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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00434
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 11-08-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00434
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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County voters were faced with three open seats on the county commission this election cycle, districts 1, 3 and 5. Taking district 1 was Ralph Thomas, district 2 went to former commissioner Howard Kessler and Sopchoppy Vice Mayor Richard Harden won district 3. Thomas, a Republican and Wakulla County native, faced incumbent and Chairman Alan Brock, Democrat, and Jenny Brock, who ran with no party af“ liation. Thomas claimed 53 percent of the vote, Alan Brock took 29 percent and Jenny Brock grabbed the remaining 18 percent. Im just overwhelmed, humbled and honored,Ž Thomas said after learning of the election results. Of campaigning, Thomas said, I really worked hard at it and tried to put my heart in the race.Ž He felt the key to his victory was connecting with the people in the county. The “ rst steps he will take once he is sworn into of“ ce in two weeks will be acclimating to the position. I want to really learn the ropes,Ž Thomas said, who described himself as an extremely detail-oriented person. He added that he wanted to get a good handle on the county budget, spending and regulations. Alan Brock, who served on the commission for the last four years and the last year as chairman, said he was disappointed about not being elected to a second term. Im grateful for the opportunity to serve the citizens of Wakulla County for the last four years,Ž he said. He congratulated Thomas and said, I trust that he will do a good job for the people of Wakulla County.Ž Jenny Brock could not be reached for a comment. In district 3 and what was the closest race for county commission, Kessler, who ran with no party af“ liation, received 53 percent of the votes, with incumbent Mike Stewart, Republican, obtained 47 percent. Kessler was thankful for his wife and for her support and actions she took on her own to support him and participate in the process, as well as his supporters and citizens. I am humbled by her con“ dence in me and by the citizens of Wakulla County having the faith to put me back in of“ ce,Ž Kessler said. After serving two terms as county commissioner in district 4, Kessler was not reelected in 2010. He decided to run for a seat in district 3 instead of waiting two more years because of the increasing tax burden that is being place on the citizens by the commission. One of his “ rst steps once he takes of“ ce will be to try and lower that tax burden, he said. Other steps, which have been platforms of his campaign, are continuing to stand up for an open and transparent government and preserving and protecting the countys natural resources. I look forward to being back on the board,Ž Kessler said. I look forward to working with the current board. Im ready to work.Ž In hearing the election results, Stewart said he was disappointed and hurt, but its a process.Ž And thats whats so wonderful about our country,Ž he said. That we can agree to disagree.Ž Stewart served as a county commissioner from 1996 to 2004 and was not re-elected in 2004. He then won the seat again in 2008. Life goes on and Gods got something better out there for me,Ž Stewart said. Snagging the district 5 seat on the commission was Harden, Republican, with 49 percent of the votes. He won the seat over John Shuff, Democrat, who obtained 31 percent, and Emily Smith, who ran under no party af“ liation, and received 20 percent. Current County Commissioner Lynn Artz chose not to seek re-election. Continued on Page 3A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 43nd Issue Thursday, November 8, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Green Scene .................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 8B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 10B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 10B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 12B Comics ...........................................................................Page 13B INDEX OBITUARIES Stephen R. Bohannon Larry Whaley Harden Marjorie ‘Annie’ MatthewsDISTRICT CHAMPS! War Eagles defeat Godby, 23-12 Sports Page 1B Charlie Creel is new sheriff By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCharlie Creel was elected sheriff of Wakulla County, winning 54 percent of the vote against opponent Maurice Langston, who won 45 percent. Im exhausted,Ž Creel said. Im thrilled to death.Ž Creel said that he looks forward to bringing the county back together. I want to thank everybody who supported me,Ž Creel said, and I ask the people who didnt support me to give me a chance.Ž He said he intends to meet soon with interim Sheriff Donnie Crum and looks forward to a smooth transition. It feels good,Ž he said of victory. Im tired. Its been 17 months. I need to spend some time with my family and rest up.Ž Major Maurice Langston said he had called sheriff-elect Creel and congratulated him. Asked about his reaction to the results, Langston said, The people have spoken.Ž Weve been campaigning the last 14 months, and its been a great opportunity to meet some great people,Ž Langston said. I just wish it would have been a little bit different outcome.Ž During the course of the campaign, Langstons son Heath died after an extended illness. Langston acknowledged his family had been through personal tragedies during the campaign. But Wakulla County is the kind of county that embraces you and brings you in. The burden is heavy when you carry it alone, but when you share it that burden is light.Ž Asked about his plans for the future, Langston said: Anytime the good Lord closes one door, he opens another. Ill be looking for an opening door.Ž Creel said that he had intended to run a clean campaign when he started running for the of“ ce … and felt he did. A lot of people told me they were tired of the negative campaigning … not just locally, but state and national,Ž he said. I ran on my issues, my platform and what I can do for the county,Ž Creel said. I want to thank the voters of Wakulla County for putting me in this position … to lead, to be a leader and bring the community back together.Ž It was Creels second campaign for sheriff … he lost by fewer than 50 votes in 2008 to longtime Sheriff David Harvey. After more than 30 years in of“ ce, Harvey decided to step down in 2011 to take a position as executive director of the Florida Sheriffs Association Self-Insurance Fund. Donnie Crum was appointed by Gov. Rick Scott to “ ll the remainder of Harveys term. Creel made no secret of his intention to run again … and started his campaign early, saying he felt like he just needed to work harder to win. Shortly after Langston announced his intent to run, questions were raised about whether his candidacy violated the federal Hatch Act, which prohibits government of“ cials who receive federal money from running for political of“ ce. Continued on Page 15A Sheriff-elect Charlie CreelThomas, Kessler, Harden win percentage of Wakulla voters who cast their ballots in early voting or absentee before election day. percentage of registered Wakulla voters who cast a ballot. 46 79.4BY THE NUMBERS By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netBobby Pearce won more than 73 percent of the vote in the race for superintendent of schools. He takes over from retiring Superintendent David Miller in two weeks. Im thankful for the support of Wakulla County,Ž said Pearce. Actually, Im very humbled by the support. A lot of responsibility comes with that support.Ž He noted that There are a lot of daunting obstacles in our way as we travel forward,Ž but praised the team working with him as very strong. His opponent, Kimball Thomas was disappointed with the election result. Continued on Page 15APearce takes superintendent of schools race in a landslideDonnie Sparkman wins re-election as property appraiser JENNIFER JENSENCandidates and volunteers wave to traf“ c at Hudson Park in Crawfordville.By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netDonnie Sparkman chuckled when asked how he felt after his election win. Im glad its over with,Ž he said. Sparkman won almost 69 percent of the votes. Im ecstatic that the people voted like I “ gured they might,Ž Sparkman said. I didnt think there was a problem.Ž Sparkman, who has served “ ve years as property appraiser, said he could have understood a challenger if there had been some sort of problem in his office … but there had been none. In fact, for the first time since 1996, there were not even any petitions before the Value Adjustment Board. Sparkman was at home on election night with family and friends and people from the of“ ce. His challenger, Jim Parham, admitted he was somewhat puzzled by the results. In light of the feedback and response we got from across the entire county, it was very puzzling,Ž Parham said. He said people speaking with him assured him they were voting for him … and so he felt puzzled at the results. Im glad for Donnie Sparkman that he was able to do that,Ž Parham said. I wish Donnie Sparkman well.Ž Parham said the experience of running for of“ ce and campaigning was enjoyable. We are forever grateful for the wonderful people in Wakulla County,Ž he said. In contrast to Parhams campaign strategy, Sparkman ran a low key campaign. He didnt go doorto-door and said that he didnt like to be bothered and hoped the people appreciated that he didnt bother them. Sparkman said it was time for the politics to come to an end and work to progress. I hope the country and the county will heal and start moving forward,Ž he said. Weve got some real problems … polarization … if we can work together and move forward.Ž Sparkman said he had been inspired by the recent show of bipartisanship by the local Republican and Democratic leaders, and hoped it was a sign of political healing and progress for the county. I feel very good,Ž he said. I heard the peoples voice. Its their of“ ce, and Im proud of that.Ž Donnie Sparkman

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage? Re“nance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a ”oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Of“ce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Of“ce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Of“ce: 850.926.1960 Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-7 Closed Sun. & Wed. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter volunteering for two successful campaigns in the United States in 2008, Jan Paternotte decided he would come back this year and help those candidates get re-elected. Paternotte, a member of the city council in Amsterdam and former president of the Young Democrats of the Netherlands, traveled to Florida in late October to participate in the re-election campaign of President Barack Obama and locally, County Commissioner Alan Brock. Paternotte met Brock “ ve years ago at a Young Democrats of America event and in 2008 decided to stop in Wakulla County and help with Brocks campaign for county commissioner. He also campaigned for Obama. It worked out pretty good,Ž Paternotte said. He decided to come back this year to help again. The last time, he brought a politician with him. This time, he decided to bring a journalist, Reinout de Vries. They arrived in Florida on Oct. 22 and spent a week traveling across the state and attending rallies for Obama and learning about early voting. In Wakulla, they put up signs for Obama and Brock, made phone calls at the Wakulla County Democratic headquarters and went door-to-door. De Vries writes for EMMA Communications and has been following the election in the U.S. and came to Florida to see how the process is on the ground and how social media in” uences the election. Being able to campaign with Brock was a great opportunity, he said. To see how the local campaigning in the U.S. looks like,Ž he said. The journalist and city councilman were also joined by Jet Mok who works for Dutch Public Radio and is doing a piece on Dutch people volunteering in the United States. Some of the differences all three noted between here and the Netherlands is the importance placed on candidates going door to door greeting voters. We do it, but less than here,Ž de Vries said. Paternotte said in the Netherlands, candidates started this practice about four years ago. When they knocked on doors in Wakulla County, de Vries said people mostly kind and they had very good conversations with voters about Obama. Another major difference between campaigning in the U.S. and the Netherlands is the use of social media. Mok said Holland is pretty behind the U.S. and is where it is currently is where the U.S. was in 2007. Its not as sophisticated,Ž Paternotte said. They also noticed that advertisements are much more negative in the U.S. De Vries said there are a few negative advertisements in Holland, but not anywhere near the amount he has seen in the U.S. Paternotte said another difference is that there are nine political parties in the Netherlands, as opposed to the two major parties in the United States. You always have to build bridges,Ž Paternotte said. In addition to campaigning for Obama and Brocj, they also spent time with a member of the Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee, Chris Russell. So they can get the full picture,Ž Brock said. Both Paternotte and de Vries spoke of the nice people they had met in the county. Americans are very nice people,Ž Paternotte said. Its great to see everyone smiling.Ž When asked if Paternotte planned to return in four more years, he said it depends how this election goes. Maybe well be sending him to D.C.,Ž Paternotte said of Brock.Dutch visitors campaign locally for Alan Brock, Obama PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSJan Paternotte, left, and Reinout de Vries, right, came to Florida from the Netherlands to learn about early voting and campaign for President Obama … and a friend from the Young Democrats, Commissioner Alan Brock. Continued from Page 1A Harden, a native of Sopchoppy, has served as a Sopchoppy city commissioner for the last six years and decided to run for county commission so he could serve everyone in the county. Im just humbled,Ž Harden said after learning he had been elected county commissioner. Im very grateful for the con“ dence the people have in me.Ž He complimented the other two candidates for running a clean, positive campaign. We ran a good, civil campaign,Ž Harden said. While campaigning, Harden said he stayed positive, had faith and focused on presenting himself to the voters and let them know who he was and why he was running. The “ rst piece of business once he is sworn in to of“ ce will be to continue to listen to the citizens, he said. I want to listen to their concerns and just be available to them,Ž he said. And try and meet their needs with the resource we have.Ž He added, Im just very excited.Ž Neither Shuff nor Smith could not be reached for comment. omas, Kessler, Harden win Like us on

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. City of Sopchoppy NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe City of Sopchoppy will hold a public hearing on the adoption of Ordinance 2012-03, AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE OPERATING BUDGET FOR THE GENERAL AND WATER FUNDS OF THE CITY OF SOPCHOPPY FOR THE 2011-12 OPERATING YEAR at the regular council meeting, November, 13, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. The public hearing will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. The public is invited and urged to attend. Any person needing special assistance to attend this meeting should contact the Clerks Of“ce 24 hours in advance by calling 962-4611.NOVEMBER 1, 8, 2012 City of Sopchoppy NOTICE OF MEETING CHANGEThe City of Sopchoppy will be changing the date of the regular November meeting from the second Monday to the second Tuesday in November in observance of the Veterans Day Holiday The meeting will be held, November 13, at 6:30 p.m. 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FLNOVEMBER 1, 8, 2012 NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS NOVEMBER 8, 15, 21, 29, 2012 NOTICE OF PREQUALIFICATION AND PROCUREMENT OF CONSTRUCTION SERVICES WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARDNovember 8, 22, 2012 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY POST 4538would like to thank the following businesses for all their contributions to our This advertisement was paid by Advance Auto Parts and VFW Ladies AuxiliaryCHINESE AUCTION By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn order to be prepared for the possibility of a large sum of money ” owing to Wakulla County in the future, the Wakulla County Commission is taking the necessary steps. At the Nov. 5 meeting, the commission adopted the RESTORE Act Advisory Committee and appointed the 13 members who will serve. The committee was formed in response to the RESTORE Act being passed earlier this year which holds those parties responsible for the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill accountable and ensures that 80 percent of the “ nes received be invested back into the Gulf region. A portion of those funds would go directly to the “ ve Gulf states and in Florida, those funds who ” ow down to the most impacted counties, which includes Wakulla. Under the current formula, Wakulla could receive over $25 million, if the settlement is $15 billion, according to County Commissioner Alan Brock. Although there have been rumblings about a negotiation between BP and the Department of Justice about a possible settlement that may direct some “ nes elsewhere, the commission agreed to have a structure in place if the stipulations of the act are upheld. There is a possibility that a portion of the “ nes could be paid under the Natural Resources Damages Act, instead of the Clean Water Act. The advisory committee will be tasked with reviewing potential projects the money can be used for and then prioritize those projects and present their recommendations to the county commission. The committee will meet no less than “ ve times and must have the priority list completed by March 2013. The committee consists of Lara Edwards representing Sopchoppy; Allen Hobbs representing St. Marks; Mark Mitchell selected by the Panacea Waterfronts; Billy Mills selected by the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce; Jay Westmark selected by the Economic Development Council; Niraj Patel selected by the Tourist Development Council; Robert Pearce selected by the Wakulla County School Board; and Bob Ballard selected by the Wakulla TCC Campus. The county commission also appointed several citizens who expressed a desire to serve on the committee. These were Ronald Fred Crum to represent the “ shing industry; Byron Price to represent Shell Point, Oyster Bay and Spring Creek communities; Scott Gaby as the citizen-at-large; and Eric Livingston to represent natural resources. County Commissioner Lynn Artz voted against creating the committee because she felt the composition of the committee did not align with the eligible activities the money can be used on. She felt the committee should be made up of members who are extremely knowledgeable in these areas. The money can be used for restoration and protection of the natural resources, ecosystems, “ sheries, marine and wildlife habitats, beaches, and coastal wetlands of the Gulf Coast region; mitigation of damage to “ sh, wildlife and natural resources; implementation of a federally approved marine, coastal, or comprehensive conservation management plan, including fisheries monitoring; workforce development and job creation; improvements to or on state parks located in coastal areas affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill; infrastructure projects benefitting the economy or ecological resources, including port infrastructure; coastal ” ood protection and related infrastructure and planning assistance. The commission chose Commissioner Randy Merritt to represent them. The county commission already approved an interlocal agreement relating to the establishment of the Gulf Consortium and approved County Administrator David Edwards to serve as the countys representative. This consortium will administer the funds that are disbursed to the “ ve states based on several factors which do not go directly to the counties. The “ rst meeting of the committee will be held on Dec. 4 at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers.COUNTY COMMISSIONBoard creates RESTORE Act committeeBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netCity Government Week was held in October and to celebrate, the city of Sopchoppy held two different events to educate citizens surrounding the theme, My City: Im part of it, Im proud of it.Ž Mayor Colleen Skipper and City Clerk Jackie Lawhon visited four fourth grade classes at Medart Elementary School on Oct. 26 to speak to them about city government. Lawhon said they chose fourth grade because they are studying Florida history. She made booklets for the students that went along with their presentation that includes the history of the cities in Wakulla County, what a city is, who runs city hall and how students and their parents can get involved in local government. The students were great, they asked a lot of questions,Ž Lawhon said. Lawhon said she also challenged the fourth graders to develop ideas for a downtown park and to make a presentation to the city commission about their ideas at a future meeting. A park and trailhead is planned in the future for the Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail. I tried to involve them and to really make them aware of the fact that municipal government is the government closest to the people, its right where you live,Ž Lawhon said. There was also some discussion about city limits and how one becomes incorporated. Since a lot of the students at Medart live in the Panacea area, I spoke to them about the process that Panacea is going through at this time to become incorporated and that hopefully by next year, Panacea could be Floridas newest city,Ž Lawhon said. In addition to visiting with local students, the city also held an open house at city hall on Oct. 24. City Government Week is sponsored by the Florida League of Cities. The League of Cities always encourages municipalities to get involved in the community to promote Municipal Government Week and to speak to community groups and schools, Lawhon said. Ive always wanted to do this and decided to start with Medart School,Ž Lawhon said. The school administration and teachers were very open to me coming into the classroom.ŽCITY OF SOPCHOPPYCity government week celebrated SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCity Manager Jackie Lawhon and Mayor Colleen Skipper at Medart Elementary. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThose who believe the assessed value of their property is incorrect have the opportunity to “ le a petition to appear in a hearing before the Value Adjustment Board. This year, there were no hearings before the board. The last time this happened was 1996, according to Clerk to the Value Adjustment Board Evelyn Evans. Evans said 17 petitions were filed, but all were withdrawn prior to the meeting on Oct. 14 after those property owners met with the property appraiser and issues were resolved. Last year, there were 112 parcels for review and 97 parcels that were heard at the hearing, Evans said. We always have petitions filed and a lot of them are resolved before the hearing, but in the past 10 years or so we had numerous hearings before the board,Ž Evans said. After property owners receive their Truth in Millage notice in the mail, which gives them their assessed property value and estimate of how much money they will owe in taxes based on the millage rate, they have a certain amount of time to “ le a petition with the board. Prior to “ ling a petition, they have the option to discuss any concerns with the property appraisers office. If they feel there was a mistake on the value assessed and disputes can not be worked out, they can have their complaint heard before the board. Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman said when someone has an issue with their property value he sits down and explains it to them and typically they understand it after he speaks to them. Sometimes mistakes are made and he and his staff are there to clear up any issues. A fair and equitable tax roll is what I want,Ž Sparkman said.No petitions heard for Value Adjustment

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Sheriff candidates square off at one last forum • From the Dock for Nov. 1, 2012 • From the Dock for Nov. 1, 2012 • Homecoming 2012 • Business: Wakulla Urgent Care Owner: David A. Keen, MD, MPH • Candidates for property appraiser appear at forum • St. Marks applies for EPA grant •Why should we do legislature’s job?thewakullanews.com Follow us on ank you, Crawfordville Auto Prayer Walk has been special event Wedding at courthouse was nice Proud of candidates for their e ortsREADERS WRITE: By HERB DONALDSON It has been said that is better to give than to receive. Giving is tough when you have very little. To receive is a great deal tougher, knowing theres not much left to go around. Both require a change within that many “ nd foreign. It is hard to believe that the holiday season is just around the corner. The giving season this year is sure to be a tight one. Last years was as well. Yet, somehow, the people of Wakulla managed to give to community projects, such as Operation Santa, that gave back to our countys residents. There was absolutely no way Operation Santa could have given food, funds, household products, clothing, and toys to the overwhelming number of applicants who requested assistance, if not for the gracious support of certain Wakulla County citizens. You know who you are, and a good majority of the county knows, too. To list the names of all who came forth and gave last year would take up a great deal of space in The Wakulla News. Countless individuals, groups, churches, county government employees and businesses gave funds and items. Some even adopted whole families. Others volunteered the most precious gift of all … their time, those irrecoverable bits and pieces of their own lives, to support the well-being of others whom they may never know. What better way to have put the proposed community center to work than to allow the community itself … teens, adults, seniors … to work as one, putting aside lip-service to assist their neighbors in making the holidays brighter for those who saw only darkness ahead? Giving is tough. Receiving, even tougher. Ours is a community built on doing for oneself. Though its nice to be charitable, the receiving of such charity can feel lonely. Operation Santas team works hard to make families feel valued and respected by meeting the simple needs most of us take for granted. Unemployment, hard times, a medical crisis, falling victim to corrupt business practices … all of these and more can place one in an entirely different category. The pull yourself up by the bootstrapsŽ verbiage is shouted from a group of onlookers similar to characters in a wild west drama. One is forced to “ ght against the depressing knowledge that their poverty has tainted them, while simultaneously “ guring whether or not to put gas in the car, food on the table, or medicine in the cabinet. Bootstraps are a hard thing to come by these days. Those seeking assistance from Operation Santa are not judged. They are supported and shielded, if only for a brief moment, from the storm of life when most needed. Tropical Storm Debbie carried away the material possessions of many. Elections and holidays become trivial issues when you “ nd yourself sleeping on a neighbors couch because your lifes work was demolished … in an instant … by an act of nature. Knowing our community means knowing that there are people who will put on a brave face and think it healthyŽ to not speak to others of their loss. This mentality does not heal the wound nor solve the problem. Ours is a smaller, tighter community than most. Through the years, we can expect that to change, but for now, the thing that keeps our county beautiful is that … when it counts … we are there for one another. It should be noted that this temporary haven we call Operation Santa, comes with a price. For those in Wakulla County who received assistance last year, if you have been fortunate enough to have your circumstances change and are now on better footing, it is asked that you pay forward the kindness that was extended to you. The American Dream is exactly what it says: A sleep induced vision thought up by Americans. Upon waking one works to make that dream … that beautiful vision that seems so unattainable that it can only exist in a dream … a reality. It is those Americans who choose to lift their fellow man after his fall, and to give even when they, too, may be lacking, that grows independence, trust, and a charitable spirit that we hope is returned when the shoe, if a shoe there be, is on the other foot. Cash donations, adoption of families, giving gently used clothing and toys, volunteering, shopping, writing, making calls, speaking to groups, referring a family, organizing … there are a hundred ways you can help. If youve been in any way blessed this year, it may be time for you to share that blessing with others. Operation Santa is a pathway to action, right here in your hometown. Call 926-3526 to learn more. Herb Donaldson is a local playwright, founder of Palaver Tree Theater, and director of Healing Arts of Wakulla County. Operation Santa is gearing up to help families in need Editor, The News: Over the last couple of weeks my car would not start a couple of times so I thought I better have my battery checked, which is almost new. I found out the battery was fully charged, so I did not worry about it again. Well, this morning I was in Tallahassee for a doctor appointment, and when I got in my car it would not turn over. Needless to say I was vexed. I called AAA and had my car towed to Crawfordville Auto & Tire since they had taken care of me before and I trusted them. The tow guy swore it was probably my starter. Lucky for me the employees at Crawfordville Auto & Tire checked my battery terminals before they checked anything else and low and behold all I needed was a new battery terminal. I dont need to say that some places love to see a woman come in with car problems because they can tell most of us just about anything, and in my case I would have believed it was my starter causing my problem. I wanted to say THANK YOUŽ Crawfordville Auto for being an honest auto repair shop. You will de“ nitely have my business and recommendation! Petra Shuff Crawfordville Editor, The News: During the past several weeks, my wife, daughter and I have been fortunate enough to attend Wakulla Countys Footsteps For Faith And Freedom Prayer Walks at Azalea Park. This has been an experience and inspiration to those of us who participated that is dif“ cult to put into words. Our community came together to pray and walk for the healing of our broken Country. Over 35 pastors from Wakulla County churches of all denominations have come together as Christians with one voice to guide us in our daily devotional walks, and to trust in God to do what is right for our nation in this important election, and for the challenges to come. We especially want to thank Cynthia Webster and the other folks who worked so diligently to make this such a special event, and to the pastors of our wonderful Wakulla County churches who gave of their time and inspirational scriptures to lift our hearts and spirits. Wakulla County is a special place, and this has been a truly special event. David Lowe Crawfordville Editor, The News: My fiancee and I are from Panama City and decided to come to Wakulla Springs to get married. We chose to exchange vows at the Crawfordville courthouse last Friday afternoon. When we arrived, we were checked in by impressive and personable sheriffs deputies who promised to not let my “ ancee get away should he get cold feet at the last minute. :-) There were some scary moments when we realized we had forgotten the marriage license in the car and my “ ancee went to get it. Thankfully, he returned on his own, so no handcuffs or guns were required! In the clerks of“ ce, after validating our paperwork and a short rehearsalŽ about where to stand and what to do, Miss Tempie performed our ceremony and Miss Ginger took pictures for us. They even furnished a beautiful bouquet of ” owers, and had a nice place for us to stand. The pre-written ceremony and vows Miss Tempie used were thorough and sincere, and she allowed us to add to them to make them our own. I want to brag on these wonderful ladies. They were ef“ cient, helpful, and professional. I also want to thank Miss Donna, who took care of all the red tapeŽ for us. From the time we arrived at the courthouse until the time we left we were treated courteously and warmly, and all of the congratulationsŽ made our wedding feel all that much more special. Thanks to everyone for making us feel so at home! Sincerely, The new Norma Smith (Mrs. L. F. Smith) Panama City Editor, The News: Today I was reminded again of why I am proud to be an American. I saw the dozen or more local candidates and their supporters standing by the highway in Crawfordville waving their hands and signs. I was reminded of the one time I ran for of“ ce … that of student council president for Crawfordville High School. I was not elected. Why? I did not ask anyone to vote for me! Well, it takes work and self-con“ dence to place yourself in the situation to campaign for votes and I am proud of all those people who had the nerve and self-con“ dence to declare their candidacy. They have spent time and money that probably could be well-used by themselves and/or their families and yet they know they will not all succeed. I think, though, they can be proud of their efforts. The tragedy of our politics today is the so-called PACs that throw so much money out there to try to control what is done. Hopefully, we will not let their trash in” uence our votes. Betty Green Crawfordville CorrectionThe name of Wakulla High Schools 2012 Homecoming Queen was incorrect in last weeks News, identifying her as Ashley Alvarez. Actually, the name of this years Homecoming Queen is Amber Alvarez. Ashley is her sister. We regret the error and apologize to Amber and Ashley.At right, Homecoming King Demetrius Lindsey with Homecoming Queen Amber Alvarez.PHOTO BY BILL ROLLINS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBy SLIM RANDLES Dud was awfully quiet all through the daily dissemination of anything on page one of the Valley Weekly Miracle, which wasnt like him at all. Just sucked down caffeine and silently shook his head now and then. Anita okay, Dud?Ž Oh ƒ sure, Doc.Ž You okay?Ž He nodded, then looked up with a wistful, philosophical look that our guys dont usually get until after the buttered toast. Sometimes I think its pearls before swine, thats all.Ž We waited. Music, I mean. You know how you practice and practice and then you get good enough to actually do something? Well, I took the accordion and went to the accordion festival to compete. Well, you know Im not really that bad any more.Ž Youre getting pretty darn good on that thing, Dud.Ž Thanks, Steve. Well, we drove down to the capital and I got in the competition and did okay. Placed third in polka. I played that new piece. Its kinda hard because it has those minor bass buttons in it and it took me forever to learn not to miss them. It was after that. You see, I put the accordion back in the car and we went in for a lunch they gave everyone.Ž Whats wrong with that?Ž I forgot to lock the car. We were halfway through lunch when Anita asked me if Id locked the car and then it hit me that I might not have locked it. She insisted I run right out and check and thats what I did. And thats when I lost my faith in human beings.Ž Oh, Dud,Ž Doc said, someone stole your accordion?Ž No, it was still there in the back seat. But someone had put two more in there with it.Ž He shook his head. Pearls before swine.ŽBrought to you by the national award-winning book A Cowboys Guide to Growing Up Right.Ž Read a free sample at www.slimrandles.com.Home Country

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 – Page 5A Firefighter’s BBQ Competition and Charity Fundraiser. F F F F F F g h h h h h h t t t r r ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ s s B B B B B B B B B B B B B B Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q C C C C C C C C C C C o o o m p e e t i i i i i i i t i i i i i i i i o o o n n n o m m m F F F F F F F i i i i i r e f f f f f f i i i i i g g h t t er t SMOKE AND FIRE Third AnnualThank you to our Sponsors! Thank You! &for their work withPlatinumCrawfordville Auto, Beef O Bradys, Century Link, Saint Marks Powder, Maurice Langston, Halsey Beshears, Bevis Funeral Home and Harvey Young ChapelGoldThe Wakulla News and HardeesBronzeCentennial Bank, Southern Floor Covering, Waste Pro, and PepsiBrassTen-8 Fire Equipment, Sopchoppy VFD, Frances Casey Lowe, PA, Hydra Engineering and Construction, Wal-Mart, Huddle House, Stedebani Enterprises, Talquin Electric, Progress Energy, Other Donors and Supporters Crawfordville Ace Hardware, Wildwood Inn and Golf Course, Farm Bureau Insurance, Lube Expert, Tangles Hair Salon, The Barber Shoppe, Myra Jeans, Talk O The Town Deli, Winn Dixie, The Donut Hole, Capital City Bank, Raymond Love Family, Skybox Sports Bar & Grill, Gulf Coast Lumber, Best Value Tire and Automotive, Knights Of Columbus, Mikes Seafood and Grille, Woodville AceSpecial ThanksPoseys Up the Creek, Poseys prepared all of our delicious side dishes. Macks Country Meats, all of the top quality meat came from Macks Country Meats. Wakulla Crawfordville Sopchoppy Smith Creek St. Marks Medart Ivan Shell Point Panacea Ochlockonee Bay Bethel Shadeville Sheriff Charlie Creel Maurice LangstonCommission District 1Alan Brock Jenny Brock Ralph ThomasCommission District 3Howard Kessler Mike StewartCommission District 5Richard Harden John Shuff Emily SmithSuperintendent of SchoolsBobby Pearce Kimball Thomas Property Appraiser Jim Parham Donnie Sparkman County Tax Exempt Yes No 607 1951 379 67 137 582 1253 383 150 177 728 905 7319 435 1583 603 70 159 534 940 311 222 227 475 670 6229 343 1064 344 39 72 278 510 214 83 92 400 478 3917 188 620 140 14 62 186 366 115 52 76 223 285 2327 507 1806 480 79 149 640 1283 355 228 223 574 777 7101 631 1766 453 63 136 541 1127 404 140 202 711 884 7058 392 1725 502 73 146 552 1021 281 225 193 470 676 6256 457 1641 612 102 145 616 1058 297 220 191 483 692 6514 355 1181 196 17 75 255 651 195 68 100 455 532 4080 205 622 175 16 58 225 421 183 72 98 241 300 2616 686 2547 741 111 204 839 1631 483 289 290 791 1065 9677 317 920 230 22 79 268 518 181 72 87 382 469 3545 338 1058 213 26 109 281 700 229 117 131 337 531 4070 695 2396 759 109 178 809 1453 454 248 260 843 1013 9217 457 1862 430 61 132 497 1056 290 184 189 595 831 6584 557 1524 510 70 148 558 1055 385 167 193 580 694 6441 Total General Election 2012 Vote Table JURISDICTION WIDE BY PRECINCT Wakulla local election results

