkey huntingFWC OperationsWakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHWhere the white and dark meat on that turkey comes from THE END If your deer season is winding down and you still havent taken that big buck, dont give up. Here are some things you can try to take that buck of a lifetime at the end of the season. *Dont hunt where anybody else has hunted. *Dont hunt at times when everyone else has or is hunting. *Use strategies no one else has tried. *Move your stand to places neither you or anyone else has ever hunted. *Now is also the time to get right into that bedding area youve been avoiding all season. It still wont be easy, but trying these tactics could result in the buck youve always dreamed about. Jim Ryan is a Member of the RedHead Pro Hunting Team For more tips, log onto basspro.com and click on the OutdoorSite LibraryDONT QUITMost hunters quit hunting after the peak of the rut because they think they no longer have a chance for a big buck. What they dont know is bucks still seek ready-to-breed does for weeks after the peak rut. Does that werent bred during the peak will come into estrus about a month later and bucks will be looking for them. During the post rut, focus on food because thats where the does will be. Dominant bucks are extremely wary and often nocturnal so get in your stand an hour before first light. In the afternoon, stay in your stand until the last second of shooting hours. Remember that post rut bucks will be jumpy, very cautious and alert to every smell and sound, but they arent invincible. NASCAR driver Tony Stewart is an avid outdoorsman For more tips, log onto basspro.com and click on the OutdoorSite Library Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

PAGE 27

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 7Ba peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & ExteriorTogether We Are Providing Employment for Local CraftsmanFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS Where the 8CR Begins in the East the area of responsibility for Flotilla 12 Apalachee Bay. Roughly 100 miles of coastline, give or take, lie between the Econ na River in Lamont and the West Pass at St. George Island. This is the area of responsibility for Flotilla 12. The closest Active Duty station is located in Panama City, 130 miles from the Econfina River and 75 Miles from St. George by land. Those who have been involved in the Coast Guard Auxiliary know the story, but many do not. Flotilla 13 Shell Point was the original otilla in our area for many years. However, due to the expanding popularity of the area and increased boat traffic and need to cover more area, Flotilla 12 St. Marks branched off in 1988. Two founding members John Champion and Don Gilbert worked with many others to build the otilla we know today. Over the last 24 years, we have faced several challenges, experienced many successes and seen many members come and go. The place we call home has changed more times than any of us would like. What has not changed is the dedication of the otilla to provide a service to the community so many of us also call home. Our success is not without the support of many local organizations. In more recent years, we have become involved in monitoring for red tide in our waters in addition to our safety patrols. Public education and public affairs have remained a focus throughout our existence as well. One of our major outreach events the last six years has been the Florida State University Fly-over. In this event we bring together support from our local otilla, Station Panama City and Air Training Center Mobile. Through all or various activities, we also have representation across the division and district. Our members have served in elected as well as appointed positions. Through all of this work, in the past 10-plus years, the otilla has provided over 67,000 hours of support to the Coast Guard in our various activities including administrative support, safety patrols, public affairs and public education. As other otillas have faced challenges they were unable to overcome, we have merged and assumed responsibility for an increased coastline. In 2012, we became Flotilla 12 Apalachee Bay to more accurately re ect who we represent and the area we serve. We have been, and always hope to be Semper Paratus. We are thankful to The Wakulla News for allowing us to run this article each week. Wakulla County has been reading about the Auxiliary since 1974 when Sherrie Alverson began writing for the local paper. The members of Flotilla 12 wish each and every reader a very happy, healthy and enjoyable Thanksgiving. Greatness is not where we stand, but in what direction we are moving... We must sail, sometimes with the wind, sometimes against it, but sail we must, and not drift nor lie at anchor. Oliver Wendell Holmes Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12 Apalachee Bay:PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA group of Auxiliarists at the dock, left. Auxiliarists Bob Asztaltos and Duane Treadon, right, collect water samples to test for red tide. What brings tourists. Every year my staff and I travel to the Diving Equipment Manufacturing Association (DEMA). We then drive on to visit suppliers all the way up to Washington. Thousands of dive operations stores, travel destinations, manufacturers, environmental groups and training agencies all converge to inspect each other and promote their cause. Their displays ll a convention center for four days, spilling into the night with after hour meetings brokering deals and generally moving the industry forward. We attend to learn, to decide on new products for next year, and network with the many friends that build up over the years. This year we were bombarded with the disbelief that Wakulla Springs would remain closed to diving. Many told us they were altering their plans to go elsewhere and wished us well. We investigated travel options to move our customers to other diving destinations with greater visions of prosperity. We have also expanded into other income revenue opportunities such as expanding our hydrostatic retesting capability, Underwater Crime Scene Investigation technology, and of course new rebreathers. There are many places to put investment funds. Then we stumbled upon the display shown above and marveled at their audacity! It seems for years, at a site just three and a half hours drive south of Wakulla, a community created a dive destination. They are now advertising nationally at the DEMA, about a place where divers and manatees can swim together. Just that feature alone attracts thousands of tourists who spend millions of dollars in a small community. This easily justi es paying for this expensive display booth at DEMA. We congratulated them for their courage and insight. Because their manatee became so valuable, the community protects and supports all of the systems that surround the attraction. Just like the hunting associations that provide more resources to promote the animals they harvest to maintain a healthier stock, the manatee at this dive destination are protected by much more than a regulation. As a result the community is rewarded with jobs and prosperity. Why cant we share? A booth featuring a site in Florida where divers and manatees can swim together, at the Diving Equipment Manufacturing Association (DEMA) show. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton GREGG STANTON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Nov 22, 12 Fri Nov 23, 12 Sat Nov 24, 12 Sun Nov 25, 12 Mon Nov 26, 12 Tue Nov 27, 12 Wed Nov 28, 12 D ate 3.4 ft. 12:18 AM 3.4 ft. 12:50 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 3:24 AM 0.6 ft. 4:34 AM 0.2 ft. 5:27 AM -0.1 ft. 6:10 AM -0.3 ft. 6:49 AM -0.4 ft. 7:25 AM -0.4 ft. 7:59 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 10:00 AM 2.7 ft. 11:10 AM 2.8 ft. 12:01 PM 3.0 ft. 12:42 PM 3.1 ft. 1:18 PM 3.1 ft. 1:52 PM 3.2 ft. 2:25 PM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 3:30 PM 1.5 ft. 4:25 PM 1.5 ft. 5:11 PM 1.5 ft. 5:51 PM 1.4 ft. 6:27 PM 1.4 ft. 7:01 PM 1.3 ft. 7:36 PM L ow 2.9 ft. 9:40 PM 3.1 ft. 10:27 PM 3.2 ft. 11:08 PM 3.3 ft. 11:44 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 22, 12 Fri Nov 23, 12 Sat Nov 24, 12 Sun Nov 25, 12 Mon Nov 26, 12 Tue Nov 27, 12 Wed Nov 28, 12 D ate 2.5 ft. 12:10 AM 2.6 ft. 12:42 AM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 3:35 AM 0.4 ft. 4:45 AM 0.2 ft. 5:38 AM -0.0 ft. 6:21 AM -0.2 ft. 7:00 AM -0.3 ft. 7:36 AM -0.3 ft. 8:10 AM L ow 1.9 ft. 9:52 AM 2.0 ft. 11:02 AM 2.1 ft. 11:53 AM 2.2 ft. 12:34 PM 2.3 ft. 1:10 PM 2.4 ft. 1:44 PM 2.4 ft. 2:17 PM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 3:41 PM 1.1 ft. 4:36 PM 1.1 ft. 5:22 PM 1.1 ft. 6:02 PM 1.0 ft. 6:38 PM 1.0 ft. 7:12 PM 0.9 ft. 7:47 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 9:32 PM 2.3 ft. 10:19 PM 2.4 ft. 11:00 PM 2.5 ft. 11:36 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 22, 12 Fri Nov 23, 12 Sat Nov 24, 12 Sun Nov 25, 12 Mon Nov 26, 12 Tue Nov 27, 12 Wed Nov 28, 12 D ate 3.1 ft. 12:20 AM 3.2 ft. 12:54 AM 3.2 ft. 1:26 AM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 4:28 AM 0.5 ft. 5:38 AM 0.2 ft. 6:31 AM -0.1 ft. 7:14 AM -0.2 ft. 7:53 AM -0.3 ft. 8:29 AM -0.4 ft. 9:03 AM L ow 2.4 ft. 10:36 AM 2.5 ft. 11:46 AM 2.6 ft. 12:37 PM 2.8 ft. 1:18 PM 2.9 ft. 1:54 PM 2.9 ft. 2:28 PM 3.0 ft. 3:01 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 4:34 PM 1.3 ft. 5:29 PM 1.4 ft. 6:15 PM 1.4 ft. 6:55 PM 1.3 ft. 7:31 PM 1.2 ft. 8:05 PM 1.2 ft. 8:40 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 10:16 PM 2.9 ft. 11:03 PM 3.0 ft. 11:44 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 22, 12 Fri Nov 23, 12 Sat Nov 24, 12 Sun Nov 25, 12 Mon Nov 26, 12 Tue Nov 27, 12 Wed Nov 28, 12 D ate 2.6 ft. 12:02 AM 2.7 ft. 12:34 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 3:03 AM 0.6 ft. 4:13 AM 0.2 ft. 5:06 AM -0.1 ft. 5:49 AM -0.2 ft. 6:28 AM -0.4 ft. 7:04 AM -0.4 ft. 7:38 AM L ow 2.0 ft. 9:44 AM 2.1 ft. 10:54 AM 2.2 ft. 11:45 AM 2.3 ft. 12:26 PM 2.4 ft. 1:02 PM 2.4 ft. 1:36 PM 2.5 ft. 2:09 PM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 3:09 PM 1.4 ft. 4:04 PM 1.5 ft. 4:50 PM 1.5 ft. 5:30 PM 1.4 ft. 6:06 PM 1.3 ft. 6:40 PM 1.3 ft. 7:15 PM L ow 2.3 ft. 9:24 PM 2.4 ft. 10:11 PM 2.5 ft. 10:52 PM 2.6 ft. 11:28 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 22, 12 Fri Nov 23, 12 Sat Nov 24, 12 Sun Nov 25, 12 Mon Nov 26, 12 Tue Nov 27, 12 Wed Nov 28, 12 D ate 3.5 ft. 12:15 AM 3.5 ft. 12:47 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 3:21 AM 0.6 ft. 4:31 AM 0.2 ft. 5:24 AM -0.1 ft. 6:07 AM -0.3 ft. 6:46 AM -0.4 ft. 7:22 AM -0.4 ft. 7:56 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 9:57 AM 2.8 ft. 11:07 AM 2.9 ft. 11:58 AM 3.0 ft. 12:39 PM 3.1 ft. 1:15 PM 3.2 ft. 1:49 PM 3.2 ft. 2:22 PM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 3:27 PM 1.6 ft. 4:22 PM 1.6 ft. 5:08 PM 1.6 ft. 5:48 PM 1.5 ft. 6:24 PM 1.5 ft. 6:58 PM 1.4 ft. 7:33 PM L ow 3.0 ft. 9:37 PM 3.1 ft. 10:24 PM 3.3 ft. 11:05 PM 3.4 ft. 11:41 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 22, 12 Fri Nov 23, 12 Sat Nov 24, 12 Sun Nov 25, 12 Mon Nov 26, 12 Tue Nov 27, 12 Wed Nov 28, 12 D ate Hi g h 0.7 ft. 3:03 AM 0.3 ft. 4:04 AM 0.0 ft. 4:55 AM -0.2 ft. 5:41 AM -0.4 ft. 6:22 AM -0.4 ft. 7:00 AM -0.5 ft. 7:35 AM L ow 1.8 ft. 9:41 AM 1.9 ft. 11:36 AM 2.0 ft. 12:55 PM 2.2 ft. 1:52 PM 2.3 ft. 2:38 PM 2.3 ft. 3:16 PM 2.3 ft. 3:49 PM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 2:42 PM 1.2 ft. 3:32 PM 1.4 ft. 4:19 PM 1.5 ft. 5:03 PM 1.6 ft. 5:43 PM 1.6 ft. 6:19 PM 1.6 ft. 6:53 PM L ow 2.4 ft. 9:15 PM 2.5 ft. 9:42 PM 2.6 ft. 10:10 PM 2.6 ft. 10:38 PM 2.7 ft. 11:09 PM 2.7 ft. 11:41 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 22 Nov. 28First Nov. 20 Full Nov. 28 Last Dec. 6 New Dec. 12Major Times 7:59 AM 9:59 AM 8:21 PM 10:21 PM Minor Times 1:48 AM 2:48 AM 2:03 PM 3:03 PM Major Times 8:43 AM 10:43 AM 9:05 PM 11:05 PM Minor Times 2:43 AM 3:43 AM 2:36 PM 3:36 PM Major Times 9:27 AM 11:27 AM 9:49 PM 11:49 PM Minor Times 3:37 AM 4:37 AM 3:10 PM 4:10 PM Major Times 10:11 AM 12:11 PM 10:34 PM 12:34 AM Minor Times 4:31 AM 5:31 AM 3:46 PM 4:46 PM Major Times 10:57 AM 12:57 PM 11:20 PM 1:20 AM Minor Times 5:25 AM 6:25 AM 4:24 PM 5:24 PM Major Times --:---:-11:44 AM 1:44 PM Minor Times 6:17 AM 7:17 AM 5:06 PM 6:06 PM Major Times 12:07 AM 2:07 AM 12:31 PM 2:31 PM Minor Times 7:09 AM 8:09 AM 5:51 PM 6:51 PM Average+ Average Average Good Better Best Best7:08 am 5:38 pm 2:03 pm 1:49 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:09 am 5:37 pm 2:37 pm 2:44 am 7:10 am 5:37 pm 3:11 pm 3:38 am 7:11 am 5:37 pm 3:47 pm 4:32 am 7:11 am 5:37 pm 4:25 pm 5:26 am 7:12 am 5:37 pm 5:07 pm 6:19 am 7:13 am 5:36 pm 5:52 pm 7:10 am61% 68% 74% 80% 86% 92% 98% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

PAGE 28

Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor 000CV38 -Janet By DAVID WHITE Thanksgiving strikes fear in just about every host. Preparing a giant bird is a herculean task. Cooking gravy, stuf ng, and cranberry sauce is always more complicated than expected. Then theres the anxiety of any family gathering -will politics or off-color jokes derail the dinner? Add wine to the list of things to worry about, and its no wonder why so many wonderful at-home chefs dread the holiday. Keep calm. With wine, at least, theres no need to stress. First, buy American. While I typically avoid jingoism, purchasing a foreign wine on Thanksgiving just doesnt seem right. So when you head to the store, embrace your patriotism and pick up something domestic. And dont hesitate to buy local. The Pilgrims didnt import their turkey from a faraway land. Second, follow the strategy of San Francisco Chronicle wine editor Jon Bonn, who advises his readers to select a roster of three wines one white, one red, and one sparkling. Anything beyond three wines creates needless confusion. Thanksgiving already causes enough headaches the last thing you need is a guest asking which red matches the stuf ng or which white goes better with the sweet potatoes. So keep it simple and let guests drink whichever wine they prefer. Youll also want to make sure you select wines with power and nesse. This is easier than it sounds. A simple Pinot Grigio, for example, isnt a powerful wine so wont stand up to mashed potatoes and gravy. Equally important, an in-your-face Cabernet Sauvignon lacks nesse, so will smother your food. Look for refreshing wines with body. For the sparkler, this means avoiding bottles that are too sweet look for brut or extra brut on the label. Old standbys like Domaine Chandon are better than ever before, and these days, there are some exciting sparklers coming from states outside California. If you can nd them, consider Gruet from New Mexico, Thibaut Janisson from Virginia, or Argyle from Oregon. For the white wine, remember to look for body. Bold Chardonnays work well with turkey and can cut through just about every component of your meal -from sweet avors like cinnamon to the bitterness of green vegetables. If youre looking for something a bit unusual, consider a Riesling, either dry or slightly sweet. New York has been producing high quality Riesling for more than 30 years, ever since German immigrant Hermann Weimer discovered that the cool climate and gravelly soils of the Finger Lakes were similar to his familys vineyards in the Mosel Valley. Producers in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Michigan are also making some stunning Riesling. White wines inspired by Frances Rhone Valley also make for a good match on Thanksgiving. Look for Viognier, Marsanne, Roussanne, or a blend with those grapes. With reds, think refreshment. This means avoiding wines with lots of tannin, so steer clear of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Malbec. It also means nding a wine with vibrant acidity, so avoid anything described as heavy or full-bodied. Pinot Noir is the most popular choice on Thanksgiving, but its dif cult to nd good one for less than $20. Thats why cool-climate Syrah or Grenache is a better bet. Both are fruity enough to satisfy the guests who like big reds, and elegant enough to handle the cornucopia of Thanksgiving. Just be sure to nd one from a cool-climate region like Washington or Californias coastal regions. Anything from a warm climate could overpower your food. If youre looking for something a bit unusual, consider a Blaufrankisch, Austrias signature red wine. Its similar in pro le to Pinot Noir, but generally a darker and spicier. New Yorks Red Tail Ridge makes one thats worth nding. Gamay Noir, the grape of Beaujolais, is also a good match. A few producers in Oregon, California, and New York are making delightful wines from this grape. Finally, and most importantly, have lots of wine on hand!David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet.Simplify wines on anksgiving WHITES WINES Family owned and operated boarding facility with over 10 years experience and a veterinary technician on-site. Indoor and outdoor boarding facilities for dogs small and large, cats and birds. Large and secure play areas with hands-on attention daily and friendly service we are sure to accommodate your needs. Whether you and your family are going on vacation, an extended stay or just away for the day, we are here for you. No duration is too long or short and our rates cant be beat! Livestock care at your farm or home is available!Personal care is given to each and every animal every day. Play time is our favorite time!(We do not make breed restrictions)Proud supporter of local rescues! Stefan Pedler, Owner1886 Bloxham Cutoff Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327 www.BloxhamBoardingKennel.com (850) 597-1739

PAGE 29

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 9BBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 16 With last weeks elections quickly slipping out of the rearview mirror, the new political reality began to take hold in Tallahassee this week. House Republicans tapped a new speaker for the 2014-16 term after the defeat of their rst choice for the position. The incoming speaker for the next two years laid out some of his priorities for the session that begins in March. And both sides began to ll out the leadership teams for the policy and political battles of the next few months. Meanwhile, Republicans and Democrats began to weigh the fallout from the messy conclusion of the fall campaign, when voters were forced to stand in line for hours on end in some precincts to cast their ballots. But agreement on what caused the problem, much less how to x it, was already proving dif cult to nd. THE NEW NEW SPEAKER It was a bit anticlimactic after the GOP rallied around him over the weekend, but Republicans officially announced Monday that Rep. Steve Crisafulli of Merritt Island would take over the House after incoming Speaker Will Weatherfords term is up in late 2014. Originally scheduled to hold that position was Rep. Chris Dorworth, R-Lake Mary, who stunningly lost his bid for re-election. Even as recounts in Dorworths close race were underway, Dorworth had conceded late last week that he was likely to lose and gave his blessing to Crisafulli. I understand the weight of the responsibility that has been placed on my shoulders, and I know with the support of the House, we will set forth a bold agenda that honors Floridians over the next four years, Crisafulli said. His rst task, of course, will be to win his own reelection he led this week and to work to hold and strengthen the GOP majority that currently dominates the House. Crisafulli was one of the top overall legislative fundraisers last year, which likely played a key factor in his selection; Crisafulli has generally had a low-key term in the Legislature since being elected in 2008. WEATHERFORD LAYS OUT HIS PRIORITIES As he was settling in as speaker for the next two years, Weatherford met with reporters early in the week to set his priorities for the upcoming session. And with state revenues looking relatively stable for the rst time in years, Weatherford instead looked ahead to some of the policy battles for next session. What could be the most bruising ght of Weatherfords first session is his willingness to tackle pensions. Republicans already targeted changes to state employees retirement bene ts two years ago, which left Gov. Rick Scott dissatisfied with the results and state unions slightly more dissatisfied -leaving the latter to le a lawsuit that has moved to the Supreme Court. Weatherford said he wanted to put new employees on a 401(k)-type retirement plan, instead of the guaranteed monthly payments retirees now get from the state. That effort was one of Scotts major pension proposals that failed to gain approval in the 2011 session. It (pension costs) is a ticking time bomb in every state and in every city across the country, and its time for us to get real and do what the private sector has done, Weatherford said. But unions and Democrats, who ercely fought the 2011 law requiring workers to contribute 3 percent of their salaries toward the state retirement plan, would likely oppose the plan again. Rep. Dwayne Taylor, DDaytona Beach, said Weatherfords plan would actually jeopardize the nancial footing of the state plan by diverting employees payments into the 401(k)-style plan while the pension plan would still owe bene ts to retirees and workers entitled to the more traditional bene ts. SLOP THE VOTE Even if the election was out of sight by the end of the week, it wasnt out of mind. Civic groups, lawmakers and Gov. Rick Scott were in a race to try and prove that they were paying attention to the Election Day debacle -with some of the public officials no doubt realizing that the voters waiting in line were considering whether to keep the incumbents in of ce. Weatherford said the Legislature should be willing to look at an elections law approved in 2011 that cut back on the number of early voting days, and said that the entire system should be reviewed. Obviously, the laws that are currently on the books may not have served the state well, may not have served the process well, he said. So we have to go back, study it, get the facts, listen to the people of Florida and make a decision. Meanwhile, Scott ordered Secretary of State Ken Detzner to look for ways to avoid another asco for a state that has something of a reputation when it comes to presidential elections. Floridas election supervisors are experts in their fields and many of them demonstrated tremendous expertise in running their elections, Scott said in a statement. We want to hear their ideas. HEALTH CARE QUESTIONS State leaders were also still working through whether and how to work with the federal government on implementing the healthcare exchanges central to the federal health-care law signed by President Barack Obama in 2010. The task took on new urgency with Obamas re-election last week, which all but guaranteed the changes will take effect. Weatherford and Gaetz sent a letter to federal of- cials saying they couldnt meet a Friday deadline for saying whether the state would set up the exchanges, work with the federal government to do it or let Washington handle it. Two factors prevent immediate state action on the establishment of an exchange, the letter said. First, the Legislature has not authorized the governor or any state agency or other entity to develop and operate an exchange, and no such authority can be established until the Legislature convenes in March. Second, the state lacks sufficient information to fully evaluate the potential impact of choosing one exchange model over another. Scott sounded a slightly different note in his own letter Friday to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, asking for a meeting to discuss the states efforts to put many Medicaid recipients into managed-care organizations and the health exchanges. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott and other state leaders wrestled with how to address the states health-care law. Scott and other Republicans ercely opposed the law and hoped a potential President Mitt Romney would repeal it, but President Barack Obama won re-election last week. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Its not a good thing when its Friday, three days after the election, and every state in the country is either red or blue, (but) there is one that is yellow because they havent counted the votes. That is something we should be embarrassed by.--Incoming Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley ChapelWEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Election fallout shakes up Capitol Students from area high schools and home schools are encouraged to apply for the Talquin Electric Youth Tour which will be held February 13-14, 2013. During this tour, students will visit the House of Representatives Chambers and attend a Florida Supreme Court session with about 100 other student leaders from around the state. During this time, four students will be chosen to represent Talquin in Washington, D.C. for the National Rural Electric Youth Tour, June 15-18, 2013. The selected students y to Washington, D.C. and visit the Lincoln Memorial, Arlington National Cemetery, Mt. Vernon, and other historic sites with hundreds of other student leaders from around the nation while learning more about cooperatives and democracy. In order to qualify: Students must currently be enrolled as a junior in a local high school or home school. Students must have a parent, grandparent or close relative who is currently a Talquin Member through business or residence. Students must currently live in Talquins four- county service area. Deadline for applications is December 10, 2012. Interested students should complete the Talquin Youth Tour Application, as well as submit a letter of reference and 250 word essay entitled, Why I want to be a Talquin Electric Youth Tour Representative in 2013. Applications are available at Talquin Area Of ces, or may be found at www.talquinelectric.com under the Community/Youth Tour link. For more information, contact Kim Gay, at (850) 627-7651. Deadline to turn in applications is December 10, 2012. Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Renance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Ofce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Ofce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Ofce: 850.926.1960 213 MILL CREEK Anxious owners, will consider all offers. Great 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 1 fenced acre reduced to $122,000. 1560 square feet, spacious living room, combo kitchen/dining room. Inside utility room, large extra room could be used as 4th bedroom, ofce, or family room. Screened-in porch leads to 1 car garage. National Forest with-in walking distance! Call Lynn for more information, 5458284 141 COUNTRY CLUB DRIVE New listing! Fabulous Golf Course home close to coast, schools, & country club. 2289 square feet, 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, formal living and dining rooms. Gorgeous kitchen with SS appliances and granite countertops. Spacious family room with loads of natural sunlight. You will love the master bedroom and bath! Double car garage, in ground pool & spa. Home is located in a gated community. Call David for more information, 519-7944 Lynn Cole-Eddinger David Hoover Coastwise Realty,Inc. Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-7 Closed Sun. & Wed.

PAGE 30

Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Acres Again Agree Ahead Anything Badge Banking Calculated Cream Dairy Diving Dried EarnestEncyclopediasErase Erosion Expand Floods Gates HasteImaginationImagine Inner Laying Minds Minor Nouns Peasant Poets Pride Rains Reform Rhyme Riding Roads Safer This page sponsored in part by: Scare Senate Series Shaggy Smokes Spears Stirs Teddy There Topic Untied Waste Yards

PAGE 31

THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 11B SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEmploymentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements Lost LOSTDOG 8 yr old female Shih pzu. Wearing a pink collar with silver bones answers to Cinnamon. Lost from St Theresa beach on 11/9 (850) 545-8256 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Medical Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Professional AIRLINE CAREERS-Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Now accepting applications forEXPERIENCEDFRONT DESK ASSOCIATE Apply in person. Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites. 3292 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville (across W.H.S.). Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 WANTED: Licensed Real Estate Agents for local offices. Please Contact 850-926-7811. Trades/ Skills DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDLTraining. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 DRIVERSApply Now, 12 Drivers Needed. Top 5% Pay & Late Model Equip Guaranteed Home for Xmas. Need CDL Class ADriving Exp (877)258-8782 www .ad drivers.com DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. HOME EVERYWEEKEND! Pay 37/mi, Both ways, FULLBENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, Fl TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 General Help DRIVERS:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money DownCALL: 888-880-5911 Schools/ Instruction Can Your Dig It? Heavy Equipment School. 3wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benefits Approved. 2 National Certifications. (866)362-6497 Schools/ Instruction ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality Job placement assistance.Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call www .Centura Online.com 888-203-3179 Appliances WHIRLPOOLWASHER GE DRYER almost new, $150. ea or $250 for pair 850-745-1189 Auctions AUCTION Nov. 28th thru Dec. 1st 35 Million Dollars in Construction/ Marine Equipment & Vehicles. Detailed list @ www .henderson auctions.com (225)686-2252 Livingston, Louisiana Farm Services BUSH HOGGING ROADS GRADED GARDENS TILLED Have tractor will bush hog finish cut large acerage grade roads driveways till gardens. dbdouge@aol.com or 850-643-6283 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3B/2b SW on 3 private acres. A rated schools. Quiet neighborhood. No smoking/pets. $675 dep. & 1st mo. 1yr lease. 850-926-6766 CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 PANACEA3 bedroom. 2 bath. DWMH with large front porch. 650.00 a month. NO PETS and NO Smoking inside house. Available December 1. 850-984-1018 or 352-603-7033 Mobile Homes For Rent PANACEAClean SW 3/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $500/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 Mobile Homes For Sale Mobile Home with acreage, ready to move in, great forpets. Lots of space forthe price. 3Br 2Ba, serious offers only, no renters. (850)308-6473 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEResidential/ Commercial House for Rent in the Center of Crawfordville For More Details Call (850) 926-9782 PANACEA2 bedroom. 2 bath. 700.00 a month plus deposit lights and water. NO PETS and No Smoking inside the house. 850-984-1018 or 850-408-4030. Auctions Estates ABSOLUTE AUCTION 79+/-Bank Owned Assets in GA, NC, TN Nov. 27 @ 6pm, Lithia Springs, GA. Nov. 28 @ 6pm, Ellijay, GA. Online & Live Bidding. GAL AU-Co002594, NCAL8935, TN5733 RowellAuctions.com (800)323-8388 Citrus Hills Homes Forest Ridge Villages Updated, move in ready, 2/2/2, Private lot 352-746-0002 Waterfront Homes Coastal Cottage! DeepwaterOcean Access with boat slips only $69,900. SALE Sat 12/1. New ready to finish cottage. Prime coastal Georgia location. Gated entrance, paved roads, underground utilities. FREE water/sewertap. Historically lowest financing. Call now (866)952-5303. x 1641 Sport/Utility Vehicles JEEP97 WRANGLER 4wd 137,000mi great cond. new soft top, $3300 Call 850-926-5494 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5438-1129 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON NOVEMBER 30, 2012 at 11:00 a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: JENNIFER BABCOCK BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF NOVEMBER 30 ,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. November 22 & 29, 2012 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5436-1122 TWN Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage 11/24 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, November 24, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Marilyn Mitchell Mike Vowell Before the sale date of Saturday, November 24, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, FL November 15 & 22, 2012 Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices 5419-1115 TWN Dept. of Child Services, 09C01-1207-JT Termination of Parental Rights PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF INDIANA, COUNTY OF CASS, IN THE CASS CIRCUIT COURT Logansport, INDIANA IN THE MATTER OF THE TERMINATION OF THE PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP OF: CRISTINA SALTER, SELENA SALTER, and JOBANY SALTER, children And SERGIO SANCHEZ, father Cause No.: 09C01-1207-JT-17 Cause No. 09C01-1207-JT-18 Cause No. 09C01-1207-JT-19 SUMMONS FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION & NOTICE OF TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the above noted parent, whose whereabouts are unknown, and who is the parent of Cristina Salter (date of birth 2-2-2007), Selena Salter (date of birth 11-26-2009), and Jobany Salter (date of birth 10-22-2010) that a Petition for Involuntary Termination of your Parental Rights in the above named Children, has been filed by the Indiana Department of Child Services, Cass County Office, in the Cass County Circuit Court, and YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED TO APPEAR before the Judge of said Court at the Cass County Courthouse, second floor, in Logansport, Indiana, telephone (574) 753-7339, on the 9th day of January, 2013 at 1:00 oclock P.M. to attend an Initial hearing/Termination hearing and to answer the Petition for Termination of your Parental Rights in said Children, and YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED that if the allegations in said petition are true, and/or if you fail to appear at the hearing, the Juvenile Court may terminate your parent-child relationship; and if the court terminates your parent-child relationship you will lose all parental rights, powers, privileges, immunities, duties and obligations including any rights to custody, control, visitation, or support in said Children; and if the court terminates your parent-child relationship, it will be permanently terminated, and thereafter you may not contest an adoption or other placement of said children, and YOU ARE ENTITLED TO REPRESENTATION BY AN ATTORNEY, provided by the State if applicable, throughout these proceedings to terminate the parent-child relationship. YOU MUST RESPOND by appearing in the case in person or by attorney within thirty (30) days after the last publication of this notice, and in the event you fail to do so, an adjudication on said petition and termination of your parental rights may be entered against you without further notice. THE ATTORNEY REPRESENTING THE INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF CHILD SERVICES, is Tricia Thompson, 300 E. Broadway Street, Suite 502, Logansport, IN 46947; telephone (574)722-3677. Date this 19th day of October, 2012 Clerk of Cass County November 8, 15 & 22, 2012 Termination of Parental Rights Notices 5442-1122 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: April S. Doty Last known address of 26 Revadee Spears Rd., Crawfordville, FL32327 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 November 22, 2012 5418-1122 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201203652 TO: Russell E. Paul ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. November 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2012 4Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep 2Br 1Ba House $595mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16 .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE.CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 GOT FALLIN G LE A VES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help!Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h a a a v e e A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l t h e e M M o o o o o o d d e e e e e r r n E q q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m e n n t t to He C C C ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f t t ! PAT GR EEN S L AWN S ER VICE Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT Christmas decorations, games, toys, books, tapes, dishes, household items, small kitchen appliances, clothes, new & used items. Something for everyone! Rain or Shine Super Yard Sale Christmas Bazaar and Bake Sale First Baptist Church of Wakulla Station 945 Woodville Hwy.

