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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00435
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 11-15-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00435
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PAGE 1

Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 44th Issue Thursday, November 15, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 5A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 6A Weekly Roundup .............................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Arts & Entertainment ......................................................Page 9A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 11A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 4B Outdoors .........................................................................Page 5B Water Ways ......................................................................Page 6B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B INDEX OBITUARIES Johnnie ‘Pa John’ Carroll Randall ‘Randy’ Richard Gray William Roscoe Revell Michael Lynn Roberts Christine Gibson SextonBy HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsIf youve typed wakullaŽ into your internet browser lately, chances are youve come across a few video clips that have piqued some interest in Wakullas Working Waterfronts Photo-Journal. Waterfronts is currently recording stories and collecting photos that highlight the early maritime lifestyles of our tiny portion of Floridas Gulf Coast. Photos, personal interviews and more are being gathered from local fishermen, seineyard workers, crabbers, crabpickers, shrimpers, oyster-folk, restaurateurs and the family descendants of communities (such as Skippers Bay), before a wealth of history … speci“ c to our county … becomes altogether lost. The Healing Arts of Wakulla County, in association with Palaver Tree Theater, will hold a photo gathering at the Spring Creek Restaurant, on Saturday, Nov. 17, from noon to 2 p.m. The get-together will be highly informal … no speechmaking. Ten percent of any meal or item purchased between the hours of noon and 2 p.m. will go to bene“ t the Waterfronts project. When most people see the word photo-journal,Ž they think simply of a book. This is short-sighted, with no true concept of what an undertaking of this sort entails. Although local photographers, writers, historians and more are integral to its success, it is those in our community who have made their living from the bounty of the Gulf, or who have picked crabs, shucked oysters, picked bait in the pinewoods, run a “ sh house, or kept their families fed through the opening of a seafood restaurant, who will prove to be the ideal storytellers for Waterfronts. Continued on Page 2AGroup seeks to gather waterfronts informationVeterans DayTDC gets $500,000 grantEvent honors those who servedBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County Tourist Development Council Director Pam Portwood received exciting news on Thursday, Nov. 8. She was informed that the TDC had been awarded a $500,000 grant from the Gulf Tourism and Seafood Promotional Fund, which is a $57 million fund established to help those areas affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in April 2010. I squealed and jumped up and down,Ž Portwood said upon hearing the news. I was really beside myself.Ž The promotional fund is intended to support programs that are directed to advertising, promoting and marketing the seafood and tourism industries in the five Gulf states. The grant was only open to public, quasi-public, non-profits and other organizations in those states. TDC Chair David Moody said, We are so excited about this incredible opportunity and the positive impact it will have on our tourism and seafood industry partners.Ž Portwood received a call on Thursday from someone who had seen a news release listing the Wakulla County TDC as one of 33 Florida organizations that had been selected to receive the BP funds. She then checked her email and it was confirmed. Continued on Page 2AWakulla’s Working Waterfronts will hold a ‘Photo Gathering’ at Spring Creek Restaurant Saturday, Nov. 17, from noon to 2 p.m. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netHundreds of people lined Crawfordville Highway on Saturday, Nov. 10 to honor those who have served in the military. The Veterans Day Parade and Celebration was held by Wakulla Christian School and Wakulla County Veterans Services to salute veterans and support active military. The event is in its sixth year. Commissioner-elect Richard Harden attended the event and walked in the parade to thank those who voted for him. Harden is also a veteran and expressed his gratitude to the organizers of the event and those who attended. It really means a lot,Ž Harden said. Prior to the parade, a free breakfast was held for all veterans. Following the parade, there were games for children, music, food, vendors, a silent auction and an awards ceremony honoring six local heroes. FILE PHOTOFisherman Clark Nichols shows off an oyster during last years oyster relay. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENWakulla Christian School students in a parade ” oat pulled by a U.S. Army truck. Students on a ” oat look out at the crowd on the parade route. Members of the Marine Corps League march in the parade. Members of Sons of the Confederacy, above, and children playing at Hudson Park after the parade. More photos online at thewakullanews.com Wakulla TDC Director Pam Portwood 10-0War Eagles are undefeated heading into the playo s Sports Page 1B

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsA 21-year-old Bradenton man wanted for murder in Manatee County was arrested by Wakulla County Sheriffs Office deputies following a traf“ c pursuit at 12:22 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 11, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Kwame Jaquavius Henri was arrested a short distance into Leon County just past the northeastern section of Wakulla County. Deputies Scott Powell and Marshall Taylor received information about a vehicle driving at an excessive speed northbound in the southbound lane on Woodville Highway. The deputies attempted to initiate a traffic stop with emergency lights and siren but Henri continued northbound a short distance into Leon County nearly striking another vehicle head-on before stopping. Once at the suspect vehicle, Deputy Powell smelled the odor of marijuana and observed the driver to be unsteady on his feet while attempting to get out of the vehicle. Henri gave the deputy multiple false names before granting permission to search his vehicle. Marijuana and an Oxycodone pill were discovered inside the vehicle. Deputy Vicki Mitchell transported Henri to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Once at the jail, marijuana was located behind the suspects ear and jail personnel discovered Henris true identity. The suspect agreed to submit a breath and urine sample and FHP Trooper Mike Simmons assisted by conducting the tests and determined Henri to be impaired. The suspects identity was processed through the NCIC/FCIC data base and deputies discovered that Henri was wanted for an outstanding murder warrant in Manatee County with a no bond order. The suspects license was also determined to be suspended. Henri faces charges in Wakulla County of DUI, ” eeing and attempting to elude, knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license is suspended or revoked, possession of a controlled substance, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and smuggling contraband into a detention facility. The Manatee County Sheriffs Of“ ce listed Henri as a fugitive of the law. In Manatee, Henri is wanted for murder, possession of a controlled substance, attempting to tamper with a witness and possession of cannabis. Wakulla 21 st Century Community Learning Center NOW accep ng enrollment applica ons for the 2012-2013 school year. The Wakulla 21st CCLC will provide enrichment to Wakulla County youth currently enrolled in Pre K-8th grade in the areas of math, reading, science, and wri ng; and will o er the families of par cipa ng students opportuni es for literacy and related educa onal development. The program will o er a wide range of opportuni es in areas of educaon, personal development and recrea on that will include business partners, mentors and educa onal facilitators.Programming at this me includes:• FCAT Review in Reading, Wri ng, Science and Math • Dance • Daily Homework Center • Mar al Arts • Tutoring • Theatre • Project Based Learning • 4H • Character Educa on • Music Lessons • Community Service Projects • Games and Physical Educa on The 2012-2013 program begins November 19, 2012 directly a er the regular school day. Program hours are 3:15 to 6:15 p.m. Monday thru Friday. The Wakulla 21 st Century Community Learning Center is a federally funded program and is o ered free of charge to qualifying Wakulla County students and their families. Enrollment applica ons are available online at h p://www.wakulla21cclc.com .Completed applica ons are due in the Wakulla 21 st CCLC o ce no later than 6:00 p.m. Friday, November 16, 2012. Space is available on a rst-come, rst-served basis.We look forward to working with you and your student this school year.Wakulla 21st CCLC • 1391 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL. 32327 • Phone ( 850) 745-4680 • Fax (850) 926-5186 • Email: info@Wakulla21CCLC.com Bonnie Holub TCC Project Director Deborah L. Fell WCS Principal Charlo e Cobb Wakulla 21 st CCLC Site Coordinator Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage? Special to The NewsA 20-year-old Crawfordville man was arrested on drug trafficking charges after the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Narcotics Unit conducted a search of his home and discovered prescription medication pills that were stolen from a Tallahassee pharmacy, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Eric Jasen Gaines was charged with drug traf“ cking of more than 14 grams but less than 28 grams and possession of Schedule III or IV narcotics with intent to sell. He was transported to the Wakulla County Jail on Nov. 9 where he posted a $10,000 bond and was released on Nov. 10. The Leon County Sheriffs Of“ ce is also conducting an investigation for activities that occurred in Tallahassee. The WCSO Narcotics Unit was contacted by the Leon County Sheriffs Of“ ce about the theft of prescription medications from a Tallahassee Publix Pharmacy. Gaines admitted to law enforcement of“ cials that he stole prescription medications from his employer over a period of several months. He also admitted to having additional prescription medications at his home in Crawfordville. WCSO Narcotics deputies were granted permission to search Gaines Lilac Lane home and discovered generic Xanax and Hydrocodone pills and Publix Pharmacy containers. The pills were seized as evidence. The total amount of seized pills included 390 generic Xanax pills which weighed 50.5 grams and 20 Hydrocodone pills weighing 15.3 grams. Two additional Ambien pills were also seized. WCSO detectives estimated the street value of the seized narcotics at $3,000. Arrest warrants are pending in Leon County as Gaines faces additional charges from the LCSO.Continued from Page 1A Patrick Juneau, claims administrator for the Deepwater Horizon Economic Claims Center, had sent her an email letting her know that the TDC had been selected to receive the $500,000 grant, which was the maximum amount that could be awarded. Prior to the call, Portwood was at a TDC meeting with the council and they were discussing the normal advertising budget and deciding how it would be spent. A couple of hours later, we have $500,000 to work with,Ž Portwood said. Portwood learned of the grant in late September and had less than a week to put together an application prior to the Oct. 5 deadline. She said she felt the county had about a 50/50 chance of getting the grant, but tried to put it out of her mind and go about business as usual. I had no idea what our chances were for actually being awarded the funds, I just knew I had to try,Ž Portwood said. The application included a very detailed marketing plan and speci“ c information about how the TDC would spend the money. That was the intense part,Ž Portwood said. The major component of the proposal is increasing the tourism name of Wakulla County and the brand awareness of its slogan, The Natural Place to Be,Ž Portwood said. This includes a marketing and advertising strategy that highlights Wakullas natural resources. Portwood said there is also an idea to create a brand for Wakullas seafood industry, such as Fresh from Wakulla, a take from the Fresh from Florida campaign. To increase awareness and also revive the publics con“ dence in our seafood,Ž Portwood said. A majority of the funds will go towards print and digital media buys. Many of the print publications the TDC targeted are ones they have never been able to afford before. Weve never had that kind of money,Ž Portwood said. This also gives the TDC a great opportunity for coop advertising, she added. The TDC is working on a co-op advertising plan so area businesses can participate and not have to share the entire cost of advertising on their own. Thats pretty exciting,Ž Portwood said. The funds will also be used for digital marketing, brochures, social media marketing and a visitors guide. Portwood has not been informed when the money will be made available, but the TDC will hold a special meeting to discuss the next steps. The TDC will also hold a public roundtable meeting to discuss the grant, their ideas and to get input from the public once the “ nal grant documents have been received from the claims administrator. We will certainly be working with the public and tourism and seafood industries,Ž Portwood said. The TDC was one of 110 entities that received a grant out of the 350 applications received.TDC gets $500,000 grantContinued from Page 1A Wakullas seafood industry has been hard-hit with net limitations, hurricanes, tropical storms, oil spills and a global economic crisis. These things, however painful, should not be used as crutches in our effort to rebuild community morale and make known … to all … our strengths, which are our countys history and maritime heritage. The economic and social results of this project can bring together elders, artists, teachers, county government and students with the common purpose of awakening the communal pride of our countys Native American, AfricanAmerican and white generations … all of whom can claim ownership to the rich “ shing and maritime culture of Wakulla. Partnerships with communities similar to Wakulla, local universities and other groups can be formed to celebrate the people and culture of our working waterfronts. Lasting exhibitions of photos, artwork and writings placed within specific locales throughout the county will provide ongoing education and inspiration to the community, and offer our children a birthright worth staying close to home for and, possibly, building upon. We ask that all residents feel free to bring old family photos of “ shers, shrimpers, crabbers, oyster workers and others that would make a nice addition to the project. The photos will be scanned on the spot so that they never leave your possession. Local professional photographers, volunteers and those who would like to share their experiences in an interview are always needed. Visit and like us on Facebook at Wakulla Waterfronts. Recent videos can also be viewed there. Contact palavertreetheater.org if you wish to get involved. Group seeks to gather waterfronts information Crawfordville man arrested for drug traf ckingFugitive wanted for murder is caught in Wakulla Eric Jasen Gaines Kwame Jaquavius Henri

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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter only a couple meetings of the Wakulla County Community Center Advisory Group, it became quite clear the group was not headed in the direction the county commission had planned. The members of the group were split into two groups … those in support of the community center and those who were not so supportive. Commissioner Lynn Artz expressed her frustration with the dysfunctional group and said the members were intended to be champions of the community center. To try and “ x the problem, the county commission voted to amend the ordinance that establishes the advisory group at its Nov. 5 meeting. The group has been changed to a “ ve-member group, instead of the previous 11, and the background and experience requirements have been removed. Artz said she was glad to see the commission was still committed to having the advisory group. She added that she spoke with the members of the group who were very committed and they had no major objections with decreasing the number of members. People who would like to serve on the advisory group will need to “ ll out an application. The commission will then chose the “ ve members from a list complied by the county administration. The county acquired the 22-acre property that was previously home to New Life Church on May 24, 2010, with plans to turn it into a community center. The current plan for the community center site is to use a legislative appropriation to renovate the former sanctuary building to include free weight and cardio room, fitness class room, kid zone and restrooms and showers. The other building would remain as it is, with several of“ ces. Also include in the plans is the addition of an open floor gymnasium, which would be a high school and college regulation size basketball court. The former sanctuary building would be utilized by the YMCA, which has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the county to manage the community center. A request for proposals was sent out and the YMCA was the lone responder. There is now discussion needed to determine what kinds of programs the YMCA will offer. Bids for the renovations at the community center are due by Nov. 28. If all goes well, the winning bid will go before the county commission at its Dec. 3 meeting for approval. In other news: The commission voted to change the speed limit of Lonnie Raker Road. The entire road is now 35 miles per hour. Commissioner Mike Stewart said the speed limit varies from 45 to 35 and back to 45. The Community Traf“ c Safety Team recommended making the entire road 35 miles per hour because of hazards associated with the right of way and the numerous residential roads and driveways, he said. He added that the sheriffs office conducted a speed study and it showed the average speed at 54 miles per hour. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he was against lowering the speed limit. Its clearly an enforcement issue,Ž Merritt said. He added that there is one area of the road with a dangerous curve that should be 35, but if it was re-aligned, the whole road would then need to be 45. Stewart felt the road should be one speed limit. The commission voted three to two to lower the speed limit. Merritt and Commissioner Jerry Moore opposed the motion. The next commission meeting will be held on Nov. 19 at 5 p.m. This is the last commission meeting for the outgoing commissioners. The swearing-in ceremony for newly elected commissioners, Richard Harden, Howard Kessler and Ralph Thomas, will be Nov. 20 at 5 p.m. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. NOVEMBER 15, 2012If a person decides to appeal any decision made with respect to any matter considered at the meeting, he or she will need a record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings are available, which records includes the testimony and evidence upon which appeal is to be based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations or an interpreter to participate in this meeting should contact the Board of County Commissioners Administration Of“ce at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Phone (850) 926-0919, at least two (2) days prior to the hearing.NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING AND ATTORNEY-CLIENT EXECUTIVE SESSIONThe Wakulla County Commission will conduct a Public Meeting and an Attorney-Client Executive Session at 4:00 p.m. on Monday, November 19, 2012 in the County Commission Chambers located at 29 Arran Road, Suite 101, Crawfordville, Florida, to discuss ongoing litigation. After the meeting is convened the Board will go into closed session pursuant to Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes. The subject matter of the executive session is the pending litigation in the following matter: Carter and Forte v. Wakulla County, Wakulla County Circuit Court, Case No. 10-147CA. The discussions in this session shall be con“ned to settlement negotiations and/or strategy relating to litigation expenditures. In attendance at this meeting will be Chairman Alan Brock, Vice Chairman Randy Merritt, Commissioner Lynn Artz, Commissioner Mike Stewart, Commissioner Jerry Moore, County Administrator David Edwards, County Attorney Heather Encinosa, Special Counsel Bill Graham, and a certi“ed court reporter. The Executive Session will last approximately 1 hour. Following the closed session, the Board will reconvene in open session so that the Chair may announce the termination of the executive session, and the Board may consider general issues relating to the pending litigation and other county business. If you have any questions, please contact Katie Taff at (850) 926-0919 or ktaff@mywakulla.com NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS NOVEMBER 8, 15, 21, 29, 2012 NOVEMBER 15, 2012The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will conduct a Special Meeting on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. at the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL.Purpose of Meeting: To Swear-In the Newly Elected County Commissioners and to Select a New Chairman and Vice Chairman If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.NOTICE OF SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETINGPUBLIC NOTICENorth Florida Child Development, Inc. is recruiting for governing board(s) members. NFCD is a 501(c) (3) organization that provides comprehensive early education and development to the young children and their families in Calhoun, Gulf, Liberty, Madison, and Wakulla Counties. The governing board(s) maintains a formal structure of shared governance through which parents and community representatives can participate in policy making and other decisions. Please contact Sebrina McGill for more information at (850) 639-5080 ext 10 or smcgill@”oridachildren.org.NOVEMBER 15, 21, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wakulla County Planning Commission and the Board of County Commissioners propose to adopt the following by ordinance. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, December 10, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, January 7, 2013 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.NOVEMBER 15, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wakulla County Planning Commission and the Board of County Commissioners propose to adopt the following by ordinance. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, December 10, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, January 7, 2013 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 9260919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.NOVEMBER 15, 2012 COUNTY COMMISSIONBoard changes community center advisory group Rotary Dictionary Project WILLIAM SNOWDENMembers of the Rotary Club of Wakulla, along with members of Friends of the Library, are in the midst of their annual project to distribute dictionaries to all third graders in Wakulla County. Rotarians Michelle Snow, Jo Ann Palmer and Niraj Patel along with Library Director Scott Joyner, were handing out dictionaries to third graders at Crawfordville Elementary.

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Sheriff candidates square off at one last forum • Sheriff’s Report for Nov. 8, 2012 • Charlie Creel is new sheriff • Dutch visitors campaign locally for Alan Brock, Obama • Thomas, Kessler, Harden win • No petitions heard for Value Adjustment Board • County commission: Board creates RESTORE Act committee •Week in Wakulla: Nov. 8-15thewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.Editor, The News: On Tuesday, Oct. 23, more than 250 guests enjoyed a Poseys shrimp dinner, good company and live foot-tapping bluegrass music from Stranger Still, all in the name of helping more Wakulla County youth achieve success in life. Presented by Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend, and supported by numerous generous sponsors and individual donors, the third annual dinner event raised more than $5,000 to support the Big Brothers Big Sisters Wakulla County Mentoring Program. Big Brothers Big Sisters would like to thank the following sponsors: Waste Pro USA, Progress Energy, Alan Brock, Charlie Creel, Kimley-Horn & Associates, Mike Stewart, Preble-Rish, Capital City Bank, Poseys Catering, Rock Landing Marina, Rogers, Gunter, Vaughn Insurance Inc. and our media sponsor, The Wakulla News. The BIG Catch is great for renewing energy within the community. We are continuing to gain momentum in Wakulla County, and we look forward to serving even more children this year. Big Brothers Big Sisters is currently seeking safe adult mentors willing to spend time with a child two to four times monthly for a minimum of 12 months. Being a Big Brother or a Big Sister is both enjoyable and ful“ lling. Volunteers have the opportunity to help shape a childs future for the better by empowering them to achieve. Volunteering just a few hours a month can change the course of a childs life for the better, forever. By simply changing their perspective on what the world can offer, volunteers can literally change lives. Sometimes, it is as simple as playing basketball, making crafts, reading, or “ shing. Louis Garcia CEO Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend Editor, The News: I understand candidates want to make voters aware of their bid for of“ ce, but in doing so they should be courteous and respectful of others. On Nov. 2, during the visitation hours for my husband at Bevis Funeral Home, some candidates or their representatives literally blocked the entrance to the parking area. This made it dif“ cult for elderly friends and families to make their way into the building. As I understand, these people were politely asked to move elsewhere. Teresa Harden & Family Editor, The News: We are deeply grateful for the participation of all our volunteers for making possible another successful year for the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival. A big THANK YOU to everyone involved. Your support and participation continues to make this festival extremely successful and directly bene“ cial to the St. Marks Community. A committee of dedicated individuals works all year without compensation to organize this great event. Each of these volunteers shoulder a specific duty making the festival happen for the community, county and visitors from surrounding areas. (Most would never guess how many hours of planning, selling, hauling, listing, calling, cleaning, dragging, thinking and promoting it takes to make an event like the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival happen.) On the day of the event we look to our 100-plus volunteers to make everything run smoothly. This event could not function without these volunteers. I just want to mention a few groups key to the events success. First, we are grateful to the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce deputies for their work and to the inmates who were involved in setting up and taking down the site, along with keeping the area clean during the festival. We are indebted to the Boy Scout Troop that directs traf“ c to parking areas for the major part of the day; to the musicians, singers and dancers who perform for the enjoyment of our visitors. Without the volunteers, the day would be bedlam rather than the highly organized event it is. Also, to the “ shermen who go out on the water and harvest the stone crabs claws and catch the “ sh for our enjoyment. Another key group that makes the event possible is our sponsors „ businesses and organizations that donated money, supplies, services and materials „ their generosity is essential to making the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival happen. Arts and crafts vendors and food vendors put significant investments of time, money and talent in providing great wares and excellent food to all the visitors. To all of these groups and other individuals who helped, we of the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival Committee wish to extend our heartfelt gratitude, though it is insufficient to compensate for the grandness of the gift you each have provided. The highway counter registered almost 4,000 vehicles and we estimate between 12,000 and 14,000 people attended. Visitors, thank you too for making the effort to join us in this fun and enjoyable event. We look forward to seeing you again next year! THANK YOU! Sincerely, Mike Pruitt ChairmanSt. Marks Stone Crab CommitteeBy JIM STEVENSON My wife and I have a septic tank that processes the wastes from our home, and I know its speci“ c location in the yard. Some homeowners have never thought about their septic tank and have no idea where it is. That means that they have never had their tank pumped. The septic tank company employee who pumped our tank a year ago said that he has had to empty some tanks out with a shovel because they have never been maintained. It is out of sight out of mind. Just ” ush it and forget it until the sewage backs up in the bathtub or spills onto the lawn. Some regard septic tank maintenance as a nuisance and an unwanted expense. All but approximately 1,200 homes in Tallahassee are connected to the citys central sewer. Those who are connected pay a reasonable monthly utility fee for this service. Some have central sewer available in front of their homes but have refused to hook-up to it because of the connection fee and the city has not required them to do so. During the 2010 Legislative session, the Legislature passed a septic tanks law thanks to the leadership of Sen. Lee Constantine (R, Altamonte Springs). The law required that septic tanks be inspected every five years to ensure that they are properly treating household sewage. Soon after the session, efforts were begun by several legislators to repeal the law during the 2011 session. During the 2012 session they were successful and essentially neutered the law, in fact it is now worse than the original law. This is about money! Public health is being ignored. Apparently, many homeowners dont want to take responsibility by paying for the proper disposal of their own poop. They choose to ” ush it and forget it. This is about votes! Every septic tank represents one or two votes. Thats why many legislators were hastily rushing to repeal the law soon after it was passed. Forget about public health. After all they are only responding to the demands of We the People.Ž Some politicians think only about the next election. A statesman thinks about the next generation. The purpose of a septic tank is to kill harmful bacteria in human waste so as to protect drinking water, swimming areas and oysters and scallops from contamination. Citizens can choose to protect the health of their community. They have the opportunity to be good neighbors by ensuring that their septic tank is properly maintained so as not to contaminate their neighbors (and their own) drinking water. When needed, we spend thousands of dollars to replace the roof on our house so as to protect the house … because we own it. Yet some homeowners rebel when required to spend a couple hundred dollars once every “ ve years to maintain their septic tank to protect drinking water that belongs to everyone. It costs to ” ush. Homeowners in Tallahassee pay on the average $40 to the utility every month to properly process their waste at the sewage treatment plant. It costs about $225 to pump a septic tank. That amounts to $3.75 per month over a five year period. Thats about the cost of a cappuccino coffee once a month. Standard septic tanks were designed to control harmful bacteria. They were not designed to control nitrate. In springsheds, the ef” uent from septic tanks ” ows through the aquifer to our springs. Nitrate flowing from the drainfield, at a concentration of 60-70 milligrams per liter, is degrading our springs. Some viruses can also be transmitted to the groundwater by septic tanks. State agencies that have the responsibility and the expertise on this issue are silent. They dare not speak due to the anti-government and anti-regulation political climate. Perhaps our elected leaders should demonstrate wisdom and seek the advice of agency experts (not agency heads or their public relations staff). Prior to every election we are reminded that our single vote contributes to a healthy democracy. Your single septic tank affects the quality of our drinking water and the health of our springs.Jim Stevenson is the former coordinator for the Ichetucknee and Wakulla Spring Basin Working Groups and former chairman of Florida Springs Task Force. He can be contacted at ” orida_springs@comcast. net.Politics and your septic tank Editor, The News: Thank you all, for all your hard work in making our “ rst Empty Bowls Project a great success, and great success it was and will continue to be. Big thanks to the Coalition for Youth for all their help and support. I want to share with you some statistics related to the event and recognize those who made contributions in a multitude of ways. First we raised $7,092.61. Our goal was $6,000. Not only did we exceed our goal, but we clearly exceeded our expectation. In regards to those that provided monetary support, I would like to thank: Carolyn Metcalf, Joann Vesecky, Kim Porter (Leon County Girl Scout Troop 57), Susie Tooke (NAMI and United Methodist Womens Group), Esther Ellis (Christ Church Anglican), Emily Smith, Ralph Thomas, Gail Campbell and son Glen (Purple Martin Nursery), Healing Arts of Wakulla County, Rachel Pienta, 4-H and AVID and Ribits Ceramic Studio customers who painted and donated a bowls. Without your support this would not have been possible. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. I would like to thank Riverspring Middle School for their 35 hand-built bowls. Two eighth grade art classes went to work on making bowls, they were beautiful. Ten beautiful bowls from the senior center through the instruction by Nancy Jefferson. Nancy Jefferson with Green Guides Associations also donated 10 bowls, made by some of the Green Guides. We would like to thank all of those who painted bowls. I would love to name all of you, but its just to many to mention and dont want to miss any. Thank you for all your beautiful bowls. Lets give a great thank for all the yummy soup that was donated by Shelley Swenson (UF/IFAS), Trudy Thompson, Florida Green Guide Association, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Rotary Club, Poseys Steam Room, Ochlocknee Bay United Methodist Church, Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park, Habitat for Humanity, Palaver Tree Theater, Ribits Ceramic, Ralph and Cynthia Thomas, Alan Brock, Madeleine Carr, Tina Johnson and the Double Tree Hotel (CARE Program). If I forgot someone please forgive me, and thank you. Thank you to Carlean Lanier from Harvest Fellowship Church and her bakers for a great and yummy Bake Sale, which raised $297. I would also like to give thanks to Petra Shuff (Chamber of Commerce) for the wonderful homemade bread. Thank you for donations from WinnDixie, Sams Club, Wal-mart and chickens and eggs from Ralph Thomas. If I missed anyone please forgive me. A great big thanks to the music played by Pickin n Grinnin, who donated their time for this worthy cause and Sharon Fox (on the saxophone). Thank you to Val and David for collecting the tickets, selling bowls, and helping with the set up. You guys were awesome. A great big thanks to all the helpers for the endless hours, standing in the heat serving soup, handing out bowls setting up tables, and the many tasks that were performed that day, the days and months before. Thank you, thank you so much for all you do and all youve done. This is a community to be proud of. This is Wakulla County and the place we call home. To all that attended and supported Empty Bowls, thank you. Haydee Jackley Ribits CeramicREADERS WRITE: ank you for support of Empty Bowls St. Marks Stone Crab Festival was success Big Brothers Big Sisters raised $5,000 Some candidates blocked funeral home

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 – Page 5AChurchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Church Briefs Emmaus to hold gathering at Crawfordville UMCThe Big Bend Walk to Emmaus Community will hold its monthly Gathering at Crawfordville United Methodist Church, 176 Ochlockonee Street on Saturday, Nov. 17. The evening will begin with a covered dish dinner at 5 p.m., music, sharing and worship will follow. The meeting is open to all who have participated in a walk and to those who would like to. Members of Tres Dias, Cursillo, Via de Cristo Communities are also invited. Call 926-7472 for more information.  Marcum Family to perform at Crawfordville UMCThe Marcum Family of Peachtree City, Ga., will present a concert on Sunday, Nov. 18, at 4 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Michael, Susan LeeAura and the four children will present a program of contemporary, gospel and original music. Each family member plays at least one instrument and all sing. Susan is the daughter of Mary and Buddy Updegraff, and grew up here in Wakulla County. The concert is free. Winter Music Festival at Harvest Fellowship Dec. 8A Winter Music Festival is set for Dec. 8 on the outdoor stage of Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. The concert will be held from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. You are invited to come and sit out on the lawn and enjoy a free musical concert featuring a variety of music styles from blue grass to hip hop, local talent, as well as visiting musicians from around the state. We’ll have a bouncy house for the little ones, a bon re with marshmallows for roasting and lots of good food. Harvest Fellowship Church and Thrift Store is sponsoring this event with the ongoing intent to make Wakulla County a great place to live. Your nancial donations will be accepted at the event. Interested Vendors should call the Harvest Thrift Store at (850) 926-3535. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDERNow that we have gotten past the recent elections, we can get back to life as normal. Of course, I am not sure what normalŽ really means. One mans normalŽ is another mans over the cliff.Ž I am not quite sure I am normal and I fear bringing this query to the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. My fear is that she will tell me the truth. You know what we Americans think about the truth. There was a time when truth was a pretty stable thing. There were certain things that were absolute truth and no ifs, ands or buts about it. Those were the good old days. Nowadays truth is not as clear as it once was. What was true in the day,Ž is now altogether a different matter. Being the simpleminded man that I am, it is very hard for me to keep up with all of this nonsense. I mean, after all, how do you know what is true if it changes all the time? I think if it is true, it is always true. That only beguiles my age. If truth is as slippery as some people are indicating, how do I know what is true today? It does not matter what was true yesterday. That was yesterday. Today is a new day and henceforth, what was true yesterday is not true today. To make matters even more confusing, what is true today will not be true tomorrow. I believe the reason I am getting bald on the top is that I am scratching my head too much lately. I cannot seem to make heads or tails out of all the nonsense transpiring today as truth. How do people keep up and know what is really true? If I plan to live quite a few more years, I am going to have to get a handle on this very thing. I am not quite sure where to go. Something has to be done so that I can “ gure out day by day what is really true. I shared my dilemma with my better half and as is usually the situation, she came up with a brilliant answer. Please, do not let her know I said that. She might get a big head and we cannot afford to buy a whole new set of hats. She simply said, Why dont you do what the politicians do?Ž I did not quite know what she was getting at, so I inquired further. Silly,Ž her pet name for Yours Truly, the politicians always take a poll before they decide on anything.Ž It dawned on me like a morning in June. Of course. Whenever a politician wants to know what truth is ” ying on any given day, he reverts to taking a poll. Out of that poll, he can know what the truth is for that day. Amazing. I need to learn some lessons from todays politician. The “ rst thing I need to understand from a politicians point of view is, What I am saying at the time is not necessarily what I mean.Ž Another thing from a politicians viewpoint is, What I said yesterday doesnt count today.Ž This also is from the polling machine. The amazing thing about most people is they do not remember what was said yesterday. A very poor politician reminds people of what they said yesterday. A politician needs to tell them what he is saying today. Because todays truth is todays truth. No need to worry about tomorrow. Tomorrow will be re” ected by tomorrows polling. This is very important because it reduces the necessity to use any sort of memory whatsoever. Because what I said yesterday does not really matter today. I do not have to remember what I said yesterday. If I want to know what I said yesterday, I need only take another poll today and that settles the matter. Perhaps the most important view from a politician is, Tomorrow may never come.Ž I do not have to worry that what I am saying today will catch up with me tomorrow, for the simple reason tomorrow may never come. If it does come, so what. I will take a poll tomorrow to “ nd out what I need to say tomorrow. I think there is something to this polling mechanism. I do not have to worry about anything; all I need to do is just take another poll. I know it may get a little confusing, but I clear up that confusion by taking another poll. It is always the last poll that really counts. Thankfully, when it comes to God, truth does not change from one day to the next. What is true today was true yesterday and will be true tomorrow. You can count on that. Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and to day, and for everŽ (Hebrews 13:8 KJV). I can always count on God being true to His Word because God never changes.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att. net. Thanksgiving is an unusual combination of a secular and a sacred holiday. It is secular because, of course, it is a day recognized by the United States as a national holiday, and sacred because of its origin: the Pilgrim feast emphasizing our basic motivation and response to being Christian … gratitude. We remember the hardships of that tiny group of Pilgrims some 370 years ago, the “ re out of which their gratitude that “ rst thanksgiving was born: uncooperative climate; the enmity of some natives; the burdens of the unknown; and the terrors of anxiety and despair. Some died “ ghting; others died hungry. Their graves were carefully smoothed over so that their enemies could not compute their losses. In the face of despair they replanted their crops, and fasted, and watched … and perhaps most importantly, they prayed. Finally, a suf“ cient harvest came; enough, anyhow, to keep them alive. The settlers called in the friendlier Indians and set a day for Thanksgiving to God. They had been delivered. Once again there was hope for the new world. Their passion for this new land was renewed. In these United States of America, we who are the bene“ ciaries of our forbears courage and faith, Thanksgiving Day is a call for us to remember, and remember rightly. For us who are Christian, worship our way of remembering rightly; a call to remember that it is God who has delivered us, set us free, and sent us out. Christ Church Anglican will celebrate our national Day of Thanksgiving on Wednesday, Nov. 21, Thanksgiving eve. Worship will begin at 7 p.m. Christ Church is located at 3383 Coastal Highway, just east of the high school. Pastor Ethel Skipper of Skipper Temple Church will have a free Thanksgiving Dinner on Saturday, Nov. 17, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The church plans to feed 100 people. If you are unable to come in because you are shut in, please call and let us know by calling (850) 962-7838 or (850) 510-6653 and someone will deliver your dinner. Free to the community. Skipper Temple Church is located at 165 Surf Road in Sopchoppy.Thanksgiving celebrationsChrist Church Anglican Skipper Temple OUT TO PASTORThou pollest too much, methinks