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Church Briefs Rocky Mount Church of Christ will hold free sh fryRocky Mount Church of Christ, located at 58 Dogwood Drive in Crawfordville, will be having a free community sh fry on Saturday, Nov. 10, from 11:30 a.m. until it's gone. Everyone is invited to attend. Marcum Family to perform at Crawfordville UMCThe Marcum Family of Peachtree City, Ga., will present a concert on Sunday, Nov. 18, at 4 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Michael, Susan LeeAura and the four children will present a program of contemporary, gospel and original music. Each family member plays at least one instrument and all sing. Susan is the daughter of Mary and Buddy Updegraff, and grew up here in Wakulla County and is hoping to see many old friends and family at the concert, which is free and open to the public. By CYNTHIA WEBSTER I truly hope that I am writing about something that many of you had an opportunity to see, hear and participate in on election eve when hundreds of people came together in Azalea Park for an evening service of prayer and hymn. No one there will ever forget the power of nearly 350 people on their knees in prayer in the great Church of Gods design nor will they forget the beauty of tiny blue lights lifted to the night sky as people sang with deep love of both their country and their God. It is always dif“ cult to say thank you to those who are willing to give so much of their time, energy and talent, not for recognition but because of faith as mostly they neither want nor need a thank you. Nevertheless the final night of Footsteps for Faith and Freedom would not have happened without many, many people saying Yes, I will be a part of the eventŽ when they might have said no. Not one person who was asked, refused. That is amazing and could only be done with Gods Blessing. These giving people however should be recognized for their desire to minister to all the people of Wakulla. I would like to share with those of you who are reading this who these very special people were: Adam Hill, the Worship Arts pastor from the River of Life Church and a man who is as kind as he is talented. Bo Mixer, a Wakulla resident who carries his American Flag proudly where ever he goes. Henry Jones, pastor of the River of Life Church whose love for God is profound, transparent, inspiring and catching. The Sopchoppy United Methodist Church Youth Drama Team, nothing is more exciting than being able to see the next generation of spiritual leaders share their praise for God with others. CUMC Quartet from the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. One of the very most special parts of the program not only because of their great ability and their willingness to share it with their community, but also because of the participation of Superintendent of Schools David Miller. He is a man who has served this county and our children as he has served God, with all his heart for 30 years and after the election his replacement will be known. For that reason I feel his being with us in hymn and prayer on election eve was truly a gift from God. Tamika Rich, whose beautiful voice did justice to a beautiful song. It made us wish we had asked her to sing another one. Tom Tillman, who took us back to the Continental Congress of 1774. His prayer was chilling in that it gave us a sense of what the Founding Fathers might have been feeling as they listened to these very same words over 225 years ago. Stephen Shores, a wonderful voice that has graced many events but none as important as those that lift his voice in praise. Thank you, Mr. Shores. You were truly a Godsend when we needed one most. David Davis, a surprise as no one knew what he would read and now everyone not only wants a copy of it but they want a copy of it read by.... David Davis. Duane Thurmond, a man who comes from a talented family, a family of great faith, a family that gives much to the community and we were blessed tonight to hear the voice he inherited sing a song of faith to an appreciative community. And last but never least: Pastor David Fell of the First Baptist Church Crawfordville who played the keyboard. He was the “ rst person to say he would be a part of the prayer and hymn evening. He was the beginning when there was little more than an idea. More importantly, he was very much a part of the entire Forty Days, having led the prayer walk himself, having appointed a member of his church to the steering committee, having a youth pastor who also led the walk and having come on the walk himself many times and at least once with his sons. A thank you for behind the scenes work goes to many people including: John Robison for providing the sound system, Vause Mechanical Contracting of Tallahassee for the ” at bed stage, Ian Burse for video taping the event, Charles Montford for printing the program, Melissa Gentry for welcoming guests with lights and programs, Wes Coleman for traf“ c control, Mike Helms for his willingness to be there if he was needed, and Keith Anderson and Ruth Porter for just being in the right place at the right time … every time. Lastly, Betty Fusco, JoAnne Kennedy and Jackie Carey are three wonderful women of faith who lent inspirational and spiritual support to the walk before the walk even became a walk … way back some eight weeks or so ago. And most of all a 40-day prayer walk could never have happened without people who love God and would come to the park to pray openly for our nation. There are so many people who participated and so many who have become family. Each clergy leader had his or her own style but was essential in providing clarity and spiritual guidance as we face a dif“ cult time in American history. There is not one walker who was left untouched by these messages. And as for the walkers … we are friends, family, brothers and sisters in Christ. Thank you all for coming to the park and being willing to profess your faith, to pray and to seek His face. 40-day Prayer Walk concludes with prayers, hymns Covenant Hospice wants to share an important message with the community this November during National Hospice and Palliative Care Month: its never too early to begin the conversation of a lifetime and create an advance directive. Our team is committed to providing education to the community about advance care planning,Ž said Dale O. Knee, Covenant Hospice president and CEO. It is important for everyone to have an advance directive regardless of present health status.Ž For information about obtaining and “ lling out an advance directive in your state, please visit www.covenanthospice.org/begintheconversation. Hospice care provides expert pain management, symptom control, psychosocial support and spiritual care to patients and families when a cure is not possible. All the necessary medicines and equipment needed to keep a patient comfortable can be brought right to the home, which is where most Americans would like to be if at all possible. Continued on Page 7ACovenant Hospice raising awareness during Palliative Care Month Hundreds of people went to Azalea Park on Monday, Nov. 5, election eve, for the conclusion of the 40-day Prayer Walk.WILLIAM SNOWDEN

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 – Page 7AObituaries Stephen R. Bohannon Larry Whaley Harden Marjorie ‘Annie’ MatthewsStephen R. Bohannon, 51, of Crawfordville, died on Thursday, Nov. 1. Originally from Maryland, he spent most of his life in Wakulla County. He is survived by his wife, Sarah Ruth Bohannon of Crawfordville; stepson, Edward L. Roberson of Crawfordville; step-daughter, Katie B. Roberson of Tallahassee; brother, Roland (Debbie) Bohannon of Savannah, Ga.; sister, Sherry (Ty) Griffin of Crestview; and two grandchildren. Funeral services were held on Tuesday, Nov. 6, at Christian Worship Center, 3922 Coastal Highway in Crawfordville. Interment followed at Arran Cemetery in Crawfordville. The family received friends on Monday, Nov. 5, at the Christian Worship Center. Arrangements were under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home (850) 559-3380. Sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome.net/. Marjorie AnnieŽ Matthews, 65, died on Oct. 30 and has joined the Angels. She taught so many of us compassion and kindness. She will never be forgotten and will live in our hearts forever. She was an elementary school teacher, mother, granny, friend to all. Survivors include a daughter, Penny McKinney (Scott); ex-husband, Floyd Matthews; grandsons, Matt, Flint, Colt and Zach McKinney; sisters, Vicki and Gwen of Georgia; and nieces and nephew. Remembrance will be held Saturday, Nov. 10, at Outzs with live music. Friends and family are welcome to attend. She loved music and we are gonna all dance with her in heaven one day. Larry Whaley Harden, 71, of Sopchoppy, passed away on Oct. 30. He was born on Jan. 22, 1941, in Sopchoppy, where he was a lifelong resident. He was an active outdoorsman who loved to hunt and “ sh, and spend time with his family and friends. He was a member of Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. He served in the U.S. Army in Germany and loved his country. He was a retired machinist from the City of Tallahassee and a gunsmith. He was always up to a challenge working with metal and machinery. He loved using his hands to work and “ x anything that was brought to him. Above all, he was extremely faithful to his family, friends, and church. He was deeply loved and will be sorely missed by all that knew him. Visitation was held Friday, Nov. 2, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Funeral services were held Saturday, Nov. 3, at 10 a.m. at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church in Sopchoppy. Interment followed at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. A donation in his memory may be made to Big Bend Hospice. 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee, FL 32308 or Sopchoppy United Methodist Church, 10 Faith Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL 32358. Survivors include his wife of 45 years, Teresa Curles Harden; two children, Charles (Anne) Harden of Sopchoppy and Cheryl (Todd) Andrews of Wacissa; “ ve grandchildren, Valerie, Chance, Sarah, Natalie and Audrey; two brothers, Warren C. Harden and Gerald (Becky) Harden, both of Sopchoppy; two sisters, Louise McCauley and Jean (David) Dunlap, both of Sopchoppy; and a host of nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents, W.C. HeddyŽ and Cornelia Whaley Harden; a brother, Ronnie (Connie White) Harden; a sister, Sherri Harden; and brotherin-law, Robert McCauley. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 www.bevisfh.com)Stephen R. Bohannon Marjorie ‘Annie’ Matthews Larry Whaley HardenBy REV. JAMES L. SNYDERI am not the kind of person looking for a handout or anything free. When somebody offers me something free, I know there is a catch somewhere, and as long as I still have a slice of sanity in my noodle soup, nobody is going to catch me. Before I had made this a hard and fast rule the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I took a company up on their free offer of three days and two nights in a marvelous resort hotel. All you have to do,Ž the person on the phone said, is listen to a short presentation.Ž That short presentationŽ took exactly three days and two nights. By the time we were done and ready to come home we were exhausted. How many times can you say no, and for it to register in the person to which it is directed? Obviously, from our experience, there is no answer to that question. I learned my lesson and have never accepted a free offer since. Not that I have not had the opportunity, I just am highly suspicious of anything that contains that fiveletter word free.Ž Recently an event happened that has upgraded my thoughts concerning the word free.Ž The day began as usual, which included a trip to the local grocery store and the bakery department for the obligatory Apple Fritter. A day without an Apple Fritter is a day I do not want to get out of bed. This one thing drives me out of my cozy bed in the morning and puts a little bit of get-up in my get-along. I am not sure if an Apple Fritter a day will keep the doctor away, but who am I to challenge such likelihood? Personally, I would rather err on the side of the Apple Fritter. It all began years ago when my wife insisted I add more fruit to my diet. It was then I discovered the marvelous delicacy of the old-fashioned Apple Fritter. Just the word apple makes it a fruit in my mind. My wife and I have had very few disputes during the almost half-century of our relationship but this is one. She feels an Apple Fritter does not qualify as a fruit. I think she is rather fruity along this line myself; however, I am too wise and love life too much to actually say it to her. What I say under my breath and behind her back does me no harm whatsoever. My argument is that there is enough Apple in an Apple Fritter to qualify it for a fruit. I am not sure who has won this argument, but I am not going to challenge it. Rather, I will enjoy the fruity nature of my delectable Apple Fritter. Getting back to the incident that has changed my mind about free. I entered the grocery store, walked back to the bakery department and selected a freshly baked Apple Fritter. It was about all I can do to keep from eating it between the bakery department and the cashier counter. We all have our crosses to bear, and this is one of mine. I need to wait until I get to my of“ ce where I can leisurely enjoy one of the great delicacies of life. Also, no one can see me eat it, especially, you know who. I got to the checkout counter and handed over, reluctantly, my Apple Fritter in order to pay for it. It is the best 79 cents I spend every day. Then the inevitable happened. Im sorry,Ž the young lady behind the counter said, but there is something wrong with this Apple Fritter.Ž Boy, did she have my attention. I was about to give her a piece of my mind. Who did she think she was? My wife? I wanted to give her a spicy lecture on the importance of the Apple Fritter in question. In my mind, there was nothing wrong with this Apple Fritter. I do not often get my dander up. After all, I do not have the hair I used to have, so it is rather dif“ cult to do it. This rather came close for me. As I stood there steaming, she looked at me and said, Im sorry, the pricing is wrong on this Apple Fritter. I guess the bakery department made a mistake.Ž She then paused for a moment, did something on the cash machine and then said some words that caused me to dance in the aisles. Im sorry that this mistake happened, so according to our store policy, this Apple Fritter is free.Ž I stood there unable to speak. All my reservations about free,Ž went out the window. I smiled. I smiled a smile that went from one end of the store to the other. Then to make sure I understood correctly I asked her, Are you sure this is free?Ž When she answered in the af“ rmative, I gently picked up that freeŽ Apple Fritter and departed from the store not afraid for anybody to see my Apple Fritter and me together. The only other free offer I ever accept is from God. For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our LordŽ (Romans 6:23 KJV). Gods gift carries with it marvelous compensations both now and eternally. Gods free is free indeed.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Free is as free gives and I don’t like free, usually OUT TO PASTOR Continued from Page 6A Hospice makes this happen. Palliative care brings these same skilled services earlier in the course of an illness and can be provided along with other treatments a patient may want to pursue. Many people dont realize that hospices are the largest providers of palliative care services in the United States. More than 1.5 million people with a life-limiting illness get help from the nations hospice and palliative care providers every single year. Its about quality of life. With the help of hospice and palliative care, patients and families can focus on whats most important, living as fully as possible in spite of illness.Ž Knee said. For additional information on hospice and palliative care, please contact your local Covenant Hospice branch.Covenant Hospice raising awareness this month New From SYP Publishing!THE GREENS AND CORNBREAD OF WAKULLA COUNTY Historical Stories Told by the People This delightful book is a collection of stories depicting the history of Wakulla County. The stories were written and submitted by different authors and families. The text includes a wide variety of topics and time periods. Many of the stories contain photos that were included by the author. Available NOW!! $29.95 As a publisher, we are constantly searching for authors and groups that wish to have works of a historical or regional signi“cance published. You may have a local book of stories and lore, a genealogy study, or a text on any speci“c historical, collectible or unique item. If you are looking for a publisher, consider contacting us. In Search Of The Diamond Brooch In Search of The Diamond Brooch is a southern historical saga starting with the migration of the pioneer families to the North Florida area. This is the story of a family that settled in North Florida in the early 1800s in Wakulla and Leon Counties. Written by Pete Gerrell & Terri Gerrell $24.95SYP Publishing 4351 Natural Bridge Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32305 www.syppublishing.com 850-421-7420 New F our Silent Hero / WWII Veteran 8/5/22 3/20/11 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE blessedare those whomourn 2012 Service of RemembranceSunday, December 2nd at 4:00pm Hudson Park21 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville Please call Pam at 850-926-9308 for more information. In Remembrance of the Brave Heroes of Wakulla County, lets not forget the years they spent away from home to insure we are safe in our homes.Jimmie, you may not be with us, but you have left a big footprint.We want to Honor A Very Special Korean War Veteran who Served with HonorƒSTAFF SERGEANT JIMMIE B. DYKESFather to Jeffrey B. Dykes Kimmie Dykes Can“eld & Jenkie Latil Husband of Jean Moore Dykes and Son to Omalee Spears and Wilmer DykesLOVE YOU Jean & Jerry

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityRelief Society makes drop cloths for adults PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpecial to The NewsThe Relief Society met last month to begin its service project. The project, proposed by Dena Wiggins, one of the church members who also takes care of the elderly, was to learn how to provide care for the elderly without causing injury to the caregiver or the patient. She said there was a great need for washable adult bibs, which were renamed drop cloths. The Relief Society met and the project exploded with great enthusiasm from the Young Womens members. As the word spread of the Drop Cloth Project some non-profit organizations, such as the Alzheimers Care, Big Bend Hospice and Home Instead Senior Care, began to make requests for them. It turned out to be a way to teach the youth the joy of service and giving. At a family gathering last Sunday for the birthday celebration of Joyce Hosford, who turned 90, Sandra W. Haymon, Ph.D., and author of Baby boomers-Sandwiched between Retirement & Caregiving,Ž was in attendance. She is also secretary of the Young Womens presidency in the Tortolita Ward, Tucson, Ariz., who after hearing about the project wanted all the information so she could include it in her seminars and also get her young women involved. The drop cloths are bright, cheerful and eco-friendly. Instead of using the disposable plastic ones these will easily last for years even with heavy use and washing. To participate in this project or for an organization who would like to request an order, contact Becky at 926-6284 or via email at shulbr1634@embarqmail. com. Members of the Relief Society make an adult drop cloth, above, and a “ nished product at right. Daughters of Confederacy chapter wins awardsSpecial to The NewsThe Ron Don McLeod Chapter 2469 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) announces their receipt of a number of awards at the Florida Division convention recently held in Tampa. Among six awards received include the Most Outstanding Chapter in the District I. Another award received was third place to its own chapter president, Louise Thomas, for her essay about the home front during the War Between the States. The chapter also is proud to announce 2nd Vice President Michelle McMillan Kirby, daughter of Finley and Jean McMillan of Ochlockonee Bay, was elected as District I director. District I consists of eight chapters comprising of more than 300 ladies living from Pensacola to Perry. Their goals are benevolent, educational, historical, patriotic and memorial. The ladies of the R. Don McLeod Chapter currently include 36 women who care about serving our community. They have helped various organizations in our community including Eden Springs, veterans groups and food pantries. Membership in the UDC is open to women aged 16 years and older who have a Confederate ancestor who faithfully served and/or supported the Southern Cause. If any young lady (or young at heart) aged 16 and up with a qualifying ancestor is interested in membership, please contact the chapter via email to rdonmcleodudc@gmail. com or visit their website at http://rdonmcleod.wordpress.com. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMember of the chapter are: front row, Kathy Frank, Evelyn Stills, Arlene Vause, Ann Cassaeux, Carolyn Harvey and Mary Ann Owens, and back row, Amy Carraway, Louise Thomas, Michelle Kirby, Tanya Lynn and Annette Strickland. Mr. and Mrs. Seth BledsoeBledsoe marries Davis Amanda Michelle Davis of Crawfordville and Seth Allen Bledsoe of Kingsport, Tenn., were married on Sept. 2 at Golden Eagle Country Club in Tallahassee. The bride is the daughter of Earl and Teresa Davis of Crawfordville, the granddaughter of Paul and Dorothy Smith of Tallahassee, and the great-niece of Cora L. Greene of Crawfordville. The groom is the son of Brent and Linda Bledsoe of Winchester, Ky., and the grandson of Bruce and Wanda Bledsoe of Kingsport, Tenn. The of“ ciate was John Carter of Nashville, Tenn. The bridesmaids were matron of honor Tiffany Taylor Porter, maid of honor Amanda Lawrence, Kelly Smith, Marissa Brown Davis, Shannon Mills and Allegra Knight. The ” ower girls were Jocelyn and Cecilia Bledsoe, nieces of the groom, and Madison Porter. The groomsmen were best man Mickey France, best man Nick Cooper, Matthew Bledsoe, Cory Bledsoe, Eric Davis, David Harpula, Jon Hagen, Vince Webb, Brandon Winters, Drew Lumpkin, Jeff Gottlieb and Adam Ware. The bride is a graduate of Florida State University with a bachelors in Religion, Emory University Candler School of Theology with a master of Theological Studies and is currently a doctoral student at LudwigMaximilians-Universitt Munich. The groom is a graduate of Carson Newman College with a bachelors in Biblical Studies, Wake Forest Divinity School with a Master of Divinity, and is currently a doctoral candidate at Florida State University. After a honeymoon in the Bahamas, the couple is now living in Munich, Germany.Upcoming 4-H club meetings Meetings for two 4-H clubs in Wakulla County will be held on Nov. 15 at 6 p.m. The clubs are the 4-H Livestock Club and Pocket Pets Club. Those interested in learning more about swine and how to show them are invited to participate. All youth ages 8„18 are invited. The “ rst meeting will be held in the Livestock Pavilion. Pocket Pets is a new, small animal Livestock Club that will be for Cloverbuds (Youth ages 5„7) to introduce them to small animals such as poultry, rabbits, dogs, cats, “ sh and birds. There will be animals to hold and learn about at every meeting. For more information, call 926-3931 or visit wakulla. ifas.u” .edu. Email community news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. Submissions are edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space is available. Wakulla 21 st Century Community Learning Center NOW accep ng enrollment applica ons for the 2012-2013 school year. The Wakulla 21st CCLC will provide enrichment to Wakulla County youth currently enrolled in Pre K-8th grade in the areas of math, reading, science, and wri ng; and will o er the families of par cipa ng students opportuni es for literacy and related educa onal development. The program will o er a wide range of opportuni es in areas of educaon, personal development and recrea on that will include business partners, mentors and educa onal facilitators.Programming at this me includes:• FCAT Review in Reading, Wri ng, Science and Math • Dance • Daily Homework Center • Mar al Arts • Tutoring • Theatre • Project Based Learning • 4H • Character Educa on • Music Lessons • Community Service Projects • Games and Physical Educa on The 2012-2013 program begins November 19, 2012 directly a er the regular school day. Program hours are 3:15 to 6:15 p.m. Monday thru Friday. The Wakulla 21 st Century Community Learning Center is a federally funded program and is o ered free of charge to qualifying Wakulla County students and their families. Enrollment applica ons are available online at h p://www.wakulla21cclc.com .Completed applica ons are due in the Wakulla 21 st CCLC o ce no later than 6:00 p.m. Friday, November 16, 2012. Space is available on a rst-come, rst-served basis.We look forward to working with you and your student this school year.Wakulla 21st CCLC • 1391 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL. 32327 • Phone ( 850) 745-4680 • Fax (850) 926-5186 • Email: info@Wakulla21CCLC.com Bonnie Holub TCC Project Director Deborah L. Fell WCS Principal Charlo e Cobb Wakulla 21 st CCLC Site Coordinator Rhonda Peden: Your family loves you, is proud of you and wishes you a Happy Birthday! Lordy Lordy... Look who’s 40! P R I M E R I B RIN R E S T A U R A N T EE thursday nights with grilled veggies & a Potato,Your Special Events! c u t t o o r d e r au jus & horseradish sauceTuesday Friday 5-9 pm Saturday & Sunday 12-9 pm 926-3751 www.SpringCreekFL.com Serving Fresh Local Seafood & Homemade Specialties for years35Have Spring Creek Cater

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSanders receives grant from Envision Special to The NewsKrissy Sanders, Wakulla prekindergarten teacher, was named an Envision Classroom Grant winner. Sanders applied through the Success for Educators website (www.successforeducators.com) where teachers can apply for grants and see other deals Envision offers exclusively to educators. As a first year teacher, Sanders plans to use the $250 grant for supplies and materials for her classroom. Sanders said, I wanted to make sure that my students had the same materials and opportunities as the students that have teachers that have been here for years. I didnt want my students to fall behind just because I was new. We are setting the foundation for their entire education and so I want them to have everything they need and then some!Ž Sanders teaches students age 3 to 5 years at the Wakulla County Schools Prekindergarten Program. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPre-kindergarten teacher, Krissy Sanders, accepts her grant award from an Envision representative, along with Principal Kim Dutton and Ashley Ward, paraprofessional.Special to The NewsOn Friday, Oct. 12 Shadeville Elementary Schools kindergarten, “ rst and second grade students enjoyed the annual visit for Fire Prevention Week from the Crawfordville and Wakulla Stations volunteer “ re departments and the Wakulla County Emergency Medical Services paramedics. This years theme was: Know 2 Ways OutŽ or EDITH drills. The students also learned the importance of staying low to avoid smoke inhalation, how to Stop-Drop & Roll and more. One of the most important things the children learned was how a “ re“ ghter who may be coming to save their life will look and sound in their gear. Some very brave students had the opportunity to use the “ re hoses to spray out the “ re … and create a beautiful rainbow also. One of the highlights of the morning was the visit from Sparky.Ž Fire Prevention is so important to the safety and well-being of children and their families, said Principal Susan Brazier. She expressed thanks those who took the time to share their expertise. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents at Shadeville Elementary try out the “ re hose, with the help of a “ re“ ghter.Students learn about “ re prevention Kimberly Porter Weaver, a 1994 graduate of Wakulla High School, recently received her doctorate in psychology with a concentration in hypnosis from Adler School for Professional Psychology in Chicago. Her graduation was held on Oct. 27 and was attended by her husband, James Weaver, her parents, Leon and Cordelia Porter of Sopchoppy, and sister, Candace Porter of Jacksonville. Weaver also has a masters degree in counseling psychology from Adler, a masters degree in social work from Michigan State University and a bachelors degree in social work from FAMU. She is the granddaughter of Leon and Rachel Porter of Sopchoppy and the late Bailey and Nursey Jefferson of Flager County.Weaver earns her doctorate in psychology STEM parent and student night is heldSpecial to The NewsTallahassee Community College joined with FloridaLearns STEM Scholars to sponsor a parent/student night on Oct. 16 for STEM scholars and their parents from Gadsden and Wakulla counties. The focus of this meeting was to share information with students and parents about careers in healthcare. Speakers for the night consisted of Joel Bialosky, P.T. Ph.D. clinical assistant professor, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida; Barbara Alford, R.N. B.S.N., executive director of Nursing Operations, Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare; and Demetria Smith, clinical pharmacist, Tallahassee VA Outpatient Clinic. They gave students an overview of the various opportunities in their career area and helpful hints about preparation. Parents and students were also given an opportunity to tour the Ghazvini Center for Healthcare. Dr. Alice Nied, dean of Healthcare Professions, welcomed the quests and facilitated the tour. Parent/student meetings ensure parents and students receive project, scholarship and post-secondary information, and learn about a variety of STEM careers. The goal is to help students make wellinformed career choices and understand the academic preparation the career requires. The parent/student meetings are designed to keep communication open between parents, STEM Scholars and grant personnel. Wakulla Christian School, in coordination with the Wakulla County Veterans Services Office, is proud to host the Saturday, November 10, 2012 at Hudson Park Games, Vendors Raffles, a Silent Auction, and Lots of Food !!! Parade Starts @ 10:00a.m. A portion of the proceeds from this grand event will be donated to our local Veterans Services Office. Your family or organization is invited to participate in this very special event dedicated to honoring all Veterans and active duty military. Please consider entering a float or vehicle decorated in honor of your loved ones’. For more information or to register your float, please contact the Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee via fax @ 850-926-5186 or email WCVDay@gmail.com “Honoring All Who Served” Soldier Care Packages 6th Annual Veterans Day Parade and Celebration to Support Our Troops and Honor Our Veterans Wakulla Christian School is collecting public donations of items to send to our troops wish list items include individually wrapped beef jerky, Pringles, individually wrapped sunflower seeds, individually wrapped nuts, individually packaged mix of Propel Fitness Water and Gatorade, individually packaged hard candy and gummy bears, white tube socks, protein bars, granola bars, books, soap, ra zors, sunscreen, nail files, AA batteries and Ziploc bags. For further information, please contact Wakulla County V eterans Day Committee Drop offanyitemsatoneof thefollowing supportivebusinessesinWakulla county: HOME MORTGAGEA MERI F IRST CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARDWakulla County is currently seeking interested citizens who have a willingness to serve as a member and alternate member on the Code Enforcement Board. There are two vacant seats as an alternate member and two forthcoming as a member appointed by the BOCC that expires December 31, 2012. The vacant seats for each appointment will be for a three year term beginning January 1, 2013, and ending December 31, 2015. The membership of the Code Enforcement Board shall, whenever possible, consist of an architect, a business person, an engineer, a general contractor, a subcontractor, a realtor, and another citizen. These positions are on a volunteer basis only and the members would have the responsibility of being present at each scheduled Code Enforcement Meeting. The alternate members will be noti ed in the event a member is unable to attend a scheduled meeting. These meetings occur on the second Wednesday of every other month, at 5:30p.m. in the Commission Chambers, with the exception of Holidays.Citizens wishing to serve as a member or alternate member can contact Jaime Baze at (850) 926-7636 ext: 423 or jbaze@mywakulla.com by November 28, 2012. FUND RAISER SILENT AUCTION & STEAK DINNER $ 10.00NOVEMBER 16TH from 5 PM … 8PM at SHELLPOINT FIRE HOUSE FOR TICKETS CONTACT MARION at 926-9023 ALSO AT CENTURY 21 in SHELLPOINTFishing TripJewelry Gift BasketsArt

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors You’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe WakuulanewsThis last Sunday we all fell behind an hour as the time changed, and though Im not too fond of daylight saving time, it is nice to know it is “ nally turning into fall. And the critters are moving. My Patti picked up and flew back to New Jersey, just as Superstorm Sandy eased a bit. Newark Airport opened Halloween morning and she got home safe and sound that evening and her power was still on. On Sunday, she got her phone line reconnected, but she is having trouble getting petrol for her car. Patti loves to photograph, and has done it professionally for years. Her photos of nature (plants and animals alike) have been on postage stamps and the cover of National Geographic. Once when she and her late husband were in the Smithsonian, she commented to Bert, Žthat looks like a photo Ive taken.Ž Upon looking closer, it was hers! So whenever shes down visiting me or were on a trip somewhere, guess what Patti is up to. You guessed it … shes taking photographs. Often, she photographs one subject for perhaps an hour or more until she gets it as perfect as possible. Often Im driving her around our lovely Big Bend region when a clump of roadside ” owers, an insect or a snake, you name it, may captivate her for a half hour or so. I tend to look farther down the road than she. Im looking for deer, etc. that might create a problem for my driving, and Patti is usually looking closer for a subject she might photograph. The last two weeks of October, I was delighted to spot “ ve Black Bears. Patti caught a glimpse of two, one on Highway 20 near Tallahassee and another on FH 13 near Crawfordville, two others she failed to see, as they bounded into the woods from the roads (one of those was about a 60-pound cub very near Jacks Landing on Highway 375). The “ fth one though was a real treat for both of us. We were in Tates Hell State Forest heading west across Buck Siding Road and as we passed Tower Road, I looked north and way up the road was an out of place black dot. I yelled, BEAR.Ž I came to a stop, backed up and with my binoculars I could see an adult bear swaggering on up the road away from us. I turned onto Tower Road and we slowly drove closer and closer. Finally we were close enough, it stood up about “ ve times trying to “ gure us and the car out, and with my camera, which will zoom in to about 30 power, I was able to nearly “ ll the frame. That was a neat experience! Also weve been in on the Monarch Festival out at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, collecting these incredible creatures for the event on Oct. 27. In the process, Ive tried, in limited time, to determine what species of birds have arrived from points north. Today as an example, I had my “ rst Chipping Sparrows at my feeder, though I know theyve been here since Oct. 20, at least. Robins have been back for the winter for about a week now, and the Pheobe Flycatcher for about two weeks or more. Also on Oct. 20, I recorded the first Red-breasted Nuthatch, normally a fairly rare winter visitor, but this winter a fair number are being recorded. On Oct. 23, we observed Rose breasted Grosbeaks here too. On the refuge this last Saturday I found a number of waterfowl species are starting to arrive for the winter. I observed at least 40 Green-winged Teal and possibly 50 Blue-winged, eight Northern Pintail, four Northern Shoveler, 20 American Widgeon, 20 Redhead, 16 Lesser Scaup and one lone hen Buf” ehead. And about eight sightings of adult Bald Eagles, plus a few female Northern Harriers (Marsh Hawks), four Glossy Ibis, an American Avocet, one Wood Stork and a gorgeous Purple Gallinule in Headquarters Pond (near the public restrooms). Grab the kids and granny too, and head to the refuge. The show has started.Various wildlife are spotted on the move as the temperatures drop Wakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHSpecial to The NewsThe U.S. Forest Service is waiving fees at most of its day-use recreation sites over the Veterans Day holiday weekend, Nov. 10-12. The fee waivers … the fourth this year … are offered in cooperation with other federal agencies under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act. This is our way of saying thanks to the brave men and women … past and present … who put their lives on the line every day to keep us safe at home,Ž said U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell. We encourage veterans, their families and all visitors to take time out over the holiday weekend to enjoy the bene“ ts that nature provides at forests and grasslands throughout the country.Ž The National Forests in Florida recreation sites listed are the only locations waiving day-use fees for Veterans Day: Ocala National Forest Apalachicola National Forest Osceola National Forest Fore Lake Day Use Leon Sinks Geological Area Olustee Beach Day Use Area Farles Day Use Lake Eaton Boat Ramp & Pier Mill Dam Boat Ramp and Swim area Lake Dorr Boat Ramp The fee waiver days support the goals of President Obamas Americas Great Outdoors initiative and First Lady Michelle Obamas Lets Move Outside.Ž Traditionally, fees are not charged on 98 percent of national forests and grasslands, and approximately two-thirds of developed recreation sites in national forests and grasslands can be used for free. Many recreation opportunities such as camping, sightseeing and hiking can be enjoyed throughout the year at no cost.Fees are waived for holiday weekend Special to The NewsBass Pro Shops, Americas most popular outdoor store, will open a 70,000-square foot Bass Pro Shops Outpost store in Tallahassee. The new store will be located in the Fallschase Development at the intersection of Mahan and Buck Lake Roads in Tallahassee and is targeted to open in 2013. The store will initially generate approximately 200 jobs which will be offered to the many outdoor enthusiasts in the Tallahassee area. In addition to being the worlds leading supplier of premium “ shing tackle, Bass Pro Shops is also Americas leading supplier of hunting gear and the top retailer of Remington and Winchester guns and ammo as well as the top retailer of Bowtech and PSE archery equipment. Bass Pro Shops manufactures and sells the worlds leading brands of fishing boats--Tracker, Nitro, SunTracker, Tahoe, Grizzly and Mako factory direct to “ shermen. Bass Pro Shops is also the No. 1 dealer in the U.S. for Arctic Cat ATVs and UTVs. More than just a “ shing and hunting store, Bass Pro Shops offers equipment and clothing for hiking, backpacking, wildlife viewing, camping, outdoor cooking and more. A gift and nature center will serve up a wide variety of outdoorrelated items, from lamps and dishes to bird feeders and furniture. We are excited about the addition of Bass Pro Shops to Fallschase,Ž said Phillip Duke of Columbus Paci“ c Properties. With an anchor line up of Bass Pro Shops, Costco and Super Wal-Mart, Fallschase will be the super-regional retail destination the city and people of Tallahassee had always envisioned.Ž We have enjoyed a long relationship with Florida sportsmen,Ž said Johnny Morris, founder of Bass Pro Shops. We opened our first Florida store in Fort Lauderdale 15 years ago and our new Outpost store, our seventh location in this great outdoor state, will be dedicated to better serving the sportsmen of northern Florida and south Georgia.Ž The new Bass Pro Shops Tallahassee Outpost will offer a broad selection of high quality gear at Bass Pro Shops famous low prices supported by friendly, expert service to this areas sportsmen and women. Bass Pro Shops opened its first Outpost store in Branson, Mo., in 2006 and it has been a tremendous hit with sportsmen. We are very grateful to everyone at Columbus Pacific, owners of the Fallschase, for the opportunity to be one of their feature retail stores along with Costco and Super Wal-Mart. Bass Pro Shops will fast track development to enhance and expand the 70,000 square feet of existing retail space. We want to be open as soon as we can to serve hunters, anglers and all outdoor enthusiasts for the 2013 seasons,Ž Morris said. Nick Wiley, executive director of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, said, The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Wildlife Foundation of Florida are pleased to hear Bass Pro Shops is now opening a new store in the Tallahassee area. We already have a great working relationship with Bass Pro Shops, from support for our youth conservation programs to our exciting new Trophy Catch program promoting catch and release of trophy bass in Florida. They have always been a pleasure to work with and continue to show outstanding leadership and support for fishing, hunting and outdoor recreation in Florida. Bass Pro Shops has been an enthusiastic and innovative conservation partner with FWC, and now they are in Tallahassee it will only help make our working relationship in Florida that much stronger.Ž HISTORY OF SUPPORTING CONSERVATION IN FLORIDA Bass Pro Shops is proud to be the lead sponsor of the new Florida TrophyCatch program and looks forward to continuing to partner with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Wildlife Foundation of Florida on youth education/outreach and “ sheries enhancement efforts. Johnny Morris is the inspirational leader for Conservation initiatives at Bass Pro Shops and was recently recognized by the state of Florida and the other 49 Fish and Wildlife Agencies through the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies as the Citizen Conservationist of the year. Bass Pro Shops is the all time leading donor of the National Wild Turkey Federation and is a significant contributor to many other “ sh and wildlife conservation efforts. Bass Pro Shops will host over 120 million people visiting its 77 stores and Tracker Marine Centers across America and Canada this year. FAMOUS FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE Bass Pro Shops was one of only eight retailers in America named a J.D. Power Customer Service Champion, based on customer service excellence. Bass Pro Shops has also been recognized numerous times for their conservation and outdoor education efforts as well as for what they do to support our military men and women. Bass Pro Shops was recently named by Advertising Age magazine as one of the Top 10 Hottest Brands in America. Bass Pro Shops awardwinning, outdoor stores are known for combining retail with entertainment, conservation and outdoor education while delivering unmatched value and service to customers. Bass Pro Shop plans to open in Tallahassee Like us on newsThe Wakulla GREAT GETAWAY 000D4D5 CASINO EXTRAVAGANZA To Hollywood Florida 3 Days 2 Nights Pkg. includes $130 Free Play 5 casinos, total 5 meal vouchers, 2 buffets. Tour Date November 29 $ 145 00 p. p. dbl occupancy $ 175 00 single ONLY $ 20 00 Per Person DAY TRIPS ONLY Day Trip To Hard Rock Casino $25 FREE Play € $5 Meal Voucher € Wednesday pick-up Homosassa: US 19 Wal-Mart parking lot 8:00 AM R E S E R V A T I O N S F O R A L L O T H E R T R I P S : 8 8 8 8 4 5 3 1 1 1 R E S E R V A T I O N S F O R A L L O T H E R T R I P S : 8 8 8 8 4 5 3 1 1 1 RESERVATIONS FOR ALL OTHER TRIPS: 888-845-3111 A s k A b o u t O u r T r i p s T o A t l a n t a S a n i b l e S t A u g u s t i n e a n d S a v a n n a h Y o u d o n  t w a n t t o m i s s t h e m A s k A b o u t O u r T r i p s T o A t l a n t a S a n i b l e S t A u g u s t i n e a n d S a v a n n a h Y o u d o n  t w a n t t o m i s s t h e m Ask About Our Trips To Atlanta, Sanible, St. Augustine and Savannah. You dont want to miss them! Pick-up location in Hernando, Pasco, Citrus, Pinellas & Hillsborough (Select Trips) Pick-up location for overnight trips: SPRING HILL PICK UP US 19 & Trenton (Winn Dixie parking lot). NEW PORT RICHEY-PICK UP US 19 & Ridge Rd. (Wal-Mart parking lot behind McDonalds). All Tours include Hotel Accommodations. Prices & itinerary subject to change without notice. Transportation provided by Hollywood Tours. Spring Hill, FL-Fla Seller of travel ref. # ST38623 ST. AUGUSTINE 3 DAY, 2 NIGHT On/Off 1 hr. narrated trolly tour, admission to Oldest Store Museum, scenic cruise, 5 meals, transportation, beach front hotel Tour Date October 23 $ 279 00 p. p. dbl occupancy $ 368 00 single BILOXI BREAKAWAY AT THE BEAU RIVAGE RESORT 4 DAY, 3 NIGHT ESCAPE $50 free play, 4 buffets Tour Date November 18 $ 229 00 p. p. dbl occupancy $ 359 00 single 2 DAY 1 NIGHT GETAWAY TO SOUTH BEACH MIAMI THE MAGICAL CITYŽ Includes 3 meals. World famous Polynesian Dinner Show, admission to the Exotic Fruit and Spice park. Tour of Millionaires Row, Fisher Island and Art Deco District Tour Date November 19 $ 179 p. p. dbl occupancy $ 199 single Bok Tower Gardens Floridas Best GardenŽ Nov. 26, 2012 Day trip General admission Pinewood Estates and lunch & Much more! Call For Tour Dates € $54pp AN OLD FASHIONED CHRISTMAS IN FORT MYERS, FLORIDA 2 Day 1 Night GETAWAY Includes Broadway Show Miracle on 34th StreetŽ, tour of Edison/Ford Homes. Hot Apple Cider & Cookies. Admission to beautiful Marie Selby Botanical Garden & shopping at St. Armands Circle Tour Date Dec. 16 Limited Seating Call For Pricing 3 DAY/2 NIGHT NEW YEARS EVE PARTY WITH A CHANCE TO WIN $2013 EVERY HOUR From 3:30 11:30pm ITS LUCKY 13 AT IMMOKALEE CASINO 4 Casinos, $100 Free Play, 2 meals plus 4 meal vouchers. Live entertainment, complimentary cocktails from 11:30 12:30, plus shopping at St. Armands Circle in Sarasota. Tour Date: December 30 $204 p.p. dbl occupancy $294 single HOLLYWOOD TOURS COME VISIT OUR NEW STORE FRONT € 1221 Kass Circle, Spring Hill PIGS IN PARADISE RIB COOKOFFŽ WEEKEND GETAWAY TO IMMOKALEE CASINO Includes $60 FREE PLAY, Two $5 Meal Vouchers, 1 Breakfast Buffet Tour Date November 17 Guaranteed Best Price! $ 85 00 p. p. dbl occupancy $ 115 00 single 0 0 0 C Z D T Biltmore Candlelight Christmas 4 Days, 3 Nights 5 Meals, 1 Show, admission to Biltmore House, Winery Tour, Tour of Asheville & Much More! Tour Date Nov. 8 & Dec. 6 $ 399 p. p. dbl occupancy $ 499 single (352) 527-88553557 N. 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MANATEE TOUR AND BREAKFAST PACKAGE:Includes one night accommodations, a welcome bag with fun manatee information inside, one manatee tour for two people at our Adventure Center/Dive Shop, and breakfast for two in our restaurant. Additional night may be added.2 People $224 Price starting at $112 per person based on double occupancy.We are the only place in North America where you can legally swim and interact with the manatees in the wild. Your tour leaves directly from the dock at the Plantation’s very own Adventure Center. Your experienced guide will fill you in on all the facts and fun of the manatees as well as the history and nature of Kings Bay and Crystal River. www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com