PAGE 32

Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5441-1129 TWN vs. The Estate of Altamease Cole Case No. 65-2012-CA-000165 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000165 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC., TRUST 2004-WMC3, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-WMC3, Plaintiff, vs. THE ESTATE OF ALTAMEASE COLE, DECEASED, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To The Estate of Altamease Cole, Deceased 41 Tharpe Lane Crawfordville, FL 32327 : YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: Commence at a U.S. Government concrete monument and a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Lot 5 of the Hartsfield survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence runs North 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East along the North boundary of said Lot 5, a distance of 343.98 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 10 seconds East 199.94 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, thence run North 72 degrees 32 minutes 01 seconds East 190.70 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run South 17 degrees 14 minutes 40 5433-1122 TWN vs. Fedorak, Louise Case No. 2012-72-CANotice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-72-CA CENTENNIALBANK, as Successor in Interest to Wakulla Bank Plaintiff, vs. LOUISE B. FEDORAK, ET AL., CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL32327 on January 24, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: COMMENCING AT APOINT WHERE THE NORTHEASTERLYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD 372-A(100 FOOT) RIGHT OF WAYINTERSECTS THE WEST BOUNDARYOF RANGE 1 WEST, SAID POINT BEING 274.32 FEET NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST AND CONTINUE NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARYOF SAID RANGE 1 WEST 314.69 FEET TO ALIGHTWOOD HUB APPROXIMATELYIN THE CENTER OF THE OLD RAKER FISHERYROAD, NOW ABANDONED, THENCE ALONG THE APPROXIMATE CENTER OF SAID ROAD AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 34 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 378.81 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 417.03 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 383.5 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 147.83 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE SOUTH 41 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 296.45 FEET TO THE NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT OF WAYLIMITS OF STATE ROAD 372-A, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 595.73 FEET ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYLIMITS TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 250.75 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 59.4 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 383.5 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 147.83 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID LAND IN AN UNNUMBERED LOT OF HARTSFIELD SURVEYEAST OF THE WEST BOUNDARYLINE OF RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. MORE RECENTLYDESCRIBED BYSURVEYPREPARED BYJAMES THURMAN RODDENBERRYPROFESSIONALLAND SURVEYOR DATED MARCH 14, 2000 JOB #00.142 AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 372-A(BOTTOMS ROAD) WITH THE WESTERLY BOUNDARYOF RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT LYING NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 274.32 FEET FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 314.69 FEET TO AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 373.54 FEET TO APOINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 422.56 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 383.56 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 150.51 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 41 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 297.65 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE LYING ON THE NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF BOTTOMS READ (STATE ROAD NO. 372-A), THENCE RUN NORTH 47 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY594.15 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 250.34 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 59.42 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 383.56 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 150.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Date: October 31, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By:/s/Desiree Willis, Deputy Clerk Wakulla County November 22 & 29, 2012 5426-1122 TWN vs. Keller, Judy Case No. 652008CA000158 Foreclosure IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA000158 DIVISION: THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE CWABS, INC., ASSETBACK CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1 Plaintiff, vs. JUDYGARNETKELLER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 1, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000158 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE CWABS, INC., ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1 is the Plaintiff and JUDYGARNETKELLER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDYGARNETKELLER N/K/AFRANK KELLER N/K/AFRANK KELLER; TENANT#1 N/K/AJESSICAKELLER N/K/AJESSICAKELLER are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 13th day of December, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 6, BLOCK D, HIGHLAND PLACE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A100 MULBERRYCIRCLE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the prop5431-1122 TWN Vs. Waltman, Mary, Case #12-187-CA, Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE # 12-187-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. MARY WALTMAN; RANDAL L. WALTMAN, SR., et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, entered in Case No. 12-187-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and MARY WALTMAN; RANDAL L. WALTMAN, SR, wife and husband, UNKNOWN TENANT, AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 at 11:00 oclock a.m. on January 24, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Partial Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: SEE EXHIBIT A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days of the sale. DATED this 31st day of October, 2012 BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A WEST HALF OF LOT 3, WOODVILLE SOUTH UNIT II (Unrecorded) Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 9, Block C of Woodville South, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, page 31 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 89 degrees 44 minutes 21 seconds East along the Southerly boundary of said subdivision 1382.32 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNINING. From said POINT OF BEGINNINING continue South 44 minutes 21 seconds East along said Southerly boundary 455.00 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 24 minutes 21 seconds West 240.00 feet to the centerline of a 60.00 foot roadway easement (J & K Lane), thence run North 89 degrees 44 minutes 21 seconds West along said centerline 455.00 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 24 minutes 21 seconds East 240.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Subject to a roadway and utility easement over and across the Southerly 30.00 feet thereof TOGETHER WITH THAT 1994 SPRl MOBILE HOME BEARING TITLE NUMBERS 66731385 AND 66731386 AND VIN # CLFL46396A AND CLFL46396B RESPECTIVELY November 15 & 22, 2012 5432-1122 TWN Vs. Hale, Troy Case No: 09000038CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 09000038CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. TROYA. HALE; KARAS. HALE; UNKNOWN TEANANT#I; UNKNOWN TENANT#2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 17th day of January, 2013, at 11:00 oclock A.M. at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: LOTS 4 & 5, BLOCK WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT III, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA Amobile home with VIN number FLHMBFP119543999Aand FLHMBFP119543999B sits on the property. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 30th day of October, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904) 926-0905. not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk jNovember 15 & 22, 2012 5432-1122 5427-1122 TWN Vs. Nelson, Buddy 65-2010-CA-000035-CA-XXXX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000035-CA-XXXX BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANY Plaintiff(s) vs. BUDDYE. NELSON, et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000035-CA-XXXX of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANYis the Plaintiff and are BUDDYE. NELSON; SHERRYA. NELSON; WACHOVIABANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION; THE FARM HONEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. and JOHN DOE N/K/AROBERTNELSON the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 24th day of January, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 1, Clock B, THE FARM SUBDIVISION, Phase I, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Pages 93-98 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. and commonly known as: 106 PIMLICO DR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLO 32327 IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANYREMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida this 31st day of October, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk, WAKULLACounty, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, WAKULLACounty, WAKULLA COUNTYCLERK OF COURT, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL, 32327 -County Phone: 850-926-0905 TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. November 15 & 22, 2012 864242.000187FMT seconds East 200.47 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run South 72 degrees 36 minutes 25 seconds West 190.71 feet to a 3 inch concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run North 17 degrees 14 minutes 28 seconds West 200.22 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.88 of an acre, more or less. SUBJECT TO an access easement over and across the Westerly 10.00 feet thereof., commonly known as: 41 Tharpe Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jacob A. Thomas, c/o Johnson & Freedman, LLC, the Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 400 Northridge Road, Suite 1100 M/S 27, Sandy Springs, Georgia 30350, within 30 days after the first publication date: November 22, 2012 and file the original with the Clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED: November 6, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond as Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy November 22 & 29, 2012 erty owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on November 1, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. November 15 & 22, 2012 F08051683 Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/3BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 3BR/1BA New carpet throughout $590 mo. No Pets, No Smoking BRGAPPRAISAL Call us for all of your appraisal needs 850.926.8777 Serving Leon, Franklin and Wakulla Counties A New Level of Service!!!Visit us for all of your real estate needs Do business with agents that are on the cutting edge of technology. Like us on Follow us on

PAGE 33

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 13B 1 14 17 20 23 36 40 43 53 58 61 64 2 32 54 3 33 55 4 26 44 47 24 48 5 15 18 21 37 41 45 6 34 59 62 65 7 27 56 8 25 49 19 22 46 9 16 38 42 10 28 39 57 60 63 66 11 29 35 50 12 30 51 13 31 52 ACROSS 1. Hotfooted it 5. Drink with a burger and fries 9. Catcher's posture 14. "Take one" 15. Hertz rival 16. The silent Marx 17. Molecule part 18. Dirty campaigner 20. Carpenter's groove 21. Mahmoud Abbas's org. 22. Main line 23. Winning candidate 25. Kofi __ Annan 26. Part of Roy G. Biv 27. "__ Maria" 28. Zero-star fare 32. Le Sage's "Gil __" 34. Bad day for Caesar 35. Have a tab 36. Memorable Jackie Gleason character 40. Pub serving 41. An army NCO 42. Hammer end 43. An jou relative 45. Clamp shape 46. Poseidon's realm 47. __ Bator, Mongolia 49. Less lenient 53. Idolizer 56. __ Na Na 57. Gun barrel diameter 58. Bit of Web programming 60. Abba of Israel 61. NY Yankees and Chi. White Sox 62. Garb for a judge 63. Designer Schiaparelli 64. Taylor of "The Nanny" 65. "Zounds!" 66. Fiddler's tuneDOWN1. What elms provide 2. Flower part 3. Chip away at 4. FDR, but not TR 5. Pitched a tent 6. Immature seed 7. Italian island resort 8. Braying beast 9. Gambler's loss, figuratively 10. Airline to down under 11. Hankering 12. Takeoff artist 13. British sympathizer of 1776 19Mostrecent 24. New Ager John 25. Turn aside 27. "Waste not, want not," e.g. 29. Prospector's find 30. "The Virginian" author Wister 31. __ capita income 32. String tie 33. Cask dregs 34. "Peer Gynt" playwright 36. Sharp left from Ali 37. Steep slope 38. Blunted blade 39. Weak brew 44. Arrow poison 46. Declared as fact 48. Car shopper's option 49. Biblical queendom 50. Duke or earl 51. Rub out 52. Kidney-related 53. Not quite shut 54. Chip' s chipmunk chum 55. Bakery fixture 56. Plod along 59. PostoppositeAmerican Prole Hometown Content 11/18/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 12 345 6217 81 57 62 92 2543 65 8639 41826 2009 HometownContent 182 3794 6 5 369254187 745861329 573 486912 614932578 298517643 927 645831 856123794 431798256 S H A D E J A B A J A R P E T A L B O L O D A L E E R O D E L E E S O V E N D E M O C R A T C U R A R E T E S H L E A S E C A M P E D E S C A R P O V U L E I B S E N P R E L I D O A D A G E S L O G A S S A V E R T S H E B A L A T E S T S T A T E D S H I R T E P E E Q A N T A S N E A R B E E R U R G E L O D E N O B L E A P E R O W E N E R A S E T O R Y P E R R E N A L Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5425-1122 TWN Estate of Chuley, Tracy File No. 12-97-CP Notice of Administration PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 12-97-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF TRACY CANDICE CHULEY Deceased. TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Formal Administration has been entered in the Estate of Tracy Candice Chuley, deceased, File Number 12-97-CP, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327; that the decedents date of death was July 2, 2012; that the total value of the Estate is less than $75,000.00 and that the names of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: NAME ADDRESS -Mark G. Chuley 2616 County Road 124, Seneca Falls, N.Y. 13148 -Lanson G. Chuley 29 Swaby Street, Seneca Falls, N.Y. 13148 -Kalan C. Chuley 25 Clinton Street, Seneca Falls, N.Y. 13148 -Daryl S. Chuley 108 Englishman Drive, Blacksburg, S.C. 29702 -Lynn D. Chuley 259 S. Cypress Road, # 511, Pompano Beach, FL 33060 -Aaron T. Chuley 454 Amanda Circle, Knoxville, TN 37922 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the Estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the Estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Person Giving Notice: /s/ John J. Ryan 6 Bob Miller Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /s/ J. Martin Hayes, ESQ., Florida Bar No. 0971766 Akerman Senterfitt, 401 E. Jackson Street, Suite 1700 Tampa, Florida 33602, Telephone: (813) 223-7333 November 15 & 22, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5429-1122 TWN Estate of Brim, John File No.: 12-96-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, FILE NO.: 12-96-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN WAYNE BRIM Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of John Wayne Brim, deceased, whose date of death was September 8, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. 5423-1115 TWN Estate of Shilling, Ana Navia Case No. 2012-CP-000090 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-CP-000090 PROBATE DIVISION NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Ana Navia Shilling, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-000090, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The date of the decedents death was June 20, 2012. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first pub lication of this Notice is November 15, 2012 Personal Representative: /s/Kathy H. Navia 1116 Chalet Drive West, Mobile, Alabama 36608-3614 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Eric S. Haug, Florida Bar No. 0850713 Eric S. Haug Law & Consulting, P.A. Post Office Box 12031, Tallahassee, Florida 32317-2031 Telephone: (850) 583-1480 Telefax: (850) 297-0300 November 15 & 22, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5439-1129 TWN Vs. Atkins, Deborah 12-14-CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO: 12-14-CA HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-4, Plaintiff, vs. Deborah S. Atkins; Jaime B. Williams; James L. Williams; Unknown Spouse of Deborah S. Atkins; Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under or against the Estate of James L. Williams, whether said Unknown Parties claim as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, trustees or other claimants; Unknown Tenant #1, and Unknown Tenant #2, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under or against the Estate of James L. Williams, whether said Unknown Parties claim as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, trustees or other claimants YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Wakulla County, Florida: Per Schedule A attached hereto Street Address: 45 Stoney Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Clarfield, Okon, Salomone & Pincus, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, within 30 days after the date of the first publication of this notice, on or before December 22 and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on November 2, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of said Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk Clarfield, Okon, Salomone & Pincus, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Avenue, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Telephone: (561) 713-1400 Schedule A COMMENCE AT A U.S. GOVERNMENT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION II, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION II, A DISTANCE OF 1208.23 FEET TO AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 47 WEST 363.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 47 52 WEST 346.00 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 50.00 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 607.69 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 26 18 EAST 346.01 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 609.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 4.84 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. November 22 & 29, 2012 5430-1122 TWN Vs. Highsmith, Phillip Case # 2012 CA 227 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE #2012 CA 227 CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. PHILLIP LEE HIGHSMITH; et al; Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, entered in Case No. 2012-CA 227 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and PHILLIP LEE HIGHSMITH, MICHELLE DAMRON ALLEN, BOBBY H. DANZEY, SR, VOY DANZEY; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 at 11:00 oclock a.m. on January 24, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Partial Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: Lots 6, 7 and 8 Block WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 3, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 43, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 31st day of October 2012 BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Court (seal) /s/ BY Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk November 15 & 22, 2012 5428-1122 TWN Estate of Edrington, Glenn File No. 12-99-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 12-99-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF GLENN L. EDRINGTON, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Glenn L. Edrington, deceased, whose date of death was September 26, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The first date of publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Personal Representative: /s/ Diane K. Ray-Edrington 103 Revell Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorneys for Personal Representative Stuart E. Goldberg, Fla. Bar No. 0365971, Amy Mason Collins, Fla. Bar No. 0044582 Law Offices of Stuart E. Goldberg, P.L. Post Office Box 12458, Tallahassee, Florida 32317 Telephone (850)222-4000 Facsimile (850) 942-6400 November 15 & 22, 2012 5422-1115 TWN Estate of Ferguson, Hugh Case No. 2012-CP-000094 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-CP-000094 PROBATE DIVISION NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Hugh Fain Ferguson, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-000094, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The date of the decedents death was August 21, 2012. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first pub lication of this Notice is November 15, 2012 Personal Representative: /s/Connie D. Torres 7337 Timber Crest Lane, Zephyrhills, Florida 33540 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Eric S. Haug, Florida Bar No. 0850713 Eric S. Haug Law & Consulting, P.A. Post Office Box 12031, Tallahassee, Florida 32317-2031 Telephone: (850) 583-1480 Telefax: (850) 297-0300 November 15 & 22, 2012 5443-1129 TWN Estate of Rona Hawkins Case No. 12-100 CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA COURT CASE NO.:12-100 CP Probate Division IN RE: THE ESTATE OF RONA LAVON HAWKINS, JR. Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS INTESTATE The administration of the estate of Rona Lavon Hawkins, Jr., Case Number 12-100 CP is pending in the 2nd Judicial Circuit Court, In and For Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. The estate is intestate. Any interested person upon whom this notice is served who may be entitled to exempt property under s. 732.402, Fla. St. must file a petition for determination of exempt property or a petition must be filed on behalf of that person WITHIN FOUR (4) MONTHS OF SERVICE OF FORMAL NOTICE OR 40 DAYS AFTER THE TERMINATION OF ANY PROCEEDING OF ANY MATTER AFFECTING ANY PART OF THE EXEMPT PROPERTY or the right to exempt property is deemed waived. All interested persons on whom a copy of this notice is served who intend to challenge the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or jurisdiction of the court must file an objection on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on that person, and all creditors having claims against this estate who are required to be served with a copy of this notice, are required to file with this court such claim WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors and other persons having claims or demands against the estate who are not known to the personal representative and whose names or addresses are not reasonably ascertainable must file their claims against the estate WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. ALL PETITIONS, CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS THE 22nd DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012. Personal Representative: COLLEEN Q. SKIPPER 18 Charlotte Rosier Road, Sopchoppy, FL 32358 Attorney for Personal Representative: HAROLD E. REGAN, FL BAR #124559 2520-2 Barrington Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32308 Telephone: (850) 681-7883, FAX: (850) 383-6604 November 22 & 29, 2012 5421-1115 TWN Estate of Whisman, Dorothy, File No. 12-98-CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA IN RE: ESTATE OF DOROTHY J. WHISMAN Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DOROTHY J. WHISMAN, deceased, File Number 12-98-CP, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327; that the total cash value of the estate is estimated to be $474,806.00, and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Beverly J. Ross 318 Harvard Rd. St. Augustine, FL 32086 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Personal Representative: BEVERLY J. ROSS 318 Harvard Rd., St. Augustine, FL 32086 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /S/ RONALD A. MOWREY, Fla. Bar No. 0122006 Mowrey Law Firm, PA 515 North Adams, Tallahassee, FL 32301, PH: 850-222-9482, Fax: 850-561-6867 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, November 15 & 22, 2012 5440-1129 TWN Estate of Whetstone, Katie Case # 12-95-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE # 12-95-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF KATIE WHETSTONE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of KATIE WHETSTONE, deceased, whose date of death was December 13, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 22, 2012 Personal Representative: KATHY L. RICHARDSON 832 Cordele Avenue, Port Charlotte, Florida 33948 Attorney for Personal Representative: MICHAEL M. WILSON, Attorney for KATHY L. RICHARDSON Florida Bar Number: 076244, Olmsted & Wilson, P.A. 17801 Murdock Circle, Suite A, Port Charlotte, Florida 33948 Telephone: (941) 624-2700, Fax: (941) 624-5151 November 22 & 29, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The first date of publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Personal Representative: /s/ Joseph William Brim 3765 Oleben Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32305 Attorneys for Personal Representative: /s/ Stuart E. Goldberg Fla. Bar No. 0365971, Amy Mason Collins, Fla. Bar No. 0044582 Law Offices of Stuart E. Goldberg, P.L. Post Office Box 12458, Tallahassee, Florida 32317 Telephone (850) 222-4000 Facsimile (850) 942-6400 November 15 & 22, 1012

PAGE 34

Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 1. ENTERTAINERS: Which actors birth name was Ramon Estevez? 2. MUSIC: What was the name of Smokey Robinsons group? 3. INVENTIONS: Who is credited with inventing bifocal lenses? 4. PSYCHOLOGY: What irrational fear is manifested in peniaphobia? 5. LITERATURE: In which of Shakespeares plays does the character Shylock appear? 6. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: During which war did Harry Truman fire Gen. Douglas MacArthur? 7. HISTORY: When did Australia become a commonwealth nation, largely gaining independence from Britain? 8. ANATOMY: About how long are the intestines in an adult male? 9. FAMOUS QUOTES: What American psychologist/philosopher once once said: Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does.? 10. MEASUREMENTS: Which month is named for the Roman festival of ritual purification? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Martin Sheen 2. The Miracles 3. Ben Franklin 4. A fear of poverty 5. The Merchant of Venice 6. Korean 7. 1901 8. About 28 feet 9. William James 10. February (Februa) YOUR AD HERE

PAGE 35

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 15B IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GET READY FOR HUNTING P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pet Phone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. Holistic Select WellnessC Lbt n Pfr tf Ab n ALL Yr P Nf.Special Orders AvailableStocking Stuffers for Pets Gift Certificates 301 C S G i Construction Cleanup, Commercial, ResidentialLICENSED AND INSURED ConstructionCleanupCommercial R Re Re Re Re R R R R R Re s si si sid id ential Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly Nicholspray like its up to God, Work like its up to youMany Thanks for Many Blessings. Have a wonderful Christmas! Across the street from the courthouse, downtown Crawfordville926-3338Open 10AM-5PM or call for later appointment.15 Vendors 2 Floors The White Elephant DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PET STOP3010 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. ANTIQUES C ARRIES C OVEC ARRIES C OVE C HRISTMAS ATC HRISTMAS ATToys Dolls Antiques Collectibles Jewelry Ornaments Decorations One-of-kinds Etc. A Cabin of Treasures~ Very Bradly ~ ~ Dots Jewels ~ ~ Greenleaf Scents ~ ~ 16 Vendors ~ ~ Gifts ~ ~ Collectibles ~ ~ Jewelry ~ ~ Custom Wood Items ~ & much more... PICK A TREASURE FROM OUR TREASURE BOX w/purchase!850926-8381M-S 10-5 Downtown Crawfordville, Next to Subwa y 27 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA Hair Place That 850-926-6020Gift Certicates Available t C C e C C FULL SERVICE HAIR SALONStyles for Men, Women & ChildrenCutsUpDosColor P erms HighlightsFacial Waxings Specialty Cuts Flat Top s MirandaTues-Sat545-2905RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MavisAppt. Only962-2171 Shop Downtown LATE Sat., Dec. 7 OPEN til 9PM Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A A A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews The Wakul la News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Shop Local Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce The Wakulla News and the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce encourage you to SHOP SMALL on NOVEMBER 24Help make a big difference for small business in Wakulla County We want to encourage you and your friends to Shop Small or help rally an entire town; everyone can help spread the word about Small Business Saturday.Between Black Friday and Cyber Monday is a day dedicated to supporting small businesses nationwide.As a consumer, you are a key part in helping small businesses thrive. By shopping or dining at a small business in Wakulla County this November 24th, youre showing your support for all the small communities around you. This means you could be helping local entrepreneurs offer more jobs, which in turn invigorate the economy and checking off items on your Christmas list at the same time.Small businesses do so much for our community, now it our chance to do something for them.