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By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 9 … Florida Democrats hadnt celebrated much since, well, President Obama won the state in 2008. But that changed Tuesday. Obama carried Florida again on the way to a second term in the White House, U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson easily won re-election, and Democratic candidates picked up legislative and congressional seats. For Republicans, the response to the election results ranged from anger to disbelief. After vowing for four years to topple Obama, they watched Republican Mitt Romneys campaign get outmaneuvered in Florida and other key states. Whats more, GOP candidates lost some high-pro“ le legislative races … including a likely defeat by state Rep. Chris Dorworth, who was in line to become House speaker in 2014. The GOP still has huge majorities in the state House and Senate and controls the governors of“ ce and all three Cabinet seats. In other words, Republicans will continue to dominate state government, at least for another two years. HEADING BACK TO WASHINGTON: Truth be told, Florida will go down as sort of a messy footnote in Obamas victory Tuesday. The president did well enough in other key states, such as Ohio, Virginia and Iowa, to lock up another term without needing Floridas 29 electoral votes. Also, as part of Floridas never-ending voting controversies, some Miami-Dade voters were still in line early Wednesday morning, after Obama was already assured of victory. But bigger picture, Obamas Florida campaign played a part in turning out voters who helped Democrats in other races. That included Hispanic voters in central Florida, where the Puerto Rican population is growing and providing a base of Democratic support. State Democratic Chairman Rod Smith described Hispanics as an absolute game changerŽ for Democrats. He said the party hired a full-time Hispanic outreach coordinator in central Florida after the 2010 elections and also said the Obama team helped increase Hispanic turnout. They saw very early that was going to be a critical vote in Florida,Ž Smith said. An important issue is the perceived hard line that many Republicans have taken on the issue of illegal immigration. But U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., indicated after the election that the GOP needs to do a better job of connecting with Hispanic voters. The conservative movement should have particular appeal to people in minority and immigrant communities who are trying to make it, and Republicans need to work harder than ever to communicate our beliefs to them,Ž Rubio told Roll Call. Obama beat Romney in the most-populous counties along the I-4 corridor … Orange, Hillsborough and Pinellas … and in Osceola County, which has a large Puerto Rican population. Romney won in other areas of central Florida, including Polk, Lake, Seminole and Brevard counties. Volusia was almost a dead-heat, with Romney winning by less than 3,000 votes. Nelson did even better as he trounced U.S. Rep. Connie Mack to earn a third term in the Senate. The Democrat handily won Orange, Hillsborough, Pinellas, Osceola, Polk, Seminole, Brevard and Volusia counties, while losing by fewer than 2,000 votes in Lake. LEGISLATIVE SHOWDOWNS AND SURPRISES: Going into Tuesdays elections, the parties and outside groups made pretty clear the races they considered battlegrounds. But as returns rolled in, surprises started to emerge. First, Democrat Carl Zimmermann unseated Rep. Peter Nehr, R-Palm Harbor, in House District 65 in Pinellas County. A little later, Democrat Mark Danish knocked off Rep. Shawn Harrison, R-Tampa, in House District 63 in Hillsborough County. But then came the biggest stunner: Lawyer and retired “ re“ ghter Mike Clelland led Dorworth by 123 votes after provisional ballots were counted Thursday, and he appeared on the verge of victory. The race would be a huge upset because Dorworth is slated to become House speaker in 2014. Republican House members were preparing Friday for a Dorworth loss, with Rep. Steve Crisafulli, R-Merritt Island, being touted as a possible speaker in 2014. Overall, Democrats had net gains of two Senate seats and a probably “ ve House seats in Tuesdays elections … though Republicans still dominate both chambers. Republicans will have a 26-14 advantage in the Senate and a 76-44 margin in the House. YES AND NO: Meritretention elections for Supreme Court justices usually draw little attention. But that changed this year when some conservative groups and leaders of the state Republican Party called for defeating justices R. Fred Lewis, Barbara Pariente and Peggy Quince. In the end, the races werent even close, with each of the justices backed by more than 67 percent of the voters. Ballots also included a barrage of proposed constitutional amendments that lawmakers put before voters. But voters rejected eight of the 11 amendments, approving only three, relatively non-controversial proposals that would offer property tax breaks for military veterans, “ rst responders and low-income seniors. STORY OF THE WEEK: President Obama and U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson win Florida, while Democrats also make gains in the Legislature and in the states congressional delegation. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: So the message is: If you are outside the state and you are trying to politicize our judicial branch, stay out. This is an assault on our democracy, our separation of powers, and were not going to tolerate attempts to implement partisan politics for special interests.Ž … Supreme Court Justice Barbara Pariente, after she and two other justices overcame conservative groups opposition to win merit-retention campaigns. Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChristine Gibson Sexton, devoted mother and grandmother, 73, of North Port, died on Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, at Capital Regional Medical Center in Tallahassee after an extended illness. She was born on Feb. 9, 1939, at Colson, Ky., the daughter of Charlie Gibson and Polly Sexton Gibson. She lived in Kentucky, and then Chicago, Ill., prior to moving to Green“ eld, Ind., in 1971, where she lived until 1984, when she moved to Venice. She was a member of the First Baptist Church of North Point, and also a member of Faith Fellowship Church, in Crawfordville. She graduated from Indiana UniversityPurdue University of Indianapolis (IUPUI) in 1977 with her degree in nursing. She went on to work in Green“ eld, Ind., Venice, Port Charlotte, and Tallahassee until she retired in 1997. Funeral services were held on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012, at 10 a.m. at Hindman Funeral Services Chapel, Hindman, Ky. Burial followed in the Bill Gibson Cemetery, Rockhouse, Ky., under the direction of Hindman Funeral Services. Please sign the guest book at www.hindmanfuneralservices.com. Survivors include her sons, Randy Sexton of Hazard, Ky., and Andy Sexton of Sarasota; daughter, Pamela Sexton (Bryan) Alyea of Crawfordville; brothers, Doug (Von) Gibson of Green“ eld, Ind., and Joe (Mary) Gibson of Litt Carr, Ky.; sisters, Reba Dennis, Symolene Anderson and Shirley (Gibson) Walker, all of Canton, Ohio, and Norma Jean Gibson of Green“ eld, Ind.: and sister-in-law, Mary Craft Gibson of Red Fox, Ky.; seven grandchildren, Candace Sexton, Trish (Alyea) ONeill, both of Greenville, Ind., Tonya Alyea, Mount Olive, Ala., Brandon Alyea, Leland Alyea and Kelsey Alyea, all of Crawfordville; Allison Joy Sexton of High Point, N.C., and a host of nieces and nephews, family and friends. She was predeceased by her husbands, Lenville Sexton Jr. of Whitesburg, Ky., and Ralph Anthony Bucata of North Port; her parents, Charlie Gibson and Polly Sexton Gibson of Colson, Ky.; and brothers, Chester Gibson and Lester Gibson of Knott County, Ky. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, assisted with arrangements. (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfh.com) Michael Lynn Roberts, 56, passed away peacefully on Nov. 4, 2012, from cancer at his parents home in Wakulla County. He was born in Fort Walton Beach and lived in Satellite Beach for six years where his parents were employed in the Aerospace Industry, and later moved to Tallahassee. He attended Godby High School, and Lively Vocational School where he earned his Certi“ cation in Construction Drafting and Design. In his younger years, he was employed at Florida State University, and later with the Leon County Facilities Management, but in recent years was a self-employed cabinet maker. He lived in Wakulla County the last four years. Over the last several years, he had successfully overcome all the challenges his life had presented him and was in a very good and peaceful place. He was a very skilled cabinetmaker, had a passion for his woodworking; he could get lost in it for hours. Give him a piece of wood and he would turn it into a piece of art. One of his most notable undertakings was the painstaking reclaiming of wainscoting and oak ” ooring from his great-grandparents 90-year-old home, which he used for ” ooring and customized cabinets in his Lake Talquin home which he called his lake house. More recently, he had painstakingly furnished, what he called his beach house, with unique and beautiful pieces of furniture he designed and crafted to blend in with his customized cabinets, ” ooring and walls. He was very artistic and creative with his work and the reclaiming of old furniture and had a real gift for working with colors. He loved camping, the beach, the sunshine and surf “ shing. He reminisced frequently about his happy times on the beach at either St. George Island, Panama City Beach or Deer“ eld Beach near Boca Raton. He also loved the outdoors, as well as his plants, fruit trees and gardens he tended to lovingly. His passion for gardening was a gift from his Grandma Callahan. He spent many of his young and adolescent years digging holes for her and helping her with plants and trees. As her “ rst grandchild, they shared a very special bond. He was an avid Seminole fan and NASCAR fan, and cheered his favorite driver, Tony Stewart, in pursuit of the checkered ” ag in every race of the 36 week season for years. His interests were broad and always made for interesting conversation, anything from the Great Wall of China, the wonders of archeological digs of our ancient cultures, hiking the Appalachian Trail to mans adventures in space. Mike never claimed to be ordinary, although he was a simple soul, he was a very unique personality, he walked in the way of his heart, and like Frank Sinatra, He did it his way.Ž Until this illness, he was a healthy, athletic, outgoing, happy, active, vibrant and energetic presence. His square jaw, his sparkling eyes and smile, and his throaty chuckle were as big as life. Until the day he left us, he never met a stranger; he trusted and always called everyone his friend. He leaves to mourn his death, his parents, Annette and Dave Roberts of Panacea; three loving aunts, Carolyn (Gerry) Losey and Beverly Ashby of Tallahassee, Julie Currie of Ferguson, Mo.; his ex-wife, good friend and mother of his only child, Kimberly Roberts; Kathy Moore, friend and long time companion; many cousins, extended family and a multitude of friends who will all miss him sorely. He was predeceased by his only son, Ivon Lynn Roberts; maternal grandparents, Margaret and Roy Callahan of Tallahassee; paternal grandparents, Wayvo and Barney Weitzel of Hot Springs, Ark.; his cousin and good friend, Doris Losey of Tallahassee; his aunt, Jeslyn Dancer of El Cajon, Calif.; and his uncle and good friend, ButchŽ Callahan of Tallahassee. A memorial and graveside service will be held with family and friends at a later date. In lieu of ” owers, memorial gifts may be made to the Convenant Hospice House, 1545 Raymond Diehl Road, Suite 102, Tallahassee FL 32308. The family wishes to express special gratitude to his Covenant Hospice nurses (truly Guardian Angels), Niki, Beverly, Marilyn, Nancy, Laura, Rene, Debbie and Connie, for the dedicated, vigilant attention they gave to Mikes care. Obituaries Johnnie ‘Pa John’ Carroll Randall ‘Randy’ Richard Gray William Roscoe Revell Michael Lynn Roberts Christine Gibson SextonJohnnie Pa JohnŽ Carroll, 82, of Crawfordville, died on Nov. 3, 2012. A lifelong native of Florida, he had lived in Crawfordville since 1997. He was an electrical lineman for the City of Tallahassee, and was a member of local NBEW #222. A memorial service will be held on Nov. 15, at 6:30 p.m. at Skybox Sports Bar & Grill in Crawfordville. Survivors include his son, Jonny Carroll; daughter, Donna (Doug) Gyuricsko; and his grandchildren. Fairchild Funeral Home (386-8686) is in charge of arrangements. Randall RandyŽ Richard Gray, 66, of Crawfordville, passed away on Nov. 7, 2012. He is survived by his wife of 40 years, Katherine Louise Vickers. He was born on July 23, 1946, in Tallahassee, and has lived in this area for 43 years. He was a member of River of Life Church. He was in the U.S. Air Force. He loved hunting and “ shing. He was a member of Simmons Pasture Hunt Club. He was a loving husband, father and grandfather. Visitation was held Friday, Nov. 9, 2012, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012, at 11 a.m. at Debra Nell Cemetery in Spring Creek. Besides his wife, other survivors include his son, Rich Gray (Denise) of Zephyrhills; brothers, Dell Gray and Jake Gray of Crawfordville; mother-inlaw, Catherine Jarvis (Donald); sister-in-law, Cherie Herndon; brother-in-law, Zendel Vickers (Susan); grandchildren, Shawn and Rachel; and many nieces and nephews. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-9263333 www.bevisfh.com)Johnnie ‘Pa John’ Carroll Michael Lynn Roberts Randall ‘Randy’ Richard Gray William Roscoe Revell Christine Gibson SextonWilliam Roscoe Revell, 73, formerly of Sopchoppy, died on Nov. 6, 2012, at Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare. He was born May 10, 1939, in Sopchoppy. He retired from the U.S. Air Force after 27 years. He was laid to rest at West Sopchoppy Cemetery on Friday, Nov. 9, at 1 p.m. Survivors include nine children, John Revell of Alabama, Charles Revell (Anne Hargrove) of Crawfordville, Leona (Sammy) Green and Sarah (Gilbert) Sanders of Sopchoppy, Tommy (Maryanne) Revell of Georgia, Shirley (Chris) Polk of Texas, Sharon (Jess) Armstrong of Virginia, Mike Revell and Robert RoscoeŽ Revell of Crawfordville. He was predeceased by his wife, Julia A. Revell. Grace Baptist Church in Crawfordville will offer a free clothing give away on Saturday, Nov. 17, at the church. The event will be held from noon to 2 p.m. Grace Baptist is located at 803 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 926-3217 or (850) 926-1034.Free clothing give away on Saturday at Grace Baptist WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Dems move forward; GOP still in control Christmas decorations, games, toys, books, tapes, dishes, household items, small kitchen appliances, clothes, new & used items. Something for everyone! Super Yard Sale Christmas Bazaar and Bake Sale First Baptist Church of Wakulla Station • 945 Woodville Hwy.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 – Page 7Ahappenings CommunityParmer marries Hillier Carly Hillier and Jeremy Parmer, both of Crawfordville, were married on Oct. 20 at 6 p.m. at Shiloh Farm. The ceremony was of“ ciated by Doc Dockery. The bride is the daughter of Sean and Terry Hillier of Crawfordville. The groom is the son of Jeff and Rita Parmer of Crawfordville. The matron of honor was Sara Turner, sister of the bride. Her bridesmaid was Amy Parmer. The best man was John Landrum. The groomsman was Bobby Turner. The bride is a 2008 graduate of Wakulla High School and is a dental hygiene student at Tallahassee Community College. The groom is a 2006 graduate of Wakulla High School and currently works at Progress Energy. Chelsea Kay Lawhon celebrated her first birthday on Oct. 5. She is the daughter of Rob and Stephenie Lawhon of Tallahassee. Her maternal grandparents are the late Ken and Elaine Matthews. Her paternal grandparents are Mitch and Pam Lawhon of Sopchoppy. Her maternal great-grandparents are the late Hardy and Lucy Revell and the late Thurston and Grace Matthews. Her paternal great-grandparents are the late James and Ruth Lawhon, Jim and Betty Ward and the late Lilly Ward.Building is named after Sopchoppy nativeSpecial to The NewsConstruction activity at Embry-Riddles rapidly expanding Daytona Beach campus has become the norm, but the grand opening of the Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center on Oct. 26 will be special … it marks the return to campus of senior leadership displaced by a 2006 tornado that destroyed the previous administration building. Its exciting to be back on campus, to actively engage with our students, faculty and staff and be energized by their enthusiasm and ideas,Ž said EmbryRiddle President Dr. John P. Johnson. Theres really no substitute for daily interaction and this striking new building puts us back where we belong.Ž The $13 million, 37,000-square-foot structure holds of“ ce and meeting spaces for Dr. Johnson, the Cabinet and the Board of Trustees. It is named for Embry-Riddle board chairman Jim Henderson, currently the chairman and CEO of Assured Partners Inc. in Lake Mary. Henderson is a native of Sopchoppy and a 1964 graduate of Sopchoppy High School. He is the son of the late Allen Willis and Sarah Willis Henderson. Those who attended the event included Hendersons brothers and sister, Jack Henderson and wife, Ann of Crawfordville, John Henderson of Tallahassee and Barbara Scott of Chester“ eld, Va. As a dual-purpose building, the sleek and swooping Henderson Center with its outdoor reflection pools and fountains is an impressive introduction to Embry-Riddle for all visitors to campus, whether prospective students and their parents, members of the local community or the nations leading aviation and aerospace professionals. In the airy atrium that soars more than 50 feet high, visitors can touch three interactive kiosks to view a map of the campus and learn about EmbryRiddle degree programs, research, astronaut alumni, leadership and history, all displayed on 70-inch screens. For university and community events, a large hall and the atrium seat 350. At a later date a sculpture of a bronze eagle with a 7-foot wingspan, titled Sky King, will be installed in the atrium, a generous donation from longtime benefactor Dr. Helen Wessel. The Henderson Center is the product of architects Gresham, Smith and Partners; general contractor Elkins Constructors Inc.; and around 40 subcontractors, mostly from Volusia County. Over the course of construction we employed approximately 300 people,Ž said Chris Hardesty, EmbryRiddles director of planning and construction management. We considered it a top priority to support the local economy.ŽSpecial to The NewsWakullas very own Heartbreaker did it again, bringing home her eighth, JRTCA National Championship. Heartbreaker at 11 years young old, showed all the Jack Russell racers shes not ready to retire. Qualifying race after race, ” at track to hurdles, Heartbreaker lost only one race all day. As the crowd watched anxiously at the start box the gates burst open and Heartbreaker had the lead. She never looked back and clinched her eighth National Championship. Along for the ride and the race, Travis and Mary, Ms. B and Dip. More than 700 other Jack Russells and their parents, showed up at Hagerstown Maryland, to the Washington County Agricultural Center, enjoying the day and seeing who had the fastest Jack Russell. Ms. B, ran well in several of her races, she was winning by the half way mark on a few, but just couldnt seem to follow through at the “ nish line. Third place is the best she could do. Dip, who has won one National Championship, just wasnt on her game. Heartbreakers sons from Jacks BŽ Quick, Goose and Maverick, won their division, Goose winning his second National Championship and Maverick bringing in his second Reserve National Championship. All in all it was a good weekend for the Jacks BŽ Quick family. Jacks BŽ Quick Kennels is looking into the future, to bring Wakulla another line of National Champions with the addition of the pups Lil Bug and Scoot, they have been out training and running with the big dogs and Travis thinks they are more than ready to start a new legacy of racers. Their “ rst of“ cial race will be this coming December, in Enigma, Ga., at the Yuletide Jack Russell Terrier Trial. Mr. and Mrs. Parmer Happy birthday, Chelsea Chelsea K. Lawhon PHOTOS COURTESY OF EMBRY-RIDDLEJim Henderson, above, gives a speech during the grand opening of the welcome center, below, on Oct. 26. Heartbreaker wins eighth national championship Heartbreaker along with other Jack Russells competes for the coveted JRTCA National Championship title. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Holiday project for seniors has begunSpecial to The NewsBe a Santa to a Senior, the campaign that delivers gifts to local needy seniors, is being planned again this holiday season. The area office of the Home Instead Senior Care network is joining with community partners in Wakulla, Leon, Gadsden, Jefferson and Franklin counties to provide gifts and companionship to seniors who otherwise might not receive either. Heres how to help these struggling seniors: Pick up ornaments with the first names of seniors and their gift requests from Christmas trees, which will be up at and NHC Home Care at 3034 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville on Nov. 12 through Dec. 17. Buy items on the list and return them unwrapped to the store, along with the ornaments attached. For more information, visit www.beasantatoasenior.com or call 297-1897. Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolPre-k students learn about “ re safety Special to The NewsFirefighter Don Burton visited with the Wakulla County Schools prekindergarten programs at Wakulla and Sopchoppy Education Centers in October to discuss fire safety with the students. He stressed the importance of having a home “ re escape plan and family meeting place when the smoke alarm sounds. Students also practiced the stop, drop and rollŽ technique, as well as received a tour of the equipment on the “ re truck. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla pre-kindergarten students listen to “ re“ ghter Don Burton as he tells them about the equipment on the “ re truck. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents Gracie Bruce, Ali Harden and Raul Whickham hit the million word mark.Special to The NewsCrawfordville Elementary School celebrated the fun of reading and the reward of working hard by hosting a gigantic picnic for all students who met their reading goal during the “ rst nine weeks of school. The picnic was held on the playground area with hotdogs, drinks, chips and sno cones. Students played, had plenty to eat and got to feel the satisfaction of being one of the 300 students participating in the picnic. The weather was beautiful, the volunteers were plentiful and the day was delightful! Teachers and parents play a large role in the reading success at Crawfordville Elementary. The teachers meet weekly with each individual student to discuss what book the student is reading, the amount of reading being done each day, the appropriate level of the book, and most of all being sure the child is enjoying the book that is being read. Teachers keep reading charts in their room to track and display the number of books a child successfully “ nishes and how the class is doing as a whole. The importance of reading is continuously stressed while the joy of reading is never forgotten. The media specialist, Cindy Burse, also plays a large role in the reading program at Crawfordville Elementary School. She sponsors the schools Million Word Reader program, as well as other reading programs for the younger grades. Burse takes an active role in incentives offered to students, she gives encouraging words, she arranges for extra time to be spent with children to help them find that perfectŽ book, and she is one of our schools number one fans when it comes to showing the fun of reading and how it can impact a childs life. The whole school participates in reading and takes a competitive approach when it comes to being a member of the Million Word Reader Club. They will continue to celebrate the small successes that each child has throughout every nine weeks, as well as a large celebration at the end of each nine weeks. Parents encouraging their children to read and reading with their children signi“ cantly improves the probability of success in all academic areas. Impressively, the school has three students who have already reached their million word status and are well on their way to their 2 million word mark. These three students are Gracie Bruce, Ali Harden and Raul Whickham. We are proud of all of our students but would like to offer a special congratulations to these three avid readers,Ž said Principal Angie Walker. They are role models for all of us.Ž Congratulations to all of Crawfordvilles readers! Keep on reading, Cougars,Ž she added. Picnic held for Crawfordville readersBingo for Books is held at Crawfordville Special to The NewsHow do you get a free dinner for your entire family, get a free brand new book for all of the children in your family, have an evening of fun and laughter with unlimited popcorn and soda? Come to Crawfordville Elementary School when they are sponsoring one of their Bingo for Books nights. The schools cafeteria was packed from one end to the other with folks lining up for food and scrambling to get their new Bingo card before the next game began. There was a record turnout with more than 165 adults and 150 children. Teachers and school staff refilled cups of soda, placed hotdogs on buns and helped to make sure each and every person attending had new Bingo cards for each game. The crowd was anxious to play and extremely reluctant to leave. One more Bingo gameŽ was heard from the crowd at the end of the night and one more was what the crowd got. Bingo for Books is a way for Crawfordville to provide a fun-“ lled family night for their parents, strengthen school and home connections, stress the importance of reading, and place more books in the homes of lots of families. Being a competent reader is the single most important ingredient in a childs academic success, and Crawfordville Elementary is trying not only to inform parents about how to help their child read at home, but they are also showing them how to help their child read at home. Every child is a winner at Bingo for Books because win or lose at the Bingo game, each child leaves with a new book in hand. Bingo for Books is only possible because of Title 1 funds allocated to the school by the District, the support of the schools PTA who also allocates funds for the evening, Pepsi Company and Scott Cason for continually supporting every event requiring liquid refreshments throughout the year, and the faculty and staff for their unwavering support and belief in the importance of school and family connections. Crawfordville Elementary School is fortunate to have the faculty and staff who are there and for the incredible parents who support the school each and every day. Re“nance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a ”oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Of“ce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Of“ce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Of“ce: 850.926.1960 New From SYP Publishing!THE GREENS AND CORNBREAD OF WAKULLA COUNTY Historical Stories Told by the People This delightful book is a collection of stories depicting the history of Wakulla County. The stories were written and submitted by different authors and families. The text includes a wide variety of topics and time periods. Many of the stories contain photos that were included by the author. Available NOW!! $29.95 As a publisher, we are constantly searching for authors and groups that wish to have works of a historical or regional signi“cance published. You may have a local book of stories and lore, a genealogy study, or a text on any speci“c historical, collectible or unique item. If you are looking for a publisher, consider contacting us. In Search Of The Diamond Brooch In Search of The Diamond Brooch is a southern historical saga starting with the migration of the pioneer families to the North Florida area. This is the story of a family that settled in North Florida in the early 1800s in Wakulla and Leon Counties. Written by Pete Gerrell & Terri Gerrell $24.95SYP Publishing 4351 Natural Bridge Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32305 www.syppublishing.com 850-421-7420 New F 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Help Big Bend Hospice Honor Those Who Are No Longer With Us Big Bend HospiceTree of Remembrance 2012 2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.orgVisit our Wakulla County Tree at Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial Bank in Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 – Page 9A & Dramatis Personae presents one-actsBy SUSAN SOLBURGWHS Drama TeacherWakulla Highs Dramatis Personae members are busy rehearsing for their up-coming Annual OneAct Plays. Each fall the drama department presents two one-act plays for students to participate in. One play is chosen to go to the District One Thespian Festival in January. The cast of this play must be comprised of students who are already members of Thespian Troupe No. 5036 or are about to earn the points that will qualify them for membership. The District Play for 2012 is the hilarious comedy about a couple, their car, a monkey and a clown. Reese & Babe,Ž written by Lew Holton, has an awesome cast of four outstanding seniors: Chelsea Austin and Hunter Wheatcraft are a young couple dealing with the aftermath of an auto accident in a most unusual manner. Caitlyn Wagner plays Salty the Clown who comes looking for some answers and Alex Lewis plays the investigating Police Of“ cer who is covering the accident. If you are fans of I Love LucyŽ and The Carol Burnett ShowŽ then you will love this fast paced and zany play. The other play is the most produced one-act play in America, a comedy written by Jonathan Rand entitled Check Please.Ž The story is about all the insanely crazy characters you can meet when you subject yourself to Blind Dating. Set in a restaurant, two hapless singles, played by Emily Davis and Brett DeRoss, go through a series of bad to worse dating situations that will have you rolling in the aisles. Krissy Sanders, an FSU theatre education graduate and former WHS student, will be directing this show. Sanders directed last years Competition PieceŽ and is thrilled to be returning to her alma mater once again to work with a cast of 24 enthusiastic theatre students. You do not want to miss these hilarious performances. The shows begin for the public on Friday, Nov. 16 and runs through Sunday, Nov. 18. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. and there is a 2:30 p.m. matinee on Sunday. Tickets will be sold at the door: $6 for adults; $5 and $4 for students. Please come out to the Wakulla High Auditorium and support these talented students.Special to The NewsThe musical duo Hot Tamale will have a CD release party for Wakulla County on Nov. 23 at Poseys Dockside Cafe in Panacea. Hot Tamale, a Tallahassee-based group made up of Adrian Fogelin and Craig Reeder, has deep roots in Wakulla County. Last Fall, the acoustic duo put on a theatrical production called The Sopchoppy Home CompanionŽ at Posh Java in Sopchoppy. They have played at the Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival, the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival and the From the Heart Music Hour,Ž a songwriters showcase produced by the Sopchoppy music studio of the same name. Plus, they have produced two songs about Wakulla County, Wakulla Green,Ž which they have sold to support the Wakulla County Green Guides, and a humorous, rollicking ode to the charms of Wakulla County called Wild about Wakulla.Ž Hot Tamale recently released their CD, titled Made from Scratch,Ž in Tallahassee, and now they plan to bring this new music to their many friends in Wakulla County. The CD has 10 original songs, including the two mentioned above, and ranges in style from acoustic new folk,Ž to vintage blues and Americana.Ž The lead song was produced at the From the Heart Studio in Sopchoppy, and features the wellknown Wakulla County artist Frank Lindamood on banjo. Hot Tamale has been described by the Tallahassee Democrat as tons of fun,Ž and they have established a reputation for lively, upbeat performances all around the Big Bend region for the last three years. Poseys Dockside Caf is situated on the scenic coastline of the Apalachee Bay in Panacea. The show starts at 7:30 p.m., and there is no cover charge. This is not a get-rich scheme. Well be playing for tips and CD sales, and mainly to see all our wonderful Wakulla friends,Ž said Reeder.Special to The NewsOn Saturday, Nov. 17, at 8 p.m., James TuckŽ Tucker will perform at Posh Java. Singer/songwriter and dobro/guitar player James TuckŽ Tucker has been described as one of the nations premier dobroists,Ž in the Florida Times Union. He describes his music as a mixture of blues, bluegrass and old country. Born and raised in Florida, he now says that home is pretty much wherever the RV is parked.Ž Tucker became a serious musician after graduating from high school in 1975. He toured the U.S. with an established band called Harmony Grits until the group broke up in 1980. He then joined another band, Red and Murphy and Co.,Ž and toured another “ ve years. Visit www.jamestucktucker.com for more information and to listen to Tuckers music. For reservations contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@yahoo.com. Tickets are $10. Posh Java is located on the corner of Rose Street and Winthrop Avenue in Sopchoppy. For a list of upcoming concerts visit www.poshjava.com PHOTO BY SUSAN SOLBURG/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS‘REESE & BABE:’ Caitlyn Wagner, center, as Salty the Clown, who comes looking for some answers from Hunter Wheatcraft and Chelsea Austin. James ‘Tuck’ Tucker to appear at Posh JavaDobroist-songwriter James Tuck Tucker.Hot Tamale sets Wakulla CD release party at Posey’s DocksideSPECIAL TO THE NEWSAdrian Fogelin and Craig Reeder of Hot Tamale will hold a Wakulla CD release party at Poseys. Special entertainment by Local Motion Join us for an evening of GREAT WHEELS, DINNER & ENTERTAINMENT! SATURDAY – NOVEMBER 17, 5:00 – 10:00 p.m. 3Y RANCH CRAWFORDVILLE Enter your Wheels $10.00 per entry Wheels Show ONLY $5.00 a car load at the gate Dinner and entertainment $35.00 per person Cash Bar Table Sponsorship $300.00 Enter your wheels for free with purchase of a dinner ticket (Limit 1 per ticket) We’re looking for: Best Original, Best Classic, Hottest Hog, Best Hunt’n Truck, Best Dressed Bike and more. Lots of Prizes! F O R M O R E I N F O R M A T I O N C O N T A C T h e l p k w c b @ g m a i l c o m ( 8 5 0 ) 7 4 5 7 1 1 1 V i s i t o u r w e b s i t e : K W C B O R G S p e c i a a l en t er t a i n m en n us f o r a a n e e ve n i n g g o f f S S S S S S i i i l l l l t t t t t t t i i i i t b b b L L l l M M i i J J J J J i f f f f f f i i i i f f f f f 1st Annual KEEP WAKULLA COUNTY BEAUTIFUL BLUE JEANS & FAST MACHINES Register to enter your car, truck, motorcycle, classic, custom, and antique wheels! All proceeds go to our educational grants, beautification projects and annual projects such as Hazardous Waste Collection Day, National Forest and Coastal Cleanups. KWCB is a 501 (C) (3) organization. FUND RAISER SILENT AUCTION & STEAK DINNER $ 10.00NOVEMBER 16TH from 5 PM … 8PM at SHELLPOINT FIRE HOUSE FOR TICKETS CONTACT MARION at 926-9023 ALSO AT CENTURY 21 in SHELLPOINTFishing TripJewelry Gift BasketsArt For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & Exterior Together We Are Providing Employment for Local Craftsman FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comA morsel of genuine history is a thing so rare as to be always valuableŽ … Thomas Jefferson.As a very young boy, and prior to the death of my grandfather, J. Y. Gresham, in 1957, I learned from him that scattered throughout the sand ” ats and marshes within sight of the St. Marks Lighthouse, and beyond, there were ruins of furnaces, kettles and vats, which were built by private individuals and the government of the Confederate States of America to produce salt. However, it was not until I retired and returned to Wakulla County that I had the free time and, thankfully, the good health to act on that knowledge and try to locate some of those works, if they still existed. Because those ruins are generally located in remote and almost inaccessible areas, and it would be foolish for a man at my advanced age to venture out there alone, I needed a partner to accompany me. I found the perfect partner in George Parker, who I have known since high school (Leon High class of 1960). George lives in Wyoming but has the presence of mind to come south in the winter (a snowbird) so as not to freeze to death in those blizzards which sweep through the Northern Plains. He is interested in history, is in tolerably good health and, just like me, likes to explore. So two or three years ago, George and I began searching for the salt works. We have been very successful. We have located dozens of ruins, generally from around the Wakulla Beach and Goose Creek areas over to the Port Leon and East River areas. I should warn anyone who, after reading this, may want to search for the salt works that you must be in good health and probably shouldnt go alone. It can be physically exhausting. The salt works in the vicinity of Port Leon are particularly dif“ cult to reach as the Port Leon road is barricaded and locked. It takes the better part of the day just to get near the Salt Works there after a very long walk on the road and then out through the marsh and bogs. George and I tried bicycles, but even that will wear you down. Also, be careful not to enter areas that are off limits, particularly those that are marked as roosting sites for eagles. You should also not remove artifacts. Most of the salt works are located on islandsŽ which are small clumps of trees which are out in the salt marshes and sand ” ats between the wood line and the bay. They all have at least one, and usually several man-made wells close by. The ruins consist of bricks from the furnaces and iron from the kettles or vats. Some are in fairly good condition but most are in advanced stages of disrepair. I found two literary sources particularly enlightening and will quote them in part. First, The Civil War and Reconstruction in FloridaŽ by William Watson Davis: During the “ rst year of war, works for the making of salt by boiling sea-water in great kettles and sheetiron boilers were established along the bays and sequestered inlets of the Florida coast, particularly on the western coastƒ The industry grew so rapidly that by the autumn of 1862 thousands of bushels of salt were being manufactured daily and scores of teams were hauling it into the more populous interior … most of it, out of state. Several thousand men were employed in the work. By Confederate law, salt makers were exempted from military serviceƒ The Florida legislature encouraged the industry thus springing up on its usually lonely seacoastƒ On November 24th 1862, a Federal expedition from Pensacola entered St. Andrews Bay (Panama City). It was night. The sky was lit up to east and west away inland for a long distance, reported the Federal commander. Fog hung over the water next morning as the Federal boats approached the usually lonely shores of St. Andrews Bay. As we came nearer we not only heard voices but we heard dogs barking, and horses neighing, and we felt quite sure we had stumbled upon a company of cavalry, stated Lieutenant Commander Hart of the Albatrossƒ By December 8th, 466 salt pans, kettles or cauldrons, each over a crude bricked furnace, had been destroyedƒ About a thousand bushels of salt were destroyed, as well as some “ fty wagons and several score shacks, cabins, and rough store housesƒ We had to knock down all the brick work, to destroy the salt already made, to knock in the heads and set “ re to barrels, boxes, and everything that would hold salt, and to disable and burn up the wagons that we found loaded with it. St. Marks Bay had been visited by the salt-destroyers, February 17-19, 1862ƒ Hundreds of furnaces … 50 of them under sheet iron boilers of near 1,000 gallons capacity each were broken up. 250 houses and a quantity of provisions were burned. The estimated value of the property lost here was $3,000,000. Most of the works were said to be Confederate property.Ž Brie” y, an account from the diary of Susan Bradford Eppes of Tallahassee in her book, Through Some Eventful Years:Ž October 27th, 1863 … We went to the salt works today and though I am tired and dirty and have no good place to write, I am going to try to tell you about itƒ Father brought us with him and we will stay three days, so he can see how they are getting on. We are to sleep in a tent, on a ticking “ lled with pine straw. It will be a novel experience. I am so interested in seeing the salt made from the water. The great big sugar kettles are “ lled full of water and “ res made beneath the kettles. They are a long time heating up and then they boil merrily. Ben and Tup and Sam keep the “ res going, for they must not cool down the least little bit. A white foam comes at “ rst and then the dirtiest scum you ever saw bubbles and dances over the surface, as the water boils away it seems to get thicker and thicker, at last only a wet mass of what looks like sand remains. This they spread on smooth oaken planks to dryƒ The salt “ nished in fair weather is much whiter and nicer in every way than that dried in bad weather, but this dark salt is used to salt meat or to pickle porkƒ Father does not get any pay whatsoever for the salt he makesƒ Yankee gun boats have been sighted once lately and there is no knowing when the salt works may be attacked. (Note: This salt work is believed to have been near St. Marks.) Although the works were attacked and much destruction caused by Federal raiding parties, they were always rebuilt and placed back in operation until the end of the war in 1865. The photograph included is from a Salt Works located near East River and the St. Marks Lighthouse. Federal forces reported using sledge hammers to destroy the iron kettles, which appears to have been used on the kettle photographed. Red Clay Footprints By John RobertsConfederate Salt Worksfrom St. Andrews Bay to Apalachee BaySPECIAL TO THE NEWSJohn Roberts at the salt works located near the East River and the St. Marks Lighthouse. The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers … if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bar“eld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year. YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible. For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program. Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor ofƒ Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com blessedare those whomourn 2012 Service of RemembranceSunday, December 2nd at 4:00pm Hudson Park21 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville Please call Pam at 850-926-9308 for more information. HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 – Page 11Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn Nov. 5, Steve Nunnery of Panacea reported a fire near Big Top Grocery in Panacea. Deputy Gibby Gibson responded and observed Sheriff Donnie Crum spraying water on an already contained “ re. Nunnery had a small “ re going that got out of hand and damaged a fence and palm trees. Approximately $500 damage was done to the trees and the fence. The sheriff helped put out the fire before the “ re department arrived on the scene. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: NOVEMBER 1 € Betty Havey of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim stated that former tenants damaged the inside of a home she is responsible for and also destroyed a mailbox. Extensive damage was observed to the inside and outside of the home and property with damage estimated at a value of $2,500. Two suspects have been identified. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Misty Attewell of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary on Halloween night. A credit card, driver license and case were stolen while trick or treating in the Songbird subdivision. The vehicle was left unsecured and the stolen items are valued at $10. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. € Deputy Vicki Mitchell recovered a bicycle owned by Mario Alanis of Crawfordville. The bike was stolen from Winn-Dixie on Oct. 23 and was observed and recovered at a Crawfordville pawn shop. The victim was able to prove to Deputy Mitchell that the bike belonged to him and it was returned to him. A suspect was identi“ ed. On Nov. 2, Detective Lorne Whaley interviewed Ronda Charlene Lamb, 43, of Crawfordville about pawning the bicycle. Lamb was charged with dealing in stolen property. A 14-year-old involved in the case was charged with petit theft and dealing in stolen property. €Michelle Crum of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim was parked at Wal-Mart when she discovered someone scratched her vehicle door. Damage was estimated at $200. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. NOVEMBER 2 € Deputy Scott Powell was operating stationary radar on Crawfordville Highway when he observed a motorist driving at a high rate of speed in a 35 mile per hour zone. The motorist was clocked at 51 miles per hour and Deputy Powell conducted a traf“ c stop. The driver, Winfred Jerome Roberts, 27, of Tallahassee did not possess a valid driver license. It was determined that Roberts had his license suspended in 2010 and has two previous convictions for driving while license suspended or revoked. He was arrested for driving on a suspended driver license with knowledge. € James Myers of Crawfordville reported the theft of a trailer from a Crawfordville Highway address. Deputy Rachel Wheeler observed the trailer sitting on the side of the highway with no vehicle attached. The trailer is valued at $900 and was returned to the victim. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € Jason Turner of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to acquire utility services in Tallahassee and was informed an account was already open in his name with his personal information. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. NOVEMBER 3 € Melissa M. Davis of Crawfordville was involved in a one vehicle traf“ c crash as she was traveling east on FH 13 three miles east of Smith Creek Road. She drove off the south shoulder, over-corrected to the north shoulder, came back to the south side of the road and rolled the vehicle onto its roof. The driver declined medical treatment. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € Ruby Metcalf of Panacea reported a credit card offense. Suspicious charges were observed on the victims bank account. A fraudulent charge was observed for $750 that originated in Maryland. Three other attempts to make fraudulent withdrawals were also observed on the account. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € Kevin Robinson of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims vehicle suffered damage to a headlight and part of the vehicle near the headlight. Damage was estimated at $1,000. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. NOVEMBER 4 € Misty Attewell of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash where her vehicle was involved in a crash with a motorcycle operated by John W. Brown of Crawfordville. Brown was stopped for another vehicle at Cajer Posey Road and Shadeville Highway when he was struck from behind by Attewell. Brown was transported to the hospital with minor injuries. Deputy Randy Phillips, Deputy Stephen Simmons and Sgt. Andy Curles investigated. € Cindy Crum Bradford, 54, of Panacea was arrested for introduction of contraband into a detention facility. Detention deputies discovered three homemade cigarette-type joints in Bradfords cell after detecting smoke from the cell. The substance weighed 1.2 grams and is believed to be Spice.Ž Deputy Stephen Simmons and Deputy Reed Brown investigated. NOVEMBER 5 € Paula Fluty of Crawfordville reported a fraud and grand theft. Suspects, who have been identi“ ed, conducted an unauthorized wire transfer from her bank account for $9,879 through a bank in Leon County. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. € Rodrigo Carmonadelaluz of Crawfordville reported the theft of his bicycle from Crawfordville. The bike was recovered at a local pawn shop. The victim received his bicycle back and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Marshall Tilden of Crawfordville reported the theft of a “ rearm. The victim loaned the “ rearm to a friend and it was never returned. A suspect has been identi“ ed and the “ rearm was entered into the FCIC/ NCIC data base. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Earl Wiggins of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Firearms were stolen from the victims home. The eight stolen “ rearms are valued at $2,800. Several medications were also stolen. They were valued at $60. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Lorri Anne Graham Abeyi of Crawfordville reported the theft of her charcoal grill from her porch. The grill is valued at $40. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € Melanie Grant of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and the residence was in disarray. DVDs, electronics, personal items, a firearm and currency, valued at $2,395, was reported missing. Deputy Scott Powell and Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. NOVEMBER 6 € Steven Fults of Panacea reported the theft of campaign signs owned by Commissioner-elect Howard Kessler. Fults noted that 12 campaign signs were stolen over a several week period in Panacea and a game camera was erected on a citizens property along with more signs. Fults reported that the newly erected signs were also cut from a post. The game camera captured the image of suspect, David Eugene LaHart, 69, of Panacea. The suspect admitted to taking the signs and was issued a notice to appear in court for petit theft. The signs are valued at $15. Detective Matt Helms investigated. € Kris Lovel of WinnDixie reported a fraud in the pharmacy. Lovel determined that a prescription called in for a Crawfordville suspect had not been called in by the doctors of“ ce. The suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Marshall Taylor and Deputy Scott Powell investigated. NOVEMBER 7 € Tully Taff of Crawfordville reported the theft of two wallets from his home. The value of the stolen property is $210 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Will Hudson investigated.€ Billy Peacock of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A chain saw and an air compressor were reported stolen from the victims shed. The stolen property is valued at $400 and the case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. A person of interest was identi“ ed in the case. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated a traf“ c crash on Taf” inger Road. Christopher Hatcher of Crawfordville was improperly backing down the middle of Tafflinger Road when he backed into a vehicle operated by Alice Milhon of Crawfordville. A passenger in the Hatcher vehicle was transported to the hospital for treatment of an injury. He was cited for improper backing. Milhon reported an injury as well but declined EMS transport. € Robert Coshatt of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A single bullet hole was discovered in the victims vehicle. Evidence was collected at the scene and the case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Randy Phillips and Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € Anita Brown of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to property owned by Derrick Crum. A rail fence and garbage receptacles were damaged by a vehicle which left the scene. Damage to the property was estimated at $500 Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € Michael Edward Hollett, 43, of the FAMU Police Department was injured in a traf“ c crash on Old Shell Point Road. A deer ran out in front of him while he was traveling approximately 40 miles per hour. The victim suffered several non-life threatening injuries and was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Deputy Randy Phillips and Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 873 calls for service during the past week including: 24 residential and commercial alarms; 74 citizen contacts; 14 disturbances; 21 abandoned E-911 cell calls; 10 regular abandoned E-911 cell calls; 18 regular E-911 cell calls; 52 investigations; 12 loud music/noise complaints; 35 medical emergencies; 300 business and residential security checks; 25 special details; 20 subpoena services; 11 suspicious people; 12 traf“ c crashes with no injuries; 23 traf“ c enforcements; 40 traf“ c stops; 11 disabled vehicles; 11 reckless vehicles; and 19 watch orders.Sheri s Report 5 Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2 Go to http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click ContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA YARD SALESFRI & SAT NOV 16 & 17 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS!TWO BIG