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It has been a busy week for the Apalachee Bay ” otilla. The North Florida Fair started Thursday night, Nov. 1 and we had a good representation from the flotilla. Chuck Hickman has been organizing our efforts with help from several members including Mike Harrison, Bruce Connors, Jaimi Creel, Tim Ashley, Terry Hoxworth, Raye Crews, David Guttman, Mark Rosen, Dave Rabon, Tiffanie Bourasa, Gary and Christie Owen, Norma Hill and Rich Rasmussen. We will be at the fair through the closing on Nov. 12. Please stop by and see us to learn about our upcoming class for safe boating scheduled for January, as well as other safe boating information. In addition to the fair, we had our monthly meeting on Saturday. Eighteen members were able to attend, as well as three guests and prospective members. The monthly meeting is a good time for all involved to learn about the progress in our many activities. Dave Rabon discussed the momentum for the St. George Island detachment. As more individuals are moving back to the island, there is renewed interest and we have been able to get a few patrols out in the area this season. No meeting is complete without the presentation of awards. This month, we had several awards with the members present to receive them. Mike Harrison received the RBS Device. This is a prestigious award within the Auxiliary. The Auxiliary Recreational Boating Safety (RBS) Device Award recognizes extraordinary effort of auxiliarists who consistently provide strong support to RBS programs. The eligibility criteria is signi“ cant RBS program activity over a minimum period of two years. Eligible RBS activities include public education, public affairs, vessel safety checks, RBS program visits and legislative outreach. Bravo Zulu Mike! Fran Keating received her of“ cial transfer con“ rmation into Flotilla 12. Welcome aboard Fran, we are proud to call you one of our own of“ cially! Raye Crews and Dave Rabon each received an Annual Service Award for their involvement in completing more than 60 vessel exams and/or program visits. Duane Treadon received his ninth Sustained Service Award for completing 750 hours. Geoff Gonzales received his of“ cial change in status from initially quali“ ed to basically quali“ ed. Larry Kolk was presented with his certi“ cate of appointment for the Flotilla Staff Officer position of Public Education. Larry assumed the position and has already started a great plan for new and exciting opportunities in the coming year. We look forward to ending the year with as much gusto as we have mustered throughout the first 10 months. This weekend, we hope to have two facilities/crews out on the water: one in St. Marks and one in Shell Point. Check back next week for details from both patrols. Thank you to Tim Ashley and Duane Treadon for submitting photos for this week. And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident Be an educated boater, as the temperatures drop, so does the water temperature. Be sure to bundle up as you head out to enjoy this great fall weather. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMike Harrison staffs the booth at the fair. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Cold Water Diving We know when the ocean water temperature begins its decline when the clambers and underwater bridge inspectors show up asking for thicker thermal protection. Most everyone else has hung up their “ ns for the year and are oiling up their ri” es for hunting season. As the winter diving season progresses, thermal requests move from thicker wet suit to dry suits. There are plenty of challenges involved in “ nding the warmest solution for your investment. The question is where to start and what is the progression? Wet suits work by capturing water under a protective garment that your body can heat up. If the suit “ ts too loosely, this warm water escapes and is continually replaced by cold water the body must reheat (at great expense and discomfort). This garment itself has thermal properties like land clothing, except that it works in water. The thicker the garment, the more heat it can hold from escaping through the material. Wet suits must “ t tightly to work and be thick enough to keep the heat in. Most think the colder the water, the thicker must be the garment. We must consider what you have been wearing this past year. Remember that new ultra stretch, easy to put on wet suit? Well, it was great for mildly cool water but the price you paid for comfort is offset by the loss of its thermal properties the deeper you dive. Wet suit garments are made of Neoprene, a nitrogen gas matrix in rubber, that is subjected to the same physical gas laws of compression that cause Barotrauma (such as an ear squeeze) and greater breathing gas consumption the deeper we dive. The suit literally shrinks in thickness, the deeper you dive, loosing a corresponding insulating capacity. The next warming step is to layer several garments under the suit such as a T-shirt or a hooded vest. Thirty percent of your bodys heat is lost from the head and neck area. Reducing water ” ow under the suit will also retain more precious body heated water. Upgrading to a thicker wet suit will be warmer, but most thicker wet suits are also more restrictive. The secret is to keep the water your body has warmed from escaping by neck, wrist and ankle seals. New suit designs are more form “ tted, joint ” exing, cloth lined and sealed systems. They keep everything in until you unzip the system or over pressure it. Yes, there are two types of divers out there, those that admit they pee in their wet suits and those that lie about it. Cold water on the skin causes vasoconstriction of the extremity veins and a shunting of blood to the bodys core. This build up of plasma must be disposed of, so the body dumps the extra ” uid to the bladder, which when released, does make you feel warmer for a short while if you are wearing a wet suit. Several engineers in Maryland came up with a simple and logical next step. Rather than invests up to $2,000 in a dry suit to stay warm during the winter, they heated the water under their sealed wet suit with a battery supported heating pad. Bikers have been using a heating pad under their jackets for years. Divers already carried lead as added buoyancy control, so the lead is now in the battery instead. The cost of the technology is a quarter that of a new dry suit, and has many applications. Dry suits have come a long way as well. They do seal the water out by maintaining an air pocket around the body in which dry clothing keeps you warm. A gas source is required to compensate for increased pressure at depth, and additional training is required to accommodate added buoyancy challenges. But new dry suit designs dive more like wet suits these days, and can accommodate the same heating pads used in wet suits. As our community matures, we incorporate more creature comforts every day. Raye Crews receives her award. Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos presents Mike Harrison with the Recreational Boating Safety Device Award. Advertise your way to Success! Statewide Advertising — Refreshing Rates C C a l l n o w t o a d v e r t i s e y o u r b u s i n e s s i n o v e r 1 0 0 n e w s p a p e r s 866.742.1373 w w w f a c e b o o k c o m / A d N e t F l o r i d a 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Nov 8, 12 Fri Nov 9, 12 Sat Nov 10, 12 Sun Nov 11, 12 Mon Nov 12, 12 Tue Nov 13, 12 Wed Nov 14, 12 D ate 3.9 ft. 12:27 AM 4.0 ft. 1:05 AM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 2:58 AM 0.9 ft. 4:05 AM 0.4 ft. 5:01 AM -0.1 ft. 5:51 AM -0.6 ft. 6:38 AM -0.9 ft. 7:25 AM -1.0 ft. 8:12 AM L ow 2.8 ft. 8:51 AM 3.0 ft. 10:17 AM 3.3 ft. 11:22 AM 3.5 ft. 12:19 PM 3.7 ft. 1:10 PM 3.7 ft. 1:59 PM 3.6 ft. 2:46 PM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 3:16 PM 1.0 ft. 4:15 PM 1.1 ft. 5:06 PM 1.2 ft. 5:52 PM 1.3 ft. 6:35 PM 1.4 ft. 7:16 PM 1.4 ft. 7:56 PM L ow 3.2 ft. 9:52 PM 3.3 ft. 10:35 PM 3.5 ft. 11:13 PM 3.7 ft. 11:50 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 8, 12 Fri Nov 9, 12 Sat Nov 10, 12 Sun Nov 11, 12 Mon Nov 12, 12 Tue Nov 13, 12 Wed Nov 14, 12 D ate 2.9 ft. 12:19 AM 3.0 ft. 12:57 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 3:09 AM 0.7 ft. 4:16 AM 0.3 ft. 5:12 AM -0.1 ft. 6:02 AM -0.4 ft. 6:49 AM -0.6 ft. 7:36 AM -0.8 ft. 8:23 AM L ow 2.1 ft. 8:43 AM 2.3 ft. 10:09 AM 2.5 ft. 11:14 AM 2.6 ft. 12:11 PM 2.8 ft. 1:02 PM 2.8 ft. 1:51 PM 2.7 ft. 2:38 PM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 3:27 PM 0.7 ft. 4:26 PM 0.8 ft. 5:17 PM 0.9 ft. 6:03 PM 0.9 ft. 6:46 PM 1.0 ft. 7:27 PM 1.0 ft. 8:07 PM L ow 2.4 ft. 9:44 PM 2.5 ft. 10:27 PM 2.6 ft. 11:05 PM 2.8 ft. 11:42 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 8, 12 Fri Nov 9, 12 Sat Nov 10, 12 Sun Nov 11, 12 Mon Nov 12, 12 Tue Nov 13, 12 Wed Nov 14, 12 D ate 3.4 ft. 12:26 AM 3.6 ft. 1:03 AM 3.7 ft. 1:41 AM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 4:02 AM 0.8 ft. 5:09 AM 0.3 ft. 6:05 AM -0.1 ft. 6:55 AM -0.5 ft. 7:42 AM -0.8 ft. 8:29 AM -0.9 ft. 9:16 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 9:27 AM 2.8 ft. 10:53 AM 3.1 ft. 11:58 AM 3.3 ft. 12:55 PM 3.4 ft. 1:46 PM 3.4 ft. 2:35 PM 3.4 ft. 3:22 PM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 4:20 PM 0.9 ft. 5:19 PM 1.0 ft. 6:10 PM 1.1 ft. 6:56 PM 1.2 ft. 7:39 PM 1.2 ft. 8:20 PM 1.3 ft. 9:00 PM L ow 2.9 ft. 10:28 PM 3.1 ft. 11:11 PM 3.3 ft. 11:49 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 8, 12 Fri Nov 9, 12 Sat Nov 10, 12 Sun Nov 11, 12 Mon Nov 12, 12 Tue Nov 13, 12 Wed Nov 14, 12 D ate 3.0 ft. 12:11 AM 3.1 ft. 12:49 AM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 2:37 AM 0.9 ft. 3:44 AM 0.4 ft. 4:40 AM -0.1 ft. 5:30 AM -0.6 ft. 6:17 AM -0.9 ft. 7:04 AM -1.0 ft. 7:51 AM L ow 2.2 ft. 8:35 AM 2.4 ft. 10:01 AM 2.6 ft. 11:06 AM 2.7 ft. 12:03 PM 2.9 ft. 12:54 PM 2.9 ft. 1:43 PM 2.8 ft. 2:30 PM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 2:55 PM 1.0 ft. 3:54 PM 1.1 ft. 4:45 PM 1.1 ft. 5:31 PM 1.2 ft. 6:14 PM 1.3 ft. 6:55 PM 1.4 ft. 7:35 PM L ow 2.5 ft. 9:36 PM 2.6 ft. 10:19 PM 2.7 ft. 10:57 PM 2.9 ft. 11:34 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 8, 12 Fri Nov 9, 12 Sat Nov 10, 12 Sun Nov 11, 12 Mon Nov 12, 12 Tue Nov 13, 12 Wed Nov 14, 12 D ate 4.0 ft. 12:24 AM 4.1 ft. 1:02 AM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 2:55 AM 1.0 ft. 4:02 AM 0.4 ft. 4:58 AM -0.1 ft. 5:48 AM -0.6 ft. 6:35 AM -1.0 ft. 7:22 AM -1.1 ft. 8:09 AM L ow 2.9 ft. 8:48 AM 3.1 ft. 10:14 AM 3.4 ft. 11:19 AM 3.6 ft. 12:16 PM 3.7 ft. 1:07 PM 3.8 ft. 1:56 PM 3.7 ft. 2:43 PM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 3:13 PM 1.1 ft. 4:12 PM 1.2 ft. 5:03 PM 1.3 ft. 5:49 PM 1.4 ft. 6:32 PM 1.5 ft. 7:13 PM 1.5 ft. 7:53 PM L ow 3.2 ft. 9:49 PM 3.4 ft. 10:32 PM 3.6 ft. 11:10 PM 3.8 ft. 11:47 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 8, 12 Fri Nov 9, 12 Sat Nov 10, 12 Sun Nov 11, 12 Mon Nov 12, 12 Tue Nov 13, 12 Wed Nov 14, 12 D ate 3.1 ft. 12:08 AM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 2:45 AM 0.9 ft. 3:44 AM 0.5 ft. 4:34 AM 0.1 ft. 5:20 AM -0.2 ft. 6:05 AM -0.4 ft. 6:51 AM -0.6 ft. 7:39 AM L ow 2.1 ft. 8:21 AM 2.2 ft. 10:02 AM 2.3 ft. 11:32 AM 2.5 ft. 12:49 PM 2.6 ft. 1:56 PM 2.7 ft. 2:57 PM 2.7 ft. 3:54 PM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 2:22 PM 0.9 ft. 3:20 PM 1.2 ft. 4:13 PM 1.4 ft. 5:02 PM 1.6 ft. 5:46 PM 1.7 ft. 6:27 PM 1.8 ft. 7:07 PM L ow 2.6 ft. 9:36 PM 2.7 ft. 10:04 PM 2.7 ft. 10:32 PM 2.9 ft. 11:00 PM 3.0 ft. 11:32 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 8 Nov. 14First Nov. 20 Full Nov. 28 Last Dec. 6 New Nov. 13Major Times 7:42 AM 9:42 AM 8:06 PM 10:06 PM Minor Times 1:15 AM 2:15 AM 2:02 PM 3:02 PM Major Times 8:30 AM 10:30 AM 8:55 PM 10:55 PM Minor Times 2:14 AM 3:14 AM 2:38 PM 3:38 PM Major Times 9:20 AM 11:20 AM 9:46 PM 11:46 PM Minor Times 3:16 AM 4:16 AM 3:16 PM 4:16 PM Major Times 10:13 AM 12:13 PM 10:40 PM 12:40 AM Minor Times 4:20 AM 5:20 AM 3:58 PM 4:58 PM Major Times 11:09 AM 1:09 PM 11:39 PM 1:39 AM Minor Times 5:28 AM 6:28 AM 4:44 PM 5:44 PM Major Times --:---:-12:09 PM 2:09 PM Minor Times 6:37 AM 7:37 AM 5:36 PM 6:36 PM Major Times 12:40 AM 2:40 AM 1:11 PM 3:11 PM Minor Times 7:46 AM 8:46 AM 6:33 PM 7:33 PM Average+ Average Average Good Better Best Better++++6:57 am 5:44 pm 1:16 am 2:03 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:57 am 5:43 pm 2:16 am 2:39 pm 6:58 am 5:43 pm 3:17 am 3:17 pm 6:59 am 5:42 pm 4:22 am 3:59 pm 7:00 am 5:42 pm 5:29 am 4:45 pm 7:01 am 5:41 pm 6:38 am 5:36 pm 7:01 am 5:41 pm 7:47 am 6:34 pm42% 35% 28% 20% 13% 5% 3% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

PAGE 12

Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Green Scene Honest Representation at Farmers Market Do you attend farmers markets? If you do attend, have you ever asked the producers if they grew the food or where they obtained it? A recent research project completed at the University of Florida caught my eye. It involved interviewing persons at local farmers markets to learn if shoppers were aware of exactly how much of the food being sold was actually locally grown and if any even cared if the food was locally grown. I was fascinated by the results. The study revealed that some, but not all shoppers cared that some markets sold non-locally grown food. Consumers often assume farmers markets sell only the freshest crops from small, local operations, said Mickie Swisher, an associate professor with UFs IFAS. She noted that since the number of U.S. farmers markets have more than quadrupled since 1994, some big-volume produce dealers sometimes use farmers markets to sell items shipped from other states and even other countries. The study found that when customers became informed of this, some felt outraged while others were totally indifferent. Peoples reactions seem to depend on whether they are committed to eating local or just wanted a pleasant excursion of which a farmers market provides. The findings of this study were published in the current issue of the Journal of HortSciences. It suggests that the organizers of the markets can satisfy both serious and casual shoppers if they require honest labeling. She concluded that is really is just a matter of knowing what consumers want and being honest about what is offered. For example, if the rules governing a farmers market are not made available on the issue of non-local food, locavores (those who want only local foods) would probably want to see that situation changed. Solutions might include barring non-local food, restricting it to certain parts of the market or requiring vendors to indicate where their merchandise was produced. It was suggested that for patrons who want to come to a farmers market to socialize, management should provide amenities such as seating area, especially if any vendors offer ready-to-eat food. Both groups have different intentions for their attendance and one market can satisfy both. The study surveyed more than 120 shoppers at farmers markets in three Florida population centers. They included a major metropolitan area, a medium-sized city and a small town. The survey asked shoppers about their expectation for the food sold at a farmers market. The results showed that a large percentage of the attendees believed that much of the merchandise was locally grown, freshly harvested, organic and sold by the growers themselves. Participants were also asked if they would continue patronizing a farmers market after learning that what they had purchased at times did not meet their expectations. What made a difference in the level of satisfaction? Participants indicated that if they found items less fresh than expected, about 75 percent would continue patronizing the market; if it was not organic, 66 percent would continue; if the items were not grown by the vendor, 62 percent said they would return; and if it wasnt local, only 53 percent would visit the market again. Using additional data analysis tools, the researchers determined which shoppers were most likely to stop visiting a farmers market that offered nonlocal food. Those were the shoppers who believed it is important to buy local food or that patronizing farmers market was somehow better than shopping at supermarkets. The number of U.S. farmers markets increased from over 1,700 in 1994 to almost 7,900 in 2012 according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It is apparent that many people frequent farmers markets for reasons that have nothing to do with food. If you are not a visitor looking for a pleasant outing, it is important that managers honor the wishes of their patrons for truthful representation. As an empowered consumer, individuals should ask questions concerning the source of the foods offered at farmers markets and base purchase decisions on the importance you place on eating locally grown food. As informed shoppers, we should make the farmers market suppliers aware of our interest in this information and our intent to base our buying decisions on the answers provided. 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And that means environmentally-friendly business practices are as necessary for the bottom line as they are for the planet, said Joe Veilleux, president of Euromed USA (euromedusa.com). Being a producer of natural ingredients for pharmaceuticals and health supplements, weve always held environmentalism as a major company value,Ž said Veilleux, a registered pharmacist. Were glad to see that, even when people face unemployment and other economic hardships, theyre still committed to green practices.Ž Recent polls, including BCGs annual International Global Green Consumer Surveys taken throughout the recession, reveal an unwavering commitment to environmentalism, he says. Even at the height of the recession in 2008 and 2009, more than a third of consumers said they were willing to pay a little more for products that are better for the environment,Ž Veilleux said. A majority said they consider a companys environmental credentials when making purchasing decisions.Ž Euromed recently earned greenŽ ISO 14001 certi“ cation for its Barcelona factory by meeting stringent criteria established by the world International Standardization Organization, which sets standards for sustainable and environmentally friendly manufacturing processes. In the “ ve-year process of re-engineering our factory to meet the ISO 14001 criteria, we learned a lot that can bene“ t other companies,Ž Veilleux said. Some of the steps we took cost little to nothing; others were, frankly, expensive. But all companies today need to be aware that consumers are looking at what theyre doing to … and for … the planet, and theyre making buying decisions based on that.Ž These are some of the initiatives undertaken at Euromed Barcelona, which manufactures herbal extracts and natural active substances for customers in the United States and Europe. € Recycling biomass … the companys manufacturing waste product. Weve found different ways to recycle the post-extraction biomass, depending on the product involved, Veilleux said. Much of the residue is sent to companies that specialize in creating bio-gas … speci“ cally, methane, which is used to generate power,Ž he said. However, the residue left from milk thistle has such a high nutritional value, its actually used to feed farm animals. We ship the waste product to a company that dries it out and cleans it before its added to feed for pigs, chickens, cows, and the like.Ž € Wood pallets become compost. At Euromed, wooden pallets are reused until they cant be used any longer. At that point, theyre sent to recycling facilities, which use them in composting products,Ž Veilleux said. This step was easily accomplished by working through waste management companies. € Printer toners get re“ lled. Empty toner cartridges are shipped to the companys supplier, where theyre recharged and returned for use. If not for recycling, the toner cartridges would be deposited in land“ lls. € Cleaner air and water. The company purchased new equipment to accomplish these goals, including on-site wastewater treatment and water puri“ cation plants, and equipment to decrease atmospheric emissions. All totaled, Euromed spent $1 million to $2 million to upgrade its factory. It was money well spent, Veilleux said. Were excited about the certi“ cation because it veri“ es that were one of the worlds leaders in environmentally friendly production,Ž he said. Thats very important to us … we rely on plants, the Earths natural, renewable resources,not only for our business but for our personal health. We have a special interest in making everyone aware of how vital it is that we all take steps to prevent environmental damage,Ž he said. Euromed USA supplies standardized botanical and herbal extracts and natural active substances for use in the pharmaceutical, health food and cosmetics industries. Euromed was founded 40 years ago. Its parent company is the 100-year-old Rottapharm-Madaus corporation based in Italy.O ers tips for companies trying to clean up their act The Wakulla News

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 – Page 13ADear EarthTalk: I heard that the Arctic summer sea ice is at its lowest level since we began recording it. What are the implications of all this melting? Jo Shoemaker Bowie, Md. It is true that on Sept. 16, 2012 the world reached a new low: The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) reported that the extent of sea ice across the Arctic was at its lowest since satellite record-keeping began in 1979. On that date the sea ice reached its summer minimum, 1.32 million square miles, half of what the average size of summer ice was between 1979 and 2000, and almost 20 percent lower than the previous record minimum of 1.61 million square miles set on Sept. 18, 2007. NSIDC added that, despite especially warm conditions in 2007 being much more favorable for sea ice loss than this year, the thinning of sea ice due to climate change has made the ice more vulnerable to breakup and melting. Meanwhile, researchers with the European Space Agencys CryoSat-2 probe reported in August that beyond the loss of sea-ice extent, the thickness and volume of the ice has also been declining signi“ cantly faster than expected. They found just 1,679 cubic miles this past summer as compared to 3,118 cubic miles in the summer of 2004. They anticipate that the Arctic could be ice-free in the summer for a day or more by the end of the decade. The implications of such melting are potentially immense. For starters, wildlife like polar bears, seals and walruses depend on sea ice for their survival; their habitat is literally being pulled out from under them. Polar bears were added to the federal Endangered Species List in 2008 for this very reason in what environmentalists herald as a great victory in that the federal government officially recognized the existence of global warming and would therefore be able to take more decisive action to rein in carbon pollution„of course, that part of the dream has yet to be realized. Perhaps even more alarming is the fact that melting sea ice and accelerating Arctic warming spur changes in the jet stream that increase the frequency of weather extremes like droughts, ” oods, heat waves and cold spells in the mid-latitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere. The fact that 2012 has been a scorcher all around„July was the hottest month on record, with twothirds of the U.S. in drought, wild“ res running rampant and half the counties in the country designated as federal disaster areas„only makes the connection between carbon pollution and the greenhouse effect all the more apparent. Environmentalists argue that we already have the technology and the legal tools to achieve rapid greenhouse pollution reductions Full use of all of the Clean Air Acts successful pollution-reduction programs is our best route to quick reductions in greenhouse gas emissions,Ž says Shaye Wolf, climate science director at the Center for Biological Diversitys Climate Law Institute. The Obama administration, however, has been too slow and timid in using this bedrock law to cut pollution.Ž The polar meltdown shows were teetering on the brink of climate-change catastrophe,Ž adds Wolf. Arctic sea ice plays a critical role in regulating the planets climate. We cant wait any longer to cut carbon pollution.Ž Dear EarthTalk: Whats the latest on the proposal to turn parts of the Northern Forest in Maine into a big national park? Peter Griswold Jaffrey, N.H. The idea of turning a large chunk of forest in central Maine into a national park dates back at least 150 years when Henry David Thoreau himself called for making the region a national preserveŽ in essays about his travels through the area via foot and canoe in the 1850s. To this day most of the areas in central Maine that Thoreau visited are still primarily undeveloped save for intermittent timber extraction. But recent changes in land ownership there are worrying ecologists. The non-profit RESTORE: The North Woods has been carrying the torch for creating a Maine Woods National Park and Preserve for 20 years and reports that, between 1994 and 2005, the share of forest land in Maines 9.3 million acre Unorganized Territory owned by timber companies dropped from 59.2 to 15.5 percent while that owned by investors grew from 3.2 to 32.6 percent. RESTORE is concerned that this dramatic change positions the region for a real estate gold rush. A huge development already planned for the shores of Moosehead Lake in the region is just one example of the kinds of changes afoot that could decimate the regions wilderness qualities. RESTOREs proposal, first aired in 1994, calls for setting aside 3.2-million acres surrounding Baxter State Park (home of Maines tallest peak, Mt. Katahdin, and the northern tip of the Appalachian Trail) as a national park. Bigger than Yellowstone and Yosemite combined, the proposed park would safeguard thousands of miles of rivers and streams while providing unfragmented habitat for wildlife. According to RESTORE, there are no significant chunks of undeveloped wilderness anywhere in the Northeastern United States and that such a large park is needed to protect wildlife habitat on a landscape scale to allow for adaptation in the face of unprecedented climate change.Ž Also, the proposed park would ensure permanent access for outdoor recreation and support a diversi“ ed and sustainable economy. Although RESTOREs campaign has the backing of a majority of Maine residents, it has failed to gain enough traction to make it before Congress. Some blame local opposition, allied as the Maine Woods Coalition, for convincing the states Congressional delegation not to push for the proposal. A new proposal from Burts bees founder Roxanne Quimby later rekindled the issue: In May 2011 she offered to donate up to 70,000 acres she owns adjacent to Baxter State Park for a new national park, along with a $40 million endowment for park operations. And to appease those opposed to RESTOREs proposal, she offered a similar amount of land for multiple-use, including hunting. Quimbys proposal includes only lands she owns, and would create a much smaller park than what RESTORE envisioned. A few months after Quimby made her offer known U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis held a public listening session in Millinocket, Maine. But then in February 2012, Maines Congressional delegation convinced Secretary Salazar to table the new proposal for the time being. So for now, the fate of millions of trees„the veritable lungs of the Northeastern U.S.„and hundreds of wildlife species may just hang in the balance. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine.com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Special to The NewsWilliam O. BillŽ Cleckley, the Northwest Florida Water Management Districts Director of Land Management and Acquisition, was recognized by Audubon Florida for his achievements managing public forests, lakes, springs and wetlands in northwest Florida. Each year, Audubon presents its Sustainable Forestry Award at the Florida Forestry Associations annual meeting to honor a forester for protecting the states water and wildlife. Throughout his 26 years at the District, Bill has shown an unwavering commitment to protecting and restoring Floridas treasured water and land resources,Ž said District Executive Director Jon Steverson. Thanks to his leadership and dedication, the District has developed one of the most active restoration and recreational programs in the South and natural communities across the panhandle continue to thrive.Ž During his tenure with the District, Cleckley helped acquire more than 122,000 acres key to the protection and preservation of Floridas water resources. He also oversees 212,371 acres of District-owned property and more than 12,400 acres of conservation easements. Using his forestry expertise to focus on habitat restoration, hes led efforts to reforest more than 11,000 acres of longleaf pine uplands and restore groundcover on thousands of acres of upland and wetland wiregrass habitats. Bill Cleckley has done an excellent job of managing and restoring the Districts public lands, which are a resource for people and wildlife alike,Ž said Eric Draper, Audubon Florida Executive Director. Anyone who has used the Districts lands for recreation knows that they provide a gateway to a wonderful assemblage of springs, forests and rivers. Audubon is proud to be associated with the Florida Forestry Association to present this award.Ž The Districts lands protect many important wetland and natural vegetation communities, including river floodplains, recharge areas/ springs, headwater wetlands, coastal marshes and pristine bottomland hardwood and associated upland forests. The Districts acquisitions include more than 85 percent of the ” oodplains along the Choctawhatchee and Escambia rivers and Econ“ na Creek. Every acre of Districtowned land is open for sustainable public use, offering a variety of recreational activities, including bird-watching, nature study, photography, hiking, jogging, camping, fishing, hunting, swimming, canoeing, boating and other nature-related outdoor activities. By working cooperatively with local law enforcement agencies, the District is committed to providing family-friendly springs and waterways experiences for Floridians and visitors. Wilderness advocates have been wanting to create a Maine Woods National Park and Preserve for 20 years, but politicians have consistently caved in to opponents, even tabling an offer by Burts Bees founder Roxanne Quimby, who offered to donate land to create a much smaller park alongside Baxter State Park, pictured here.PHOTO BY NASA/GODDARD SCIENTIFIC VISUALIZATION STUDIO NUMBPHOTO, COURTESY FLICKRNWFWMD Land Manager recognized for restoration e orts The Wak u lla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com What are the implications of melting Artic ice? On Sept. 16, 2012 the National Snow and Ice Data Center reported that the extent of sea ice across the Arctic was at its lowest since satellite record-keeping began in 1979. Pictured: Satellite data reveal how the new record low compares to the average minimum extent over the past 30 years. William BillŽ CleckleySpecial to The NewsOrganic foods are not merely a passing trend. According to statistics tracking food purchases, more consumers are embracing organic foods. Whole Foods Food Shopping Trend Tracker Survey,Ž which was conducted online by Harris Interactive between Aug. 3 and Aug. 7, indicated nearly three out of four Americans (73 percent) do not want to compromise on the food they buy, despite what foods costs at the store. Seventy-one percent of survey participants said they prefer natural and organic foods over conventional foods, particularly if the prices are comparable. Nearly 27 percent of shoppers routinely devote more than 25 percent of their grocery store budgets to organic products, and nearly half are willing to pay higher prices for locally produced foods. Quality, selection and freshness of foods are the things driving many people to purchase organic and natural food items. DID YOU KNOW?Organic foods arent a passing trend30 percent of home energy lost to poorly sealed ductworkAccording to Going Green Today, an estimated 15 to 30 percent of a homes total heating and cooling energy is lost through poorly sealed ductwork, costing consumers about $5 billion dollars annually. A consultation with a heating and cooling technician may reveal where the drafts are located and what can be done to address the problem.