PAGE 36

By MARGE PERRYContributor, Relish magazineAn apple pie without cheese is like a kiss without the squeeze or so goes the saying from the Central Leatherstocking region of New York State. This oddly named and eminently quotable area (home to the Baseball Hall of Fame) was also the setting for James Fenimore Coopers series of books that includes The Last of the Mohicans. These stories of the frontier were collectively called The Leatherstocking Tales named for the deerskin garment early settlers donned over their linen pants to protect them from the underbrush and brambles. High above those nasty brambles were plenty of fruit-laden apple trees, from which the local women made their pies. Today, New York State produces more than 25 million bushels of apples and more varieties than any other apple-growing region. New York State is also home of the worlds rst cheese factory and is the third largest cheese producer in the country. It makes perfect sense, then, to combine these two meant-to-be-together foods cheese and fruit in one irresistible package. And while those rst Apple Cheddar Pies may have been made with fruit picked 15 minutes ago and cheese from the bakers own cows, the pies we make today can be every bit as good. The version below can be made in a mere 15 minutes of work, thanks to ready made pie crusts and the fact that we dont have to light a re to heat our ovens. LEATHERSTOCKING APPLE CHEDDAR PIE 3 pounds Granny Smith apples, peeled and cut in 1/4-inch slices (about 8 cups) 1/3 cup all-purpose our 3/4 cup sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 t easpoon ground nutmeg 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons butter, diced into bits 1 (15-ounce) package refrigerated piecrust dough (2 crusts) 3 ounces extra sharp Cheddar cheese, shredded 1 egg, lightly beaten 1. Preheat oven to 375F. Line a pie plate with one pie crust, gently pressing dough into sides, and letting excess hang over the edge. 2. In a large bowl, combine apples, flour, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, lemon juice, vanilla and salt. Spoon into pie crust and scatter bits of butter evenly over filling. Top with an even layer of cheese. 3. Drape second crust loosely over lling. Pull excess from the bottom crust over edge of top crust and crimp to enclose. Flute edge decoratively. Brush top crust lightly with beaten egg and use a sharp knife to make 4 to 5 small (1/2-inch) slits. 4. Bake until top is golden brown and fruit is bubbling and tender, about 50 to 55 minutes. If crust browns too quickly, drape pie lightly with foil and continue cooking. 5. Let cool at least 15 minutes before serving. Serves 8. Per serving: 460 calories, 24g fat, 6g prot., 58g carbs., 3g ber, 510mg sodium. Page 16B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com RELISH THE AMERICAN TABLEApples and cheese are made for each other MARK BOUGHTON PHOTOGRAPHY Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerEl Jalisco Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with side Hamaknockers Flatbread HoagiePulled Pork or Chicken Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99 Mixed Tues. & urs. Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under 926-4329mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza 926432 9 9 2 6 4 3 29 2 9 Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.com Open 7 Days Open 7 Days 926-7530 Restaurant 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville Come in for selected catch each week Seafood Fridays Seafood FridaysLunch & Dinner at OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringWin One Meal from Every Restaurant!EATIN path EATIN pathOFF OFF the theEATIN pathOFF the g Winner Eileen Hewittdrawn from Myra Jeans in Crawfordville 850-926-4737 VOTED BEST IN THE AREA Friday & Saturday Fresh Hand cut Ribeyes Mouthwatering Combo Smoked Wings Ribs & Sides Pulled Pork Friend us on facebook Friend us on facebook Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator Hamaknockers bar-b-q now has concession trailer! Nine years ago, there was no BBQ restaurant in Wakulla County. I talked to several local and old time restaurant owners, suggesting they need to open a BBQ restaurant. I even suggested they call it Hamaknockers, since the word seemed sort of unique to the area but no takers. So, a good friend of mine, Mark Baker, and I decided to do it ourselves. We started with a little concession trailer and a borrowed smoker. We decided to set up our trailer on the road by Rose Alley in Crawfordville. By August, we shut it down (it was miserably hot), but wherever I went in Crawfordville, people would ask, Where are you going to be? As most of you know, we ended up in the little house south of the Courthouse. And we are still there! By Jim Lowe



PAGE 1

By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter 17 years as superintendent of schools, David Miller is handing the reins over to someone who he feels is more than capable to lead the district. Bobby Pearce officially became the new superintendent at 12:01 a.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 20. Kind of like Cinderella, Pearce said. When I wake up, I will be the superintendent of schools. Miller chose not to run for re-election and announced his retirement in April. About his retirement, Miller said he feels good about it. You know when its time, he said. He added that he wanted to go out on a high note. I feel pretty good about the success of our district. Pearce was elected to the position on Nov. 6 over East Gadsden High School Principal Kimball Thomas, receiving an overwhelming percentage of the votes, more than 73 percent. It feels great, Pearce said. Thats a high voter approval rating. Although he did acknowledge the pressure that comes with that approval. He said voters are expecting a top notch system, not a humdrum system. Im just excited to be an even bigger part of it than I have been, Pearce said of the school district. Miller, who has known Pearce for quite some time, retires feeling good about leaving the district in Pearces hands. Everybody pulls together as a team. Thats the key to our success, Miller said. I dont see that changing. He added that hes watched Pearce over the years, as a coach, a teacher, a principal and now assistant superintendent, and knows he will keep that same mentality with everyone working together and supporting one another. Hes got a lot of support out there, Miller said. Their relationship started in the classroom when Miller was Pearces eighth grade science teacher. He has also been his coach and for the last several years, his boss. And Millers mother was Pearces Sunday school teacher. She was the only Sunday school teacher to give out homework, Pearce said. Pearce will now move to Millers office which also happened to be his mothers classroom when she was a teacher. Continued on Page 15A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 45th Issue Wednesday, November 21, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School ...........................................................................Page 15A Senior Citizens ..............................................................Page 16A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 18A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Outdoors .........................................................................Page 6B Water Ways ......................................................................Page 7B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 9B Thinking Outside the Book ............................................Page 10B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 10B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 10B Comics ...........................................................................Page 13BINDEX OBITUARIES Robert J. Keith Sr. John Buford Morrow Jr. John Henry Taylor This issue is being delivered to every household in Wakulla County CHECK IT OUTHappy ThanksgivingSheriff-elect Creel names undersheriffBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWith a little more than a month before he takes over as the new sheriff of Wakulla County, Charlie Creel isnt sitting by simply counting the days. Creel has already starting planning for the transition which will take place on Jan. 8, 2013. Last week, Sheriff Donnie Crum gave him a temporary of ce at the sheriffs of ce to prepare for his new position, as well as sit in on meetings, get to know the employees and learn his way around. Crum has also allowed him to go ahead and start making decisions, however, they will not go into effect until January. Im meeting with coworkers and getting acclimated, Creel said. I want everything to be in place before I take of ce. He added that he wants everything to be ready to be implemented once he of cially starts. Creel beat Major Maurice Langston in the sheriffs race, taking 54 percent of the vote. I want to thank my supporters and the ones who didnt vote for me, I ask them to give me a chance to show them that I can run this department ef ciently and effectively, Creel said. Langston is currently a major with the sheriffs of- ce and when asked about his future following the election, he told The News that he would be looking for an open door. Anytime the good Lord closes one door, he opens another, Langston said after the election. Crum, who will retire at the end of the year, encouraged everyone to form a relationship with Creel and stressed the importance of keeping the community safe. He said, Maurice is a good man and Charlie is a good man and I look forward to Wakulla County getting behind Charlie as he begins the challenge of operating the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. It is a hard job to be asked to do more with less money. Along with getting acclimated to the sheriffs of ce, Creel has also already chosen his undersheriff. On Friday, Creel announced that Lt. Clarence Trey Morrison would serve as his No. 2 once he takes of ce. I wanted the most highly quali ed person, Creel said. When Creel ran in 2008 and lost to then-sheriff David Harvey, Morrison was his pick. So coming into this race, he already knew who his undersheriff would be, if elected. Creel said he wanted to select someone from within the sheriffs of ce who knew the ins and outs. He has known Morrison and his family for a long time and said he looked at Morrisons resume and was impressed. He has worked in every division in the sheriffs of ce, Creel said, except communications and animal control. Morrison said he was humbled by Creels decision. To know that Im the one who he wants to be beside him, Im just as proud as I can be.Continued on Page 10AStudents help promote Diabetes DayA new superintendentJENNIFER JENSENLongtime Superintendent of Schools David Miller says goodbye to students at Medart Elementary last week.Bobby Pearce takes over the post from David MillerBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netNov. 14 was World Diabetes Day and to bring about awareness for this disease and help educate the public, several Wakulla County schools promoted the day in a different way. This is the rst year that we made a real effort to bring awareness, said Lori Lawhon, School Health coordinator. We kind of felt compelled because we are seeing more kids in our schools with diabetes. Lawhon said the goal was to educate the students and their parents, as well as the community. They are educating the public about the signs and symptoms of diabetes so that people can make the connection if their child has these symptoms, which include frequent urination, lack of energy, weight loss and excessive thirst. Continued on Page 11A JENNIFER JENSENSheriff-elect Charlie Creel, foreground, with Lt. Clarence Trey Morrison, Creels choice for undersheriff. New Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce (850) 201-8499 | TCCWakullaEnvironmentalInstitute.com | Online classes and in-the-field trainingTCC Wakulla environmental instituteCLASSES START JANUARY Train for careers in water quality, natural resource management and environmental monitoring.

PAGE 2

Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comMyers Carter shares the tradition of syrup-makingBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netFor the last 15 years, Myers Carter has been making sugar cane syrup the old fashioned way and each year he invites the community to see how its done. We want to keep it the way it used to be, Carter says at his home on Nov. 10. Keep it like grandpa did it. Carters type of syrup is kettle-cooked over a wood re. We do everything the hardest and oldest way we can, Carter says. Prior to going into the kettle, the river cane is stripped and cut down. It then goes through the cane mill that is powered by a lawnmower to grind it down. The cane mill squeezes the juice out of the cane. When he started in 1997, he used a cane mill from the early 1900s and it was powered by a mule. He now uses a different cane mill and switched from a truck-powered cane mill eventually to using the lawn mower. The furnace used to cook the sugar cane juice is the same one from the beginning. The 80-gallons of juice is then moved to the kettle which has a wood re to get it to boil. They use pine wood because it is a good re starter, Carter says. It takes a hot fire to boil 80 gallons of liquid, he says. The cane juice is boiled and cooked down to get all the water out of the sugar, Carter says. This is the easy part, says Roland Revell, who began helping Carter about four years ago and helped his family make syrup years ago. The juice needs to boil over so that the impurities can be removed. After about 4.5 hours of cooking the cane juice, large bubbles begin to form which is an indication the syrup is nearly ready. Once it is nearing completion, Carter will take a bucket and dip it in the center of the kettle to see if the syrup has reached its desired thickness. Once the syrup is done, it is strained and poured in a bucket. Out of 80 gallons, Carter says they will get about 10 percent syrup. He just knows when its done, says Bobby Strickland, who has been helping Carter make syrup for more than 10 years and also helped make syrup with his family. Ive been doing this all my life, he says. I was glad Myers needed some help. Pat Harvey has also been helping Carter for several years. He only pays off in syrup, Harvey says with a laugh. Carter remembers making sugar cane syrup with his father years ago. The rst thing I remembered seeing was syrup making, he says. He continued to make syrup with his father until 1972. Then about 25 years later, he decided to continue that tradition. I grew up doing this, Carter says. I just got away from it. As he got older, he decided he wanted to start doing it again and wanted to keep with the original way of making sugar cane syrup. We didnt want to let the old tradition die, Carter says. Carter holds a public syrup making day every year to share the tradition with the community. People enjoy food and listen to the music being played under the big trees on his property. Carter and his helpers are happy to answer questions about the process from curious onlookers. Carter also holds a family reunion with syrup making each year. Carter, who has been a longtime supporter of the Wakulla County Historical Society, donates proceeds from his annual syrup day sales to the Heritage Village Park project. MAKING CANE SYRUP: Myers Carter, left, watches the cauldron of cane juice boil. The syrup is strained, above, after being boiled. Musicians gather to perform during the traditional syrup-making.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN Please Recycle

PAGE 3

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider:A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.NOVEMBER 21 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING ADOPTION OF LARGE SCALE MAP AMENDMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE MAP Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.NOVEMBER 21, 2012 Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.NOVEMBER 21, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS CONCERNING SMALL SCALE MAP AMENDMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE MAP AND CHANGE OF ZONINGCopies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.NOVEMBER 21, 2012 NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS NOVEMBER 8, 15, 21, 29, 2012 PUBLIC NOTICENorth Florida Child Development, Inc. is recruiting for governing board(s) members. NFCD is a 501(c) (3) organization that provides comprehensive early education and development to the young children and their families in Calhoun, Gulf, Liberty, Madison, and Wakulla Counties. The governing board(s) maintains a formal structure of shared governance through which parents and community representatives can participate in policy making and other decisions. Please contact Sebrina McGill for more information at (850) 639-5080 ext 10 or smcgill@oridachildren.org.NOVEMBER 15, 21, 2012 NOTICE OF PREQUALIFICATION AND PROCUREMENT OF CONSTRUCTION SERVICES WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARDNovember 8, 22, 2012

PAGE 4

Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Confederate Salt Works from St. Andrews Bay to Apalachee Bay Crawfordville man arrested for drug trafficking Group seeks to gather waterfronts information Charlie Creel is new sheriff County commission: Board creates RESTORE Act committee 10-0, War Eagles end regular season undefeated Hot Tamale sets Wakulla CD release party at Poseys Docksidethewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.Editor, The News: My recent experience has compelled me to bring to light a misunderstanding that must be corrected. Like others, I often donate to charities to do my part to help my community. This fall, I decided to step it up a notch and volunteer for Operation Santa 2012. Initially, I thought Id be helping others; instead I was awakened by the desperation that many people in our community are facing. On my rst day, I helped organize applications and I couldnt help but notice key phrases like disabled veteran, laid off from my job, disabling illness, working single parent and raising my grandchildren. Then I saw what sort of gifts they were hoping to receive a baby blanket, warm coat and used dining table/chairs so her children didnt have to eat sitting on the oor. What happened to communities taking care of their own? Like many of your readers, Im proud I live in Wakulla. Ive seen our community work together to help people in need and we need to continue by helping these families, who are only asking for what many of us take for granted. To those like me, who didnt know how much they were needed, come forward, adopt an Operation Santa family, volunteer and make sure no child goes without a gift and a warm meal this season. Call 926-3526 or come by the community center weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. to help our families. Thank you. From a late bloomer whos now wide awake, Layne Davis CrawfordvilleTake a look at The News:Content you cant get anywhere elseIf youre not a regular subscriber to The Wakulla News, you may be wondering why you got this in the mail. This is the issue we do every year thats delivered to every address in Wakulla County. If youre not a subscriber, we hope this issue shows you why you should be. The main reason is that there is no other source of local news as complete as what you have in your hands. Our lead stories this week were about the transitions with new Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce taking over from longtime Superintendent David Miller, as well as Sheriff-elect Charlie Creel looking at changes in that department, and naming Lt. Clarence Trey Morrison as his undersheriff. Reporter Jennifer Jensen also had a story on students at Crawfordville Elementary School learning about diabetes for World Diabetes Day, as well as feature stories on Myers Carter making cane syrup and the communitywide Thanksgiving feast held Saturday at Hudson Park. The News also typically covers local government ranging from the county commission and the city governments of St. Marks and Sopchoppy. We have local sports: a story this week on the Wakulla High School War Eagles football team beating Gulf Breeze in the playoffs last week and preparing for the regional semi- nal against the Godby Cougars. A recent addition to the paper has been Extension Director Les Harrison and his Natural Wakulla column in which he writes about things in nature that capture his fancy. This week he writes about wild turkeys. Other columnists include George Weymouths outdoors column, which alternates with a fishing report by Capt. Jody Campbell and his From the Dock column. We also cover whats happening on the water with the Coast Guard Auxiliary Report by Carolyn Brown Treadon, and a dive column by Gregg Stanton. Other popular features include the Sheriffs Report, with some of the interesting law enforcement activity of the past week, and News Service of Floridas Weekly Roundup, which reports on happenings in state government. Every week of the month, we have a different focus in this edition, its Senior Citizen news. Other weeks, its the Chamber of Commerce on the rst of the month, followed by Green Scene with environmental news, and an Arts & Entertainment section on the third week. On those months when theres a fth week, we have the News Extra! which focuses on special news and reports. Are we missing something youd like to see in the paper? Let me know. You can call me at 9267102 or email at editor@ thewakullanews.net.William Snowden is the editor of The Wakulla News. William Snowdenwsnowden@thewakullanews.netThere are people here in Wakulla who are without food and basic essentials. The good news is that the recent Empty Bowls event created a broader awareness of this issue and, as a result, many efforts of outreach are now at work to address this growing problem. For example, Promise Land Ministries is going to prepare a hot traditional Christmas dinner for all the Operation Santa families. The B&B youth organization over the past month has donated four large bags of groceries. Much of it recently went to a family in crisis. Operation Santa, a signi cant outreach during the Christmas season conducted by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, has kicked off and is blessed to have use of the Community Center again this year. There are already 98 families currently in the system and they expect that number to reach 200 before the outreach is completed. There are a few families that have contacted Operation Santa directly because they are aware of the program and need help, however, most of the referrals are coming from local schools and agencies like Healthy Start, Disc Village and the Health Department who work with the families and know their needs. Many of these families have limited incomes, or they face health problems. Some of these families are working, but their modest incomes do not cover lifes essentials, or the ability to join in the holiday spirit. All too often grandparents are raising their grandchildren, many folks cannot nd a job or they are under-employment. This is all compounded by the rising cost of living essentials. Operation Santas team prays for giving hearts everyday and there are many in the community that respond, but with the growing number of families in need they need more giving hearts. A great example is Judi King and her team. They will be contacting each family multiple times in the days ahead in an effort to get to know them better, make a heart felt connection to each and to help identify their needs. Families have requested the most basic items such as books, dolls, board games and toys for children. Operation Santa will not be providing bicycles this year as they are focusing on providing for more families than in years past. In the days ahead items of need for these families will be listed on Operation Santas Facebook. Also, we hope to begin the adoption process whereby families will be identi ed with a number, their situation described, and the items they most need listed. Last year more than 60 families were adopted of the 141 families assisted. So why are you hearing all this? Operation Santa hopes you will consider a donation this year. These families truly need your help. Especially because one of the grants we obtained last year will not be coming in this year. We do have a sh fry planned for early December (led by the Panacea Fire Department, we hope) and that will help, as will donations by others, and we are hopeful the Rotary will take on providing the food boxes and Christmas dinners as we want to preserve Empty Bowls money for the seven church pantries. We have many things working. It is also hoped that individually you will: Adopt a family or two (basic needs, no high end items). Help as your time allows at the community center, staffed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., organizing donations, helping ll boxes. Go through your closets for gently used clothing and toys to donate. Bring these things to the community center before Nov. 30. Pull from the Wal-Mart tree a wish that you then buy and drop into the Operation Santa bin at customer service Tell everyone you know about Operation Santa and how they can help too. Its a community thing. Call 926-3526 with any questions. Wakulla County Coalition for YouthPlease help Operation SantaEditor, The News: Thank you for being such a voice for the county. I truly enjoyed your election coverage. I thought it was comprehensive, extensive and fair. I also appreciated the coverage you gave our religious community as you covered the 40-day prayer walk while still making room for the individual church coverage. It is beyond me why there would be a household in all of Wakulla County that would not be a subscriber and for those who are not, I feel they are losing an essential connection to their community. The Wakulla News is as much a part of its readers life as are the activities, the interests and the events that you highlight each week. Thank you again for embracing and keeping our neighborhoods in touch with one another. Cyndi Webster CrawfordvilleOperation Santa showed community need E orts to save cedar at beach are good Card of thanks Wakulla News has role in community Appreciate waves from newly elected anks from Riversprings for supportEditor, The News: As I was driving to work on a cold, breezy postelection morning, I was not the least bit surprised to see Commissioner-elect Ralph Thomas standing on the side of the road waving and thanking everyone for their support. And right along beside him, Sheriff-elect Charlie Creel. This reflects the character of these men that Wakulla County chose to lead us into a better future. So many times candidates think it is over once they win an election, but these guys know it has just begun. Whether you voted for them or not, please support these gentlemen and allow them do their hard work. Good work, guys! Did I mention it was cold? S. Roberts Crawfordville The Bradham and Webster families would like to give sincere thanks for the many acts of kindness shown during the loss of our loved one, Robert T. Bradham Jr. (Robbie Love). It has helped the family so much to have caring relatives and friends. He will be greatly missed and may God bless each of you! Editor, The News: An open letter to Commissioner Jerry Moore, and David Edwards, Wakulla County Administrator: Since the old Fishermans Jetty was removed by well intentioned, misinformed people several years ago, Shell Point Beach has receded more than 100 feet. The countys recent efforts to temporarily restore a portion of the beach and save the historic cedar tree are to be commended. On behalf of the many, many people in Wakulla County who enjoy Shell Point Beach, I want to thank you and your staff for trying to save this piece of paradise. I understand that this sand/oyster shell addition is only a temporary x and that you are seeking FEMA funds and permitting to eventually provide some hardening that will aid in the natural restoration of our once beautiful beach. By covering the trees roots, perhaps it will survive the winter and bring us all another year of joy. Thank you for again for a job well done. Alan Lamarche Shell Point Editor, The News: Riversprings Middle School wants to thank all of the community members and businesses that donated their time, money and prizes to our annual fun day. It was one of our most successful fun days in several years, raising more than $7,000. The funds will be used for classroom supplies and PE equipment. We thank the parents, teachers and community members who gave their time and donations to make this successful. A special RMS bear hug to the following businesses who donated supplies, gift cards, food, and prizes: Ace Hardware-Crawfordville, Badcock Furniture, Bert Thomas Grocery, Black Gold, Burger King, Busch Gardens, BWs Grill, Capital City Bank, Capital Lanes, Centennial Bank, Dazzles, Disney, Evolution Day Spa, Fun Station, Fun Station Jr., Genghis Grill, Gold Exchange, High Quality Heating and Air, Jimmy Johns, Lindys Chicken, McDonalds, Mikes Marine Supply, Myra Jeans, Next Level Baseball, Pepsi, Publix, Riverside Caf, Sams Club, Sonic, Sonnys Barbecue, Stonecreek Pizza, Subway, Suntrust Bank, Superlube, Tallahassee Jr. Museum, Talquin Electric, Team Wakulla Wrestling, Tn-T Hideaway Inc., Victorias Secret, Wakulla Springs, Walgreens, Wal-mart, WHS Band Boosters, Wild Adventures and Winn-Dixie.Riversprings Middle School

PAGE 5

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 5AFree community-wide Thanksgiving feast is heldBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netMembers of several area churches and groups gathered in Hudson Park on Saturday, Nov. 17 to serve a free Thanksgiving feast to those in the community. We wanted to offer a free meal to the citizens of Wakulla County to show caring and love in these times, said Tim Davis, organizer of the event and bishop of Hallowed Be Thy Name Church of God in Crawfordville. Hallowed Be Thy Name has been serving a free Thanksgiving meal for the last ve years and this year, they decided to expand it and see if other churches and groups might be interested in helping and serving an even larger group of people. The support and volunteer service has been overwhelming, Davis said. With the help of Crawfordville United Methodist Church, Charlottes Faith and Deliverance Temple, Spirit Life Church, Promise Land Ministries, Wakulla One, Wakulla County Commission, Sopchoppy United Methodist Church, Thessalonia Missionary Baptist Church, Wakulla Signs, Winn-Dixie, Wal-Mart and Wave 94.1, as well as volunteers from the Cub Scouts, the Florida A&M pharmacy school and others, they had enough food to feed more than 500 people. Its a community-wide effort, Davis said. In exchange for a free meal, those in attendance were asked to bring a canned good to donate to the local food pantries. If there were any leftovers, they planned to take it to the homeless shelter. Davis hopes the event will continue to grow and get bigger every year. Its a lot of work, Davis said. But its worth the effort to see all the smiles. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENMore ham is put out on the serving line at the Thanksgiving feast held Saturday in Hudson Park. Veronica, 8, Trinity, 4, and Travis, 3, play at the community feast. Gregory Jackson II, 2, enjoys the food. Several area churches and businesses came together to make the community feast happen. A free Thanksgiving dinner served up to residents.

PAGE 6

Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Church Briefs Winter Music Festival at Harvest Fellowship Dec. 8A Winter Music Festival is set for Dec. 8 on the outdoor stage of Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. The concert will be held from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. You are invited to come and sit out on the lawn and enjoy a free musical concert featuring a variety of music styles from blue grass to hip hop, local talent, as well as visiting musicians from around the state. Well have a bouncy house for the little ones, a bon re with marshmallows for roasting and lots of good food. Harvest Fellowship Church and Thrift Store is sponsoring this event with the ongoing intent to make Wakulla County a great place to live. Your nancial donations will be accepted at the event. Interested vendors should call the Harvest Thrift Store at (850) 926-3535. Quilt is being raf ed by Christ Church AnglicanChrist Church Quilters are raf ing a beautiful hand quilted queen-king size quilt. The pattern is Star-spangled Four Patch. Raf e tickets are now available, six tickets for $5 or $1 each. The drawing will be held after noon on Dec. 9, at Christ Church Anglican, 3383 Coastal Highway. You may call the church at 745-8412 or Mary Lou Martin 210-1203 for more information or for tickets. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER Let me make it clear right up front that Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays. I admit I am not too fond of many holidays. Can a week go by without some holiday that shuts down everybody? I celebrated Veterans Day, for example, on Sunday and the next day I went to the bank and discovered the bank was celebrating Veterans Day on Monday. Dont they know what day it is? I trust these people with my money? Of all the holidays we have, Thanksgiving is high on my list. I used to have a high regard for my birthday but so many of them have come that I do not like them anymore. I am ready to cancel that holiday. My birthday only means I am one year older and not one whit wiser. I am not thinking just about the scrumptious Thanksgiving dinner. Okay, maybe I am, a little. Down through the years, I have been great fraternity buddies with eating. We have bonded so great throughout the years that even now that bonding is beginning to show. I like Thanksgiving, and so I am a little confused about these Sanity Challenged Buffoons who are allergic to the word Thanksgiving. They want to use names like, Turkey Day, and the latest one T-Day. What the T stands for is anybodys guess. I know what D-Day stands for but all the gray matter has leaked out of my skull trying to gure out what T-Day stands for. Given the rationality of these purveyors of insanity, I can only guess. Looking at what is happening to this great holiday, I have uncovered a con so convert that most people do not know it is going on. I call it the great Thanksgiving con. This is especially true for those who call it Turkey Day. First off, everybody says nice things about the turkey. The more the turkey struts, the more the compliments ow his way. What the turkey does not know is that when these Turkey Day people are looking at the turkey they are also licking their lips. It is not the beautiful feathers that interest them. It is not the way the turkey proudly struts back and forth. The frame these people want to see the turkey in is a roasting pan. They want to get rid of all those feathers that the turkey is so proud of and strip him bare so that he ts nicely in the roasting pan. The last few weeks of the turkeys life are rather remarkable. These people will give the turkey everything it wants. More food than the turkey can gobble up. What the turkey does not know is that there is a destiny in store for him. With all the attention paid him, he has the idea that everybody appreciates him for his looks. If this turkey would ever spend an evening watching television with his human host, he would gather the idea that the most important thing in all the world is how you look. Looking into the mirror the turkey is quite proud of what he sees. He assumes that what he sees looking in the mirror is what his human host sees when they look at him. How wrong can a turkey be? The con begins to unfold. Rumors are ying about that there is a great banquet being prepared in his honor. Any turkey would be proud of this kind of development and look forward to being the guest of honor. In fact, as the turkey struts back-and-forth in front of his human hosts, he hears them saying, Wont that turkey look good at our dinner table? Whose head wouldnt turn hearing this kind of a compliment? What the turkey does not know is that being a guest at a dinner table is a onetime event for a creature like himself. Any turkey worth his feathers does not think beyond this great feast being held in his honor. I can imagine the gobble back in the turkey pen with the other turkeys. This great big, good-looking turkey, is telling all the others how important he is on the other side of the fence. Being the kind of turkey that he is, his gobble wins over the admiration of the other turkeys. Im so special, the turkey gobbles to his inferiors, that those humans are having a special banquet and I am the special guest of honor. The rest of the turkeys are ooohing in his direction for they never seen anyone quite as special as this turkey. The fatal day arrives. People come for the turkey and the rest of the turkeys have gathered around giving him a special turkey sendoff. They cannot wait to hear his report when he gets back from the special banquet. I say this is a con to beat all cons. Wrong messages are being sent to the turkey population. Thinking they are the guest of honor, they turn out to be the main dish on the banquet table. This is why I am against the term Turkey Day. It sends the wrong message. The focus around our table on this special occasion will not be the turkey but rather giving thanks to God who has been so good to us. Enter into his gates with thanksgiving, and into his courts with praise: be thankful unto him, and bless his name (Psalms 100:4 KJV).Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. OUT TO PASTORThe great Thanksgiving conFirst job for husbands is to love GodBy ANDRE WHITEMens Fraternity of WakullaThe role of a husband has two important prerequisites. We must determine in our heart to obey the greatest commandment of loving God with all our heart and the second greatest commandment, loving our neighbor as our selves. Secondly we must make daily prayer a priority in our lives. The rst prerequisite is found in Matthew 22:37-40: 37 Jesus said to him, You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind. [d] 38 This is the rst and great commandment. 39 And the second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. [e] 40 On these two commandments hang all the Law and the Prophets. Husbands, our greatest challenge will be learning how to love, lead, and live with our wives. In marriage husbands and wives will have misunderstandings, disagreements, and unfulfilled expectations, but God expects his people to remain true to their vows. If we love God we will keep his commandments. Below are some dos and donts that will help us in our marriage. 1. Treat your spouse with love as described in 1 Corinthians 13. 2. Care for her as you care for yourself. 3. Love her more than your own life (Hobby, team, friends, etc..). 4. Her needs and concerns are your highest priority. 5. Make whatever sacri ces necessary to ensure her safety and wellbeing. 6. She should be con dent in knowing no one or thing comes before her. 7. You must be committed and faithful to her in both action and heart. 8. Wifes joy and happiness is a high priority. 9. Be gentle and affectionate. 10. Be a Godly husband. 11. Ensure biblical teaching/ learning is taking place in your home. 12. Treat our wives with respect and honor. (Give her the same respect as an important house guest or family member) 13. Set a good example. 14. Strive to provide intimate ful llment. 15. Learn everything about your wife. Joys, pains, concerns, fears, likes, dislikes, etc. 16. The wife is not second to the children, or your parents. 17. Do not be demanding, bossy, overbearing, controlling, coerce or express unrealistic expectations, degrading, belittling, devaluing, unappreciative, critical, fault nding, blaming, harsh, verbally or physically abusive, disrespectful, nor treat her like a slave. Do our wives trust us to be faithful? Do our wives believe we will seek Gods will concerning her, the children, and the home? 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826)