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comGone to seed.Ž It is a distinctly American agricultural saying with usually negative connotations when applied to people, places and things. The implication is the subject of the comment is in decline after producing all they are capable of producing. This adage came from a time when most of Americas population was on the farm. Once the annual grain crop had gone to seed it meant harvest was at hand and the “ elds could be cleared. The plant from which the annual crop was derived had little worth. It was chopped and used for livestock bedding or burned, but had no additional potential for producing anything of value. Autumn in Wakulla County results in many annual and perennial plants producing seed. Better knowledge of how plants function throughout their life-cycle has led to understanding the ingenious ways they continue their species next spring. Many plants identi“ ed as wild” owers have gone to seed by now. They are preparing for next years colorful show, but the dying foliage still has a valuable part to play in both the curing and distribution of the seed. Many wild” ower seeds are distributed by wind, birds and animals. The seed heads or pods are easily shattered when the seed is mature and ready to disperse. There are, however, some species which use other methods. Beggarticks employ two barbed prongs that attach the seed to unsuspecting passersby. After a period of travel the seed are brushed or scratched off and colonize a new plot. Bidens alba, the scienti“ c name for Beggarticks, literally means two teeth in Latin. The plant which has prolific white and yellow blooms is important to sustaining Monarch butter” ies and European honeybees. Autumn mowing on rights-of-ways and pastures is critically important to the continuation of wild” owers. Timing mowing cycles to ” owering and seed set is the optimal method to ensure establishment of a planting is sustainable over the long term. Avoid mowing when plants are ” owering and seeds are still maturing. Seeds need about three to four weeks to mature after an individual ” ower has bloomed. The general recommendation for North Florida is to avoid mowing from April through September. Realize weather can alter ” owering and seed set by at least two to four weeks. Wakulla Countys perennial plants and native trees use many of the same techniques as wild” owers for spreading seed. Wind, animals and birds do the bulk of the scattering. The plants and trees aid the birds and animals with discovery by having brightly colored seed. Migratory birds, bears and other omnivores are all seeking to increase their calorie count in the face of the impending winter. The seed which are not digested pass through and are deposited in a new location, sometime many miles from the parent plant. The tree or perennial plant will establish itself in a new area if all the necessary components for plant growth are present. To learn more about spread of Wakulla Countys wild” owers and wild perennials, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u” edu/Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931.The meaning of the phrase ‘Gone to seed’ Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDogwood seeds, above, and beautyberry, below. Beggartick seeds, above, and a closer look at the hooks that the seeds use for transport by animals. “Panacea Market Place” Shopping All Day with Local Merchants andWe are looking for arts and crafts vendors to set-up from 2 p.m. 8 p.m.There will be no charge to vendors. will be decorating for the holidays. 4 p.m. 8 p.m. Join in the parade fun by decorating your boat, golf cart, ”oats or just walk. We welcome entries from all over. Saturday, Dec. 1 st CENTENNIALBANK Member FDIC This Advertisement Sponsored by s t s s t st st s t The 8th Annual “Boat On Trailer Parade” The News Wakulla www.my100bank.comA Home BancShares Company In-Home Assessments and Referrals Offered for Comfort and Convenience If falls, weakness or inability to participate in activities become a concern for your loved one, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Tallahassee is here to help. We oer free inhome assessments with no physician orders needed. Once an evaluation is approved, HealthSouths team of professionals develop comprehensive, individualized treatment plans for a safe return home. If you have any questions or need more information contact us. IS YOUR LOVED ONE SAFE AT HOME? 2012:HealthSouth Corporation:551345 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO Susie Updegraff & Family PresentThe Marcum Family In ConcertSunday, November 18, 4 p.m. Crawfordville United Methodist Church176 Ochlockonee St., Crawfordville, FLFREE

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By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach At Saturdays Regional Cross Country Meet held at Sunnyhill Farms in north Leon County, the WHS boys team placed higher than any other local boys team ever has at the Regional level, but came up just a whisker shy of qualifying for the State Finals Meet. The local harriers had an outstanding meet, “ nishing in seventh place, but only the “ rst six teams move on to the State Finals. The WHS boys finished with 175 points, only 2 points behind sixth place Eastside Hight School from Gainesville. The WHS girls team also performed extremely well, finishing in eighth place. The boys were once again led by Aaron Smith (17:38, 23rd), J.P. Piotrowski (17:51, 26th) and Travis Parks (17:56, 29th). Rounding out the scoring for the team were Lane Williams (18:29, 50th) and Ryan Dodson (18:53, 58th), with Alan Pearson (19:20, 70th) and Mitchell Atkinson (19:21, 71st) completing the top 7 for the local squad. This was the “ rst time this year that the team had three runners under 18 minutes and the 18:10 team average was also the best for this season. Although Smith is a junior, all of the other starting runners are either freshmen or sophomores, so this should be just a glimpse of what is to come in the next couple of years. Marty Wiedeman (20:57, 24th) once again led the charge for the WHS girls, with the next three girls dipping under the 22:00 minute barrier. Those girls ran and worked together as a group, with Kasey James (21:56, 37th) a step ahead of Raychel Gray (21:57, 38th) and Lydia Wiedeman (21:58, 40th). Lilianna Broadway (22:42, 53rd) was the “ nal scorer for the team and Kayla Webbe (24:10, 68th) and Connie Lewis (24:20, 70th) rounded out the varsity team. This was also the first time this season that four girls ran under 22:00 minutes and the 21:54 team average was also a season best. We had hoped to extend the season one more week, but we came up just a little short,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. Both the teams had really good seasons, so we arent disappointed. The boys were somewhat upset to come that close to qualifying for State, but they really should just be proud of how well they did and they way they have raced all season long. The girls were really solid all year and were again on Saturday. When you look at the times they ran and the fact that both teams ran their fastest meet of the season, we couldnt have asked for much more from them. This is a great group of kids and Coach James and I are really proud of them, how they have worked together and what they have accomplished this year.Ž Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 sports news and team views SportsWar Eagles end regular season undefeated10-0CROSS COUNTRYBoys team misses state by a whisker PHOTO BY KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe boys and girls teams two weeks ago after sweeping the District Meet. KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSQuarterback Caleb Stephens, 9, busts a long run against the Escambia Gators to end the regular season. PLAYOFFS: The War Eagles face Gulf Breeze for rst round at home at J.D. Jones Stadium on Friday, Nov. 16, at 7:30 p.m. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles “ nished out the regular season undefeated … the schools “ rst undefeated season since 1983 … with a 24-8 win over Escambia County. Of the undefeated season, Head Coach Scott Klees said he was proud of that accomplishment, though it wasnt one of the teams goals at the beginning of the season. Going into the playoffs, the War Eagles are a banged up bunch … and it showed in Friday nights play against the Gators. An offense that was a speed machine and looked unstoppable was still potent, but not quite as dominating. A lot of that has to do with injuries,Ž Klees said. Weve got a bunch of new guys playing a bunch of new positions.Ž It was a weird night,Ž Klees said. We had so many different guys starting … a different look than even a couple of weeks ago.Ž Lineman John Cole is out with back injury, with two guards rotating to “ ll that position; running back and kicker Dillon Norman is out for the year with an ACL; and backs Mikal Cromartie and Malik Thomas both have sprains.Continued on Page 2BMore big white trout this yearFrom the Dock by Capt. Jody Campbell Outdoors, Page 5B Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary Underwater Wakulla Page 6B Expert physicians.Quality obstetrical & gynecological care. 2770 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 110, Tallahassee, FL 32308 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comOf“ce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. … 5 p.m. Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. Next-day appointments available. Dr. Stephanie Cruz Lee is an OB/GYN who is ”uent in both English and Spanish. She is accepting new patients. In addition to delivering babies, Dr. Lees areas of clinical interests are abnormal menstrual bleeding, minimally invasive gynecological surgery, infertility and menopausal hormone therapy. Dr. Lee received her medical degree from the Florida State University College of Medicine. She completed her residency at the University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville.To schedule an appointment with Dr. Lee, call (850) 877-5589 Capital Regional Medical Center Welcomes Dr. Stephanie Cruz Lee Specializing in Gynecology & Obstetrics Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator

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Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comPlayers of the WeekCALEB STEPHENS Quarterback Threw for 142 yards and rushed for 75 yards. FELEIPE FRANKS Kicked in place of Dillon Norman, made a “ eld goal and extra points DEQUON SIMMONS Strong safety 8 solo tackles and an interceptionO ense Defense Special Teams War Eagles end regular season undefeated10-0 WILLIAM SNOWDENThe new scoreboard at J.D. Jones Stadium will be of“ cially ready to go before this weeks playoff game against Gulf Breeze. The new scoreboard is twice as big as the old scoreboard, and includes a programmable screen. The new board was provided by Centennial Bank, and will be dedicated in a short ceremony before the game. There will also be 25-second clocks in the end zone. Scoreboard to be unveiled Continued from Page 1B I dont think well have any of those guys back this weekŽ for the playoff game against Gulf Breeze, Klees said. On Friday night against Escambia, Klees was trying to plug those holes with other players … for example, moving defensive cornerback Brandon Nichols, whos played some wide receiver, to running back. Still, the War Eagle defense continued to play outstanding, Klees said. A bright spot there is the expectation that linebacker Kevin James will return. He played a few series against Escambia, but Klees was hopeful he would play the whole game against Gulf Breeze. Wakulla ran off 24 unanswered points against Escambia, which never really challenged the War Eagles until late the fourth quarter when the Gators scored a touchdown and made a two-point conversion. Feleipe Franks, kicking in place of injured Dillon Norman, made a 25-yard “ eld goal in the “ rst quarter to put the War Eagles up 3-0. Early in the second, freshman receiver Keith Gavin grabbed a jumpball fade pass in the endzone, and Franks added the extra point to make it 10-0. Quarterback Caleb Stephens rumbled for a 30-yard touchdown run in the third quarter to make it 17-0 with the PAT. In the fourth quarter, it appeared that offensive lineman Chris Grif“ n recovered a fumble in the endzone for score. UP NEXT: GULF BREEZE Theyre huge up front,Ž Klees said of the Dolphins, who are 7-3.. Two of their linemen are commitments to Division 1 schools, including FSU. In the playoffs, everybody is good,Ž Klees said. Whoever turns the ball over the fewest times and plays good defense is going to win,Ž he said. For his offense, even though some of these new guys havent had a lot of playing time together, Klees said hes hoping they can play at a high level without a lot of reps.Ž The big thing weve got to get is healthy,Ž he said. Or some of these young guys to step up. Theyre going to have to step up.Ž KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDENWar Eagle receiver Jordan Franks tries to shake a defender. Linebacker Fred Cummings disrupts a running play and makes a tackle. Students take the “ eld after the game to sing the school song. More photos online at thewakullanews.net Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICEƒ EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts • Color • F acial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • F lat T ops F eather Locks • Color • P erms • Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. c e H a i r S a l o n e H l o H a i a l o i r S a c e c e o n o o n Tues -S at 54 529 05 & t. . . . . F STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN 1-866-742-1373 Get your business noticed One Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Don’t make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.AdNetworksFlorida.com

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Nov. 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, Nov. 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Nov. 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Nov. 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Nov. 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Nov. 20  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  SARRACENIA CHAPTER of the Florida Native Plant Society meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Sarracenia’s guest, Jean Huffman, will present “Pines, tree rings and the history of re in Florida pine savannas.” Dr. Huffman’s illustrated presentation will include stories of how re creates and maintains plant diversity and sustains rare plant populations, and how plants can reveal the history of re in our local natural areas. The public is invited. Social time, with refreshments, will precede the meeting. Wednesday, Nov. 21  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Nov. 22  HAPPY THANKSGIVING.Special EventsFriday, Nov. 16  ANNUAL ONE ACT PLAYS will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at 7:30 p.m. in the auditorium. The plays include “Reese and Babe,” and “Check Please.” There will be a show at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday and at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday as well. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for students. Saturday, Nov. 17  FIRST BLUE JEANS AND FAST MACHINES EVENT for Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will be held from 5 to 10 p.m. at 3Y Ranch, Crawfordville. There will be dinner and entertainment by Local Motion. Enter a fast machine for $10 per entry. To attend the show only, cost is $5 per car load. Dinner and entertainment is $35 per person. A table sponsorship is $300. For more information, email helpkwcb@gmail.com, call (850) 745-7111 or visit the website www.kwcb.org.  SOPCHOPPY OPRY will feature local country music legend Hoot Gibson with South Bound Band at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy School Auditorium. Hoot Gibson’s career in music spans over 60 years and his November appearance at the Opry has become a tradition. Tickets are $10. Call 962-3711 for tickets.  CARTER FAMILY REUNION will be held at 1 p.m. Family and friends will gather at Myers Carter’s cane mill on Elie Carter Lane in Medart. There will be cane grinding and syrupmaking all day. Bring a picnic lunch as the meal will be served at 1 p.m. Guests are invited to share memories and new happenings. For more information, call 926-7317.  OUTDOORS FOR THE HOLIDAYS will be held at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sponsored by the St. Marks NWR Photo Club, this family-friendly day of fun will include holiday photographs, crafts for the kids, yummy holiday treats and hot cider and outdoor wagon rides. A chili lunch will be available for a small donation.  EAGLE WATCH TRAINING will be held at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge from 1 p.m. to 4 .p.m at the Nature’s Classroom, 1255 Lighthouse Road. It will cover topics such as the status of the Bald Eagle in Florida, general eagle biology, eagle nesting behavior and habits, Bald Eagle management guidelines and nest observation techniques and strategies. The training will include a classroom portion with live bald eagle, Paige and a eld observation of a nearby eagle nest on Lighthouse Road. The training is free and open to all who are interested, even just to learn about the program. Matt Smith, EagleWatch coordinator, will present the training. Call the refuge at 925-6121 to register.  ANNUAL ONE ACT PLAYS will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at 7:30 p.m. in the auditorium. The plays include “Reese and Babe,” and “Check Please.” There will be a show at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday as well. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for students.  FREE CLOTHING GIVEAWAY will be held at Grace Baptist Church, 803 Crawfordville Highway, from noon to 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Call 926-3217 or 926-1034 for more information.  CONCERT BY JAMES “TUCK” TUCKER, dobroist and songwriter, will be held at 8 p.m. at Posh Java in Sopchoppy. Tucker describes his music as a mixture of blues, bluegrass and old country. Visit www.jamestucktucker.com for more information. For reservations, call (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@yahoo.com. Tickets are $10. Posh Java is located on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. in Sopchoppy. For a list of upcoming concerts visit www.poshjava.com. Sunday, Nov. 18  ANNUAL ONE ACT PLAYS will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at 2:30 p.m. in the auditorium. The plays include “Reese and Babe,” and “Check Please.” Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for students. Monday, Nov. 19  WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will hold a public meeting from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. Tuesday, Nov. 20  BLOOD DRIVE will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital Wakulla, 15 Council Moore Road. Each donor will get a gift and their name in a drawing for a chance to win a Honda Civic. Walk-ins are welcome. Upcoming EventsFriday, Nov. 23  CD RELEASE PARTY for the musical duo Hot Tamale at Posey’s Dockside Cafe in Panacea. The show will start at 7:30 p.m. Hot Tamale, a Tallahassee-based group made up of Adrian Fogelin and Craig Reeder, has deep roots in Wakulla County. Hot Tamale recently released their CD, titled “Made from Scratch.” Tuesday, Nov. 27  WAKULLA EUROTRIP MEETING will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Those interested in the next Wakulla Eurotrip through the educational travel company, Explorica, lead by Wakulla High School AP Art History/ Art Teacher and Watercolor painter, Cassie Tucker, are invited to the next information meeting. Enrollment is open for the Summer 2014 trip that includes London, Paris, Monaco, Florence, Rome and Sorrento. For questions, call 926-2394. Wednesday, Nov. 28  CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held at the Bistro at Wildwood Country Club from noon to 1:15 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1  BOOK SALE EXTRAVAGANZA FUNDRAISER will be held at the library from 9 a.m. to noon. There are thousands of books, audio, video and more. Proceeds bene t children’s programs at the library. Sunday, Dec. 2  SERVICE OF REMEMBRANCE will be held by Big Bend Hospice at 4 p.m. at Hudson Park. Big Bend Hospice’s Service of Remembrance is a non-denominational service that brings together those in the community to honor the memories of loved ones at this very special time of year. Everyone who attends shares a common purpose – to honor and to remember a loved one who has died, to be surrounded by others who are on a similar journey and to connect with loved ones. For additional information about Big Bend Hospice’s bereavement services, contact Pam Mezzina at (850) 878-5310, ext. 799. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 – Page 3B Government Meetings Monday, Nov. 19  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for its regular meeting in the commission chambers.  SCHOOL BOARD will meet at 5:45 p.m. for its regular meeting in the school administration building. Tuesday, Nov. 20  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for the swearing in ceremony for the new commissioners in the commission chambers.  SCHOOL BOARD will hold a re-organizational meeting at 5:45 p.m. in the school administration building. Outdoor for the Holidays at the St. Marks Refuge from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Blue Jeans and Fast Machines event at 3Y Ranch from 5 to 10 p.m. Sopchoppy Opry at 7 p.m. features Hoot Gibson. Carter Family Reunion at 1 p.m. SaturdaySaturdaySaturdaySaturday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Matt Smith, Audubon Eaglewatch coordinator, will present eagle watch training at the refuge on. Nov. 17 from 1 to 4 p.m. Community Thanksgiving DinnersSaturday, Nov. 17  FREE THANKSGIVING DINNER will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 165 Surf Road, Sopchoppy, by Pastor Ethel Skipper of Skipper Temple Church. If someone is unable to come because they are shut in, they can call 962-7838 or 510-6653 and someone will deliver their dinner to them.  THANKSGIVING COMMUNITY FEAST will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park hosted by several Wakulla groups and churches. There will be free food and christian fellowship. Tuesday, Nov. 20  FREE COUNTY WIDE THANKSGIVING DINNER will be held at the Senior Center, 33 Michael Drive in Crawfordville, from 4 to 7 p.m. For questions, call 926-7145. Night of One Act Plays will be performed by WHS Dramatis Personae on Nov. 16 and 17 at 7:30 p.m. and Nov. 18 at 2:30 p.m.

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy TIM LINAFELTBLACKSBURG, Va. „ As the sophomore receiver weaved his way through the defense, rounding the corner and sprinting into the end zone for the crucial touchdown, the “ fthyear senior quarterback felt the surge of emotion that perfectly mirrored the small pockets of Florida State fans at Virginia Techs Lane Stadium last week. EJ Manuel is not one to wear his heart on his sleeve. Hes calm, cool and collected … not passionless, just in control. But as Rashad Greene crossed the goal line … on a play that FSU hoped would just set up better “ eld goal position … Manuels passion, energy and excitement couldnt stay internal any longer. He raced down the sideline, toward his celebrating teammates and stopped near the 20-yard line. He raised his arms in the air, cocked his head back at the sky and let out a scream into the cold Virginia night. I just started praying and thanking God, to be honest with you. Just excitement,Ž Manuel said. Every great Florida State quarterback has a signature moment. Charlie Ward had … among several others … the swing pass to Warrick Dunn that sealed a win over Florida in 1993. Chris Weinkes 99-yard play-action pass to Marvin Minnis helped paved the way to a Heisman Trophy. Even Chris Rixs up-and-down career will always have the 52-yard Hail Mary to P.K. Sam that beat Florida in 2003. Manuel will have the last 2:19 in Blacksburg. He didnt have his best game … he was sacked “ ve times, threw an interception and missed a handful of throws. But when he walked onto the “ eld for the last time in his home state of Virginia … Blacksburg is six hours from his home town of Virginia Beach … Manuel was in total control. Ive been saying it all week … Hey, were going to VA, baby. Were going to your town,Ž fellow senior Lonnie Pryor said. It just felt good to see him complete that ball and Rashad score. He doesnt get a lot of the credit that he should get but we know what he does and Im happy for him.Ž He completed four passes on an eight-play drive that completed Florida States “ rst late-game, come-from-behind victory in years. This program hasnt had much luck in that regard recently. There was Marcus Sims fumble at Georgia Tech in 2008 and Jarmon Fortsons drop against Miami in 2009. There was the Ty Jones-Christian Ponder fumble that cost FSU at N.C. State in 2010 and the missed “ eld goal the next week that denied FSU a victory over North Carolina. And there was another missed kick in 2011 that let Virginia steal a win from Doak Campbell Stadium. Even this years loss to N.C. State was lost in the “ nal minute, and Florida States offense held the ball as the “ nal seconds expired. All of them painful memories for Florida State, and all of them denied the Seminoles something costly. A loss in Blacksburg wouldve almost certainly cost FSU a chance at an ACC title. But this time Manuel ” ipped the script … helped this team break through where so many previous iterations had fallen short. Its tremendous,Ž Fisher said. EJ is full of character and Im blessed to be able to coach him.Ž No, Virginia Tech is not a great team. But even with a 4-6 record, the Hokies are 4-1 at home. A win over the Seminoles wouldve salvaged an unmitigated disappointment of a season … not to mention another win toward bowl eligibility. And aside from that, this win meant an awful lot for Florida States big picture. With just Maryland left on the ACC slate, FSU is virtually assured a spot in Charlotte for the ACC Championship Game. And with wins over all of their potential opponents from the Coastal Division, the time is ripe for Florida States “ rst conference title and Orange Bowl appearance since 2005 … when EJ Manuel was a sophomore in high school. Consider that with four games left to play, Manuel is already 21-5 as a starter, is undefeated against Miami, undefeated against Clemson and had his only blemish against Florida come on the road as a redshirt freshman starting for the injured Christian Ponder. Hes 3-0 in bowl games … including Bobby Bowdens send-off in the Gator Bowl … is on target to become the most accurate passer in ACC history and is the odds-on favorite to be the ACCs 2012 player of the year. None of that was on his mind in Blacksburg, though. Just the victory that he and the Seminoles snatched away from a desperate team in a dif“ cult stadium full of desperate fans. To “ nally be a part of something like that,Ž Manuel said. Just to see my guys go out there and do it. Nobody was ” ustered, nobody was afraid.Ž After the clock hit zero, Manuel found Jimbo Fisher and shared some words and an embrace with the coach who recruited him so hard out of Virginia Beachs Bayside High more than “ ve years ago. I thanked him, told him I loved him,Ž Manuel said. Coach Fisher is a hard coach, but times like this is when you see all the hard work and all the hard coaching pay off.Ž Fisher echoed those sentiments. I told him I loved him,Ž he said. I told him this is why I do what I do. This is why I push him like I do.Ž Tim Linafelt is the Osceolas editor. Email him at tim@theosceola.com F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State t e Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M at Bethune-CookmanSaturday, Nov. 17 at 2 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPNC. Jacksonville State at #6 FloridaSaturday, Nov. 17 at 1 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3. #10 Florida State at MarylandThursday, Nov. 17 at 12 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPNU. FSUs EJ Manuel has his signature moment during this win against Virginia. PHOTO BY JEREMY ESBRANDT/OSCEOLA GATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON#6 Jeff Driskel W h a t e v e r Whatever i t t a k e s it takes By MARTY COHENGatorBait.net Editor OK, bear with me, but its a symptom of having two elementary schoolage kids and watching dozens of kid movies literally thousands of times, that when Florida struck for its unbelievable come-from-behind win on a walkoff blocked punt/touchdown, the “ rst thing that came to my mind was a line from Lightning McQueen, the lead character of the animated movie Cars.Ž McQueen is inches away from winning the last race of the season when he arrogantly decides to bypass a late pit stop, and instead of an easy victory, blows two tires and ends up limping to the “ nish line in a threeway photo “ nish tie. Theres a lot more to racing than just winning,Ž offers McQueen. I mean, taking the race by a full lap . Wheres the entertainment in that? No, no, no, I wanted to give folks a little sizzle.Ž Where would the entertainment value have been if Florida had drubbed Louisiana-Lafayette (what we will refer to the Ragin Cajuns as, not just Louisiana) by 30 points? Nah, thats not the nature of these Gators, who survived a too-close-for comfort 27-20 win over La.-Lafayette on a splendid Saturday afternoon in a game they found themselves trailing by a touchdown with less than three minutes remaining. In searching for an explanation not only for this crazy triumph, but for this entire Florida season, you begin to look away from the tangibles on the football “ eld, like the performance of the defense and the ” ash of the special teams. Instead you maybe begin to search for the esoteric, the idea there is a dose of serendipity or providence or karma, or just plain good fortune, surrounding this team. Weve seen it plenty of times in difference sports, where teams get on a roll on positive things seem to just continually occur, whether its a coachs move that works or a fortuitous bounce of the ball or pulling a play out of the bag that rarely, if ever, happens, such as a blocked punt returned for a touchdown to snatch a victory with two seconds left. When teams get behind that positive mojo, they ride it as long as it will go and when clubs are on the other side of that fence, when bad things occur, when an of“ cials decision steals a win. Ive been a part of both sides of that (good and bad things) … great plays happen and then bad plays happen for teams … for example, thats a bad play for them,Ž junior defensive tackle Sharrif Floyd said. You never know how that ball is going to bounce. It (blocked punt to win a game) was a great play … Ive never seen anything like that before.Ž The Gators finally made some plays down the stretch in all three phases, from the defense keeping he Ragin Cajuns out of the endzone early in the fourth quarter and then turning in three consecutive three-andouts, to the offense moving 49 yards for a score in the closing minutes to the soon-to-be-famed punt block by Loucheiz Purifoy and subsequent winning touchdown return by Jelani Jenkins with two seconds left. It was a great play by Loucheiz, they executed it perfectly and I just happened to be in the right place at the right time,Ž Jenkins said. It came right to me, there was a lot of open “ eld and I had a lot of blockers, I was pretty sure (Id score). Were a hard“ ghting team, we dont ever give up.Ž Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! A signature moment for EJ

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 – Page 5B outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsSo far this fall has been absolutely gorgeous. We had a couple of days when the weather was bad, but most have been very nice and very “ shable. The water temperature really cooled down with the cool nights we had last week and the water clarity went from dingy to gin-clear almost overnight. I have “ shed the ” ats and some of the outer bars, which were loaded up with reds before the cool and have not been able to “ nd anything. Everything has either been out real deep or around the oyster bars. I think most people have a certain person that they “ sh with most of the time. When I “ rst moved to Tallahassee in 1976, Hank Redd and I “ shed together every weekend that rolled around. We did mostly freshwater “ shing but when we moved to the coast it turned to saltwater “ shing. I left IBM and things changed. We still stayed in touch but didnt do that much “ shing together. He was living in Tallahassee and we lived at the coast. Fifteen and a half years ago I found a new “ shing partner. She was always ready to go whether it was raining or the wind was blowing. The one day I remember most fondly was about 12 years ago. A good friend and a guide wanted his wife to catch a tarpon. If she caught one she wouldnt be able to hold it up for a picture so he was going to hire me to take them. I said let me go to Spring Creek and just see if there are any there and if so we would go the next morning. I was just gonna go look but decided to take a couple of pin“ sh and a tarpon rod. When I got everything loaded and the motor running she was up on the front deck ready to go wherever we were gonna go. I pulled into Stewart Cove and cut the motor. Almost immediately two or three tarpon rolled. I decided since I was there and had some pin“ sh and a rod I might as well “ sh. I anchored the boat, cast out a pin“ sh under a balloon and immediately a tarpon hit. Pearl jumped to the front of the boat, started barking and I was hollering for her to sit down. When that tarpon made its second leap it was just too much for her. She jumped in the water and started swimming right towards that tarpon. I was “ ghting the tarpon and whistling for her to come back to the boat. She “ nally turned around and swam up beside the boat. I grabbed her collar, threw her in the boat and told her to lie down. About an hour later I was able to get the tarpon up beside the boat and release it. Pearl was able to lick it a time or two and then it swam away. Pearl was our 15 year old black lab that we had to put to sleep last week and Im gonna miss having her in the boat. She was part of our family and will be deeply missed. I just got back from Shell Island Fish Camp and Jimmy said “ shing has been spectacular. Lots of trout, reds, sheepshead and some big ” ounder. In fact a 4.5-pound ” ounder came in which he said was the biggest he had seen weighed in at Shell Island. Two of the guides out of there, Kenny and Danny, had excellent trips last week limiting on both trout and reds. They were “ shing the oyster bars to the west of St. Marks. Jimmy said on of their customers came in with some pictures of some big bull reds they had caught out of St. Marks. Capt. David Fife came back to Spring Creek a week ago and took some of his buddies from North Carolina “ shing. They caught quite a few trout and limited out on reds each day using mud minnows and “ nger mullet. I was talking with one of the barbers where I go and he said his soninlaw and daughter caught some reds to about 43 inches. They were “ shing off a dock at St. Teresa using cut bait on the bottom. He said his daughter had to pull her “ sh up onto the bank. They got some good pictures and then let em go. Capt. Luke over at AMS said he and his son and another gentleman went out of Spring Creek on Friday. They “ shed several holes around Oyster Bay with no luck and Luke said lets go to Panacea. They ended up with 40 silver trout up to 17 inches. They used the Gulp and cut bait on the bottom. Bill Chandler who also works at AMS went out last week with his wife Nancy and “ shed the mouth of the Ochlockonee. He told Luke they had their limit of speckled trout in about 15 minutes and then just started catching and releasing. He said he had never seen that many trout concentrated in one spot. They then went out and caught as many white trout as they wanted to clean. I have seen more big white trout this year than ever before. Seventeen and eighteen inch “ sh arent uncommon. Saturday I fished with Kevin Walsh and party from Macon. We fished everywhere I knew and just couldnt “ nd many “ sh. We had caught eight big white trout early and “ nally late in the day went back to that spot. Nothing! We had about an hour to “ sh so we headed to another white trout spot. We caught 40 nice white trout to 19 inches and Kevin and Jeff each caught and released reds that were about 40 inches long. That last hour made the day. Last Sunday I took Steve Sgan and his daughter Madeline, son Jack and Jacks friend David. We caught several speckled trout and a bunch of white trout. Steve caught a 35 inch black drum while “ shing for the white trout. When the tide got right we came in and caught our limit of reds to 25 inches. Those kids all caught big reds and Madeline caught a three-and-ahalf-foot bonnet head shark, which really made her day. Its fun to take kids “ shing but more fun to see them catch “ sh. Harrison King, the young man who was on the boat that sank several weeks ago, said he caught a 30 pound red last weekend. Randy Mimms of Shell Point said he also caught one about that big. This is the time of year the big bull reds come in shallower water to breed. When you hook into one there is no doubt as to what is on the other end of the line. Remember to take a kid “ shing and be careful out on the water. Good luck and good “ shing! The First Sunday at the Refuge Presentation Series will feature Owls and Other Night Birds at St. MarksŽ with Don Morrow of The Trust for Public Lands on Dec. 2 at 2 p.m. Owls arent the only birds that come out at night. Don will tell about birds of the night and share their habits, how to identify them, and where you are likely to “ nd them. Linger afterward for a short twilight “ eld trip with Don. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures ClassroomŽ at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call (850) 925-6121 for information. The Florida Bluebird Society (FBS) is sponsoring the Third Winter Florida Bluebird Blitz on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 16 and 17. Faith Jones, FBS Statewide Bluebird Blitz Chair, said a blitz is a concentrated effort on two speci“ c days to locate as many Eastern Bluebirds as possible in Florida. She said the goal of the Bluebird Blitz is to gather information about bluebirds in Florida in an effort to help determine the health of the species in the Sunshine State. Reports from participants over a span of years will help reveal if the bluebird population in Florida is increasing or decreasing. This requires learning the location and number of bluebirds throughout the state. The winter blitz will help reveal where bluebirds “ nd food and survival habitat between the end of the breeding and migration time until breeding activity begins again in the spring. Jones stressed that volunteers are needed to assist in this concentrated effort to report where, when, and how many Eastern Bluebirds are seen in their areas during the two day period. Reporting forms can be downloaded from the FBS website: www.” oridabluebirdsociety.com. Results from past Bluebird Blitzes, including reports by counties, also can be seen on the FBS website. The St. Marks Refuge Photo Club is holding their annual Outdoors for the Holidays event on Saturday, Nov. 17, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Nature Store and Natures Classroom (education building) at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. To celebrate this event, the Nature Store is offering 10 percent off all merchandise in the store. Members of the St. Marks Refuge Association (the refuges friends group) will get 20 percent off. You can join SMRA the same day for 20 percent savings! There will be an appearance by the National Wildlife Refuges Blue Goose,Ž who can also pose with you for a free holiday photo. In addition to savings on purchases, there will be childrens crafts, holiday photos, a wagon ride behind the gates, and the live eagle, PaigeŽ (from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.), and free cider and cookies. There will also be chili and “ xings for a donation. Donations will go to the Junior Ranger Summer Camp at the refuge. From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL More big white trout this yearOutdoors for the Holidays at the refuge Winter Bluebird Blitz is Nov. 16-17 in Florida First Sunday will feature owls and night birdsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has implemented changes to commercial licensing requirements making it easier for Florida veterans and veterans with disabilities to enter the commercial shing industry. The commission adopted the changes at its September meeting and made a formal announcement of the changes in a media event on Nov. 9. The changes modify income requirements for many of Florida veterans seeking a commercial restricted species endorsement, which allows commercial harvesters to sh for and sell species that are designated as restricted.Becoming sherman easier for Florida vets Sunday ThursdayALL U CAN EATSpecials Catfish ......$11.95 Shrimp ....,$13.95 Scallops ..$13.95Includes Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies30 SHRIMP• 10 Fried • 10 Grilled • 10 BlackenedServed with Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies$12.95 w Winter hours: Tues. Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 Sunday 4-9 984-5243 1506 COASTAL HWY., SCENIC BIWAY IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle G E T READY FOR HUN T IN G Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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Saturday started bright, early, and chilly! Coxswain Bob Asztalos met crew Phil Hill, Carolyn Treadon and Duane Treadon at the Fort in St. Marks for the scheduled safety patrol. The crew was greeted by many others heading out to enjoy the water and could not have asked for a better day to be out. Each year, it is a good rule of thumb to check the deviation on a boat. This is the difference between what true and magnetic north and what the compass on the boat reads. Electronics and metal on a boat can cause variation in readings, and while it may not make a huge difference for the facilities when land is in sight and visual markers available, when on longer journeys a degree or two can cause a vessel to be signi“ cantly off course. The crew worked together to create a deviation table for The Doc B to assure that it had not changed. After completing the deviation table, the vessel was anchored just west of the center channel marker where Coxswain Bob Asztalos had the crew plot a course to the buoy marking the three nautical mile line east of Shell Point. The crew was challenged to calculate the time it would take to reach the target as well as the compass heading. Once reaching their mark, the crew were instructed to again plot a course to the entrance to the Panacea Channel. It is a great lesson to practice navigation and not rely on electronics in the event of a failure. It was also a good lesson for the crew who had not been in the waters of Panacea before. Team Coordination Training came in very useful as it was challenging to locate the buoys without electronics. After a successful navigation of the channel, the crew stopped in Poseys for a lunch break. The return to St. Marks took the crew through Shell Point. The effects of winter and low tide was evident as at times there was only two feet of water under the boat. While navigation through the shallow waters the crew were treated to several dolphins and a sea turtle. After navigating back to St. Marks, the crew secured for the day. All agreed it could not have been a more perfect day to be out on the water. While some of us were out on the water, others were working the booth at the North Florida Fair. Many thanks to Norma Hill and Duane Treadon for submitting photos. And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Be an educated boater, even a sunny day can be chilly when out on the water. Layers offer a great way to remain both protected and comfortable. Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAuxiliarists plotting a course while on patrol. Phil HIll on bow watch. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Nov 15, 12 Fri Nov 16, 12 Sat Nov 17, 12 Sun Nov 18, 12 Mon Nov 19, 12 Tue Nov 20, 12 Wed Nov 21, 12 D ate 4.1 ft. 1:45 AM 4.0 ft. 2:27 AM 3.9 ft. 3:11 AM 3.6 ft. 4:00 AM 3.2 ft. 4:59 AM Hi g h -1.0 ft. 8:59 AM -0.8 ft. 9:47 AM -0.5 ft. 10:36 AM -0.1 ft. 11:27 AM 0.4 ft. 12:21 PM 1.5 ft. 12:18 AM 1.3 ft. 1:52 AM L ow 3.5 ft. 3:32 PM 3.3 ft. 4:18 PM 3.1 ft. 5:04 PM 2.9 ft. 5:53 PM 2.8 ft. 6:46 PM 2.8 ft. 6:20 AM 2.5 ft. 8:16 AM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 8:36 PM 1.5 ft. 9:19 PM 1.5 ft. 10:07 PM 1.5 ft. 11:04 PM 0.8 ft. 1:21 PM 1.1 ft. 2:26 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 7:45 PM 2.8 ft. 8:46 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 15, 12 Fri Nov 16, 12 Sat Nov 17, 12 Sun Nov 18, 12 Mon Nov 19, 12 Tue Nov 20, 12 Wed Nov 21, 12 D ate 3.1 ft. 1:37 AM 3.0 ft. 2:19 AM 2.9 ft. 3:03 AM 2.7 ft. 3:52 AM 2.4 ft. 4:51 AM Hi g h -0.7 ft. 9:10 AM -0.6 ft. 9:58 AM -0.4 ft. 10:47 AM -0.1 ft. 11:38 AM 0.3 ft. 12:32 PM 1.1 ft. 12:29 AM 0.9 ft. 2:03 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 3:24 PM 2.5 ft. 4:10 PM 2.3 ft. 4:56 PM 2.2 ft. 5:45 PM 2.1 ft. 6:38 PM 2.1 ft. 6:12 AM 1.9 ft. 8:08 AM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 8:47 PM 1.1 ft. 9:30 PM 1.1 ft. 10:18 PM 1.1 ft. 11:15 PM 0.6 ft. 1:32 PM 0.8 ft. 2:37 PM L ow 2.1 ft. 7:37 PM 2.1 ft. 8:38 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 15, 12 Fri Nov 16, 12 Sat Nov 17, 12 Sun Nov 18, 12 Mon Nov 19, 12 Tue Nov 20, 12 Wed Nov 21, 12 D ate 3.8 ft. 2:21 AM 3.8 ft. 3:03 AM 3.6 ft. 3:47 AM 3.3 ft. 4:36 AM Hi g h -0.9 ft. 10:03 AM -0.8 ft. 10:51 AM -0.5 ft. 11:40 AM -0.1 ft. 12:31 PM 1.4 ft. 12:08 AM 1.3 ft. 1:22 AM 1.2 ft. 2:56 AM L ow 3.2 ft. 4:08 PM 3.0 ft. 4:54 PM 2.8 ft. 5:40 PM 2.7 ft. 6:29 PM 3.0 ft. 5:35 AM 2.6 ft. 6:56 AM 2.4 ft. 8:52 AM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 9:40 PM 1.3 ft. 10:23 PM 1.4 ft. 11:11 PM 0.3 ft. 1:25 PM 0.7 ft. 2:25 PM 1.0 ft. 3:30 PM L ow 2.6 ft. 7:22 PM 2.5 ft. 8:21 PM 2.6 ft. 9:22 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 15, 12 Fri Nov 16, 12 Sat Nov 17, 12 Sun Nov 18, 12 Mon Nov 19, 12 Tue Nov 20, 12 Wed Nov 21, 12 D ate 3.2 ft. 1:29 AM 3.2 ft. 2:11 AM 3.0 ft. 2:55 AM 2.8 ft. 3:44 AM 2.5 ft. 4:43 AM 2.2 ft. 6:04 AM Hi g h -1.0 ft. 8:38 AM -0.8 ft. 9:26 AM -0.5 ft. 10:15 AM -0.1 ft. 11:06 AM 0.4 ft. 12:00 PM 0.8 ft. 1:00 PM 1.3 ft. 1:31 AM L ow 2.7 ft. 3:16 PM 2.6 ft. 4:02 PM 2.4 ft. 4:48 PM 2.2 ft. 5:37 PM 2.2 ft. 6:30 PM 2.1 ft. 7:29 PM 2.0 ft. 8:00 AM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 8:15 PM 1.4 ft. 8:58 PM 1.5 ft. 9:46 PM 1.5 ft. 10:43 PM 1.4 ft. 11:57 PM 1.1 ft. 2:05 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 8:30 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 15, 12 Fri Nov 16, 12 Sat Nov 17, 12 Sun Nov 18, 12 Mon Nov 19, 12 Tue Nov 20, 12 Wed Nov 21, 12 D ate 4.2 ft. 1:42 AM 4.1 ft. 2:24 AM 4.0 ft. 3:08 AM 3.7 ft. 3:57 AM 3.3 ft. 4:56 AM Hi g h -1.1 ft. 8:56 AM -0.9 ft. 9:44 AM -0.5 ft. 10:33 AM -0.1 ft. 11:24 AM 0.4 ft. 12:18 PM 1.6 ft. 12:15 AM 1.4 ft. 1:49 AM L ow 3.6 ft. 3:29 PM 3.3 ft. 4:15 PM 3.1 ft. 5:01 PM 2.9 ft. 5:50 PM 2.8 ft. 6:43 PM 2.8 ft. 6:17 AM 2.6 ft. 8:13 AM Hi g h 1.6 ft. 8:33 PM 1.6 ft. 9:16 PM 1.6 ft. 10:04 PM 1.6 ft. 11:01 PM 0.9 ft. 1:18 PM 1.2 ft. 2:23 PM L ow 2.8 ft. 7:42 PM 2.9 ft. 8:43 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 15, 12 Fri Nov 16, 12 Sat Nov 17, 12 Sun Nov 18, 12 Mon Nov 19, 12 Tue Nov 20, 12 Wed Nov 21, 12 D ate 3.2 ft. 12:50 AM 3.2 ft. 1:35 AM 3.1 ft. 2:26 AM 2.8 ft. 3:23 AM 2.5 ft. 4:28 AM Hi g h -0.6 ft. 8:28 AM -0.5 ft. 9:19 AM -0.4 ft. 10:12 AM -0.1 ft. 11:06 AM 0.1 ft. 12:01 PM 1.3 ft. 12:20 AM 1.0 ft. 1:49 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 4:48 PM 2.5 ft. 5:38 PM 2.4 ft. 6:24 PM 2.3 ft. 7:05 PM 2.3 ft. 7:42 PM 2.2 ft. 5:49 AM 1.9 ft. 7:34 AM Hi g h 1.8 ft. 7:48 PM 1.7 ft. 8:35 PM 1.6 ft. 9:35 PM 1.5 ft. 10:50 PM 0.4 ft. 12:56 PM 0.7 ft. 1:50 PM L ow 2.3 ft. 8:15 PM 2.3 ft. 8:46 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 15 Nov. 21First Nov. 20 Full Nov. 28 Last Dec. 6 New Dec. 12Major Times 1:43 AM 3:43 AM 2:15 PM 4:15 PM Minor Times 8:52 AM 9:52 AM 7:36 PM 8:36 PM Major Times 2:47 AM 4:47 AM 3:17 PM 5:17 PM Minor Times 9:54 AM 10:54 AM 8:41 PM 9:41 PM Major Times 3:48 AM 5:48 AM 4:17 PM 6:17 PM Minor Times 10:47 AM 11:47 AM 9:47 PM 10:47 PM Major Times 4:45 AM 6:45 AM 5:12 PM 7:12 PM Minor Times 11:35 AM 12:35 PM 10:51 PM 11:51 PM Major Times 5:38 AM 7:38 AM 6:03 PM 8:03 PM Minor Times 12:16 PM 1:16 PM 11:53 PM 12:53 AM Major Times 6:27 AM 8:27 AM 6:51 PM 8:51 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:54 PM 1:54 PM Major Times 7:14 AM 9:14 AM 7:37 PM 9:37 PM Minor Times 12:51 AM 1:51 AM 1:29 PM 2:29 PM Better Average Average Average Average Average Average7:02 am 5:40 pm 8:54 am 7:37 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:03 am 5:40 pm 9:54 am 8:42 pm 7:04 am 5:39 pm 10:49 am 9:48 pm 7:05 am 5:39 pm 11:36 am 10:52 pm 7:06 am 5:39 pm 12:18 pm 11:53 pm 7:06 am 5:38 pm 12:55 pm --:-7:07 am 5:38 pm 1:30 pm 12:52 am11% 19% 26% 34% 41% 48% 55% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Aplysia, which you may more commonly know as the sea hare, is a sea slug, that is found eating algae and sea grass off our Florida coast. Aplysia, and all other sea hares, were named in ancient times because their rhinopores, a pair of sensory organs which grow out of the top of their heads, look much like the large rabbit ears. Aplysia are generally a few inches long, but can grow up to a foot, and can range in color from yellowish green to black depending on species. If you happened to “ nd an Aplysia out of the caressing support of water, you probably would not be very impressed; they tend to shrink and look, poetically, a bit like a big ball of snot. In the water, things are quite the opposite. Aplysia moves with beautiful grace, and can swim short distances by moving ” aps of skin called parapodia much like a bird ” apping its wings in the sky. Beyond pure grace, Aplysia are party animals of the sea. These hares are hermaphroditic, which allows each individual to mate with both males and females at once. When mating they secrete pheromones, chemicals which attract more animals to come mate. This leads to a wild mating behavior, known commonly as daisy chainingŽ in which up to 20 animals at once may reproduce with animals in a line, functioning as both sexes at once. Even after having kids or in this case long spaghetti-like strand of eggs, Aplysia are still up for dancing. They exhibit a behavior where they will waive their head from side to side. Hares can be characterized by this behavior. When not busy partying, Aplysia make sure to do their part to contribute to society and to the scienti“ c community. Aplysia have a simple nervous system, and large neurons, making them an ideal organism for the study of their nervous system (neurobiology). Eric Kandel of Columbia University was awarded a 2000 Nobel Prize for his work which showed how several learning and chemical responses worked on the cellular level in Aplysia. And Aplysia arent the only smart ones in the family; their cousin Bursatella, the frilled sea hare, has a protein in their defensive ink which has been isolated for its anti-HIV properties. In fact, lore says that Aplysia have been at work since biblical times, when they were used for making ink. I suggest that you go and meet an Aplysia for yourself. When you do, be polite and gentle; as if you are rude, much like an octopus, this slug may defensively secrete a reddish purple ink at you. If one inks on you though, no harm will come, as this ink isnt toxic to humans. If you keep one in your aquarium, the ink it excretes may kill everything else in the tank if it gets upset. Aplysia numbers in the grass bed can vary greatly from year to year, so if you can “ nd one off the coast of the panhandle, you can always meet one at Gulf Specimen Lab in Panacea.UnderwaterWakullaBy Heather Kunigelis AUXILIARISTS: Bob Asztalos, above, using a handheld compass for deviation table. At right, an auxiliarist shows off a Mustang suit at the North Florida Fair.FWC program improves boating across stateFrom FWC NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has announced the recipients for the 2012-2013 Florida Boating Improvement Program grants. Twenty-seven different grants, totaling $5.2 million, will be awarded throughout the state. These grants for boat ramps will bring economic development opportunities across our state,Ž said Governor Rick Scott. As the “ shing capital of the world, Florida takes pride in the maintenance and quality of our boat ramps and facilities. They will provide a steady ” ow of tourism and recreation.Ž In addition to patrolling Floridas woods and waters to protect people and natural resources, the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement manages boating access. We administer grant programs for boating access and boating-related activities,Ž said Major Jack Daugherty, leader of the FWCs Boating and Waterways Section. The grants are awarded to eligible counties, municipalities and other state governmental entities to fund projects like boat ramp construction, channel marking and derelict vessel removal.Ž