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsBlake Ross Nolin, 26, of Crawfordville was arrested on Oct. 25 and charged with possession of a weapon by a convicted felon, burglary, grand theft and grand theft of a firearm. Nine members of the WCSO law enforcement staff executed a search warrant at the suspects home. A “ rearm from an early October theft case was recovered at the home and seized as evidence. Detectives also discovered a prescription medication bottle that was not owned by the suspect. The search warrant was executed without incident. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce this week: OCTOBER 25 € Edward Kimberlin of Crawfordville reported the loss of a tag from a boat trailer. The victim noticed that the tag was missing while working to maintain the trailer. The victim does not believe the tag was stolen. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € John Trice of Crawfordville reported an arson case. A scrap vehicle on the victims property was observed burning. The vehicle was valued at $250. The vehicle “ re was extinguished and a witness stated he observed two juveniles near the scene prior to the “ re. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Reserve Deputy Roy Gunnarsson investigated. € James Bridwell of Crawfordville reported a hit-and-run crash involving his parked vehicle. The victim was at a Crawfordville business when a witness told him his vehicle had just been struck by another motorist who ” ed the area. Damage was observed to the right front portion of the car. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. OCTOBER 26 € Detectives Lorne Whaley and Nick Boutwell were seeking a wanted person in Crawfordville. While speaking to a suspect in a case, the detectives discovered two marijuana smoking pipes with residue on them. Due to multiple individuals living at the home ownership could not be determined and there were no arrests. The property was seized for disposal. € Benjamin T. Moore of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim could not “ nd his cellular telephone following visits to Crawfordville businesses. He called the number and an unknown male answered the phone. It has not been determined exactly where the phone was lost or stolen. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. Bobby Robison of Crawfordville reported a vehicle fire. The victim reported that his boat caught “ re in his yard. The victim observed the “ re and attempted to put it out with a hose. An extension cord was observed at the scene that was used to charge a boat battery. Wakulla “ re“ ghters ruled the “ re an accident although the exact cause of the “ re is still under investigation. The boat was a total loss. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € A 15-year-old Crawfordville male was issued a notice to appear in court for resisting an of“ cer without violence and disorderly conduct. The teenager became unruly at the high school football game and was asked to leave school property. Road patrol deputies offered to drive the teenager home but he refused to calm down and resisted efforts by deputies to assist him. Eventually, deputies secured the teenager in a patrol vehicle at property near the school and transported him to his home where he was issued the NTA. Sgt. Ray Johnson, Sgt. Mike Helms, Detective Matt Helms and Deputy Carl Allen investigated. OCTOBER 27 € Charles McCool of Crawfordville reported a hit-and-run at his home. Someone struck the victims mailbox with a motor vehicle. The mailbox is valued at $50 and evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € Ephe Williams of Crawfordville reported the theft of a Wal-Mart gift card. The victim misplaced the card and discovered later that it was used several times to leave a zero balance on the card. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Amanda McCord of Crawfordville reported the theft of an automotive battery from her vehicle. The vehicle was parked at the victims home. The battery is valued at $50. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € Charles Hardeman of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victim loaned the vehicle to a friend who had not returned it. Kelli Marie Taylor, 26, of Sopchoppy met Deputy Clint Beam at the sheriffs of“ ce and told Deputy Beam the vehicle was in Woodville. Later, a relative of the suspect returned the vehicle and Deputy Beam took possession of the keys. Taylor was arrested for vehicle theft and the vehicle was secured at the WCSO for the victim. € Mary Randolph of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim told Deputy Mike Zimba that someone had broken into her home on more than one occasion and stolen food from her kitchen. A forced entry was discovered at the home. The stolen food items are valued at $50. OCTOBER 28 € Angela Brower of Skybox Lounge reported a theft. Two suspects consumed $107 worth of alcoholic beverages and left the establishment without paying their bill. The suspects were identified and warrants have been requested for fraud/swindling or defrauding an innkeeper. Deputy Mike Zimba and Reserve Deputy David Pienta investigated. OCTOBER 29 € Deputy Mike Zimba discovered an abandoned bicycle in a wooded area on Feli Way in Crawfordville. The bike was found in the woodline and is valued at $75. The owner of the bike is unknown and it was turned into WCSO Evidence for storage. € Sgt. Ray Johnson observed a disoriented 14year-old student at lunch at Riversprings Middle School. It was determined that the student may have received some pills from a friend and consumed them. Wakulla EMS transported the student to the hospital for treatment. He was released from the hospital several hours later. € Justin Duggan of the Wakulla County Fire Department reported a criminal mischief to a “ re vehicle. Someone damaged the wiring under the dashboard. Damage is estimated at $800. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. € Catrina Auxier of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and a television was stolen along with medications. The missing property is valued at $1,700 and damage to the home is estimated at $150. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. OCTOBER 30 € Dorothy Pate of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at the entrance to the Grove subdivision. Lantern covers on the subdivision entrance sign were damaged. Extra patrols were set up in the area. Damage was estimated at $100. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. € Frank Simmons of Crawfordville reported an illegal dumping on Spring Creek Highway. Tires were dumped on the vacant lot on which the property owner plans to build a structure. Litter Control Of“ cer David Roberts was contacted to remove the tires and the WCSO work crew counted 97 tires that weighed 2,500 pounds. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. € William Stinson of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim noticed an unauthorized charge of $185 on his bank account from a Wal-Mart in the Orlando area. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. OCTOBER 31 € Travis Perez of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. Four unauthorized transactions were observed on the victims bank card. The transactions totaled $223 and were reported in New York. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. NOVEMBER 1 € Michael Joseph Butler, 54, of Crawfordville was arrested for fleeing and attempting to elude a law enforcement of“ cer, driving while license suspended or revoked-habitual offender and resisting an officer with violence following a traf“ c stop. Deputy Mike Zimba ob-served the motorist driving at a high rate of speed on Woodville Highway. He also crossed the road center line and fog lines several times. Butler failed to stop on Kinsey Road as the deputy used his emergency lights and siren and eventually stopped at his home. Butler refused to comply with the directions of Deputy Zimba and cursed the deputy repeatedly. Deputy Zimba used pepper spray to secure Butler when he became combative and refused to follow orders. The length of the attempted traf“ c stop was “ ve miles and a DUI investigation was also conducted. The results of the DUI blood draw are pending. Deputy Scott Powell and FHP Trooper John Tallman assisted at the scene. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 965 calls for service during the past week including 17 business and residential alarms; 13 assists to other agencies; 70 citizen contacts; 14 disturbances; 16 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 11 E-911 abandoned regular calls; 18 regular E-911 calls; 36 investigations; 10 loud music/noise complaints; 40 medical emergencies; 357 business and residential security checks; 34 special details; 41 subpoena services; 35 traf“ c enforcements; 57 traf“ c stops; 10 disabled vehicles;12 reckless vehicles; 13 wanted people and 22 watch orders.Sheri s Report 5 Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2 Go to http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click ContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ. www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 – Page 15A IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle G E T READY FOR HUN T IN G GET TO A BETTER STATE.’ CALL ME TODAY. 1103208 12/11Get a Free Discount Double Check.’ I can help you save like a champion, with discounts that could add up to XX%* and be worth hundreds of dollars. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, State Farm Indemnity Company, Bloomington, IL *Discounts may vary by state. Aaron Rodgers got his. How about you? 40% *Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO Continued from Page 1A Langston had his job title changed from Undersheriff to Major to come into compliance. Langston missed a couple of forums held by groups or individuals he felt wouldnt treat him fairly, but he did attend forums held by the Chamber and a bi-partisan forum of local Republicans and Democrats. The race turned rough with Langston aggressively taking on Creel, labeling him a traffic copŽ while comparing his own law enforcement quali“ cations. Creel is a retired Florida Highway Patrol trooper. A third party group sent out a mailer blasting Creel for an incident in South Florida more than 30 years ago in which he “ red his weapon at a speeding car that had wrecked into several police cars. He took the action without approval from a supervisor and was given a letter of reprimand. Langston denied involvement with the group that sent the mailer. After the long campaign, Creel said he looked forward to bringing the county back together.Charlie Creel is new sheri Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum presented a Distinguished Service Award to Joseph B. and Alida Schaffer of Crawfordville on Wednesday, Oct. 17 for 25 years of dedicated support of the Florida Sheriffs Association Youth Ranches. The award was signed by Sheriff Crum and Highlands County Sheriff Susan Benton, who is president of the Florida Sheriffs Association. We appreciate the support of people like the Schaffers who have supported the Youth Ranches for many years,Ž said Sheriff Crum. It is a great cause.Ž We are happy to do it,Ž said Joseph Schaffer.Special to The NewsThe Florida Sheriffs Association (FSA) announced that a three-week operation of the Florida Sheriffs Task Force (FSTF) resulted in 11,875 felons being removed from the streets. Operation Felon Sweep combined the strengths of 43 Sheriffs Of“ ces from Sept. 28 to Oct. 22 and focused on removing violent felons and felons with outstanding warrants off the streets. This was a concentrated effort that included targeted enforcement activities as well as adding extra resources to highlight the role Sheriffs and their teams play in crime reduction. Operation Felon Sweep was an aggressive initiative that included proactive enforcement efforts to locate elusive felons, enhance law enforcement presence in certain higher crime areas, provide additional patrols and resources to combat violent crime, and one of the most comprehensive and intense efforts to check the whereabouts and activities of sexual predators and offenders across the state. When the safety of Floridas citizens is threatened, our Sheriffs have developed the resources to act swiftly and strategically to address the issue at hand,Ž said Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd, Florida Sheriffs Task Force chair. FSA is proud of this sweep and the many other successes resulting from great work by the Florida Sheriffs Task Force.Ž The sheriffs of the State of Florida and their deputies work each day to combat threats to the safety of our citizenry and protect their quality of life. Operation Felon Sweep focused primarily on violent felons with outstanding warrants and sexual offenders and predators from our communities. Past initiatives have targeted cyber sexual predators, prescription drug abusers and deadbeat dads,Ž and resulted in arrests statewide. Felony crimes are considered most dangerous, and the Florida Sheriffs Association is proud to lead this initiative to get the most serious criminals off the streets,Ž said Highlands County Sheriff Susan Benton, FSA president. The Florida Sheriffs Task Force will continue to work tirelessly to make Florida one of the safest states in the country.Ž The Florida Sheriffs Task Force pools resources from the 67 Sheriffs Of“ ces to address specific areas of concern. The Florida Sheriffs Task Force also is the point of contact for statewide initiatives, including helping to staff the State Emergency Operations Center and coordinating Sheriffs of“ ces responses to storm-ravaged communities during hurricanes and other disasters. WAKULLA COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE statistics: 37 FELONY ARRESTS over the three week period. Fourteen arrested the “ rst week, 16 arrested the second and seven arrested the third week. Charges included aggravated battery, aggravated assault, kidnapping, “ rearm offenses, burglary, forgery, fraud and felony battery with two seized “ rearms and a small seizure of cocaine.Special to The NewsThe U.S. Marshal Service conducted an Absconder/ Department of Corrections Sex Offender Operation from Oct. 29 to Nov. 2 and arrested 15 individuals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden and Liberty counties on a wide variety of charges. Members of local law enforcement agencies, including the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce, take part in U.S. Marshal Operations on a regular basis. The relationship between the U.S. Marshals Of“ ce and local law enforcement allows the agencies to share manpower, equipment and intelligence for more effective law enforcement. The charges from the operation included: probations violations and other arrests involving theft, firearms, narcotics, battery, arson, witness tampering, assault, driving while license is suspended or revoked and failure to appear. In addition, the Marshals Of“ ce and local law enforcement agencies conducted 66 sexual offender and sexual predator compliance checks on individuals on Halloween night in the same four counties.Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce detectives have arrested an 18-year-old Crawfordville male in connection with a series of sexually related offenses committed against underage children, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Jamal Jerez Gavin faces charges of felony sexual battery with a weapon on a victim of 12 years of age; misdemeanor battery; and felony lewd and lascivious act in the presence of a child under age 16. During the month of October, detectives investigated three complaints involving a 12-year-old male victim, a 13-year-old female victim and a 17-year-old female victim. The male victim told investigators that he was forced to perform a sex act on Gavin while he was at the victims home playing video games. When the victim refused to follow Gavins demand, Gavin produced a knife and threatened the victim. Gavin was charged with sexual battery with a weapon in the case. The 13-year-old female victim told investigators that Gavin touched her inappropriately while she was in a swimming pool during the summer. The victim provided three incidents where Gavin touched her in inappropriate locations. He was charged with a lewd and lascivious act in the case. The 17-year-old female victim disclosed that Gavin grabbed her inappropriately while she was outside a Crawfordville business before she could get away. Gavin was charged with battery in the case. Gavin was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident and remains in the jail with no bond. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSService award presented to Scha ers Gavin is arrested for sexual o enses Jamal Jerez Gavin Marshal conducts sex o ender operation Task force makes 12,000 arrests during sweep Continued from Page 1A I was hoping my message would resonate a little better with voters,Ž Thomas said. Ive been doing this for eight months … Ive put in a lot of energy and money into it.Ž I respect the voters voice,Ž Thomas said. I can hold my head up high that I ran a good, clean campaign,Ž he said. Pearce said the biggest thing he learned on the campaign trail is that You cant control a political campaign, you can only hope to guide it. Its very dif“ cult to maintain the course you set out on.Ž He will be sworn-in on Nov. 19 and take office on Nov. 20 at the School Boards restructuring meeting at which they choose a chair, vice-chair and set meeting dates and times. Pearce also thanked Miller for his role. I would like to say this … I have known David Miller most of my life. Hes been a coach, a teacher, a boss, a mentor.Ž Of the situation of an assistant superintendent running for his bosss job, Pearce said there were a lot of things that couldve happened. Ive been treated with grace by him, respect by him.Ž I feel very sure that his endorsement of me was a very big turning point in this race,Ž Pearce said. Of the challenges ahead, Pearce said, Well have to work very hard as s team … and we already have a very strong team in place.ŽPearce takes superintendent of schools race Like us on

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comThanksgiving is coming and with it all the wonderful traditional dishes from recipes passed down through the generations. Historically, these specialties have been concocted from locally produced foodstuffs, but with that distinctive and unique quality identified with familys pride. Chief among those family culinary treats are the desserts, or offerings which would be desserts under non-holiday conditions. An oft used ingredient in these gastronomic delights is the local tree nuts: pecans, hickory and the occasional walnut. Each nut variety adds a distinctive flavor or texture to cooked icings, sweet potato pie, divinity, and all the other mortal temptations which entice violation of modern dietary restrictions. Alas, there others in Wakulla County who are tempted to gorge on the tree nuts raining down in autumn, and attracted to the trees themselves. The most recognized tree nut poacher is the common gray squirrel, Sciurus carolinensis, sometimes known as a limb rat. It collects nuts in the fall and buries them in caches for later use. Forgotten deposits will rot or germinate. Squirrels produce two litters annually with two to six pups. They are weaned at seven weeks and leave the nest at 10 weeks, ready to eat. Luckily tree nuts are not their only source of nourishment. Walnut caterpillars and Hickory Horned Devils do prefer to feed on foliage of trees in the family Juglandaceae (pecans, hickories and walnuts) and can affect nut yield. Walnut caterpillar moths emerge from the ground in late spring after spending the winter underground in the pupae phase. The moths quickly lay round, white eggs in loose masses of 300 or more on the underside of host plant leaves. The larvae or caterpillars appear soon after. They are animated and commonly feed in groups. Small larvae skeletonize leaves but larger larvae consume all but the center leaf stem. Heavy populations can damage the nut yield. Periodically the caterpillars migrate back to the trunk or larger limbs each time they are ready to shed their skins. An unsightly hairballŽ of shed skins remains on the trunk as the cluster caterpillars returns to the foliage and continues feeding. Populations vary greatly from year to year and from tree to tree. Isolated trees or trees growing in small groups are especially susceptible to infestation. Fortunately these caterpillars are on the menu for a wide variety of birds and small animals. When disturbed or attacked the larvae arch their head and tail into the air to “ ght off predators. The hickory horned devil is not as common, but is among the largest of our native caterpillars. It is about the size of a large hot dog. The caterpillars are usually bluegreen, but may vary some in tone. The larva has a menacing appearance with multiple horns protruding in almost every direction, but they are harmless to humans. The Hickory Horned Devil is a hearty feeder on local Hickories and pecans, but overwinters in the pupae phase. In late spring it emerges as the regal moth to begin the process again. To learn more about animal which enjoy Wakulla Countys tree nut crop, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u” .edu/Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931.These pests go after pecans and other nuts You’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe Wakuulanews Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe most common nut poacher is the common gray squirrel, top; another is the Walnut caterpillar, middle, which feed in groups; and the less common hickory horned devil, bottom. Win or lose (ad deadlines are before election day) We will be forever grateful for the connections with so many wonderful people of Wakulla County Ramsay & Jim Parham "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www.FairValuesInWakulla.com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles made it look easier than it should have, rolling over the district rival Godby Cougars to take the crown as district champions. The undefeated War Eagles (9-0, 3-0 district) moved up to the No. 1 ranking for Division 5A in Maxpreps … and No. 16 in the state … after knocking off Godby 23-12 on Friday, Nov. 2. We seem to be peaking,Ž Head Coach Scott Klees said of his team, noting the level of play seems to be improving every week. Some observers had expected a drop-off this year from last years War Eagle team that made it to the state championship game, and while Klees acknowledged that Wakulla lost a lot of talented players, this years team has played above a lot of peoples expectations. Some people didnt expect much from this team … I did, and my coaching staff did,Ž he said. We are by far a very, very wellrounded team. And a very deep team.Ž While this team has suffered injuries, Klees noted that, For whatever reason, the next guy has been able to step up and do the job.Ž He credited the team with maintaining an even keel during games … not letting themselves become too emotional. It showed against Godby, he said … after Godby scored “ rst. The War Eagles had gone threeand-out on their opening drive. But Godby, he noted, On their opening drive, they went right down the “ eld, boom, boom, boom and scored.Ž But the War Eagles didnt become flustered or lose focus, Klees said. On their “ rst offensive play after Godbys kickoff, running back Demetrius Lindsey took the ball for a 72-yard run to tie the game at 6 all. Klees said he and his staff have been preaching about maintaining an even keel. Throughout the course of the the game, youre going to make good plays and bad plays. How you react to that can determine the course of the game.Ž The War Eagle defense locked down on the Cougars after that “ rst score, and the Wakulla defense rattled off 23 unanswered points. In the fourth quarter, with time running out … and aided by a couple of Wakulla personal foul penalties … Godby did move the ball down the “ eld and score a touchdown. The two-point conversion failed, and Wakulla recovered the onside kick. On Godbys last possession, freshman Keith Gavin intercepted a pass to seal the victory. But Klees acknowledged that his team did leave points out there … plays that could have been made but werent. With a couple of seconds before halftime, Wakulla had the ball at the Godby 2-yard line but couldnt score. A perfectly executed ” eaflicker trick play worked well, except the pass was dropped by the open receiver. Another pass at the goal line was dropped. Weve got to “ x those,Ž Klees said. When you get to the playoffs, you cant leave points out there.Ž The win secures home“ eld advantage for the “ rst two games of the playoffs. But the win also came at a cost: The War Eagles lost running back and kicker Dillon Norman for the rest of the season with a torn ACL. Its not clear whos going to replace the speedy Norman in the running back rotation. Nor who can take his place as kicker … though both backup quarterback Feleipe Franks and cornerback Brandon Nichols have been practicing. Outstanding offensive lineman John Cole went to the hospital after suffering a contusion on his back. He was injured in the “ rst quarter but continued playing the rest of the half. Continued on Page 4BSection B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 sports news and team views SportsIGG’s gymnastic teams have had good year Page 2B Halloween pictures Page 7B Empty Bowl pictures Page 14B DISTRICT CHAMPS!The War Eagles play their best game in a 23-12 domination of Godby Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpeedster Demetrius Lindsey, 11, follows the lead block of freshman back Monterious Loggins, 27. Lindsey would gain 139 yards in 18 carries in a winning effort against the Godby Cougars on Friday night.THIS WEEK: The War Eagles play Escambia County at home at J.D. Jones Stadium on Friday, Nov. 9, at 7:30 p.m. Some things get better with age. Capital Health Plan is one of them. Plan to attend a SEMINAR to LEARN MORE about CHP Advantage Plus (HMO) and CHP Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-8708943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Paid Endorsement. Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 to RSVP or for more information. (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/medicare Seminars will be held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center 1491 Governors Square Blvd.H5938_DP 121 File & Use 09242011 Anna Johnson says.... Join me and become a member of a Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO) Plan.Ž SM Friday, November 9 Monday, November 12 Tuesday, November 13 Wednesday, November 21 Friday, November 23 Thursday, November 29 Friday, November 30 Wednesday, December 5 Thursday, December 6 At HealthSouth, we understand that recovering from a stroke can be challenging. But no matter where a patient is in his/her recovery process, or how long ago the stroke occurred, our Second Chance Stroke Program could help maximize functional ability, increase independence and improve quality of life. This includes areas of mobility, speech or written communication, swallowing, cognitive functions and activities of daily living. Our program oers: € Physical/occupational/speech therapy € Certi“ed rehabilitation nurses € Therapist trained in neuro developmental treatment € Patient/family education € Support groups Admission is by referral for a free in-home evaluation. For more information contact us. YOU DESERVE A SECOND CHANCE 2012:HealthSouth Corporation:551344 Law Oce Est. 1998Fore cl osures Creditor / Debtor B usiness L aw1 7 High Drive, S uite C Courthouse Sq uare Crawfordvi ll e, F l orida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator

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Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBY PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach On Saturday morning, the Wakulla High School cross country teams were once again at the Apalachee Regional Cross Country Park, this time competing for their respective 2A District titles. The course was in excellent shape, as it is being prepared for this Fridays NCAA Regional Meet, but record high temperatures and a late starting time made the conditions especially challenging for the 2A runners. By the time the races were run and the results tabulated, the local harriers learned that they had won both the boys and girls District Titles. Additionally, junior captain Aaron Smith captured the overall individual boys district title and junior girls co-captain Margaret Wiedeman had earned the district runner-up individual title for the girls. This week the boys race started at 10:30 a.m., with the girls going off at 11 a.m. The boys race was hotly contested with WHSs Smith battling with two Marianna and two Florida High runners for the lead for the “ rst two miles of the 5K race. At 1.5 miles, as the runners charged up the infamous hill on the course known as the wall,Ž Smith was in “ fth place, but in close contact. By 2 miles, it was a twoway battle between Smith and Anthony Mahoney, from Florida High. Over the “ nal mile Smith kept the pressure on and opened a gap that he was able to hold to the “ nish. His winning time was 17:40, nine seconds ahead of Mahoney, who held on to second place. Third, fourth and “ fth places were taken by other Florida High and Marianna runners, but then the depth of the local team became evident, as WHS runners captured “ ve of the next seven places, with J.P. Piotrowsk i placing sixth, Travis Parks seventh, Lane Willliams ninth, Ryan Dodson 11th and Alan Pearson 12th. Mitchell Atkinson was the “ nal local varsity runner, finishing in 19th place. This placing gave the local squad a score of 34 points, well ahead of the Marianna (62 points) and Floida High (65 points), Rickards (69) and East Gadsen (140). In cross country, the lowest score wins. The “ rst three teams and top 13 individuals quali“ ed for this weeks Regional Meet that will be held at Sunnyhill Farms in Leon County. The top 13 runners were also named to the AllDistrict Team and quali“ ed individually for the Regional Meet, which included the WHS contingent of Smith, Piotrowski, Parks, Williams, Dodson and Pearson. The Marianna and Florida High teams also advanced to the Regional Meet. GIRLS MEET By the time the girls toed the starting line, the sun had come out and the temperatures were in the 80s, less than ideal conditions for a distance race. However, the local harriers knew what they had to do and went out and took care of business. The meet came down to a team battle with Florida High, with the WHS runners winning handily. In cross country, 15 is a perfect score, meaning that a team takes all of the “ rst “ ve places. The WHS girls werent quite able to pull that off, but did “ nish with the excellent score of 19, with Florida High capturing second place with a score of 37. Both teams will advance to the Regional Meet. Immediately after the starting gun was “ red, Taylor Countys lone entry in the meet, Meagan Giddens, the Districts top female runner all season, charged into the lead and was never seriously threatened, “ nishing in 20:54. WHSs Margaret Wiedeman ran a strong and controlled race, finishing in second place in 21:55, 16 seconds ahead of Florida Highs Amanda Toothman. Once again, the WHS depth became evident as local runners captured the fourth, sixth, seventh and eighth places. Senior Ray-chel Gray ran a good race to “ nish fourth, with Kasey James coming in sixth, Lydia Wiedeman seventh and Lilianna Broadway eighth. Freshman Connie Lewis also had a solid race, “ nishing in 13th place and Logan Kelley “ nished 21st. M. Wiedeman, Gray, James, L. Wiedeman, Broadway and Lewis were all named to the All-District Team and quali“ ed indvidually, as well as a team, for the Regional Meet. We are extremely proud of the kids and what they have accomplished so far this year,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. We had speci“ c goals for this meet and we accomplished almost all of them. We werent really concerned about the times we ran this week,Ž Hoover said, we just concentrated on placing and advancing to the Regional Meet. The boys team this year has really surprised us and a lot of other people. Coming into the season, we were expected to place either third or fourth in the district, but I guess our guys forgot to read that. They have steadily improved all season and have pulled for and challenged each other, with the results being a win Saturday. As near as we can determine, this is the first time in school history that a WHS boys team has won or been the runner-up at the District Meet. Weve had individual champions before, but never a team.Ž Additionally, to see Aaron go from a 27 minute 5K runner just last year to an individual District Champion this year, has been something special. Im not quite sure how you improve that much, but he has … through hard work and a heart as big as he is.Ž Our girls have also performed exceptionally well this year,Ž Hoover said. They are absolutely solid, know what they have to do and they go out and do it every week. Margaret was the individual champion last year and I know that she wanted to repeat this year, and she came close, but she has had an excellent season so far and has been our first girl every time she has raced this season. Both of our teams are really looking forward the Regional Meet and the possibility of qualifying for State and I wouldnt bet against them!Ž Chiles High School will host the Regional Meet on Saturday, Nov. 10, at Sunnyhill Farms off Centerville Road in north Leon County. The girls will run at 9:30 a.m. and the boys at 10:15 a.m.sports news and team views SportsCROSS COUNTRYWHS teams sweep District MeetSpecial to The NewsThe International Gold Gymnastics Competitive Teams have had a successful year as they head into the state competitions in November and December. Level 2 team members are McKenzie Anderson, Grace Carroll, Jaleesah Davis, Lucy Edwards, Emily Fondo, Abbott Gauger, Emma Hallaian, Elliyah Hilbert, Lily McMillian, Sydney Revels, Kaylee Sanders, Lily Stolk, and Alexis Wellman. They finished out their season with a second and a third place “ nish. Level 3 team members are Caroline Barwick, Aubree Bushee, Riley Davis, Jewell Fondo, Hannah Francis, Annika Matlock, Hailey Quick, Makenna Schissler, and Lillie Steinle. They “ nish out their season with three “ rst place “ nishes and a second place “ nish (missing “ rst by 0.6). The Level 3 State Competition will be held in Deer“ eld Beach on Nov. 17 and 18. Level 4 team members are Lacie Blackburn, Katarina Gunnarsson, Sadie Hobby, Haley Hooker, Leah Lewis, Cheyenne Porter, and Hailey Sandberg. They “ nish out their season with three third place finishes and a fourth place “ nish. The Level 4 State Competition will be held in Palmetto on Dec. 8 and 9. Level 5 team members are Hannah Bryan, Ansley Dull, Makenna Martindale, Melanie Oglesby, Kristen Romeka, Bailey Strickland, Emily Thomas, and Lindsey Wells. They “ nish out their season with three third place “ nishes and a fourth place “ nish. The Level 5/6 State Competition will be held in Kissimmee on Dec. 1 and 2. Level 6 team members are Brianne Camp, Kristen Romeka and Madisen Rudd. The Level 6 gymnasts competed in two meets to qualify for Level 7 and will be competing Prep-Optional in the spring. Being a gymnast takes a lot of dedication. These girls are in the gym training between four and 14 hours per week, depending on their level. Some of them “ nd time to participate in other activities as well as maintain academic excellence. GYMNASTICSPHOTO BY SAEEDEH POSEY/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSIGG teams have had a good year www.Ken FieldsPhotography.photoshelter.com Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC.THG-12902 G G Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Joint and Muscle soreness € Arthritis € Back aches

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Nov. 8  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Nov. 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Nov. 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Nov. 11  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Nov. 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Nov. 13  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. A group of seniors who have lived in Woodville throughout their lives will tell stories about its history. Wednesday, Nov. 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Nov. 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050.Special EventsThursday, Nov. 8  FOOD PRESERVATION WORKSHOP will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Extension Of ce by David Moody, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge director, and Shelley Swenson, Wakulla County FCS Extension agent. They will be covering the basics of food preservation through pressure canning and dehydrating. Moody has years of experience preserving wildlife and sh and wants to share some of the things that he has learned with others. Swenson will share an overview of the pressure canner, why a pressure canner must be used for low acid vegetables, meats and sh and some basic canning techniques. Sample foods will be provided. Registration fee is $5. Enroll by calling the Wakulla County Extension Of ce at 926-3931. Pre-registration is necessary, but workshop fee can be paid at the workshop. Saturday, Nov. 10  SIXTH ANNUAL VETERANS DAY CELEBRATION AND PARADE will start at 10 a.m. at Hudson Park by Wakulla Christian School to honor all veterans and active duty military. Parade entries are encouraged to decorate in a patriotic theme. There is no fee to enter, but a donation of toiletry supplies for active duty military is requested. There will also be games, food, raf e, vendors and silent auction.  FREE COMMUNITY FISH FRY will be held by Rocky Mount Church of Christ, which is located at 58 Dogwood Drive in Crawfordville, from 11:30 a.m. until it’s gone. Everyone is invited to attend.  TOCAMOS MAS featuring danceable rhythms and jazz improvisations will perform at 8 p.m. at Posh Java in Sopchoppy. This professional group of musicians combines keyboards, congas, timbales, bass guitar and vocals. The performance will also feature guest artist Richard Bertram on saxophone. The core band consists of William “Yazid” Johnson, keyboards, Chuck Carbia, bass guitar/lead vocals, and Paul Harvey and Dave Breault, on congas and timbales. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Seats are $10. Posh Java will be closing its doors at the end of December, so take advantage this musical performance.  MYERS CARTER SYRUP DAY will be held starting at 10 a.m. at his home. Family and friends will gather for fun and fellowship as music makers entertain. Carter and his helpers will cook, skim, stoke the re and bottle syrup. From the Wakulla County Courthouse take U.S. Highway 319 south 4.5 miles, look for Fish Hawk Trace on the right and follow the signs. Proceeds from the syrup sales will go to the Heritage Village Park project. Sunday, Nov. 11  FREE PANCAKE AND SAUSAGE BREAKFAST will be held by the Wakulla County Memorial Post, VFW POST 4538 from 7 a.m. until 10 a.m. Everyone is invited as a thank you and to give back to the public for its support throughout the year. The VFW post is located at 475 Arran Road, Crawfordville. Wednesday, Nov. 14  ANNUAL FARM CITY BREAKFAST will be held from 7 to 8 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce by the Wakulla County Farm Bureau. The purpose is to recognize the Owen Bellamy Family as the North Florida Fair Association’s 2012 Outstanding Farm Family for Wakulla County. The guest speaker will be Adam Basford, Florida Farm Bureau Federation, director of State Legislative Affairs. R.S.V.P. by Nov. 9 by calling 926-3931. Saturday, Nov. 17  THANKSGIVING COMMUNITY FEAST will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park by several Wakulla groups and churches. There will be free food and Christian fellowship.  FIRST BLUE JEANS AND FAST MACHINES EVENT for Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will be held from 5 to 10 p.m. at 3Y Ranch, Crawfordville. There will be dinner and entertainment by Local Motion. Enter a fast machine for $10. To attend the show only, cost is $5 per car load. Dinner and entertainment is $35 per person. A table sponsorship is $300. For more information, email helpkwcb@gmail.com, call 745-7111 or visit www.kwcb.org.  SOPCHOPPY OPRY will feature local country music legend Hoot Gibson with South Bound Band at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy School Auditorium. Hoot Gibson’s career in music spans over 60 years and his November appearance at the Opry has become a tradition. Tickets are $10. Call 962-3711 for tickets. Monday, Nov. 19  WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will hold a public meeting from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. Tuesday, Nov. 20  FREE COUNTY WIDE THANKSGIVING DINNER will be held at the Senior Center, 33 Michael Drive in Crawfordville, from 4 to 7 p.m. For questions, call 926-7145. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 – Page 3B Government Meetings Thursday, Nov. 8  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Tuesday, Nov. 13  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall.  WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Administration Of ce. Wednesday, Nov. 14  WAKULLA COUNTY CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD will hold a public hearing at 5:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorWe wanted to thank everyone who has made use of our e-book checkout service over its “ rst week. Many have come in, sent emails, or called with questions, comments, etc., which makes us very happy. As we continue to build the collection we need your input. What would you like to see? Keeping in mind that not every book is made into an e-book, and due to issues out of our control, not every e-book will be available to us to purchase. Please tell us how we should build the collection. This program opens up doors to easy access to entertainment and information to our patrons and our goal is to make it the best in the area. Please feel free to contact us and keep checking out our collection as we continue to build! For those interested, we will be holding our first workshop on how the overdrive system works on your Kindle next Thursday, Nov. 15 at 6 p.m. in our computer lab to answer any questions or help you learn how to use the system. We will hold workshops on other devices in the coming weeks. Please join us! Friday Night Movie Were happy to show this Friday night at 7 p.m., the newest take on the Spider Man saga. This PG-13 “ lm tells of Peter Parker “ nding a clue that might help him understand why his parents disappeared when he was young. His path puts him on a collision course with Dr. Curt Connors, his fathers former partner. With dazzling special effects and a return to Spideys roots, this worldwide hit should start the long weekend off with a thrilling two hours. Bring the family out as we show the “ lm on the same day its released on DVD! Doors open at 6:45 p.m. and seating will be limited due to “ re code restrictions. Please have minors be accompanied by a responsible adult and not just dropped off. Computer classes for November and December Our computer class schedule is out for the rest of the year. Were offering, free of charge, everything from the basics, to digital photography, buying and selling on Craigslist, to creating holiday invitations and cards. The classes kick off next Wednesday, Nov. 14 with Craigslist: Buying and Selling at 9:30 a.m. followed by Outlook 2007: Calendars, Tasks, Notes & More at 1:30 p.m. The next day, Nov. 15, we have Desktop Publishing: Creating Invitations & Cards at 9:30 a.m. Please stop by to get a full schedule and register or give us a call. All classes are free but must be signed up for early as seating is limited. Library News... Food preservation workshop at 6:30 p.m. at the extension of ce Veterans Day Parade and Celebration will be held at Hudson Park at 10 a.m. Free pancake breakfast at VFW Post from 7 to 10 a.m. Farm City Breakfast from 7 to 8 a.m. at the extension of ce. ThursdaySaturdaySundayWednesday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Hoot Gibson will play at the Sopchoppy Opry on Nov. 17. Call 962-3711 for tickets.