PAGE 7

By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsTheres an old gospel tune that says there is A leak in this old building / And my soul has got to move. Theres no doubt the Macedonia Church of Christ Written in Heaven congregation are taking those words to heart. The effects of Tropical Storm Debby this past June caused historic ooding in areas of the county. Sopchoppy and Buckhorn where Macedonia Church is located were hard hit. A number of residents and business owners are still in the throes of digging out from under. Before the storm, Macedonia spent upwards of $25,000 to remodel their entire facility. No room was left untouched in this effort, but as Debby touched down, the church kitchen and basement suffered major ooding, and the roof, literally, shifted. That roof has now begun to separate. We were doing renovations, says member Delores Nelson. Putting down new carpet, redoing the pews, air conditioning. Our plan was to add to the structure that we now have by extending the sides and moving the bathrooms up front, and also reworking the roof. But the storm hit before we could put that phase of our plan in motion. Like many, they are currently involved with the paperwork for FEMA and the insurance company. They are now reaching out for the communitys support to help save as much of the original structure as possible while undergoing this unexpected chapter of rebuilding. Were doing everything we can to get the community involved, says church Secretary Bobbery Smith Rosier, We plan to have a Saints Night Out fundraising dinner soon. But we need the help of those in the community. This church is an historic location, and a number of churches in the area are spin-offs from this one. Deacon George Washington Green and Mary Eliza Green donated the land for the church back in 1934. Before this, services were held at the Greens home, or locations such as the site of where the Old Buckhorn School once stood. There were also bush harbor services, where the faithful would gather beneath a temporary structure. Often in these types of gatherings, wooden barrels were covered with cloth and used as the lectern, or pulpit, while baptisms took place in whatever area was open to Negroes from rivers, to ditches. The rst pastor of the church was Elder Moses Brown, from Indian Pass, between Apalachicola and Port St. Joe. As the story goes, the Greens and the daughter of another family went to a Pentecostal meeting in the Apalachicola area held by a Mother Dukes. She was, in turn, invited to come to Crawfordville to hold similar meetings. She would go on to visit the Bethel community, and then Hype Park. This was the beginning of the First Born Church. Eventually, a few members of the FBC broke off and formed a Written in Heaven organization. Macedonia was the rst church built in the area (and most likely in the state), under the Church of Christ Written in Heaven charter. The building was constructed by Elder J.D. Musgray, with Bishop Thomas Brown, who cut down the trees donated by the Green family for the window sills. Hamp Rosier donated bricks and blocks for the building. Averaging approximately 75 members in attendance for its services, a large majority are family descendants of those who started the original church, such as the Rosier, Green and Skipper families, to name few. This is a common built frame church, says Pastor Alfred Nelson, It doesnt have trusses, but a common frame instead, so most everything is nailed together. A lot of those nails came apart in the roof area and is now causing pressure on the rest of the building. We need funding for a different pitch to support the structure and fortify the walls, he continues, A retaining wall out back is also needed to protect us from other storms. The oors are old wood plank oors. Theres not a block foundation underneath, but cut pine trees. Thats how they built them in the old days, so what were dealing with is a true classic. We hope to rework the building while maintaining as much of its historic quality as possible. Adding to this woe is the necessity of nding a place of worship. An appreciation program was scheduled to take place this month. Knowing out of state visitors would be in attendance, services in the building were to be suspended directly afterwards so renovations could begin in December. It was a surprise for us, says Pastor Nelson. Our engineer told us that if nothing else happened like another storm this building should last for another three years. It was sturdy enough that it wouldnt just collapse on its own. We understand the county has concerns, he adds, and were not arguing that at all. Wed planned to halt services at the end of the month. That end just came a few weeks earlier than expected. My number one concern is that the spiritual wellbeing of our members and parishioners be taken care of in this time. All other things are secondary. We want people to know that we have a need. If they can donate a facility for worship, nances, or have expertise in an area, or can provide manpower, or organization skills to help get the word out, we would gladly accept. The Bible says you have not, because you ask not. Were working with that principle in mind. For more information on how you can donate or help, contact Pastor Nelson at (850) 264-6621 or secretary, Rosier at (850) 962-2884. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 7AObituaries Robert J. Keith Sr. John Buford Morrow Jr. John Henry TaylorJohn Henry Taylor, 73, of Crawfordville, passed away on Sunday, Nov. 18, 2012, in Tallahassee. He was born on May 13, 1939, in Wakulla County and had lived in this area his entire life. He retired as a captain from the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. He served in the U.S. Army. He was a Baptist and an avid commercial sherman. He was a loving father and family man. Visitation was held Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2012, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Funeral services will be Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2012, at 1 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Burial will follow at Bonnett Pond Cemetery. Survivors include two sons, Cricket Taylor (Patty) of Panacea and Darrell Taylor (Carolyn) of Crawfordville; three sisters, Irene Nichols, Corky Crum and Tenny Spears; nine grandchildren; one great-grandchild; and many other loving family and friends. He is predeceased by a son, Danny Taylor; and his parents, Nelson and Susie Taylor. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 www.bevisfh. com). John Henry TaylorRobert J. Keith Sr., 63, went home to be with his mother, Edna Keith, and brother, Edward Keith, on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012. He was born Feb. 9, 1949, in Tallahassee. He raised his family working as a commercial sherman while living in Panacea. He was of the Christian faith. His memorial service was held at Panacea Full Gospel Church on Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2012. Survivors include his wife of 33 years, Tammie D. Keith; two sons, Robert J. Keith Jr. (Adela) and Richard A. Keith, all of Panacea; one daughter, Angela Hutchinson; four brothers, Vernon L. Keith (Doris Ann) of Tallahassee, Arnell Keith (Lois) of Crawfordville, Johnnie Keith (Dianna) of Butler, Ga., and Andrew Keith; a sister, Linda Trice (Everett Griggs) of Sopchoppy; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 www.bevisfh. com) John Buford Morrow Jr., 62, died Friday, Oct. 26, 2012, at his home in Perry. Born in Las Vegas, he moved to Perry from Tallahassee in 1983. He was a U.S. Army veteran, having served in Vietnam. He worked as a paint and body repairman for over 30 years. He was preceded in death by his father, John Buford Morrow Sr. Survivors include his wife of 23 years, Kathleen Morrow of Perry; mother and stepfather, Jeanne and Carl Johnson of Edgewater; a son, Michael Pridmore of Gaffney, S.C.; a stepson, John V. Ross of Tallahassee; four step-daughters, Robin Ross of Kings Park, N.Y., Kimberly Burr of Augusta, Ga., Michelle Hanson and Joy-lyn Tuten, both of Perry; one sister, Joan Couture of Edgewater; 14 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. A memorial service was held Tuesday, Oct. 30, at Beggs Funeral Home in Perry. His remains will be laid to rest at his family cemetery in Sopchoppy.John Buford Morrow Jr. Robert J. Keith Sr.Historic Macedonia Church seeking help for storm damage PHOTO BY HERB DONALDSON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMacedonia Church had structural damage as a result of Tropical Storm Debby. Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage? Help Big Bend Hospice Honor Those Who Are No Longer With Us Big Bend HospiceTree of Remembrance 2012 2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.orgVisit our Wakulla County Tree at Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial Bank in Crawfordville LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE

PAGE 8

Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community Community Special to The NewsBig Bend Hospice staff and members of the Big Bend Hospice Wakulla County Advisory Council joined Alan Brock, chair of the Wakulla County Board of Commissioners, for a Proclamation reading on Oct. 15, declaring November as National Hospice Month. County Commission Chair Alan Brock presents the proclamation to Pam Allbritton, Community Resources coordinator of Big Bend Hospice.Lions present awards to peace poster winners SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMembers of the Sopchoppy Lions Club visit Wakulla Middle School to hand out checks to this years Imagine Peace contest winners, Shelby Weeks, Gracie Barwick, Olivia Tillman and Emily McMillan. By MARJ LAWSopchoppy LionFor the third year in a row, the Sopchoppy Lions Club and Wakulla Middle School students have worked together to celebrate world peace. Lion Marshall Catoe and Wakulla Middle School art teacher Carol Belancsik encouraged students to create posters depicting this theme. The contest is a 23-year International Lions Club project entitled Imagine Peace. Once a student wins a local poster contest, his or her poster is submitted to the next highest level. Sopchoppy Lions had more than 20 posters from which to choose, and every single poster received votes. This year, Shelby Weeks won the first prize of $50. Shelbys poster featured a central dove and a child blowing bubbles having peace symbols within the bubbles. To me, peace is love and happiness, said Shelby. It is just having fun with friends and family. Second prize of $35 went to Gracie Alex Barwick. Olivia Tillman and Emily McMillan won third and fourth prizes of $25 and $20. Each year, Imagine Peace attracts more and more students. The Lions were surprised at how well they are able to draw, and at how complex their minds work. Principal Mike Barwick announced the winners over the school intercom Thursday morning. Then, Lions Club President Elaine Herndon and Project Chairman Marshall Catoe passed out winners checks and certi cates. Lion Marshall Catoe started up Imagine Peace for Sopchoppy Lions three years ago. We, as Lions, want to be actively involved with the youth in our area, he said, and I want to thank Principal Barwick and Art Teacher Carol Belancsik for joining with us. Maybe one day, a Wakulla Middle School student might win the International Contest.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCommission recognizes National Hospice MonthBrodhead chosen to receive citizen appreciation awardSpecial to The NewsThe Concerned Citizens of Wakulla, Inc. (CCOW) announces the winner of this years Leon Nettles Citizen Appreciation Award is Jeannie Brodhead of Wakulla County selected out of a eld of well-quali ed candidates. The Leon Nettles Citizen Award was established by the CCOW to recognize and honor a citizen highly engaged in the Wakulla County community and who best exempli es the principles of honesty and integrity that former County Commissioner Leon Nettles demonstrated while serving the county. Selection of the awardee can be based on a single good citizen deed or accomplishment, deeds or accomplishments over a period of years, or lifetime contribution to the welfare of Wakulla County. Brodhead grew up in the Myers park neighborhood of Tallahassee, graduated from Leon High, and earned a bachelors degree in Elementary education from FSU. She taught elementary school in West Homestead, where she was elected Teacher of the Year. She moved to Wakulla County in 1997 and taught four years in Leon County. Presently, Brodhead is COASTs librarian, president of the Wakulla Iris Garden Club,and very active in the Native Plant Society Wakullas Sarracenia Chapter. As a volunteer, she is deeply involved in Youth Gardening Programs with COAST and teaching Coast Charter school students about gardening, the beauty of our natural landscapes and the workings of our natural plant communities. Brodhead has worked vigorously to beautify the county and has motivated many others to do likewise through her examples. She has been very instrumental in the landscaping of the library and very active in Wakullas Arbor Day activities. Brodhead has unlimited energy, a very big heart, and sincerely cares about Wakulla, its youth and its natural beauty. She accomplishes so much with very little fanfare and much humility. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMary Cortese, of CCOW, presents the Leon Nettles Citizen Appreciation Award to Jeannie Brodhead. Email community news to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar. Do You Need a Ride toLicensed, Insured, Local*one way trip Flat rate for groups of up to six persons availableRates as low as $6*Now serving Crawfordville, Woodville, St. Marks, Medart, Panacea, Sopchoppy, Ochlockonee Bay and the Tallahassee area.Call Brandy in Wakulla: 850-567-8485TALLAHASSE OFFICE: 850-228-9669 Monday Saturday Sunday by appointment.

PAGE 9

Special to The NewsThe weather has been getting cooler and that usually heralds the arrival of the young whooping cranes, migrating south. They have traveled 53 days and over 914 miles from Wisconsin, leaving on Sept. 28. They have three more stops until they reach Jefferson County. They will rest there before the nal ight to St. Marks. All ve cranes will spend the winter at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. People will be able to view the cranes and the ultralights at a yover event in St. Marks. The exact date in unknown, but refuge staff are guessing they might arrive on Saturday, Nov. 24. If interested, visit www. operationmigration.org. Plan on arriving at the yover site around 8 a.m. The flyover should occur around 8:45 am. Operation Migration and the St. Marks Refuge Association will have crane merchandise to sell and volunteers will be there to answer questions. It was a disappointment last year when the migration was halted in northern Alabama, said Refuge Manager Terry Peacock. This year, the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge will be the only Florida refuge to host young cranes and we are excited to be a part of this incredible project. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 9AOptimist Club holds installation Special to The NewsThe Coastal Optimist Club of Wakulla held their installation of of cers on Nov. 1 at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. The swearing in was done by Clerk of the Court Brent Thurmond. The of cers for 2012-2013 are President Bill Versiga, Secretary Jo Ann Daniels, Treasurer Susan Payne Turner and Vice President Sally Gandy (not pictured).Photo SPECIAL: TO THE NEWSAmeris Bank helps to ght hunger SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSupporters of President Obama march in a rally to encourage citizens to vote early. Obama supporters march for early votesSpecial to The NewsA large number of supporters of the re-election campaign for President Barack Obama turned out on Saturday, Oct. 27, for an Early Voting Kickoff Rally in Azalea Park. While some waived signs, others enjoyed a covered dish barbecue picnic luncheon and talks from community leaders. Local Obama volunteer Kim Kramer stressed the importance of early voting and discussed the improving economy, the importance of the Affordable Health Care Act and the forward thinking policies on education, womens rights, the environment and the return of manufacturing jobs. County Commissioner Alan Brock also spoke about the importance of voting for Democrats to make sure they have someone ghting for them at every level of government. Following the luncheon, supporters joined together for a march to the Supervisor of Elections of ce where they cast their votes in the election. Ameris Bank held its third Annual Helping Fight Hunger food drive during the month of October, and bankwide collected more than 297,000 non-perishable food items. In Crawfordville, 1,611 items were collected. The donation will be delivered to First Baptist Church of Crawfordville and Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Throughout October, customers, bank employees, and members of the community were encouraged to donate non-perishable food items. e whooping cranes are coming OPERATION MIGRATION For that Special & Unique Gift:Lots of educational gifts & toys for children & adults. We have a great selection of natural history Books for all ages, books by Jack and Anne Rudloe, beautiful jewelry, home decor, prints, cards, ornaments. We have added many items to our collection. Great Stocking Stuffers Too! Open: Mon. Fri. 9am 5pm www.gulfspecimen.org Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Aquarium Your generous support helps us to continue our mission to educate and inspire. S S Visit the Gift Shopat Open 7 Days

PAGE 10

Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1AMorrison, 43, is from Wakulla County and is the son of Wilhelmina and Clarence Morrison. He started with the sheriffs of ce in 1991 as a correctional of- cer after graduating from TCC and the Lively Law Enforcement Academy. He then returned to Lively and became a certi ed law enforcement of cer. He has worked in the detention facility, narcotics unit and road patrol division. He is currently a lieutenant with the criminal investigations division. He is also a eld training of cer. Morrison also has a connection to the sheriffs office through his family members. His greatgrandfather, James Smith, was the sheriff from 1901 to 1912 and his great-uncle Angus Morrison served as sheriff from 1912 to 1933. Creels main goal is bringing the respect back to the agency. I want the community to respect this agency, Creel said. I want them to trust this agency. Creel, who campaigned on the need for a fresh start at the sheriffs of ce, said there will de nitely be changes once he is at the helm, but he stressed that there will not be massive rings. Im not a hatchet man, Creel said. But, he added that there will be some restructuring and a staff analysis performed to ensure that all employees of the sheriffs of ce are in a position where they feel comfortable and are quali- ed to be there. Both Creel and Morrison also acknowledged that some people will choose to leave the sheriffs of ce, while others will stay. We would be naive to think everything would stay the same, Morrison said. He added that any time the sheriffs office changes hands, there are people who decide to go and others would choose to stay. Creel plans to bring in a transition team later this month to look at the organization of the entire of ce and perform a review from the top to the bottom. The team consists of a retired auditor, retired sheriff, retired banker, retired law enforcement of- cer and a member of the Wakulla Christian Coalition. Once he takes office, he plans to also perform an audit to ensure that the funds are being spent the most effectively and ef ciently. A lot of county funds are spent at this department, he said. And he wants to make the budget process as transparent as possible for the citizens. He is also going to create a citizens advisory committee that will be tasked with bringing concerns of the community to the sheriffs of ce. I dont want them to tell us what we want to hear, I want them to tell us what we need to know, Creel said. The sheriffs of ce will also be aggressively attacking the drug problem in the county, he said. The crime rate is up because of burglaries and drugs and burglaries go hand in hand, he said. The only people who are going to lose their jobs in this county are the drug dealers, he said.Sheri -elect Creel names undersheri By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 16 Floridas jobless rate fell in October to 8.5 percent, its lowest level since December 2008, the states unemployment office reported Friday. Florida still lags behind the nation but closed the gap a bit. The national rate stood last month at 7.9 percent. If discouraged workers and part-time employees seeking full-time jobs are added, Floridas unemployment rate for October was 16.4 percent down from 18.2 percent a year ago. We are creating an environment that fosters job creation, economic development and provides a skilled workforce, Gov. Rick Scott said in a statement. My number one goal is to create jobs for Florida families and get this state back to work. There is still more work that needs to be done, but Im con dent were on the right path. Non agricultural employment reached 7,371,500, the 27th straight month that the number of employed residents increased year to year, according to DEO estimates. Floridas labor force also grew in October, inching up 0.7 percent from October 2011. Non-farm employment has grown by 67,600 jobs over the past 12 months, with professional services, health care, transportation and utilities sectors providing most new jobs over the year. Total government employment fell by 12,900, driven by a decrease in state government work, which fell 2.1 percent. Floridas construction sector also continued its slump, falling 4,900 jobs from an already anemic October 2011. Crestview/Fort Walton/ Destin had the lowest unemployment rate in the state at 5.7 percent. Tallahassee came in second at 6.2 percent. Counties with a high percentage of government employees continued to enjoy some of the lowest jobless rates in the state, with Walton, Okaloosa, Wakulla and Franklin counties in the top ve. Speaking to the Federalist Society in Washington Friday morning, Scott said in prepared remarks that the drop in unemployment combined with increases in the labor pool were testament to the wisdom of austere state spending and other Republican-led efforts. Our economic turnaround for Florida families is well underway and we are proof that conservative solutions work, Scott said. Democrats were quick to question whether all was good news, noting Floridas rate remains higher than the national average, and has been worse than the nation as a whole since mid-2008.Florida jobless rate down againIn October, Wakulla County saw a major decrease in unemployment to 5.9 percent from 6.6 percent in September, a .7 percent drop. Wakullas jobless rate has fallen 2.1 percent over the past year from a high of 8.0 percent. Gadsden Countys jobless rate in October was 8.2 percent, down from 8.7 percent in September. Leon County also saw a decrease moving from 7.1 to 6.4 percent over the month. Staff reportWakulla down JENNIFER JENSENLt. Trey Morrison and Sheriff-elect Charlie Creel. DECEMBER Power up the holidays with great products at stock up prices. Find the right products for your project and expert advice at True Value. Sale ends 12/31/2012 3361 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville 926-5559 Mon Fri 7am 6pm Sat 7:30am 5pm GULF COAST GULF COAST Lumber & Supply Inc. Lumber & Supply Inc. SAVE 40%899reg. 14.99Your choice B. 3 RemoteControlled Outdoor Outlets A. 2 Remote-Controlled Indoor Outlets B. A. SPECIAL PURCHASE997Floodlight Holder and 8' Extension Cord Value Pack SPECIAL PURCHASE12975-Pc. Bonus Pliers Set BONUS PACK299reg. 3.996-Outlet White or Green Power Strip Your choice SPECIAL PURCHASE197M & M Holiday Ornament $3reg. 4.193-Pk. Invisible Tape SAVE 38%3999reg. 64.99Battery Charger SAVE 30% 899reg. 12.9916-Pk. AA or AAA Alkaline Batteries Your choice SAVE 25% 899reg. 11.994-Pk. AA or AAA Lithium Batteries Your choice SPECIAL PURCHASE497Scented Musical Soap Dispenser Your choice SAVE 30%6999reg. 99.994,000/9,000 BTU Portable Buddy Heater SPECIAL PURCHASE4997Electric Stove Heater SAVE 33%9999reg. 149.99120V/1500W Infrared Heater with Remote SAVE 25%1499reg. 19.994V Lithium-Ion Cordless Screwdriver HOT DEAL 599reg. 7.498-Pk. AA or AAA Alkaline Batteries Your choice SAVE 47%899reg. 16.99105-Ct. LED Icicle Light Set Your choice SAVE 50% 1999reg. 39.99 100-Pc. Rotary Tool KitSPECIAL PURCHASE149717-Pc. Drill Bit and 40-Pc. Screwdriver Bit Combo Pack SAVE $153999reg. 54.994-Step Aluminum Step Ladder Over $50 value Gary & Shari EdingtonShort Sale/Foreclosure Resource 850-933-6364 or 850-556-4736We wish you a Blessed and Happy Holiday SeasonServing Leon, Wakulla and Franklin Counties for all your Real Estate Needs for 8 years and counting visit us at www.ShariEdington.com Realtors Who CareGary & Shari Edington Shell Point Realty

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 11AContinued from Page 1A By the time they gure it out, their child may be really sick, Lawhon said. We may help one parent see it before that happens. Students in Wakulla High Schools TV production class produced a short video about diabetes featuring one of their fellow students who has type 1 diabetes. At Crawfordville Elementary School, they chose to show students this video and have the three students at the school who have type 1 diabetes share their experiences. The students were very eager and willing to promote it, Lawhon said. We wanted to empower them too. Its a powerful message coming from a student. Lawhon commended the three students, Hayden Betz, Carson Goodwin and Sydney Andrews, at Crawfordville for having to deal with this disease every single day of their lives, and many from when they were just a baby. Theyre just tremendous kids, Lawhon said. I dont know many adults who could handle it as well. Betz and Goodwin spoke numerous times to students during their lunch period explaining diabetes and what they have to do every day and how it impacts their lives. Betz, a third grader, told the students that he has to get a shot of insulin four times a day and said if his blood sugar gets too high, he starts to have blurred vision and is extremely thirsty. Goodwin, a fourth grader, has an insulin pump and showed it to the students. Both of them are extremely brave boys, said Principal Angie Walker. We kind of want to honor them. Lawhon said they were also looking to educate the community about type 2 diabetes, which is preventable. Years ago, those who had type 2 diabetes were usually older people, she said. But now, they are seeing students with type 2. In addition to promoting the day at the schools, the health department performed diabetic screenings and health education in their lobby. Diabetes is such a growing problem, said Grace Keith, health educator at the health department. The big this is bringing about awareness and educating the public, she said. Its a whole body disease, Keith said. We have to get folks to eat better to at least delay it from occurring. Diabetes is the only chronic medical problem with its own world day, Lawhon said. In Wakulla County, there are 16 students with diabetes, that they know of, said Dr. Larry Deeb Pediatric Endocrinologist in Tallahasse. Ten years ago we didnt have a single student in Wakulla schools that had diabetes. Eleven of those students have to test their blood sugar three or four times a day and receive insulin one or two times a day. According to Dr. Deeb, they are seeing a 3 percent increase per year in children worldwide and a 5 percent increase in children under 5 each year.Students help promote World Diabetes Day JENNIFER JENSENThree students at Crawfordville Elementary who suffer from diabetes: Carson Goodwin, Sidney Andrews and Hayden Betz. At 1 a.m. on Sunday morning, Wakulla EMS and Wakulla Fire responded to a report of an accident on re in the area of Brooks Concrete in Panacea where a pickup truck was on re. The lone occupant had escaped the vehicle, after the southbound truck struck a utility pole and then careened into the plumbing of the main of ce of the concrete company before striking a second utility pole and breaking it also. Later it was discovered that a re had occurred in the of ce of the concrete company, caused by the downed power lines shorting computer equipment caused additional damage. Once the lines were de-energized that re self-extinguished. PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPanacea wreck In-Home Assessments and Referrals Offered for Comfort and Convenience If falls, weakness or inability to participate in activities become a concern for your loved one, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Tallahassee is here to help. We oer free inhome assessments with no physician orders needed. Once an evaluation is approved, HealthSouths team of professionals develop comprehensive, individualized treatment plans for a safe return home. If you have any questions or need more information contact us.IS YOUR LOVED ONE SAFE AT HOME?:HealthSouth Corporation:551345 At HealthSouth, we understand that recovering from a stroke can be challenging. But no matter where a patient is in his/her recovery process, or how long ago the stroke occurred, our Second Chance Stroke Program could help maximize functional ability, increase independence and improve quality of life. This includes areas of mobility, speech or written communication, swallowing, cognitive functions and activities of daily living. Our program oers: Physical/occupational/speech therapy Certied rehabilitation nurses Therapist trained in neuro developmental treatment Patient/family education Support groups Admission is by referral for a free in-home evaluation. For more information contact us.YOU DESERVE A SECOND CHANCE:HealthSouth Corporation:551344

PAGE 12

By JO ANN PALMERKWCB DirectorOn Saturday night, Nov. 17, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful held its Blue Jeans and Fast Machines fundraiser. The event kicked off at 5 p.m. with a wheels show. The show was open to all categories of vehicles such as trucks, bog trucks, off road vehicles, classics, new, rare, and restored or in progress, motorcycles and tricked-out rides, basically anything you wanted to show. There were a total of 22 vehicles, including the Purple Frog Race Teams Reynard SF200, a 1954 Cushman Scooter, an Quartershot T3R Rave Boat, two custom bog trucks, a Willys Jeep CJ2A, a 4 Chevy Nova Drag racer and six motorcycles. The trophy for Best in Show went to Sean and Rachel Wheeler for an 4 Big Dog Pitbull motorcycle with a custom red, white and blue paint job and ground effects of ashing blue lights. The Peoples Choice was Brad McKenzies Chevrolet Chevelle, the Sponsors Choice was Fred Martins 4 Chevrolet Corvette and the Presidents Choice was Woody Palmers Barracuda. All the awards were based on the total highest score among all entries and were scored by those in attendance. We also had the Lively Technical alternative fuel car and truck, and Red Hills Powersports showcased their line of electric motorcycles and ATV equipment. At 6 p.m. the band Local Motion from Gadsden County cranked up the music with an outstanding live performance that got everybody on their feet dancing and moving around to stay warm against the cold November evening. John Posey, Noah Posey and Sherrie Posey-Miller served up a delicious dinner of fresh shrimp and sh and the party continued with lots of door prizes donated by ACE Hardware, Auto Zone, Advanced Auto. The silent auction had several items autographed by FSU Coach Jimbo Fisher, a ReNu U Medical Spa gift certificate for a TriPollar Skin Tightening Treatment, coffee mugs from Mullet Girls at The White Elephant and a certi cate for services from Serendipity Salon. The lucky high bidders when home with great deals on holiday gifts. Over the past two years, the KWCB board has developed a projected plan that will enhance our existing mission to include the completion of several beauti cation projects such as the mural along U.S. Highway 98 in Panacea, supporting the renovation of the stairs at the Historical Society Museum and Archives and developing a green space on the grounds of the property, initiating an Adopt-A-Shore program, expanding the coastal and forest cleanups, hosting a hazardous waste amnesty day in the spring and fall, and to develop an educational program. We hope to also be initiating a small grants program to assist classroom teachers fund environmental education projects such as container gardens. All these things require funding and especially community support. Thank you to our sponsors who make this and other events possible. The Wakulla County Historical Society, Revell Electric & Automated Access Systems, Marpan Recycling, Veolia Environmental, 3Y Ranch & 3 Y Outdoor Equipment, Red Hills Powersports, Wakulla Realty, A New Look Painting of N.F., Inc., Refreshment Services PEPSI, The Wakulla News, Air-Con of Wakulla, Traci B. Cash CPA, JoAnne and Larry Strickland, Capital City Bank, ReNu U Spa, Wakulla County Sheriffs Office, Wakulla County Commissioners, St. Marks Refuge Association, Rotary Club of Wakulla, Paul G. Johnson & Associates, Flag Credit Union, Progress Energy, Wal-Mart, Waste Pro, the Naumann Group Realty and Centennial Bank. We are already beginning plans for our second Annual Blue Jeans & Fast Machines. Follow us on Facebook, log onto our website, kwcb.org or email us at helpkwcb@ gmail.com for updates. We look forward to continuing this new tradition and building on the foundation for bringing something new and different to Wakulla County. Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comKWCB holds Blue Jeans and Fast Machines fundraiser PHOTOS BY JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSClassic cars, motorcycles, race cars and bog trucks were on display at 3Y Farm for KWCBs fundraiser. For more information Call 210-8831 or 528-1527 4 p.m. 8 p.m. Boat On Trailer Parade This Advertisement Sponsored by The News Wakulla ertisement Spons or r ed ed ed ed ed ed ed ed b y s s CENTENNIALBANK Member FDICwww.my100bank.comA Home BancShares Company Kids Come Visit Santa Crums Mini Mall Wakulla Discount Liquor Mikes Marine Supply East Coast Connections at Angelos My-Way Seafood Mineral Springs Seafood Big Top Supermarket Dollar General Sea-Tow Two Blondes Yasmania Sheer Expressions Hair Salon Tropical Trader Seafood Brooks Concrete Rock Landing Marina Angelos Coastal Restaurant Poseys Steam Room Poseys Dockside Coyote Mullet Shufe Stevens Seafood & Chicken Restaurant Coastal Corner Barwicks Seafood & Deli Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Free Admission from 2-6p.m. Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea Maritime Center Panacea Market Place 2pm 8pmNEXT TO BIG TOP SUPERMARKETLocal Arts & Crafts Vendors Saturday, Dec. 1 st The 8th Annual LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t