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 – Page 7B YOUR AD HERE Also Born Breaks Bulk Cane Doll Drew Ends Even Extraordinary Fetch Food Four Graph Hair Hard Here Hero Honor Howl Indeed Indicate Into Japan Kept Lane Leaf Moth Name Nice Nine Note Oats Only Oval Owner Pear Plunged Port Push Raft Rang Reds Refrigerator Roar Roll Safe Sealed This page sponsored in part by: Shock Shook Shot Skip Sold Stated Stay Stone Take Tart Teacher Teeth Tents Theyd Threw Took Torn Trees Trust Unit Untie Weed

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Available December 1. 850-984-1018 or 352-603-7033 SOPCHOPPY2/1.5 Singlewide $575.REVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Mobile Homes For Rent PANACEAClean SW 2/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $500/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 Mobile Homes For Sale 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, Beautiful Kitchen. Huge Master Bedroom Walk In Closets Call Today (850) 576-2106 4 BR Mobile Home on 5 Acres, Ready to Move IN -EZ Payments. Call Me (850) 576-2105 100 Families Needed for Govt Loan Program. Call Today (850) 576-2104 3BR, 2BA-Used Mobile Home. Great Condition Wont Last !!! Call Me ASAP (850) 576-2687 Foreclosed Mobile Home with land, ready to move in. Great Value. Approx 1500 sq ft, 3Br2Ba, serious offers only, no renters. (850)308-6473 GOTLAND? Need a Home. Use Your Land As your DOWN Payment Call Now (850) 576 2687 Apartments Unfurnished PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall Mary (850) 984-4811Equal Housing Opportunity TDD 1 800 955 2771 Rental Houses OPEN HOUSESOPCHOPPY AREASunday 1 to 5 waterfront cottage 1br/1ba, exc. cond. cath. ceiling, sep storage/laundry, $590.pr mnth. 84 Mt. Beasor Rd off Persimmon 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEResidential/ Commercial House for Rent in the Center of Crawfordville For More Details Call (850) 926-9782 PANACEA2 bedroom. 2 bath. 700.00 a month plus deposit lights and water. NO PETS and No Smoking inside the house. 850-984-1018 or 850-408-4030. Rent: Houses Unfurnished SOPCHOPPY2/1For Rent, $600 month On CanalREVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Auctions Estates ABSOLUTE AUCTION 79+/-Bank Owned Assets in GA, NC, TN Nov. 27 @ 6pm, Lithia Springs, GA. Nov. 28 @ 6pm, Ellijay, GA. Online & Live Bidding. GAL AU-Co002594, NCAL8935, TN5733 RowellAuctions.com (800)323-8388 Citrus Hills Homes Forest Ridge Villages Updated, move in ready, 2/2/2, Private lot 352-746-0002 Cars FORD1994 Taurus Good motor, has some body damage. $700 (850)926-8548 Sport/Utility Vehicles CHEVROLET2008 Tahoe LTZ, 34,600 miles, black, leather, 4X4, DVD, navigation, warranty, excellent condition, $11400, awan@netscape.com JEEP97Ž WRANGLER 4wd 137,000mi great cond. new soft top, $3300 Call 850-926-5494 Fictitious Name Notices 5437-1115 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Taylor Beard Doing business as: Geo Saves Florida at 402 Parkside Circle, Fictitious Name Notices Fictitious Name Notices Crawfordville, FL, 32327 with a mailing address of: 402 Parkside Circle, Crawfordville, FL 32327 desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 9th day of November, 2012 /s/Taylor Beard Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News November 15, 2012 5434-1115 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ITB 2013-01 UPPER RIVER BRIDGE FENCING (SHADEVILLE ROAD AND WAKULLA RIVER) Advertisement Begins: November 7, 2012 @ 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Sealed bids for ITB 2013-01, UPPER RIVER BRIDGE FENCING will be received until 10:00 a.m. on November 28, 2012. Bids should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Office, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at which time all bids will be publicly opened. Bids received after the time and date specified will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Bidder. Please direct all questions to: ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNICAL: Deborah DuBose Brent PellWakulla County BOCC ESG Operations, Inc. Phone: 850.926.9500 x 410340 Trice Lane FAX: 850.926.0940 Crawfordville, FL 32327E-mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com Office: 850.926.7616 FAX: 850.926.2890 Email: bpell@escinc.net Bid Notices Bid Notices Bid Notices Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16Ž .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE. CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 OFFICE SPACE LEASEFOR THE BARRY BUILDING ATTHE LOG CABINCrawfordville 850-508-5471$25000/MO Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT GOT FALLIN G L E A VES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help! Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h h h h h a a a a v e e A A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l t h e e M M o o o o o o d d e e e e e e r r n E q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m m e n n t t t o H e C C C ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f t ! PAT GR EE N ’ S L AWN S E R V IC E 4Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1150mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. LIVING ESTATE SALE 1875 Wakulla-Arran Rd. Crawfordville 8 AM 4 PMFrench Ormolu Hall Table with Mirror, Danish Modern Teak Server, Davis Walnut Server, Edwardian Sideboard, Dining Table with 6 chairs, Sterling Silver 2.17 troy ounce Rounds, Asian style Cabinet, Game Table, 2 Drawer antique Chest, Gilt Mirrors, 5 Salvatore Dali Prints and Etchings, Broyhill China Hutch, Metal/Glass Serving Cart, Edwardian Sofa, 2 Armchirs, 2 matching Side-chairs, stools, 6 piece French provincial Bedroom Set, Mahogany Dresser with Mirror, 2 Cedar Chests, Upright Freezer, Washer/Dryer, TV’s, Hickory green matching 2 drawer chests, Laundry baskets, Books, Linen, Limoges China, Mary Kay Dinnerset and Makeup, Lots of ne Costume Jewelry, Glassware, Pots, Fostoria etched and Crystal stems, Cambridge elegant Glassware, Waterford crystal seahorse Candlesticks, Silver-plate Candelabra & serving pieces, Schumann Cobalt dinnerware, Art-glass, Oil Paintings, Lamps, Flatware, Cobalt Glass, Chairs, Fabulous Vintage Gowns and Handbags, Shoes, Rattan Shelves, Deer Feeder, Greenhouse, Portable Outside Shed, lots of ne Porcelain and Glass, Kentucky Derby Collectibles, Xmas Items, Hurricane Lamps, Large outdoor beveled glass tables, Agate and Metal side table, Walnut Dresser with Mirror, Walnut Chest Drawers, Primitive Grey Chest drawers, Silver-plate, 2 Blue Martin Bird Houses, Floor rugs, misc tools, kitchen items and lots more...!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 – Page 9B ITB documents will be available at www.mywakulla.com or can be picked up at Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administrative Office at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 after 8:00 a.m. on November 7, 2012. Bid Documents may be picked up at the Wakulla County Purchasing Office at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. There will be a Mandatory On-Site Pre Bid Meeting at 10:00 a.m. on Monday, November 19, 2012 at Upper River Bridge Shadeville Road and Wakulla River. The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. E. Alan Brock, Chairman Deborah DuBose, Purchasing November 15, 2012 Bid Notices Bid Notices Bid Notices 5409-1115 TWN THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE : Monday, November 19, 2012 TIME: Regular Meeting 5:45 p.m. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE :Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County School, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850 926-0065 November 15, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5418-1122 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201203652 TO: Russell E. Paul ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. November 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5424-1115 TWN vs. Diaz, Sarah Case No. 652012CA000233CAXXXX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 652012CA000233CAXXXX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. SARAH S. DIAZ A/K/A SARAH SIMONDS PATTON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SARAH S. DIAZ A/K/A SARAH SIMONDS PATTON, DAVID DIAZ A/K/A DAVID C. DIAZ, JOHN TENANT, JANE TENANT, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID DIAZ and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SARAH S. DIAZ RESIDENT:Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:469 WHIDDON LAKE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-0029 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in WAKULLA County, Florida: Commence at an old concrete monument marking the Southwest corner of Section 7, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 00 degrees 01 minutes 27 seconds East along the West boundary of said Section 7, a distance of 674.17 feet to an old concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 50 minutes 33 seconds East 156.70 feet to a concrete monument on the Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary of Whiddon Lake Road, thence run North 15 degrees 30 minutes 51 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 210.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 14 degrees 52 minutes 25 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 122.61 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point OF Beginning, continue North 14 degrees 52 minutes 25 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 149.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 41 minutes 03 seconds East 331.49 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 09 minutes 27 seconds East 224.25 feet, thence run North 78 degrees 02 minutes 43 seconds West 378.56 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 1.50 acres, more or less. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy to your written defenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan PLC, attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, either before December 7, 2012 or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in The Wakulla News. DATED:October 19, 2012 Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk of the CourtCopies furnished to: Phelan Hallinan PLC 2727 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion noticed has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 8 & 15, 2012 PH #28623 5426-1122 TWN vs. Keller, Judy Case No. 652008CA000158 Foreclosure IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA000158 DIVISION: THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE CWABS, INC., ASSETBACK CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1 Plaintiff, vs. JUDYGARNETKELLER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 1, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000158 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE CWABS, INC., ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1 is the Plaintiff and JUDYGARNETKELLER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDYGARNETKELLER N/K/AFRANK KELLER N/K/AFRANK KELLER; TENANT#1 N/K/AJESSICAKELLER N/K/AJESSICAKELLER are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 13th day of December, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 6, BLOCK D, HIGHLAND PLACE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A100 MULBERRYCIRCLE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. 5427-1122 TWN Vs. Nelson, Buddy 65-2010-CA-000035-CA-XXXX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000035-CA-XXXX BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANY Plaintiff(s) vs. BUDDYE. NELSON, et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000035-CA-XXXX of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANYis the Plaintiff and are BUDDYE. NELSON; SHERRYA. NELSON; WACHOVIABANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION; THE FARM HONEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. and JOHN DOE N/K/AROBERTNELSON the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 24th day of January, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 1, Clock BŽ, THE FARM SUBDIVISION, Phase I, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Pages 93-98 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. and commonly known as: 106 PIMLICO DR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLO 32327 IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANYREMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida this 31st day of October, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk, WAKULLACounty, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, WAKULLACounty, WAKULLA COUNTYCLERK OF COURT, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL, 32327 -County Phone: 850-926-0905 TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay ServiceŽ. November 15 & 22, 2012 864242.000187FMT 5430-1122 TWN Vs. Highsmith, Phillip Case # 2012 CA 227 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE #2012 CA 227 CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. PHILLIP LEE HIGHSMITH; et al ; Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, entered in Case No. 2012-CA 227 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and PHILLIP LEE HIGHSMITH, MICHELLE DAMRON ALLEN, BOBBY H. DANZEY, SR, VOY DANZEY; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 at 11:00 oclock a.m. on January 24, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Partial Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: Lots 6, 7 and 8 Block 24Ž WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 3, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 43, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 31st day of October 2012 BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Court (seal) /s/ BY Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk November 15 & 22, 2012 5431-1122 TWN Vs. Waltman, Mary, Case #12-187-CA, Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE # 12-187-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. MARY WALTMAN; RANDAL L. WALTMAN, SR., et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, entered in Case No. 12-187-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and MARY WALTMAN; RANDAL L. WALTMAN, SR, wife and husband, UNKNOWN TENANT, AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 at 11:00 oclock a.m. on January 24, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Partial Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: SEE EXHIBIT A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days of the sale. 5432-1122 TWN Vs. Hale, Troy Case No: 09000038CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 09000038CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. TROYA. HALE; KARAS. HALE; UNKNOWN TEANANT#I; UNKNOWN TENANT#2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 17th day of January, 2013, at 11:00 oclock A.M. at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: LOTS 4 & 5, BLOCK 36Ž, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT III, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA Amobile home with VIN number FLHMBFP119543999Aand FLHMBFP119543999B sits on the property. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 30th day of October, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904) 926-0905. not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk jNovember 15 & 22, 2012 5432-1122 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices DATED this 31st day of October, 2012 BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A WEST HALF OF LOT 3, WOODVILLE SOUTH UNIT II (Unrecorded) Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 9, Block CŽ of Woodville South, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, page 31 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 89 degrees 44 minutes 21 seconds East along the Southerly boundary of said subdivision 1382.32 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNINING. From said POINT OF BEGINNINING continue South 44 minutes 21 seconds East along said Southerly boundary 455.00 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 24 minutes 21 seconds West 240.00 feet to the centerline of a 60.00 foot roadway easement (J & K Lane), thence run North 89 degrees 44 minutes 21 seconds West along said centerline 455.00 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 24 minutes 21 seconds East 240.00 feet to the POINŽT OF BEGINNING. Subject to a roadway and utility easement over and across the Southerly 30.00 feet thereof TOGETHER WITH THAT 1994 SPRl MOBILE HOME BEARING TITLE NUMBERS 66731385 AND 66731386 AND VIN # CLFL46396A AND CLFL46396B RESPECTIVELY November 15 & 22, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on November 1, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. November 15 & 22, 2012 F08051683 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5428-1122 TWN Estate of Edrington, Glenn File No. 12-99-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 12-99-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF GLENN L. EDRINGTON, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Glenn L. Edrington, deceased, whose date of death was September 26, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF 5429-1122 TWN Estate of Brim, John File No.: 12-96-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, FILE NO.: 12-96-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN WAYNE BRIM Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of John Wayne Brim, deceased, whose date of death was September 8, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The first date of publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Personal Representative: /s/ Joseph William Brim 3765 Oleben Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32305 Attorneys for Personal Representative: /s/ Stuart E. Goldberg Fla. Bar No. 0365971, Amy Mason Collins, Fla. Bar No. 0044582 Law Offices of Stuart E. Goldberg, P.L. Post Office Box 12458, Tallahassee, Florida 32317 Telephone (850) 222-4000 Facsimile (850) 942-6400 November 15 & 22, 1012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities • 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit • 31 Magpie 3BR/2BA $1400 mo. $1400 sec. dep. Outside pets okay with approval • $900 mo. $900 security Lease with OPTION TO BUY! • 5 Albin Live Oak Island 2BR/ 2 BA with Lost and Dock. $950. mo. $950 Security Deposit. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2837 Coastal Hwy. Commercial Building $800 mo. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. George's Lighthouse Point Waterfront living Overlooking georgious Ochlockonee Bay Unit 25E, 2BD/2BA, 1,460 sq. ft., washer/dryer, hardwood oors throughout, gated community with pool and tennis court. $1000. mo. No pets

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1 13 16 25 30 37 41 49 53 59 63 66 2 19 26 50 3 27 51 4 28 45 5 22 42 20 31 38 46 54 60 64 67 6 14 17 32 43 7 29 55 8 23 52 9 39 47 24 33 48 61 65 68 15 18 21 40 44 56 10 34 57 11 35 58 12 36 62 ACROSS 1. Cattail's locale 6. Belfry critters 10. Warmed the bench 13. Oil-yielding rock 14. Netman Arthur 15. Cher's ex Sonny 16. Middle Ages invader 17. Caboose's place 18. Black, to bards 19. Carpentry joint scandal? 21. Right-hand person 22. Tip of a wing tip 23. Caught in a trap 25. Railway car problem 29. Thresher's tool 30. Two-time Indy champ Luyendyk 31. Prefix with lateral 33. Strung along 37. Turf occupier 38. Catches a wave 40. In __ (within a living organism) 41. Villain 's look 43. Genesis victim 44. Times to call, in ads 45. Grid great Bradshaw 47. Main highway 49. Model T, e.g. 52. __-Cat (winter vehicle) 53. Poor, as excuses go 54. Borscht-making tool? 59. Humorist Bombeck 60. Jessica of "Dark Angel" 61. Cheech of Cheech & Chong 63. Devil's doings 64. Virgin Is., e.g. 65. Upper crust 66. "Norma __" (Field film) 67. Bow-toting god 68. Faked out, NHLstyleDOWN1. Colorado hrs. 2. Moby's pursuer 3. Affix an "X" to, maybe 4. Serb or Croat 5. Regarding this point 6. T ug's tow 7. On the briny 8. Shrug-of-theshoulders comment 9. One of the tennisplaying Williamses 10. Edna Ferber novel 11. Battery terminal 12. Muted, with "down" 15. Snoopy's doc? 20. Bagel fillers 24. Be out of sorts 25. No beauty queens, these 26. Algerian port 27. Pitchfork prong 28. Sire a calf? 29. Fad critter of the late '90s 32. One in a dispute 34. Dumpy bar 35. "Your turn," in radio talk 36. Like a yenta 39. Much teen talk 42. Ministerial nickname 46. Cash back 48. Gadded about 49. Big name in sports cards 50. Grub or maggot 51. Shoot ing marble 52. Generals' insignia 55. River of Spain 56. Low-lying area 57. Estrada of "CHiPs" 58. Lo-cal 62. Sparks or Rorem American Prole Hometown Content 11/11/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 23 4 5163 78645 2 5 31 69 1 3852 4968 3517 200 9 HometownContent 691 2358 4 7 254187639 783694215 928 413576 375869421 416572398 167 348952 549726183 832951764 M S T H A G S F L E E R A H A B O R A N L A R V A R A T E T I N E I M M I E S L A V B E G E T V E A L H E R E T O R E V L O X E S R E B A T E B A R G E Q U A R R E L E R A S E A F U R B Y E B R O T H A T S L I F E S T A R S S E R E N A S L A N G A I L R O A M E D B E A G L E V E T V A L E S O B I G D I V E E R I K A N O D E O V E R L I T E T O N E D N O S Y N E D THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The first date of publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Personal Representative: /s/ Diane K. Ray-Edrington 103 Revell Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorneys for Personal Representative Stuart E. Goldberg, Fla. Bar No. 0365971, Amy Mason Collins, Fla. Bar No. 0044582 Law Offices of Stuart E. Goldberg, P.L. Post Office Box 12458, Tallahassee, Florida 32317 Telephone (850)222-4000 Facsimile (850) 942-6400 November 15 & 22, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5421-1115 TWN Estate of Whisman, Dorothy, File No. 12-98-CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA IN RE: ESTATE OF DOROTHY J. WHISMAN Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DOROTHY J. WHISMAN, deceased, File Number 12-98-CP, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327; that the total cash value of the estate is estimated to be $474,806.00, and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Beverly J. Ross 318 Harvard Rd. St. Augustine, FL 32086 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Personal Representative: BEVERLY J. ROSS 318 Harvard Rd., St. Augustine, FL 32086 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /S/ RONALD A. MOWREY, Fla. Bar No. 0122006 Mowrey Law Firm, PA 515 North Adams, Tallahassee, FL 32301, PH: 850-222-9482, Fax: 850-561-6867 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, November 15 & 22, 2012 5422-1115 TWN Estate of Ferguson, Hugh Case No. 2012-CP-000094 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-CP-000094 PROBATE DIVISION NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Hugh Fain Ferguson, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-000094, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The date of the decedents death was August 21, 2012. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first pub lication of this Notice is November 15, 2012 Personal Representative: /s/Connie D. Torres 7337 Timber Crest Lane, Zephyrhills, Florida 33540 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Eric S. Haug, Florida Bar No. 0850713 Eric S. Haug Law & Consulting, P.A. Post Office Box 12031, Tallahassee, Florida 32317-2031 Telephone: (850) 583-1480 Telefax: (850) 297-0300 November 15 & 22, 2012 5423-1115 TWN Estate of Shilling, Ana Navia Case No. 2012-CP-000090 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-CP-000090 PROBATE DIVISION NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Ana Navia Shilling, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-000090, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The date of the decedents death was June 20, 2012. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first pub lication of this Notice is November 15, 2012 Personal Representative: /s/Kathy H. Navia 1116 Chalet Drive West, Mobile, Alabama 36608-3614 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Eric S. Haug, Florida Bar No. 0850713 Eric S. Haug Law & Consulting, P.A. Post Office Box 12031, Tallahassee, Florida 32317-2031 Telephone: (850) 583-1480 Telefax: (850) 297-0300 November 15 & 22, 2012 5425-1122 TWN Estate of Chuley, Tracy File No. 12-97-CP Notice of Administration PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 12-97-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF TRACY CANDICE CHULEY Deceased. TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Formal Administration has been entered in the Estate of Tracy Candice Chuley, deceased, File Number 12-97-CP, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327; that the decedents date of death was July 2, 2012; that the total value of the Estate is less than $75,000.00 and that the names of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: NAME ADDRESS -Mark G. Chuley 2616 County Road 124, Seneca Falls, N.Y. 13148 -Lanson G. Chuley29 Swaby Street, Seneca Falls, N.Y. 13148 -Kalan C. Chuley25 Clinton Street, Seneca Falls, N.Y. 13148 -Daryl S. Chuley108 Englishman Drive, Blacksburg, S.C. 29702 -L ynn D. Chuley259 S. Cypress Road, # 511, Pompano Beach, FL 33060 -Aaron T. Chuley454 Amanda Circle, Knoxville, TN 37922 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the Estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the Estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Person Giving Notice: /s/ John J. Ryan 6 Bob Miller Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /s/ J. Martin Hayes, ESQ., Florida Bar No. 0971766 Akerman Senterfitt, 401 E. Jackson Street, Suite 1700 Tampa, Florida 33602, Telephone: (813) 223-7333 November 15 & 22, 2012 Self Storage Notices 5436-1122 TWN Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage 11/24 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will 5412-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.12 TXD013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2424Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-080-000-11508-013LOT 80 HS P-4-13-M-22 COMM AT NE COR OF LOT 81 HS OR 648 P 773 Name in which assessedBEN WITHERS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this11day of October 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 5413-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLCthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2182Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-076-000-10250-008 LOT 76 HS P-7-8-M-20-C IN NE 1/4 OF LOT 76 HS OR 148 P 292 OR 219 P 610 Name in which assessedTHE SIGHTS & SOUNDS COMPANY OF WAKULLA INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5419-1115 TWN Dept. of Child Services, 09C01-1207-JT Termination of Parental Rights PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF INDIANA, COUNTY OF CASS, IN THE CASS CIRCUIT COURT Logansport, INDIANA IN THE MATTER OF THE TERMINATION OF THE PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP OF: CRISTINA SALTER, SELENA SALTER, and JOBANY SALTER, children And SERGIO SANCHEZ, father Cause No.: 09C01-1207-JT-17 Cause No. 09C01-1207-JT-18 Cause No. 09C01-1207-JT-19 SUMMONS FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION & NOTICE OF TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the above noted parent, whose whereabouts are unknown, and who is the parent of Cristina Salter (date of birth 2-2-2007), Selena Salter (date of birth 11-26-2009), and Jobany Salter (date of birth 10-22-2010) that a Petition for Involuntary Termination of your Parental Rights in the above named Children, has been filed by the Indiana Department of Child Services, Cass County Office, in the Cass County Circuit Court, and YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED TO APPEAR before the Judge of said Court at the Cass County Courthouse, second floor, in Logansport, Indiana, telephone (574) 753-7339, on the 9th day of January, 2013 at 1:00 oclock P.M. to attend an Initial hearing/Termination hearing and to answer the Petition for Termination of your Parental Rights in said Children, and YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED that if the allegations in said petition are true, and/or if you fail to appear at the hearing, the Juvenile Court may terminate your parent-child relationship; and if the court terminates your parent-child relationship you will lose all parental rights, powers, privileges, immunities, duties and obligations including any rights to custody, control, visitation, or support in said Children; and if the court terminates your parent-child relationship, it will be permanently terminated, and thereafter you may not contest an adoption or other placement of said children, and YOU ARE ENTITLED TO REPRESENTATION BY AN ATTORNEY, provided by the State if applicable, throughout these proceedings to terminate the parent-child relationship. YOU MUST RESPOND by appearing in the case in person or by attorney within thirty (30) days after the last publication of this notice, and in the event you fail to do so, an adjudication on said petition and termination of your parental rights may be entered against you without further notice. THE ATTORNEY REPRESENTING THE INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF CHILD SERVICES, is Tricia Thompson, 300 E. Broadway Street, Suite 502, Logansport, IN 46947; telephone (574)722-3677. Date this 19th day of October, 2012 Clerk of Cass County November 8, 15 & 22, 2012 Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, November 24, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Marilyn Mitchell Mike Vowell Before the sale date of Saturday, November 24, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, FL November 15 & 22, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Dated this12day of October2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 – Page 11B 1. TELEVISION: In the X-FilesŽ TV drama series, what was the phrase on the UFO poster in Fox Mulders office? 2. MOVIES: What did Bruce Willis character do for a living in Die HardŽ? 3. BUSINESS: What is the name of Nikes logo that appears on its sports merchandise? 4. U.S. GOVERNMENT: Where is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention located? 5. LANGUAGE: What is a fen? 6. SCIENCE: What is the botanist Carolus Linnaeus famous for? 7. HISTORY: What did the Edict of Nantes do for the French in 1598? 8. GEOGRAPHY: Where is the island of Bonaire located? 9. ASTRONOMY: What are the Perseids? 10. PSYCHOLOGY: What kind of fear is represented in thanatophobia? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. I Want to BelieveŽ 2. Police officer 3. Swoosh 4. Atlanta 5. Bog 6. Creating a classification system for plants 7. Promised French Protestants the same rights as French Catholics 8. The Caribbean, just north of Venezuela 9. A meteor shower most visible in August 10. Fear of death YOUR AD HERE

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000CV38 Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy DAVID WHITE Napa Valley accounts for less than 4 percent of Americas total wine production. Yet its the countrys bestknown wine region. Napa rocketed to the forefront of American winemaking in 1976, when British wine merchant Steven Spurrier organized a wine competition in Paris to pit Californias best Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon against the best wines France had to offer. Everyone assumed that France would win. After all, the nation had been making wine for thousands of years and was widely regarded as the worlds top wine region. But with both its whites and reds, California won. The white wine, produced by Chateau Montelena, came from Calistoga, a city at the north end of Napa Valley. The red, produced by Stags Leap Wine Cellars, came from the southern Napa town of Yountville. The outcome shocked the world. Ten years later, the red wines were re-tasted at the French Culinary Institute. Once again, California came out on top. This time, the Cabernet Sauvignon was produced by Clos Du Val, a winery located down the road from Stags Leap. Ever since, the world has recognized Americas ability to produce world-class wine. The portion of Napa Valley that stretches from just north of Stags Leap Wine Cellars to Clos du Val is now known as the Stags Leap District, a one-mile-by-three mile stretch of land that comprises just 1/100th of Napa Valley. The federal government recognized this district as an of“ cial American Viticultural Area in 1989. If it werent for this stretch of Napa Valley, America might not have its reputation for producing some of the worlds best wines. In early October, I spent a week in Stags Leap learning about the region, its history, and its wine producers. Grape growing in Stags Leap began in 1878, when Napa Valley was little more than sleepy towns and horse paths. That year, an entrepreneur named Terrill Grigsby built Occidental Winery, the regions first winery. Fifteen years later, Grigsby was joined by another entrepreneur, Horace Chase, who founded Stags Leap Winery. By 1895, Chases winery was producing 40,000 gallons of wine each year. Grape-growing in the region took off. But around the same time, a pest called phylloxera was spreading and it soon destroyed half the areas vineyards. Most vines that survived were ripped up during Prohibition, as vintners planted walnut trees and other legal crops. Grapes returned to the region in 1961, when a gutsy farmer named Nathan Fay planted several acres of Cabernet Sauvignon near the now-shuttered wineries. Fays grapes quickly gained a reputation among Napa Valleys vintners, including Warren Winiarski, an intrepid winemaker who was quickly gaining a reputation as one of the best. In 1970, Winiarski decided to buy land next to Fay and establish Stags Leap Wine Cellars. The rest is history. Today, the Stags Leap District is home to 19 highly praised wineries. The wines from the region are unique for two main reasons. First, theres the soil. Most of it is coarse and volcanic with good drainage, which is perfect for Cabernet Sauvignon. Then, theres the geography. At the southern end of Stags Leap, low-lying ” atlands extend all the way to San Pablo Bay, an extension of San Francisco Bay. The eastern side of Stags Leap is marked by dramatic, clifflike hills, which serve two purposes. In the mornings, they reflect heat onto the vineyards below, enabling temperatures to rise more quickly than they otherwise would. In the afternoons, they help funnel cool air in from San Pablo Bay, resulting in low nighttime temperatures. These swings help the grapes attain complex ” avors and achieve balance. These factors result in wines that display not just richness and ripeness but vibrant acidity and soft tannins. Especially when young, Cabernet Sauvignon from the Stags Leap District is more approachable than other Napa Valley wines. Its no wonder that Cabernet Sauvignon from Stags Leap District is sometimes described as an iron “ st in a velvet glove.Ž The wines from this region arent cheap few wines from Napa Valley are but theyre worth seeking out.David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet. -Janet WHITES WINESNapa Valley: An iron “ st in a velvet glove FOR FREE QUIT TIPS AND COUNSELING IN WAKULLA COUNTY, CALL 926-0401 ext. 217 Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe WakuulanewsYou’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the