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comPlayers of the WeekDEMETRIUS LINDSEY Running back 18 carries for 139 yards and a touchdown. BRETT BUCKRIDGE Center Long snapper has yet to have a bad snap DALTON BOHANNON Linebacker Big plays all over the “ eld, caused a fumble The whole defensive squad. It was tough to just pick one player, said Coach Klees.O ense Knock Em Back Defense Special Teams Continued from Page 1BLinebacker Kevin James, who has been a runstopper, did play four or “ ve plays but re-aggravated his injury, Klees said. UP NEXT: ESCAMBIA The last game of the regular season has Wakulla facing off against Escambia County. A bigger 6A school, Escambia has a 4-5 record. They remind me of Jefferson County,Ž Klees said. Theyre not that big but theyre very fast and very athletic.Ž The biggest challenge, Klees said, is keeping the War Eagles focused after the big win against Godby, and the playoffs coming up the week after Escambia. The trap is a let-down game against Escambia. Weve told them this week, You dont want to lose this game going into the playoffs,Ž Klees said. Looking forward to the playoffs, Klees acknowledged the War Eagles have a huge home “ eld advantage. It was obvious against Godby … fans packed the stands, and the student section was loud and raucous, cheering on the War Eagles. Theres nothing like playing at Wakulla,Ž Klees said. DISTRICT CHAMPS! PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDENLinebacker Michael Sarvis, 59, scoops up the fumble caused by Dalton Bohannons hit on the Godby quarterback. Dillon Norman carries against Godby. The speedy back, who is also kicker, tore his ACL in the game and is out for the year. Jordan Franks, 81, on a wide receiver screen with a block from Lindsey. The student section cheer on the War Eagles against district rival Godby.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 – Page 5BBy BOB FERRANTETALLAHASSEE … EJ Manuel was one of the top high school quarterbacks in the class of 2008, so the options were plentiful. He grew up in Virginia Beach, Va., but schools like Virginia Tech (5.5 hours) and Virginia (three hours) were a long way from home. Manuel visited Blacksburg, Va., for a football camp during his sophomore year, but when Tyrod Taylor committed to the Hokies in 2007 it became clear that Manuel would go elsewhere. So Manuel chose Florida State in the summer before his senior season, took just one unof“ cial visit and didnt waver. Virginia Tech and Virginia offered him scholarships, but Manuel felt comfortable with Florida State over the in-state schools and offers from programs like LSU, Alabama, Oregon and Tennessee. They both appealed to me,Ž Manuel said of Virginia Tech and Virginia. But at the time I was getting offers and interest from other schools. (Tyrod) helped my decision to move on from Virginia Tech.Ž And now Manuel will return to his home state, albeit a long drive from his hometown, on Thursday night when Florida State (8-1, 5-1 ACC) faces Virginia Tech (4-5, 2-3). Hes expecting a large group of family and friends to make the 320mile trip from Virginia Beach, but for the most part the crowd of 65,000 will be cheering for the Hokies. Theyre not going to like me very much, but thats “ ne,Ž Manuel said. We just have to go out there and play.Ž Manuel has played quite well at Florida State. Hes 21-5 as a starter. Hes completed 67.3 percent of his passes … exactly five percentage points better than Heisman Trophy winner Charlie Ward, who is Florida States current leader. Hes sixth on the schools career passing yards list (6,659), just 213 shy of the quarterback he “ lled in for so many times, Christian Ponder. And Manuel is sixth on the all-time completions list (498), just 31 shy of Danny Kanell. While the loss to N.C. State took Florida State out of the national title picture … and removed Manuel from the Heisman conversation … he has played well this season. Manuel has thrown for 2,315 yards, 16 touchdowns and four interceptions (a few of which have been in and out of the hands of receivers). He is completing 70 percent of his passes, tops in the ACC. The guy is playing super football,Ž Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher said. One thing Manuel has never done? Beat a Virginia team as Florida States starter. Manuel and the Seminoles lost to the Cavaliers 14-13 in 2011. And Manuel was an emergency starter for Ponder, who had an injured elbow, in the 2010 ACC Championship game when Florida State fell 44-33 to the Hokies. I dont think I knew I was going to start the game until the game started,Ž said Manuel, who still completed 23 for 31 passes for 288 yards, a touchdown and two interceptions. The whole week of practice, (I was) preparing like I was going to start. We came up short. I know those guys respect us. We respect them, too.Ž The respect is mutual. Virginia Tech coach Frank Beamer has watched Manuel play for years. And Beamer knows that the Manuel his team will face on Thursday is far different from who he saw two years ago. Experience is a wonderful thing,Ž Beamer said. Hes been around. Hes played a lot.Ž His play, and his leadership, has put the Seminoles in this position: if the Seminoles defeat Virginia Tech and then win at Maryland on Nov. 17, Florida State will win the Atlantic Division and play in the ACC Championship game. Virginia Tech is going in the other direction, struggling while losing four of its past “ ve games. The Hokies are allowing 32.6 points per game in that stretch. And Virginia Tech will face quite a challenge from Manuel & Co. Few teams move the ball up and down the “ eld … with balance … like Florida State, which is third in scoring (44.7 points) and seventh in the Football Bowl Subdivision in total yards (524 per game). Theyre about as good as it gets in college football,Ž Beamer said. In many ways it would appear to be a mismatch. Still, of anyone on Florida States roster, Manuel knows the level of talent that Virginia Tech has. And he relishes the opportunity that he has Thursday night. Thats what you want,Ž Manuel said. Growing up, playing in those type of games. The Florida State-Virginia Tech games.Ž F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State t e Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102North Carolina Central at Florida A&MSaturday, Nov. 10 at 3 p.m.The game can be seen on famuathletics.com. Louisiana-Lafayette at #6 Florida (HC)Saturday, Nov. 10 at 12:21 p.m.The game can be seen on SEC Network. #10 Florida State at Virginia TechThursday, Nov. 8 at 7:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. FSUs EJ Manuel returns to his homestate, Virginia, for this weeks game. PHOTO BY COLIN HACKLEY/OSCEOLA GATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSONWide receiver SOLOMON PATTON suffered a season-ending broken arm on this play that sure had the look of an illegal tackle. S e a s o n c a n Season can s t i l l b e s p e c i a l still be specialBy MARTY COHENGatorBait.net Editor We saw college football at its most unforgiving on Saturday Oct. 27, as Florida showed a charitable side, turning the ball over six times amid a host of mistakes in an agonizing 17-9 setback to Georgia. The loss severely dents the Gators hopes of claiming the SEC East title, which it would have won outright with a win on Saturday. The Gators need Georgia to Auburn on the road … not likely. Its the nature of college football, that one loss can severely damage a teams season, a quest for perfection that simply doesnt exist in any other sport. Every other sport you can lose a game, or a bunch of games, heck play just .500 ball in your conference, and still have a shot in the postseason, still win a national championship or professional title. Every one. But not college football … one loss and your championship aspirations are severely damaged. Two losses and theyre crushed, unless you happen to be Les Miles and LSU in 2007. So one bad day at the of“ ce and Floridas season is in the tank, right? Well, not really. The odds are long now regarding their chances to get to Atlanta as SEC East champs. The Gators beat Missouri, but their hopes are pinned on Georgia losing to Auburn, which is not impossible, but its probably not happening. But Florida has a real chance to finish 11-1, which would require beating Louisiana-Lafayette and Jacksonville State all at home before putting all the eggs in the basket in the Thanksgiving trip to Tallahassee against FSU. And in all honesty, should that scenario occur, Florida could conceivably be in a better postseason position then if the Gators had gone to Atlanta. Before I present the scenario, lets make one point clear: losing is never a good thing, losing to Georgia is never, ever a positive thing and not winning the SEC East, especially when its in your hands, is never simply acceptable. Its the goal of every season, whether youre a favorite or a heavy underdog, to be in Atlanta the “ rst Saturday in December. Period. But lets just say Florida wins out, hardly an inconceivable notion and winds up 11-1. And lets say Georgia faces Alabama in the SEC title game and gets rubbed out by 35 points, which is also quite conceivable. Would a BCS bowl game, say the Sugar Bowl or Orange Bowl, rather have a two-loss Georgia team coming off a beatdown or a one loss Florida team that would be ranked around 5th in the nation? Yes, we know that Georgia beat Florida, but it wouldnt be the “ rst time the SEC title game loser got bumped to Orlando. Something to ponder, if it makes you feel any better. More Musings . Its easy to play armchair quarterback after the fact, especially when Florida gives you so many opportunities to question what happened on the “ eld against Georgia. Heres one: Muschamp talked after the game about doing a better job down the “ eld offensively, which I assume to mean the passing game. If thats the case, then Florida has to consider an occasional pass on “ rst down. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! FSU’s Manuel returns to Virginia

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTH & FITNESSYou may be wondering what yoga has to do with football. It has everything to do with it. Many NFL teams participate in yoga to improve their endurance and ” exibility. In fact, last year I accurately predicted that the New York Giants would win the Super Bowl due to their participation in yoga and poses (asanas). Numerous other NFL teams and players implement poses as a means to help them play ball better. In addition, numerous college and high school teams practice asanas for many reasons. The New York Giants are practicing yoga to prepare for Super Bowl again this year. It is smart on their part to prepare for this years Super Bowl in much the same manner. Gwen Lawrence is a yoga instructor who is working with the Giants again this year and has been instructing them for the past 11 years. During the active season, Lawrence focuses on post-game poses as a means to stretch and cool down the muscles. Her favorites are pigeon pose, frog pose and hero pose. The Tennessee Titans defensive tackle, Shaun Smith, lost 22 pounds by participating in Bikram (hot) Yoga during the offseason. Some of his fellow teammates are giving him a hard time because he is participating in a form of exercise that many females also “ nd bene“ cial. Let them joke all they want because yoga is for real men and it is not an easy form of exercise. It takes a lot of concentration and commitment. It will help one to shed pounds as well as gain ” exibility and endurance. It also has the capability to increase muscle mass. MERCYHURST COOLS DOWN WITH YOGA The Mercyhurst University football team makes use of yoga after practice as a way to stretch their muscles and relax. This is a great way to cool down since there are many asanas that stretch numerous muscle groups and help the mind and body unwind. Their instructor, Betty Amatangelo, takes advantage of poses that prevent injury and stretch the muscles used during football practice. K-STATE FOOTBALL PLAYERS UTILIZE YOGA Both receiver Chris Harper and linebacker Arthur Brown of the Kansas State Wildcats participate in yoga to gain ” exibility. Harper says, The “ rst time I took it, I was upset because I cant sit Indian style on the ground, and I took it and told the teacher thats what I was trying to do, and I still couldnt do it after the class … I didnt feel any better. I took a regular yoga class so I can try to sit Indian style, because the groin area is vital for receivers. If I can sit Indian style I think that would be big.Ž Foley Falcons high school lineman unwinds by practicing yoga. Cameron Svihla, a lineman for the Foley Falcons, participates in yoga once a week after football practice to get a superior stretch. Svihla says, Its just a good stretch. We stretch after practice, but we dont do 20-25 minutes of stretching.Ž Cameron participates in yoga, allowing anyone else on the team that wants to join him come along. Yoga is an excellent way for athletes to warm up, football players included. Hip opening yoga poses (asanas) are important because the hips need to be stretched in order for players to run more speedily. It is also important to stretch the legs and trunk of the body. Before hitting the “ eld, try one of these top “ ve hip opening yoga poses by incorporating them into your warm-up. TOP FIVE YOGA POSES FOR FOOTBALL PLAYERS 1. Revolved Triangle Pose (Parivrtta Trikonasana) Begin your five-step yoga warm-up with the revolved triangle pose because it prepares the body for twists and seated poses, especially those that include forward bends. It also stretches both the hips and spine and alleviates minor back pain. This asana is also a counter pose to the extended triangle pose, so you may consider performing this pose after the revolved triangle pose. 2. Bound Angle Pose (Baddha Konasana) Try to fall forward with a straightened back once getting comfortably in the bound angle pose. This pose will warm-up the knees, hips and inner thighs while alleviating stress, tiredness and minor depression. Aim to hold this asana for at least “ ve breaths. 3. Fire Log Pose (Agnistambhasana) After getting into the “ re log pose, lean forward so that the hips are over the your legs if you are able to do so. In addition to stretching the hips, this pose provides an excellent stretch to the groin while relieving stress. Hold this posture for about “ ve breaths before slowly coming out of the asana. 4. Cow Face Pose (Gomukhasana) Aim to sit evenly on both sides once in the cow face pose and hold it for at least 1 minute. This asana stretches the ankles, hips and thighs. It also warms up the chest, shoulders and triceps by providing a super stretch. For an advanced pose, bend forward and allow the torso to rest on the inner top thigh. Try to stay in the forward bend position for at least 20 seconds before breathing in and coming back into the seated pose. 5. One-Legged King Pigeon Pose (Eka Pada Rajakapotasana) Start off in a lunge and slowly make your way into the one-legged king pigeon pose. This asana provides an excellent stretch to the hips, core and thighs. In addition, it stretches the neck, chest and shoulders. Hold this pose for at least 1 minute before gently coming back up into a lunge and repeating the posture on the other side for balance. If you are a football player who has not tried yoga as a warm-up, try something new.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at Focusyoga@yahoo.com or by calling (228) 380-0140.So many people consider the upcoming holiday season an open seasonŽ for whatever they want to eat and figure they will deal with the weight gain with their New Years resolution. If you have been in the same depressing cycle of weight gain during the holidays and trying desperately to lose it come Jan. 1, you may want to consider a new plan. Think how wonderful you would feel if you not only didnt gain weight this holiday season, you actually lost! You can go into this upcoming new year looking better and feeling better than you ever have! If you commit to a few key principles in your daily life, this is possible Easy? No. Possible? Yes! While there is no magic pill to make you lose weight effortlessly, there are tried and true methods to help you shed pounds safely. I also doubt that anyone in your world is going to suddenly volunteer to watch your kids, clean your house, cook your dinner, etc. so you can go spend a few hours at the gym. You have to make yourself a priority to make yourself healthier and happier, for yourself and for your family. Granted, a gym is the easiest place to get in shape. A variety of classes and weight machines, free weights and an encouraging atmosphere all help you in your pursuit of getting yourself in shape. However, you can get a quality workout in your own home, with little or no equipment. Your most important tool in getting “ t or losing weight is your attitude. If you can get your family to eat healthy with you and exercise with you, great! If not, you have to have the fortitude to do it anyway. Eat your own meals, do your own workouts. This is about you … no one else. Plan ahead. Shop for your healthy foods and stash them wherever you spend a signi“ cant amount of time. Your car, desk, home … everywhere. Commit to some sort of exercise every day. DVDs, walking, running, classes at the gym. Do it no matter what time it is, or what else you would rather be doing. Set small goals: a few minutes more walking, several days of healthy eating in a row … whatever motivates you to keep going. Reward yourself when you reach those goals, then set a bigger goal for next time. Its not ” ashy or dramatic. No one may notice for a while, including you. But if you keep plugging away, youll notice one small gain after another as you make your way to your goal. Keep at it.Gena Davis is a CFT at Body-Tek 24-Hour Fitness Center in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348.What does yoga have to do with football? Everything GET FITBy GENA DAVIS YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Keep plugging away – do it for yourselfSpecial to The NewsDo you know whats in your fridge? Believe it or not, there are many ordinary foods in there that have extraordinary nutritional value. Whether its a vegetable or seed, these foods can add ” avor and health bene“ ts to any meal or snack. TOPS Club Inc. (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), the nonpro“ t weight-loss support organization, examines 10 Super FoodsŽ that you already have at home. Beans … (also known as legumes), including kidney, black, white and red beans, chick peas, and lentils, are a powerful source of protein and complex carbohydrates, as well as “ ber and important vitamins and minerals. Eating beans has been proven to help reduce cholesterol levels, body weight, the risk of heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, and some instances of cancer. Add a variety of beans to your meal, whether they are fresh, frozen, canned, or dried. Celery … is a simple, yet important vegetable, offering vitamins, minerals, and nutrients that can reduce cholesterol and protect against cancer. Add celery to soups, stews, meats, side dishes, and other meals. Garlic … with a distinct ” avor and fragrance, garlic contains anti-in” ammatory and anti-oxidative properties that protect against heart disease, reduce blood pressure, lower cholesterol levels, and provide anti-clotting features. It also offers vitamins C and B6, manganese, and selenium. Onion … whether theyre sliced, diced, chopped, or pureed, onions have a pungent flavor and a lot of nutrition, containing “ ber, minerals, and vitamins C and B6. There has also been research to learn more about onions polyphenol and sulfur compounds, which may reduce the risk of cancer and boost immune function and heart health. Peas … green and yellow vegetables, including green peas, are often associated with reducing the risk of heart disease. Garden, snow, snap, dried, and other varieties of peas are also loaded with vitamins A, C, K, and B, minerals, “ ber, and protein. They are a great source for eye-healthy compounds beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. Include peas in a soup or stew, toss them into a salad, or eat them as a snack. Black Pepper … This common spice is a great way to boost a meals ” avor without adding calories. Also, capsaicin, the substance that gives pepper its heat, is known for its anti-cancer properties and in” ammation reduction, which is the root of chronic disease. Use ground, cracked, or whole versions of pepper. Bell Peppers … come in a variety of vibrant colors … green, red, yellow, orange, and purple. Peppers offer powerful anti-oxidants, vitamins, and minerals, which can help lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of certain cancers. Enjoy cooked or raw peppers and their many health bene“ ts. Sun” ower Seeds … are a good source of vitamin E, which serves as an antioxidant and contains antiinflammatory properties. They also offer B vitamins, heart-healthy polyunsaturated oil, manganese, magnesium, selenium, and phytosterols, a compound known to reduce blood cholesterol levels. Add sunflower seeds to a fresh salad, mix them into chicken salad, sprinkle them over meat, or grind them up for a spread. Sesame Seeds … are a rich source of copper, which can provide arthritis relief. They also contain calcium and magnesium, which may lower blood pressure, protect against osteoporosis, and more. Mix them with steamed vegetables, sauted fish or chicken, or add sesame seeds to homemade bread. Canned Tomatoes … are not only a versatile ingredient, but they are also a powerhouse of anti-oxidants and nutrients, including lycopene, vitamin C, “ ber, potassium, and iron. Keep some in your pantry for pasta and rice dishes, soups, stews, casseroles, ethnic meals, and other concoctions.TOPS Club Inc. (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) is the original weight-loss support and wellness education organization founded more than 64 years ago. A look at 10 under-appreciated Super Foods Special to The NewsHigh cholesterol is an issue for many men and women, who may or may not know that excessive cholesterol in the blood can increase a person’s risk of cardiovascular disease. That’s a genuine concern for many people, as the American Heart Association notes that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. The link between high cholesterol and cardiovascular disease has long been established, but the good news is that even men and women with considerably high cholesterol levels can greatly reduce their risk of one day developing cardiovascular disease. Men and women should discuss a plan of attack to lower their cholesterol levels with a physician, who will determine if medication should be a part of the plan. Even if medication is a factor, the following are some lifestyle changes men and women with high or moderate cholesterol levels can make to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease.  Shed those extra pounds. According to the Mayo Clinic, losing as little as 5 to 10 percent of your body weight can greatly reduce cholesterol levels. There are a number of ways to lose weight, but the most successful way to lose weight and keep it off typically involves adopting a more active lifestyle and coupling that with a healthy diet. The AHA recommends 30 minutes of physical activity each day. This can include any number of activities that get you off the couch and exercising, including walking, biking, swimming, and jogging.  Embrace heart-healthy foods. One of the more effective, yet often most dif cult, ways to lower cholesterol is to make dietary changes, forgoing unhealthy fare for more heartfriendly foods. The idea of changing one’s diet does not appeal to many people, but a more heart-healthy diet does not have to be devoid of taste. You can still eat red meat and dairy products, but keep them to a minimum, as both red meat and dairy can raise your “bad” cholesterol. Also known as low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, bad cholesterol can combine with other substances to form plaque, a thick, hard deposit that can narrow the arteries and make them less exible, increasing one’s risk of heart attack and stroke. There are many ways to make more heart-healthy dietary choices, some of which include selecting whole grains (including whole wheat pasta and whole wheat our), loading up on fruits and vegetables that are high in ber (which can lower cholesterol) and choosing entrees rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as certain types of sh, which help lower LDL cholesterol.  Stop smoking. Smokers have a sure re way to reduce their cholesterol, though some may nd it more difficult than making any dietary changes. Quitting smoking has an almost immediate impact on the health of your heart, which is at a lower risk of attack within 24 hours of quitting smoking. Within one year of quitting, your risk of heart attack is half that of someone who continues to smoke, and in 15 years your risk of heart disease will be similar to that of someone who has never smoked. Though it might not be easy, quitting smoking might be the most effective way to improve your cholesterol levels while lowering your risk for cardiovascular disease.Easy ways to lower your cholesterol

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 – Page 7BHALLOWEEN TRICK OR TREATERS Chase, Jess and Roedy Wells. Wakulla News paper carrier Jimmie Smith came to work as the Joker. Trick-or-treaters at The Wakulla News of“ ce. C0usins Jacob Crum, Andon Christian and Brady Crum on the way to get candy at The Farm. Trick-or-treaters at The Wakulla News of“ ce.Trick-or-treaters at The Wakulla News of“ ce. Sophia Michael Gauger, daughter of Mike and Christa Gauger. Arabella and Adalyn Moore with Sophia Gauger before heading out trick-or-treating.

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Actors Adapt Alarm Armor Ashore Attic Beans Beasts Beggar Bench Bombs Books Circulation Congratulates Cooled Coral Crush Dislike Drive Elder Error Green Greys Harsh Hourly Human Killer Loser March Movies Multiplication This page sponsored in part by: Noisy Numeral Opera Passion Relationships Sheds Stage Stock Street Swims Tempo Upside Views Wheat Write Yards

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 – Page 9B Easy ways to celebrate Veterans Day Veterans Day is an annual holiday in the United States when veterans of the armed forces are honored and celebrated. Many people confuse Veterans Day with Memorial Day. While both days honor members of the armed forces, there’s a distinction between the two holidays. Memorial Day, which is celebrated in May, is a day designated for remembering servicemen and servicewomen who died while serving. Veterans Day, which is observed in November, honors all military veterans. The role of the brave men and women who serve in the military is an important one, and it’s one that warrants appreciation and celebration. The following are a few easy ways to celebrate veterans and their significant contribution to our country this Veterans Day. Offer your thanks. Serving in the military can feel like a thankless job, as those who have not served might not be aware of the risks men and women in the military take and the sacrifices they must make to protect our country and help the less fortunate across the globe. As a result, something as simple as saying “Thank you” to a current service member or military veteran can go a long way. Veterans know they don’t serve in vain, but it’s still a great idea to let them know how much you appreciate their efforts and sacrifices. Thank businesses who support veterans. Many businesses show their gratitude to veterans by offering them free services on Veterans Day. When a local business shows its appreciation to veterans, patronize that business and let them know you appreciate their efforts to help veterans. Help families of active military. Many service members are currently stationed and serving overseas, and their families back home may need or just appreciate a helping hand. Invite family members of active military over for dinner, offer to do chores like cutting the grass or shoveling the driveway when it snows, or help around the house if something needs fixing. Even if families of active members serving overseas appear to be getting along great, offer your friendship and let them know you’re there to help should anything arise. Visit hospitalized veterans. Unfortunately, many veterans are hospitalized after suffering an injury during a tour of duty. These veterans sacrificed their physical well-being to protect our way of life, and many spend extended periods of time in the hospital. Visiting a hospital to get to know a veteran and spend some time with him or her sharing a few laughs and thanking them for their service is a great way to celebrate the holiday and lift a veteran’s spirits at the same time. Recruit friends and family members to visit hospitalized veterans as well. Pay for a veteran’s night out on the town. Like many people, veterans appreciate an escape from the daily grind. Men and women who want to show their appreciation to veterans can treat a veteran to a night out on the town. Have extra tickets to a ballgame or play? Donate them to a local VFW or play. Or if you see a veteran out on the town, offer to pay for his meal. Be sure to come out Saturday, Nov. 10, starting at 10 a.m., for the Wakulla County Veteran’s Day Parade at Hudson Park. American Veterans:STANDING TALL FOR FREEDOMWe proudly salute Americas veterans and active-duty military for their drive and dedication, contributions and courage. Their commitment to our country and our freedom has protected us for generations, and we owe them a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid. This Veterans Day, please join us in honoring the brave men and women of our Armed Forces who have fought, sacri“ ced and served their country with pride.We thank you, veterans and soldiers!