PAGE 13

By HERB DONALDSON Building a theatre in Wakulla County is not easy. A lot depends on who you know; who knows certain members of your church and/or social circle; and who is willing to possibly help you achieve a home an actual building that can be used for the purposes of theatre. All the worlds a stage. And all the men and women merely players, as Shakespeare says in As You Like It. We all play a part. And for some, theatre, lmmaking, dance, music and other forms of artistry provide them with both a sense of peace and torment. These feelings are not unlike those of a true-believer who, having witnessed a powerful sermon, steps out the church doors and into the vast world. They may feel renewed in their beliefs and faith. But a terrible dread lingers, because there is work to do and minds to change before the message he carries within can ever be accepted or believed. All one can ever truly do, is try. The mission of the Palaver Tree Theater is steeped in the belief that theatre is an instrument of transformation. That instrument is put to use by providing our community the opportunity to engage in productions, forums, and events that validate and re ect our human experiences. Earlier this year, one of Palaver Trees board members introduced me to a woman from Tallahassee. Shed come across a play titled The Left Hand Singing and wanted to know if we could mount it during Black History Month in February. I was unsure about attempting such a strong work in Wakulla. To speak of race here can easily turn into an almost silent exchange of accusations and guilt, instead of an opportunity to embrace our history, so that we may take control of our future without being chained to, or controlled by the actions of our ancestral past. The trick is how not to become vili ed for the attempt. The play, written by Barbara Lebow, is about three students who decide to participate in a voter registration drive for AfricanAmericans in Mississippi during the Freedom Summer of 1964. They suddenly go missing. Their parents, now left with questions of what may have happened to them, are the key triggers of the story. We see their inward change when faced with a communitys fear of the unknown, disguised as racism and bigotry, and how that fear eventually manages to kill something within the human spirit, and possibly their three children along with it. The story is based on true events and is set for a one-night-only staged reading here in February. Recently, Wakullas Historical Society managed to receive a gift conveyance of land from the Boynton family on which to build their Heritage Village. During the signing over of the property, members Murray McLaughlin and Brent Thurmond were asked by a bystander if the county was doing anything to celebrate Floridas 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leons arrival on the east coast, to be recognized in 2013. I later received a call from Thurmond with the idea of developing a play centered around the Forbes Purchase, and the receiving of Indian lands through socalled debts and cessions, that led to the Panton, Leslie & Company merchant business coming into 1.2 million acres between the Apalachicola and St. Marks River in 1804. After a few meetings, Thurmond and Madeleine Carr agreed to work on the play together, and a modern-day version of the story will be performed in the main courtroom of the Wakulla County Courthouse this coming March. This will serve as the latest installment of WakullaStory and is being done in association with the Historical Society. Not long ago, Rodney Letchworth spoke at Wakullas Rotary Club meeting about his Uncle Mike, who had passed some years earlier. After the death, Letchworths brother approached him about his uncles extracurricular activities through the years epecially his hunting and shing trips. It was revealed that their Uncle Mike was involved in more than simple weekend jaunts with ri e and shing pole. He was, in fact, seeking buried treasure. There has long been the legend of pirate gold buried somewhere in Wakulla County. Letchworths truelife tale of murder, greed, and a family secret, is based on personal accounts and actual facts regarding a dead mans treasure stored somewhere, On an island, up a river, near a volcano, in Wakulla County. The Wakulla Volcano takes place in April as part of Wild About Wakulla Week, at the Sopchoppy School. Palaver Tree is also involved in the Working Waterfronts Photo-Journal project with the Healing Arts of Wakulla County (HAWC), and is developing the Wakulla 50 documentary in which 50 Wakulla residents ages 50 and older are being interviewed and recorded to capture their living histories. Both Waterfronts and Wakulla 50 are ongoing projects that are in continual need of subjects to interview. Volunteers, no matter their talent capacity, are also needed to help see these projects through. One of the more exciting endeavors that Palaver Tree will undertake this year is the SCENE in WAKULLA New Plays/Films Festival. SCENE will bring playwrights, lmmakers, actors and directors together for staged readings and lm screenings from emerging writers and directors in Wakulla and surrounding counties. The hope is to develop an annual visual and performance arts festival presented in an out-of-town, Southern comfort-type way where artists of different genres and locations can connect and eventually work together on projects. The submission fee for the festival is $10 and is non-refundable. The deadline to submit work is March 31, 2013. All screenings and readings will be free and open to the public, with donations accepted to help grow the festival in the years to come. SCENE in Wakulla is co-sponsored by Best Western Plus / Wakulla Inn & Suites, and will take place in June. Palaver Tree encourages all in Wakulla who are interested in participating in the productions or behind the scenes to get involved in something thats fun, challenging, and transformative. Contact us at (718) 682-3870 or palavertreetheater@gmail.com. Visit us at palavertreetheater.org, and like us on Facebook. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 13APalaver Tree Theater announces its 2012-13 season DR. DAVID A. KEEN, M.D., M.P.H.BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PRACTICE ELIZABETH HEULER, ARNP-C VALERIE RUSSELL, ARNP-C2615 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, SUITE 103, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327PH 850-926-3140 FX 850-926-3163 (Next to the Winn-Dixie Shopping Plaza) www.wakullaurgentcare.comCOME VISIT US FOR ALL OF YOUR HEALTHCARE NEEDS WE NOW ACCEPT We are an approved Medically Supervised Weight Loss ProgramFAMILY PRIMARY CARE URGENT CARE/WALK INS Pulmonary Function Testing Pediatrics/Immunizations X-Ray, EKG, Labs Sleep Study DEXA Bone Density Testing Workers Comp Injury Overnight Pulse Ox Holter/Event Monitor Pre-Employment Drug Screening School/Bus/DOT/Sports Physicals ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991

PAGE 14

Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy CYNTHIA PAULSON Wild about Wakulla Week showcases Wakulla County, the Natural Place to be. This years extended week from April 12-21, 2013, highlights the heritage, outdoor recreational opportunities and enterprise of Wakulla County. Events of the week are still in the formative stages, but residents and guests will want to stay tuned for details which should be available at www.WildAboutWakulla.com by midJanuary. The Kick-Off event is the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival held on Saturday, April 13. The event celebrates the heritage and art of worm gruntin the act of pounding a stake (stob) into the ground and rubbing a at piece of iron rhythmically across its top. This creates vibrations that drive earthworms up from the ground to the surface where they are collected for sh bait. The practice borders on mystical, but for some local folks it has provided a way of life for over 50 years. The worm gruntin demonstrations captivate both young and old. The festival is held along the picturesque downtown streets of Sopchoppy. Events begin at 9 a.m. and offer over 80 vendors providing food, arts and crafts. The day concludes with the Worm Grunters Ball. There is no admission to the event and it is loaded with family oriented activities. Please visit www. wormgruntinfestival.com for more information. Plan to visit the Gulf Specimen Marine Aquarium in Panacea with your children or grandchildren to experience the glee of hands-on discovery. This do-not-miss opportunity can be experienced anytime the explorer inside you is looking to create vivid memories, but specials will be offered during Wild About Wakulla Week. Visit www.gulfspecimen.org to get started on your family adventure. St. Marks, Americas Oldest River Town, exempli es the hospitality of a cozy gulf side village. Although any day is a good day to visit this coastal community, its welcoming arms will offer guests special hometown opportunities and a special Viva Florida 500 tour will celebrate the 500th anniversary of Spanish in uence on Florida. Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee event will dramatically capture the rich history at the con uence of the St. Marks and Wakulla Rivers with informative boat cruises along with museum and fort tours at San Marcos de Apalache State Park. Visit www.palmettoexpeditions.com for a wide selection of tours suited to varying tastes and activity levels. The fun continues on Saturday, April 20 at Wakulla Springs State Park as the Wakulla Wildlife Festival goes into high gear offering inspiring local musicians, knowledgeable exhibitors, dazzling presentations, convincing living history demonstrators, and special premium guided tours. Fine art, ne food and ne music mingle in the historic Wakulla Springs Lodge as Art on the Terrace, another aspect of the festival, features the work of gifted local talent. Visit www. WakullaWildlifeFestival.org for more information. Please visit www.WildAboutWakulla.com to guide you to more of what makes Wakulla County a destination for heritage and outdoor recreational activities and adventure.Wild About Wakulla Week will be celebrated April 12-21 FILE PHOTOThe Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival kicks off Wild About Wakulla Week. R E S T A U R A N T S PR REE C K G IN For 35 Years, Serving Only Fresh, Local Seafood, A n d M u c h M o r e . . P R I M E R I B thursday nights A l l Y o u C a n E a tFried Quail & Catfish What you will find is really fresh seafood, simply prepared and seasoned with the taste of Florida as it used to be. Southern Living Magazine, August, 2009 Tomato Pie with Grilled Shrimp REEK C P RIN G S C A T E R I N G When you want only the best for your special event,Spring Creek will come to you. Contact us for more information,850-926-2751 www.SpringCreekFL.com Tuesday Friday 5-9 pm Saturday & Sunday 12-9 pm WAKULLA LP GAS 850-926-7670 LP GAS & APPLIANCESSee US for ALL Your Stoves Water Heaters Space Heaters Gas Log Heaterswith remote control 850 926-76702725 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordvillewww.wakullaLPGas.com Pat Greens Lawn ServiceHOLIDAY CHORE LIST (850) 528-2371 today for a free quote!Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredLeaf Removal Trim Trees Clean Flower Beds Hang Lights RUNNING OUT OF TIME?We have all the equipment to take care of that fall chore list. New From SYP Publishing!THE GREENS AND CORNBREAD OF WAKULLA COUNTY Historical Stories Told by the People This delightful book is a collection of stories depicting the history of Wakulla County. The stories were written and submitted by different authors and families. The text includes a wide variety of topics and time periods. Many of the stories contain photos that were included by the author. Available NOW!! $29.95As a publisher, we are constantly searching for authors and groups that wish to have works of a historical or regional signicance published. You may have a local book of stories and lore, a genealogy study, or a text on any specic historical, collectible or unique item. If you are looking for a publisher, consider contacting us.In Search Of The Diamond Brooch In Search of The Diamond Brooch is a southern historical saga starting with the migration of the pioneer families to the North Florida area. This is the story of a family that settled in North Florida in the early 1800s in Wakulla and Leon Counties. Written by Pete Gerrell & Terri Gerrell $24.95SYP Publishing 4351 Natural Bridge Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32305 www.syppublishing.com 850-421-7420 New F

PAGE 15

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 15Aeducation news from local schools SchoolContinued on Page 10A For the last nine months, Pearce has worked directly under Miller as principal on special assignment and then as assistant superintendent. I am very thankful that I have gotten to know him even better in these last nine months, Pearce said. Theres a really strong bond there. He added that he hopes to live up to Millers expectations. He set the bar pretty high. Miller said there will be a transition period, but that Pearce comes into the position with more preparation than he had when he rst started in 1995. Miller was appointed by Gov. Lawton Chiles after the sudden death of Roger Stokley. Stokley passed away on a Thursday and that following Wednesday Miller was appointed. I didnt have much preparation, Miller said. He added that Pearce has been able to see things from the district perspective. Pearce is also older than Miller was when he took of ce. Hes got a few more years under his belt, Miller said. Pearce commended Millers leadership style and felt he was better prepared because of it. Hes very informative, Pearce said. Hes very transparent. As a principal and assistant superintendent, Pearce said Miller always kept him up to speed on changes coming from the state and national level. He made all principals and district-level administration aware and informed, he said. Thats what has made us so successful, Pearce said. The district does not wait to take on new initiatives, but meets them head on, Pearce said. If you look, Wakulla is pioneering a lot of these initiatives, he said. Pearce said the district will continue to do that and move forward. Meeting those new initiatives head on is our key to success, he said. Both Miller and Pearce acknowledge these new initiatives as challenging, including the conversion to digital technology. Theres no way that its going to be as economical to operate as textbooks, Miller said. It sounds like a good idea, but it is going to be costly and it will not be able to provide things that textbooks can, he added. Pearce said there is a lot of concern with the switch to digital text, such as how much of the mandate will be funded by the state. There is also some concern over decreasing student enrollment and merit pay for teachers. However, Pearce said the management of the budget and finance is excellent and will continue to stay that way. We will continue to have great management, he said. Pearce said there will de nitely be some changes at the school district, but that is mainly because he isnt Miller. Changes will happen, Pearce said. In his rst six to eight months, Pearce plans to listen and pay attention so that he can tweak areas where needed. He added that he wants to break down any barriers that make parents or students feel like the school district is not able to meet their needs. He wants to ensure that every student has the same opportunities and is made aware of these opportunities. He wants to focus heavily on informing students and parents of their options. Our job is to make sure they dont miss that opportunity because of a lack of education, Pearce said. He will look at expanding the career education and college counseling offered to students. We need to build on what we are already doing, Pearce said. Miller said students are provided with a world class education in Wakulla County that starts at prekindergarten. It goes from the littlest learners all the way until they graduate, he said. And he added that it will only continue to get better. Being elected as superintendent has been a humbling experience for Pearce and he said he has great respect for the of ce and what it stands for. He added that he serves the public. They trust us to do the right thing by their kids every day, he said. That cant be taken lightly. Pearce plans to use stay in touch with Miller and reach out to him when needed. Its kind of like having an in-house mentor, Pearce said.A new superintendent: Bobby Pearce takes over the post from Miller New programs at TCCSpecial to The NewsIn the spring of 2013, Tallahassee Community College is expanding its offerings to include a Water Quality Technician Certi cate and an Environmental Science Technology A.S. Degree. The new programs represent the rst phase of TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute, with the goal of preparing the next generation of environmental professionals. TCCs new certi cate and degree programs will qualify students to work in the technical areas of water quality, natural resource management and environmental monitoring with the local, state and national levels of government and private enterprises such as environmental consulting rms. Environmental science technology careers offer opportunities to make a difference in the community and to work in a variety of settings from laboratories to the eld. TCCs environmental science technology programs are ideal for working students that require exible class schedules, with courses offered online and in the classroom. These programs combine TCCs academics with the incredible biodiversity and natural resources of Wakulla County, said Pamela MacRae, assistant professor of biology at TCC. TCC plans to implement additional Wakulla Environmental Institute programs in the coming semesters, including hospitality and tourism management, aquaculture management, parks and leisure technology, and agribusiness management. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRiversprings Middle School eighth grade art students proudly show off the bowls they made and donated to the Empty Bowls project held on Nov. 3 to raise money for the local food pantries. RMS students make bowls to help Empty Bowl project 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 blessedare those whomourn 2012 Service of RemembranceSunday, December 2nd at 4:00pm Hudson Park21 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville Please call Pam at 850-926-9308 for more information. FridayNovember 30Medart Elementary School4pm 8pmAll funds raised will go towards needed items for the school.Winter Holiday Festival Come visit with Santa and decorate Christmas cookies with Mrs. Claus!Annualgames, prizes, bingo, cake walk, inatable obstacle course, jump house, paintball, jousting and giant slides, go-cart racing, face painting, sno-cones and lots of delicious food.2558 Coastal Highway. For more information, call 962-4881.Home Of The StingraysCALL 925-6344WAKULLA COAST CHARTER SCHOOLAlyssa Higgins Principalalyssa.higgins@wcsb.us48 Shell Island Rd. P.O. Box 338 St. Marks, FL. 32355Wakullas C.O.A.S.T. Charter SchoolA WINNING TEAM!wakullaschooldistrict.org Grades K-8 Free Public School & VPK Strong Academic Support Character Development Art Music Technology Marine Aquarium & Buttery Gardens Junior Garden Club Bus Transportation Available National School Lunch Program Free or Reduced Breakfast & LunchENROLLMENT APPLICATIONS AVAILABLEOPENINGS AVAILABLE ENROLL NOW! AFTER-SCHOOL HOMEWORK CENTERGRADES 3RD 6TH Introductory rate for the rst twenty students to respond to this ad! 850926-9977 Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408

PAGE 16

Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate LifeThe greatest holiday season of the year is here. We have feasts and gift sharing that we enjoy. However, many older Americans experience stress and depression during the holidays. The Senior Center strives to reduce these anxieties and make each day brighter for every client. Every service is based on individual assessments of each client. The board and staff recognize the unhealthy conditions created by the feelings of isolation and loneliness. We strive to keep the senior citizens engaged in the Senior Center and our community to combat these threats to their health. The Wakulla County Senior Center provides in-home services such as housekeeping, personal care, meals-on-wheels, telephone reassurance, emergency alert response systems, utilities, etc. The center also provides daily congregate meals, music, art, exercise, many educational programs and a variety of health screenings. The senior programs actively strive to enable our older population to age in place in a secure, safe and senior friendly environment while helping them to be more engaged in our community. This bene t helps all of us by reducing early admission to nursing homes and other institutions that are so expensive. Nationwide, people are becoming disconnected from their community and this results in reduced support of family and neighbors in need. However, Wakulla County continues to be a loving and caring community that is proud to support our youth and our senior citizens. We take advantage of every holiday and also invent ways to turn an ordinary day into a special celebration. This Holiday Season provides many opportunities to celebrate. Thanksgiving was celebrated with a free County Wide Thanksgiving Dinner on Nov. 20. Hundreds showed up for the happy occasion. The next morning Chef Mary charmed the seniors with a brunch. There was a wonderful buffet spread as Chef Mary prepared omelets as ordered while each senior observed her adding all the individually selected ingredients. There were two Santa quilts raf ed which added to the party atmosphere. The shared happiness continues throughout the holiday season. Our staff has selected a grandmother that cares for three small grandchildren that we, as employees of the Senior Center, plan to bring happiness to their home on Christmas morning. We are not alone. The Christmas Connection, Area Agency on Aging, Christ Church Anglican, Catholic Charities, and Home Insteads Senior Santa Program began preparation to give to the Senior Centers clients long before Thanksgiving. There will be many churches and organizations to add to this list before Christmas. Christmas will be celebrated on Friday, Dec. 21. The Band will be playing while Chef Mary serves individually prepared omelets with unlimited smiles to the seniors. We will raffle a camcorder and a crocheted Afghan. Santa will arrive bearing gifts. Christmas is not taken lightly. We recognize the reason for the season and see Gods gift of love that the seniors share with each other, with smiles, gifts and many other acts of kindness. Seniors caring for seniors occurs daily, but it appears more visible during the Christmas season. We enjoy sharing with close friends and family during Christmas. Take some time to visit someone you know that is alone. Give a gift to someone that may not have a close friend or family to visit during Christmas. Giving your time and resources to someone that cannot give back can be the most rewarding experience of the season. During this Holiday Season please consider a contribution to the Senior Center at 33 Michael Drive. Your contribution will enhance the lives of friends and neighbors. If you are more closely associated with another non-pro t service organization, consider sending a gift to them. During recent years it has been dif cult for these organizations to get enough funding to adequately meet their needs. We wish you a Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year. R.H. Carter is executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizen Center. R.H. Carter Senior Center tries to reduce holiday anxiety for seniorsBy MICHELLE HUNTEROctober came, the weather changed, and the holiday festivities are beginning. Our Tuesday craft class started making holiday cards for Halloween, and Thanksgiving, as well decorations went up for a Halloween Party. Many of the seniors participated by dressing up in fun and very creative costumes. The group that plays cards daily decided to dress as a deck of cards. About 20 players participated; you might say we were not playing with a full deck. There were princesses, witches, vampires, kings and pirates. Prizes were given for best costumes in several categories. The seniors enjoyed a cakewalk, with several homemade cakes as prizes. On Halloween day the Wakulla Wigglers performed to Halloweenthemed music. Members of the Wakulla Wigglers participate in the line dancing classes provided on Mondays at 1:30 p.m. and Wednesday at 2 p.m. Representatives for Area Agency and SHINE came to help the seniors with decision making on any changes they might want during open enrollment for Medicare. Open enrollment is through Dec. 7 this year. A representative from SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders) will be at the senior center on Fridays at 10:30 a.m. If you would like to make an appointment please call the center at 926-7145 or 1-800-963-5337, or just stop by.Continued on Page 17A Seniors celebrate Halloween, enjoy crafts, dance, touch tanks and more PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe group that plays cards decided to dress as a deck of cards for Halloween. Special Christmas ShowSPONSORED BY: FAIRCLOTH INSURANCE AGENCY PURVIS BROTHERS BANDCall 962-3711 for Ticket Information Country SopchoppyOpry.com

PAGE 17

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 17AContinued from Page 16A Gulf Specimen Marine Lab of Panacea brought their new mobile unit touch tank. It was enjoyed by the seniors as well as the children of the Before and After School Program. Both groups were taught about the living creatures of the sea and how to protect the waters that they live in. Kimberly Davis of FAMU brought a display to demonstrate how our ground water becomes part of the watershed, and how we must protect it from pollution. The activities at the center vary daily and include topics from health and recreation to fun. Nutrition is taught by Shelley Swenson of the Wakulla County Extension of ce, and Cynthia Christen, who is a volunteer. Cynthia also teaches a chair exercise class. Diabetes Support is provided twice a month by Grace Keith, who is a health educator from the Wakulla County Health Department. Grace has been providing recipes of healthy alternatives for holidays, and educational materials for diabetes and arthritis. Brain Gym, taught by Elaine Webb, is a combination of chair exercises and mental calisthenics which help with balance, coordination and linguistics. Now that the weather is getting cooler, the seniors are able to go out walking on the nature trail just outside the center. Seniors enjoy staying busy with activities and learning new things. The seniors were treated to a wonderful musical performance by Carolyn and Joey Grubbs. The songs ranged from numbers by Ann Murray, Johnny Cash, Etta James, The Beatles, gospel, pop and rock. Seniors danced and sang along and a good time was had by all. On Friday, Oct. 26, many wore pink in recognition of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Individuals spoke that day of their own personal stories of how they have been affected directly or indirectly by beast cancer. Also that day, Buddy Wells, Supervisor of Elections, came to speak to the seniors who had questions regarding the election and the large amount of amendments on the ballot. We sure appreciated the help and information. If anyone is interested in assisting the seniors with computer help, we are looking for a volunteer who can help with this. Please contact the center at 926-7145 if you are interested. Any donations of yarn would be appreciated for a hat making project for the seniors. It can be dropped off at the center.Seniors celebrate Halloween, enjoy crafts, dance, touch tanks and more PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Gulf Specimen Marine Lab touch tank visits the Senior Center. The Wakulla Wigglers dance class. Kimberly Davis of FAMU shares a display about groundwater. More seniors from the card-playing group who dressed as a deck of cards. About 20 seniors dressed as cards, meaning they werent playing with a full deck. St. MarksRIVER CANTINA We Have The Best Hamburgers AroundPrize for Best Dressed Golf Kart Dress Up Your Golf Kart & Join The Parade Call for FREE registration925-9908 6th Annual Golf Kart Christmas ParadeFriday, Dec. 14 @ 6:30 p.m. St. Marks Toy DriveBring an unwrapped giftgifts will be distributed by St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department Join the Cantina for Thanksgiving Dinner on Thanksgiving at 1 p.m. Bring a covered dish If you cant Join us Anyway! HOWARD KESSLER County Commissioner, Dist. 3Extends a heartfelt thank you and looks forward to working for a better Wakulla County. g for a bette r Thank You! Gracias!Merci!Vielen Dank!Dhnnabad!

PAGE 18

Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Nov. 12, Bryan Jenkins of Wakulla Pawn in Crawfordville reported receiving a law enforcement Taser believed to be stolen. The Taser, cartridge and charger are valued at $665. It was determined that the Taser is owned by the Gadsden County Sheriffs Of ce and the individual who attempted to pawn the item was identified. The Taser was confiscated and the case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: NOVEMBER 8 Michael Foster of Live Oak reported a felony criminal mischief in Crawfordville. A tractor tire on equipment owned by Musgrove Construction was damaged at Springhill Road and New Light Church Road. The tire was found to have a bullet hole in it. A suspect has been identi ed. Damage is estimated at $2,350. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. Tonya Michelle Goelz, 41, of Crawfordville was involved in a one vehicle traffic crash on Hilliardville Road. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated and observed Goelz and her automobile disabled in the middle of the road with damage to the vehicle. EMS checked the victim who declined to be transported to the hospital. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated a bridge on Hilliardville Road where the motorist struck a pine tree and the bridge railing before becoming disabled. Damage to the bridge was estimated at $25,000. Damage to the vehicle was estimated at $15,000. The accident is still under investigation. Deputy Will Hudson also investigated. Steve Walker of Crawfordville reported a burglary to his shed. A marine battery and light were removed from the property following a similar incident in August. The property is valued at $125. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. A retail theft was reported at Two Blondes Liquors and Gifts in Panacea. A customer entered the store and purchased a bottle of liquor while failing to pay for a second bottle that was hidden in his clothing. The theft is valued at $14. The suspect is an unshaven white male who weighs approximately 240 pounds and had multiple tattoos including initials on his neck. He left the scene in a Dodge Intrepid with a Florida tag. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. Beatriz Salquero of Tallahassee reported the loss of her dog. The location of the dog was identi ed through a microchip and the victim went to the home and saw the dog. But the animal was no longer at the home when Deputy Sean Wheeler spoke to the homeowner involved. Cecilia D. McClain of Sopchoppy was a passenger in a vehicle driven by Corey Lee of Crawfordville when she fell out of the vehicle through an open door onto Lonesome Road. The victim refused transportation to the hospital by Wakulla EMS. She was transported to the hospital by Lee. Sgt. Andy Curles investigated. NOVEMBER 9 A concerned citizen from Panacea reported that a subject was attempting to break into a shed. The subject was startled by the concerned citizen and left the area. It has not been determined if anything was taken. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Rex Wilson of Panacea reported a hit-and-run traf- c crash while eating at a Panacea restaurant. A witness observed a Ford truck strike the victims vehicle while backing up. Damage to the Wilson vehicle was estimated at $2,500. The witness was able to secure suspect information. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. A Wakulla High School student from Crawfordville reported the theft of cash and an iPod Touch from her book bag. The bag was located inside the girls locker room while the victim attended physical education class. The stolen property is valued at $270. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. NOVEMBER 10 Bailey Burgin of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A stroller and cash were removed from the victims unsecured vehicle. The value of the stolen items is estimated at $330. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. Deputy Gibby Gibson issued a notice to appear in court to Kelwin Nathaniel Rosier, 21, of Crawfordville after Rosier, on a bicycle, came across Deputy Gibsons travel lane. Deputy Gibson checked on the safety of the subject who advised he was out exercising. When Deputy Gibson smelled the odor of an alcoholic beverage, he was granted permission to check Rosiers bag. Deputy Gibson found drug paraphernalia with a digital scale, plastic bags and green leafy substance. The grinder and scale were seized as evidence and Rosier was issued a NTA for possession of narcotics equipment. Chansamone Bryant of Columbus, Ga., reported a criminal mischief in Crawfordville. Damage was reported to the victims home by previous tenants. A screen was damaged and walls and tiles were damaged. An entertainment center and a dog kennel were also reported stolen. The missing items are valued at $550. Suspects have been identified. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. NOVEMBER 11 Annie Boyd of Panacea reported a credit card offense. The victim reported the use of her grocery card on multiple occasions. A suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Angelo Petrandis of Panacea reported a trespass on his property. The victim stated that someone has been coming on his property and discharging rearms and frightening his horses. Two sections of his fence were damaged. Damage to the fence was estimated at $100. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Ivan Farmer of Tallahassee reported a traf c crash. The victim reported that someone hit his vehicle while he was working at St. Marks Powder. Damage is estimated at $1,500. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Antwan Brinson, 18, of Tallahassee was charged with battery by a person detained in a jail facility in the Wakulla County Jail after striking a 35-year-old inmate in the face. The victim was transported to a Tallahassee hospital for treatment of a laceration to his face. Deputy Jerry Morgan investigated. Jason Gibson of Crawfordville reported the theft of a wallet on Shadeville Highway. The victim was riding a four wheeler when he lost the wallet. It was recovered but a credit card was missing from the wallet. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Leigha Shirley of Crawfordville reported the theft of currency from her wallet. The wallet was recovered at the victims place of business but $12 was reported missing. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. NOVEMBER 12 Deputy Mike Zimba and Reserve Deputy David Pienta responded to a welfare check of a pedestrian on U.S. Highway 319. Once they arrived on scene they asked the female subject to identify herself and were given a false name. Deputy Zimba recognized the subject as someone with active warrants in Wakulla County. Christina Lee Mills, 38, of Tallahassee admitted she gave the deputies a false name. During the arrest process a homemade crack pipe was recovered. Mills was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia and resisting an of cer by a disguised person, in addition to the two active warrants for violation of probation. Francella Wilson of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Tools, valued at $700, were reported missing from a home that was used as storage. The house was not secured at the time of the theft. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. A business burglary was reported at Dollar General on Crawfordville Highway. The stores propane tank cage locking mechanism was cut but nothing was taken from the cage. Damage to the cage was estimated at $1,000. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. Hamaknockers BBQ in Crawfordville reported a structure re. A barbecue smoker with grease nearby caught fire. The smoker shed and equipment suffered $3,000 worth of damage. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. Amanda Schram of Crawfordville reported the theft of clothing from her home. The clothing is valued at $240 and a suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. NOVEMBER 13 A business burglary was reported at Shell Point Spirits. Glass in the front door was broken out and store items were rummaged through by a subject or subjects. Two bottles of liquor were stolen. They are valued at $125. A pry bar was used to gain entry into the building and damage to the door was estimated at $500. Detective Derek Lawhon and Deputy Nick Gray investigated. Marcus Beard of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary in reference to the theft of guns stolen from his vehicle. The rearms are valued at $1,100. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Duc Tran of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim was washing his boat when he realized a tackle box was missing. The tackle box and contents are valued at $400. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. James Watson of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the loss of a GPS unit from his vehicle. The unit is valued at $99. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. Wal-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft. Four individuals were allegedly observed stealing items from the store. When they were approached by store staff they fled the store and left the items behind. Suspects were identi- ed but the store assistant manager refused to sign t he pr osecution affidavit. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. NOVEMBER 14 Maria Caso of Crawfordville reported a fraud and passing of forged checks. The victim reported seven checks being stolen for a total value of $713. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Richard Moon and Deputy Ryan Muse investigated. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated a traf c crash at the Wakulla County Courthouse. Jessica L. Fincher of Tallahassee reported striking a parked vehicle owned by Michelle L. Christensen of Crawfordville. Finchers vehicle suffered $1,000 worth of damage and the Christensen vehicle suffered $3,500 worth of damage. There were no injuries. Ronald Collins of Crawfordville reported glass breaking at his home. Someone shot the window of the victims home with a rearm. A projectile was recovered inside the home. Deputy Mike Zimba and Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated and determined that the gun incident may have been an accident as the shot came from a distance. FWC was noti ed in the event that poachers are illegally hunting in the area. Damage was estimated at $50. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 904 calls for service during the past week. Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 19ASpecial to The NewsA 58-year-old Crawfordville man died in a camper trailer fire reported by a witness at 9:19 a.m. Friday, Nov. 16 in Crawfordville, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. Witnesses reported the trailer engulfed in ames. WCSO investigators arrived at 9:26 a.m. and discovered the burned remains of Louis Felipe Jordan in what was left of the camper trailer. The trailer was located behind a home at 88 Sam Smith Circle in northeastern Wakulla County. Wakulla County re ghters and volunteer re ghters from Wakulla Station and Crawfordville responded to the blaze and put out the camper re. There was no other damage to nearby structures. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) and State Fire Marshal were called to the scene to assist with the investigation. Preliminary ndings indicated that the re may have been electrical in nature and the death does not appear to be suspicious. The 1970s era trailer was destroyed by the blaze. State of cials and WCSO deputies and detectives are still working to determine the exact point of origin of the re as the investigation continues. This is the rst case of an individual dying in a Wakulla County residential re in approximately two years. PHOTO BY KEITH BLACKMAR/WCSOThe camper, in the distance, after the re in which a 58-year-old man died.Man dies in camper-trailer re on Friday morningThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce will host a Personal Protection and Firearms Safety Course on Saturday, Dec. 15 from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the WCSO Range in Otter Creek, near Sopchoppy. The program is $65 for non-range members and $55 for range members and satis- es the requirement for a conceal carry permit. For more information or to register, call the Range at 745-7290 or Lt. Fred Nichols at 251-1676.Concealed weapon class to be o ered NEED CASH FOR CHRISTMAS?Tallahassee-Leon FCUs Fairy Loanmaker Can Grant Your Wish! HOLIDAY LOANS 2.99% APR on your Christmas ........ purchases for 6 monthsPlus, visit TLFCU.org for details on how to submit your Wish List to the Fairy Loanmaker. She may pick up the tab for you this year!FACEBOOK.COM/TLFCU TWITTER.COM/TLFCU PINTEREST.COM/TLFCU *APR is Annual Percentage Rate. Promotional rate is good for 6 statement billing cycles for TLFCU.org ank You! Political adertisement paid for and approved by Halsey Beshears, Republican for State Representative.