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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 44th Issue Thursday, November 15, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 5A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 6A Weekly Roundup .............................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Arts & Entertainment ......................................................Page 9A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 11A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 4B Outdoors .........................................................................Page 5B Water Ways ......................................................................Page 6B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11BINDEX OBITUARIES Johnnie Pa John Carroll Randall Randy Richard Gray William Roscoe Revell Michael Lynn Roberts Christine Gibson SextonBy HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsIf youve typed wakulla into your internet browser lately, chances are youve come across a few video clips that have piqued some interest in Wakullas Working Waterfronts Photo-Journal. Waterfronts is currently recording stories and collecting photos that highlight the early maritime lifestyles of our tiny portion of Floridas Gulf Coast. Photos, personal interviews and more are being gathered from local fishermen, seineyard workers, crabbers, crabpickers, shrimpers, oyster-folk, restaurateurs and the family descendants of communities (such as Skippers Bay), before a wealth of history speci c to our county becomes altogether lost. The Healing Arts of Wakulla County, in association with Palaver Tree Theater, will hold a photo gathering at the Spring Creek Restaurant, on Saturday, Nov. 17, from noon to 2 p.m. The get-together will be highly informal no speechmaking. Ten percent of any meal or item purchased between the hours of noon and 2 p.m. will go to bene t the Waterfronts project. When most people see the word photo-journal, they think simply of a book. This is short-sighted, with no true concept of what an undertaking of this sort entails. Although local photographers, writers, historians and more are integral to its success, it is those in our community who have made their living from the bounty of the Gulf, or who have picked crabs, shucked oysters, picked bait in the pinewoods, run a sh house, or kept their families fed through the opening of a seafood restaurant, who will prove to be the ideal storytellers for Waterfronts. Continued on Page 2AGroup seeks to gather waterfronts informationVeterans DayTDC gets $500,000 grantEvent honors those who servedBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County Tourist Development Council Director Pam Portwood received exciting news on Thursday, Nov. 8. She was informed that the TDC had been awarded a $500,000 grant from the Gulf Tourism and Seafood Promotional Fund, which is a $57 million fund established to help those areas affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in April 2010. I squealed and jumped up and down, Portwood said upon hearing the news. I was really beside myself. The promotional fund is intended to support programs that are directed to advertising, promoting and marketing the seafood and tourism industries in the five Gulf states. The grant was only open to public, quasi-public, non-profits and other organizations in those states. TDC Chair David Moody said, We are so excited about this incredible opportunity and the positive impact it will have on our tourism and seafood industry partners. Portwood received a call on Thursday from someone who had seen a news release listing the Wakulla County TDC as one of 33 Florida organizations that had been selected to receive the BP funds. She then checked her email and it was confirmed. Continued on Page 2AWakullas Working Waterfronts will hold a Photo Gathering at Spring Creek Restaurant Saturday, Nov. 17, from noon to 2 p.m. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netHundreds of people lined Crawfordville Highway on Saturday, Nov. 10 to honor those who have served in the military. The Veterans Day Parade and Celebration was held by Wakulla Christian School and Wakulla County Veterans Services to salute veterans and support active military. The event is in its sixth year. Commissioner-elect Richard Harden attended the event and walked in the parade to thank those who voted for him. Harden is also a veteran and expressed his gratitude to the organizers of the event and those who attended. It really means a lot, Harden said. Prior to the parade, a free breakfast was held for all veterans. Following the parade, there were games for children, music, food, vendors, a silent auction and an awards ceremony honoring six local heroes. FILE PHOTOFisherman Clark Nichols shows off an oyster during last years oyster relay. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENWakulla Christian School students in a parade oat pulled by a U.S. Army truck. Students on a oat look out at the crowd on the parade route. Members of the Marine Corps League march in the parade. Members of Sons of the Confederacy, above, and children playing at Hudson Park after the parade.More photos online at thewakullanews.com Wakulla TDC Director Pam Portwood 10-0War Eagles are undefeated heading into the playo sSports Page 1B

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsA 21-year-old Bradenton man wanted for murder in Manatee County was arrested by Wakulla County Sheriffs Office deputies following a traf c pursuit at 12:22 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 11, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Kwame Jaquavius Henri was arrested a short distance into Leon County just past the northeastern section of Wakulla County. Deputies Scott Powell and Marshall Taylor received information about a vehicle driving at an excessive speed northbound in the southbound lane on Woodville Highway. The deputies attempted to initiate a traffic stop with emergency lights and siren but Henri continued northbound a short distance into Leon County nearly striking another vehicle head-on before stopping. Once at the suspect vehicle, Deputy Powell smelled the odor of marijuana and observed the driver to be unsteady on his feet while attempting to get out of the vehicle. Henri gave the deputy multiple false names before granting permission to search his vehicle. Marijuana and an Oxycodone pill were discovered inside the vehicle. Deputy Vicki Mitchell transported Henri to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Once at the jail, marijuana was located behind the suspects ear and jail personnel discovered Henris true identity. The suspect agreed to submit a breath and urine sample and FHP Trooper Mike Simmons assisted by conducting the tests and determined Henri to be impaired. The suspects identity was processed through the NCIC/FCIC data base and deputies discovered that Henri was wanted for an outstanding murder warrant in Manatee County with a no bond order. The suspects license was also determined to be suspended. Henri faces charges in Wakulla County of DUI, eeing and attempting to elude, knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license is suspended or revoked, possession of a controlled substance, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and smuggling contraband into a detention facility. The Manatee County Sheriffs Of ce listed Henri as a fugitive of the law. In Manatee, Henri is wanted for murder, possession of a controlled substance, attempting to tamper with a witness and possession of cannabis. Wakulla 21 st Century Community Learning Center NOW accep ng enrollment applica ons for the 2012-2013 school year.The Wakulla 21st CCLC will provide enrichment to Wakulla County y outh currently enrolled in Pre K-8th grade in the areas of math, reading, science, and wri ng; and will o er the families of par cipa ng studen ts opportuni es for literacy and related educa onal development. The program will o er a wide range of opportuni es in areas of educaon, personal development and recrea on that will include business partners, mentors and educa onal facilitators.Programming at this me includes: FCAT Review in Reading, Wring, Science and Math Dance Daily Homework Center Mar al Arts Tutoring Theatre Project Based Learning 4H Character Educa on Music Lessons Community Service Projects Games and Physical Educa on The 2012-2013 program begins November 19, 2012 directly a er the regular school day. Program hours are 3:15 to 6:15 p.m. Monday thru Friday. The Wakulla 21 st Century Community Learning Center is a federally funded program and is o ered free of charge to qualifying Wakulla County students and their families. Enrollment applica ons are available online at h p://www.wakulla21cclc.com .Completed applica ons are due in the Wakulla 21 st CCLC o ce no later than 6:00 p.m. Friday, November 16, 2012. Space is available on a rst-come, rst-served basis.We look forward to working with you and your student this school year.Wakulla 21st CCLC 1391 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL. 32327 Phone ( 850) 745-4680 Fax (850) 926-5186 Email: info@Wakulla21CCLC.com Bonnie Holub TCC Project Director Deborah L. Fell WCS Principal Charlo e Cobb Wakulla 21 st CCLC Site Coordinator Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage? Special to The NewsA 20-year-old Crawfordville man was arrested on drug trafficking charges after the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Narcotics Unit conducted a search of his home and discovered prescription medication pills that were stolen from a Tallahassee pharmacy, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Eric Jasen Gaines was charged with drug traf cking of more than 14 grams but less than 28 grams and possession of Schedule III or IV narcotics with intent to sell. He was transported to the Wakulla County Jail on Nov. 9 where he posted a $10,000 bond and was released on Nov. 10. The Leon County Sheriffs Of ce is also conducting an investigation for activities that occurred in Tallahassee. The WCSO Narcotics Unit was contacted by the Leon County Sheriffs Of ce about the theft of prescription medications from a Tallahassee Publix Pharmacy. Gaines admitted to law enforcement of cials that he stole prescription medications from his employer over a period of several months. He also admitted to having additional prescription medications at his home in Crawfordville. WCSO Narcotics deputies were granted permission to search Gaines Lilac Lane home and discovered generic Xanax and Hydrocodone pills and Publix Pharmacy containers. The pills were seized as evidence. The total amount of seized pills included 390 generic Xanax pills which weighed 50.5 grams and 20 Hydrocodone pills weighing 15.3 grams. Two additional Ambien pills were also seized. WCSO detectives estimated the street value of the seized narcotics at $3,000. Arrest warrants are pending in Leon County as Gaines faces additional charges from the LCSO.Continued from Page 1A Patrick Juneau, claims administrator for the Deepwater Horizon Economic Claims Center, had sent her an email letting her know that the TDC had been selected to receive the $500,000 grant, which was the maximum amount that could be awarded. Prior to the call, Portwood was at a TDC meeting with the council and they were discussing the normal advertising budget and deciding how it would be spent. A couple of hours later, we have $500,000 to work with, Portwood said. Portwood learned of the grant in late September and had less than a week to put together an application prior to the Oct. 5 deadline. She said she felt the county had about a 50/50 chance of getting the grant, but tried to put it out of her mind and go about business as usual. I had no idea what our chances were for actually being awarded the funds, I just knew I had to try, Portwood said. The application included a very detailed marketing plan and speci c information about how the TDC would spend the money. That was the intense part, Portwood said. The major component of the proposal is increasing the tourism name of Wakulla County and the brand awareness of its slogan, The Natural Place to Be, Portwood said. This includes a marketing and advertising strategy that highlights Wakullas natural resources. Portwood said there is also an idea to create a brand for Wakullas seafood industry, such as Fresh from Wakulla, a take from the Fresh from Florida campaign. To increase awareness and also revive the publics con dence in our seafood, Portwood said. A majority of the funds will go towards print and digital media buys. Many of the print publications the TDC targeted are ones they have never been able to afford before. Weve never had that kind of money, Portwood said. This also gives the TDC a great opportunity for coop advertising, she added. The TDC is working on a co-op advertising plan so area businesses can participate and not have to share the entire cost of advertising on their own. Thats pretty exciting, Portwood said. The funds will also be used for digital marketing, brochures, social media marketing and a visitors guide. Portwood has not been informed when the money will be made available, but the TDC will hold a special meeting to discuss the next steps. The TDC will also hold a public roundtable meeting to discuss the grant, their ideas and to get input from the public once the nal grant documents have been received from the claims administrator. We will certainly be working with the public and tourism and seafood industries, Portwood said. The TDC was one of 110 entities that received a grant out of the 350 applications received.TDC gets $500,000 grantContinued from Page 1A Wakullas seafood industry has been hard-hit with net limitations, hurricanes, tropical storms, oil spills and a global economic crisis. These things, however painful, should not be used as crutches in our effort to rebuild community morale and make known to all our strengths, which are our countys history and maritime heritage. The economic and social results of this project can bring together elders, artists, teachers, county government and students with the common purpose of awakening the communal pride of our countys Native American, AfricanAmerican and white generations all of whom can claim ownership to the rich shing and maritime culture of Wakulla. Partnerships with communities similar to Wakulla, local universities and other groups can be formed to celebrate the people and culture of our working waterfronts. Lasting exhibitions of photos, artwork and writings placed within specific locales throughout the county will provide ongoing education and inspiration to the community, and offer our children a birthright worth staying close to home for and, possibly, building upon. We ask that all residents feel free to bring old family photos of shers, shrimpers, crabbers, oyster workers and others that would make a nice addition to the project. The photos will be scanned on the spot so that they never leave your possession. Local professional photographers, volunteers and those who would like to share their experiences in an interview are always needed. Visit and like us on Facebook at Wakulla Waterfronts. Recent videos can also be viewed there. Contact palavertreetheater.org if you wish to get involved. Group seeks to gather waterfronts information Crawfordville man arrested for drug traf ckingFugitive wanted for murder is caught in Wakulla Eric Jasen Gaines Kwame Jaquavius Henri

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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter only a couple meetings of the Wakulla County Community Center Advisory Group, it became quite clear the group was not headed in the direction the county commission had planned. The members of the group were split into two groups those in support of the community center and those who were not so supportive. Commissioner Lynn Artz expressed her frustration with the dysfunctional group and said the members were intended to be champions of the community center. To try and x the problem, the county commission voted to amend the ordinance that establishes the advisory group at its Nov. 5 meeting. The group has been changed to a ve-member group, instead of the previous 11, and the background and experience requirements have been removed. Artz said she was glad to see the commission was still committed to having the advisory group. She added that she spoke with the members of the group who were very committed and they had no major objections with decreasing the number of members. People who would like to serve on the advisory group will need to ll out an application. The commission will then chose the ve members from a list complied by the county administration. The county acquired the 22-acre property that was previously home to New Life Church on May 24, 2010, with plans to turn it into a community center. The current plan for the community center site is to use a legislative appropriation to renovate the former sanctuary building to include free weight and cardio room, fitness class room, kid zone and restrooms and showers. The other building would remain as it is, with several of ces. Also include in the plans is the addition of an open floor gymnasium, which would be a high school and college regulation size basketball court. The former sanctuary building would be utilized by the YMCA, which has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the county to manage the community center. A request for proposals was sent out and the YMCA was the lone responder. There is now discussion needed to determine what kinds of programs the YMCA will offer. Bids for the renovations at the community center are due by Nov. 28. If all goes well, the winning bid will go before the county commission at its Dec. 3 meeting for approval. In other news: The commission voted to change the speed limit of Lonnie Raker Road. The entire road is now 35 miles per hour. Commissioner Mike Stewart said the speed limit varies from 45 to 35 and back to 45. The Community Traf c Safety Team recommended making the entire road 35 miles per hour because of hazards associated with the right of way and the numerous residential roads and driveways, he said. He added that the sheriffs office conducted a speed study and it showed the average speed at 54 miles per hour. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he was against lowering the speed limit. Its clearly an enforcement issue, Merritt said. He added that there is one area of the road with a dangerous curve that should be 35, but if it was re-aligned, the whole road would then need to be 45. Stewart felt the road should be one speed limit. The commission voted three to two to lower the speed limit. Merritt and Commissioner Jerry Moore opposed the motion. The next commission meeting will be held on Nov. 19 at 5 p.m. This is the last commission meeting for the outgoing commissioners. The swearing-in ceremony for newly elected commissioners, Richard Harden, Howard Kessler and Ralph Thomas, will be Nov. 20 at 5 p.m. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. NOVEMBER 15, 2012If a person decides to appeal any decision made with respect to any matter considered at the meeting, he or she will need a record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings are available, which records includes the testimony and evidence upon which appeal is to be based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations or an interpreter to participate in this meeting should contact the Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Phone (850) 926-0919, at least two (2) days prior to the hearing.NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING AND ATTORNEY-CLIENT EXECUTIVE SESSIONThe Wakulla County Commission will conduct a Public Meeting and an Attorney-Client Executive Session at 4:00 p.m. on Monday, November 19, 2012 in the County Commission Chambers located at 29 Arran Road, Suite 101, Crawfordville, Florida, to discuss ongoing litigation. After the meeting is convened the Board will go into closed session pursuant to Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes. The subject matter of the executive session is the pending litigation in the following matter: Carter and Forte v. Wakulla County, Wakulla County Circuit Court, Case No. 10-147CA. The discussions in this session shall be conned to settlement negotiations and/or strategy relating to litigation expenditures. In attendance at this meeting will be Chairman Alan Brock, Vice Chairman Randy Merritt, Commissioner Lynn Artz, Commissioner Mike Stewart, Commissioner Jerry Moore, County Administrator David Edwards, County Attorney Heather Encinosa, Special Counsel Bill Graham, and a certied court reporter. The Executive Session will last approximately 1 hour. Following the closed session, the Board will reconvene in open session so that the Chair may announce the termination of the executive session, and the Board may consider general issues relating to the pending litigation and other county business. If you have any questions, please contact Katie Taff at (850) 926-0919 or ktaff@mywakulla.com NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS NOVEMBER 8, 15, 21, 29, 2012 NOVEMBER 15, 2012The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will conduct a Special Meeting on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. at the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL.Purpose of Meeting: To Swear-In the Newly Elected County Commissioners and to Select a New Chairman and Vice Chairman If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.NOTICE OF SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETINGPUBLIC NOTICENorth Florida Child Development, Inc. is recruiting for governing board(s) members. NFCD is a 501(c) (3) organization that provides comprehensive early education and development to the young children and their families in Calhoun, Gulf, Liberty, Madison, and Wakulla Counties. The governing board(s) maintains a formal structure of shared governance through which parents and community representatives can participate in policy making and other decisions. Please contact Sebrina McGill for more information at (850) 639-5080 ext 10 or smcgill@oridachildren.org.NOVEMBER 15, 21, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wakulla County Planning Commission and the Board of County Commissioners propose to adopt the following by ordinance. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, December 10, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, January 7, 2013 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.NOVEMBER 15, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wakulla County Planning Commission and the Board of County Commissioners propose to adopt the following by ordinance. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, December 10, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, January 7, 2013 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 9260919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.NOVEMBER 15, 2012 COUNTY COMMISSIONBoard changes community center advisory group Rotary Dictionary Project WILLIAM SNOWDENMembers of the Rotary Club of Wakulla, along with members of Friends of the Library, are in the midst of their annual project to distribute dictionaries to all third graders in Wakulla County. Rotarians Michelle Snow, Jo Ann Palmer and Niraj Patel along with Library Director Scott Joyner, were handing out dictionaries to third graders at Crawfordville Elementary.

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Sheriff candidates square off at one last forum Sheriffs Report for Nov. 8, 2012 Charlie Creel is new sheriff Dutch visitors campaign locally for Alan Brock, Obama Thomas, Kessler, Harden win No petitions heard for Value Adjustment Board County commission: Board creates RESTORE Act committee Week in Wakulla: Nov. 8-15thewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.Editor, The News: On Tuesday, Oct. 23, more than 250 guests enjoyed a Poseys shrimp dinner, good company and live foot-tapping bluegrass music from Stranger Still, all in the name of helping more Wakulla County youth achieve success in life. Presented by Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend, and supported by numerous generous sponsors and individual donors, the third annual dinner event raised more than $5,000 to support the Big Brothers Big Sisters Wakulla County Mentoring Program. Big Brothers Big Sisters would like to thank the following sponsors: Waste Pro USA, Progress Energy, Alan Brock, Charlie Creel, Kimley-Horn & Associates, Mike Stewart, Preble-Rish, Capital City Bank, Poseys Catering, Rock Landing Marina, Rogers, Gunter, Vaughn Insurance Inc. and our media sponsor, The Wakulla News. The BIG Catch is great for renewing energy within the community. We are continuing to gain momentum in Wakulla County, and we look forward to serving even more children this year. Big Brothers Big Sisters is currently seeking safe adult mentors willing to spend time with a child two to four times monthly for a minimum of 12 months. Being a Big Brother or a Big Sister is both enjoyable and ful lling. Volunteers have the opportunity to help shape a childs future for the better by empowering them to achieve. Volunteering just a few hours a month can change the course of a childs life for the better, forever. By simply changing their perspective on what the world can offer, volunteers can literally change lives. Sometimes, it is as simple as playing basketball, making crafts, reading, or shing. Louis Garcia CEO Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend Editor, The News: I understand candidates want to make voters aware of their bid for of ce, but in doing so they should be courteous and respectful of others. On Nov. 2, during the visitation hours for my husband at Bevis Funeral Home, some candidates or their representatives literally blocked the entrance to the parking area. This made it dif cult for elderly friends and families to make their way into the building. As I understand, these people were politely asked to move elsewhere. Teresa Harden & Family Editor, The News: We are deeply grateful for the participation of all our volunteers for making possible another successful year for the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival. A big THANK YOU to everyone involved. Your support and participation continues to make this festival extremely successful and directly bene cial to the St. Marks Community. A committee of dedicated individuals works all year without compensation to organize this great event. Each of these volunteers shoulder a specific duty making the festival happen for the community, county and visitors from surrounding areas. (Most would never guess how many hours of planning, selling, hauling, listing, calling, cleaning, dragging, thinking and promoting it takes to make an event like the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival happen.) On the day of the event we look to our 100-plus volunteers to make everything run smoothly. This event could not function without these volunteers. I just want to mention a few groups key to the events success. First, we are grateful to the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce deputies for their work and to the inmates who were involved in setting up and taking down the site, along with keeping the area clean during the festival. We are indebted to the Boy Scout Troop that directs traf c to parking areas for the major part of the day; to the musicians, singers and dancers who perform for the enjoyment of our visitors. Without the volunteers, the day would be bedlam rather than the highly organized event it is. Also, to the shermen who go out on the water and harvest the stone crabs claws and catch the sh for our enjoyment. Another key group that makes the event possible is our sponsors businesses and organizations that donated money, supplies, services and materials their generosity is essential to making the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival happen. Arts and crafts vendors and food vendors put significant investments of time, money and talent in providing great wares and excellent food to all the visitors. To all of these groups and other individuals who helped, we of the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival Committee wish to extend our heartfelt gratitude, though it is insufficient to compensate for the grandness of the gift you each have provided. The highway counter registered almost 4,000 vehicles and we estimate between 12,000 and 14,000 people attended. Visitors, thank you too for making the effort to join us in this fun and enjoyable event. We look forward to seeing you again next year! THANK YOU! Sincerely, Mike Pruitt ChairmanSt. Marks Stone Crab CommitteeBy JIM STEVENSON My wife and I have a septic tank that processes the wastes from our home, and I know its speci c location in the yard. Some homeowners have never thought about their septic tank and have no idea where it is. That means that they have never had their tank pumped. The septic tank company employee who pumped our tank a year ago said that he has had to empty some tanks out with a shovel because they have never been maintained. It is out of sight out of mind. Just ush it and forget it until the sewage backs up in the bathtub or spills onto the lawn. Some regard septic tank maintenance as a nuisance and an unwanted expense. All but approximately 1,200 homes in Tallahassee are connected to the citys central sewer. Those who are connected pay a reasonable monthly utility fee for this service. Some have central sewer available in front of their homes but have refused to hook-up to it because of the connection fee and the city has not required them to do so. During the 2010 Legislative session, the Legislature passed a septic tanks law thanks to the leadership of Sen. Lee Constantine (R, Altamonte Springs). The law required that septic tanks be inspected every five years to ensure that they are properly treating household sewage. Soon after the session, efforts were begun by several legislators to repeal the law during the 2011 session. During the 2012 session they were successful and essentially neutered the law, in fact it is now worse than the original law. This is about money! Public health is being ignored. Apparently, many homeowners dont want to take responsibility by paying for the proper disposal of their own poop. They choose to ush it and forget it. This is about votes! Every septic tank represents one or two votes. Thats why many legislators were hastily rushing to repeal the law soon after it was passed. Forget about public health. After all they are only responding to the demands of We the People. Some politicians think only about the next election. A statesman thinks about the next generation. The purpose of a septic tank is to kill harmful bacteria in human waste so as to protect drinking water, swimming areas and oysters and scallops from contamination. Citizens can choose to protect the health of their community. They have the opportunity to be good neighbors by ensuring that their septic tank is properly maintained so as not to contaminate their neighbors (and their own) drinking water. When needed, we spend thousands of dollars to replace the roof on our house so as to protect the house because we own it. Yet some homeowners rebel when required to spend a couple hundred dollars once every ve years to maintain their septic tank to protect drinking water that belongs to everyone. It costs to ush. Homeowners in Tallahassee pay on the average $40 to the utility every month to properly process their waste at the sewage treatment plant. It costs about $225 to pump a septic tank. That amounts to $3.75 per month over a five year period. Thats about the cost of a cappuccino coffee once a month. Standard septic tanks were designed to control harmful bacteria. They were not designed to control nitrate. In springsheds, the ef uent from septic tanks ows through the aquifer to our springs. Nitrate flowing from the drainfield, at a concentration of 60-70 milligrams per liter, is degrading our springs. Some viruses can also be transmitted to the groundwater by septic tanks. State agencies that have the responsibility and the expertise on this issue are silent. They dare not speak due to the anti-government and anti-regulation political climate. Perhaps our elected leaders should demonstrate wisdom and seek the advice of agency experts (not agency heads or their public relations staff). Prior to every election we are reminded that our single vote contributes to a healthy democracy. Your single septic tank affects the quality of our drinking water and the health of our springs.Jim Stevenson is the former coordinator for the Ichetucknee and Wakulla Spring Basin Working Groups and former chairman of Florida Springs Task Force. He can be contacted at orida_springs@comcast. net.Politics and your septic tank Editor, The News: Thank you all, for all your hard work in making our rst Empty Bowls Project a great success, and great success it was and will continue to be. Big thanks to the Coalition for Youth for all their help and support. I want to share with you some statistics related to the event and recognize those who made contributions in a multitude of ways. First we raised $7,092.61. Our goal was $6,000. Not only did we exceed our goal, but we clearly exceeded our expectation. In regards to those that provided monetary support, I would like to thank: Carolyn Metcalf, Joann Vesecky, Kim Porter (Leon County Girl Scout Troop 57), Susie Tooke (NAMI and United Methodist Womens Group), Esther Ellis (Christ Church Anglican), Emily Smith, Ralph Thomas, Gail Campbell and son Glen (Purple Martin Nursery), Healing Arts of Wakulla County, Rachel Pienta, 4-H and AVID and Ribits Ceramic Studio customers who painted and donated a bowls. Without your support this would not have been possible. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. I would like to thank Riverspring Middle School for their 35 hand-built bowls. Two eighth grade art classes went to work on making bowls, they were beautiful. Ten beautiful bowls from the senior center through the instruction by Nancy Jefferson. Nancy Jefferson with Green Guides Associations also donated 10 bowls, made by some of the Green Guides. We would like to thank all of those who painted bowls. I would love to name all of you, but its just to many to mention and dont want to miss any. Thank you for all your beautiful bowls. Lets give a great thank for all the yummy soup that was donated by Shelley Swenson (UF/IFAS), Trudy Thompson, Florida Green Guide Association, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Rotary Club, Poseys Steam Room, Ochlocknee Bay United Methodist Church, Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park, Habitat for Humanity, Palaver Tree Theater, Ribits Ceramic, Ralph and Cynthia Thomas, Alan Brock, Madeleine Carr, Tina Johnson and the Double Tree Hotel (CARE Program). If I forgot someone please forgive me, and thank you. Thank you to Carlean Lanier from Harvest Fellowship Church and her bakers for a great and yummy Bake Sale, which raised $297. I would also like to give thanks to Petra Shuff (Chamber of Commerce) for the wonderful homemade bread. Thank you for donations from WinnDixie, Sams Club, Wal-mart and chickens and eggs from Ralph Thomas. If I missed anyone please forgive me. A great big thanks to the music played by Pickin n Grinnin, who donated their time for this worthy cause and Sharon Fox (on the saxophone). Thank you to Val and David for collecting the tickets, selling bowls, and helping with the set up. You guys were awesome. A great big thanks to all the helpers for the endless hours, standing in the heat serving soup, handing out bowls setting up tables, and the many tasks that were performed that day, the days and months before. Thank you, thank you so much for all you do and all youve done. This is a community to be proud of. This is Wakulla County and the place we call home. To all that attended and supported Empty Bowls, thank you. Haydee Jackley Ribits CeramicREADERS WRITE: ank you for support of Empty Bowls St. Marks Stone Crab Festival was success Big Brothers Big Sisters raised $5,000 Some candidates blocked funeral home

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Page 5AChurchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Church Briefs Emmaus to hold gathering at Crawfordville UMCThe Big Bend Walk to Emmaus Community will hold its monthly Gathering at Crawfordville United Methodist Church, 176 Ochlockonee Street on Saturday, Nov. 17. The evening will begin with a covered dish dinner at 5 p.m., music, sharing and worship will follow. The meeting is open to all who have participated in a walk and to those who would like to. Members of Tres Dias, Cursillo, Via de Cristo Communities are also invited. Call 926-7472 for more information. Marcum Family to perform at Crawfordville UMCThe Marcum Family of Peachtree City, Ga., will present a concert on Sunday, Nov. 18, at 4 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Michael, Susan LeeAura and the four children will present a program of contemporary, gospel and original music. Each family member plays at least one instrument and all sing. Susan is the daughter of Mary and Buddy Updegraff, and grew up here in Wakulla County. The concert is free. Winter Music Festival at Harvest Fellowship Dec. 8A Winter Music Festival is set for Dec. 8 on the outdoor stage of Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. The concert will be held from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. You are invited to come and sit out on the lawn and enjoy a free musical concert featuring a variety of music styles from blue grass to hip hop, local talent, as well as visiting musicians from around the state. Well have a bouncy house for the little ones, a bon re with marshmallows for roasting and lots of good food. Harvest Fellowship Church and Thrift Store is sponsoring this event with the ongoing intent to make Wakulla County a great place to live. Your nancial donations will be accepted at the event. Interested Vendors should call the Harvest Thrift Store at (850) 926-3535. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDERNow that we have gotten past the recent elections, we can get back to life as normal. Of course, I am not sure what normal really means. One mans normal is another mans over the cliff. I am not quite sure I am normal and I fear bringing this query to the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. My fear is that she will tell me the truth. You know what we Americans think about the truth. There was a time when truth was a pretty stable thing. There were certain things that were absolute truth and no ifs, ands or buts about it. Those were the good old days. Nowadays truth is not as clear as it once was. What was true in the day, is now altogether a different matter. Being the simpleminded man that I am, it is very hard for me to keep up with all of this nonsense. I mean, after all, how do you know what is true if it changes all the time? I think if it is true, it is always true. That only beguiles my age. If truth is as slippery as some people are indicating, how do I know what is true today? It does not matter what was true yesterday. That was yesterday. Today is a new day and henceforth, what was true yesterday is not true today. To make matters even more confusing, what is true today will not be true tomorrow. I believe the reason I am getting bald on the top is that I am scratching my head too much lately. I cannot seem to make heads or tails out of all the nonsense transpiring today as truth. How do people keep up and know what is really true? If I plan to live quite a few more years, I am going to have to get a handle on this very thing. I am not quite sure where to go. Something has to be done so that I can gure out day by day what is really true. I shared my dilemma with my better half and as is usually the situation, she came up with a brilliant answer. Please, do not let her know I said that. She might get a big head and we cannot afford to buy a whole new set of hats. She simply said, Why dont you do what the politicians do? I did not quite know what she was getting at, so I inquired further. Silly, her pet name for Yours Truly, the politicians always take a poll before they decide on anything. It dawned on me like a morning in June. Of course. Whenever a politician wants to know what truth is ying on any given day, he reverts to taking a poll. Out of that poll, he can know what the truth is for that day. Amazing. I need to learn some lessons from todays politician. The rst thing I need to understand from a politicians point of view is, What I am saying at the time is not necessarily what I mean. Another thing from a politicians viewpoint is, What I said yesterday doesnt count today. This also is from the polling machine. The amazing thing about most people is they do not remember what was said yesterday. A very poor politician reminds people of what they said yesterday. A politician needs to tell them what he is saying today. Because todays truth is todays truth. No need to worry about tomorrow. Tomorrow will be re ected by tomorrows polling. This is very important because it reduces the necessity to use any sort of memory whatsoever. Because what I said yesterday does not really matter today. I do not have to remember what I said yesterday. If I want to know what I said yesterday, I need only take another poll today and that settles the matter. Perhaps the most important view from a politician is, Tomorrow may never come. I do not have to worry that what I am saying today will catch up with me tomorrow, for the simple reason tomorrow may never come. If it does come, so what. I will take a poll tomorrow to nd out what I need to say tomorrow. I think there is something to this polling mechanism. I do not have to worry about anything; all I need to do is just take another poll. I know it may get a little confusing, but I clear up that confusion by taking another poll. It is always the last poll that really counts. Thankfully, when it comes to God, truth does not change from one day to the next. What is true today was true yesterday and will be true tomorrow. You can count on that. Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and to day, and for ever (Hebrews 13:8 KJV). I can always count on God being true to His Word because God never changes.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att. net. Thanksgiving is an unusual combination of a secular and a sacred holiday. It is secular because, of course, it is a day recognized by the United States as a national holiday, and sacred because of its origin: the Pilgrim feast emphasizing our basic motivation and response to being Christian gratitude. We remember the hardships of that tiny group of Pilgrims some 370 years ago, the re out of which their gratitude that rst thanksgiving was born: uncooperative climate; the enmity of some natives; the burdens of the unknown; and the terrors of anxiety and despair. Some died ghting; others died hungry. Their graves were carefully smoothed over so that their enemies could not compute their losses. In the face of despair they replanted their crops, and fasted, and watched and perhaps most importantly, they prayed. Finally, a suf cient harvest came; enough, anyhow, to keep them alive. The settlers called in the friendlier Indians and set a day for Thanksgiving to God. They had been delivered. Once again there was hope for the new world. Their passion for this new land was renewed. In these United States of America, we who are the bene ciaries of our forbears courage and faith, Thanksgiving Day is a call for us to remember, and remember rightly. For us who are Christian, worship our way of remembering rightly; a call to remember that it is God who has delivered us, set us free, and sent us out. Christ Church Anglican will celebrate our national Day of Thanksgiving on Wednesday, Nov. 21, Thanksgiving eve. Worship will begin at 7 p.m. Christ Church is located at 3383 Coastal Highway, just east of the high school. Pastor Ethel Skipper of Skipper Temple Church will have a free Thanksgiving Dinner on Saturday, Nov. 17, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The church plans to feed 100 people. If you are unable to come in because you are shut in, please call and let us know by calling (850) 962-7838 or (850) 510-6653 and someone will deliver your dinner. Free to the community. Skipper Temple Church is located at 165 Surf Road in Sopchoppy.Thanksgiving celebrationsChrist Church Anglican Skipper Temple OUT TO PASTORThou pollest too much, methinks