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements Todays New Ads Cypress Lumber Pecky T&G v Joint Timbers and beams (850) 643-6283 YARD SALE & FISH FRYPanacea Fire Department, Coastal Hwy Sat Nov 10th 9:00 to 2:00. Dinner starts at 11:00. Fundraiser to benefit Sopchoppy/Ochlockonee Bay UMC Youth. Collectibles, household items and more. Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements Turn your art into cash! FREE ARTAPPRAISALS FOR POSSIBLE CONSIGNMENT* Nov 10 & 11. Noon to 10pm at Baterbys Art Gallery. 9101 International Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, FL32819. Call (866)537-1013 or visit www.Baterbys.com for more information. *Verbal appraisals & consignments taken based on consideration. Medical Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Professional AIRLINE CAREERS-Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Professional AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AV AILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 Trades/ Skills AFew Pro Drivers Needed.Top Pay & 401K. Need CDLClass ADriving Exp. (877)258-8782 www .addrivers.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. HOME EVERYWEEKEND! Pay 37/mi, Both ways, FULLBENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, Fl Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 20 12 Trades/ Skills Tire Technician /Mechanic NeededB & B Dugger, Inc. is looking for a part or full-time tire mounting technician that has experience with tire changers. tire balancers and mounting truck & small tractor tires. Additional experience in roadside asssistanceŽ and working in the field is also prefererred. A Florida driver license with a clear MVR is a position requirement. Pay negotiable. Call the business office at (850) 926-2929 or email to office@band bdugger.com to receive an application Schools/ Instruction ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call www.Centura Online.com 888-203-3179 Furniture CHERRYBEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used, brand new in factory boxes. Original cost $4500. Sell for $795. Can deliver. Call Tom (407)574-3067 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET. In original plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice $975. Can deliver. Call Bill (813)298-0221 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLEFri & Sat 8am -until Multi -Family Furn. tools & Households 155 Jane Drive CRAWFORDVILLE Sat, Nov 9am to 1pm hunters camel, bikers leathers, Coleman pop-up camper, MLK to Palomino, right turn follow signs Garage/ Yard Sales River Plantation Subdivision-Wide Sat. 8am-4pm Furniture, sm appliances. Vintage linens & jewerly. China, glassware,tools, & much more. Gate will be open. 850-745-84394 YARD SALE & FISH FRYPanacea Fire Department, Coastal Hwy Sat Nov 10th 9:00 to 2:00. Dinner starts at 11:00. Fundraiser to benefit Sopchoppy/Ochlockonee Bay UMC Youth. Collectibles, household items and more. Farm Services BUSH HOGGING ROADS GRADED GARDENS TILLED Have tractor will bush hog finish cut large acerage grade roads driveways till gardens. dbdouge@aol.com or 850-643-6283 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 PANACEAClean SW 2/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $500/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 SOPCHOPPY2/1.5 Singlewide $575.REVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 SPRING CREEK HWY10 acre min-farm, DWMH, 2BR/2BA, Spring Creek & Jack Crum Rd. $550/mo., $550/deposit. SWMH, 2BR/1BA, Irvin Bryant St., Spring Creek. $500/mo., $500/deposit. 850-926-5192. Mobile Homes For Sale 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, Beautiful Kitchen. Huge Master Bedroom Walk In Closets Call Today (850) 576-2106 4 BR Mobile Home on 5 Acres, Ready to Move IN -EZ Payments. Call Me (850) 576-2105 100 Families Needed for Govt Loan Program. Call Today (850) 576-2104 3BR, 2BA-Used Mobile Home. Great Condition Wont Last !!! Call Me ASAP (850) 576-2687 GOTLAND? Need a Home. Use Your Land As your DOWN Payment Call Now (850) 576 2687 Mobile Homes For Sale 2002 MOBILE HOME 28X76 4Bedroom/2Bath Master Suite with Office, Walk-in Closet, Garden Tub, Shower. Family Room with Fireplace. Separate Living Room. Large Kitchen with Breakfast Nook and Island. Laundry Room. $35,000. MUST MOVE Billy (850) 962-3884 Mobile Home with land, ready to move in, great value. Approx 1500 sq ft, 3Br2Ba, serious offers only, no renters. (850)308-6473 Apartments Unfurnished PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall Mary (850) 984-4811Equal Housing Opportunity TDD 1 800 955 2771 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLENICE 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Home in Wakulla Gardens, Lots of extra features, $850. month (850) 926-8948 CRAWFORDVILLEResidential/ Commercial House for Rent in the Center of Crawfordville For More Details Call (850) 926-9782 SOPCHOPPY2/1For Rent, $600 month On CanalREVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Real Estate For Sale 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www .sunsetranches.com Auctions Estates AUCTION 106+/Residential Lots in Florida Minimum Bid $300/lot Online Auction Nov 6-14 249+/-Lots in Southeast FL, GA, SC, NC, TN, VA Tranzon Driggers FL Lic#AU707 & AB3145 Tranzon.com (877)374-4437 Auctions Estates REALESTATE AUCTION, Blount County, TN:(55) 5+ Acre Tracts, Log Cabin, Commercial Building & (3) Residential Lots. Saturday, Nov. 17. 1-800-4FURROW. TN Lic. #62. Citrus Hills Homes Forest Ridge Villages Updated, move in ready, 2/2/2, Private lot 352-746-0002 Cars FORD1994 Taurus Good motor, has some body damage. $700 (850)926-8548 5418-1122 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201203652 TO: Russell E. Paul ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. November 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5420-1108 TWN vs. Nelson, Phillip Case No:65-2008-CA-000222FC Notice of Foreclosure Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 65-2008-CA-000222FC US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE CSFB MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2001-HE-17, Plaintiff, PHILLIPA. NELSON; KELLYM. NELSON; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE 5424-1115 TWN vs. Diaz, Sarah Case No. 652012CA000233CAXXXX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 652012CA000233CAXXXX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. SARAH S. DIAZ A/K/A SARAH SIMONDS PATTON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SARAH S. DIAZ A/K/A SARAH SIMONDS PATTON, DAVID DIAZ A/K/A DAVID C. DIAZ, JOHN TENANT, JANE TENANT, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID DIAZ and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SARAH S. DIAZ RESIDENT:Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:469 WHIDDON LAKE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-0029 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in WAKULLA County, Florida: Commence at an old concrete monument marking the Southwest corner of Section 7, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 00 degrees 01 minutes 27 seconds East along the West boundary of said Section 7, a distance of 674.17 feet to an old concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 50 minutes 33 seconds East 156.70 feet to a concrete monument on the Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary of Whiddon Lake Road, thence run North 15 degrees 30 minutes 51 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 210.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 14 degrees 52 minutes 25 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 122.61 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point OF Beginning, continue North 14 degrees 52 minutes 25 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 149.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 41 minutes 03 seconds East 331.49 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 09 minutes 27 seconds East 224.25 feet, thence run North 78 degrees 02 minutes 43 seconds West 378.56 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 1.50 acres, more or less. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy to your written defenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan PLC, attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, either before December 7, 2012 or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in The Wakulla News. DATED:October 19, 2012 Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk of the CourtCopies furnished to: Phelan Hallinan PLC 2727 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion noticed has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 8 & 15, 2012 PH #28623 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net The White Elephant 50% OFFON ALL ITEMS in Bob & Marge’s Booth atfrom Nov. 1, thru Nov. 10nd us across from the courthouse in Crawfordville926-3338 Antique Mall 4Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16Ž .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE. CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 OFFICE SPACE LEASEFOR THE BARRY BUILDING ATTHE LOG CABINCrawfordville 850-508-5471$25000/MO Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065"pray like it's up to God, Work like it's up to you" LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 – Page 911B NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 16th day of October, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000222FC, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE CSFB MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2001-HE-17 is the Plaintiff and PHILLIPA. NELSON, KELLYM. NELSON and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONTLOBBYof WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32326, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT A ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 22ND day of October, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk PARCEL1: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,(MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J.K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, N.E., THE DISTANCE OF 1,049.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT DESCRIBED HEREIN. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 560.2 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST 385.36 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LANDS OF GRANVILLE JAMES, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 552.63 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST 420.9 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S. THE DISTANCE OF 1,108.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. THIS LAND IS SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR ASIXTYFOOT WIDE ROADWAYACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED TRACT. LESS AND EXCEPT: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,(MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD) THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 1,049.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY522.91 FEET. THENCE RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 422.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 385.36, FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 560.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING THE SAME PROPERTYAS DEEDED TO ROYE. MERSDORF AND ALICIAL. MERSDORF, HUSBAND AND WIFE BYSTEPHEN M. VELTRI AND MARSHAS VELTRI, HUSBAND AND WIFE RECORDED MAY27, 1993 IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 212, PAGE 302 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL2: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 2,158.22 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT DESCRIBED HEREIN. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES WEST 60 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES WEST 360.9 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 340 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST 360.9 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST 60FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF LOT NO. 69, H.S., 340 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SITUATE LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. THIS LAND IS SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR ASIXTYFOOT WIDE: ROADWAYACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED TRACT. ALSO: APERPETUALEASEMENT SIXTY(60) FEET WIDE FOR AROAD RIGHT-OF-WAYFOR ALLTYPES OF TRAFFIC OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND, TO-WIT: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 672.27 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF ACOUNTYROAD AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT DESCRIBED HEREIN. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAYOF SAID COUNTYROAD THE DISTANCE OF 665.62 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE LANDS OF GRANVILLE JAMES 356.2 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 560.2 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF LOT NO. 69, H.S. 377.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 69 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO: AN EASEMENT SIXTY(60) FEET WIDE FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND, TO-WIT: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (MARKED BYA CONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 1,049.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY522.91 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 422.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 385.36 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 560.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Tax ID: 000006900010116002 Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News November 1 & 8, 2012 08-50754 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5415-1108 TWN vs. Harrell, Tracy N. Case No. 65-2010-CA-000282 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000282 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. TRACYN. HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELLAND BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES, et. al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in 65-2010-CA-000282 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP F/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and TRACYN HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELL; BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE; AMYDENISE LALONDE; BRYAN DOLPHIS LALONDE; WAKULLABANK are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front lobby Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. on January 17, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22, WALKERS CROSSING COMMENCING AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 360.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 198.19 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT ; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 212.39 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLYALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU A CENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 31 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.19 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST, 229.82 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 330.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. THE ABOVE LEGALDESCRIPTION BEING MORE RECENTLYSURVEYED BYTHURMAN RODDENBERRYAND ASSOCIATES, DATED APRIL4, 2002, UNDER JOB NO. 01-034, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST, 360.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 200.49 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF CHANCE COURT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE ADISTANCE OF 212.88 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET, THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 38 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 61.66 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 11 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 61.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 232.20 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919); THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 330.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1998 OR 1999 HOMES OF LEGEND SINGLE -WIDE VIN #HL9774AL. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. 5416-1108 TWN vs. Hummel, Maurice Case No. 10-103-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 10-103-CA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporationauthorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. MAURICE A. HUMMEL, III and DAWN M. HUMMEL, husband and wife; and UNIDENTIFIED JOHN DOE(S) and UNIDENTIFIED JANE DOE (S), Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on September 19, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on January 17th, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. (EST), in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, the following described property: The North 396 feet of the East 220 feet of the following described parcel: Commencing at the Northwest corner of the Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4) of Section 10, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, and run South along the West boundary of said SW 1/4 the distance of 440 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, continue South along the West boundary line of said SW 1/4 the distance of 392 feet to a point, then at right angles run East 208.7 feet to a point, then run South parallel with the West boundary of said SW 1/4 208.7 feet to a point, then at right angles run East 1024 feet to the West boundary of the Lizzie Taylor property then run North along the West boundary of said Lizzie Taylor land 600.7 feet to a point, then at right angles run West 1232.7 feet back to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Being situate in the SW 1/4 of Section 10, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH an easement for ingress and egress on the North 25 feet of a 16 acre parcel described above which parcel herein conveyed forms a part thereof, running from the East right-of-way line of Bethel Church Road to the West boundary of the 2 acre parcel herein conveyed. Together with a 2005 CMH Riverwood Double wide Mobile Home, serial no. WHC014594GAA & WHC014594GAB Property Address: 84 Gosset Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTERST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: October 8, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK, WAKULLA COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 1 & 8, 2012 5417-1108 TWN Vs. Dunn, Darrell 2009 CA 000322 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO. 2009 CA 006090 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. DARRELL DAVID DUNN, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed September 20, 2012 entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000322 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and DARRELL DAVID DUNN, et al., are the Defendants. The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 15th day of November, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 6, THE FAIRWAYS AT WILDWOOD AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 51 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an inter est in the surplus fr om the sale, if any, other than the pr operty owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. November 1 & 8, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5412-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.12 TXD013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2424Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-080-000-11508-013LOT 80 HS P-413-M-22 COMM AT NE COR OF LOT 81 HS OR 648 P 773 Name in which assessedBEN WITHERS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this11day of October 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 5413-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLCthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2182Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-076-000-10250-008 LOT 76 HS P-7-8-M-20-C IN NE 1/4 OF LOT 76 HS OR 148 P 292 OR 219 P 610 Name in which assessedTHE SIGHTS & SOUNDS COMPANY OF WAKULLA INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this12day of October2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5419-1115 TWN Dept. of Child Services, 09C01-1207-JT Termination of Parental Rights PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF INDIANA, COUNTY OF CASS, IN THE CASS CIRCUIT COURT Logansport, INDIANA IN THE MATTER OF THE TERMINATION OF THE PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP OF: CRISTINA SALTER, SELENA SALTER, and JOBANY SALTER, children And SERGIO SANCHEZ, father Cause No.: 09C01-1207-JT-17 Cause No. 09C01-1207-JT-18 Cause No. 09C01-1207-JT-19 SUMMONS FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION & NOTICE OF TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the above noted parent, whose whereabouts are unknown, and who is the parent of Cristina Salter (date of birth 2-2-2007), Selena Salter (date of birth 11-26-2009), and Jobany Salter (date of birth 10-22-2010) that a Petition for Involuntary Termination of your Parental Rights in the above named Children, has been filed by the Indiana Department of Child Services, Cass County Office, in the Cass County Circuit Court, and YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED TO APPEAR before the Judge of said Court at the Cass County Courthouse, second floor, in Logansport, Indiana, telephone (574) 753-7339, on the 9th day of January, 2013 at 1:00 oclock P.M. to attend an Initial hearing/Termination hearing and to answer the Petition for Termination of your Parental Rights in said Children, and YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED that if the allegations in said petition are true, and/or if you fail to appear at the hearing, the Juvenile Court may terminate your parent-child relationship; and if the court terminates your parent-child relationship you will lose all parental rights, powers, privileges, immunities, duties and obligations including any rights to custody, control, visitation, or support in said Children; and if the court terminates your parent-child relationship, it will be permanently terminated, and thereafter you may not contest an adoption or other placement of said children, and YOU ARE ENTITLED TO REPRESENTATION BY AN ATTORNEY, provided by the State if applicable, throughout these proceedings to terminate the parent-child relationship. YOU MUST RESPOND by appearing in the case in person or by attorney within thirty (30) days after the last publication of this notice, and in the event you fail to do so, an adjudication on said petition and termination of your parental rights may be entered against you without further notice. THE ATTORNEY REPRESENTING THE INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF CHILD SERVICES, is Tricia Thompson, 300 E. Broadway Street, Suite 502, Logansport, IN 46947; telephone (574)722-3677. Date this 19th day of October, 2012 Clerk of Cass County November 8, 15 & 22, 2012 Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Dated this 16th day of October, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 1 & 8, 2012 11-05421 Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2837 Coastal Hwy. Commercial Building $800 mo. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. George's Lighthouse Point Waterfront living Overlooking georgious Ochlockonee Bay Unit 25E, 2BD/2BA, 1,460 sq. ft., washer/dryer, hardwood oors throughout, gated community with pool and tennis court. $1000. mo. No pets RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities • 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 2 … As former Hurricane Sandy and its remnants slammed the Northeast, politicos and observers in Florida were focused on the calm before the storm: Speci“ cally, the final run-up to Election Day. CalmŽ might be too strong a word. With President Barack Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney battling for the states 29 electoral votes, Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson looking for reelection against Republican Congressman Connie Mack and all 160 legislative seats and 27 congressional seats up for grabs in a redistricting year, there was no lack of action. STORM WAVES Sandy never even really threatened Florida, continuing a season that has been relatively quiet for the state with less than a month to go. But the fallout was felt, with President Barack Obama nixing his appearance at a Florida event to ” y back to the White House to deal with the storm. About the same time, GOP vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan canceled a pair of appearances early in the week out of respect for the unfolding tragedy. What might have been a more welcome campaignrelated respite for weary Florida voters … an end to the storm surge of ads that continued to push its way into their favorite programming … never came. Despite the lack of direct hits, it was the second time the Sunshine States political season has been interrupted by decidedly cloudy weather. A near-miss by Hurricane Isaac forced the Republican National Convention to be shortened by a day in August. Gov. Rick Scott said the state is ready to help with the recovery from Sandy if needed. FLORIDA, FLORIDA, FLORIDA Even with the two-day hiatus from campaigning that Sandy caused early in the week, it was hard to find a day when at least one “ gure from one of the national campaigns wasnt in the state, often taking a bus trip or hop-scotching the state in some form that conveniently touched on several of Floridas 10 media markets. But party spin wasnt limited to the campaign trail. The two camps also warred over who was winning the early vote, with the Obama campaign periodically sending emails to reporters highlighting how the numbers stacked up to last years … a dubious exercise given a change in the number of days when early voting was allowed … and the GOP and Romney arguing that their ground game was a step above U.S. Sen. John McCains losing effort in 2008. No one wanted to wait a whole week to “ nd out the winner. Democrats overtake GOP in ballots cast,Ž a post on the state Democratic Party website boasted early in the week. So the Democrats might crow about a very slight edge in total returns, but it is nowhere near the numbers that they need to run up to be in position for victory on Election Day,Ž the Republican Party of Florida responded. Meanwhile, candidates for state of“ ce kept up their efforts. Attention was particularly focused on a few races, including former Republican lawmaker Nancy Argenzianos independent bid to knock off Rep. Jimmie Smith, R-Inverness, and the Senates sole incumbentvs.-incumbent race, in a Broward and Palm Beach district where Republican Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff is battling Democratic Sen. Maria Sachs. And the fallout from an earlier campaign echoed in Congressional District 26, where alleged straw candidate Justin Lamar Sternad opted to plead the Fifth Amendment rather than “ le a report in the FEC. Sternad lost the Democratic primary in the seat before media reports bubbled up that the FBI and other law enforcement were looking into whether Republican Congressman David Rivera helped Sternad criticize the eventual Democratic nominee, Joe Garcia. Rivera has denied those charges. HOW MANY ELECTION DAYS? Early voting lines spilled out in the streets and around corners, prompting Democrats to ask for the hours to be extended … much as then-Republican Gov. Charlie Crist did in 2008, when Obama carried Florida with help from the early vote. It was, they said, all in the name of good government. In light of the record turnout this year, we call on Governor Scott to extend early voting hours in every county across Florida through Sunday, so that Florida citizens can exercise their constitutionally guaranteed right and freedom to participate in this election,Ž Florida Democratic Party Chairman Rod Smith said. Perhaps not surprisingly, Scott and Republicans said no dice … assuring everyone that their decision was in keeping with the clear law. For one side to demand that we break the law because they feel like they are losing is wrong,Ž Republican Party of Florida executive director Mike Grissom said. MORTGAGE PAYMENTS In some areas, policy intruded, rudely interrupting a week devoted to candidates on the hustings. The week ended with Attorney General Pam Bondi and legislative leaders striking a deal over how to spend the $300 million windfall from a national foreclosure settlement. The money comes from a total of $8 billion in relief Florida is supposed to get from the $25 billion settlement, announced in February. Lawmakers didnt want Bondi spending the money without their say-so. As part of the deal, Bondi said she would seek legislative approval in the coming weeks to spend $60 million of the proceeds for down payment assistance, foreclosure-related legal assistance and education programs and efforts to ease the backlog of cases now in the clogging civil courts across the states. The remaining $240 million will be dispersed through the regular legislative appropriations process … including $40 million will of general revenue that lawmakers can use however they would like, adding to $34 million in civil penalties already placed there. Over at the Agency for Health Care Administration, officials announced hospital rates would be reduced to stay in line with the limits lawmakers put in the budget. And the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida announced Thursday that it was going to federal court to protect the rights of a DeFuniak Springs employee who was “ red for refusing to take a random drug test required by the city. At the same time, a federal appeals court in Atlanta was hearing arguments over the states plan to drug-test Floridians applying for public bene“ ts. STORY OF THE WEEK: Even with Hurricane Sandy hammering the Northeast, campaigning continued apace across Florida. Every legislative and congressional seat is up for grabs, and President Obama and U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson are both hoping to keep the state blue at the federal level. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Johns running against Mount Rushmore. Hes running against a political legend in South Florida, Gwen Margolis.Ž … Incoming Senate President Don Gaetz discussing Republican Senate candidate John Couriels campaign.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Is it the frenetic calm before the storm?By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 5 – Even in the nal hours before Election Day, the changes to early voting that roiled the state’s election system for more than a year and sparked weeks of court challenges remained controversial – and led to one last bit of litigation. All of it came as elections supervisors in a handful of Florida counties worked to nd ways to allow more voters to cast ballots as the state continues to play a pivotal role in the electoral calculations of President Barack Obama, a Democrat, and his Republican challenger, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. Also in the balance were the fates of 190 state and federal lawmakers and hundreds of local of cials. The Florida Democratic Party rushed to court over the weekend to attempt to keep elections of ces open and allow in-person absentee voting after the time for early voting under the new rules ran out. They won a case in Orange County, where a voting site had been evacuated based on a bomb scare. A county supervisor has discretion about whether and when to accept in-person absentee votes, which differ only slightly from early voting. Some counties even opened of ces Sunday to make up for a reduction in early voting days from at least 12 to no more than eight, a change approved by the Legislature in 2011. Democrats eventually struck an agreement with the supervisors – chie y in Broward County, which agreed to allow in-person absentee voting until at least 5 p.m. Monday and then from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday. “This is an important step in making sure that all those who are eligible to vote have the opportunity to do so,” said Scott Arceneaux, the party’s executive director. Some counties have long allowed voters to cast in-person absentee ballots in the nal days before an election. But the process took on extra signi cance this year with the early-voting changes. Leon County Elections Supervisor Ion Sancho, a critic of the early-voting changes, said his county has seen an uptick in other methods of voting this year. “I think citizens that wanted to access the process have availed themselves of all the available methods to do so,” Sancho said. Leon County of ces did not open Sunday but did accept in-person absentee voting Monday. The Democratic Party’s action had been spurred by long lines. Some voters reportedly waited in line several hours to cast their ballots on Saturday, the last of cial day of early voting, with some voting in the wee hours of Sunday morning. A nal scrum over early voting Brain Teaser 1 14 17 26 33 41 44 52 59 64 68 71 2 20 27 53 3 28 54 4 23 34 47 60 5 29 42 55 21 35 48 65 69 72 6 15 18 45 56 7 30 49 61 8 24 36 57 9 31 43 22 37 50 66 70 73 10 16 19 32 46 58 11 25 38 51 62 12 39 63 13 40 67 ACROSS 1. Lincoln Continental model of the late '70s 6. "Serpico" writer Peter 10. Bauxite and galena 14. Big name in appliances 15. Sax type 16. Low-lying area 17. Classic column style 18. False god 19. Sea of __ (Don River's terminus) 20. Enclosure with an ear doctor's bill? 23. Seeks damages 24. Bard's nightfall 25. Stimpy's TV pal 26. __-Mart Stores, Inc. 29. Fictional spy Helm 31. Crater edge 33. Oodles 35. Coral formation 37. Like Thor or Odin 41. Ear doctor's favorite statesman? 44. Dummy Mortim er 45. Tallow source 46. Cassini of fashion 47. Final: Abbr. 49. Clobber with snowballs 51. Ram's ma'am 52. Nile slitherer 55. Greek goddess of dawn 57. Balzac's "Le __ Goriot" 59. Cause problems for an ear doctor? 64. Metered vehicle 65. Apple throwaway 66. Ballerina Shearer 68. March 17 slogan word 69. Tilling tools 70. Williams of "Happy Days" 71. Smell something fierce 72. Fraternal fellows 73. Lake Malawi, as it's also knownDOWN1. Alfred E. Neuman's mag 2. Love personified 3. Hard to come by 4. Makes bootees 5. Appliance that sucks 6. Principal streets, slangily 7. Pierce player on "M*A*S*H" 8. Do penance 9. You, right now 10. Pennsylvania Avenue office shape 11. Five o'clock shadow remover 12. Flee to hitch 13. A natural, in craps 21. Supply more weapons to 22. How a confident 9Down may work 26. Rolls of bills 27. Astronaut Shepard 28. Theater box 30. Prepare to hit a drive 32. Voodoo charm 34. NO __ TRAFFIC 36. Major Detroit newspaper 38. Part to play 39. Bumped off, biblically 40. Add fringe to 42. Freud contemporary 43. "Great" pope of the 5th cen. 48. Fen cer's "You got me!" 50. "The buck stops here" president 52. Autumn bloomer 53. Look impolitely 54. Tinker Bell, for one 56. Thread holder 58. Black wood 60. Hockey venue 61. Travel like Kirk 62. "Mona __" 63. Love personified 67. Santa __, CA American Prole Hometown Content 11/04/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you've already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 12 345 46 3718 7 45 6829 193 9 682 94 83561 200 9 HometownContent 162 8349 7 5 487596123 395721468 279 483516 638175249 541269837 913 648752 756912384 824357691 M A D W A D S A S T E R A M O R A L A N S T A R E R A R E L O G E P I X I E K N I T S T H R U R I N K V A C U U M A D L E R R E A R M T O U C H E M A I N S T E M S S P O O L A L D A T E E U P T R E K A T O N E F R E E P R E S S S O L V E R S T L E O I N I N K T R U M A N O V A L M O J O E B O N Y R A Z O R R O L E L I S A E L O P E S L E W E R O S S E V E N E D G E A N A

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 – Page 13B 1. LANGUAGE: Variety magazine coined the term “oater” to describe what kind of entertainment? 2. MATH: What is the Arabic equivalent of the Roman numeral LXXX? 3. STYLE: What is the function of furniture called an etagere? 4. FOOD: What is the chief ingredient in caponata? 5. MEASUREMENTS: What did the Binet-Simon Scale measure? 6. GEOGRAPHY: On which continent is the country of Paraguay located? 7. MEDICINE: What is digitalis used to treat? 8. ENTERTAINMENT: Which humorist created the fictional town of Lake Wobegon? 9. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is an aqueduct? 10. LITERATURE: Who wrote the novel “The Portrait of a Lady”? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. A Western film 2. 80 3. It’s a stand with open shelves for display 4. Eggplant 5. Intelligence 6. South America 7. Congestive heart failure 8. Garrison Keillor 9. An artificial channel to bring water to a town 10. Henry James YOUR AD HERE

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Page 14B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Empty Bowls fundraiser is held Herb Donaldson and Gail Campbell address the crowd before soup is served. Searching for a bowl before sampling the various soups. Relaxing with a bowl of soup and bread at the Empty Bowls fundraiser on Saturday at Hudson Park. The Green Guides were one group serving soup … green pea, of course. Members of the Rotary Club of Wakulla served up chicken noodle soup.Staff ReportThe first-ever Empty Bowls fundraiser was widely hailed as a success. Held Saturday, Nov. 3, at Hudson Park, the event was an effort to raise money to stock local food pantries. At Empty Bowls, $15 got a ceramic bowl and an opportunity to sample the many soups on hand, made by various groups and individuals. Organizer Gail Campbell said the group sold out of the nearly 350 bowls that were painted and donated for the event, and more than $6,000 was raised. In addition, Farm Share, a large-scale food bank, was on hand with a tractor trailer “ lled with fresh produce for food pantries and families in need. Campbell said more than 100 families received food. She also noted that two more food pantries, operated by local churches, were added to the list of those distributing food. The Empty Bowl event was sponsored by the Healing Arts of Wakulla County and the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth.PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN Special entertainment by Local Motion Join us for an evening of GREAT WHEELS, DINNER & ENTERTAINMENT! SATURDAY – NOVEMBER 17, 5:00 – 10:00 p.m. 3Y RANCH CRAWFORDVILLE Enter your Wheels $10.00 per entry Wheels Show ONLY $5.00 a car load at the gate Dinner and entertainment $35.00 per person Cash Bar Table Sponsorship $300.00 Enter your wheels for free with purchase of a dinner ticket (Limit 1 per ticket) We’re looking for: Best Original, Best Classic, Hottest Hog, Best Hunt’n Truck, Best Dressed Bike and more. Lots of Prizes! F O R M O R E I N F O R M A T I O N C O N T A C T h e l p k w c b @ g m a i l c o m ( 8 5 0 ) 7 4 5 7 1 1 1 V i s i t o u r w e b s i t e : K W C B O R G S p e c i a a l entert a i n m e n n us f o r a a n e e ve ni n g g o f f S S S S S S i i i i l l l l l t t t t t t i i i i i i t b b b L L l l M M i i J J J J J i f f f f i i i i i f f f f 1st Annual KEEP WAKULLA COUNTY BEAUTIFUL BLUE JEANS & FAST MACHINES Register to enter your car, truck, motorcycle, classic, custom, and antique wheels! All proceeds go to our educational grants, beautification projects and annual projects such as Hazardous Waste Collection Day, National Forest and Coastal Cleanups. KWCB is a 501 (C) (3) organization. LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t



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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County voters were faced with three open seats on the county commission this election cycle, districts 1, 3 and 5. Taking district 1 was Ralph Thomas, district 2 went to former commissioner Howard Kessler and Sopchoppy Vice Mayor Richard Harden won district 3. Thomas, a Republican and Wakulla County native, faced incumbent and Chairman Alan Brock, Democrat, and Jenny Brock, who ran with no party af liation. Thomas claimed 53 percent of the vote, Alan Brock took 29 percent and Jenny Brock grabbed the remaining 18 percent. Im just overwhelmed, humbled and honored, Thomas said after learning of the election results. Of campaigning, Thomas said, I really worked hard at it and tried to put my heart in the race. He felt the key to his victory was connecting with the people in the county. The rst steps he will take once he is sworn into of ce in two weeks will be acclimating to the position. I want to really learn the ropes, Thomas said, who described himself as an extremely detail-oriented person. He added that he wanted to get a good handle on the county budget, spending and regulations. Alan Brock, who served on the commission for the last four years and the last year as chairman, said he was disappointed about not being elected to a second term. Im grateful for the opportunity to serve the citizens of Wakulla County for the last four years, he said. He congratulated Thomas and said, I trust that he will do a good job for the people of Wakulla County. Jenny Brock could not be reached for a comment. In district 3 and what was the closest race for county commission, Kessler, who ran with no party af liation, received 53 percent of the votes, with incumbent Mike Stewart, Republican, obtained 47 percent. Kessler was thankful for his wife and for her support and actions she took on her own to support him and participate in the process, as well as his supporters and citizens. I am humbled by her con dence in me and by the citizens of Wakulla County having the faith to put me back in of ce, Kessler said. After serving two terms as county commissioner in district 4, Kessler was not reelected in 2010. He decided to run for a seat in district 3 instead of waiting two more years because of the increasing tax burden that is being place on the citizens by the commission. One of his rst steps once he takes of ce will be to try and lower that tax burden, he said. Other steps, which have been platforms of his campaign, are continuing to stand up for an open and transparent government and preserving and protecting the countys natural resources. I look forward to being back on the board, Kessler said. I look forward to working with the current board. Im ready to work. In hearing the election results, Stewart said he was disappointed and hurt, but its a process. And thats whats so wonderful about our country, he said. That we can agree to disagree. Stewart served as a county commissioner from 1996 to 2004 and was not re-elected in 2004. He then won the seat again in 2008. Life goes on and Gods got something better out there for me, Stewart said. Snagging the district 5 seat on the commission was Harden, Republican, with 49 percent of the votes. He won the seat over John Shuff, Democrat, who obtained 31 percent, and Emily Smith, who ran under no party af liation, and received 20 percent. Current County Commissioner Lynn Artz chose not to seek re-election. Continued on Page 3A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 43nd Issue Thursday, November 8, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Green Scene .................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 8B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 10B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 10B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 12B Comics ...........................................................................Page 13BINDEX OBITUARIES Stephen R. Bohannon Larry Whaley Harden Marjorie Annie MatthewsDISTRICT CHAMPS! War Eagles defeat Godby, 23-12 SportsPage 1BCharlie Creel is new sheriff By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCharlie Creel was elected sheriff of Wakulla County, winning 54 percent of the vote against opponent Maurice Langston, who won 45 percent. Im exhausted, Creel said. Im thrilled to death. Creel said that he looks forward to bringing the county back together. I want to thank everybody who supported me, Creel said, and I ask the people who didnt support me to give me a chance. He said he intends to meet soon with interim Sheriff Donnie Crum and looks forward to a smooth transition. It feels good, he said of victory. Im tired. Its been 17 months. I need to spend some time with my family and rest up. Major Maurice Langston said he had called sheriff-elect Creel and congratulated him. Asked about his reaction to the results, Langston said, The people have spoken. Weve been campaigning the last 14 months, and its been a great opportunity to meet some great people, Langston said. I just wish it would have been a little bit different outcome. During the course of the campaign, Langstons son Heath died after an extended illness. Langston acknowledged his family had been through personal tragedies during the campaign. But Wakulla County is the kind of county that embraces you and brings you in. The burden is heavy when you carry it alone, but when you share it that burden is light. Asked about his plans for the future, Langston said: Anytime the good Lord closes one door, he opens another. Ill be looking for an opening door. Creel said that he had intended to run a clean campaign when he started running for the of ce and felt he did. A lot of people told me they were tired of the negative campaigning not just locally, but state and national, he said. I ran on my issues, my platform and what I can do for the county, Creel said. I want to thank the voters of Wakulla County for putting me in this position to lead, to be a leader and bring the community back together. It was Creels second campaign for sheriff he lost by fewer than 50 votes in 2008 to longtime Sheriff David Harvey. After more than 30 years in of- ce, Harvey decided to step down in 2011 to take a position as executive director of the Florida Sheriffs Association Self-Insurance Fund. Donnie Crum was appointed by Gov. Rick Scott to ll the remainder of Harveys term. Creel made no secret of his intention to run again and started his campaign early, saying he felt like he just needed to work harder to win. Shortly after Langston announced his intent to run, questions were raised about whether his candidacy violated the federal Hatch Act, which prohibits government of cials who receive federal money from running for political of ce. Continued on Page 15A Sheriff-elect Charlie CreelThomas, Kessler, Harden win percentage of Wakulla voters who cast their ballots in early voting or absentee before election day. percentage of registered Wakulla voters who cast a ballot.46 79.4BY THE NUMBERSBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netBobby Pearce won more than 73 percent of the vote in the race for superintendent of schools. He takes over from retiring Superintendent David Miller in two weeks. Im thankful for the support of Wakulla County, said Pearce. Actually, Im very humbled by the support. A lot of responsibility comes with that support. He noted that There are a lot of daunting obstacles in our way as we travel forward, but praised the team working with him as very strong. His opponent, Kimball Thomas was disappointed with the election result. Continued on Page 15APearce takes superintendent of schools race in a landslideDonnie Sparkman wins re-election as property appraiser JENNIFER JENSENCandidates and volunteers wave to traf c at Hudson Park in Crawfordville.By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netDonnie Sparkman chuckled when asked how he felt after his election win. Im glad its over with, he said. Sparkman won almost 69 percent of the votes. Im ecstatic that the people voted like I gured they might, Sparkman said. I didnt think there was a problem. Sparkman, who has served ve years as property appraiser, said he could have understood a challenger if there had been some sort of problem in his office but there had been none. In fact, for the first time since 1996, there were not even any petitions before the Value Adjustment Board. Sparkman was at home on election night with family and friends and people from the of ce. His challenger, Jim Parham, admitted he was somewhat puzzled by the results. In light of the feedback and response we got from across the entire county, it was very puzzling, Parham said. He said people speaking with him assured him they were voting for him and so he felt puzzled at the results. Im glad for Donnie Sparkman that he was able to do that, Parham said. I wish Donnie Sparkman well. Parham said the experience of running for of ce and campaigning was enjoyable. We are forever grateful for the wonderful people in Wakulla County, he said. In contrast to Parhams campaign strategy, Sparkman ran a low key campaign. He didnt go doorto-door and said that he didnt like to be bothered and hoped the people appreciated that he didnt bother them. Sparkman said it was time for the politics to come to an end and work to progress. I hope the country and the county will heal and start moving forward, he said. Weve got some real problems polarization if we can work together and move forward. Sparkman said he had been inspired by the recent show of bipartisanship by the local Republican and Democratic leaders, and hoped it was a sign of political healing and progress for the county. I feel very good, he said. I heard the peoples voice. Its their of ce, and Im proud of that. Donnie Sparkman