PAGE 20

Page 20A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comThe Currier and Ives image of late November has hunters returning with a turkey for Thanksgiving dinner. A great feast was implied for all attending the meal, except, of course, for the turkey. To this day the Eastern Wild Turkey is hunted in Wakulla County and much of the eastern United States. The birds range extends from north Florida to southern Canada. This is the same turkey species Squanto of the Patuxet tribe used to help the Pilgrim survive the wilderness perils of 1621. Thanksgiving was established with the turkey as the perennial guest of honor. Even the likes of founding father Benjamin Franklin believed the turkeys qualities so enviable as to suggest it be the avian emblem for the young nation. He wrote the turkey was a respectable bird of courage that would not hesitate to attack a Grenadier of the British Guards who should presume to invade his farm yard with a red coat on. The Eastern Wild Turkeys popularity almost proved to be its downfall. Pressure from hunting and habitat destruction reduced the turkeys to dangerously low number and the threat of extinction by the early 20th century. Aggressive game management and hunting regulations eventually alleviated the annihilation menace from humanity. The turkey once again became a holiday favorite. Life in the 21st century has changed the hunt for a turkey from the woods to the supermarket meat case. Domestic turkey production is concentrated, for the most part, in states also known for producing large volumes of grain. Curiously, the commercially produced domestic turkeys are not descendants of the Eastern Wild Turkey in Wakullas woods. These gobblers and hens trace their lineage back to southern Mexico and the Aztec Empire. After looting and pillaging southern Mexico, enterprising Spanish conquistadores took these tamed birds back to Europe during the 16th century along with the gold and silver. If the food supplies ran out or spoiled during the return voyage to Spain, turkey was on the menu but without the cranberry sauce. In the decades following, propagation of the domesticated turkeys reached France, Britain and other European countries and provinces. The tasty birds were a prized novelty on the estates of royalty and the landed gentry. The lucky aristocratic diners enjoyed the plumage and culinary aspects of the turkey. Ultimately, European turkey producers were successful enough to export the live birds to the North American colonies to feed the settlers who did not have the time or inclination to hunt the Eastern Wild Turkey. The human population is not alone in its enjoyment of turkey as a main dish. Every hunter knows the Eastern Wild Turkey is legendary for its guile and wariness, and for good reason. Many native omnivores enjoy the turkeys eggs and poults. Additionally, larger carnivores dine on the adult turkeys, except for the mature males or toms. The toms are equipped with several effective defensive tools. Wild Eastern Turkeys feed on the berries, acorns, seed and occasionally small reptiles. In autumn, the diets of wild turkey can be comprised of up to 70% acorns. Acorn production varies by locality, oak species, and between individual oaks of the same species. Turkey hunters are wise to consider this. To learn more about Wakulla Countys Eastern Wild Turkeys, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Eastern wild turkey is part of traditional Thanksgiving Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTurkey hens, above, and a tom and hen below. WAKULLA COMMUNITY CHORUS In Handels MESSIAH Directed By Reba Mason Featuring a Cast of 60 Singers and Instrumentalists SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9 3:00 PM Sopchoppy United Methodist Church 10 Faith Ave. -Free AdmissionReception In Fellowship Hall Immediately Following WAKULLA COMMUNITY THEATRE Presents Some things get better with age. Capital Health Plan is one of them. Plan to attend a SEMINAR to LEARN MORE about CHP Advantage Plus (HMO) and CHP Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-8708943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Paid Endorsement. Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 to RSVP or for more information. (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week or visit us at: w ww.capitalhealth.com/medicareSeminars will be held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center 1491 Governors Square Blvd.H5938_DP 121 File & Use 09242011Anna Johnson says....Join me and become a member of a Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO) Plan. SMFriday, November 23 Thursday, November 29 Friday, November 30 Wednesday, December 5 Thursday, December 6

PAGE 21

Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 sports news and team views Sports Giving thanks.1101000.1 State Farm, Home Oce, Bloomington, ILI thank you for your continued business. Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL ME TODAY. Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com WAR EAGLES WIN, 42-19 PLAYOFFS: The War Eagles face Godby in the district seminal at home at J.D. Jones Stadium on Friday, Nov. 23, at 7:30 p.m. PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDENDown 19-7 to Gulf Breeze at halftime, Wakulla comes back in the second half with 35 unanswered pointsRunning back Demetrius Lindsey, above, hurdles a would-be tackler. Brandon Nichols, a cornerback and sometime receiver converted to running back because of injuries, bounces off a tackler and goes into the end zone for a touchdown that marked the War Eagles second half comeback. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt was a tale of two halfs. In the rst half, Wakulla was down to Gulf Breeze 19-7. Despite an opening scoring drive, the War Eagle offense couldnt move the ball. The defense couldnt stop the Dolphins. In the second half, the War Eagles played like the team fans have come to expect speedy backs who slash up opposing defenses and tear off long runs, and a dominating, hard-hitting defense. In the opening round of the regional playoffs on Friday night, the secondhalf War Eagles scored 35 unanswered points and kept the Dolphins scoreless to win 42-19. The win sets up a district showdown against Godby in the regional semi- nals. The War Eagles have beat the Cougars in their last three meetings, going back to last year when they won in the regular season and in the playoffs. Of the victory over Gulf Breeze, Head Coach Scott Klees chuckled that he had warned the game was going to be a tough one. I told you Gulf Breeze was very good up front and very big. He attributed Wakullas slow start in the rst half to all new players playing because of injuries to regular starters. They havent had the time or the reps to play well. At halftime, Klees said he and other coaches made some adjustments and changed some things around. We helped them understand what theyre facing and how to overcome it. Continued on Page 4B Purple Frog Racing wins Road Race of ChampionsPage 2BWater WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary Underwater Wakulla Page 7B

PAGE 22

Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com OUR PAP SAYS Thank You for your Support! (and He Loves US! Brigs, Walker & Reese)Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, for Property Appraiser DONNIE SPARKMAN, WAKULLA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER Special to The NewsOn Nov. 3, Mike Eakin of Crawfordville won the American Road Race of Champions race at Road Atlanta. Road Atlanta is a challenging 2.7 mile, 12 turn, very hilly road race course just outside Flowery Branch, Ga. Eakin was driving a Club Formula Continental race car entered by Purple Frog Racing which is based in Crawfordville. Eakin, the technical director of the F2000 Championship Series, took the opportunity provided by his sponsor, Hoosier Race Tires, to run this national championship event. This was the nal event of the 2012 season, a race for the national championship in his class of cars. This is the third time he has won this national championship, having won it twice before in 2006 and 2011. The success of the team is due much in part to services provided by many businesses local to Wakulla County. This victory was dedicated to wishing Kevin Roberts at Kevins Machine a speedy recovery from his accident. Dallas Beckett at Moonlight Welding painted the Reynard SF2000 its bright metallic purple and silver. Dave Boudreau at S&D Machine machined many custom chassis parts. Custom Design and Trim provided all the graphics on the car and Mikes helmet. The car was on display at the Blue Jeans and Fast Machines car show sponsored by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful at HarveyYoung Farm on Nov. 17. By JOE JACOBSRMS CoachAfter a shaky start to the 2012 campaign, the Riversprings Bears ended the season on a hot streak, winning four straight games, giving RMS a 5-3 record. Riversprings final opponent of the season was the Warriors of Kingdom Life. Riding a strong defensive performance, the Bears cruised to a 30-14 victory. The Bears were led defensively by Kody Zanco, who paced all defenders with ve solo tackles, two tackles for loss, and one assist. Jake McCarl also added two quarterback sacks. Andrew Harrison, Demarcus Lindsey, Jacob Austin and Tyrone Williams also played solid defense. RMS was led offensively by the running of Jacob Austin and Demarcus Lindsey, and the passing of Zach Norman. Lindsey had 85 yards rushing on four carries and a touchdown, while Austin added 34 yards on seven carries. Norman had an ef- cient game, going 4 of 5 for 63 yards and two touchdowns, with no interceptions. Lindsey and Zanco had 1 TD reception apiece. Riversprings ends the season 5-3, with another Wakulla County Middles School Football Championship under its belt. The coaches are already looking forward to next season. With the loss of 23 8th graders and the prospects of returning only one starter on offense and perhaps two on defense, RMS will be in a de nite rebuilding year. By CONNOR HARRISONWakullaSports.comThe Wakulla War Eagle boys basketball team is due to open on Tuesday, Nov. 20 when they head over to play the Maclay Marauders at 7 p.m. Their rst district game will be at Rickards on Dec. 6. Their other district games include Rickards one more time and Suwannee twice. Other big games are against Godby and Lincoln. They also have two games against North Florida Christian which will present a couple of great challenges. Last year the NFC Eagles had a record of 21 wins and six losses. The Suwannee Bulldogs will also present a stiff challenge, coming in from a season which they made it to the playoffs with a 20-7 record. Wakulla has already tipped off in the pre-season with losses against both Lincoln and Godby. In the game against Godby, the Cougars won 67-44. The War Eagles fell 56-41 to Lincoln. The War Eagles would like to avenge these losses with a win in the regular season. Wakulla does have a stretch of four straight away games from Dec. 6 to the 13 and then another stretch from Jan. 10 to 22. They also have a tournament in Bainbridge on Dec. 14 and 15. Following that is the Chipley Christmas Tourney on Dec. 27 and 28. The teams to play have yet to be determined, but with a few wins Wakulla could pull out a victory in these tourneys. They also have a long distance game in Panama City against Rutherford on the Jan. 26. The War Eagles will hope to improve from game to game working their way to the playoffs for a chance to make a run to the championship game.sports news and team views SportsPHOTO BY ROB BODLE/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMike Eakin of Purple Frog Racing at Road Atlanta.Purple Frog Racing wins American Road Race of ChampionsRACING BOYS BASKETBALL FOOTBALLWar Eagles ready to startRMS ends season 5-3 CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY Saturday, Dec. 89 A.M. until 4 P.M. Relaxed Shopping from Arts, Crafts and Food Vendors, and our Local Merchants.Sponsored by Sopchoppy Preservation and Improvement Association, Inc. For information call our HOTLINE (850) 962-4138 Daytime AT 11 A.M. Christmas Music

PAGE 23

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Nov. 22 Happy Thanksgiving Friday, Nov. 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Nov. 24 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Nov. 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Nov. 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Nov. 27 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Wednesday, Nov. 28 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Nov. 29 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsFriday, Nov. 23 CD RELEASE PARTY for the musical duo Hot Tamale at Poseys Dockside Cafe in Panacea. The show will start at 7:30 p.m. Hot Tamale, a Tallahassee-based group made up of Adrian Fogelin and Craig Reeder, has deep roots in Wakulla County. Hot Tamale recently released their CD, titled Made from Scratch. BLACK FRIDAY BABYSITTING FUNDRAISER will be held by The Purplettes Relay for Life Team. Let them take care of the children while the adults shop from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. All proceeds bene t the American Cancer Society, which serves cancer survivors. For more information, contact Jillian Richardson or Nancy Floyd Richardson at 933-1083 or CreativFlo@comcast.net. Tuesday, Nov. 27 WAKULLA EUROTRIP MEETING will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Those interested in the next Wakulla Eurotrip through the educational travel company, Explorica, lead by Wakulla High School AP Art History/ Art Teacher and Watercolor painter, Cassie Tucker, are invited to the next information meeting. Enrollment is open for the Summer 2014 trip that includes London, Paris, Monaco, Florence, Rome and Sorrento. For questions, call 926-2394. Wednesday, Nov. 28 CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held at the Bistro at Wildwood Country Club from noon to 1:15 p.m. Cost is $12 per person and includes a buffet style lunch of rosemary lemon chicken, assorted vegetables, salad, rolls, dessert and drink. RSVP to the chamber at 926-1848.Upcoming EventsFriday, Nov. 30 ANNUAL WINTER HOLIDAY FESTIVAL will be held at Medart Elementary School from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. All funds raised will go towards needed items for the school. There will be games, prizes, bingo, cake walk, in atable obstacle course, jousting, giant slides, go-cart racing, face painting, sno-cones and food, Come and visit with Santa and decorate Christmas cookies with Mrs. Claus. The school is located at 2558 Coastal Highway. For more information, call 962-4881. Saturday, Dec. 1 BOOK SALE EXTRAVAGANZA FUNDRAISER will be held at the library from 9 a.m. to noon. There are thousands of books, audio, video and more. Proceeds bene t childrens programs at the library. CHRISTMAS IN PANACEA will be held from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. There will be a Panacea Market Place with arts and craft vendors starting at 2 p.m. Entertainment will be from 4 to 8 p.m. The boat on trailer parade begins at 6:30 p.m. The tree lighting will take place following the parade. There will also be free refreshments and popcorn, as well as children activities, games, hay ride, face painting and a story teller. Children can also visit with Santa. For more information, call Michelle Crum at 210-8831 or Sherrie Miller at 528-1527. Sunday, Dec. 2 SERVICE OF REMEMBRANCE will be held by Big Bend Hospice at 4 p.m. at Hudson Park. Big Bend Hospices Service of Remembrance is a non-denominational service that brings together those in the community to honor the memories of loved ones at this very special time of year. Everyone who attends shares a common purpose to honor and to remember a loved one who has died, to be surrounded by others who are on a similar journey and to connect with loved ones. For additional information about Big Bend Hospices bereavement services, contact Pam Mezzina at (850) 878-5310, ext. 799. FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE presentation series will feature Owls and Other Night Birds at St. Marks with Don Morrow of The Trust for Public Lands at 2 p.m. He will tell about birds of the night and share their habits, how to identify them and where you are likely to nd them. Linger afterward for a short twilight eld trip. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures Classroom, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 925-6121 for more information. Friday, Dec. 7 HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held at 6 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club. This is a preview party for the Saturday event. For $10 enjoy wine and hors doeuvres while shopping. The general public day is Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and is free. For more information contact Nita Burke at 294-6482 or Heather Robison at 544-5418. Saturday, Dec. 8 HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club. There will be arts and craft vendors. For more information contact Nita Burke at 294-6482 or Heather Robison at 544-5418. Sunday, Dec. 9 THE MESSIAH will be performed by the Tallahassee Florida Stake of The Church of Jesus at 7 p.m. at Chiles High School in Tallahassee. Messiah features a choir and orchestra comprised of members of the community. Tickets are free, but limited. They can be ordered online at www.tallahasseemessiah.com. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 3B Government Meetings Monday, Nov. 26 WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Monday, Dec. 3 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorFor those of you who arent regular subscribers of The Wakulla News, Im Scott Joyner the director of the Wakulla County Public Library. Were proud to have more than 14,000 card holders who take advantage of the more than 42,000 books, 1,500 audio books and 3,000 videotapes and DVDs that we provide for free. We have also recently begun offering e-books to checkout to your Kindle, iPad, laptop or similar devices. In addition to providing many things for you and your family to check out, we offer so much more! We have 12 public computers with high speed internet, computer classes on a wide range of subjects, childrens programs and regular showings of movies. Not to mention all of the great community organizations that meet here, including the Wakulla County Historical Society, Iris Garden Club, Concerned Citizens of Wakulla, among many others. We offer childrens programs for infants and preschoolers year around with Summer Programs for kids through middle school each summer. Were able to do all this through the help of the Friends of the Library. The Friends pay for our annual Summer Program of Events for the children of Wakulla County, a portion of our book budget, as well as other expenses taxpayers dont have to pay for. This group over the past three years has saved county taxpayers more than $75,000. This is done through an annual silent auction, book sales every other month, as well as donations accepted year round. For those interested in joining this organization, please contact us or come by the monthly meeting of the Friends the fourth Thursday of each month at the library. We also have a great volunteer program for those who are interested in helping us at the library. This is a great way to get involved in the community, as well as a way to earn community services hours for scholarships for students. Those interested can contact our Volunteer Coordinator Pam Mueller. We are happy to provide all of the above free of cost to our patrons and encourage everyone who isnt already a member of the library to come by and see all we have to offer. We are proud to provide a place for children and families to go to learn and entertain themselves. For those interested in more details on all that we do please check out our website at wakullalibrary.org or call us at 926-7415. I also send out a weekly email newsletter, as well as an article here in The Wakulla News most weeks. We have many great plans for the great citizens of Wakulla County over the next year so please come join us!Library News... Happy Thanksgiving! CD release party for Hot Tamale at Poseys Dockside at 7:30 p.m. Black Friday Babysitting Fundraiser for Relay for Life from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Chamber Networking Luncheon from noon to 1:15 at Wildwood Bistro.ThursdayFridayFridayWednesday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net The next informational meeting for the Wakulla High School Eurotrip will be on Nov. 27 at at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Students, above, in London on last years trip.

PAGE 24

Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Sunday ThursdayALL U CAN EATSpecials Catfish ......$11.95 Shrimp ....,$13.95 Scallops ..$13.95Includes Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies30 SHRIMP 10 Fried 10 Grilled 10 BlackenedServed with Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies$12.95 w Winter hours: Tues. Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 Sunday 4-9 984-5243 1506 COASTAL HWY., SCENIC BIWAY www.Ken FieldsPhotography.photoshelter.com HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926685 or 510Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH Players of the WeekDEQUON SIMMONS Running back 102 yards on 12 carries and a touchdown MONTERIOUS LOGGINS He ew around the eld on kickoffs, Coach Klees said. FRED CUMMINGS Linebacker 14 tackles, including two for a lossO ense Defense Special Teams WAR EAGLES WIN, 42-19 WILLIAM SNOWDENIn a halftime ceremony, local Centennial Bank of cials presented a check for $51,000 to Superintendent of Schools David Miller to mark the a new scoreboard at J.D. Jones Stadium. The scoreboard is twice the size of the old scoreboard and includes a LCD display where messages can ash. The gift from the bank also included 25-second play clocks in the north and south end zones.Centennial Bank presents new scoreboard at J.D. Jones StadiumContinued from Page 1B Klees said he told his players at halftime: Win or lose, were gonna do it the right way. Were not gonna come out here and pout or take cheap shots. Well put our faith where it needs to be and move forward. Klees praised the three running backs who gained some big yards in the second half Demetrius Lindsey, Brandon Nichols and Dequon Simmons. Lindsey gained 95 yards and scored two touchdowns. Nichols gained 72 yards on three carries and scored twice. Simmons gained 101 yards and scored once. Klees also praised freshman running back Monterious Loggins and quarter back Caleb Stephens. They also ran the ball very well. The War Eagles continued to suffer injuries: guard Brett Buckridge was hurt on the last play of the game. Dalton Norman suffered a knee injury and will likely join twin brother Dillon Norman as out for the year. And Brandon Nichols, who electrified with his running to ll in for Dillon Norman has been sick with the u. Klees was hopeful he could recover by Friday night. UP NEXT: GODBY AGAIN Facing district rival Godby Cougars for the second time this year, Klees warned: Theyre gonna make some adjustments especially because defensively we did some things that hurt them. He also expected that his War Eagles would be different if only because of going with different players because of injury. Klees was hopeful that safety Mikal Cromartie and lineman John Cole would be well enough to play against Godby. The Lords been good to us and the kids have been challenged and come through it, he said. KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTOS BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDequon Simmons, above, stumbles on a hard run on his way to a 100-yard game. Receiver Jordan Franks, left, with the ball. The scoreboard at the end of the game showing the 42-19 nal score.

PAGE 25

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 21, 2012 Page 5BBy TIM LINAFELTWith its goal of an ACC Atlantic Division title achieved, the Florida State Seminoles can now focus their efforts on another preseason goal: the unof cial state championship that would come with a win over the Florida Gators next week at Doak Campbell Stadium (3:30, ABC). This years FSU-UF matchup could carry the rivalrys heaviest national signi cance in years. Both schools are ranked in the Top Ten of the BCS standings, both carry identical 10-1 records and both are hoping that an impressive win over the other might potentially vault them back into the national championship conversation. Its the rst time the Seminoles and Gators will meet with each school having just one loss since 2000, when Florida State was ranked No. 3 and UF No. 4. FSU won that contest, 30-7, and went on to play in its fourth national championship game in ve seasons. Its a big game and a very important one, said FSU quarterback EJ Manuel, who owns a 1-1 record against Florida. Were both 10-1 and we just need to play our game. They have a great defense, but that one they had when I was a redshirt freshman was pretty good too. We just have to stay focused. Manuel was referring to the 2009 meeting, when, as a redshirt freshman, he started for the injured Christian Ponder. That was also the last time that Florida beat Florida State, capping off a streak of six straight UF victories. Florida State meanwhile, will be going for its third straight win over the Gators, a 3-0 record over UF for Jimbo Fisher and 6-0 record over in-state rivals Florida and Miami during Fishers tenure. Thats why you come to Florida State, to play in a game against a school with the history and tradition of Florida, Fisher said. Those are the rivalry games that you take pride in. Its a very important game for them and us. If they were 1-10 and we were 1-10 it would be a very important game. Its one of the great rivalries in college football. FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M No game. #4 Florida at #10 Florida State Saturday, Nov. 24 at 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ABC. Wide receiver Rashad Greene takes it into the end zone for a touchdown. PHOTO BY BILL BRIDE/OSCEOLA UF No. 4 in UF No. 4 in BCS, back BCS, back in title race in title raceBy THOMAS GOLDKAMPGatorbait.net writerOne night after wild upsets rocked the college football world, the Florida Gators found themselves even closer to being back on top of it. The Gators checked in at No. 4 in the BCS Standings unveiled Sunday night. Florida coach Will Muschamp had a lot to cheer about over the weekend, as the Gators took care of business with a win and vaulted up the BCS standings. Even better, at least one of the teams in front of Florida must lose, with No. 2 Alabama and No. 3 Georgia set to meet in the SEC Championship Game in two weeks. That puts the Gators in position to potentially play for a national title if just one more upset goes its way -and, of course, Florida takes care of business against No. 10 Florida State in Tallahassee next weekend. Florida needs No. 1 Notre Dame to lose. And theres only one more chance for the Irish to do so: against a likely Matt Barkley-less USC team coached by Lane Kif n. If Notre Dame does lose, theres still a slim chance Florida misses out on the title game. The Gators checked in at No. 5 in the Harris Poll and No. 6 in the Coaches Poll on Sunday, the polls that make up two-thirds of the BCS. Florida ranks much better in the computers, at No. 2, behind only the Irish. Should Notre Dame lose and Florida win next weekend, the Gators would be virtually assured of the No. 1 computer ranking in the nal BCS standings. But what the human voters do with Florida is another story. In the Harris Poll, Florida still sits one spot behind No. 4 Oregon. The Gators will likely move past the SEC title game loser (No. 2 Alabama or No. 3 Georgia). But will Harris Poll voters drop No. 1 Notre Dame past Florida with a loss to USC, especially if its, say, a tight loss in overtime like Oregons? Thats up for debate, particularly with fans and media grumbling about the possibility of another all-SEC title game. The same is true in the Coaches Poll, where Florida sits at No. 6, also behind No. 4 Oregon and No. 5 Florida State. The Gators will be in virtually the exact same position as the Coaches Poll, vaulting past FSU with a win but still not sure if theyd make it past Notre Dame. In all probability, the Gators jump the Irish with a win over Florida State and a Notre Dame loss. Oregon could be the bigger threat, though. The Ducks watched their computer ranking tumble to No. 7 after slipping to Stanford. But assuming Oregon takes care of business and beats Oregon State in its season nale, the Ducks will be no worse than No. 3 in the human polls. If Notre Dame falls, the voters will likely have Oregon at No. 2, meaning it would be a battle of numbers between Florida and Oregon for the allimportant No. 2 spot in the BCS. Florida also needs to hope Oregon doesnt sneak its way into the Pac12 title game, a chance to pick up another big win. The Ducks can get into the Pac-12 championship game with a UCLA win over Stanford this weekend. The extra game would give Oregon an added boost in the computers, which for now, are certainly on Floridas side. The voters, on the other hand, are already rmly in the Ducks corner. I dont really worry about the perception of what might be out there, coach Will Muschamp said Monday. Unfortunately, in our profession, sometimes perception becomes reality. I dont apologize for being 3-1 (against the BCS Top 10) and the only team in the BCS Top 10 that has that record and a better record than anyone else and has a tougher schedule than anyone else in the country. The problem for Florida right now is that the perception of the Gators is not kind. Muschamps team plays an ugly brand of football, while the Ducks dazzle voters with a high- ying offense. Muschamp and the Gators wont want to be shy about campaigning at this point. They might very well need the help, despite having the most impressive resume in the country.FSU turns focus to Gators Like us on newsThe Wakulla 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Managemen Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. G G Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Joint and Muscle soreness Arthritis Back aches THG-12902 FL Seniors Now Qualify for FREE Easy-to-Use Mobile Phone A new statewide program offers a free mobile phone for those 55 and older. Seniors are now entitled to a free mobile phone with built in help button. These phones are designed for seniors and have a huge display & large dial buttons & feature a one-touch panic button that will notify first responders and up to four friends if you have an emergency. No contracts, no credit checks, no pers onal information required. Call our toll-free 24-hour info line for details. Credit card required for activation. 1-888-670-3103 Ma n a t e e T i m e s Adversing Networks of Florida Statewide advertisingone low price Reach a wide audience (866)742-1373

PAGE 26

Ever wonder why the birds we mostly eat have white and dark meat too? When gallinatious birds (those grain eaters like chickens and our Thanksgiving turkey) take off, the energy used to get the bird off the ground, comes directly from the muscle. This is why our Bobwhite quail and turkeys only y for short distances. They take off with a roar, then set their wings, and glide to a landing, as far from a predator as possible. But if the predator is fast, and ushes them again before the ight muscles get replenished with blood-energy, then after about three flushes, the bird hasnt the energy to get airborne again! On the other hand, a turkey can run and run, if they need, because those leg muscles are supplied with energy, mostly drawn from reserves (stored fat) during emergencies, and the veins are bigger to allow for lots of energy rich blood to keep the muscles like the Duracell batteries going and going. So the leg muscles are dark due to the veins, and larger amounts of blood, while the breast muscles are lighter in coloration due to the lack of blood. Now a hummingbird would be just the opposite, because they beat their wings hundreds of beats per second, their breast meat is extremely dark while the leg meat is very light for their legs are used only for perching. On the other hand a duck/goose swims for hours and ies during migration for hours and hours, so their meat is dark all through. Got it? If we ew, the muscles in our arms (serving as wings) would be pulled up with our back muscles, and down with our chest muscles, right? But, birds are set up differently. Both their raising muscles and lowering muscles of the wings are attached to that big breast bone. If you think about it there are no muscles hardly on the back of a chicken. So you have both flight muscles attached to the breast bone. The main mass of muscle is to pull the wing down and it is attached to the wing as wed figure, but the muscle that raises the wing has tendons going up through the shoulder, and over the base of the wing bone, to lift the wing for the next down stroke. As a bird ies these two muscle masses alternate contracting, resulting in a heat build up and friction, and so birds have developed hollow ight bones, and air sacs (seven to nine, roughly) to keep the bird from overheating. Theyve also got no teeth, which means they dont have teeth weight, plus the jawbones to hold the teeth, nor the muscles needed to chew with. So enjoy your Thanksgiving and your white and dark steamed turkey too.Editors Note: This column originally appeared in 2010. Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors Thank You for 5 Years In A Row Readers Choice 2009 Readers Choice 2008 Readers Choice 2010 Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice 2012 24 HR EMERGENCY SERVICEEstablished 2000 KAYAKS CHRISTMAS SALE6527 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 at the Wakulla River & Hwy. 982013 Kayaks Just Arrived!~2012 Kayaks Deeply Discounted~T~n~T Hide-a-way, Inc.850-925-6412Gift Certicates Available for Eco-Tours, Kayak Fishing and Rentals www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service This report represents some events the FWC handled in the Northwest Region the week of Nov. 9 through 15. GADSDEN COUNTY: Of cer Benjamin Johnson worked complaints at the Little River area, which involved the taking of over the limit and undersized striped bass and speckled perch. Fishing activity was very heavy. Johnson located two individuals in possession of the undersized perch and undersized bass and issued citations to both individuals. BAY COUNTY: Of cers on patrol in St. Andrews Bay inspected a commercial shing vessel. The captain of the vessel was charged for possession of reef sh not maintained or landed in whole condition.From the NWTF Here are some tips from the National Wild Turkey Federation to consider when youre in the woods this fall: Know your states hunting regulations and follow them. Keep your rearm pointed in a safe direction, and leave the safety on until you are ready to shoot. Positively identify your target, and know what is beyond your target before you shoot. Avoid wearing white, red, black or blue since these are the colors of a gobblers head and body. Select a spot that is in open timber rather than thick brush. Eliminating movement and camou age is more critical to success than heavy cover. Sit against a large stump, blow-down, tree trunk or rock that is wider than your shoulders and higher than your head when calling wild turkeys. If you imitate the sound of a gobbling turkey, you could call in other hunters. You should always be cautious, but especially when hunting public land. Leave the area if you suspect theres another hunter already working the same bird.Some tips for safe turkey huntingFWC OperationsWakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHWhere the white and dark meat on that turkey comes from THE END If your deer season is winding down and you still havent taken that big buck, dont give up. Here are some things you can try to take that buck of a lifetime at the end of the season. *Dont hunt where anybody else has hunted. *Dont hunt at times when everyone else has or is hunting. *Use strategies no one else has tried. *Move your stand to places neither you or anyone else has ever hunted. *Now is also the time to get right into that bedding area youve been avoiding all season. It still wont be easy, but trying these tactics could result in the buck youve always dreamed about. Jim Ryan is a Member of the RedHead Pro Hunting Team For more tips, log onto basspro.com and click on the OutdoorSite LibraryDONT QUITMost hunters quit hunting after the peak of the rut because they think they no longer have a chance for a big buck. What they dont know is bucks still seek ready-to-breed does for weeks after the peak rut. Does that werent bred during the peak will come into estrus about a month later and bucks will be looking for them. During the post rut, focus on food because thats where the does will be. Dominant bucks are extremely wary and often nocturnal so get in your stand an hour before first light. In the afternoon, stay in your stand until the last second of shooting hours. Remember that post rut bucks will be jumpy, very cautious and alert to every smell and sound, but they arent invincible. NASCAR driver Tony Stewart is an avid outdoorsman For more tips, log onto basspro.com and click on the OutdoorSite Library Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