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By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 9 Florida Democrats hadnt celebrated much since, well, President Obama won the state in 2008. But that changed Tuesday. Obama carried Florida again on the way to a second term in the White House, U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson easily won re-election, and Democratic candidates picked up legislative and congressional seats. For Republicans, the response to the election results ranged from anger to disbelief. After vowing for four years to topple Obama, they watched Republican Mitt Romneys campaign get outmaneuvered in Florida and other key states. Whats more, GOP candidates lost some high-pro le legislative races including a likely defeat by state Rep. Chris Dorworth, who was in line to become House speaker in 2014. The GOP still has huge majorities in the state House and Senate and controls the governors of ce and all three Cabinet seats. In other words, Republicans will continue to dominate state government, at least for another two years. HEADING BACK TO WASHINGTON: Truth be told, Florida will go down as sort of a messy footnote in Obamas victory Tuesday. The president did well enough in other key states, such as Ohio, Virginia and Iowa, to lock up another term without needing Floridas 29 electoral votes. Also, as part of Floridas never-ending voting controversies, some Miami-Dade voters were still in line early Wednesday morning, after Obama was already assured of victory. But bigger picture, Obamas Florida campaign played a part in turning out voters who helped Democrats in other races. That included Hispanic voters in central Florida, where the Puerto Rican population is growing and providing a base of Democratic support. State Democratic Chairman Rod Smith described Hispanics as an absolute game changer for Democrats. He said the party hired a full-time Hispanic outreach coordinator in central Florida after the 2010 elections and also said the Obama team helped increase Hispanic turnout. They saw very early that was going to be a critical vote in Florida, Smith said. An important issue is the perceived hard line that many Republicans have taken on the issue of illegal immigration. But U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., indicated after the election that the GOP needs to do a better job of connecting with Hispanic voters. The conservative movement should have particular appeal to people in minority and immigrant communities who are trying to make it, and Republicans need to work harder than ever to communicate our beliefs to them, Rubio told Roll Call. Obama beat Romney in the most-populous counties along the I-4 corridor Orange, Hillsborough and Pinellas and in Osceola County, which has a large Puerto Rican population. Romney won in other areas of central Florida, including Polk, Lake, Seminole and Brevard counties. Volusia was almost a dead-heat, with Romney winning by less than 3,000 votes. Nelson did even better as he trounced U.S. Rep. Connie Mack to earn a third term in the Senate. The Democrat handily won Orange, Hillsborough, Pinellas, Osceola, Polk, Seminole, Brevard and Volusia counties, while losing by fewer than 2,000 votes in Lake. LEGISLATIVE SHOWDOWNS AND SURPRISES: Going into Tuesdays elections, the parties and outside groups made pretty clear the races they considered battlegrounds. But as returns rolled in, surprises started to emerge. First, Democrat Carl Zimmermann unseated Rep. Peter Nehr, R-Palm Harbor, in House District 65 in Pinellas County. A little later, Democrat Mark Danish knocked off Rep. Shawn Harrison, R-Tampa, in House District 63 in Hillsborough County. But then came the biggest stunner: Lawyer and retired re ghter Mike Clelland led Dorworth by 123 votes after provisional ballots were counted Thursday, and he appeared on the verge of victory. The race would be a huge upset because Dorworth is slated to become House speaker in 2014. Republican House members were preparing Friday for a Dorworth loss, with Rep. Steve Crisafulli, R-Merritt Island, being touted as a possible speaker in 2014. Overall, Democrats had net gains of two Senate seats and a probably ve House seats in Tuesdays elections though Republicans still dominate both chambers. Republicans will have a 26-14 advantage in the Senate and a 76-44 margin in the House. YES AND NO: Meritretention elections for Supreme Court justices usually draw little attention. But that changed this year when some conservative groups and leaders of the state Republican Party called for defeating justices R. Fred Lewis, Barbara Pariente and Peggy Quince. In the end, the races werent even close, with each of the justices backed by more than 67 percent of the voters. Ballots also included a barrage of proposed constitutional amendments that lawmakers put before voters. But voters rejected eight of the 11 amendments, approving only three, relatively non-controversial proposals that would offer property tax breaks for military veterans, rst responders and low-income seniors. STORY OF THE WEEK: President Obama and U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson win Florida, while Democrats also make gains in the Legislature and in the states congressional delegation. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: So the message is: If you are outside the state and you are trying to politicize our judicial branch, stay out. This is an assault on our democracy, our separation of powers, and were not going to tolerate attempts to implement partisan politics for special interests. Supreme Court Justice Barbara Pariente, after she and two other justices overcame conservative groups opposition to win merit-retention campaigns. Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChristine Gibson Sexton, devoted mother and grandmother, 73, of North Port, died on Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, at Capital Regional Medical Center in Tallahassee after an extended illness. She was born on Feb. 9, 1939, at Colson, Ky., the daughter of Charlie Gibson and Polly Sexton Gibson. She lived in Kentucky, and then Chicago, Ill., prior to moving to Green eld, Ind., in 1971, where she lived until 1984, when she moved to Venice. She was a member of the First Baptist Church of North Point, and also a member of Faith Fellowship Church, in Crawfordville. She graduated from Indiana UniversityPurdue University of Indianapolis (IUPUI) in 1977 with her degree in nursing. She went on to work in Green eld, Ind., Venice, Port Charlotte, and Tallahassee until she retired in 1997. Funeral services were held on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012, at 10 a.m. at Hindman Funeral Services Chapel, Hindman, Ky. Burial followed in the Bill Gibson Cemetery, Rockhouse, Ky., under the direction of Hindman Funeral Services. Please sign the guest book at www.hindmanfuneralservices.com. Survivors include her sons, Randy Sexton of Hazard, Ky., and Andy Sexton of Sarasota; daughter, Pamela Sexton (Bryan) Alyea of Crawfordville; brothers, Doug (Von) Gibson of Green eld, Ind., and Joe (Mary) Gibson of Litt Carr, Ky.; sisters, Reba Dennis, Symolene Anderson and Shirley (Gibson) Walker, all of Canton, Ohio, and Norma Jean Gibson of Green eld, Ind.: and sister-in-law, Mary Craft Gibson of Red Fox, Ky.; seven grandchildren, Candace Sexton, Trish (Alyea) ONeill, both of Greenville, Ind., Tonya Alyea, Mount Olive, Ala., Brandon Alyea, Leland Alyea and Kelsey Alyea, all of Crawfordville; Allison Joy Sexton of High Point, N.C., and a host of nieces and nephews, family and friends. She was predeceased by her husbands, Lenville Sexton Jr. of Whitesburg, Ky., and Ralph Anthony Bucata of North Port; her parents, Charlie Gibson and Polly Sexton Gibson of Colson, Ky.; and brothers, Chester Gibson and Lester Gibson of Knott County, Ky. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, assisted with arrangements. (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfh.com) Michael Lynn Roberts, 56, passed away peacefully on Nov. 4, 2012, from cancer at his parents home in Wakulla County. He was born in Fort Walton Beach and lived in Satellite Beach for six years where his parents were employed in the Aerospace Industry, and later moved to Tallahassee. He attended Godby High School, and Lively Vocational School where he earned his Certi cation in Construction Drafting and Design. In his younger years, he was employed at Florida State University, and later with the Leon County Facilities Management, but in recent years was a self-employed cabinet maker. He lived in Wakulla County the last four years. Over the last several years, he had successfully overcome all the challenges his life had presented him and was in a very good and peaceful place. He was a very skilled cabinetmaker, had a passion for his woodworking; he could get lost in it for hours. Give him a piece of wood and he would turn it into a piece of art. One of his most notable undertakings was the painstaking reclaiming of wainscoting and oak ooring from his great-grandparents 90-year-old home, which he used for ooring and customized cabinets in his Lake Talquin home which he called his lake house. More recently, he had painstakingly furnished, what he called his beach house, with unique and beautiful pieces of furniture he designed and crafted to blend in with his customized cabinets, ooring and walls. He was very artistic and creative with his work and the reclaiming of old furniture and had a real gift for working with colors. He loved camping, the beach, the sunshine and surf shing. He reminisced frequently about his happy times on the beach at either St. George Island, Panama City Beach or Deer eld Beach near Boca Raton. He also loved the outdoors, as well as his plants, fruit trees and gardens he tended to lovingly. His passion for gardening was a gift from his Grandma Callahan. He spent many of his young and adolescent years digging holes for her and helping her with plants and trees. As her rst grandchild, they shared a very special bond. He was an avid Seminole fan and NASCAR fan, and cheered his favorite driver, Tony Stewart, in pursuit of the checkered ag in every race of the 36 week season for years. His interests were broad and always made for interesting conversation, anything from the Great Wall of China, the wonders of archeological digs of our ancient cultures, hiking the Appalachian Trail to mans adventures in space. Mike never claimed to be ordinary, although he was a simple soul, he was a very unique personality, he walked in the way of his heart, and like Frank Sinatra, He did it his way. Until this illness, he was a healthy, athletic, outgoing, happy, active, vibrant and energetic presence. His square jaw, his sparkling eyes and smile, and his throaty chuckle were as big as life. Until the day he left us, he never met a stranger; he trusted and always called everyone his friend. He leaves to mourn his death, his parents, Annette and Dave Roberts of Panacea; three loving aunts, Carolyn (Gerry) Losey and Beverly Ashby of Tallahassee, Julie Currie of Ferguson, Mo.; his ex-wife, good friend and mother of his only child, Kimberly Roberts; Kathy Moore, friend and long time companion; many cousins, extended family and a multitude of friends who will all miss him sorely. He was predeceased by his only son, Ivon Lynn Roberts; maternal grandparents, Margaret and Roy Callahan of Tallahassee; paternal grandparents, Wayvo and Barney Weitzel of Hot Springs, Ark.; his cousin and good friend, Doris Losey of Tallahassee; his aunt, Jeslyn Dancer of El Cajon, Calif.; and his uncle and good friend, Butch Callahan of Tallahassee. A memorial and graveside service will be held with family and friends at a later date. In lieu of owers, memorial gifts may be made to the Convenant Hospice House, 1545 Raymond Diehl Road, Suite 102, Tallahassee FL 32308. The family wishes to express special gratitude to his Covenant Hospice nurses (truly Guardian Angels), Niki, Beverly, Marilyn, Nancy, Laura, Rene, Debbie and Connie, for the dedicated, vigilant attention they gave to Mikes care. Obituaries Johnnie Pa John Carroll Randall Randy Richard Gray William Roscoe Revell Michael Lynn Roberts Christine Gibson SextonJohnnie Pa John Carroll, 82, of Crawfordville, died on Nov. 3, 2012. A lifelong native of Florida, he had lived in Crawfordville since 1997. He was an electrical lineman for the City of Tallahassee, and was a member of local NBEW #222. A memorial service will be held on Nov. 15, at 6:30 p.m. at Skybox Sports Bar & Grill in Crawfordville. Survivors include his son, Jonny Carroll; daughter, Donna (Doug) Gyuricsko; and his grandchildren. Fairchild Funeral Home (386-8686) is in charge of arrangements. Randall Randy Richard Gray, 66, of Crawfordville, passed away on Nov. 7, 2012. He is survived by his wife of 40 years, Katherine Louise Vickers. He was born on July 23, 1946, in Tallahassee, and has lived in this area for 43 years. He was a member of River of Life Church. He was in the U.S. Air Force. He loved hunting and shing. He was a member of Simmons Pasture Hunt Club. He was a loving husband, father and grandfather. Visitation was held Friday, Nov. 9, 2012, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012, at 11 a.m. at Debra Nell Cemetery in Spring Creek. Besides his wife, other survivors include his son, Rich Gray (Denise) of Zephyrhills; brothers, Dell Gray and Jake Gray of Crawfordville; mother-inlaw, Catherine Jarvis (Donald); sister-in-law, Cherie Herndon; brother-in-law, Zendel Vickers (Susan); grandchildren, Shawn and Rachel; and many nieces and nephews. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-9263333 www.bevisfh.com)Johnnie Pa John Carroll Michael Lynn Roberts Randall Randy Richard Gray William Roscoe Revell Christine Gibson SextonWilliam Roscoe Revell, 73, formerly of Sopchoppy, died on Nov. 6, 2012, at Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare. He was born May 10, 1939, in Sopchoppy. He retired from the U.S. Air Force after 27 years. He was laid to rest at West Sopchoppy Cemetery on Friday, Nov. 9, at 1 p.m. Survivors include nine children, John Revell of Alabama, Charles Revell (Anne Hargrove) of Crawfordville, Leona (Sammy) Green and Sarah (Gilbert) Sanders of Sopchoppy, Tommy (Maryanne) Revell of Georgia, Shirley (Chris) Polk of Texas, Sharon (Jess) Armstrong of Virginia, Mike Revell and Robert Roscoe Revell of Crawfordville. He was predeceased by his wife, Julia A. Revell. Grace Baptist Church in Crawfordville will offer a free clothing give away on Saturday, Nov. 17, at the church. The event will be held from noon to 2 p.m. Grace Baptist is located at 803 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 926-3217 or (850) 926-1034.Free clothing give away on Saturday at Grace Baptist WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Dems move forward; GOP still in control Christmas decorations, games, toys, books, tapes, dishes, household items, small kitchen appliances, clothes, new & used items. Something for everyone! Super Yard Sale Christmas Bazaar and Bake Sale First Baptist Church of Wakulla Station 945 Woodville Hwy.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Page 7Ahappenings CommunityParmer marries Hillier Carly Hillier and Jeremy Parmer, both of Crawfordville, were married on Oct. 20 at 6 p.m. at Shiloh Farm. The ceremony was of ciated by Doc Dockery. The bride is the daughter of Sean and Terry Hillier of Crawfordville. The groom is the son of Jeff and Rita Parmer of Crawfordville. The matron of honor was Sara Turner, sister of the bride. Her bridesmaid was Amy Parmer. The best man was John Landrum. The groomsman was Bobby Turner. The bride is a 2008 graduate of Wakulla High School and is a dental hygiene student at Tallahassee Community College. The groom is a 2006 graduate of Wakulla High School and currently works at Progress Energy. Chelsea Kay Lawhon celebrated her first birthday on Oct. 5. She is the daughter of Rob and Stephenie Lawhon of Tallahassee. Her maternal grandparents are the late Ken and Elaine Matthews. Her paternal grandparents are Mitch and Pam Lawhon of Sopchoppy. Her maternal great-grandparents are the late Hardy and Lucy Revell and the late Thurston and Grace Matthews. Her paternal great-grandparents are the late James and Ruth Lawhon, Jim and Betty Ward and the late Lilly Ward.Building is named after Sopchoppy nativeSpecial to The NewsConstruction activity at Embry-Riddles rapidly expanding Daytona Beach campus has become the norm, but the grand opening of the Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center on Oct. 26 will be special it marks the return to campus of senior leadership displaced by a 2006 tornado that destroyed the previous administration building. Its exciting to be back on campus, to actively engage with our students, faculty and staff and be energized by their enthusiasm and ideas, said EmbryRiddle President Dr. John P. Johnson. Theres really no substitute for daily interaction and this striking new building puts us back where we belong. The $13 million, 37,000-square-foot structure holds of ce and meeting spaces for Dr. Johnson, the Cabinet and the Board of Trustees. It is named for Embry-Riddle board chairman Jim Henderson, currently the chairman and CEO of Assured Partners Inc. in Lake Mary. Henderson is a native of Sopchoppy and a 1964 graduate of Sopchoppy High School. He is the son of the late Allen Willis and Sarah Willis Henderson. Those who attended the event included Hendersons brothers and sister, Jack Henderson and wife, Ann of Crawfordville, John Henderson of Tallahassee and Barbara Scott of Chester eld, Va. As a dual-purpose building, the sleek and swooping Henderson Center with its outdoor reflection pools and fountains is an impressive introduction to Embry-Riddle for all visitors to campus, whether prospective students and their parents, members of the local community or the nations leading aviation and aerospace professionals. In the airy atrium that soars more than 50 feet high, visitors can touch three interactive kiosks to view a map of the campus and learn about EmbryRiddle degree programs, research, astronaut alumni, leadership and history, all displayed on 70-inch screens. For university and community events, a large hall and the atrium seat 350. At a later date a sculpture of a bronze eagle with a 7-foot wingspan, titled Sky King, will be installed in the atrium, a generous donation from longtime benefactor Dr. Helen Wessel. The Henderson Center is the product of architects Gresham, Smith and Partners; general contractor Elkins Constructors Inc.; and around 40 subcontractors, mostly from Volusia County. Over the course of construction we employed approximately 300 people, said Chris Hardesty, EmbryRiddles director of planning and construction management. We considered it a top priority to support the local economy.Special to The NewsWakullas very own Heartbreaker did it again, bringing home her eighth, JRTCA National Championship. Heartbreaker at 11 years young old, showed all the Jack Russell racers shes not ready to retire. Qualifying race after race, at track to hurdles, Heartbreaker lost only one race all day. As the crowd watched anxiously at the start box the gates burst open and Heartbreaker had the lead. She never looked back and clinched her eighth National Championship. Along for the ride and the race, Travis and Mary, Ms. B and Dip. More than 700 other Jack Russells and their parents, showed up at Hagerstown Maryland, to the Washington County Agricultural Center, enjoying the day and seeing who had the fastest Jack Russell. Ms. B, ran well in several of her races, she was winning by the half way mark on a few, but just couldnt seem to follow through at the nish line. Third place is the best she could do. Dip, who has won one National Championship, just wasnt on her game. Heartbreakers sons from Jacks B Quick, Goose and Maverick, won their division, Goose winning his second National Championship and Maverick bringing in his second Reserve National Championship. All in all it was a good weekend for the Jacks B Quick family. Jacks B Quick Kennels is looking into the future, to bring Wakulla another line of National Champions with the addition of the pups Lil Bug and Scoot, they have been out training and running with the big dogs and Travis thinks they are more than ready to start a new legacy of racers. Their rst of cial race will be this coming December, in Enigma, Ga., at the Yuletide Jack Russell Terrier Trial. Mr. and Mrs. Parmer Happy birthday, Chelsea Chelsea K. Lawhon PHOTOS COURTESY OF EMBRY-RIDDLEJim Henderson, above, gives a speech during the grand opening of the welcome center, below, on Oct. 26. Heartbreaker wins eighth national championship Heartbreaker along with other Jack Russells competes for the coveted JRTCA National Championship title. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Holiday project for seniors has begunSpecial to The NewsBe a Santa to a Senior, the campaign that delivers gifts to local needy seniors, is being planned again this holiday season. The area office of the Home Instead Senior Care network is joining with community partners in Wakulla, Leon, Gadsden, Jefferson and Franklin counties to provide gifts and companionship to seniors who otherwise might not receive either. Heres how to help these struggling seniors: Pick up ornaments with the first names of seniors and their gift requests from Christmas trees, which will be up at and NHC Home Care at 3034 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville on Nov. 12 through Dec. 17. Buy items on the list and return them unwrapped to the store, along with the ornaments attached. For more information, visit www.beasantatoasenior.com or call 297-1897. Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolPre-k students learn about re safety Special to The NewsFirefighter Don Burton visited with the Wakulla County Schools prekindergarten programs at Wakulla and Sopchoppy Education Centers in October to discuss fire safety with the students. He stressed the importance of having a home re escape plan and family meeting place when the smoke alarm sounds. Students also practiced the stop, drop and roll technique, as well as received a tour of the equipment on the re truck. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla pre-kindergarten students listen to re ghter Don Burton as he tells them about the equipment on the re truck. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents Gracie Bruce, Ali Harden and Raul Whickham hit the million word mark.Special to The NewsCrawfordville Elementary School celebrated the fun of reading and the reward of working hard by hosting a gigantic picnic for all students who met their reading goal during the rst nine weeks of school. The picnic was held on the playground area with hotdogs, drinks, chips and sno cones. Students played, had plenty to eat and got to feel the satisfaction of being one of the 300 students participating in the picnic. The weather was beautiful, the volunteers were plentiful and the day was delightful! Teachers and parents play a large role in the reading success at Crawfordville Elementary. The teachers meet weekly with each individual student to discuss what book the student is reading, the amount of reading being done each day, the appropriate level of the book, and most of all being sure the child is enjoying the book that is being read. Teachers keep reading charts in their room to track and display the number of books a child successfully nishes and how the class is doing as a whole. The importance of reading is continuously stressed while the joy of reading is never forgotten. The media specialist, Cindy Burse, also plays a large role in the reading program at Crawfordville Elementary School. She sponsors the schools Million Word Reader program, as well as other reading programs for the younger grades. Burse takes an active role in incentives offered to students, she gives encouraging words, she arranges for extra time to be spent with children to help them find that perfect book, and she is one of our schools number one fans when it comes to showing the fun of reading and how it can impact a childs life. The whole school participates in reading and takes a competitive approach when it comes to being a member of the Million Word Reader Club. They will continue to celebrate the small successes that each child has throughout every nine weeks, as well as a large celebration at the end of each nine weeks. Parents encouraging their children to read and reading with their children signi cantly improves the probability of success in all academic areas. Impressively, the school has three students who have already reached their million word status and are well on their way to their 2 million word mark. These three students are Gracie Bruce, Ali Harden and Raul Whickham. We are proud of all of our students but would like to offer a special congratulations to these three avid readers, said Principal Angie Walker. They are role models for all of us. Congratulations to all of Crawfordvilles readers! Keep on reading, Cougars, she added. Picnic held for Crawfordville readersBingo for Books is held at Crawfordville Special to The NewsHow do you get a free dinner for your entire family, get a free brand new book for all of the children in your family, have an evening of fun and laughter with unlimited popcorn and soda? Come to Crawfordville Elementary School when they are sponsoring one of their Bingo for Books nights. The schools cafeteria was packed from one end to the other with folks lining up for food and scrambling to get their new Bingo card before the next game began. There was a record turnout with more than 165 adults and 150 children. Teachers and school staff refilled cups of soda, placed hotdogs on buns and helped to make sure each and every person attending had new Bingo cards for each game. The crowd was anxious to play and extremely reluctant to leave. One more Bingo game was heard from the crowd at the end of the night and one more was what the crowd got. Bingo for Books is a way for Crawfordville to provide a fun- lled family night for their parents, strengthen school and home connections, stress the importance of reading, and place more books in the homes of lots of families. Being a competent reader is the single most important ingredient in a childs academic success, and Crawfordville Elementary is trying not only to inform parents about how to help their child read at home, but they are also showing them how to help their child read at home. Every child is a winner at Bingo for Books because win or lose at the Bingo game, each child leaves with a new book in hand. Bingo for Books is only possible because of Title 1 funds allocated to the school by the District, the support of the schools PTA who also allocates funds for the evening, Pepsi Company and Scott Cason for continually supporting every event requiring liquid refreshments throughout the year, and the faculty and staff for their unwavering support and belief in the importance of school and family connections. Crawfordville Elementary School is fortunate to have the faculty and staff who are there and for the incredible parents who support the school each and every day. Renance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Ofce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Ofce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Ofce: 850.926.1960 New From SYP Publishing!THE GREENS AND CORNBREAD OF WAKULLA COUNTY Historical Stories Told by the People This delightful book is a collection of stories depicting the history of Wakulla County. The stories were written and submitted by different authors and families. The text includes a wide variety of topics and time periods. Many of the stories contain photos that were included by the author. Available NOW!! $29.95As a publisher, we are constantly searching for authors and groups that wish to have works of a historical or regional signicance published. You may have a local book of stories and lore, a genealogy study, or a text on any specic historical, collectible or unique item. If you are looking for a publisher, consider contacting us.In Search Of The Diamond Brooch In Search of The Diamond Brooch is a southern historical saga starting with the migration of the pioneer families to the North Florida area. This is the story of a family that settled in North Florida in the early 1800s in Wakulla and Leon Counties. Written by Pete Gerrell & Terri Gerrell $24.95SYP Publishing 4351 Natural Bridge Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32305 www.syppublishing.com 850-421-7420 New F 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Help Big Bend Hospice Honor Those Who Are No Longer With Us Big Bend HospiceTree of Remembrance 2012 2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.orgVisit our Wakulla County Tree at Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial Bank in Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Page 9A & Dramatis Personae presents one-actsBy SUSAN SOLBURGWHS Drama TeacherWakulla Highs Dramatis Personae members are busy rehearsing for their up-coming Annual OneAct Plays. Each fall the drama department presents two one-act plays for students to participate in. One play is chosen to go to the District One Thespian Festival in January. The cast of this play must be comprised of students who are already members of Thespian Troupe No. 5036 or are about to earn the points that will qualify them for membership. The District Play for 2012 is the hilarious comedy about a couple, their car, a monkey and a clown. Reese & Babe, written by Lew Holton, has an awesome cast of four outstanding seniors: Chelsea Austin and Hunter Wheatcraft are a young couple dealing with the aftermath of an auto accident in a most unusual manner. Caitlyn Wagner plays Salty the Clown who comes looking for some answers and Alex Lewis plays the investigating Police Of cer who is covering the accident. If you are fans of I Love Lucy and The Carol Burnett Show then you will love this fast paced and zany play. The other play is the most produced one-act play in America, a comedy written by Jonathan Rand entitled Check Please. The story is about all the insanely crazy characters you can meet when you subject yourself to Blind Dating. Set in a restaurant, two hapless singles, played by Emily Davis and Brett DeRoss, go through a series of bad to worse dating situations that will have you rolling in the aisles. Krissy Sanders, an FSU theatre education graduate and former WHS student, will be directing this show. Sanders directed last years Competition Piece and is thrilled to be returning to her alma mater once again to work with a cast of 24 enthusiastic theatre students. You do not want to miss these hilarious performances. The shows begin for the public on Friday, Nov. 16 and runs through Sunday, Nov. 18. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. and there is a 2:30 p.m. matinee on Sunday. Tickets will be sold at the door: $6 for adults; $5 and $4 for students. Please come out to the Wakulla High Auditorium and support these talented students.Special to The NewsThe musical duo Hot Tamale will have a CD release party for Wakulla County on Nov. 23 at Poseys Dockside Cafe in Panacea. Hot Tamale, a Tallahassee-based group made up of Adrian Fogelin and Craig Reeder, has deep roots in Wakulla County. Last Fall, the acoustic duo put on a theatrical production called The Sopchoppy Home Companion at Posh Java in Sopchoppy. They have played at the Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival, the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival and the From the Heart Music Hour, a songwriters showcase produced by the Sopchoppy music studio of the same name. Plus, they have produced two songs about Wakulla County, Wakulla Green, which they have sold to support the Wakulla County Green Guides, and a humorous, rollicking ode to the charms of Wakulla County called Wild about Wakulla. Hot Tamale recently released their CD, titled Made from Scratch, in Tallahassee, and now they plan to bring this new music to their many friends in Wakulla County. The CD has 10 original songs, including the two mentioned above, and ranges in style from acoustic new folk, to vintage blues and Americana. The lead song was produced at the From the Heart Studio in Sopchoppy, and features the wellknown Wakulla County artist Frank Lindamood on banjo. Hot Tamale has been described by the Tallahassee Democrat as tons of fun, and they have established a reputation for lively, upbeat performances all around the Big Bend region for the last three years. Poseys Dockside Caf is situated on the scenic coastline of the Apalachee Bay in Panacea. The show starts at 7:30 p.m., and there is no cover charge. This is not a get-rich scheme. Well be playing for tips and CD sales, and mainly to see all our wonderful Wakulla friends, said Reeder.Special to The NewsOn Saturday, Nov. 17, at 8 p.m., James Tuck Tucker will perform at Posh Java. Singer/songwriter and dobro/guitar player James Tuck Tucker has been described as one of the nations premier dobroists, in the Florida Times Union. He describes his music as a mixture of blues, bluegrass and old country. Born and raised in Florida, he now says that home is pretty much wherever the RV is parked. Tucker became a serious musician after graduating from high school in 1975. He toured the U.S. with an established band called Harmony Grits until the group broke up in 1980. He then joined another band, Red and Murphy and Co., and toured another ve years. Visit www.jamestucktucker.com for more information and to listen to Tuckers music. For reservations contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@yahoo.com. Tickets are $10. Posh Java is located on the corner of Rose Street and Winthrop Avenue in Sopchoppy. For a list of upcoming concerts visit www.poshjava.com PHOTO BY SUSAN SOLBURG/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSREESE & BABE: Caitlyn Wagner, center, as Salty the Clown, who comes looking for some answers from Hunter Wheatcraft and Chelsea Austin. James Tuck Tucker to appear at Posh JavaDobroist-songwriter James Tuck Tucker.Hot Tamale sets Wakulla CD release party at Poseys DocksideSPECIAL TO THE NEWSAdrian Fogelin and Craig Reeder of Hot Tamale will hold a Wakulla CD release party at Poseys. Special entertainment by Local Motion Join us for an evening of GREAT WHEELS, DINNER & ENTERTAINMENT! SATURDAY NOVEMBER 17, 5:00 10:00 p.m. 3Y RANCH CRAWFORDVILLE Enter your Wheels $10.00 per entry Wheels Show ONLY $5.00 a car load at the gate Dinner and entertainment $35.00 per person Cash Bar Table Sponsorship $300.00 Enter your wheels for free with purchase of a dinner ticket (Limit 1 per ticket) Were looking for: Best Original, Best Classic, Hottest Hog, Best Huntn Truck, Best Dressed Bike and more. Lots of Prizes! F O R M O R E I N F O R M A T I O N C O N T A C T h e l p k w c b @ g m a i l c o m ( 8 5 0 ) 7 4 5 7 1 1 1 V i s i t o u r w e b s i t e : K W C B O R G S p e c i a a l en t er t a i n m en n us f o r a a n e e ve n i n g g o f f S S S S S S i i i l l l l t t t t t t t i i i i t b b b L L l l M M i i J J J J J i f f f f f f i i i i f f f f f 1st Annual KEEP WAKULLA COUNTY BEAUTIFUL BLUE JEANS & FAST MACHINES Register to enter your car, truck, motorcycle, classic, custom, and antique wheels! All proceeds go to our educational grants, beautification projects and annual projects such as Hazardous Waste Collection Day, National Forest and Coastal Cleanups. KWCB is a 501 (C) (3) organization. FUND RAISER SILENT AUCTION & STEAK DINNER $ 10.00NOVEMBER 16TH from 5 PM 8PM at SHELLPOINT FIRE HOUSE FOR TICKETS CONTACT MARION at 926-9023 ALSO AT CENTURY 21 in SHELLPOINTFishing TripJewelry Gift BasketsArt For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & ExteriorTogether We Are Providing Employment for Local CraftsmanFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comA morsel of genuine history is a thing so rare as to be always valuable Thomas Jefferson.As a very young boy, and prior to the death of my grandfather, J. Y. Gresham, in 1957, I learned from him that scattered throughout the sand ats and marshes within sight of the St. Marks Lighthouse, and beyond, there were ruins of furnaces, kettles and vats, which were built by private individuals and the government of the Confederate States of America to produce salt. However, it was not until I retired and returned to Wakulla County that I had the free time and, thankfully, the good health to act on that knowledge and try to locate some of those works, if they still existed. Because those ruins are generally located in remote and almost inaccessible areas, and it would be foolish for a man at my advanced age to venture out there alone, I needed a partner to accompany me. I found the perfect partner in George Parker, who I have known since high school (Leon High class of 1960). George lives in Wyoming but has the presence of mind to come south in the winter (a snowbird) so as not to freeze to death in those blizzards which sweep through the Northern Plains. He is interested in history, is in tolerably good health and, just like me, likes to explore. So two or three years ago, George and I began searching for the salt works. We have been very successful. We have located dozens of ruins, generally from around the Wakulla Beach and Goose Creek areas over to the Port Leon and East River areas. I should warn anyone who, after reading this, may want to search for the salt works that you must be in good health and probably shouldnt go alone. It can be physically exhausting. The salt works in the vicinity of Port Leon are particularly dif cult to reach as the Port Leon road is barricaded and locked. It takes the better part of the day just to get near the Salt Works there after a very long walk on the road and then out through the marsh and bogs. George and I tried bicycles, but even that will wear you down. Also, be careful not to enter areas that are off limits, particularly those that are marked as roosting sites for eagles. You should also not remove artifacts. Most of the salt works are located on islands which are small clumps of trees which are out in the salt marshes and sand ats between the wood line and the bay. They all have at least one, and usually several man-made wells close by. The ruins consist of bricks from the furnaces and iron from the kettles or vats. Some are in fairly good condition but most are in advanced stages of disrepair. I found two literary sources particularly enlightening and will quote them in part. First, The Civil War and Reconstruction in Florida by William Watson Davis: During the rst year of war, works for the making of salt by boiling sea-water in great kettles and sheetiron boilers were established along the bays and sequestered inlets of the Florida coast, particularly on the western coast The industry grew so rapidly that by the autumn of 1862 thousands of bushels of salt were being manufactured daily and scores of teams were hauling it into the more populous interior most of it, out of state. Several thousand men were employed in the work. By Confederate law, salt makers were exempted from military service The Florida legislature encouraged the industry thus springing up on its usually lonely seacoast On November 24th 1862, a Federal expedition from Pensacola entered St. Andrews Bay (Panama City). It was night. The sky was lit up to east and west away inland for a long distance, reported the Federal commander. Fog hung over the water next morning as the Federal boats approached the usually lonely shores of St. Andrews Bay. As we came nearer we not only heard voices but we heard dogs barking, and horses neighing, and we felt quite sure we had stumbled upon a company of cavalry, stated Lieutenant Commander Hart of the Albatross By December 8th, 466 salt pans, kettles or cauldrons, each over a crude bricked furnace, had been destroyed About a thousand bushels of salt were destroyed, as well as some fty wagons and several score shacks, cabins, and rough store houses We had to knock down all the brick work, to destroy the salt already made, to knock in the heads and set re to barrels, boxes, and everything that would hold salt, and to disable and burn up the wagons that we found loaded with it. St. Marks Bay had been visited by the salt-destroyers, February 17-19, 1862 Hundreds of furnaces 50 of them under sheet iron boilers of near 1,000 gallons capacity each were broken up. 250 houses and a quantity of provisions were burned. The estimated value of the property lost here was $3,000,000. Most of the works were said to be Confederate property. Brie y, an account from the diary of Susan Bradford Eppes of Tallahassee in her book, Through Some Eventful Years: October 27th, 1863 We went to the salt works today and though I am tired and dirty and have no good place to write, I am going to try to tell you about it Father brought us with him and we will stay three days, so he can see how they are getting on. We are to sleep in a tent, on a ticking lled with pine straw. It will be a novel experience. I am so interested in seeing the salt made from the water. The great big sugar kettles are lled full of water and res made beneath the kettles. They are a long time heating up and then they boil merrily. Ben and Tup and Sam keep the res going, for they must not cool down the least little bit. A white foam comes at rst and then the dirtiest scum you ever saw bubbles and dances over the surface, as the water boils away it seems to get thicker and thicker, at last only a wet mass of what looks like sand remains. This they spread on smooth oaken planks to dry The salt nished in fair weather is much whiter and nicer in every way than that dried in bad weather, but this dark salt is used to salt meat or to pickle pork Father does not get any pay whatsoever for the salt he makes Yankee gun boats have been sighted once lately and there is no knowing when the salt works may be attacked. (Note: This salt work is believed to have been near St. Marks.) Although the works were attacked and much destruction caused by Federal raiding parties, they were always rebuilt and placed back in operation until the end of the war in 1865. The photograph included is from a Salt Works located near East River and the St. Marks Lighthouse. Federal forces reported using sledge hammers to destroy the iron kettles, which appears to have been used on the kettle photographed. Red Clay Footprints By John RobertsConfederate Salt Worksfrom St. Andrews Bay to Apalachee BaySPECIAL TO THE NEWSJohn Roberts at the salt works located near the East River and the St. Marks Lighthouse. The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bareld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com blessedare those whomourn 2012 Service of RemembranceSunday, December 2nd at 4:00pm Hudson Park21 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville Please call Pam at 850-926-9308 for more information. HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926685 or 510Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Page 11Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn Nov. 5, Steve Nunnery of Panacea reported a fire near Big Top Grocery in Panacea. Deputy Gibby Gibson responded and observed Sheriff Donnie Crum spraying water on an already contained re. Nunnery had a small re going that got out of hand and damaged a fence and palm trees. Approximately $500 damage was done to the trees and the fence. The sheriff helped put out the fire before the re department arrived on the scene. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: NOVEMBER 1 Betty Havey of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim stated that former tenants damaged the inside of a home she is responsible for and also destroyed a mailbox. Extensive damage was observed to the inside and outside of the home and property with damage estimated at a value of $2,500. Two suspects have been identified. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Misty Attewell of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary on Halloween night. A credit card, driver license and case were stolen while trick or treating in the Songbird subdivision. The vehicle was left unsecured and the stolen items are valued at $10. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. Deputy Vicki Mitchell recovered a bicycle owned by Mario Alanis of Crawfordville. The bike was stolen from Winn-Dixie on Oct. 23 and was observed and recovered at a Crawfordville pawn shop. The victim was able to prove to Deputy Mitchell that the bike belonged to him and it was returned to him. A suspect was identi ed. On Nov. 2, Detective Lorne Whaley interviewed Ronda Charlene Lamb, 43, of Crawfordville about pawning the bicycle. Lamb was charged with dealing in stolen property. A 14-year-old involved in the case was charged with petit theft and dealing in stolen property. Michelle Crum of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim was parked at Wal-Mart when she discovered someone scratched her vehicle door. Damage was estimated at $200. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. NOVEMBER 2 Deputy Scott Powell was operating stationary radar on Crawfordville Highway when he observed a motorist driving at a high rate of speed in a 35 mile per hour zone. The motorist was clocked at 51 miles per hour and Deputy Powell conducted a traf c stop. The driver, Winfred Jerome Roberts, 27, of Tallahassee did not possess a valid driver license. It was determined that Roberts had his license suspended in 2010 and has two previous convictions for driving while license suspended or revoked. He was arrested for driving on a suspended driver license with knowledge. James Myers of Crawfordville reported the theft of a trailer from a Crawfordville Highway address. Deputy Rachel Wheeler observed the trailer sitting on the side of the highway with no vehicle attached. The trailer is valued at $900 and was returned to the victim. A suspect has been identi ed. Jason Turner of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to acquire utility services in Tallahassee and was informed an account was already open in his name with his personal information. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. NOVEMBER 3 Melissa M. Davis of Crawfordville was involved in a one vehicle traf c crash as she was traveling east on FH 13 three miles east of Smith Creek Road. She drove off the south shoulder, over-corrected to the north shoulder, came back to the south side of the road and rolled the vehicle onto its roof. The driver declined medical treatment. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. Ruby Metcalf of Panacea reported a credit card offense. Suspicious charges were observed on the victims bank account. A fraudulent charge was observed for $750 that originated in Maryland. Three other attempts to make fraudulent withdrawals were also observed on the account. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. Kevin Robinson of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims vehicle suffered damage to a headlight and part of the vehicle near the headlight. Damage was estimated at $1,000. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. NOVEMBER 4 Misty Attewell of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash where her vehicle was involved in a crash with a motorcycle operated by John W. Brown of Crawfordville. Brown was stopped for another vehicle at Cajer Posey Road and Shadeville Highway when he was struck from behind by Attewell. Brown was transported to the hospital with minor injuries. Deputy Randy Phillips, Deputy Stephen Simmons and Sgt. Andy Curles investigated. Cindy Crum Bradford, 54, of Panacea was arrested for introduction of contraband into a detention facility. Detention deputies discovered three homemade cigarette-type joints in Bradfords cell after detecting smoke from the cell. The substance weighed 1.2 grams and is believed to be Spice. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Deputy Reed Brown investigated. NOVEMBER 5 Paula Fluty of Crawfordville reported a fraud and grand theft. Suspects, who have been identi ed, conducted an unauthorized wire transfer from her bank account for $9,879 through a bank in Leon County. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. Rodrigo Carmonadelaluz of Crawfordville reported the theft of his bicycle from Crawfordville. The bike was recovered at a local pawn shop. The victim received his bicycle back and a suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Marshall Tilden of Crawfordville reported the theft of a rearm. The victim loaned the rearm to a friend and it was never returned. A suspect has been identi ed and the rearm was entered into the FCIC/ NCIC data base. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Earl Wiggins of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Firearms were stolen from the victims home. The eight stolen rearms are valued at $2,800. Several medications were also stolen. They were valued at $60. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Lorri Anne Graham Abeyi of Crawfordville reported the theft of her charcoal grill from her porch. The grill is valued at $40. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Melanie Grant of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and the residence was in disarray. DVDs, electronics, personal items, a firearm and currency, valued at $2,395, was reported missing. Deputy Scott Powell and Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. NOVEMBER 6 Steven Fults of Panacea reported the theft of campaign signs owned by Commissioner-elect Howard Kessler. Fults noted that 12 campaign signs were stolen over a several week period in Panacea and a game camera was erected on a citizens property along with more signs. Fults reported that the newly erected signs were also cut from a post. The game camera captured the image of suspect, David Eugene LaHart, 69, of Panacea. The suspect admitted to taking the signs and was issued a notice to appear in court for petit theft. The signs are valued at $15. Detective Matt Helms investigated. Kris Lovel of WinnDixie reported a fraud in the pharmacy. Lovel determined that a prescription called in for a Crawfordville suspect had not been called in by the doctors of ce. The suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Marshall Taylor and Deputy Scott Powell investigated. NOVEMBER 7 Tully Taff of Crawfordville reported the theft of two wallets from his home. The value of the stolen property is $210 and a suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. Billy Peacock of Crawf ordville reported a grand theft. A chain saw and an air compressor were reported stolen from the victims shed. The stolen property is valued at $400 and the case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. A person of interest was identi ed in the case. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated a traf c crash on Taf inger Road. Christopher Hatcher of Crawfordville was improperly backing down the middle of Tafflinger Road when he backed into a vehicle operated by Alice Milhon of Crawfordville. A passenger in the Hatcher vehicle was transported to the hospital for treatment of an injury. He was cited for improper backing. Milhon reported an injury as well but declined EMS transport. Robert Coshatt of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A single bullet hole was discovered in the victims vehicle. Evidence was collected at the scene and the case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Randy Phillips and Deputy Cole Wells investigated. Anita Brown of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to property owned by Derrick Crum. A rail fence and garbage receptacles were damaged by a vehicle which left the scene. Damage to the property was estimated at $500 Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Michael Edward Hollett, 43, of the FAMU Police Department was injured in a traf c crash on Old Shell Point Road. A deer ran out in front of him while he was traveling approximately 40 miles per hour. The victim suffered several non-life threatening injuries and was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Deputy Randy Phillips and Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 873 calls for service during the past week including: 24 residential and commercial alarms; 74 citizen contacts; 14 disturbances; 21 abandoned E-911 cell calls; 10 regular abandoned E-911 cell calls; 18 regular E-911 cell calls; 52 investigations; 12 loud music/noise complaints; 35 medical emergencies; 300 business and residential security checks; 25 special details; 20 subpoena services; 11 suspicious people; 12 traf c crashes with no injuries; 23 traf c enforcements; 40 traf c stops; 11 disabled vehicles; 11 reckless vehicles; and 19 watch orders.Sheri s Report 5Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2Go to http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click Continue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click Continue. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA YARD SALESFRI & SAT NOV 16 & 17 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS!TWO BIG