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage? Renance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Ofce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Ofce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Ofce: 850.926.1960 Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-7 Closed Sun. & Wed. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter volunteering for two successful campaigns in the United States in 2008, Jan Paternotte decided he would come back this year and help those candidates get re-elected. Paternotte, a member of the city council in Amsterdam and former president of the Young Democrats of the Netherlands, traveled to Florida in late October to participate in the re-election campaign of President Barack Obama and locally, County Commissioner Alan Brock. Paternotte met Brock ve years ago at a Young Democrats of America event and in 2008 decided to stop in Wakulla County and help with Brocks campaign for county commissioner. He also campaigned for Obama. It worked out pretty good, Paternotte said. He decided to come back this year to help again. The last time, he brought a politician with him. This time, he decided to bring a journalist, Reinout de Vries. They arrived in Florida on Oct. 22 and spent a week traveling across the state and attending rallies for Obama and learning about early voting. In Wakulla, they put up signs for Obama and Brock, made phone calls at the Wakulla County Democratic headquarters and went door-to-door. De Vries writes for EMMA Communications and has been following the election in the U.S. and came to Florida to see how the process is on the ground and how social media in uences the election. Being able to campaign with Brock was a great opportunity, he said. To see how the local campaigning in the U.S. looks like, he said. The journalist and city councilman were also joined by Jet Mok who works for Dutch Public Radio and is doing a piece on Dutch people volunteering in the United States. Some of the differences all three noted between here and the Netherlands is the importance placed on candidates going door to door greeting voters. We do it, but less than here, de Vries said. Paternotte said in the Netherlands, candidates started this practice about four years ago. When they knocked on doors in Wakulla County, de Vries said people mostly kind and they had very good conversations with voters about Obama. Another major difference between campaigning in the U.S. and the Netherlands is the use of social media. Mok said Holland is pretty behind the U.S. and is where it is currently is where the U.S. was in 2007. Its not as sophisticated, Paternotte said. They also noticed that advertisements are much more negative in the U.S. De Vries said there are a few negative advertisements in Holland, but not anywhere near the amount he has seen in the U.S. Paternotte said another difference is that there are nine political parties in the Netherlands, as opposed to the two major parties in the United States. You always have to build bridges, Paternotte said. In addition to campaigning for Obama and Brocj, they also spent time with a member of the Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee, Chris Russell. So they can get the full picture, Brock said. Both Paternotte and de Vries spoke of the nice people they had met in the county. Americans are very nice people, Paternotte said. Its great to see everyone smiling. When asked if Paternotte planned to return in four more years, he said it depends how this election goes. Maybe well be sending him to D.C., Paternotte said of Brock.Dutch visitors campaign locally for Alan Brock, Obama PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSJan Paternotte, left, and Reinout de Vries, right, came to Florida from the Netherlands to learn about early voting and campaign for President Obama and a friend from the Young Democrats, Commissioner Alan Brock. Continued from Page 1A Harden, a native of Sopchoppy, has served as a Sopchoppy city commissioner for the last six years and decided to run for county commission so he could serve everyone in the county. Im just humbled, Harden said after learning he had been elected county commissioner. Im very grateful for the con dence the people have in me. He complimented the other two candidates for running a clean, positive campaign. We ran a good, civil campaign, Harden said. While campaigning, Harden said he stayed positive, had faith and focused on presenting himself to the voters and let them know who he was and why he was running. The rst piece of business once he is sworn in to of ce will be to continue to listen to the citizens, he said. I want to listen to their concerns and just be available to them, he said. And try and meet their needs with the resource we have. He added, Im just very excited. Neither Shuff nor Smith could not be reached for comment. omas, Kessler, Harden win Like us on

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. City of Sopchoppy NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe City of Sopchoppy will hold a public hearing on the adoption of Ordinance 2012-03, AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE OPERATING BUDGET FOR THE GENERAL AND WATER FUNDS OF THE CITY OF SOPCHOPPY FOR THE 2011-12 OPERATING YEAR, at the regular council meeting, November, 13, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. The public hearing will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. The public is invited and urged to attend. Any person needing special assistance to attend this meeting should contact the Clerks Ofce 24 hours in advance by calling 962-4611.NOVEMBER 1, 8, 2012 City of Sopchoppy NOTICE OF MEETING CHANGEThe City of Sopchoppy will be changing the date of the regular November meeting from the second Monday to the second Tuesday in November in observance of the Veterans Day Holiday The meeting will be held, November 13, at 6:30 p.m., 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FLNOVEMBER 1, 8, 2012 NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS NOVEMBER 8, 15, 21, 29, 2012 NOTICE OF PREQUALIFICATION AND PROCUREMENT OF CONSTRUCTION SERVICES WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARDNovember 8, 22, 2012 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY POST 4538would like to thank the following businesses for all their contributions to our This advertisement was paid by Advance Auto Parts and VFW Ladies AuxiliaryCHINESE AUCTION By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn order to be prepared for the possibility of a large sum of money owing to Wakulla County in the future, the Wakulla County Commission is taking the necessary steps. At the Nov. 5 meeting, the commission adopted the RESTORE Act Advisory Committee and appointed the 13 members who will serve. The committee was formed in response to the RESTORE Act being passed earlier this year which holds those parties responsible for the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill accountable and ensures that 80 percent of the nes received be invested back into the Gulf region. A portion of those funds would go directly to the ve Gulf states and in Florida, those funds who ow down to the most impacted counties, which includes Wakulla. Under the current formula, Wakulla could receive over $25 million, if the settlement is $15 billion, according to County Commissioner Alan Brock. Although there have been rumblings about a negotiation between BP and the Department of Justice about a possible settlement that may direct some nes elsewhere, the commission agreed to have a structure in place if the stipulations of the act are upheld. There is a possibility that a portion of the nes could be paid under the Natural Resources Damages Act, instead of the Clean Water Act. The advisory committee will be tasked with reviewing potential projects the money can be used for and then prioritize those projects and present their recommendations to the county commission. The committee will meet no less than ve times and must have the priority list completed by March 2013. The committee consists of Lara Edwards representing Sopchoppy; Allen Hobbs representing St. Marks; Mark Mitchell selected by the Panacea Waterfronts; Billy Mills selected by the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce; Jay Westmark selected by the Economic Development Council; Niraj Patel selected by the Tourist Development Council; Robert Pearce selected by the Wakulla County School Board; and Bob Ballard selected by the Wakulla TCC Campus. The county commission also appointed several citizens who expressed a desire to serve on the committee. These were Ronald Fred Crum to represent the shing industry; Byron Price to represent Shell Point, Oyster Bay and Spring Creek communities; Scott Gaby as the citizen-at-large; and Eric Livingston to represent natural resources. County Commissioner Lynn Artz voted against creating the committee because she felt the composition of the committee did not align with the eligible activities the money can be used on. She felt the committee should be made up of members who are extremely knowledgeable in these areas. The money can be used for restoration and protection of the natural resources, ecosystems, sheries, marine and wildlife habitats, beaches, and coastal wetlands of the Gulf Coast region; mitigation of damage to sh, wildlife and natural resources; implementation of a federally approved marine, coastal, or comprehensive conservation management plan, including fisheries monitoring; workforce development and job creation; improvements to or on state parks located in coastal areas affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill; infrastructure projects benefitting the economy or ecological resources, including port infrastructure; coastal ood protection and related infrastructure and planning assistance. The commission chose Commissioner Randy Merritt to represent them. The county commission already approved an interlocal agreement relating to the establishment of the Gulf Consortium and approved County Administrator David Edwards to serve as the countys representative. This consortium will administer the funds that are disbursed to the ve states based on several factors which do not go directly to the counties. The rst meeting of the committee will be held on Dec. 4 at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers.COUNTY COMMISSIONBoard creates RESTORE Act committeeBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netCity Government Week was held in October and to celebrate, the city of Sopchoppy held two different events to educate citizens surrounding the theme, My City: Im part of it, Im proud of it. Mayor Colleen Skipper and City Clerk Jackie Lawhon visited four fourth grade classes at Medart Elementary School on Oct. 26 to speak to them about city government. Lawhon said they chose fourth grade because they are studying Florida history. She made booklets for the students that went along with their presentation that includes the history of the cities in Wakulla County, what a city is, who runs city hall and how students and their parents can get involved in local government. The students were great, they asked a lot of questions, Lawhon said. Lawhon said she also challenged the fourth graders to develop ideas for a downtown park and to make a presentation to the city commission about their ideas at a future meeting. A park and trailhead is planned in the future for the Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail. I tried to involve them and to really make them aware of the fact that municipal government is the government closest to the people, its right where you live, Lawhon said. There was also some discussion about city limits and how one becomes incorporated. Since a lot of the students at Medart live in the Panacea area, I spoke to them about the process that Panacea is going through at this time to become incorporated and that hopefully by next year, Panacea could be Floridas newest city, Lawhon said. In addition to visiting with local students, the city also held an open house at city hall on Oct. 24. City Government Week is sponsored by the Florida League of Cities. The League of Cities always encourages municipalities to get involved in the community to promote Municipal Government Week and to speak to community groups and schools, Lawhon said. Ive always wanted to do this and decided to start with Medart School, Lawhon said. The school administration and teachers were very open to me coming into the classroom.CITY OF SOPCHOPPYCity government week celebrated SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCity Manager Jackie Lawhon and Mayor Colleen Skipper at Medart Elementary. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThose who believe the assessed value of their property is incorrect have the opportunity to le a petition to appear in a hearing before the Value Adjustment Board. This year, there were no hearings before the board. The last time this happened was 1996, according to Clerk to the Value Adjustment Board Evelyn Evans. Evans said 17 petitions were filed, but all were withdrawn prior to the meeting on Oct. 14 after those property owners met with the property appraiser and issues were resolved. Last year, there were 112 parcels for review and 97 parcels that were heard at the hearing, Evans said. We always have petitions filed and a lot of them are resolved before the hearing, but in the past 10 years or so we had numerous hearings before the board, Evans said. After property owners receive their Truth in Millage notice in the mail, which gives them their assessed property value and estimate of how much money they will owe in taxes based on the millage rate, they have a certain amount of time to le a petition with the board. Prior to ling a petition, they have the option to discuss any concerns with the property appraisers office. If they feel there was a mistake on the value assessed and disputes can not be worked out, they can have their complaint heard before the board. Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman said when someone has an issue with their property value he sits down and explains it to them and typically they understand it after he speaks to them. Sometimes mistakes are made and he and his staff are there to clear up any issues. A fair and equitable tax roll is what I want, Sparkman said.No petitions heard for Value Adjustment

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Sheriff candidates square off at one last forum From the Dock for Nov. 1, 2012 From the Dock for Nov. 1, 2012 Homecoming 2012 Business: Wakulla Urgent Care Owner: David A. Keen, MD, MPH Candidates for property appraiser appear at forum St. Marks applies for EPA grant Why should we do legislatures job?thewakullanews.com Follow us on ank you, Crawfordville Auto Prayer Walk has been special event Wedding at courthouse was nice Proud of candidates for their e ortsREADERS WRITE: By HERB DONALDSON It has been said that is better to give than to receive. Giving is tough when you have very little. To receive is a great deal tougher, knowing theres not much left to go around. Both require a change within that many nd foreign. It is hard to believe that the holiday season is just around the corner. The giving season this year is sure to be a tight one. Last years was as well. Yet, somehow, the people of Wakulla managed to give to community projects, such as Operation Santa, that gave back to our countys residents. There was absolutely no way Operation Santa could have given food, funds, household products, clothing, and toys to the overwhelming number of applicants who requested assistance, if not for the gracious support of certain Wakulla County citizens. You know who you are, and a good majority of the county knows, too. To list the names of all who came forth and gave last year would take up a great deal of space in The Wakulla News. Countless individuals, groups, churches, county government employees and businesses gave funds and items. Some even adopted whole families. Others volunteered the most precious gift of all their time, those irrecoverable bits and pieces of their own lives, to support the well-being of others whom they may never know. What better way to have put the proposed community center to work than to allow the community itself teens, adults, seniors to work as one, putting aside lip-service to assist their neighbors in making the holidays brighter for those who saw only darkness ahead? Giving is tough. Receiving, even tougher. Ours is a community built on doing for oneself. Though its nice to be charitable, the receiving of such charity can feel lonely. Operation Santas team works hard to make families feel valued and respected by meeting the simple needs most of us take for granted. Unemployment, hard times, a medical crisis, falling victim to corrupt business practices all of these and more can place one in an entirely different category. The pull yourself up by the bootstraps verbiage is shouted from a group of onlookers similar to characters in a wild west drama. One is forced to ght against the depressing knowledge that their poverty has tainted them, while simultaneously guring whether or not to put gas in the car, food on the table, or medicine in the cabinet. Bootstraps are a hard thing to come by these days. Those seeking assistance from Operation Santa are not judged. They are supported and shielded, if only for a brief moment, from the storm of life when most needed. Tropical Storm Debbie carried away the material possessions of many. Elections and holidays become trivial issues when you nd yourself sleeping on a neighbors couch because your lifes work was demolished in an instant by an act of nature. Knowing our community means knowing that there are people who will put on a brave face and think it healthy to not speak to others of their loss. This mentality does not heal the wound nor solve the problem. Ours is a smaller, tighter community than most. Through the years, we can expect that to change, but for now, the thing that keeps our county beautiful is that when it counts we are there for one another. It should be noted that this temporary haven we call Operation Santa, comes with a price. For those in Wakulla County who received assistance last year, if you have been fortunate enough to have your circumstances change and are now on better footing, it is asked that you pay forward the kindness that was extended to you. The American Dream is exactly what it says: A sleep induced vision thought up by Americans. Upon waking one works to make that dream that beautiful vision that seems so unattainable that it can only exist in a dream a reality. It is those Americans who choose to lift their fellow man after his fall, and to give even when they, too, may be lacking, that grows independence, trust, and a charitable spirit that we hope is returned when the shoe, if a shoe there be, is on the other foot. Cash donations, adoption of families, giving gently used clothing and toys, volunteering, shopping, writing, making calls, speaking to groups, referring a family, organizing there are a hundred ways you can help. If youve been in any way blessed this year, it may be time for you to share that blessing with others. Operation Santa is a pathway to action, right here in your hometown. Call 926-3526 to learn more. Herb Donaldson is a local playwright, founder of Palaver Tree Theater, and director of Healing Arts of Wakulla County. Operation Santa is gearing up to help families in need Editor, The News: Over the last couple of weeks my car would not start a couple of times so I thought I better have my battery checked, which is almost new. I found out the battery was fully charged, so I did not worry about it again. Well, this morning I was in Tallahassee for a doctor appointment, and when I got in my car it would not turn over. Needless to say I was vexed. I called AAA and had my car towed to Crawfordville Auto & Tire since they had taken care of me before and I trusted them. The tow guy swore it was probably my starter. Lucky for me the employees at Crawfordville Auto & Tire checked my battery terminals before they checked anything else and low and behold all I needed was a new battery terminal. I dont need to say that some places love to see a woman come in with car problems because they can tell most of us just about anything, and in my case I would have believed it was my starter causing my problem. I wanted to say THANK YOU Crawfordville Auto for being an honest auto repair shop. You will de nitely have my business and recommendation! Petra Shuff Crawfordville Editor, The News: During the past several weeks, my wife, daughter and I have been fortunate enough to attend Wakulla Countys Footsteps For Faith And Freedom Prayer Walks at Azalea Park. This has been an experience and inspiration to those of us who participated that is dif cult to put into words. Our community came together to pray and walk for the healing of our broken Country. Over 35 pastors from Wakulla County churches of all denominations have come together as Christians with one voice to guide us in our daily devotional walks, and to trust in God to do what is right for our nation in this important election, and for the challenges to come. We especially want to thank Cynthia Webster and the other folks who worked so diligently to make this such a special event, and to the pastors of our wonderful Wakulla County churches who gave of their time and inspirational scriptures to lift our hearts and spirits. Wakulla County is a special place, and this has been a truly special event. David Lowe Crawfordville Editor, The News: My fiancee and I are from Panama City and decided to come to Wakulla Springs to get married. We chose to exchange vows at the Crawfordville courthouse last Friday afternoon. When we arrived, we were checked in by impressive and personable sheriffs deputies who promised to not let my ancee get away should he get cold feet at the last minute. :-) There were some scary moments when we realized we had forgotten the marriage license in the car and my ancee went to get it. Thankfully, he returned on his own, so no handcuffs or guns were required! In the clerks of ce, after validating our paperwork and a short rehearsal about where to stand and what to do, Miss Tempie performed our ceremony and Miss Ginger took pictures for us. They even furnished a beautiful bouquet of owers, and had a nice place for us to stand. The pre-written ceremony and vows Miss Tempie used were thorough and sincere, and she allowed us to add to them to make them our own. I want to brag on these wonderful ladies. They were ef cient, helpful, and professional. I also want to thank Miss Donna, who took care of all the red tape for us. From the time we arrived at the courthouse until the time we left we were treated courteously and warmly, and all of the congratulations made our wedding feel all that much more special. Thanks to everyone for making us feel so at home! Sincerely, The new Norma Smith (Mrs. L. F. Smith) Panama City Editor, The News: Today I was reminded again of why I am proud to be an American. I saw the dozen or more local candidates and their supporters standing by the highway in Crawfordville waving their hands and signs. I was reminded of the one time I ran for of ce that of student council president for Crawfordville High School. I was not elected. Why? I did not ask anyone to vote for me! Well, it takes work and self-con dence to place yourself in the situation to campaign for votes and I am proud of all those people who had the nerve and self-con dence to declare their candidacy. They have spent time and money that probably could be well-used by themselves and/or their families and yet they know they will not all succeed. I think, though, they can be proud of their efforts. The tragedy of our politics today is the so-called PACs that throw so much money out there to try to control what is done. Hopefully, we will not let their trash in uence our votes. Betty Green Crawfordville CorrectionThe name of Wakulla High Schools 2012 Homecoming Queen was incorrect in last weeks News, identifying her as Ashley Alvarez. Actually, the name of this years Homecoming Queen is Amber Alvarez. Ashley is her sister. We regret the error and apologize to Amber and Ashley.At right, Homecoming King Demetrius Lindsey with Homecoming Queen Amber Alvarez.PHOTO BY BILL ROLLINS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBy SLIM RANDLES Dud was awfully quiet all through the daily dissemination of anything on page one of the Valley Weekly Miracle, which wasnt like him at all. Just sucked down caffeine and silently shook his head now and then. Anita okay, Dud? Oh sure, Doc. You okay? He nodded, then looked up with a wistful, philosophical look that our guys dont usually get until after the buttered toast. Sometimes I think its pearls before swine, thats all. We waited. Music, I mean. You know how you practice and practice and then you get good enough to actually do something? Well, I took the accordion and went to the accordion festival to compete. Well, you know Im not really that bad any more. Youre getting pretty darn good on that thing, Dud. Thanks, Steve. Well, we drove down to the capital and I got in the competition and did okay. Placed third in polka. I played that new piece. Its kinda hard because it has those minor bass buttons in it and it took me forever to learn not to miss them. It was after that. You see, I put the accordion back in the car and we went in for a lunch they gave everyone. Whats wrong with that? I forgot to lock the car. We were halfway through lunch when Anita asked me if Id locked the car and then it hit me that I might not have locked it. She insisted I run right out and check and thats what I did. And thats when I lost my faith in human beings. Oh, Dud, Doc said, someone stole your accordion? No, it was still there in the back seat. But someone had put two more in there with it. He shook his head. Pearls before swine.Brought to you by the national award-winning book A Cowboys Guide to Growing Up Right. Read a free sample at www.slimrandles.com.Home Country

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Page 5A Firefighters BBQ Competition and Charity Fundraiser. F F F F F F g h h h h h h t t t r r s s B B B B B B B B B B B B B B Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q C C C C C C C C C C C o o o m p e e t i i i i i i i t i i i i i i i i o o o n n n o m m m F F F F F F F i i i i i r e f f f f f f i i i i i g g h t t er t SMOKE AND FIREThird AnnualThank you to our Sponsors! Thank You! &for their work withPlatinumCrawfordville Auto, Beef O Bradys, Century Link, Saint Marks Powder, Maurice Langston, Halsey Beshears, Bevis Funeral Home and Harvey Young ChapelGoldThe Wakulla News and HardeesBronzeCentennial Bank, Southern Floor Covering, Waste Pro, and PepsiBrassTen-8 Fire Equipment, Sopchoppy VFD, Frances Casey Lowe, PA, Hydra Engineering and Construction, Wal-Mart, Huddle House, Stedebani Enterprises, Talquin Electric, Progress Energy, Other Donors and Supporters Crawfordville Ace Hardware, Wildwood Inn and Golf Course, Farm Bureau Insurance, Lube Expert, Tangles Hair Salon, The Barber Shoppe, Myra Jeans, Talk O The Town Deli, Winn Dixie, The Donut Hole, Capital City Bank, Raymond Love Family, Skybox Sports Bar & Grill, Gulf Coast Lumber, Best Value Tire and Automotive, Knights Of Columbus, Mikes Seafood and Grille, Woodville AceSpecial ThanksPoseys Up the Creek, Poseys prepared all of our delicious side dishes. Macks Country Meats, all of the top quality meat came from Macks Country Meats. Wakulla Crawfordville Sopchoppy Smith Creek St. Marks Medart Ivan Shell Point Panacea Ochlockonee Bay Bethel Shadeville Sheriff Charlie Creel Maurice LangstonCommission District 1Alan Brock Jenny Brock Ralph ThomasCommission District 3Howard Kessler Mike StewartCommission District 5Richard Harden John Shuff Emily SmithSuperintendent of SchoolsBobby Pearce Kimball Thomas Property Appraiser Jim Parham Donnie Sparkman County Tax Exempt Yes No 607 1951 379 67 137 582 1253 383 150 177 728 905 7319 435 1583 603 70 159 534 940 311 222 227 475 670 6229 343 1064 344 39 72 278 510 214 83 92 400 478 3917 188 620 140 14 62 186 366 115 52 76 223 285 2327 507 1806 480 79 149 640 1283 355 228 223 574 777 7101 631 1766 453 63 136 541 1127 404 140 202 711 884 7058 392 1725 502 73 146 552 1021 281 225 193 470 676 6256 457 1641 612 102 145 616 1058 297 220 191 483 692 6514 355 1181 196 17 75 255 651 195 68 100 455 532 4080 205 622 175 16 58 225 421 183 72 98 241 300 2616 686 2547 741 111 204 839 1631 483 289 290 791 1065 9677 317 920 230 22 79 268 518 181 72 87 382 469 3545 338 1058 213 26 109 281 700 229 117 131 337 531 4070 695 2396 759 109 178 809 1453 454 248 260 843 1013 9217 457 1862 430 61 132 497 1056 290 184 189 595 831 6584 557 1524 510 70 148 558 1055 385 167 193 580 694 6441 Total General Election 2012 Vote TableJURISDICTION WIDE BY PRECINCTWakulla local election results

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Church Briefs Rocky Mount Church of Christ will hold free sh fryRocky Mount Church of Christ, located at 58 Dogwood Drive in Crawfordville, will be having a free community sh fry on Saturday, Nov. 10, from 11:30 a.m. until its gone. Everyone is invited to attend. Marcum Family to perform at Crawfordville UMCThe Marcum Family of Peachtree City, Ga., will present a concert on Sunday, Nov. 18, at 4 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Michael, Susan LeeAura and the four children will present a program of contemporary, gospel and original music. Each family member plays at least one instrument and all sing. Susan is the daughter of Mary and Buddy Updegraff, and grew up here in Wakulla County and is hoping to see many old friends and family at the concert, which is free and open to the public. By CYNTHIA WEBSTER I truly hope that I am writing about something that many of you had an opportunity to see, hear and participate in on election eve when hundreds of people came together in Azalea Park for an evening service of prayer and hymn. No one there will ever forget the power of nearly 350 people on their knees in prayer in the great Church of Gods design nor will they forget the beauty of tiny blue lights lifted to the night sky as people sang with deep love of both their country and their God. It is always dif cult to say thank you to those who are willing to give so much of their time, energy and talent, not for recognition but because of faith as mostly they neither want nor need a thank you. Nevertheless the final night of Footsteps for Faith and Freedom would not have happened without many, many people saying Yes, I will be a part of the event when they might have said no. Not one person who was asked, refused. That is amazing and could only be done with Gods Blessing. These giving people however should be recognized for their desire to minister to all the people of Wakulla. I would like to share with those of you who are reading this who these very special people were: Adam Hill, the Worship Arts pastor from the River of Life Church and a man who is as kind as he is talented. Bo Mixer, a Wakulla resident who carries his American Flag proudly where ever he goes. Henry Jones, pastor of the River of Life Church whose love for God is profound, transparent, inspiring and catching. The Sopchoppy United Methodist Church Youth Drama Team, nothing is more exciting than being able to see the next generation of spiritual leaders share their praise for God with others. CUMC Quartet from the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. One of the very most special parts of the program not only because of their great ability and their willingness to share it with their community, but also because of the participation of Superintendent of Schools David Miller. He is a man who has served this county and our children as he has served God, with all his heart for 30 years and after the election his replacement will be known. For that reason I feel his being with us in hymn and prayer on election eve was truly a gift from God. Tamika Rich, whose beautiful voice did justice to a beautiful song. It made us wish we had asked her to sing another one. Tom Tillman, who took us back to the Continental Congress of 1774. His prayer was chilling in that it gave us a sense of what the Founding Fathers might have been feeling as they listened to these very same words over 225 years ago. Stephen Shores, a wonderful voice that has graced many events but none as important as those that lift his voice in praise. Thank you, Mr. Shores. You were truly a Godsend when we needed one most. David Davis, a surprise as no one knew what he would read and now everyone not only wants a copy of it but they want a copy of it read by.... David Davis. Duane Thurmond, a man who comes from a talented family, a family of great faith, a family that gives much to the community and we were blessed tonight to hear the voice he inherited sing a song of faith to an appreciative community. And last but never least: Pastor David Fell of the First Baptist Church Crawfordville who played the keyboard. He was the rst person to say he would be a part of the prayer and hymn evening. He was the beginning when there was little more than an idea. More importantly, he was very much a part of the entire Forty Days, having led the prayer walk himself, having appointed a member of his church to the steering committee, having a youth pastor who also led the walk and having come on the walk himself many times and at least once with his sons. A thank you for behind the scenes work goes to many people including: John Robison for providing the sound system, Vause Mechanical Contracting of Tallahassee for the at bed stage, Ian Burse for video taping the event, Charles Montford for printing the program, Melissa Gentry for welcoming guests with lights and programs, Wes Coleman for traf c control, Mike Helms for his willingness to be there if he was needed, and Keith Anderson and Ruth Porter for just being in the right place at the right time every time. Lastly, Betty Fusco, JoAnne Kennedy and Jackie Carey are three wonderful women of faith who lent inspirational and spiritual support to the walk before the walk even became a walk way back some eight weeks or so ago. And most of all a 40-day prayer walk could never have happened without people who love God and would come to the park to pray openly for our nation. There are so many people who participated and so many who have become family. Each clergy leader had his or her own style but was essential in providing clarity and spiritual guidance as we face a dif cult time in American history. There is not one walker who was left untouched by these messages. And as for the walkers we are friends, family, brothers and sisters in Christ. Thank you all for coming to the park and being willing to profess your faith, to pray and to seek His face. 40-day Prayer Walk concludes with prayers, hymns Covenant Hospice wants to share an important message with the community this November during National Hospice and Palliative Care Month: its never too early to begin the conversation of a lifetime and create an advance directive. Our team is committed to providing education to the community about advance care planning, said Dale O. Knee, Covenant Hospice president and CEO. It is important for everyone to have an advance directive regardless of present health status. For information about obtaining and lling out an advance directive in your state, please visit www.covenanthospice.org/begintheconversation. Hospice care provides expert pain management, symptom control, psychosocial support and spiritual care to patients and families when a cure is not possible. All the necessary medicines and equipment needed to keep a patient comfortable can be brought right to the home, which is where most Americans would like to be if at all possible. Continued on Page 7ACovenant Hospice raising awareness during Palliative Care Month Hundreds of people went to Azalea Park on Monday, Nov. 5, election eve, for the conclusion of the 40-day Prayer Walk.WILLIAM SNOWDEN

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Page 7AObituaries Stephen R. Bohannon Larry Whaley Harden Marjorie Annie MatthewsStephen R. Bohannon, 51, of Crawfordville, died on Thursday, Nov. 1. Originally from Maryland, he spent most of his life in Wakulla County. He is survived by his wife, Sarah Ruth Bohannon of Crawfordville; stepson, Edward L. Roberson of Crawfordville; step-daughter, Katie B. Roberson of Tallahassee; brother, Roland (Debbie) Bohannon of Savannah, Ga.; sister, Sherry (Ty) Griffin of Crestview; and two grandchildren. Funeral services were held on Tuesday, Nov. 6, at Christian Worship Center, 3922 Coastal Highway in Crawfordville. Interment followed at Arran Cemetery in Crawfordville. The family received friends on Monday, Nov. 5, at the Christian Worship Center. Arrangements were under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home (850) 559-3380. Sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome.net/. Marjorie Annie Matthews, 65, died on Oct. 30 and has joined the Angels. She taught so many of us compassion and kindness. She will never be forgotten and will live in our hearts forever. She was an elementary school teacher, mother, granny, friend to all. Survivors include a daughter, Penny McKinney (Scott); ex-husband, Floyd Matthews; grandsons, Matt, Flint, Colt and Zach McKinney; sisters, Vicki and Gwen of Georgia; and nieces and nephew. Remembrance will be held Saturday, Nov. 10, at Outzs with live music. Friends and family are welcome to attend. She loved music and we are gonna all dance with her in heaven one day. Larry Whaley Harden, 71, of Sopchoppy, passed away on Oct. 30. He was born on Jan. 22, 1941, in Sopchoppy, where he was a lifelong resident. He was an active outdoorsman who loved to hunt and sh, and spend time with his family and friends. He was a member of Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. He served in the U.S. Army in Germany and loved his country. He was a retired machinist from the City of Tallahassee and a gunsmith. He was always up to a challenge working with metal and machinery. He loved using his hands to work and x anything that was brought to him. Above all, he was extremely faithful to his family, friends, and church. He was deeply loved and will be sorely missed by all that knew him. Visitation was held Friday, Nov. 2, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Funeral services were held Saturday, Nov. 3, at 10 a.m. at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church in Sopchoppy. Interment followed at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. A donation in his memory may be made to Big Bend Hospice. 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee, FL 32308 or Sopchoppy United Methodist Church, 10 Faith Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL 32358. Survivors include his wife of 45 years, Teresa Curles Harden; two children, Charles (Anne) Harden of Sopchoppy and Cheryl (Todd) Andrews of Wacissa; ve grandchildren, Valerie, Chance, Sarah, Natalie and Audrey; two brothers, Warren C. Harden and Gerald (Becky) Harden, both of Sopchoppy; two sisters, Louise McCauley and Jean (David) Dunlap, both of Sopchoppy; and a host of nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents, W.C. Heddy and Cornelia Whaley Harden; a brother, Ronnie (Connie White) Harden; a sister, Sherri Harden; and brotherin-law, Robert McCauley. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 www.bevisfh.com)Stephen R. Bohannon Marjorie Annie Matthews Larry Whaley HardenBy REV. JAMES L. SNYDERI am not the kind of person looking for a handout or anything free. When somebody offers me something free, I know there is a catch somewhere, and as long as I still have a slice of sanity in my noodle soup, nobody is going to catch me. Before I had made this a hard and fast rule the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I took a company up on their free offer of three days and two nights in a marvelous resort hotel. All you have to do, the person on the phone said, is listen to a short presentation. That short presentation took exactly three days and two nights. By the time we were done and ready to come home we were exhausted. How many times can you say no, and for it to register in the person to which it is directed? Obviously, from our experience, there is no answer to that question. I learned my lesson and have never accepted a free offer since. Not that I have not had the opportunity, I just am highly suspicious of anything that contains that fiveletter word free. Recently an event happened that has upgraded my thoughts concerning the word free. The day began as usual, which included a trip to the local grocery store and the bakery department for the obligatory Apple Fritter. A day without an Apple Fritter is a day I do not want to get out of bed. This one thing drives me out of my cozy bed in the morning and puts a little bit of get-up in my get-along. I am not sure if an Apple Fritter a day will keep the doctor away, but who am I to challenge such likelihood? Personally, I would rather err on the side of the Apple Fritter. It all began years ago when my wife insisted I add more fruit to my diet. It was then I discovered the marvelous delicacy of the old-fashioned Apple Fritter. Just the word apple makes it a fruit in my mind. My wife and I have had very few disputes during the almost half-century of our relationship but this is one. She feels an Apple Fritter does not qualify as a fruit. I think she is rather fruity along this line myself; however, I am too wise and love life too much to actually say it to her. What I say under my breath and behind her back does me no harm whatsoever. My argument is that there is enough Apple in an Apple Fritter to qualify it for a fruit. I am not sure who has won this argument, but I am not going to challenge it. Rather, I will enjoy the fruity nature of my delectable Apple Fritter. Getting back to the incident that has changed my mind about free. I entered the grocery store, walked back to the bakery department and selected a freshly baked Apple Fritter. It was about all I can do to keep from eating it between the bakery department and the cashier counter. We all have our crosses to bear, and this is one of mine. I need to wait until I get to my of ce where I can leisurely enjoy one of the great delicacies of life. Also, no one can see me eat it, especially, you know who. I got to the checkout counter and handed over, reluctantly, my Apple Fritter in order to pay for it. It is the best 79 cents I spend every day. Then the inevitable happened. Im sorry, the young lady behind the counter said, but there is something wrong with this Apple Fritter. Boy, did she have my attention. I was about to give her a piece of my mind. Who did she think she was? My wife? I wanted to give her a spicy lecture on the importance of the Apple Fritter in question. In my mind, there was nothing wrong with this Apple Fritter. I do not often get my dander up. After all, I do not have the hair I used to have, so it is rather dif- cult to do it. This rather came close for me. As I stood there steaming, she looked at me and said, Im sorry, the pricing is wrong on this Apple Fritter. I guess the bakery department made a mistake. She then paused for a moment, did something on the cash machine and then said some words that caused me to dance in the aisles. Im sorry that this mistake happened, so according to our store policy, this Apple Fritter is free. I stood there unable to speak. All my reservations about free, went out the window. I smiled. I smiled a smile that went from one end of the store to the other. Then to make sure I understood correctly I asked her, Are you sure this is free? When she answered in the af rmative, I gently picked up that free Apple Fritter and departed from the store not afraid for anybody to see my Apple Fritter and me together. The only other free offer I ever accept is from God. For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord (Romans 6:23 KJV). Gods gift carries with it marvelous compensations both now and eternally. Gods free is free indeed.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Free is as free gives and I dont like free, usually OUT TO PASTOR Continued from Page 6A Hospice makes this happen. Palliative care brings these same skilled services earlier in the course of an illness and can be provided along with other treatments a patient may want to pursue. Many people dont realize that hospices are the largest providers of palliative care services in the United States. More than 1.5 million people with a life-limiting illness get help from the nations hospice and palliative care providers every single year. Its about quality of life. With the help of hospice and palliative care, patients and families can focus on whats most important, living as fully as possible in spite of illness. Knee said. For additional information on hospice and palliative care, please contact your local Covenant Hospice branch.Covenant Hospice raising awareness this month New From SYP Publishing!THE GREENS AND CORNBREAD OF WAKULLA COUNTY Historical Stories Told by the People This delightful book is a collection of stories depicting the history of Wakulla County. The stories were written and submitted by different authors and families. The text includes a wide variety of topics and time periods. Many of the stories contain photos that were included by the author. Available NOW!! $29.95As a publisher, we are constantly searching for authors and groups that wish to have works of a historical or regional signicance published. You may have a local book of stories and lore, a genealogy study, or a text on any specic historical, collectible or unique item. If you are looking for a publisher, consider contacting us.In Search Of The Diamond Brooch In Search of The Diamond Brooch is a southern historical saga starting with the migration of the pioneer families to the North Florida area. This is the story of a family that settled in North Florida in the early 1800s in Wakulla and Leon Counties. Written by Pete Gerrell & Terri Gerrell $24.95SYP Publishing 4351 Natural Bridge Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32305 www.syppublishing.com 850-421-7420 New F our Silent Hero / WWII Veteran 8/5/22 3/20/11 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE blessedare those whomourn 2012 Service of RemembranceSunday, December 2nd at 4:00pm Hudson Park21 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville Please call Pam at 850-926-9308 for more information. In Remembrance of the Brave Heroes of Wakulla County, lets not forget the years they spent away from home to insure we are safe in our homes.Jimmie, you may not be with us, but you have left a big footprint.We want to Honor A Very Special Korean War Veteran who Served with HonorSTAFF SERGEANT JIMMIE B. DYKESFather to Jeffrey B. Dykes Kimmie Dykes Caneld & Jenkie Latil Husband of Jean Moore Dykes and Son to Omalee Spears and Wilmer DykesLOVE YOU Jean & Jerry