PAGE 27

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 7Ba peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & ExteriorTogether We Are Providing Employment for Local CraftsmanFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS Where the 8CR Begins in the East the area of responsibility for Flotilla 12 Apalachee Bay. Roughly 100 miles of coastline, give or take, lie between the Econ na River in Lamont and the West Pass at St. George Island. This is the area of responsibility for Flotilla 12. The closest Active Duty station is located in Panama City, 130 miles from the Econfina River and 75 Miles from St. George by land. Those who have been involved in the Coast Guard Auxiliary know the story, but many do not. Flotilla 13 Shell Point was the original otilla in our area for many years. However, due to the expanding popularity of the area and increased boat traffic and need to cover more area, Flotilla 12 St. Marks branched off in 1988. Two founding members John Champion and Don Gilbert worked with many others to build the otilla we know today. Over the last 24 years, we have faced several challenges, experienced many successes and seen many members come and go. The place we call home has changed more times than any of us would like. What has not changed is the dedication of the otilla to provide a service to the community so many of us also call home. Our success is not without the support of many local organizations. In more recent years, we have become involved in monitoring for red tide in our waters in addition to our safety patrols. Public education and public affairs have remained a focus throughout our existence as well. One of our major outreach events the last six years has been the Florida State University Fly-over. In this event we bring together support from our local otilla, Station Panama City and Air Training Center Mobile. Through all or various activities, we also have representation across the division and district. Our members have served in elected as well as appointed positions. Through all of this work, in the past 10-plus years, the otilla has provided over 67,000 hours of support to the Coast Guard in our various activities including administrative support, safety patrols, public affairs and public education. As other otillas have faced challenges they were unable to overcome, we have merged and assumed responsibility for an increased coastline. In 2012, we became Flotilla 12 Apalachee Bay to more accurately re ect who we represent and the area we serve. We have been, and always hope to be Semper Paratus. We are thankful to The Wakulla News for allowing us to run this article each week. Wakulla County has been reading about the Auxiliary since 1974 when Sherrie Alverson began writing for the local paper. The members of Flotilla 12 wish each and every reader a very happy, healthy and enjoyable Thanksgiving. Greatness is not where we stand, but in what direction we are moving... We must sail, sometimes with the wind, sometimes against it, but sail we must, and not drift nor lie at anchor. Oliver Wendell Holmes Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12 Apalachee Bay:PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA group of Auxiliarists at the dock, left. Auxiliarists Bob Asztaltos and Duane Treadon, right, collect water samples to test for red tide. What brings tourists. Every year my staff and I travel to the Diving Equipment Manufacturing Association (DEMA). We then drive on to visit suppliers all the way up to Washington. Thousands of dive operations stores, travel destinations, manufacturers, environmental groups and training agencies all converge to inspect each other and promote their cause. Their displays ll a convention center for four days, spilling into the night with after hour meetings brokering deals and generally moving the industry forward. We attend to learn, to decide on new products for next year, and network with the many friends that build up over the years. This year we were bombarded with the disbelief that Wakulla Springs would remain closed to diving. Many told us they were altering their plans to go elsewhere and wished us well. We investigated travel options to move our customers to other diving destinations with greater visions of prosperity. We have also expanded into other income revenue opportunities such as expanding our hydrostatic retesting capability, Underwater Crime Scene Investigation technology, and of course new rebreathers. There are many places to put investment funds. Then we stumbled upon the display shown above and marveled at their audacity! It seems for years, at a site just three and a half hours drive south of Wakulla, a community created a dive destination. They are now advertising nationally at the DEMA, about a place where divers and manatees can swim together. Just that feature alone attracts thousands of tourists who spend millions of dollars in a small community. This easily justi es paying for this expensive display booth at DEMA. We congratulated them for their courage and insight. Because their manatee became so valuable, the community protects and supports all of the systems that surround the attraction. Just like the hunting associations that provide more resources to promote the animals they harvest to maintain a healthier stock, the manatee at this dive destination are protected by much more than a regulation. As a result the community is rewarded with jobs and prosperity. Why cant we share? A booth featuring a site in Florida where divers and manatees can swim together, at the Diving Equipment Manufacturing Association (DEMA) show. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton GREGG STANTON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Nov 22, 12 Fri Nov 23, 12 Sat Nov 24, 12 Sun Nov 25, 12 Mon Nov 26, 12 Tue Nov 27, 12 Wed Nov 28, 12 D ate 3.4 ft. 12:18 AM 3.4 ft. 12:50 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 3:24 AM 0.6 ft. 4:34 AM 0.2 ft. 5:27 AM -0.1 ft. 6:10 AM -0.3 ft. 6:49 AM -0.4 ft. 7:25 AM -0.4 ft. 7:59 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 10:00 AM 2.7 ft. 11:10 AM 2.8 ft. 12:01 PM 3.0 ft. 12:42 PM 3.1 ft. 1:18 PM 3.1 ft. 1:52 PM 3.2 ft. 2:25 PM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 3:30 PM 1.5 ft. 4:25 PM 1.5 ft. 5:11 PM 1.5 ft. 5:51 PM 1.4 ft. 6:27 PM 1.4 ft. 7:01 PM 1.3 ft. 7:36 PM L ow 2.9 ft. 9:40 PM 3.1 ft. 10:27 PM 3.2 ft. 11:08 PM 3.3 ft. 11:44 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 22, 12 Fri Nov 23, 12 Sat Nov 24, 12 Sun Nov 25, 12 Mon Nov 26, 12 Tue Nov 27, 12 Wed Nov 28, 12 D ate 2.5 ft. 12:10 AM 2.6 ft. 12:42 AM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 3:35 AM 0.4 ft. 4:45 AM 0.2 ft. 5:38 AM -0.0 ft. 6:21 AM -0.2 ft. 7:00 AM -0.3 ft. 7:36 AM -0.3 ft. 8:10 AM L ow 1.9 ft. 9:52 AM 2.0 ft. 11:02 AM 2.1 ft. 11:53 AM 2.2 ft. 12:34 PM 2.3 ft. 1:10 PM 2.4 ft. 1:44 PM 2.4 ft. 2:17 PM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 3:41 PM 1.1 ft. 4:36 PM 1.1 ft. 5:22 PM 1.1 ft. 6:02 PM 1.0 ft. 6:38 PM 1.0 ft. 7:12 PM 0.9 ft. 7:47 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 9:32 PM 2.3 ft. 10:19 PM 2.4 ft. 11:00 PM 2.5 ft. 11:36 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 22, 12 Fri Nov 23, 12 Sat Nov 24, 12 Sun Nov 25, 12 Mon Nov 26, 12 Tue Nov 27, 12 Wed Nov 28, 12 D ate 3.1 ft. 12:20 AM 3.2 ft. 12:54 AM 3.2 ft. 1:26 AM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 4:28 AM 0.5 ft. 5:38 AM 0.2 ft. 6:31 AM -0.1 ft. 7:14 AM -0.2 ft. 7:53 AM -0.3 ft. 8:29 AM -0.4 ft. 9:03 AM L ow 2.4 ft. 10:36 AM 2.5 ft. 11:46 AM 2.6 ft. 12:37 PM 2.8 ft. 1:18 PM 2.9 ft. 1:54 PM 2.9 ft. 2:28 PM 3.0 ft. 3:01 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 4:34 PM 1.3 ft. 5:29 PM 1.4 ft. 6:15 PM 1.4 ft. 6:55 PM 1.3 ft. 7:31 PM 1.2 ft. 8:05 PM 1.2 ft. 8:40 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 10:16 PM 2.9 ft. 11:03 PM 3.0 ft. 11:44 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 22, 12 Fri Nov 23, 12 Sat Nov 24, 12 Sun Nov 25, 12 Mon Nov 26, 12 Tue Nov 27, 12 Wed Nov 28, 12 D ate 2.6 ft. 12:02 AM 2.7 ft. 12:34 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 3:03 AM 0.6 ft. 4:13 AM 0.2 ft. 5:06 AM -0.1 ft. 5:49 AM -0.2 ft. 6:28 AM -0.4 ft. 7:04 AM -0.4 ft. 7:38 AM L ow 2.0 ft. 9:44 AM 2.1 ft. 10:54 AM 2.2 ft. 11:45 AM 2.3 ft. 12:26 PM 2.4 ft. 1:02 PM 2.4 ft. 1:36 PM 2.5 ft. 2:09 PM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 3:09 PM 1.4 ft. 4:04 PM 1.5 ft. 4:50 PM 1.5 ft. 5:30 PM 1.4 ft. 6:06 PM 1.3 ft. 6:40 PM 1.3 ft. 7:15 PM L ow 2.3 ft. 9:24 PM 2.4 ft. 10:11 PM 2.5 ft. 10:52 PM 2.6 ft. 11:28 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 22, 12 Fri Nov 23, 12 Sat Nov 24, 12 Sun Nov 25, 12 Mon Nov 26, 12 Tue Nov 27, 12 Wed Nov 28, 12 D ate 3.5 ft. 12:15 AM 3.5 ft. 12:47 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 3:21 AM 0.6 ft. 4:31 AM 0.2 ft. 5:24 AM -0.1 ft. 6:07 AM -0.3 ft. 6:46 AM -0.4 ft. 7:22 AM -0.4 ft. 7:56 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 9:57 AM 2.8 ft. 11:07 AM 2.9 ft. 11:58 AM 3.0 ft. 12:39 PM 3.1 ft. 1:15 PM 3.2 ft. 1:49 PM 3.2 ft. 2:22 PM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 3:27 PM 1.6 ft. 4:22 PM 1.6 ft. 5:08 PM 1.6 ft. 5:48 PM 1.5 ft. 6:24 PM 1.5 ft. 6:58 PM 1.4 ft. 7:33 PM L ow 3.0 ft. 9:37 PM 3.1 ft. 10:24 PM 3.3 ft. 11:05 PM 3.4 ft. 11:41 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 22, 12 Fri Nov 23, 12 Sat Nov 24, 12 Sun Nov 25, 12 Mon Nov 26, 12 Tue Nov 27, 12 Wed Nov 28, 12 D ate Hi g h 0.7 ft. 3:03 AM 0.3 ft. 4:04 AM 0.0 ft. 4:55 AM -0.2 ft. 5:41 AM -0.4 ft. 6:22 AM -0.4 ft. 7:00 AM -0.5 ft. 7:35 AM L ow 1.8 ft. 9:41 AM 1.9 ft. 11:36 AM 2.0 ft. 12:55 PM 2.2 ft. 1:52 PM 2.3 ft. 2:38 PM 2.3 ft. 3:16 PM 2.3 ft. 3:49 PM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 2:42 PM 1.2 ft. 3:32 PM 1.4 ft. 4:19 PM 1.5 ft. 5:03 PM 1.6 ft. 5:43 PM 1.6 ft. 6:19 PM 1.6 ft. 6:53 PM L ow 2.4 ft. 9:15 PM 2.5 ft. 9:42 PM 2.6 ft. 10:10 PM 2.6 ft. 10:38 PM 2.7 ft. 11:09 PM 2.7 ft. 11:41 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 22 Nov. 28First Nov. 20 Full Nov. 28 Last Dec. 6 New Dec. 12Major Times 7:59 AM 9:59 AM 8:21 PM 10:21 PM Minor Times 1:48 AM 2:48 AM 2:03 PM 3:03 PM Major Times 8:43 AM 10:43 AM 9:05 PM 11:05 PM Minor Times 2:43 AM 3:43 AM 2:36 PM 3:36 PM Major Times 9:27 AM 11:27 AM 9:49 PM 11:49 PM Minor Times 3:37 AM 4:37 AM 3:10 PM 4:10 PM Major Times 10:11 AM 12:11 PM 10:34 PM 12:34 AM Minor Times 4:31 AM 5:31 AM 3:46 PM 4:46 PM Major Times 10:57 AM 12:57 PM 11:20 PM 1:20 AM Minor Times 5:25 AM 6:25 AM 4:24 PM 5:24 PM Major Times --:---:-11:44 AM 1:44 PM Minor Times 6:17 AM 7:17 AM 5:06 PM 6:06 PM Major Times 12:07 AM 2:07 AM 12:31 PM 2:31 PM Minor Times 7:09 AM 8:09 AM 5:51 PM 6:51 PM Average+ Average Average Good Better Best Best7:08 am 5:38 pm 2:03 pm 1:49 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:09 am 5:37 pm 2:37 pm 2:44 am 7:10 am 5:37 pm 3:11 pm 3:38 am 7:11 am 5:37 pm 3:47 pm 4:32 am 7:11 am 5:37 pm 4:25 pm 5:26 am 7:12 am 5:37 pm 5:07 pm 6:19 am 7:13 am 5:36 pm 5:52 pm 7:10 am61% 68% 74% 80% 86% 92% 98% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

PAGE 28

Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor 000CV38 -Janet By DAVID WHITE Thanksgiving strikes fear in just about every host. Preparing a giant bird is a herculean task. Cooking gravy, stuf ng, and cranberry sauce is always more complicated than expected. Then theres the anxiety of any family gathering -will politics or off-color jokes derail the dinner? Add wine to the list of things to worry about, and its no wonder why so many wonderful at-home chefs dread the holiday. Keep calm. With wine, at least, theres no need to stress. First, buy American. While I typically avoid jingoism, purchasing a foreign wine on Thanksgiving just doesnt seem right. So when you head to the store, embrace your patriotism and pick up something domestic. And dont hesitate to buy local. The Pilgrims didnt import their turkey from a faraway land. Second, follow the strategy of San Francisco Chronicle wine editor Jon Bonn, who advises his readers to select a roster of three wines one white, one red, and one sparkling. Anything beyond three wines creates needless confusion. Thanksgiving already causes enough headaches the last thing you need is a guest asking which red matches the stuf ng or which white goes better with the sweet potatoes. So keep it simple and let guests drink whichever wine they prefer. Youll also want to make sure you select wines with power and nesse. This is easier than it sounds. A simple Pinot Grigio, for example, isnt a powerful wine so wont stand up to mashed potatoes and gravy. Equally important, an in-your-face Cabernet Sauvignon lacks nesse, so will smother your food. Look for refreshing wines with body. For the sparkler, this means avoiding bottles that are too sweet look for brut or extra brut on the label. Old standbys like Domaine Chandon are better than ever before, and these days, there are some exciting sparklers coming from states outside California. If you can nd them, consider Gruet from New Mexico, Thibaut Janisson from Virginia, or Argyle from Oregon. For the white wine, remember to look for body. Bold Chardonnays work well with turkey and can cut through just about every component of your meal -from sweet avors like cinnamon to the bitterness of green vegetables. If youre looking for something a bit unusual, consider a Riesling, either dry or slightly sweet. New York has been producing high quality Riesling for more than 30 years, ever since German immigrant Hermann Weimer discovered that the cool climate and gravelly soils of the Finger Lakes were similar to his familys vineyards in the Mosel Valley. Producers in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Michigan are also making some stunning Riesling. White wines inspired by Frances Rhone Valley also make for a good match on Thanksgiving. Look for Viognier, Marsanne, Roussanne, or a blend with those grapes. With reds, think refreshment. This means avoiding wines with lots of tannin, so steer clear of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Malbec. It also means nding a wine with vibrant acidity, so avoid anything described as heavy or full-bodied. Pinot Noir is the most popular choice on Thanksgiving, but its dif cult to nd good one for less than $20. Thats why cool-climate Syrah or Grenache is a better bet. Both are fruity enough to satisfy the guests who like big reds, and elegant enough to handle the cornucopia of Thanksgiving. Just be sure to nd one from a cool-climate region like Washington or Californias coastal regions. Anything from a warm climate could overpower your food. If youre looking for something a bit unusual, consider a Blaufrankisch, Austrias signature red wine. Its similar in pro le to Pinot Noir, but generally a darker and spicier. New Yorks Red Tail Ridge makes one thats worth nding. Gamay Noir, the grape of Beaujolais, is also a good match. A few producers in Oregon, California, and New York are making delightful wines from this grape. Finally, and most importantly, have lots of wine on hand!David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet.Simplify wines on anksgiving WHITES WINES Family owned and operated boarding facility with over 10 years experience and a veterinary technician on-site. Indoor and outdoor boarding facilities for dogs small and large, cats and birds. Large and secure play areas with hands-on attention daily and friendly service we are sure to accommodate your needs. Whether you and your family are going on vacation, an extended stay or just away for the day, we are here for you. No duration is too long or short and our rates cant be beat! Livestock care at your farm or home is available!Personal care is given to each and every animal every day. Play time is our favorite time!(We do not make breed restrictions)Proud supporter of local rescues! Stefan Pedler, Owner1886 Bloxham Cutoff Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327 www.BloxhamBoardingKennel.com (850) 597-1739

PAGE 29

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 9BBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 16 With last weeks elections quickly slipping out of the rearview mirror, the new political reality began to take hold in Tallahassee this week. House Republicans tapped a new speaker for the 2014-16 term after the defeat of their rst choice for the position. The incoming speaker for the next two years laid out some of his priorities for the session that begins in March. And both sides began to ll out the leadership teams for the policy and political battles of the next few months. Meanwhile, Republicans and Democrats began to weigh the fallout from the messy conclusion of the fall campaign, when voters were forced to stand in line for hours on end in some precincts to cast their ballots. But agreement on what caused the problem, much less how to x it, was already proving dif cult to nd. THE NEW NEW SPEAKER It was a bit anticlimactic after the GOP rallied around him over the weekend, but Republicans officially announced Monday that Rep. Steve Crisafulli of Merritt Island would take over the House after incoming Speaker Will Weatherfords term is up in late 2014. Originally scheduled to hold that position was Rep. Chris Dorworth, R-Lake Mary, who stunningly lost his bid for re-election. Even as recounts in Dorworths close race were underway, Dorworth had conceded late last week that he was likely to lose and gave his blessing to Crisafulli. I understand the weight of the responsibility that has been placed on my shoulders, and I know with the support of the House, we will set forth a bold agenda that honors Floridians over the next four years, Crisafulli said. His rst task, of course, will be to win his own reelection he led this week and to work to hold and strengthen the GOP majority that currently dominates the House. Crisafulli was one of the top overall legislative fundraisers last year, which likely played a key factor in his selection; Crisafulli has generally had a low-key term in the Legislature since being elected in 2008. WEATHERFORD LAYS OUT HIS PRIORITIES As he was settling in as speaker for the next two years, Weatherford met with reporters early in the week to set his priorities for the upcoming session. And with state revenues looking relatively stable for the rst time in years, Weatherford instead looked ahead to some of the policy battles for next session. What could be the most bruising ght of Weatherfords first session is his willingness to tackle pensions. Republicans already targeted changes to state employees retirement bene ts two years ago, which left Gov. Rick Scott dissatisfied with the results and state unions slightly more dissatisfied -leaving the latter to le a lawsuit that has moved to the Supreme Court. Weatherford said he wanted to put new employees on a 401(k)-type retirement plan, instead of the guaranteed monthly payments retirees now get from the state. That effort was one of Scotts major pension proposals that failed to gain approval in the 2011 session. It (pension costs) is a ticking time bomb in every state and in every city across the country, and its time for us to get real and do what the private sector has done, Weatherford said. But unions and Democrats, who ercely fought the 2011 law requiring workers to contribute 3 percent of their salaries toward the state retirement plan, would likely oppose the plan again. Rep. Dwayne Taylor, DDaytona Beach, said Weatherfords plan would actually jeopardize the nancial footing of the state plan by diverting employees payments into the 401(k)-style plan while the pension plan would still owe bene ts to retirees and workers entitled to the more traditional bene ts. SLOP THE VOTE Even if the election was out of sight by the end of the week, it wasnt out of mind. Civic groups, lawmakers and Gov. Rick Scott were in a race to try and prove that they were paying attention to the Election Day debacle -with some of the public officials no doubt realizing that the voters waiting in line were considering whether to keep the incumbents in of ce. Weatherford said the Legislature should be willing to look at an elections law approved in 2011 that cut back on the number of early voting days, and said that the entire system should be reviewed. Obviously, the laws that are currently on the books may not have served the state well, may not have served the process well, he said. So we have to go back, study it, get the facts, listen to the people of Florida and make a decision. Meanwhile, Scott ordered Secretary of State Ken Detzner to look for ways to avoid another asco for a state that has something of a reputation when it comes to presidential elections. Floridas election supervisors are experts in their fields and many of them demonstrated tremendous expertise in running their elections, Scott said in a statement. We want to hear their ideas. HEALTH CARE QUESTIONS State leaders were also still working through whether and how to work with the federal government on implementing the healthcare exchanges central to the federal health-care law signed by President Barack Obama in 2010. The task took on new urgency with Obamas re-election last week, which all but guaranteed the changes will take effect. Weatherford and Gaetz sent a letter to federal of- cials saying they couldnt meet a Friday deadline for saying whether the state would set up the exchanges, work with the federal government to do it or let Washington handle it. Two factors prevent immediate state action on the establishment of an exchange, the letter said. First, the Legislature has not authorized the governor or any state agency or other entity to develop and operate an exchange, and no such authority can be established until the Legislature convenes in March. Second, the state lacks sufficient information to fully evaluate the potential impact of choosing one exchange model over another. Scott sounded a slightly different note in his own letter Friday to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, asking for a meeting to discuss the states efforts to put many Medicaid recipients into managed-care organizations and the health exchanges. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott and other state leaders wrestled with how to address the states health-care law. Scott and other Republicans ercely opposed the law and hoped a potential President Mitt Romney would repeal it, but President Barack Obama won re-election last week. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Its not a good thing when its Friday, three days after the election, and every state in the country is either red or blue, (but) there is one that is yellow because they havent counted the votes. That is something we should be embarrassed by.--Incoming Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley ChapelWEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Election fallout shakes up Capitol Students from area high schools and home schools are encouraged to apply for the Talquin Electric Youth Tour which will be held February 13-14, 2013. During this tour, students will visit the House of Representatives Chambers and attend a Florida Supreme Court session with about 100 other student leaders from around the state. During this time, four students will be chosen to represent Talquin in Washington, D.C. for the National Rural Electric Youth Tour, June 15-18, 2013. The selected students y to Washington, D.C. and visit the Lincoln Memorial, Arlington National Cemetery, Mt. Vernon, and other historic sites with hundreds of other student leaders from around the nation while learning more about cooperatives and democracy. In order to qualify: Students must currently be enrolled as a junior in a local high school or home school. Students must have a parent, grandparent or close relative who is currently a Talquin Member through business or residence. Students must currently live in Talquins four- county service area. Deadline for applications is December 10, 2012. Interested students should complete the Talquin Youth Tour Application, as well as submit a letter of reference and 250 word essay entitled, Why I want to be a Talquin Electric Youth Tour Representative in 2013. Applications are available at Talquin Area Of ces, or may be found at www.talquinelectric.com under the Community/Youth Tour link. For more information, contact Kim Gay, at (850) 627-7651. Deadline to turn in applications is December 10, 2012. Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Renance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Ofce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Ofce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Ofce: 850.926.1960 213 MILL CREEK Anxious owners, will consider all offers. Great 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 1 fenced acre reduced to $122,000. 1560 square feet, spacious living room, combo kitchen/dining room. Inside utility room, large extra room could be used as 4th bedroom, ofce, or family room. Screened-in porch leads to 1 car garage. National Forest with-in walking distance! Call Lynn for more information, 5458284 141 COUNTRY CLUB DRIVE New listing! Fabulous Golf Course home close to coast, schools, & country club. 2289 square feet, 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, formal living and dining rooms. Gorgeous kitchen with SS appliances and granite countertops. Spacious family room with loads of natural sunlight. You will love the master bedroom and bath! Double car garage, in ground pool & spa. Home is located in a gated community. Call David for more information, 519-7944 Lynn Cole-Eddinger David Hoover Coastwise Realty,Inc. Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-7 Closed Sun. & Wed.

PAGE 30

Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Acres Again Agree Ahead Anything Badge Banking Calculated Cream Dairy Diving Dried EarnestEncyclopediasErase Erosion Expand Floods Gates HasteImaginationImagine Inner Laying Minds Minor Nouns Peasant Poets Pride Rains Reform Rhyme Riding Roads Safer This page sponsored in part by: Scare Senate Series Shaggy Smokes Spears Stirs Teddy There Topic Untied Waste Yards

PAGE 31

THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 11B SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEmploymentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements Lost LOSTDOG 8 yr old female Shih pzu. Wearing a pink collar with silver bones answers to Cinnamon. Lost from St Theresa beach on 11/9 (850) 545-8256 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Medical Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Professional AIRLINE CAREERS-Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Now accepting applications forEXPERIENCEDFRONT DESK ASSOCIATE Apply in person. Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites. 3292 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville (across W.H.S.). Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 WANTED: Licensed Real Estate Agents for local offices. Please Contact 850-926-7811. Trades/ Skills DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDLTraining. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 DRIVERSApply Now, 12 Drivers Needed. Top 5% Pay & Late Model Equip Guaranteed Home for Xmas. Need CDL Class ADriving Exp (877)258-8782 www .ad drivers.com DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. HOME EVERYWEEKEND! Pay 37/mi, Both ways, FULLBENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, Fl TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 General Help DRIVERS:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money DownCALL: 888-880-5911 Schools/ Instruction Can Your Dig It? Heavy Equipment School. 3wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benefits Approved. 2 National Certifications. (866)362-6497 Schools/ Instruction ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality Job placement assistance.Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call www .Centura Online.com 888-203-3179 Appliances WHIRLPOOLWASHER GE DRYER almost new, $150. ea or $250 for pair 850-745-1189 Auctions AUCTION Nov. 28th thru Dec. 1st 35 Million Dollars in Construction/ Marine Equipment & Vehicles. Detailed list @ www .henderson auctions.com (225)686-2252 Livingston, Louisiana Farm Services BUSH HOGGING ROADS GRADED GARDENS TILLED Have tractor will bush hog finish cut large acerage grade roads driveways till gardens. dbdouge@aol.com or 850-643-6283 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3B/2b SW on 3 private acres. A rated schools. Quiet neighborhood. No smoking/pets. $675 dep. & 1st mo. 1yr lease. 850-926-6766 CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 PANACEA3 bedroom. 2 bath. DWMH with large front porch. 650.00 a month. NO PETS and NO Smoking inside house. Available December 1. 850-984-1018 or 352-603-7033 Mobile Homes For Rent PANACEAClean SW 3/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $500/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 Mobile Homes For Sale Mobile Home with acreage, ready to move in, great forpets. Lots of space forthe price. 3Br 2Ba, serious offers only, no renters. (850)308-6473 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEResidential/ Commercial House for Rent in the Center of Crawfordville For More Details Call (850) 926-9782 PANACEA2 bedroom. 2 bath. 700.00 a month plus deposit lights and water. NO PETS and No Smoking inside the house. 850-984-1018 or 850-408-4030. Auctions Estates ABSOLUTE AUCTION 79+/-Bank Owned Assets in GA, NC, TN Nov. 27 @ 6pm, Lithia Springs, GA. Nov. 28 @ 6pm, Ellijay, GA. Online & Live Bidding. GAL AU-Co002594, NCAL8935, TN5733 RowellAuctions.com (800)323-8388 Citrus Hills Homes Forest Ridge Villages Updated, move in ready, 2/2/2, Private lot 352-746-0002 Waterfront Homes Coastal Cottage! DeepwaterOcean Access with boat slips only $69,900. SALE Sat 12/1. New ready to finish cottage. Prime coastal Georgia location. Gated entrance, paved roads, underground utilities. FREE water/sewertap. Historically lowest financing. Call now (866)952-5303. x 1641 Sport/Utility Vehicles JEEP97 WRANGLER 4wd 137,000mi great cond. new soft top, $3300 Call 850-926-5494 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5438-1129 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON NOVEMBER 30, 2012 at 11:00 a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: JENNIFER BABCOCK BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF NOVEMBER 30 ,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. November 22 & 29, 2012 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5436-1122 TWN Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage 11/24 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, November 24, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Marilyn Mitchell Mike Vowell Before the sale date of Saturday, November 24, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, FL November 15 & 22, 2012 Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices 5419-1115 TWN Dept. of Child Services, 09C01-1207-JT Termination of Parental Rights PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF INDIANA, COUNTY OF CASS, IN THE CASS CIRCUIT COURT Logansport, INDIANA IN THE MATTER OF THE TERMINATION OF THE PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP OF: CRISTINA SALTER, SELENA SALTER, and JOBANY SALTER, children And SERGIO SANCHEZ, father Cause No.: 09C01-1207-JT-17 Cause No. 09C01-1207-JT-18 Cause No. 09C01-1207-JT-19 SUMMONS FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION & NOTICE OF TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the above noted parent, whose whereabouts are unknown, and who is the parent of Cristina Salter (date of birth 2-2-2007), Selena Salter (date of birth 11-26-2009), and Jobany Salter (date of birth 10-22-2010) that a Petition for Involuntary Termination of your Parental Rights in the above named Children, has been filed by the Indiana Department of Child Services, Cass County Office, in the Cass County Circuit Court, and YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED TO APPEAR before the Judge of said Court at the Cass County Courthouse, second floor, in Logansport, Indiana, telephone (574) 753-7339, on the 9th day of January, 2013 at 1:00 oclock P.M. to attend an Initial hearing/Termination hearing and to answer the Petition for Termination of your Parental Rights in said Children, and YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED that if the allegations in said petition are true, and/or if you fail to appear at the hearing, the Juvenile Court may terminate your parent-child relationship; and if the court terminates your parent-child relationship you will lose all parental rights, powers, privileges, immunities, duties and obligations including any rights to custody, control, visitation, or support in said Children; and if the court terminates your parent-child relationship, it will be permanently terminated, and thereafter you may not contest an adoption or other placement of said children, and YOU ARE ENTITLED TO REPRESENTATION BY AN ATTORNEY, provided by the State if applicable, throughout these proceedings to terminate the parent-child relationship. YOU MUST RESPOND by appearing in the case in person or by attorney within thirty (30) days after the last publication of this notice, and in the event you fail to do so, an adjudication on said petition and termination of your parental rights may be entered against you without further notice. THE ATTORNEY REPRESENTING THE INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF CHILD SERVICES, is Tricia Thompson, 300 E. Broadway Street, Suite 502, Logansport, IN 46947; telephone (574)722-3677. Date this 19th day of October, 2012 Clerk of Cass County November 8, 15 & 22, 2012 Termination of Parental Rights Notices 5442-1122 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: April S. Doty Last known address of 26 Revadee Spears Rd., Crawfordville, FL32327 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 November 22, 2012 5418-1122 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201203652 TO: Russell E. Paul ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. November 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2012 4Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep 2Br 1Ba House $595mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16 .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE.CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 GOT FALLIN G LE A VES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help!Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h a a a v e e A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l t h e e M M o o o o o o d d e e e e e r r n E q q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m e n n t t to He C C C ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f t t ! PAT GR EEN S L AWN S ER VICE Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT Christmas decorations, games, toys, books, tapes, dishes, household items, small kitchen appliances, clothes, new & used items. Something for everyone! Rain or Shine Super Yard Sale Christmas Bazaar and Bake Sale First Baptist Church of Wakulla Station 945 Woodville Hwy.