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comGone to seed. It is a distinctly American agricultural saying with usually negative connotations when applied to people, places and things. The implication is the subject of the comment is in decline after producing all they are capable of producing. This adage came from a time when most of Americas population was on the farm. Once the annual grain crop had gone to seed it meant harvest was at hand and the elds could be cleared. The plant from which the annual crop was derived had little worth. It was chopped and used for livestock bedding or burned, but had no additional potential for producing anything of value. Autumn in Wakulla County results in many annual and perennial plants producing seed. Better knowledge of how plants function throughout their life-cycle has led to understanding the ingenious ways they continue their species next spring. Many plants identi ed as wild owers have gone to seed by now. They are preparing for next years colorful show, but the dying foliage still has a valuable part to play in both the curing and distribution of the seed. Many wild ower seeds are distributed by wind, birds and animals. The seed heads or pods are easily shattered when the seed is mature and ready to disperse. There are, however, some species which use other methods. Beggarticks employ two barbed prongs that attach the seed to unsuspecting passersby. After a period of travel the seed are brushed or scratched off and colonize a new plot. Bidens alba, the scienti c name for Beggarticks, literally means two teeth in Latin. The plant which has prolific white and yellow blooms is important to sustaining Monarch butter ies and European honeybees. Autumn mowing on rights-of-ways and pastures is critically important to the continuation of wild owers. Timing mowing cycles to owering and seed set is the optimal method to ensure establishment of a planting is sustainable over the long term. Avoid mowing when plants are owering and seeds are still maturing. Seeds need about three to four weeks to mature after an individual ower has bloomed. The general recommendation for North Florida is to avoid mowing from April through September. Realize weather can alter owering and seed set by at least two to four weeks. Wakulla Countys perennial plants and native trees use many of the same techniques as wild owers for spreading seed. Wind, animals and birds do the bulk of the scattering. The plants and trees aid the birds and animals with discovery by having brightly colored seed. Migratory birds, bears and other omnivores are all seeking to increase their calorie count in the face of the impending winter. The seed which are not digested pass through and are deposited in a new location, sometime many miles from the parent plant. The tree or perennial plant will establish itself in a new area if all the necessary components for plant growth are present. To learn more about spread of Wakulla Countys wild owers and wild perennials, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u edu/Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.The meaning of the phrase Gone to seed Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDogwood seeds, above, and beautyberry, below. Beggartick seeds, above, and a closer look at the hooks that the seeds use for transport by animals. Panacea Market PlaceShopping All Day with Local Merchants andWe are looking for arts and crafts vendors to set-up from 2 p.m. 8 p.m.There will be no charge to vendors. will be decorating for the holidays. 4 p.m. 8 p.m. Join in the parade fun by decorating your boat, golf cart, oats or just walk. We welcome entries from all over. Saturday, Dec. 1 st CENTENNIALBANK Member FDIC This Advertisement Sponsored by s t s s t st st s t The 8th Annual Boat On Trailer Parade The News Wakulla www.my100bank.comA Home BancShares Company In-Home Assessments and Referrals Offered for Comfort and Convenience If falls, weakness or inability to participate in activities become a concern for your loved one, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Tallahassee is here to help. We oer free inhome assessments with no physician orders needed. Once an evaluation is approved, HealthSouths team of professionals develop comprehensive, individualized treatment plans for a safe return home. If you have any questions or need more information contact us.IS YOUR LOVED ONE SAFE AT HOME?:HealthSouth Corporation:551345 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO Susie Updegraff & Family PresentThe Marcum Family In ConcertSunday, November 18, 4 p.m. Crawfordville United Methodist Church176 Ochlockonee St., Crawfordville, FLFREE

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By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach At Saturdays Regional Cross Country Meet held at Sunnyhill Farms in north Leon County, the WHS boys team placed higher than any other local boys team ever has at the Regional level, but came up just a whisker shy of qualifying for the State Finals Meet. The local harriers had an outstanding meet, nishing in seventh place, but only the rst six teams move on to the State Finals. The WHS boys finished with 175 points, only 2 points behind sixth place Eastside Hight School from Gainesville. The WHS girls team also performed extremely well, finishing in eighth place. The boys were once again led by Aaron Smith (17:38, 23rd), J.P. Piotrowski (17:51, 26th) and Travis Parks (17:56, 29th). Rounding out the scoring for the team were Lane Williams (18:29, 50th) and Ryan Dodson (18:53, 58th), with Alan Pearson (19:20, 70th) and Mitchell Atkinson (19:21, 71st) completing the top 7 for the local squad. This was the rst time this year that the team had three runners under 18 minutes and the 18:10 team average was also the best for this season. Although Smith is a junior, all of the other starting runners are either freshmen or sophomores, so this should be just a glimpse of what is to come in the next couple of years. Marty Wiedeman (20:57, 24th) once again led the charge for the WHS girls, with the next three girls dipping under the 22:00 minute barrier. Those girls ran and worked together as a group, with Kasey James (21:56, 37th) a step ahead of Raychel Gray (21:57, 38th) and Lydia Wiedeman (21:58, 40th). Lilianna Broadway (22:42, 53rd) was the nal scorer for the team and Kayla Webbe (24:10, 68th) and Connie Lewis (24:20, 70th) rounded out the varsity team. This was also the first time this season that four girls ran under 22:00 minutes and the 21:54 team average was also a season best. We had hoped to extend the season one more week, but we came up just a little short, said Coach Paul Hoover. Both the teams had really good seasons, so we arent disappointed. The boys were somewhat upset to come that close to qualifying for State, but they really should just be proud of how well they did and they way they have raced all season long. The girls were really solid all year and were again on Saturday. When you look at the times they ran and the fact that both teams ran their fastest meet of the season, we couldnt have asked for much more from them. This is a great group of kids and Coach James and I are really proud of them, how they have worked together and what they have accomplished this year. Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 sports news and team views SportsWar Eagles end regular season undefeated10-0CROSS COUNTRYBoys team misses state by a whisker PHOTO BY KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe boys and girls teams two weeks ago after sweeping the District Meet. KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSQuarterback Caleb Stephens, 9, busts a long run against the Escambia Gators to end the regular season. PLAYOFFS: The War Eagles face Gulf Breeze for rst round at home at J.D. Jones Stadium on Friday, Nov. 16, at 7:30 p.m. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles nished out the regular season undefeated the schools rst undefeated season since 1983 with a 24-8 win over Escambia County. Of the undefeated season, Head Coach Scott Klees said he was proud of that accomplishment, though it wasnt one of the teams goals at the beginning of the season. Going into the playoffs, the War Eagles are a banged up bunch and it showed in Friday nights play against the Gators. An offense that was a speed machine and looked unstoppable was still potent, but not quite as dominating. A lot of that has to do with injuries, Klees said. Weve got a bunch of new guys playing a bunch of new positions. It was a weird night, Klees said. We had so many different guys starting a different look than even a couple of weeks ago. Lineman John Cole is out with back injury, with two guards rotating to ll that position; running back and kicker Dillon Norman is out for the year with an ACL; and backs Mikal Cromartie and Malik Thomas both have sprains.Continued on Page 2BMore big white trout this yearFrom the Dock by Capt. Jody CampbellOutdoors, Page 5B Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary Underwater Wakulla Page 6B Expert physicians.Quality obstetrical & gynecological care. 2770 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 110, Tallahassee, FL 32308 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comOfce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. Next-day appointments available. Dr. Stephanie Cruz Lee is an OB/GYN who is uent in both English and Spanish. She is accepting new patients. In addition to delivering babies, Dr. Lees areas of clinical interests are abnormal menstrual bleeding, minimally invasive gynecological surgery, infertility and menopausal hormone therapy. Dr. Lee received her medical degree from the Florida State University College of Medicine. She completed her residency at the University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville.To schedule an appointment with Dr. Lee, call (850) 877-5589. 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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comPlayers of the WeekCALEB STEPHENS Quarterback Threw for 142 yards and rushed for 75 yards. FELEIPE FRANKS Kicked in place of Dillon Norman, made a eld goal and extra points DEQUON SIMMONS Strong safety 8 solo tackles and an interceptionO ense Defense Special Teams War Eagles end regular season undefeated10-0 WILLIAM SNOWDENThe new scoreboard at J.D. Jones Stadium will be of cially ready to go before this weeks playoff game against Gulf Breeze. The new scoreboard is twice as big as the old scoreboard, and includes a programmable screen. The new board was provided by Centennial Bank, and will be dedicated in a short ceremony before the game. There will also be 25-second clocks in the end zone. Scoreboard to be unveiled Continued from Page 1B I dont think well have any of those guys back this week for the playoff game against Gulf Breeze, Klees said. On Friday night against Escambia, Klees was trying to plug those holes with other players for example, moving defensive cornerback Brandon Nichols, whos played some wide receiver, to running back. Still, the War Eagle defense continued to play outstanding, Klees said. A bright spot there is the expectation that linebacker Kevin James will return. He played a few series against Escambia, but Klees was hopeful he would play the whole game against Gulf Breeze. Wakulla ran off 24 unanswered points against Escambia, which never really challenged the War Eagles until late the fourth quarter when the Gators scored a touchdown and made a two-point conversion. Feleipe Franks, kicking in place of injured Dillon Norman, made a 25-yard eld goal in the rst quarter to put the War Eagles up 3-0. Early in the second, freshman receiver Keith Gavin grabbed a jumpball fade pass in the endzone, and Franks added the extra point to make it 10-0. Quarterback Caleb Stephens rumbled for a 30-yard touchdown run in the third quarter to make it 17-0 with the PAT. In the fourth quarter, it appeared that offensive lineman Chris Grif n recovered a fumble in the endzone for score. UP NEXT: GULF BREEZE Theyre huge up front, Klees said of the Dolphins, who are 7-3.. Two of their linemen are commitments to Division 1 schools, including FSU. In the playoffs, everybody is good, Klees said. Whoever turns the ball over the fewest times and plays good defense is going to win, he said. For his offense, even though some of these new guys havent had a lot of playing time together, Klees said hes hoping they can play at a high level without a lot of reps. The big thing weve got to get is healthy, he said. Or some of these young guys to step up. Theyre going to have to step up. KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDENWar Eagle receiver Jordan Franks tries to shake a defender. Linebacker Fred Cummings disrupts a running play and makes a tackle. Students take the eld after the game to sing the school song.More photos online at thewakullanews.net Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts Color F acial Waxings Specialty Cuts F lat T ops F eather Locks Color P erms Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. c e H a i r S a l o n e H l o H a i a l o i r S a c e c e o n o o n Tues -S at 54 529 05 & t. . . . . F STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN 1-866-742-1373 Get your business noticed One Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Dont make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.AdNetworksFlorida.com

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Nov. 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, Nov. 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Nov. 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Nov. 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Nov. 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Nov. 20 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. SARRACENIA CHAPTER of the Florida Native Plant Society meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Sarracenias guest, Jean Huffman, will present Pines, tree rings and the history of re in Florida pine savannas. Dr. Huffmans illustrated presentation will include stories of how re creates and maintains plant diversity and sustains rare plant populations, and how plants can reveal the history of re in our local natural areas. The public is invited. Social time, with refreshments, will precede the meeting. Wednesday, Nov. 21 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Nov. 22 HAPPY THANKSGIVING.Special EventsFriday, Nov. 16 ANNUAL ONE ACT PLAYS will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at 7:30 p.m. in the auditorium. The plays include Reese and Babe, and Check Please. There will be a show at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday and at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday as well. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for students. Saturday, Nov. 17 FIRST BLUE JEANS AND FAST MACHINES EVENT for Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will be held from 5 to 10 p.m. at 3Y Ranch, Crawfordville. There will be dinner and entertainment by Local Motion. Enter a fast machine for $10 per entry. To attend the show only, cost is $5 per car load. Dinner and entertainment is $35 per person. A table sponsorship is $300. For more information, email helpkwcb@gmail.com, call (850) 745-7111 or visit the website www.kwcb.org. SOPCHOPPY OPRY will feature local country music legend Hoot Gibson with South Bound Band at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy School Auditorium. Hoot Gibsons career in music spans over 60 years and his November appearance at the Opry has become a tradition. Tickets are $10. Call 962-3711 for tickets. CARTER FAMILY REUNION will be held at 1 p.m. Family and friends will gather at Myers Carters cane mill on Elie Carter Lane in Medart. There will be cane grinding and syrupmaking all day. Bring a picnic lunch as the meal will be served at 1 p.m. Guests are invited to share memories and new happenings. For more information, call 926-7317. OUTDOORS FOR THE HOLIDAYS will be held at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sponsored by the St. Marks NWR Photo Club, this family-friendly day of fun will include holiday photographs, crafts for the kids, yummy holiday treats and hot cider and outdoor wagon rides. A chili lunch will be available for a small donation. EAGLE WATCH TRAINING will be held at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge from 1 p.m. to 4 .p.m at the Natures Classroom, 1255 Lighthouse Road. It will cover topics such as the status of the Bald Eagle in Florida, general eagle biology, eagle nesting behavior and habits, Bald Eagle management guidelines and nest observation techniques and strategies. The training will include a classroom portion with live bald eagle, Paige and a eld observation of a nearby eagle nest on Lighthouse Road. The training is free and open to all who are interested, even just to learn about the program. Matt Smith, EagleWatch coordinator, will present the training. Call the refuge at 925-6121 to register. ANNUAL ONE ACT PLAYS will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at 7:30 p.m. in the auditorium. The plays include Reese and Babe, and Check Please. There will be a show at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday as well. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for students. FREE CLOTHING GIVEAWAY will be held at Grace Baptist Church, 803 Crawfordville Highway, from noon to 2 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Call 926-3217 or 926-1034 for more information. CONCERT BY JAMES TUCK TUCKER, dobroist and songwriter, will be held at 8 p.m. at Posh Java in Sopchoppy. Tucker describes his music as a mixture of blues, bluegrass and old country. Visit www.jamestucktucker.com for more information. For reservations, call (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@yahoo.com. Tickets are $10. Posh Java is located on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. in Sopchoppy. For a list of upcoming concerts visit www.poshjava.com. Sunday, Nov. 18 ANNUAL ONE ACT PLAYS will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at 2:30 p.m. in the auditorium. The plays include Reese and Babe, and Check Please. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for students. Monday, Nov. 19 WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will hold a public meeting from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. Tuesday, Nov. 20 BLOOD DRIVE will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital Wakulla, 15 Council Moore Road. Each donor will get a gift and their name in a drawing for a chance to win a Honda Civic. Walk-ins are welcome. Upcoming EventsFriday, Nov. 23 CD RELEASE PARTY for the musical duo Hot Tamale at Poseys Dockside Cafe in Panacea. The show will start at 7:30 p.m. Hot Tamale, a Tallahassee-based group made up of Adrian Fogelin and Craig Reeder, has deep roots in Wakulla County. Hot Tamale recently released their CD, titled Made from Scratch. Tuesday, Nov. 27 WAKULLA EUROTRIP MEETING will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Those interested in the next Wakulla Eurotrip through the educational travel company, Explorica, lead by Wakulla High School AP Art History/ Art Teacher and Watercolor painter, Cassie Tucker, are invited to the next information meeting. Enrollment is open for the Summer 2014 trip that includes London, Paris, Monaco, Florence, Rome and Sorrento. For questions, call 926-2394. Wednesday, Nov. 28 CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held at the Bistro at Wildwood Country Club from noon to 1:15 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1 BOOK SALE EXTRAVAGANZA FUNDRAISER will be held at the library from 9 a.m. to noon. There are thousands of books, audio, video and more. Proceeds bene t childrens programs at the library. Sunday, Dec. 2 SERVICE OF REMEMBRANCE will be held by Big Bend Hospice at 4 p.m. at Hudson Park. Big Bend Hospices Service of Remembrance is a non-denominational service that brings together those in the community to honor the memories of loved ones at this very special time of year. Everyone who attends shares a common purpose to honor and to remember a loved one who has died, to be surrounded by others who are on a similar journey and to connect with loved ones. For additional information about Big Bend Hospices bereavement services, contact Pam Mezzina at (850) 878-5310, ext. 799. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Page 3B Government Meetings Monday, Nov. 19 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for its regular meeting in the commission chambers. SCHOOL BOARD will meet at 5:45 p.m. for its regular meeting in the school administration building. Tuesday, Nov. 20 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for the swearing in ceremony for the new commissioners in the commission chambers. SCHOOL BOARD will hold a re-organizational meeting at 5:45 p.m. in the school administration building. Outdoor for the Holidays at the St. Marks Refuge from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Blue Jeans and Fast Machines event at 3Y Ranch from 5 to 10 p.m. Sopchoppy Opry at 7 p.m. features Hoot Gibson. Carter Family Reunion at 1 p.m. SaturdaySaturdaySaturdaySaturday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Matt Smith, Audubon Eaglewatch coordinator, will present eagle watch training at the refuge on. Nov. 17 from 1 to 4 p.m. Community Thanksgiving DinnersSaturday, Nov. 17 FREE THANKSGIVING DINNER will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 165 Surf Road, Sopchoppy, by Pastor Ethel Skipper of Skipper Temple Church. If someone is unable to come because they are shut in, they can call 962-7838 or 510-6653 and someone will deliver their dinner to them. THANKSGIVING COMMUNITY FEAST will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park hosted by several Wakulla groups and churches. There will be free food and christian fellowship. Tuesday, Nov. 20 FREE COUNTY WIDE THANKSGIVING DINNER will be held at the Senior Center, 33 Michael Drive in Crawfordville, from 4 to 7 p.m. For questions, call 926-7145. Night of One Act Plays will be performed by WHS Dramatis Personae on Nov. 16 and 17 at 7:30 p.m. and Nov. 18 at 2:30 p.m.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy TIM LINAFELTBLACKSBURG, Va. As the sophomore receiver weaved his way through the defense, rounding the corner and sprinting into the end zone for the crucial touchdown, the fthyear senior quarterback felt the surge of emotion that perfectly mirrored the small pockets of Florida State fans at Virginia Techs Lane Stadium last week. EJ Manuel is not one to wear his heart on his sleeve. Hes calm, cool and collected not passionless, just in control. But as Rashad Greene crossed the goal line on a play that FSU hoped would just set up better eld goal position Manuels passion, energy and excitement couldnt stay internal any longer. He raced down the sideline, toward his celebrating teammates and stopped near the 20-yard line. He raised his arms in the air, cocked his head back at the sky and let out a scream into the cold Virginia night. I just started praying and thanking God, to be honest with you. Just excitement, Manuel said. Every great Florida State quarterback has a signature moment. Charlie Ward had among several others the swing pass to Warrick Dunn that sealed a win over Florida in 1993. Chris Weinkes 99-yard play-action pass to Marvin Minnis helped paved the way to a Heisman Trophy. Even Chris Rixs up-and-down career will always have the 52-yard Hail Mary to P.K. Sam that beat Florida in 2003. Manuel will have the last 2:19 in Blacksburg. He didnt have his best game he was sacked ve times, threw an interception and missed a handful of throws. But when he walked onto the eld for the last time in his home state of Virginia Blacksburg is six hours from his home town of Virginia Beach Manuel was in total control. Ive been saying it all week Hey, were going to VA, baby. Were going to your town, fellow senior Lonnie Pryor said. It just felt good to see him complete that ball and Rashad score. He doesnt get a lot of the credit that he should get but we know what he does and Im happy for him. He completed four passes on an eight-play drive that completed Florida States rst late-game, come-from-behind victory in years. This program hasnt had much luck in that regard recently. There was Marcus Sims fumble at Georgia Tech in 2008 and Jarmon Fortsons drop against Miami in 2009. There was the Ty Jones-Christian Ponder fumble that cost FSU at N.C. State in 2010 and the missed eld goal the next week that denied FSU a victory over North Carolina. And there was another missed kick in 2011 that let Virginia steal a win from Doak Campbell Stadium. Even this years loss to N.C. State was lost in the nal minute, and Florida States offense held the ball as the nal seconds expired. All of them painful memories for Florida State, and all of them denied the Seminoles something costly. A loss in Blacksburg wouldve almost certainly cost FSU a chance at an ACC title. But this time Manuel ipped the script helped this team break through where so many previous iterations had fallen short. Its tremendous, Fisher said. EJ is full of character and Im blessed to be able to coach him. No, Virginia Tech is not a great team. But even with a 4-6 record, the Hokies are 4-1 at home. A win over the Seminoles wouldve salvaged an unmitigated disappointment of a season not to mention another win toward bowl eligibility. And aside from that, this win meant an awful lot for Florida States big picture. With just Maryland left on the ACC slate, FSU is virtually assured a spot in Charlotte for the ACC Championship Game. And with wins over all of their potential opponents from the Coastal Division, the time is ripe for Florida States rst conference title and Orange Bowl appearance since 2005 when EJ Manuel was a sophomore in high school. Consider that with four games left to play, Manuel is already 21-5 as a starter, is undefeated against Miami, undefeated against Clemson and had his only blemish against Florida come on the road as a redshirt freshman starting for the injured Christian Ponder. Hes 3-0 in bowl games including Bobby Bowdens send-off in the Gator Bowl is on target to become the most accurate passer in ACC history and is the odds-on favorite to be the ACCs 2012 player of the year. None of that was on his mind in Blacksburg, though. Just the victory that he and the Seminoles snatched away from a desperate team in a dif cult stadium full of desperate fans. To nally be a part of something like that, Manuel said. Just to see my guys go out there and do it. Nobody was ustered, nobody was afraid. After the clock hit zero, Manuel found Jimbo Fisher and shared some words and an embrace with the coach who recruited him so hard out of Virginia Beachs Bayside High more than ve years ago. I thanked him, told him I loved him, Manuel said. Coach Fisher is a hard coach, but times like this is when you see all the hard work and all the hard coaching pay off. Fisher echoed those sentiments. I told him I loved him, he said. I told him this is why I do what I do. This is why I push him like I do. Tim Linafelt is the Osceolas editor. Email him at tim@theosceola.comFLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State t e Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M at Bethune-CookmanSaturday, Nov. 17 at 2 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPNC. Jacksonville State at #6 FloridaSaturday, Nov. 17 at 1 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3. #10 Florida State at MarylandThursday, Nov. 17 at 12 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPNU. FSUs EJ Manuel has his signature moment during this win against Virginia. PHOTO BY JEREMY ESBRANDT/OSCEOLA GATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON#6 Jeff Driskel Whatever Whatever it takes it takes By MARTY COHENGatorBait.net Editor OK, bear with me, but its a symptom of having two elementary schoolage kids and watching dozens of kid movies literally thousands of times, that when Florida struck for its unbelievable come-from-behind win on a walkoff blocked punt/touchdown, the rst thing that came to my mind was a line from Lightning McQueen, the lead character of the animated movie Cars. McQueen is inches away from winning the last race of the season when he arrogantly decides to bypass a late pit stop, and instead of an easy victory, blows two tires and ends up limping to the nish line in a threeway photo nish tie. Theres a lot more to racing than just winning, offers McQueen. I mean, taking the race by a full lap . Wheres the entertainment in that? No, no, no, I wanted to give folks a little sizzle. Where would the entertainment value have been if Florida had drubbed Louisiana-Lafayette (what we will refer to the Ragin Cajuns as, not just Louisiana) by 30 points? Nah, thats not the nature of these Gators, who survived a too-close-for comfort 27-20 win over La.-Lafayette on a splendid Saturday afternoon in a game they found themselves trailing by a touchdown with less than three minutes remaining. In searching for an explanation not only for this crazy triumph, but for this entire Florida season, you begin to look away from the tangibles on the football eld, like the performance of the defense and the ash of the special teams. Instead you maybe begin to search for the esoteric, the idea there is a dose of serendipity or providence or karma, or just plain good fortune, surrounding this team. Weve seen it plenty of times in difference sports, where teams get on a roll on positive things seem to just continually occur, whether its a coachs move that works or a fortuitous bounce of the ball or pulling a play out of the bag that rarely, if ever, happens, such as a blocked punt returned for a touchdown to snatch a victory with two seconds left. When teams get behind that positive mojo, they ride it as long as it will go and when clubs are on the other side of that fence, when bad things occur, when an of cials decision steals a win. Ive been a part of both sides of that (good and bad things) great plays happen and then bad plays happen for teams for example, thats a bad play for them, junior defensive tackle Sharrif Floyd said. You never know how that ball is going to bounce. It (blocked punt to win a game) was a great play Ive never seen anything like that before. The Gators finally made some plays down the stretch in all three phases, from the defense keeping he Ragin Cajuns out of the endzone early in the fourth quarter and then turning in three consecutive three-andouts, to the offense moving 49 yards for a score in the closing minutes to the soon-to-be-famed punt block by Loucheiz Purifoy and subsequent winning touchdown return by Jelani Jenkins with two seconds left. It was a great play by Loucheiz, they executed it perfectly and I just happened to be in the right place at the right time, Jenkins said. It came right to me, there was a lot of open eld and I had a lot of blockers, I was pretty sure (Id score). Were a hard- ghting team, we dont ever give up. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! A signature moment for EJ

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Page 5B outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsSo far this fall has been absolutely gorgeous. We had a couple of days when the weather was bad, but most have been very nice and very shable. The water temperature really cooled down with the cool nights we had last week and the water clarity went from dingy to gin-clear almost overnight. I have shed the ats and some of the outer bars, which were loaded up with reds before the cool and have not been able to nd anything. Everything has either been out real deep or around the oyster bars. I think most people have a certain person that they sh with most of the time. When I rst moved to Tallahassee in 1976, Hank Redd and I shed together every weekend that rolled around. We did mostly freshwater shing but when we moved to the coast it turned to saltwater shing. I left IBM and things changed. We still stayed in touch but didnt do that much shing together. He was living in Tallahassee and we lived at the coast. Fifteen and a half years ago I found a new shing partner. She was always ready to go whether it was raining or the wind was blowing. The one day I remember most fondly was about 12 years ago. A good friend and a guide wanted his wife to catch a tarpon. If she caught one she wouldnt be able to hold it up for a picture so he was going to hire me to take them. I said let me go to Spring Creek and just see if there are any there and if so we would go the next morning. I was just gonna go look but decided to take a couple of pin sh and a tarpon rod. When I got everything loaded and the motor running she was up on the front deck ready to go wherever we were gonna go. I pulled into Stewart Cove and cut the motor. Almost immediately two or three tarpon rolled. I decided since I was there and had some pin sh and a rod I might as well sh. I anchored the boat, cast out a pin sh under a balloon and immediately a tarpon hit. Pearl jumped to the front of the boat, started barking and I was hollering for her to sit down. When that tarpon made its second leap it was just too much for her. She jumped in the water and started swimming right towards that tarpon. I was ghting the tarpon and whistling for her to come back to the boat. She nally turned around and swam up beside the boat. I grabbed her collar, threw her in the boat and told her to lie down. About an hour later I was able to get the tarpon up beside the boat and release it. Pearl was able to lick it a time or two and then it swam away. Pearl was our 15 year old black lab that we had to put to sleep last week and Im gonna miss having her in the boat. She was part of our family and will be deeply missed. I just got back from Shell Island Fish Camp and Jimmy said shing has been spectacular. Lots of trout, reds, sheepshead and some big ounder. In fact a 4.5-pound ounder came in which he said was the biggest he had seen weighed in at Shell Island. Two of the guides out of there, Kenny and Danny, had excellent trips last week limiting on both trout and reds. They were shing the oyster bars to the west of St. Marks. Jimmy said on of their customers came in with some pictures of some big bull reds they had caught out of St. Marks. Capt. David Fife came back to Spring Creek a week ago and took some of his buddies from North Carolina shing. They caught quite a few trout and limited out on reds each day using mud minnows and nger mullet. I was talking with one of the barbers where I go and he said his soninlaw and daughter caught some reds to about 43 inches. They were shing off a dock at St. Teresa using cut bait on the bottom. He said his daughter had to pull her sh up onto the bank. They got some good pictures and then let em go. Capt. Luke over at AMS said he and his son and another gentleman went out of Spring Creek on Friday. They shed several holes around Oyster Bay with no luck and Luke said lets go to Panacea. They ended up with 40 silver trout up to 17 inches. They used the Gulp and cut bait on the bottom. Bill Chandler who also works at AMS went out last week with his wife Nancy and shed the mouth of the Ochlockonee. He told Luke they had their limit of speckled trout in about 15 minutes and then just started catching and releasing. He said he had never seen that many trout concentrated in one spot. They then went out and caught as many white trout as they wanted to clean. I have seen more big white trout this year than ever before. Seventeen and eighteen inch sh arent uncommon. Saturday I fished with Kevin Walsh and party from Macon. We fished everywhere I knew and just couldnt nd many sh. We had caught eight big white trout early and nally late in the day went back to that spot. Nothing! We had about an hour to sh so we headed to another white trout spot. We caught 40 nice white trout to 1 9 inches and Kevin and Jeff each caught and released reds that were about 40 inches long. That last hour made the day. Last Sunday I took Steve Sgan and his daughter Madeline, son Jack and Jacks friend David. We caught several speckled trout and a bunch of white trout. Steve caught a 35 inch black drum while shing for the white trout. When the tide got right we came in and caught our limit of reds to 25 inches. Those kids all caught big reds and Madeline caught a three-and-ahalf-foot bonnet head shark, which really made her day. Its fun to take kids shing but more fun to see them catch sh. Harrison King, the young man who was on the boat that sank several weeks ago, said he caught a 30 pound red last weekend. Randy Mimms of Shell Point said he also caught one about that big. This is the time of year the big bull reds come in shallower water to breed. When you hook into one there is no doubt as to what is on the other end of the line. Remember to take a kid shing and be careful out on the water. Good luck and good shing! The First Sunday at the Refuge Presentation Series will feature Owls and Other Night Birds at St. Marks with Don Morrow of The Trust for Public Lands on Dec. 2 at 2 p.m. Owls arent the only birds that come out at night. Don will tell about birds of the night and share their habits, how to identify them, and where you are likely to nd them. Linger afterward for a short twilight eld trip with Don. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures Classroom at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call (850) 925-6121 for information. The Florida Bluebird Society (FBS) is sponsoring the Third Winter Florida Bluebird Blitz on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 16 and 17. Faith Jones, FBS Statewide Bluebird Blitz Chair, said a blitz is a concentrated effort on two speci c days to locate as many Eastern Bluebirds as possible in Florida. She said the goal of the Bluebird Blitz is to gather information about bluebirds in Florida in an effort to help determine the health of the species in the Sunshine State. Reports from participants over a span of years will help reveal if the bluebird population in Florida is increasing or decreasing. This requires learning the location and number of bluebirds throughout the state. The winter blitz will help reveal where bluebirds nd food and survival habitat between the end of the breeding and migration time until breeding activity begins again in the spring. Jones stressed that volunteers are needed to assist in this concentrated effort to report where, when, and how many Eastern Bluebirds are seen in their areas during the two day period. Reporting forms can be downloaded from the FBS website: www. oridabluebirdsociety.com. Results from past Bluebird Blitzes, including reports by counties, also can be seen on the FBS website. The St. Marks Refuge Photo Club is holding their annual Outdoors for the Holidays event on Saturday, Nov. 17, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Nature Store and Natures Classroom (education building) at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. To celebrate this event, the Nature Store is offering 10 percent off all merchandise in the store. Members of the St. Marks Refuge Association (the refuges friends group) will get 20 percent off. You can join SMRA the same day for 20 percent savings! There will be an appearance by the National Wildlife Refuges Blue Goose, who can also pose with you for a free holiday photo. In addition to savings on purchases, there will be childrens crafts, holiday photos, a wagon ride behind the gates, and the live eagle, Paige (from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.), and free cider and cookies. There will also be chili and xings for a donation. Donations will go to the Junior Ranger Summer Camp at the refuge. From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL More big white trout this yearOutdoors for the Holidays at the refuge Winter Bluebird Blitz is Nov. 16-17 in Florida First Sunday will feature owls and night birdsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has implemented changes to commercial licensing requirements making it easier for Florida veterans and veterans with disabilities to enter the commercial shing industry. The commission adopted the changes at its September meeting and made a formal announcement of the changes in a media event on Nov. 9. The changes modify income requirements for many of Florida veterans seeking a commercial restricted species endorsement, which allows commercial harvesters to sh for and sell species that are designated as restricted.Becoming sherman easier for Florida vets Sunday ThursdayALL U CAN EATSpecials Catfish ......$11.95 Shrimp ....,$13.95 Scallops ..$13.95Includes Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies30 SHRIMP 10 Fried 10 Grilled 10 BlackenedServed with Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies$12.95 w Winter hours: Tues. Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 Sunday 4-9 984-5243 1506 COASTAL HWY., SCENIC BIWAY IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle G E T READY FOR HUN T IN G Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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Saturday started bright, early, and chilly! Coxswain Bob Asztalos met crew Phil Hill, Carolyn Treadon and Duane Treadon at the Fort in St. Marks for the scheduled safety patrol. The crew was greeted by many others heading out to enjoy the water and could not have asked for a better day to be out. Each year, it is a good rule of thumb to check the deviation on a boat. This is the difference between what true and magnetic north and what the compass on the boat reads. Electronics and metal on a boat can cause variation in readings, and while it may not make a huge difference for the facilities when land is in sight and visual markers available, when on longer journeys a degree or two can cause a vessel to be signi cantly off course. The crew worked together to create a deviation table for The Doc B to assure that it had not changed. After completing the deviation table, the vessel was anchored just west of the center channel marker where Coxswain Bob Asztalos had the crew plot a course to the buoy marking the three nautical mile line east of Shell Point. The crew was challenged to calculate the time it would take to reach the target as well as the compass heading. Once reaching their mark, the crew were instructed to again plot a course to the entrance to the Panacea Channel. It is a great lesson to practice navigation and not rely on electronics in the event of a failure. It was also a good lesson for the crew who had not been in the waters of Panacea before. Team Coordination Training came in very useful as it was challenging to locate the buoys without electronics. After a successful navigation of the channel, the crew stopped in Poseys for a lunch break. The return to St. Marks took the crew through Shell Point. The effects of winter and low tide was evident as at times there was only two feet of water under the boat. While navigation through the shallow waters the crew were treated to several dolphins and a sea turtle. After navigating back to St. Marks, the crew secured for the day. All agreed it could not have been a more perfect day to be out on the water. While some of us were out on the water, others were working the booth at the North Florida Fair. Many thanks to Norma Hill and Duane Treadon for submitting photos. And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Be an educated boater, even a sunny day can be chilly when out on the water. Layers offer a great way to remain both protected and comfortable. Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAuxiliarists plotting a course while on patrol. Phil HIll on bow watch. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Nov 15, 12 Fri Nov 16, 12 Sat Nov 17, 12 Sun Nov 18, 12 Mon Nov 19, 12 Tue Nov 20, 12 Wed Nov 21, 12 D ate 4.1 ft. 1:45 AM 4.0 ft. 2:27 AM 3.9 ft. 3:11 AM 3.6 ft. 4:00 AM 3.2 ft. 4:59 AM Hi g h -1.0 ft. 8:59 AM -0.8 ft. 9:47 AM -0.5 ft. 10:36 AM -0.1 ft. 11:27 AM 0.4 ft. 12:21 PM 1.5 ft. 12:18 AM 1.3 ft. 1:52 AM L ow 3.5 ft. 3:32 PM 3.3 ft. 4:18 PM 3.1 ft. 5:04 PM 2.9 ft. 5:53 PM 2.8 ft. 6:46 PM 2.8 ft. 6:20 AM 2.5 ft. 8:16 AM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 8:36 PM 1.5 ft. 9:19 PM 1.5 ft. 10:07 PM 1.5 ft. 11:04 PM 0.8 ft. 1:21 PM 1.1 ft. 2:26 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 7:45 PM 2.8 ft. 8:46 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 15, 12 Fri Nov 16, 12 Sat Nov 17, 12 Sun Nov 18, 12 Mon Nov 19, 12 Tue Nov 20, 12 Wed Nov 21, 12 D ate 3.1 ft. 1:37 AM 3.0 ft. 2:19 AM 2.9 ft. 3:03 AM 2.7 ft. 3:52 AM 2.4 ft. 4:51 AM Hi g h -0.7 ft. 9:10 AM -0.6 ft. 9:58 AM -0.4 ft. 10:47 AM -0.1 ft. 11:38 AM 0.3 ft. 12:32 PM 1.1 ft. 12:29 AM 0.9 ft. 2:03 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 3:24 PM 2.5 ft. 4:10 PM 2.3 ft. 4:56 PM 2.2 ft. 5:45 PM 2.1 ft. 6:38 PM 2.1 ft. 6:12 AM 1.9 ft. 8:08 AM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 8:47 PM 1.1 ft. 9:30 PM 1.1 ft. 10:18 PM 1.1 ft. 11:15 PM 0.6 ft. 1:32 PM 0.8 ft. 2:37 PM L ow 2.1 ft. 7:37 PM 2.1 ft. 8:38 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 15, 12 Fri Nov 16, 12 Sat Nov 17, 12 Sun Nov 18, 12 Mon Nov 19, 12 Tue Nov 20, 12 Wed Nov 21, 12 D ate 3.8 ft. 2:21 AM 3.8 ft. 3:03 AM 3.6 ft. 3:47 AM 3.3 ft. 4:36 AM Hi g h -0.9 ft. 10:03 AM -0.8 ft. 10:51 AM -0.5 ft. 11:40 AM -0.1 ft. 12:31 PM 1.4 ft. 12:08 AM 1.3 ft. 1:22 AM 1.2 ft. 2:56 AM L ow 3.2 ft. 4:08 PM 3.0 ft. 4:54 PM 2.8 ft. 5:40 PM 2.7 ft. 6:29 PM 3.0 ft. 5:35 AM 2.6 ft. 6:56 AM 2.4 ft. 8:52 AM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 9:40 PM 1.3 ft. 10:23 PM 1.4 ft. 11:11 PM 0.3 ft. 1:25 PM 0.7 ft. 2:25 PM 1.0 ft. 3:30 PM L ow 2.6 ft. 7:22 PM 2.5 ft. 8:21 PM 2.6 ft. 9:22 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 15, 12 Fri Nov 16, 12 Sat Nov 17, 12 Sun Nov 18, 12 Mon Nov 19, 12 Tue Nov 20, 12 Wed Nov 21, 12 D ate 3.2 ft. 1:29 AM 3.2 ft. 2:11 AM 3.0 ft. 2:55 AM 2.8 ft. 3:44 AM 2.5 ft. 4:43 AM 2.2 ft. 6:04 AM Hi g h -1.0 ft. 8:38 AM -0.8 ft. 9:26 AM -0.5 ft. 10:15 AM -0.1 ft. 11:06 AM 0.4 ft. 12:00 PM 0.8 ft. 1:00 PM 1.3 ft. 1:31 AM L ow 2.7 ft. 3:16 PM 2.6 ft. 4:02 PM 2.4 ft. 4:48 PM 2.2 ft. 5:37 PM 2.2 ft. 6:30 PM 2.1 ft. 7:29 PM 2.0 ft. 8:00 AM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 8:15 PM 1.4 ft. 8:58 PM 1.5 ft. 9:46 PM 1.5 ft. 10:43 PM 1.4 ft. 11:57 PM 1.1 ft. 2:05 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 8:30 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 15, 12 Fri Nov 16, 12 Sat Nov 17, 12 Sun Nov 18, 12 Mon Nov 19, 12 Tue Nov 20, 12 Wed Nov 21, 12 D ate 4.2 ft. 1:42 AM 4.1 ft. 2:24 AM 4.0 ft. 3:08 AM 3.7 ft. 3:57 AM 3.3 ft. 4:56 AM Hi g h -1.1 ft. 8:56 AM -0.9 ft. 9:44 AM -0.5 ft. 10:33 AM -0.1 ft. 11:24 AM 0.4 ft. 12:18 PM 1.6 ft. 12:15 AM 1.4 ft. 1:49 AM L ow 3.6 ft. 3:29 PM 3.3 ft. 4:15 PM 3.1 ft. 5:01 PM 2.9 ft. 5:50 PM 2.8 ft. 6:43 PM 2.8 ft. 6:17 AM 2.6 ft. 8:13 AM Hi g h 1.6 ft. 8:33 PM 1.6 ft. 9:16 PM 1.6 ft. 10:04 PM 1.6 ft. 11:01 PM 0.9 ft. 1:18 PM 1.2 ft. 2:23 PM L ow 2.8 ft. 7:42 PM 2.9 ft. 8:43 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 15, 12 Fri Nov 16, 12 Sat Nov 17, 12 Sun Nov 18, 12 Mon Nov 19, 12 Tue Nov 20, 12 Wed Nov 21, 12 D ate 3.2 ft. 12:50 AM 3.2 ft. 1:35 AM 3.1 ft. 2:26 AM 2.8 ft. 3:23 AM 2.5 ft. 4:28 AM Hi g h -0.6 ft. 8:28 AM -0.5 ft. 9:19 AM -0.4 ft. 10:12 AM -0.1 ft. 11:06 AM 0.1 ft. 12:01 PM 1.3 ft. 12:20 AM 1.0 ft. 1:49 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 4:48 PM 2.5 ft. 5:38 PM 2.4 ft. 6:24 PM 2.3 ft. 7:05 PM 2.3 ft. 7:42 PM 2.2 ft. 5:49 AM 1.9 ft. 7:34 AM Hi g h 1.8 ft. 7:48 PM 1.7 ft. 8:35 PM 1.6 ft. 9:35 PM 1.5 ft. 10:50 PM 0.4 ft. 12:56 PM 0.7 ft. 1:50 PM L ow 2.3 ft. 8:15 PM 2.3 ft. 8:46 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 15 Nov. 21First Nov. 20 Full Nov. 28 Last Dec. 6 New Dec. 12Major Times 1:43 AM 3:43 AM 2:15 PM 4:15 PM Minor Times 8:52 AM 9:52 AM 7:36 PM 8:36 PM Major Times 2:47 AM 4:47 AM 3:17 PM 5:17 PM Minor Times 9:54 AM 10:54 AM 8:41 PM 9:41 PM Major Times 3:48 AM 5:48 AM 4:17 PM 6:17 PM Minor Times 10:47 AM 11:47 AM 9:47 PM 10:47 PM Major Times 4:45 AM 6:45 AM 5:12 PM 7:12 PM Minor Times 11:35 AM 12:35 PM 10:51 PM 11:51 PM Major Times 5:38 AM 7:38 AM 6:03 PM 8:03 PM Minor Times 12:16 PM 1:16 PM 11:53 PM 12:53 AM Major Times 6:27 AM 8:27 AM 6:51 PM 8:51 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:54 PM 1:54 PM Major Times 7:14 AM 9:14 AM 7:37 PM 9:37 PM Minor Times 12:51 AM 1:51 AM 1:29 PM 2:29 PM Better Average Average Average Average Average Average7:02 am 5:40 pm 8:54 am 7:37 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:03 am 5:40 pm 9:54 am 8:42 pm 7:04 am 5:39 pm 10:49 am 9:48 pm 7:05 am 5:39 pm 11:36 am 10:52 pm 7:06 am 5:39 pm 12:18 pm 11:53 pm 7:06 am 5:38 pm 12:55 pm --:-7:07 am 5:38 pm 1:30 pm 12:52 am11% 19% 26% 34% 41% 48% 55% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Aplysia, which you may more commonly know as the sea hare, is a sea slug, that is found eating algae and sea grass off our Florida coast. Aplysia, and all other sea hares, were named in ancient times because their rhinopores, a pair of sensory organs which grow out of the top of their heads, look much like the large rabbit ears. Aplysia are generally a few inches long, but can grow up to a foot, and can range in color from yellowish green to black depending on species. If you happened to nd an Aplysia out of the caressing support of water, you probably would not be very impressed; they tend to shrink and look, poetically, a bit like a big ball of snot. In the water, things are quite the opposite. Aplysia moves with beautiful grace, and can swim short distances by moving aps of skin called parapodia much like a bird apping its wings in the sky. Beyond pure grace, Aplysia are party animals of the sea. These hares are hermaphroditic, which allows each individual to mate with both males and females at once. When mating they secrete pheromones, chemicals which attract more animals to come mate. This leads to a wild mating behavior, known commonly as daisy chaining in which up to 20 animals at once may reproduce with animals in a line, functioning as both sexes at once. Even after having kids or in this case long spaghetti-like strand of eggs, Aplysia are still up for dancing. They exhibit a behavior where they will waive their head from side to side. Hares can be characterized by this behavior. When not busy partying, Aplysia make sure to do their part to contribute to society and to the scienti c community. Aplysia have a simple nervous system, and large neurons, making them an ideal organism for the study of their nervous system (neurobiology). Eric Kandel of Columbia University was awarded a 2000 Nobel Prize for his work which showed how several learning and chemical responses worked on the cellular level in Aplysia. And Aplysia arent the only smart ones in the family; their cousin Bursatella, the frilled sea hare, has a protein in their defensive ink which has been isolated for its anti-HIV properties. In fact, lore says that Aplysia have been at work since biblical times, when they were used for making ink. I suggest that you go and meet an Aplysia for yourself. When you do, be polite and gentle; as if you are rude, much like an octopus, this slug may defensively secrete a reddish purple ink at you. If one inks on you though, no harm will come, as this ink isnt toxic to humans. If you keep one in your aquarium, the ink it excretes may kill everything else in the tank if it gets upset. Aplysia numbers in the grass bed can vary greatly from year to year, so if you can nd one off the coast of the panhandle, you can always meet one at Gulf Specimen Lab in Panacea.UnderwaterWakullaBy Heather Kunigelis AUXILIARISTS: Bob Asztalos, above, using a handheld compass for deviation table. At right, an auxiliarist shows off a Mustang suit at the North Florida Fair.FWC program improves boating across stateFrom FWC NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has announced the recipients for the 2012-2013 Florida Boating Improvement Program grants. Twenty-seven different grants, totaling $5.2 million, will be awarded throughout the state. These grants for boat ramps will bring economic development opportunities across our state, said Governor Rick Scott. As the shing capital of the world, Florida takes pride in the maintenance and quality of our boat ramps and facilities. They will provide a steady ow of tourism and recreation. In addition to patrolling Floridas woods and waters to protect people and natural resources, the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement manages boating access. We administer grant programs for boating access and boating-related activities, said Major Jack Daugherty, leader of the FWCs Boating and Waterways Section. The grants are awarded to eligible counties, municipalities and other state governmental entities to fund projects like boat ramp construction, channel marking and derelict vessel removal.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Page 7B YOUR AD HERE Also Born Breaks Bulk Cane Doll Drew Ends Even Extraordinary Fetch Food Four Graph Hair Hard Here Hero Honor Howl Indeed Indicate Into Japan Kept Lane Leaf Moth Name Nice Nine Note Oats Only Oval Owner Pear Plunged Port Push Raft Rang Reds Refrigerator Roar Roll Safe Sealed This page sponsored in part by: Shock Shook Shot Skip Sold Stated Stay Stone Take Tart Teacher Teeth Tents Theyd Threw Took Torn Trees Trust Unit Untie Weed