PAGE 32

Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5441-1129 TWN vs. The Estate of Altamease Cole Case No. 65-2012-CA-000165 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000165 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC., TRUST 2004-WMC3, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-WMC3, Plaintiff, vs. THE ESTATE OF ALTAMEASE COLE, DECEASED, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To The Estate of Altamease Cole, Deceased 41 Tharpe Lane Crawfordville, FL 32327 : YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: Commence at a U.S. Government concrete monument and a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Lot 5 of the Hartsfield survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence runs North 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East along the North boundary of said Lot 5, a distance of 343.98 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 10 seconds East 199.94 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, thence run North 72 degrees 32 minutes 01 seconds East 190.70 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run South 17 degrees 14 minutes 40 5433-1122 TWN vs. Fedorak, Louise Case No. 2012-72-CANotice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-72-CA CENTENNIALBANK, as Successor in Interest to Wakulla Bank Plaintiff, vs. LOUISE B. FEDORAK, ET AL., CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL32327 on January 24, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: COMMENCING AT APOINT WHERE THE NORTHEASTERLYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD 372-A(100 FOOT) RIGHT OF WAYINTERSECTS THE WEST BOUNDARYOF RANGE 1 WEST, SAID POINT BEING 274.32 FEET NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST AND CONTINUE NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARYOF SAID RANGE 1 WEST 314.69 FEET TO ALIGHTWOOD HUB APPROXIMATELYIN THE CENTER OF THE OLD RAKER FISHERYROAD, NOW ABANDONED, THENCE ALONG THE APPROXIMATE CENTER OF SAID ROAD AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 34 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 378.81 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 417.03 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 383.5 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 147.83 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE SOUTH 41 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 296.45 FEET TO THE NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT OF WAYLIMITS OF STATE ROAD 372-A, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 595.73 FEET ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYLIMITS TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 250.75 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 59.4 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 383.5 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 147.83 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID LAND IN AN UNNUMBERED LOT OF HARTSFIELD SURVEYEAST OF THE WEST BOUNDARYLINE OF RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. MORE RECENTLYDESCRIBED BYSURVEYPREPARED BYJAMES THURMAN RODDENBERRYPROFESSIONALLAND SURVEYOR DATED MARCH 14, 2000 JOB #00.142 AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 372-A(BOTTOMS ROAD) WITH THE WESTERLY BOUNDARYOF RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT LYING NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 274.32 FEET FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 314.69 FEET TO AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 373.54 FEET TO APOINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 422.56 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 383.56 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 150.51 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 41 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 297.65 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE LYING ON THE NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF BOTTOMS READ (STATE ROAD NO. 372-A), THENCE RUN NORTH 47 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY594.15 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 250.34 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 59.42 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 383.56 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 150.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Date: October 31, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By:/s/Desiree Willis, Deputy Clerk Wakulla County November 22 & 29, 2012 5426-1122 TWN vs. Keller, Judy Case No. 652008CA000158 Foreclosure IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA000158 DIVISION: THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE CWABS, INC., ASSETBACK CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1 Plaintiff, vs. JUDYGARNETKELLER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 1, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000158 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE CWABS, INC., ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1 is the Plaintiff and JUDYGARNETKELLER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDYGARNETKELLER N/K/AFRANK KELLER N/K/AFRANK KELLER; TENANT#1 N/K/AJESSICAKELLER N/K/AJESSICAKELLER are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 13th day of December, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 6, BLOCK D, HIGHLAND PLACE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A100 MULBERRYCIRCLE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the prop5431-1122 TWN Vs. Waltman, Mary, Case #12-187-CA, Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE # 12-187-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. MARY WALTMAN; RANDAL L. WALTMAN, SR., et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, entered in Case No. 12-187-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and MARY WALTMAN; RANDAL L. WALTMAN, SR, wife and husband, UNKNOWN TENANT, AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 at 11:00 oclock a.m. on January 24, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Partial Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: SEE EXHIBIT A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days of the sale. DATED this 31st day of October, 2012 BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A WEST HALF OF LOT 3, WOODVILLE SOUTH UNIT II (Unrecorded) Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 9, Block C of Woodville South, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, page 31 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 89 degrees 44 minutes 21 seconds East along the Southerly boundary of said subdivision 1382.32 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNINING. From said POINT OF BEGINNINING continue South 44 minutes 21 seconds East along said Southerly boundary 455.00 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 24 minutes 21 seconds West 240.00 feet to the centerline of a 60.00 foot roadway easement (J & K Lane), thence run North 89 degrees 44 minutes 21 seconds West along said centerline 455.00 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 24 minutes 21 seconds East 240.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Subject to a roadway and utility easement over and across the Southerly 30.00 feet thereof TOGETHER WITH THAT 1994 SPRl MOBILE HOME BEARING TITLE NUMBERS 66731385 AND 66731386 AND VIN # CLFL46396A AND CLFL46396B RESPECTIVELY November 15 & 22, 2012 5432-1122 TWN Vs. Hale, Troy Case No: 09000038CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 09000038CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. TROYA. HALE; KARAS. HALE; UNKNOWN TEANANT#I; UNKNOWN TENANT#2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 17th day of January, 2013, at 11:00 oclock A.M. at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: LOTS 4 & 5, BLOCK WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT III, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA Amobile home with VIN number FLHMBFP119543999Aand FLHMBFP119543999B sits on the property. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 30th day of October, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904) 926-0905. not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk jNovember 15 & 22, 2012 5432-1122 5427-1122 TWN Vs. Nelson, Buddy 65-2010-CA-000035-CA-XXXX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000035-CA-XXXX BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANY Plaintiff(s) vs. BUDDYE. NELSON, et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000035-CA-XXXX of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANYis the Plaintiff and are BUDDYE. NELSON; SHERRYA. NELSON; WACHOVIABANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION; THE FARM HONEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. and JOHN DOE N/K/AROBERTNELSON the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 24th day of January, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 1, Clock B, THE FARM SUBDIVISION, Phase I, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Pages 93-98 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. and commonly known as: 106 PIMLICO DR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLO 32327 IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANYREMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida this 31st day of October, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk, WAKULLACounty, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, WAKULLACounty, WAKULLA COUNTYCLERK OF COURT, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL, 32327 -County Phone: 850-926-0905 TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. November 15 & 22, 2012 864242.000187FMT seconds East 200.47 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run South 72 degrees 36 minutes 25 seconds West 190.71 feet to a 3 inch concrete monument (marked # 2919), thence run North 17 degrees 14 minutes 28 seconds West 200.22 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.88 of an acre, more or less. SUBJECT TO an access easement over and across the Westerly 10.00 feet thereof., commonly known as: 41 Tharpe Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jacob A. Thomas, c/o Johnson & Freedman, LLC, the Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 400 Northridge Road, Suite 1100 M/S 27, Sandy Springs, Georgia 30350, within 30 days after the first publication date: November 22, 2012 and file the original with the Clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED: November 6, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond as Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy November 22 & 29, 2012 erty owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on November 1, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. November 15 & 22, 2012 F08051683 Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/3BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 3BR/1BA New carpet throughout $590 mo. No Pets, No Smoking BRGAPPRAISAL Call us for all of your appraisal needs 850.926.8777 Serving Leon, Franklin and Wakulla Counties A New Level of Service!!!Visit us for all of your real estate needs Do business with agents that are on the cutting edge of technology. Like us on Follow us on

PAGE 33

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 13B 1 14 17 20 23 36 40 43 53 58 61 64 2 32 54 3 33 55 4 26 44 47 24 48 5 15 18 21 37 41 45 6 34 59 62 65 7 27 56 8 25 49 19 22 46 9 16 38 42 10 28 39 57 60 63 66 11 29 35 50 12 30 51 13 31 52 ACROSS 1. Hotfooted it 5. Drink with a burger and fries 9. Catcher's posture 14. "Take one" 15. Hertz rival 16. The silent Marx 17. Molecule part 18. Dirty campaigner 20. Carpenter's groove 21. Mahmoud Abbas's org. 22. Main line 23. Winning candidate 25. Kofi __ Annan 26. Part of Roy G. Biv 27. "__ Maria" 28. Zero-star fare 32. Le Sage's "Gil __" 34. Bad day for Caesar 35. Have a tab 36. Memorable Jackie Gleason character 40. Pub serving 41. An army NCO 42. Hammer end 43. An jou relative 45. Clamp shape 46. Poseidon's realm 47. __ Bator, Mongolia 49. Less lenient 53. Idolizer 56. __ Na Na 57. Gun barrel diameter 58. Bit of Web programming 60. Abba of Israel 61. NY Yankees and Chi. White Sox 62. Garb for a judge 63. Designer Schiaparelli 64. Taylor of "The Nanny" 65. "Zounds!" 66. Fiddler's tuneDOWN1. What elms provide 2. Flower part 3. Chip away at 4. FDR, but not TR 5. Pitched a tent 6. Immature seed 7. Italian island resort 8. Braying beast 9. Gambler's loss, figuratively 10. Airline to down under 11. Hankering 12. Takeoff artist 13. British sympathizer of 1776 19Mostrecent 24. New Ager John 25. Turn aside 27. "Waste not, want not," e.g. 29. Prospector's find 30. "The Virginian" author Wister 31. __ capita income 32. String tie 33. Cask dregs 34. "Peer Gynt" playwright 36. Sharp left from Ali 37. Steep slope 38. Blunted blade 39. Weak brew 44. Arrow poison 46. Declared as fact 48. Car shopper's option 49. Biblical queendom 50. Duke or earl 51. Rub out 52. Kidney-related 53. Not quite shut 54. Chip' s chipmunk chum 55. Bakery fixture 56. Plod along 59. PostoppositeAmerican Prole Hometown Content 11/18/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 12 345 6217 81 57 62 92 2543 65 8639 41826 2009 HometownContent 182 3794 6 5 369254187 745861329 573 486912 614932578 298517643 927 645831 856123794 431798256 S H A D E J A B A J A R P E T A L B O L O D A L E E R O D E L E E S O V E N D E M O C R A T C U R A R E T E S H L E A S E C A M P E D E S C A R P O V U L E I B S E N P R E L I D O A D A G E S L O G A S S A V E R T S H E B A L A T E S T S T A T E D S H I R T E P E E Q A N T A S N E A R B E E R U R G E L O D E N O B L E A P E R O W E N E R A S E T O R Y P E R R E N A L Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5425-1122 TWN Estate of Chuley, Tracy File No. 12-97-CP Notice of Administration PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 12-97-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF TRACY CANDICE CHULEY Deceased. TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Formal Administration has been entered in the Estate of Tracy Candice Chuley, deceased, File Number 12-97-CP, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327; that the decedents date of death was July 2, 2012; that the total value of the Estate is less than $75,000.00 and that the names of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: NAME ADDRESS -Mark G. Chuley 2616 County Road 124, Seneca Falls, N.Y. 13148 -Lanson G. Chuley 29 Swaby Street, Seneca Falls, N.Y. 13148 -Kalan C. Chuley 25 Clinton Street, Seneca Falls, N.Y. 13148 -Daryl S. Chuley 108 Englishman Drive, Blacksburg, S.C. 29702 -Lynn D. Chuley 259 S. Cypress Road, # 511, Pompano Beach, FL 33060 -Aaron T. Chuley 454 Amanda Circle, Knoxville, TN 37922 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the Estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the Estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Person Giving Notice: /s/ John J. Ryan 6 Bob Miller Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /s/ J. Martin Hayes, ESQ., Florida Bar No. 0971766 Akerman Senterfitt, 401 E. Jackson Street, Suite 1700 Tampa, Florida 33602, Telephone: (813) 223-7333 November 15 & 22, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5429-1122 TWN Estate of Brim, John File No.: 12-96-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, FILE NO.: 12-96-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN WAYNE BRIM Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of John Wayne Brim, deceased, whose date of death was September 8, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. 5423-1115 TWN Estate of Shilling, Ana Navia Case No. 2012-CP-000090 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-CP-000090 PROBATE DIVISION NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Ana Navia Shilling, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-000090, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The date of the decedents death was June 20, 2012. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first pub lication of this Notice is November 15, 2012 Personal Representative: /s/Kathy H. Navia 1116 Chalet Drive West, Mobile, Alabama 36608-3614 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Eric S. Haug, Florida Bar No. 0850713 Eric S. Haug Law & Consulting, P.A. Post Office Box 12031, Tallahassee, Florida 32317-2031 Telephone: (850) 583-1480 Telefax: (850) 297-0300 November 15 & 22, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5439-1129 TWN Vs. Atkins, Deborah 12-14-CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO: 12-14-CA HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-4, Plaintiff, vs. Deborah S. Atkins; Jaime B. Williams; James L. Williams; Unknown Spouse of Deborah S. Atkins; Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under or against the Estate of James L. Williams, whether said Unknown Parties claim as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, trustees or other claimants; Unknown Tenant #1, and Unknown Tenant #2, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under or against the Estate of James L. Williams, whether said Unknown Parties claim as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, trustees or other claimants YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Wakulla County, Florida: Per Schedule A attached hereto Street Address: 45 Stoney Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Clarfield, Okon, Salomone & Pincus, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, within 30 days after the date of the first publication of this notice, on or before December 22 and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on November 2, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of said Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk Clarfield, Okon, Salomone & Pincus, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Avenue, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Telephone: (561) 713-1400 Schedule A COMMENCE AT A U.S. GOVERNMENT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION II, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION II, A DISTANCE OF 1208.23 FEET TO AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 47 WEST 363.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 47 52 WEST 346.00 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 50.00 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 607.69 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 26 18 EAST 346.01 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 609.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 4.84 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. November 22 & 29, 2012 5430-1122 TWN Vs. Highsmith, Phillip Case # 2012 CA 227 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE #2012 CA 227 CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. PHILLIP LEE HIGHSMITH; et al; Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, entered in Case No. 2012-CA 227 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and PHILLIP LEE HIGHSMITH, MICHELLE DAMRON ALLEN, BOBBY H. DANZEY, SR, VOY DANZEY; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 at 11:00 oclock a.m. on January 24, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Partial Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: Lots 6, 7 and 8 Block WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 3, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 43, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 31st day of October 2012 BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Court (seal) /s/ BY Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk November 15 & 22, 2012 5428-1122 TWN Estate of Edrington, Glenn File No. 12-99-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 12-99-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF GLENN L. EDRINGTON, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Glenn L. Edrington, deceased, whose date of death was September 26, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The first date of publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Personal Representative: /s/ Diane K. Ray-Edrington 103 Revell Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorneys for Personal Representative Stuart E. Goldberg, Fla. Bar No. 0365971, Amy Mason Collins, Fla. Bar No. 0044582 Law Offices of Stuart E. Goldberg, P.L. Post Office Box 12458, Tallahassee, Florida 32317 Telephone (850)222-4000 Facsimile (850) 942-6400 November 15 & 22, 2012 5422-1115 TWN Estate of Ferguson, Hugh Case No. 2012-CP-000094 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-CP-000094 PROBATE DIVISION NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Hugh Fain Ferguson, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-000094, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The date of the decedents death was August 21, 2012. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first pub lication of this Notice is November 15, 2012 Personal Representative: /s/Connie D. Torres 7337 Timber Crest Lane, Zephyrhills, Florida 33540 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Eric S. Haug, Florida Bar No. 0850713 Eric S. Haug Law & Consulting, P.A. Post Office Box 12031, Tallahassee, Florida 32317-2031 Telephone: (850) 583-1480 Telefax: (850) 297-0300 November 15 & 22, 2012 5443-1129 TWN Estate of Rona Hawkins Case No. 12-100 CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA COURT CASE NO.:12-100 CP Probate Division IN RE: THE ESTATE OF RONA LAVON HAWKINS, JR. Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS INTESTATE The administration of the estate of Rona Lavon Hawkins, Jr., Case Number 12-100 CP is pending in the 2nd Judicial Circuit Court, In and For Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. The estate is intestate. Any interested person upon whom this notice is served who may be entitled to exempt property under s. 732.402, Fla. St. must file a petition for determination of exempt property or a petition must be filed on behalf of that person WITHIN FOUR (4) MONTHS OF SERVICE OF FORMAL NOTICE OR 40 DAYS AFTER THE TERMINATION OF ANY PROCEEDING OF ANY MATTER AFFECTING ANY PART OF THE EXEMPT PROPERTY or the right to exempt property is deemed waived. All interested persons on whom a copy of this notice is served who intend to challenge the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or jurisdiction of the court must file an objection on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on that person, and all creditors having claims against this estate who are required to be served with a copy of this notice, are required to file with this court such claim WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors and other persons having claims or demands against the estate who are not known to the personal representative and whose names or addresses are not reasonably ascertainable must file their claims against the estate WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. ALL PETITIONS, CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS THE 22nd DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012. Personal Representative: COLLEEN Q. SKIPPER 18 Charlotte Rosier Road, Sopchoppy, FL 32358 Attorney for Personal Representative: HAROLD E. REGAN, FL BAR #124559 2520-2 Barrington Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32308 Telephone: (850) 681-7883, FAX: (850) 383-6604 November 22 & 29, 2012 5421-1115 TWN Estate of Whisman, Dorothy, File No. 12-98-CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA IN RE: ESTATE OF DOROTHY J. WHISMAN Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DOROTHY J. WHISMAN, deceased, File Number 12-98-CP, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327; that the total cash value of the estate is estimated to be $474,806.00, and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Beverly J. Ross 318 Harvard Rd. St. Augustine, FL 32086 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Personal Representative: BEVERLY J. ROSS 318 Harvard Rd., St. Augustine, FL 32086 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /S/ RONALD A. MOWREY, Fla. Bar No. 0122006 Mowrey Law Firm, PA 515 North Adams, Tallahassee, FL 32301, PH: 850-222-9482, Fax: 850-561-6867 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, November 15 & 22, 2012 5440-1129 TWN Estate of Whetstone, Katie Case # 12-95-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE # 12-95-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF KATIE WHETSTONE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of KATIE WHETSTONE, deceased, whose date of death was December 13, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 22, 2012 Personal Representative: KATHY L. RICHARDSON 832 Cordele Avenue, Port Charlotte, Florida 33948 Attorney for Personal Representative: MICHAEL M. WILSON, Attorney for KATHY L. RICHARDSON Florida Bar Number: 076244, Olmsted & Wilson, P.A. 17801 Murdock Circle, Suite A, Port Charlotte, Florida 33948 Telephone: (941) 624-2700, Fax: (941) 624-5151 November 22 & 29, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The first date of publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Personal Representative: /s/ Joseph William Brim 3765 Oleben Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32305 Attorneys for Personal Representative: /s/ Stuart E. Goldberg Fla. Bar No. 0365971, Amy Mason Collins, Fla. Bar No. 0044582 Law Offices of Stuart E. Goldberg, P.L. Post Office Box 12458, Tallahassee, Florida 32317 Telephone (850) 222-4000 Facsimile (850) 942-6400 November 15 & 22, 1012

PAGE 34

Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 1. ENTERTAINERS: Which actors birth name was Ramon Estevez? 2. MUSIC: What was the name of Smokey Robinsons group? 3. INVENTIONS: Who is credited with inventing bifocal lenses? 4. PSYCHOLOGY: What irrational fear is manifested in peniaphobia? 5. LITERATURE: In which of Shakespeares plays does the character Shylock appear? 6. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: During which war did Harry Truman fire Gen. Douglas MacArthur? 7. HISTORY: When did Australia become a commonwealth nation, largely gaining independence from Britain? 8. ANATOMY: About how long are the intestines in an adult male? 9. FAMOUS QUOTES: What American psychologist/philosopher once once said: Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does.? 10. MEASUREMENTS: Which month is named for the Roman festival of ritual purification? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Martin Sheen 2. The Miracles 3. Ben Franklin 4. A fear of poverty 5. The Merchant of Venice 6. Korean 7. 1901 8. About 28 feet 9. William James 10. February (Februa) YOUR AD HERE

PAGE 35

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 15B IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GET READY FOR HUNTING P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pet Phone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. Holistic Select WellnessC Lbt n Pfr tf Ab n ALL Yr P Nf.Special Orders AvailableStocking Stuffers for Pets Gift Certificates 301 C S G i Construction Cleanup, Commercial, ResidentialLICENSED AND INSURED ConstructionCleanupCommercial R Re Re Re Re R R R R R Re s si si sid id ential Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly Nicholspray like its up to God, Work like its up to youMany Thanks for Many Blessings. Have a wonderful Christmas! Across the street from the courthouse, downtown Crawfordville926-3338Open 10AM-5PM or call for later appointment.15 Vendors 2 Floors The White Elephant DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PET STOP3010 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. ANTIQUES C ARRIES C OVEC ARRIES C OVE C HRISTMAS ATC HRISTMAS ATToys Dolls Antiques Collectibles Jewelry Ornaments Decorations One-of-kinds Etc. A Cabin of Treasures~ Very Bradly ~ ~ Dots Jewels ~ ~ Greenleaf Scents ~ ~ 16 Vendors ~ ~ Gifts ~ ~ Collectibles ~ ~ Jewelry ~ ~ Custom Wood Items ~ & much more... PICK A TREASURE FROM OUR TREASURE BOX w/purchase!850926-8381M-S 10-5 Downtown Crawfordville, Next to Subwa y 27 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA Hair Place That 850-926-6020Gift Certicates Available t C C e C C FULL SERVICE HAIR SALONStyles for Men, Women & ChildrenCutsUpDosColor P erms HighlightsFacial Waxings Specialty Cuts Flat Top s MirandaTues-Sat545-2905RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MavisAppt. Only962-2171 Shop Downtown LATE Sat., Dec. 7 OPEN til 9PM Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A A A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews The Wakulla News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Shop Local Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce The Wakulla News and the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce encourage you to SHOP SMALL on NOVEMBER 24Help make a big difference for small business in Wakulla County We want to encourage you and your friends to Shop Small or help rally an entire town; everyone can help spread the word about Small Business Saturday.Between Black Friday and Cyber Monday is a day dedicated to supporting small businesses nationwide.As a consumer, you are a key part in helping small businesses thrive. By shopping or dining at a small business in Wakulla County this November 24th, youre showing your support for all the small communities around you. This means you could be helping local entrepreneurs offer more jobs, which in turn invigorate the economy and checking off items on your Christmas list at the same time.Small businesses do so much for our community, now it our chance to do something for them.

PAGE 36

By MARGE PERRYContributor, Relish magazineAn apple pie without cheese is like a kiss without the squeeze or so goes the saying from the Central Leatherstocking region of New York State. This oddly named and eminently quotable area (home to the Baseball Hall of Fame) was also the setting for James Fenimore Coopers series of books that includes The Last of the Mohicans. These stories of the frontier were collectively called The Leatherstocking Tales named for the deerskin garment early settlers donned over their linen pants to protect them from the underbrush and brambles. High above those nasty brambles were plenty of fruit-laden apple trees, from which the local women made their pies. Today, New York State produces more than 25 million bushels of apples and more varieties than any other apple-growing region. New York State is also home of the worlds rst cheese factory and is the third largest cheese producer in the country. It makes perfect sense, then, to combine these two meant-to-be-together foods cheese and fruit in one irresistible package. And while those rst Apple Cheddar Pies may have been made with fruit picked 15 minutes ago and cheese from the bakers own cows, the pies we make today can be every bit as good. The version below can be made in a mere 15 minutes of work, thanks to ready made pie crusts and the fact that we dont have to light a re to heat our ovens. LEATHERSTOCKING APPLE CHEDDAR PIE 3 pounds Granny Smith apples, peeled and cut in 1/4-inch slices (about 8 cups) 1/3 cup all-purpose our 3/4 cup sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 t easpoon ground nutmeg 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons butter, diced into bits 1 (15-ounce) package refrigerated piecrust dough (2 crusts) 3 ounces extra sharp Cheddar cheese, shredded 1 egg, lightly beaten 1. Preheat oven to 375F. Line a pie plate with one pie crust, gently pressing dough into sides, and letting excess hang over the edge. 2. In a large bowl, combine apples, flour, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, lemon juice, vanilla and salt. Spoon into pie crust and scatter bits of butter evenly over filling. Top with an even layer of cheese. 3. Drape second crust loosely over lling. Pull excess from the bottom crust over edge of top crust and crimp to enclose. Flute edge decoratively. Brush top crust lightly with beaten egg and use a sharp knife to make 4 to 5 small (1/2-inch) slits. 4. Bake until top is golden brown and fruit is bubbling and tender, about 50 to 55 minutes. If crust browns too quickly, drape pie lightly with foil and continue cooking. 5. Let cool at least 15 minutes before serving. Serves 8. Per serving: 460 calories, 24g fat, 6g prot., 58g carbs., 3g ber, 510mg sodium. Page 16B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com RELISH THE AMERICAN TABLEApples and cheese are made for each other MARK BOUGHTON PHOTOGRAPHY Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerEl Jalisco Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with side Hamaknockers Flatbread HoagiePulled Pork or Chicken Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99 Mixed Tues. & urs. Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under 926-4329mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza 926432 9 9 2 6 4 3 29 2 9 Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.com Open 7 Days Open 7 Days 926-7530 Restaurant 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville Come in for selected catch each week Seafood Fridays Seafood FridaysLunch & Dinner at OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringWin One Meal from Every Restaurant!EATIN path EATIN pathOFF OFF the theEATIN pathOFF the g Winner Eileen Hewittdrawn from Myra Jeans in Crawfordville 850-926-4737 VOTED BEST IN THE AREA Friday & Saturday Fresh Hand cut Ribeyes Mouthwatering Combo Smoked Wings Ribs & Sides Pulled Pork Friend us on facebook Friend us on facebook Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator Hamaknockers bar-b-q now has concession trailer! Nine years ago, there was no BBQ restaurant in Wakulla County. I talked to several local and old time restaurant owners, suggesting they need to open a BBQ restaurant. I even suggested they call it Hamaknockers, since the word seemed sort of unique to the area but no takers. So, a good friend of mine, Mark Baker, and I decided to do it ourselves. We started with a little concession trailer and a borrowed smoker. We decided to set up our trailer on the road by Rose Alley in Crawfordville. By August, we shut it down (it was miserably hot), but wherever I went in Crawfordville, people would ask, Where are you going to be? As most of you know, we ended up in the little house south of the Courthouse. And we are still there! By Jim Lowe