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEmploymentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements Todays New Ads Cypress Lumber Pecky T&G v Joint Timbers and beams (850) 643-6283 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements Bring your certified artwork to be considered for Art Auction consignment. November 17 & 18. Noon to 5pm at Baterbys Art Gallery. 9101 International Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, FL32819. Call (866)537-1013 or visit www.Baterbys.com for more information. Medical Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Professional AIRLINE CAREERS-Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Professional Now accepting applications forEXPERIENCEDFRONT DESK ASSOCIATE Apply in person. Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites. 3292 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville (across W.H.S.). Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -TRAIN IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 Trades/ Skills DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDLTraining. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Trades/ Skills DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. HOME EVERYWEEKEND! Pay 37/mi, Both ways, FULLBENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, Fl Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED /INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. -Tanker Training Available. Call Today! (877)882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Top Pay for Limited Experience! 34 cpm for 1 Mos OTR Exp Plus Benefits, New Equip & 401K (877)258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com Trades/ Skills Tire Technician /Mechanic NeededB & B Dugger, Inc. is looking for a part or full-time tire mounting technician that has experience with tire changers. tire balancers and mounting truck & small tractor tires. Additional experience in roadside asssistance and working in the field is also prefererred. A Florida driver license with a clear MVR is a position requirement. Pay negotiable. Call the business office at (850) 926-2929 or email to office@band bdugger.com to receive an application Schools/ Instruction ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call www.Centura Online.com 888-203-3179 Appliances KENMORE REFRIGERATOR 2 yrs old. 19.7 cu ft. call 850-962-3123 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLEFri 10 am (no early birds) Sat 8am. HUGE Shabby Sheek-Country Cottage & Antique Inventory Sale. Furn., Paintings, Lamps, Linens, Glassware & much more! 1 MILE N. OF McDonalds @ 2427 Crawfordville HWY OCHLOCKONEE BAY Sat, Sun Nov 17 & 18 8 to 5, grill, tools, hswares, bed frames, electronics, clothes, 373 Mashes Sands Rd Farm Services BUSH HOGGING ROADS GRADED GARDENS TILLED Have tractor will bush hog finish cut large acerage grade roads driveways till gardens. dbdouge@aol.com or 850-643-6283 Pets LHASAAPSO AKC Purebreed champ line Vet health cert.,1st shots, Bordetella, paper trained $500 (352)596-8974 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3B/2b SW on 3 private acres. A rated schools. Quiet neighborhood. No smoking/pets. $675 dep. & 1st mo. 1yr lease. 850-926-6766 CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 PANACEA3 bedroom. 2 bath. DWMH with large front porch. 650.00 a month. NO PETS and NO Smoking inside house. Available December 1. 850-984-1018 or 352-603-7033 SOPCHOPPY2/1.5 Singlewide $575.REVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Mobile Homes For Rent PANACEAClean SW 2/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $500/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 Mobile Homes For Sale 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, Beautiful Kitchen. Huge Master Bedroom Walk In Closets Call Today (850) 576-2106 4 BR Mobile Home on 5 Acres, Ready to Move IN -EZ Payments. Call Me (850) 576-2105 100 Families Needed for Govt Loan Program. Call Today (850) 576-2104 3BR, 2BA-Used Mobile Home. Great Condition Wont Last !!! Call Me ASAP (850) 576-2687 Foreclosed Mobile Home with land, ready to move in. Great Value. Approx 1500 sq ft, 3Br2Ba, serious offers only, no renters. (850)308-6473 GOTLAND? Need a Home. Use Your Land As your DOWN Payment Call Now (850) 576 2687 Apartments Unfurnished PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall Mary (850) 984-4811Equal Housing Opportunity TDD 1 800 955 2771 Rental Houses OPEN HOUSESOPCHOPPY AREASunday 1 to 5 waterfront cottage 1br/1ba, exc. cond. cath. ceiling, sep storage/laundry, $590.pr mnth. 84 Mt. Beasor Rd off Persimmon 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEResidential/ Commercial House for Rent in the Center of Crawfordville For More Details Call (850) 926-9782 PANACEA2 bedroom. 2 bath. 700.00 a month plus deposit lights and water. NO PETS and No Smoking inside the house. 850-984-1018 or 850-408-4030. Rent: Houses Unfurnished SOPCHOPPY2/1For Rent, $600 month On CanalREVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Auctions Estates ABSOLUTE AUCTION 79+/-Bank Owned Assets in GA, NC, TN Nov. 27 @ 6pm, Lithia Springs, GA. Nov. 28 @ 6pm, Ellijay, GA. Online & Live Bidding. GAL AU-Co002594, NCAL8935, TN5733 RowellAuctions.com (800)323-8388 Citrus Hills Homes Forest Ridge Villages Updated, move in ready, 2/2/2, Private lot 352-746-0002 Cars FORD1994 Taurus Good motor, has some body damage. $700 (850)926-8548 Sport/Utility Vehicles CHEVROLET2008 Tahoe LTZ, 34,600 miles, black, leather, 4X4, DVD, navigation, warranty, excellent condition, $11400, awan@netscape.com JEEP97 WRANGLER 4wd 137,000mi great cond. new soft top, $3300 Call 850-926-5494 Fictitious Name Notices 5437-1115 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Taylor Beard Doing business as: Geo Saves Florida at 402 Parkside Circle, Fictitious Name Notices Fictitious Name Notices Crawfordville, FL, 32327 with a mailing address of: 402 Parkside Circle, Crawfordville, FL 32327 desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 9th day of November, 2012 /s/Taylor Beard Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News November 15, 2012 5434-1115 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ITB 2013-01 UPPER RIVER BRIDGE FENCING (SHADEVILLE ROAD AND WAKULLA RIVER) Advertisement Begins: November 7, 2012 @ 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Sealed bids for ITB 2013-01, UPPER RIVER BRIDGE FENCING will be received until 10:00 a.m. on November 28, 2012. Bids should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Office, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at which time all bids will be publicly opened. Bids received after the time and date specified will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Bidder. Please direct all questions to: ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNICAL: Deborah DuBose Brent PellWakulla County BOCC ESG Operations, Inc. Phone: 850.926.9500 x 410340 Trice Lane FAX: 850.926.0940 Crawfordville, FL 32327E-mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com Office: 850.926.7616 FAX: 850.926.2890 Email: bpell@escinc.net Bid Notices Bid Notices Bid Notices Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16 .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE.CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 OFFICE SPACE LEASEFORTHE BARRY BUILDING ATTHE LOG CABINCrawfordville 850-508-5471$25000/MO Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT GOT FALLIN G LE A VES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help!Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h h h h h a a a a v e e A A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l t h e e M M o o o o o o d d e e e e e e r r n E q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m m e n n t t t o H e C C C ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f t ! PAT GR EEN S L AWN S ER VICE 4Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1150mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. LIVING ESTATE SALE 1875 Wakulla-Arran Rd. Crawfordville 8 AM 4 PMFrench Ormolu Hall Table with Mirror, Danish Modern Teak Server, Davis Walnut Server, Edwardian Sideboard, Dining Table with 6 chairs, Sterling Silver 2.17 troy ounce Rounds, Asian style Cabinet, Game Table, 2 Drawer antique Chest, Gilt Mirrors, 5 Salvatore Dali Prints and Etchings, Broyhill China Hutch, Metal/Glass Serving Cart, Edwardian Sofa, 2 Armchirs, 2 matching Side-chairs, stools, 6 piece French provincial Bedroom Set, Mahogany Dresser with Mirror, 2 Cedar Chests, Upright Freezer, Washer/Dryer, TVs, Hickory green matching 2 drawer chests, Laundry baskets, Books, Linen, Limoges China, Mary Kay Dinnerset and Makeup, Lots of ne Costume Jewelry, Glassware, Pots, Fostoria etched and Crystal stems, Cambridge elegant Glassware, Waterford crystal seahorse Candlesticks, Silver-plate Candelabra & serving pieces, Schumann Cobalt dinnerware, Art-glass, Oil Paintings, Lamps, Flatware, Cobalt Glass, Chairs, Fabulous Vintage Gowns and Handbags, Shoes, Rattan Shelves, Deer Feeder, Greenhouse, Portable Outside Shed, lots of ne Porcelain and Glass, Kentucky Derby Collectibles, Xmas Items, Hurricane Lamps, Large outdoor beveled glass tables, Agate and Metal side table, Walnut Dresser with Mirror, Walnut Chest Drawers, Primitive Grey Chest drawers, Silver-plate, 2 Blue Martin Bird Houses, Floor rugs, misc tools, kitchen items and lots more...!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Page 9B ITB documents will be available at www.mywakulla.com or can be picked up at Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administrative Office at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 after 8:00 a.m. on November 7, 2012. Bid Documents may be picked up at the Wakulla County Purchasing Office at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. There will be a Mandatory On-Site Pre Bid Meeting at 10:00 a.m. on Monday, November 19, 2012 at Upper River Bridge Shadeville Road and Wakulla River. The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. E. Alan Brock, Chairman Deborah DuBose, Purchasing November 15, 2012 Bid Notices Bid Notices Bid Notices 5409-1115 TWN THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE : Monday, November 19, 2012 TIME: Regular Meeting 5:45 p.m.. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE:Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County School, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850 926-0065 November 15, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5418-1122 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201203652 TO: Russell E. Paul ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. November 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5424-1115 TWN vs. Diaz, Sarah Case No. 652012CA000233CAXXXX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 652012CA000233CAXXXX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. SARAH S. DIAZ A/K/A SARAH SIMONDS PATTON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SARAH S. DIAZ A/K/A SARAH SIMONDS PATTON, DAVID DIAZ A/K/A DAVID C. DIAZ, JOHN TENANT, JANE TENANT, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID DIAZ and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SARAH S. DIAZ RESIDENT:Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:469 WHIDDON LAKE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-0029 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in WAKULLA County, Florida: Commence at an old concrete monument marking the Southwest corner of Section 7, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 00 degrees 01 minutes 27 seconds East along the West boundary of said Section 7, a distance of 674.17 feet to an old concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 50 minutes 33 seconds East 156.70 feet to a concrete monument on the Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary of Whiddon Lake Road, thence run North 15 degrees 30 minutes 51 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 210.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 14 degrees 52 minutes 25 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 122.61 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point OF Beginning, continue North 14 degrees 52 minutes 25 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 149.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 41 minutes 03 seconds East 331.49 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 09 minutes 27 seconds East 224.25 feet, thence run North 78 degrees 02 minutes 43 seconds West 378.56 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 1.50 acres, more or less. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy to your written defenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan PLC, attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, either before December 7, 2012 or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in The Wakulla News. DATED:October 19, 2012 Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk of the CourtCopies furnished to: Phelan Hallinan PLC 2727 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion noticed has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 8 & 15, 2012 PH #28623 5426-1122 TWN vs. Keller, Judy Case No. 652008CA000158 Foreclosure IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA000158 DIVISION: THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE CWABS, INC., ASSETBACK CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1 Plaintiff, vs. JUDYGARNETKELLER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 1, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000158 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE CWABS, INC., ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1 is the Plaintiff and JUDYGARNETKELLER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDYGARNETKELLER N/K/AFRANK KELLER N/K/AFRANK KELLER; TENANT#1 N/K/AJESSICAKELLER N/K/AJESSICAKELLER are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 13th day of December, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 6, BLOCK D, HIGHLAND PLACE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A100 MULBERRYCIRCLE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. 5427-1122 TWN Vs. Nelson, Buddy 65-2010-CA-000035-CA-XXXX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000035-CA-XXXX BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANY Plaintiff(s) vs. BUDDYE. NELSON, et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000035-CA-XXXX of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANYis the Plaintiff and are BUDDYE. NELSON; SHERRYA. NELSON; WACHOVIABANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION; THE FARM HONEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. and JOHN DOE N/K/AROBERTNELSON the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 24th day of January, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 1, Clock B, THE FARM SUBDIVISION, Phase I, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Pages 93-98 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. and commonly known as: 106 PIMLICO DR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLO 32327 IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANYREMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida this 31st day of October, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk, WAKULLACounty, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, WAKULLACounty, WAKULLA COUNTYCLERK OF COURT, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL, 32327 -County Phone: 850-926-0905 TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. November 15 & 22, 2012 864242.000187FMT 5430-1122 TWN Vs. Highsmith, Phillip Case # 2012 CA 227 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE #2012 CA 227 CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. PHILLIP LEE HIGHSMITH; et al; Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, entered in Case No. 2012-CA 227 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and PHILLIP LEE HIGHSMITH, MICHELLE DAMRON ALLEN, BOBBY H. DANZEY, SR, VOY DANZEY; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 at 11:00 oclock a.m. on January 24, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Partial Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: Lots 6, 7 and 8 Block WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 3, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 43, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 31st day of October 2012 BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Court (seal) /s/ BY Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk November 15 & 22, 2012 5431-1122 TWN Vs. Waltman, Mary, Case #12-187-CA, Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE # 12-187-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. MARY WALTMAN; RANDAL L. WALTMAN, SR., et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2012, entered in Case No. 12-187-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and MARY WALTMAN; RANDAL L. WALTMAN, SR, wife and husband, UNKNOWN TENANT, AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 at 11:00 oclock a.m. on January 24, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Partial Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: SEE EXHIBIT A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days of the sale. 5432-1122 TWN Vs. Hale, Troy Case No: 09000038CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 09000038CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. TROYA. HALE; KARAS. HALE; UNKNOWN TEANANT#I; UNKNOWN TENANT#2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 17th day of January, 2013, at 11:00 oclock A.M. at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: LOTS 4 & 5, BLOCK WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT III, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA Amobile home with VIN number FLHMBFP119543999Aand FLHMBFP119543999B sits on the property. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 30th day of October, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904) 926-0905. not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk jNovember 15 & 22, 2012 5432-1122 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices DATED this 31st day of October, 2012 BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A WEST HALF OF LOT 3, WOODVILLE SOUTH UNIT II (Unrecorded) Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 9, Block C of Woodville South, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, page 31 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 89 degrees 44 minutes 21 seconds East along the Southerly boundary of said subdivision 1382.32 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNINING. From said POINT OF BEGINNINING continue South 44 minutes 21 seconds East along said Southerly boundary 455.00 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 24 minutes 21 seconds West 240.00 feet to the centerline of a 60.00 foot roadway easement (J & K Lane), thence run North 89 degrees 44 minutes 21 seconds West along said centerline 455.00 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 24 minutes 21 seconds East 240.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Subject to a roadway and utility easement over and across the Southerly 30.00 feet thereof TOGETHER WITH THAT 1994 SPRl MOBILE HOME BEARING TITLE NUMBERS 66731385 AND 66731386 AND VIN # CLFL46396A AND CLFL46396B RESPECTIVELY November 15 & 22, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on November 1, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. November 15 & 22, 2012 F08051683 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5428-1122 TWN Estate of Edrington, Glenn File No. 12-99-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 12-99-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF GLENN L. EDRINGTON, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Glenn L. Edrington, deceased, whose date of death was September 26, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF 5429-1122 TWN Estate of Brim, John File No.: 12-96-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, FILE NO.: 12-96-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN WAYNE BRIM Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of John Wayne Brim, deceased, whose date of death was September 8, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The first date of publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Personal Representative: /s/ Joseph William Brim 3765 Oleben Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32305 Attorneys for Personal Representative: /s/ Stuart E. Goldberg Fla. Bar No. 0365971, Amy Mason Collins, Fla. Bar No. 0044582 Law Offices of Stuart E. Goldberg, P.L. Post Office Box 12458, Tallahassee, Florida 32317 Telephone (850) 222-4000 Facsimile (850) 942-6400 November 15 & 22, 1012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit 31 Magpie 3BR/2BA $1400 mo. $1400 sec. dep. Outside pets okay with approval $900 mo. $900 security Lease with OPTION TO BUY! 5 Albin Live Oak Island 2BR/ 2 BA with Lost and Dock. $950. mo. $950 Security Deposit. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2837 Coastal Hwy. Commercial Building $800 mo. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. George's Lighthouse Point Waterfront living Overlooking georgious Ochlockonee Bay Unit 25E, 2BD/2BA, 1,460 sq. ft., washer/dryer, hardwood oors throughout, gated community with pool and tennis court. $1000. mo. No pets

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1 13 16 25 30 37 41 49 53 59 63 66 2 19 26 50 3 27 51 4 28 45 5 22 42 20 31 38 46 54 60 64 67 6 14 17 32 43 7 29 55 8 23 52 9 39 47 24 33 48 61 65 68 15 18 21 40 44 56 10 34 57 11 35 58 12 36 62 ACROSS 1. Cattail's locale 6. Belfry critters 10. Warmed the bench 13. Oil-yielding rock 14. Netman Arthur 15. Cher's ex Sonny 16. Middle Ages invader 17. Caboose's place 18. Black, to bards 19. Carpentry joint scandal? 21. Right-hand person 22. Tip of a wing tip 23. Caught in a trap 25. Railway car problem 29. Thresher's tool 30. Two-time Indy champ Luyendyk 31. Prefix with lateral 33. Strung along 37. Turf occupier 38. Catches a wave 40. In __ (within a living organism) 41. Villain 's look 43. Genesis victim 44. Times to call, in ads 45. Grid great Bradshaw 47. Main highway 49. Model T, e.g. 52. __-Cat (winter vehicle) 53. Poor, as excuses go 54. Borscht-making tool? 59. Humorist Bombeck 60. Jessica of "Dark Angel" 61. Cheech of Cheech & Chong 63. Devil's doings 64. Virgin Is., e.g. 65. Upper crust 66. "Norma __" (Field film) 67. Bow-toting god 68. Faked out, NHLstyleDOWN1. Colorado hrs. 2. Moby's pursuer 3. Affix an "X" to, maybe 4. Serb or Croat 5. Regarding this point 6. T ug's tow 7. On the briny 8. Shrug-of-theshoulders comment 9. One of the tennisplaying Williamses 10. Edna Ferber novel 11. Battery terminal 12. Muted, with "down" 15. Snoopy's doc? 20. Bagel fillers 24. Be out of sorts 25. No beauty queens, these 26. Algerian port 27. Pitchfork prong 28. Sire a calf? 29. Fad critter of the late '90s 32. One in a dispute 34. Dumpy bar 35. "Your turn," in radio talk 36. Like a yenta 39. Much teen talk 42. Ministerial nickname 46. Cash back 48. Gadded about 49. Big name in sports cards 50. Grub or maggot 51. Shoot ing marble 52. Generals' insignia 55. River of Spain 56. Low-lying area 57. Estrada of "CHiPs" 58. Lo-cal 62. Sparks or RoremAmerican Prole Hometown Content 11/11/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 1 23 4 5163 78645 2 5 31 69 1 3852 4968 3517 2009 HometownContent 691 2358 4 7 254187639 783694215 928 413576 375869421 416572398 167 348952 549726183 832951764 M S T H A G S F L E E R A H A B O R A N L A R V A R A T E T I N E I M M I E S L A V B E G E T V E A L H E R E T O R E V L O X E S R E B A T E B A R G E Q U A R R E L E R A S E A F U R B Y E B R O T H A T S L I F E S T A R S S E R E N A S L A N G A I L R O A M E D B E A G L E V E T V A L E S O B I G D I V E E R I K A N O D E O V E R L I T E T O N E D N O S Y N E D THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The first date of publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Personal Representative: /s/ Diane K. Ray-Edrington 103 Revell Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorneys for Personal Representative Stuart E. Goldberg, Fla. Bar No. 0365971, Amy Mason Collins, Fla. Bar No. 0044582 Law Offices of Stuart E. Goldberg, P.L. Post Office Box 12458, Tallahassee, Florida 32317 Telephone (850)222-4000 Facsimile (850) 942-6400 November 15 & 22, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5421-1115 TWN Estate of Whisman, Dorothy, File No. 12-98-CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA IN RE: ESTATE OF DOROTHY J. WHISMAN Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DOROTHY J. WHISMAN, deceased, File Number 12-98-CP, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327; that the total cash value of the estate is estimated to be $474,806.00, and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Beverly J. Ross 318 Harvard Rd. St. Augustine, FL 32086 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Personal Representative: BEVERLY J. ROSS 318 Harvard Rd., St. Augustine, FL 32086 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /S/ RONALD A. MOWREY, Fla. Bar No. 0122006 Mowrey Law Firm, PA 515 North Adams, Tallahassee, FL 32301, PH: 850-222-9482, Fax: 850-561-6867 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, November 15 & 22, 2012 5422-1115 TWN Estate of Ferguson, Hugh Case No. 2012-CP-000094 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-CP-000094 PROBATE DIVISION NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Hugh Fain Ferguson, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-000094, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The date of the decedents death was August 21, 2012. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first pub lication of this Notice is November 15, 2012 Personal Representative: /s/Connie D. Torres 7337 Timber Crest Lane, Zephyrhills, Florida 33540 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Eric S. Haug, Florida Bar No. 0850713 Eric S. Haug Law & Consulting, P.A. Post Office Box 12031, Tallahassee, Florida 32317-2031 Telephone: (850) 583-1480 Telefax: (850) 297-0300 November 15 & 22, 2012 5423-1115 TWN Estate of Shilling, Ana Navia Case No. 2012-CP-000090 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-CP-000090 PROBATE DIVISION NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Ana Navia Shilling, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-000090, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The date of the decedents death was June 20, 2012. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first pub lication of this Notice is November 15, 2012 Personal Representative: /s/Kathy H. Navia 1116 Chalet Drive West, Mobile, Alabama 36608-3614 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Eric S. Haug, Florida Bar No. 0850713 Eric S. Haug Law & Consulting, P.A. Post Office Box 12031, Tallahassee, Florida 32317-2031 Telephone: (850) 583-1480 Telefax: (850) 297-0300 November 15 & 22, 2012 5425-1122 TWN Estate of Chuley, Tracy File No. 12-97-CP Notice of Administration PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 12-97-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF TRACY CANDICE CHULEY Deceased. TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Formal Administration has been entered in the Estate of Tracy Candice Chuley, deceased, File Number 12-97-CP, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327; that the decedents date of death was July 2, 2012; that the total value of the Estate is less than $75,000.00 and that the names of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: NAME ADDRESS -Mark G. Chuley 2616 County Road 124, Seneca Falls, N.Y. 13148 -Lanson G. Chuley29 Swaby Street, Seneca Falls, N.Y. 13148 -Kalan C. Chuley25 Clinton Street, Seneca Falls, N.Y. 13148 -Daryl S. Chuley108 Englishman Drive, Blacksburg, S.C. 29702 -L ynn D. Chuley259 S. Cypress Road, # 511, Pompano Beach, FL 33060 -Aaron T. Chuley454 Amanda Circle, Knoxville, TN 37922 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the Estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the Estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is November 15, 2012. Person Giving Notice: /s/ John J. Ryan 6 Bob Miller Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /s/ J. Martin Hayes, ESQ., Florida Bar No. 0971766 Akerman Senterfitt, 401 E. Jackson Street, Suite 1700 Tampa, Florida 33602, Telephone: (813) 223-7333 November 15 & 22, 2012 Self Storage Notices 5436-1122 TWN Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage 11/24 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will 5412-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.12 TXD013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2424Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-080-000-11508-013LOT 80 HS P-4-13-M-22 COMM AT NE COR OF LOT 81 HS OR 648 P 773 Name in which assessedBEN WITHERS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this11day of October 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 5413-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLCthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2182Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-076-000-10250-008 LOT 76 HS P-7-8-M-20-C IN NE 1/4 OF LOT 76 HS OR 148 P 292 OR 219 P 610 Name in which assessedTHE SIGHTS & SOUNDS COMPANY OF WAKULLA INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5419-1115 TWN Dept. of Child Services, 09C01-1207-JT Termination of Parental Rights PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF INDIANA, COUNTY OF CASS, IN THE CASS CIRCUIT COURT Logansport, INDIANA IN THE MATTER OF THE TERMINATION OF THE PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP OF: CRISTINA SALTER, SELENA SALTER, and JOBANY SALTER, children And SERGIO SANCHEZ, father Cause No.: 09C01-1207-JT-17 Cause No. 09C01-1207-JT-18 Cause No. 09C01-1207-JT-19 SUMMONS FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION & NOTICE OF TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the above noted parent, whose whereabouts are unknown, and who is the parent of Cristina Salter (date of birth 2-2-2007), Selena Salter (date of birth 11-26-2009), and Jobany Salter (date of birth 10-22-2010) that a Petition for Involuntary Termination of your Parental Rights in the above named Children, has been filed by the Indiana Department of Child Services, Cass County Office, in the Cass County Circuit Court, and YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED TO APPEAR before the Judge of said Court at the Cass County Courthouse, second floor, in Logansport, Indiana, telephone (574) 753-7339, on the 9th day of January, 2013 at 1:00 oclock P.M., to attend an Initial hearing/Termination hearing and to answer the Petition for Termination of your Parental Rights in said Children, and YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED that if the allegations in said petition are true, and/or if you fail to appear at the hearing, the Juvenile Court may terminate your parent-child relationship; and if the court terminates your parent-child relationship you will lose all parental rights, powers, privileges, immunities, duties and obligations including any rights to custody, control, visitation, or support in said Children; and if the court terminates your parent-child relationship, it will be permanently terminated, and thereafter you may not contest an adoption or other placement of said children, and YOU ARE ENTITLED TO REPRESENTATION BY AN ATTORNEY, provided by the State if applicable, throughout these proceedings to terminate the parent-child relationship. YOU MUST RESPOND by appearing in the case in person or by attorney within thirty (30) days after the last publication of this notice, and in the event you fail to do so, an adjudication on said petition and termination of your parental rights may be entered against you without further notice. THE ATTORNEY REPRESENTING THE INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF CHILD SERVICES, is Tricia Thompson, 300 E. Broadway Street, Suite 502, Logansport, IN 46947; telephone (574)722-3677. Date this 19th day of October, 2012 Clerk of Cass County November 8, 15 & 22, 2012 Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, November 24, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Marilyn Mitchell Mike Vowell Before the sale date of Saturday, November 24, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, FL November 15 & 22, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Dated this12 day of October2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Page 11B 1. TELEVISION: In the X-Files TV drama series, what was the phrase on the UFO poster in Fox Mulders office? 2. MOVIES: What did Bruce Willis character do for a living in Die Hard? 3. BUSINESS: What is the name of Nikes logo that appears on its sports merchandise? 4. U.S. GOVERNMENT: Where is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention located? 5. LANGUAGE: What is a fen? 6. SCIENCE: What is the botanist Carolus Linnaeus famous for? 7. HISTORY: What did the Edict of Nantes do for the French in 1598? 8. GEOGRAPHY: Where is the island of Bonaire located? 9. ASTRONOMY: What are the Perseids? 10. PSYCHOLOGY: What kind of fear is represented in thanatophobia? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. I Want to Believe 2. Police officer 3. Swoosh 4. Atlanta 5. Bog 6. Creating a classification system for plants 7. Promised French Protestants the same rights as French Catholics 8. The Caribbean, just north of Venezuela 9. A meteor shower most visible in August 10. Fear of death YOUR AD HERE

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000CV38 Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy DAVID WHITE Napa Valley accounts for less than 4 percent of Americas total wine production. Yet its the countrys bestknown wine region. Napa rocketed to the forefront of American winemaking in 1976, when British wine merchant Steven Spurrier organized a wine competition in Paris to pit Californias best Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon against the best wines France had to offer. Everyone assumed that France would win. After all, the nation had been making wine for thousands of years and was widely regarded as the worlds top wine region. But with both its whites and reds, California won. The white wine, produced by Chateau Montelena, came from Calistoga, a city at the north end of Napa Valley. The red, produced by Stags Leap Wine Cellars, came from the southern Napa town of Yountville. The outcome shocked the world. Ten years later, the red wines were re-tasted at the French Culinary Institute. Once again, California came out on top. This time, the Cabernet Sauvignon was produced by Clos Du Val, a winery located down the road from Stags Leap. Ever since, the world has recognized Americas ability to produce world-class wine. The portion of Napa Valley that stretches from just north of Stags Leap Wine Cellars to Clos du Val is now known as the Stags Leap District, a one-mile-by-three mile stretch of land that comprises just 1/100th of Napa Valley. The federal government recognized this district as an of cial American Viticultural Area in 1989. If it werent for this stretch of Napa Valley, America might not have its reputation for producing some of the worlds best wines. In early October, I spent a week in Stags Leap learning about the region, its history, and its wine producers. Grape growing in Stags Leap began in 1878, when Napa Valley was little more than sleepy towns and horse paths. That year, an entrepreneur named Terrill Grigsby built Occidental Winery, the regions first winery. Fifteen years later, Grigsby was joined by another entrepreneur, Horace Chase, who founded Stags Leap Winery. By 1895, Chases winery was producing 40,000 gallons of wine each year. Grape-growing in the region took off. But around the same time, a pest called phylloxera was spreading and it soon destroyed half the areas vineyards. Most vines that survived were ripped up during Prohibition, as vintners planted walnut trees and other legal crops. Grapes returned to the region in 1961, when a gutsy farmer named Nathan Fay planted several acres of Cabernet Sauvignon near the now-shuttered wineries. Fays grapes quickly gained a reputation among Napa Valleys vintners, including Warren Winiarski, an intrepid winemaker who was quickly gaining a reputation as one of the best. In 1970, Winiarski decided to buy land next to Fay and establish Stags Leap Wine Cellars. The rest is history. Today, the Stags Leap District is home to 19 highly praised wineries. The wines from the region are unique for two main reasons. First, theres the soil. Most of it is coarse and volcanic with good drainage, which is perfect for Cabernet Sauvignon. Then, theres the geography. At the southern end of Stags Leap, low-lying atlands extend all the way to San Pablo Bay, an extension of San Francisco Bay. The eastern side of Stags Leap is marked by dramatic, clifflike hills, which serve two purposes. In the mornings, they reflect heat onto the vineyards below, enabling temperatures to rise more quickly than they otherwise would. In the afternoons, they help funnel cool air in from San Pablo Bay, resulting in low nighttime temperatures. These swings help the grapes attain complex avors and achieve balance. These factors result in wines that display not just richness and ripeness but vibrant acidity and soft tannins. Especially when young, Cabernet Sauvignon from the Stags Leap District is more approachable than other Napa Valley wines. Its no wonder that Cabernet Sauvignon from Stags Leap District is sometimes described as an iron st in a velvet glove. The wines from this region arent cheap few wines from Napa Valley are but theyre worth seeking out.David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet. -Janet WHITES WINESNapa Valley: An iron st in a velvet glove FOR FREE QUIT TIPS AND COUNSELING IN WAKULLA COUNTY, CALL 926-0401 ext. 217 Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe WakuulanewsYouve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the