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityRelief Society makes drop cloths for adults PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpecial to The NewsThe Relief Society met last month to begin its service project. The project, proposed by Dena Wiggins, one of the church members who also takes care of the elderly, was to learn how to provide care for the elderly without causing injury to the caregiver or the patient. She said there was a great need for washable adult bibs, which were renamed drop cloths. The Relief Society met and the project exploded with great enthusiasm from the Young Womens members. As the word spread of the Drop Cloth Project some non-profit organizations, such as the Alzheimers Care, Big Bend Hospice and Home Instead Senior Care, began to make requests for them. It turned out to be a way to teach the youth the joy of service and giving. At a family gathering last Sunday for the birthday celebration of Joyce Hosford, who turned 90, Sandra W. Haymon, Ph.D., and author of Baby boomers-Sandwiched between Retirement & Caregiving, was in attendance. She is also secretary of the Young Womens presidency in the Tortolita Ward, Tucson, Ariz., who after hearing about the project wanted all the information so she could include it in her seminars and also get her young women involved. The drop cloths are bright, cheerful and eco-friendly. Instead of using the disposable plastic ones these will easily last for years even with heavy use and washing. To participate in this project or for an organization who would like to request an order, contact Becky at 926-6284 or via email at shulbr1634@embarqmail. com. Members of the Relief Society make an adult drop cloth, above, and a nished product at right. Daughters of Confederacy chapter wins awardsSpecial to The NewsThe Ron Don McLeod Chapter 2469 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) announces their receipt of a number of awards at the Florida Division convention recently held in Tampa. Among six awards received include the Most Outstanding Chapter in the District I. Another award received was third place to its own chapter president, Louise Thomas, for her essay about the home front during the War Between the States. The chapter also is proud to announce 2nd Vice President Michelle McMillan Kirby, daughter of Finley and Jean McMillan of Ochlockonee Bay, was elected as District I director. District I consists of eight chapters comprising of more than 300 ladies living from Pensacola to Perry. Their goals are benevolent, educational, historical, patriotic and memorial. The ladies of the R. Don McLeod Chapter currently include 36 women who care about serving our community. They have helped various organizations in our community including Eden Springs, veterans groups and food pantries. Membership in the UDC is open to women aged 16 years and older who have a Confederate ancestor who faithfully served and/or supported the Southern Cause. If any young lady (or young at heart) aged 16 and up with a qualifying ancestor is interested in membership, please contact the chapter via email to rdonmcleodudc@gmail. com or visit their website at http://rdonmcleod.wordpress.com. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMember of the chapter are: front row, Kathy Frank, Evelyn Stills, Arlene Vause, Ann Cassaeux, Carolyn Harvey and Mary Ann Owens, and back row, Amy Carraway, Louise Thomas, Michelle Kirby, Tanya Lynn and Annette Strickland. Mr. and Mrs. Seth BledsoeBledsoe marries Davis Amanda Michelle Davis of Crawfordville and Seth Allen Bledsoe of Kingsport, Tenn., were married on Sept. 2 at Golden Eagle Country Club in Tallahassee. The bride is the daughter of Earl and Teresa Davis of Crawfordville, the granddaughter of Paul and Dorothy Smith of Tallahassee, and the great-niece of Cora L. Greene of Crawfordville. The groom is the son of Brent and Linda Bledsoe of Winchester, Ky., and the grandson of Bruce and Wanda Bledsoe of Kingsport, Tenn. The of ciate was John Carter of Nashville, Tenn. The bridesmaids were matron of honor Tiffany Taylor Porter, maid of honor Amanda Lawrence, Kelly Smith, Marissa Brown Davis, Shannon Mills and Allegra Knight. The ower girls were Jocelyn and Cecilia Bledsoe, nieces of the groom, and Madison Porter. The groomsmen were best man Mickey France, best man Nick Cooper, Matthew Bledsoe, Cory Bledsoe, Eric Davis, David Harpula, Jon Hagen, Vince Webb, Brandon Winters, Drew Lumpkin, Jeff Gottlieb and Adam Ware. The bride is a graduate of Florida State University with a bachelors in Religion, Emory University Candler School of Theology with a master of Theological Studies and is currently a doctoral student at LudwigMaximilians-Universitt Munich. The groom is a graduate of Carson Newman College with a bachelors in Biblical Studies, Wake Forest Divinity School with a Master of Divinity, and is currently a doctoral candidate at Florida State University. After a honeymoon in the Bahamas, the couple is now living in Munich, Germany.Upcoming 4-H club meetings Meetings for two 4-H clubs in Wakulla County will be held on Nov. 15 at 6 p.m. The clubs are the 4-H Livestock Club and Pocket Pets Club. Those interested in learning more about swine and how to show them are invited to participate. All youth ages 88 are invited. The rst meeting will be held in the Livestock Pavilion. Pocket Pets is a new, small animal Livestock Club that will be for Cloverbuds (Youth ages 5) to introduce them to small animals such as poultry, rabbits, dogs, cats, sh and birds. There will be animals to hold and learn about at every meeting. For more information, call 926-3931 or visit wakulla. ifas.u .edu. Email community news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. Submissions are edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space is available. Wakulla 21 st Century Community Learning Center NOW accep ng enrollment applica ons for the 2012-2013 school year.The Wakulla 21st CCLC will provide enrichment to Wakulla County y outh currently enrolled in Pre K-8th grade in the areas of math, reading, science, and wri ng; and will o er the families of par cipa ng studen ts opportuni es for literacy and related educa onal development. The program will o er a wide range of opportuni es in areas of educaon, personal development and recrea on that will include business partners, mentors and educa onal facilitators.Programming at this me includes: FCAT Review in Reading, Wring, Science and Math Dance Daily Homework Center Mar al Arts Tutoring Theatre Project Based Learning 4H Character Educa on Music Lessons Community Service Projects Games and Physical Educa on The 2012-2013 program begins November 19, 2012 directly a er the regular school day. Program hours are 3:15 to 6:15 p.m. Monday thru Friday. The Wakulla 21 st Century Community Learning Center is a federally funded program and is o ered free of charge to qualifying Wakulla County students and their families. Enrollment applica ons are available online at h p://www.wakulla21cclc.com .Completed applica ons are due in the Wakulla 21 st CCLC o ce no later than 6:00 p.m. Friday, November 16, 2012. Space is available on a rst-come, rst-served basis.We look forward to working with you and your student this school year.Wakulla 21st CCLC 1391 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL. 32327 Phone ( 850) 745-4680 Fax (850) 926-5186 Email: info@Wakulla21CCLC.com Bonnie Holub TCC Project Director Deborah L. Fell WCS Principal Charlo e Cobb Wakulla 21 st CCLC Site Coordinator Rhonda Peden: Your family loves you, is proud of you and wishes you a Happy Birthday! Lordy Lordy... Look whos 40! P R I M E R I B RIN R E S T A U R A N T EE thursday nights with grilled veggies & a Potato,Your Special Events! c u t t o o r d e r au jus & horseradish sauceTuesday Friday 5-9 pm Saturday & Sunday 12-9 pm 926-3751 www.SpringCreekFL.com Serving Fresh Local Seafood & Homemade Specialties for years35Have Spring Creek Cater

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSanders receives grant from Envision Special to The NewsKrissy Sanders, Wakulla prekindergarten teacher, was named an Envision Classroom Grant winner. Sanders applied through the Success for Educators website (www.successforeducators.com) where teachers can apply for grants and see other deals Envision offers exclusively to educators. As a first year teacher, Sanders plans to use the $250 grant for supplies and materials for her classroom. Sanders said, I wanted to make sure that my students had the same materials and opportunities as the students that have teachers that have been here for years. I didnt want my students to fall behind just because I was new. We are setting the foundation for their entire education and so I want them to have everything they need and then some! Sanders teaches students age 3 to 5 years at the Wakulla County Schools Prekindergarten Program. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPre-kindergarten teacher, Krissy Sanders, accepts her grant award from an Envision representative, along with Principal Kim Dutton and Ashley Ward, paraprofessional.Special to The NewsOn Friday, Oct. 12 Shadeville Elementary Schools kindergarten, rst and second grade students enjoyed the annual visit for Fire Prevention Week from the Crawfordville and Wakulla Stations volunteer re departments and the Wakulla County Emergency Medical Services paramedics. This years theme was: Know 2 Ways Out or EDITH drills. The students also learned the importance of staying low to avoid smoke inhalation, how to Stop-Drop & Roll and more. One of the most important things the children learned was how a re ghter who may be coming to save their life will look and sound in their gear. Some very brave students had the opportunity to use the re hoses to spray out the re and create a beautiful rainbow also. One of the highlights of the morning was the visit from Sparky. Fire Prevention is so important to the safety and well-being of children and their families, said Principal Susan Brazier. She expressed thanks those who took the time to share their expertise. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents at Shadeville Elementary try out the re hose, with the help of a re- ghter.Students learn about re prevention Kimberly Porter Weaver, a 1994 graduate of Wakulla High School, recently received her doctorate in psychology with a concentration in hypnosis from Adler School for Professional Psychology in Chicago. Her graduation was held on Oct. 27 and was attended by her husband, James Weaver, her parents, Leon and Cordelia Porter of Sopchoppy, and sister, Candace Porter of Jacksonville. Weaver also has a masters degree in counseling psychology from Adler, a masters degree in social work from Michigan State University and a bachelors degree in social work from FAMU. She is the granddaughter of Leon and Rachel Porter of Sopchoppy and the late Bailey and Nursey Jefferson of Flager County.Weaver earns her doctorate in psychology STEM parent and student night is heldSpecial to The NewsTallahassee Community College joined with FloridaLearns STEM Scholars to sponsor a parent/student night on Oct. 16 for STEM scholars and their parents from Gadsden and Wakulla counties. The focus of this meeting was to share information with students and parents about careers in healthcare. Speakers for the night consisted of Joel Bialosky, P.T. Ph.D. clinical assistant professor, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida; Barbara Alford, R.N. B.S.N., executive director of Nursing Operations, Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare; and Demetria Smith, clinical pharmacist, Tallahassee VA Outpatient Clinic. They gave students an overview of the various opportunities in their career area and helpful hints about preparation. Parents and students were also given an opportunity to tour the Ghazvini Center for Healthcare. Dr. Alice Nied, dean of Healthcare Professions, welcomed the quests and facilitated the tour. Parent/student meetings ensure parents and students receive project, scholarship and post-secondary information, and learn about a variety of STEM careers. The goal is to help students make wellinformed career choices and understand the academic preparation the career requires. The parent/student meetings are designed to keep communication open between parents, STEM Scholars and grant personnel. Wakulla Christian School, in coordination with the Wakulla County Veterans Services Office, is proud to host the Saturday, November 10, 2012 at Hudson Park Games, Vendors Raffles, a Silent Auction, and Lots of Food !!! Parade Starts @ 10:00a.m. A portion of the proceeds from this grand event will be donated to our local Veterans Services Office. Your family or organization is invited to participate in this very special event dedicated to honoring all Veterans and active duty military. Please consider entering a float or vehicle decorated in honor of your loved ones. For more information or to register your float, please contact the Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee via fax @ 850-926-5186 or email WCVDay@gmail.com Honoring All Who Served Soldier Care Packages 6th Annual Veterans Day Parade and Celebration to Support Our Troops and Honor Our Veterans Wakulla Christian School is collecting public donations of items to send to our troops wish list items include individually wrapped beef jerky, Pringles, individually wrapped sunflower seeds, individually wrapped nuts, individually packaged mix of Propel Fitness Water and Gatorade, individually packaged hard candy and gummy bears, white tube socks, protein bars, granola bars, books, soap, ra zors, sunscreen, nail files, AA batteries and Ziploc bags. For further information, please contact Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee Drop offanyitemsatoneof thefollowing supportivebusinessesinWakulla county: HOME MORTGAGEA MERI F IRST CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARDWakulla County is currently seeking interested citizens who have a willingness to serve as a member and alternate member on the Code Enforcement Board. There are two vacant seats as an alternate member and two forthcoming as a member appointed by the BOCC that expires December 31, 2012. The vacant seats for each appointment will be for a three year term beginning January 1, 2013, and ending December 31, 2015. The membership of the Code Enforcement Board shall, whenever possible, consist of an architect, a business person, an engineer, a general contractor, a subcontractor, a realtor, and another citizen. These positions are on a volunteer basis only and the members would have the responsibility of being present at each scheduled Code Enforcement Meeting. The alternate members will be noti ed in the event a member is unable to attend a scheduled meeting. These meetings occur on the second Wednesday of every other month, at 5:30p.m. in the Commission Chambers, with the exception of Holidays.Citizens wishing to serve as a member or alternate member can contact Jaime Baze at (850) 926-7636 ext: 423 or jbaze@mywakulla.com by November 28, 2012. FUND RAISER SILENT AUCTION & STEAK DINNER $ 10.00NOVEMBER 16TH from 5 PM 8PM at SHELLPOINT FIRE HOUSE FOR TICKETS CONTACT MARION at 926-9023 ALSO AT CENTURY 21 in SHELLPOINTFishing TripJewelry Gift BasketsArt

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe WakuulanewsThis last Sunday we all fell behind an hour as the time changed, and though Im not too fond of daylight saving time, it is nice to know it is nally turning into fall. And the critters are moving. My Patti picked up and flew back to New Jersey, just as Superstorm Sandy eased a bit. Newark Airport opened Halloween morning and she got home safe and sound that evening and her power was still on. On Sunday, she got her phone line reconnected, but she is having trouble getting petrol for her car. Patti loves to photograph, and has done it professionally for years. Her photos of nature (plants and animals alike) have been on postage stamps and the cover of National Geographic. Once when she and her late husband were in the Smithsonian, she commented to Bert, that looks like a photo Ive taken. Upon looking closer, it was hers! So whenever shes down visiting me or were on a trip somewhere, guess what Patti is up to. You guessed it shes taking photographs. Often, she photographs one subject for perhaps an hour or more until she gets it as perfect as possible. Often Im driving her around our lovely Big Bend region when a clump of roadside owers, an insect or a snake, you name it, may captivate her for a half hour or so. I tend to look farther down the road than she. Im looking for deer, etc. that might create a problem for my driving, and Patti is usually looking closer for a subject she might photograph. The last two weeks of October, I was delighted to spot ve Black Bears. Patti caught a glimpse of two, one on Highway 20 near Tallahassee and another on FH 13 near Crawfordville, two others she failed to see, as they bounded into the woods from the roads (one of those was about a 60-pound cub very near Jacks Landing on Highway 375). The fth one though was a real treat for both of us. We were in Tates Hell State Forest heading west across Buck Siding Road and as we passed Tower Road, I looked north and way up the road was an out of place black dot. I yelled, BEAR. I came to a stop, backed up and with my binoculars I could see an adult bear swaggering on up the road away from us. I turned onto Tower Road and we slowly drove closer and closer. Finally we were close enough, it stood up about ve times trying to gure us and the car out, and with my camera, which will zoom in to about 30 power, I was able to nearly ll the frame. That was a neat experience! Also weve been in on the Monarch Festival out at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, collecting these incredible creatures for the event on Oct. 27. In the process, Ive tried, in limited time, to determine what species of birds have arrived from points north. Today as an example, I had my rst Chipping Sparrows at my feeder, though I know theyve been here since Oct. 20, at least. Robins have been back for the winter for about a week now, and the Pheobe Flycatcher for about two weeks or more. Also on Oct. 20, I recorded the first Red-breasted Nuthatch, normally a fairly rare winter visitor, but this winter a fair number are being recorded. On Oct. 23, we observed Rose breasted Grosbeaks here too. On the refuge this last Saturday I found a number of waterfowl species are starting to arrive for the winter. I observed at least 40 Green-winged Teal and possibly 50 Blue-winged, eight Northern Pintail, four Northern Shoveler, 20 American Widgeon, 20 Redhead, 16 Lesser Scaup and one lone hen Buf ehead. And about eight sightings of adult Bald Eagles, plus a few female Northern Harriers (Marsh Hawks), four Glossy Ibis, an American Avocet, one Wood Stork and a gorgeous Purple Gallinule in Headquarters Pond (near the public restrooms). Grab the kids and granny too, and head to the refuge. The show has started.Various wildlife are spotted on the move as the temperatures drop Wakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHSpecial to The NewsThe U.S. Forest Service is waiving fees at most of its day-use recreation sites over the Veterans Day holiday weekend, Nov. 10-12. The fee waivers the fourth this year are offered in cooperation with other federal agencies under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act. This is our way of saying thanks to the brave men and women past and present who put their lives on the line every day to keep us safe at home, said U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell. We encourage veterans, their families and all visitors to take time out over the holiday weekend to enjoy the bene ts that nature provides at forests and grasslands throughout the country. The National Forests in Florida recreation sites listed are the only locations waiving day-use fees for Veterans Day: Ocala National Forest Apalachicola National Forest Osceola National Forest Fore Lake Day Use Leon Sinks Geological Area Olustee Beach Day Use Area Farles Day Use Lake Eaton Boat Ramp & Pier Mill Dam Boat Ramp and Swim area Lake Dorr Boat Ramp The fee waiver days support the goals of President Obamas Americas Great Outdoors initiative and First Lady Michelle Obamas Lets Move Outside. Traditionally, fees are not charged on 98 percent of national forests and grasslands, and approximately two-thirds of developed recreation sites in national forests and grasslands can be used for free. Many recreation opportunities such as camping, sightseeing and hiking can be enjoyed throughout the year at no cost.Fees are waived for holiday weekend Special to The NewsBass Pro Shops, Americas most popular outdoor store, will open a 70,000-square foot Bass Pro Shops Outpost store in Tallahassee. The new store will be located in the Fallschase Development at the intersection of Mahan and Buck Lake Roads in Tallahassee and is targeted to open in 2013. The store will initially generate approximately 200 jobs which will be offered to the many outdoor enthusiasts in the Tallahassee area. In addition to being the worlds leading supplier of premium shing tackle, Bass Pro Shops is also Americas leading supplier of hunting gear and the top retailer of Remington and Winchester guns and ammo as well as the top retailer of Bowtech and PSE archery equipment. Bass Pro Shops manufactures and sells the worlds leading brands of fishing boats--Tracker, Nitro, SunTracker, Tahoe, Grizzly and Mako factory direct to shermen. Bass Pro Shops is also the No. 1 dealer in the U.S. for Arctic Cat ATVs and UTVs. More than just a shing and hunting store, Bass Pro Shops offers equipment and clothing for hiking, backpacking, wildlife viewing, camping, outdoor cooking and more. A gift and nature center will serve up a wide variety of outdoorrelated items, from lamps and dishes to bird feeders and furniture. We are excited about the addition of Bass Pro Shops to Fallschase, said Phillip Duke of Columbus Paci c Properties. With an anchor line up of Bass Pro Shops, Costco and Super Wal-Mart, Fallschase will be the super-regional retail destination the city and people of Tallahassee had always envisioned. We have enjoyed a long relationship with Florida sportsmen, said Johnny Morris, founder of Bass Pro Shops. We opened our first Florida store in Fort Lauderdale 15 years ago and our new Outpost store, our seventh location in this great outdoor state, will be dedicated to better serving the sportsmen of northern Florida and south Georgia. The new Bass Pro Shops Tallahassee Outpost will offer a broad selection of high quality gear at Bass Pro Shops famous low prices supported by friendly, expert service to this areas sportsmen and women. Bass Pro Shops opened its first Outpost store in Branson, Mo., in 2006 and it has been a tremendous hit with sportsmen. We are very grateful to everyone at Columbus Pacific, owners of the Fallschase, for the opportunity to be one of their feature retail stores along with Costco and Super Wal-Mart. Bass Pro Shops will fast track development to enhance and expand the 70,000 square feet of existing retail space. We want to be open as soon as we can to serve hunters, anglers and all outdoor enthusiasts for the 2013 seasons, Morris said. Nick Wiley, executive director of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, said, The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Wildlife Foundation of Florida are pleased to hear Bass Pro Shops is now opening a new store in the Tallahassee area. We already have a great working relationship with Bass Pro Shops, from support for our youth conservation programs to our exciting new Trophy Catch program promoting catch and release of trophy bass in Florida. They have always been a pleasure to work with and continue to show outstanding leadership and support for fishing, hunting and outdoor recreation in Florida. Bass Pro Shops has been an enthusiastic and innovative conservation partner with FWC, and now they are in Tallahassee it will only help make our working relationship in Florida that much stronger. HISTORY OF SUPPORTING CONSERVATION IN FLORIDA Bass Pro Shops is proud to be the lead sponsor of the new Florida TrophyCatch program and looks forward to continuing to partner with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Wildlife Foundation of Florida on youth education/outreach and sheries enhancement efforts. Johnny Morris is the inspirational leader for Conservation initiatives at Bass Pro Shops and was recently recognized by the state of Florida and the other 49 Fish and Wildlife Agencies through the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies as the Citizen Conservationist of the year. Bass Pro Shops is the all time leading donor of the National Wild Turkey Federation and is a significant contributor to many other sh and wildlife conservation efforts. Bass Pro Shops will host over 120 million people visiting its 77 stores and Tracker Marine Centers across America and Canada this year. FAMOUS FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE Bass Pro Shops was one of only eight retailers in America named a J.D. Power Customer Service Champion, based on customer service excellence. Bass Pro Shops has also been recognized numerous times for their conservation and outdoor education efforts as well as for what they do to support our military men and women. Bass Pro Shops was recently named by Advertising Age magazine as one of the Top 10 Hottest Brands in America. Bass Pro Shops awardwinning, outdoor stores are known for combining retail with entertainment, conservation and outdoor education while delivering unmatched value and service to customers. Bass Pro Shop plans to open in Tallahassee Like us on newsThe Wakulla GREAT GETAWAY 000D4D5 CASINO EXTRAVAGANZA To Hollywood Florida 3 Days 2 Nights Pkg. includes $130 Free Play 5 casinos, total 5 meal vouchers, 2 buffets. Tour Date November 29 $ 145 00 p. p. dbl occupancy $ 175 00 single ONLY $ 20 00 Per Person DAY TRIPS ONLY Day Trip To Hard Rock Casino $25 FREE Play $5 Meal Voucher Wednesday pick-up Homosassa: US 19 Wal-Mart parking lot 8:00 AM RESERVATIONS FOR ALL OTHER TRIPS: 888-845-3111 RESERVATIONS FOR ALL OTHER TRIPS: 888-845-3111 RESERVATIONS FOR ALL OTHER TRIPS: 888-845-3111 Ask About Our Trips To Atlanta, Sanible, St. Augustine and Savannah. You dont want to miss them! Ask About Our Trips To Atlanta, Sanible, St. Augustine and Savannah. You dont want to miss them! Ask About Our Trips To Atlanta, Sanible, St. Augustine and Savannah. You dont want to miss them! Pick-up location in Hernando, Pasco, Citrus, Pinellas & Hillsborough (Select Trips) Pick-up location for overnight trips: SPRING HILL PICK UP US 19 & Trenton (Winn Dixie parking lot). NEW PORT RICHEY-PICK UP US 19 & Ridge Rd. (Wal-Mart parking lot behind McDonalds). All Tours include Hotel Accommodations. Prices & itinerary subject to change without notice. Transportation provided by Hollywood Tours. Spring Hill, FL-Fla Seller of travel ref. # ST38623 ST. AUGUSTINE 3 DAY, 2 NIGHT On/Off 1 hr. narrated trolly tour, admission to Oldest Store Museum, scenic cruise, 5 meals, transportation, beach front hotel Tour Date October 23 $ 279 00 p. p. dbl occupancy $ 368 00 single BILOXI BREAKAWAY AT THE BEAU RIVAGE RESORT 4 DAY, 3 NIGHT ESCAPE $50 free play, 4 buffets Tour Date November 18 $ 229 00 p. p. dbl occupancy $ 359 00 single 2 DAY 1 NIGHT GETAWAY TO SOUTH BEACH MIAMI THE MAGICAL CITY Includes 3 meals. World famous Polynesian Dinner Show, admission to the Exotic Fruit and Spice park. Tour of Millionaires Row, Fisher Island and Art Deco District Tour Date November 19 $ 179 p. p. dbl occupancy $ 199 single Bok Tower Gardens Floridas Best Garden Nov. 26, 2012 Day trip General admission Pinewood Estates and lunch & Much more! Call For Tour Dates $54pp AN OLD FASHIONED CHRISTMAS IN FORT MYERS, FLORIDA 2 Day 1 Night GETAWAY Includes Broadway Show Miracle on 34th Street, tour of Edison/Ford Homes. Hot Apple Cider & Cookies. Admission to beautiful Marie Selby Botanical Garden & shopping at St. Armands Circle Tour Date Dec. 16 Limited Seating Call For Pricing 3 DAY/2 NIGHT NEW YEARS EVE PARTY WITH A CHANCE TO WIN $2013 EVERY HOUR From 3:30 11:30pm ITS LUCKY 13 AT IMMOKALEE CASINO 4 Casinos, $100 Free Play, 2 meals plus 4 meal vouchers. Live entertainment, complimentary cocktails from 11:30 12:30, plus shopping at St. Armands Circle in Sarasota. Tour Date: December 30 $204 p.p. dbl occupancy $294 single HOLLYWOOD TOURS COME VISIT OUR NEW STORE FRONT 1221 Kass Circle, Spring Hill PIGS IN PARADISE RIB COOKOFF WEEKEND GETAWAY TO IMMOKALEE CASINO Includes $60 FREE PLAY, Two $5 Meal Vouchers, 1 Breakfast Buffet Tour Date November 17 Guaranteed Best Price! $ 85 00 p. p. dbl occupancy $ 115 00 single 000CZDT Biltmore Candlelight Christmas 4 Days, 3 Nights 5 Meals, 1 Show, admission to Biltmore House, Winery Tour, Tour of Asheville & Much More! Tour Date Nov. 8 & Dec. 6 $ 399 p. p. dbl occupancy $ 499 single (352) 527-88553557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465Located Next to Winn Dixie www.beckystravelservice.comST 35415 Sail Date Nights Destination JAN. 1710 Western Caribbean JAN. 2710 Eastern Caribbean FEB. 610 Eastern Caribbean FEB. 1610 Western Caribbean FEB. 2610 Eastern Caribbean MAR. 87 Western CaribbeanAsk about FREE Shore Excursions000D4A0 2 for 1 Fares Additional Bonus Savings of up to $5,000 per suiteFREERoundtrip Air*FREEUnlimited Shore ExcursionsFREE1-Night Pre-Cruise Luxury Hotel Pkg.FREEPre-Paid GratuitiesFREEGround TransfersFREEUnlimited Beverages, Incl. Fine Wines & Prem. Spirits *Air inclusive program applies to economy, roundtrip flights only from select U.S & Canadian gateways. For information contact 352-795-4211 or 800-632-62629301 West Fort Island Trail Crystal River, FLHeres your chance to interact! MANATEE TOUR AND BREAKFAST PACKAGE:Includes one night accommodations, a welcome bag with fun manatee information inside, one manatee tour for two people at our Adventure Center/Dive Shop, and breakfast for two in our restaurant. Additional night may be added.2 People $224 Price starting at $112 per person based on double occupancy.We are the only place in North America where you can legally swim and interact with the manatees in the wild. Your tour leaves directly from the dock at the Plantations very own Adventure Center. Your experienced guide will fill you in on all the facts and fun of the manatees as well as the history and nature of Kings Bay and Crystal River.www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com

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It has been a busy week for the Apalachee Bay otilla. The North Florida Fair started Thursday night, Nov. 1 and we had a good representation from the flotilla. Chuck Hickman has been organizing our efforts with help from several members including Mike Harrison, Bruce Connors, Jaimi Creel, Tim Ashley, Terry Hoxworth, Raye Crews, David Guttman, Mark Rosen, Dave Rabon, Tiffanie Bourasa, Gary and Christie Owen, Norma Hill and Rich Rasmussen. We will be at the fair through the closing on Nov. 12. Please stop by and see us to learn about our upcoming class for safe boating scheduled for January, as well as other safe boating information. In addition to the fair, we had our monthly meeting on Saturday. Eighteen members were able to attend, as well as three guests and prospective members. The monthly meeting is a good time for all involved to learn about the progress in our many activities. Dave Rabon discussed the momentum for the St. George Island detachment. As more individuals are moving back to the island, there is renewed interest and we have been able to get a few patrols out in the area this season. No meeting is complete without the presentation of awards. This month, we had several awards with the members present to receive them. Mike Harrison received the RBS Device. This is a prestigious award within the Auxiliary. The Auxiliary Recreational Boating Safety (RBS) Device Award recognizes extraordinary effort of auxiliarists who consistently provide strong support to RBS programs. The eligibility criteria is signi cant RBS program activity over a minimum period of two years. Eligible RBS activities include public education, public affairs, vessel safety checks, RBS program visits and legislative outreach. Bravo Zulu Mike! Fran Keating received her of cial transfer con- rmation into Flotilla 12. Welcome aboard Fran, we are proud to call you one of our own of cially! Raye Crews and Dave Rabon each received an Annual Service Award for their involvement in completing more than 60 vessel exams and/or program visits. Duane Treadon received his ninth Sustained Service Award for completing 750 hours. Geoff Gonzales received his of cial change in status from initially quali ed to basically quali ed. Larry Kolk was presented with his certi cate of appointment for the Flotilla Staff Officer position of Public Education. Larry assumed the position and has already started a great plan for new and exciting opportunities in the coming year. We look forward to ending the year with as much gusto as we have mustered throughout the first 10 months. This weekend, we hope to have two facilities/crews out on the water: one in St. Marks and one in Shell Point. Check back next week for details from both patrols. Thank you to Tim Ashley and Duane Treadon for submitting photos for this week. And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident Be an educated boater, as the temperatures drop, so does the water temperature. Be sure to bundle up as you head out to enjoy this great fall weather. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMike Harrison staffs the booth at the fair. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Cold Water Diving We know when the ocean water temperature begins its decline when the clambers and underwater bridge inspectors show up asking for thicker thermal protection. Most everyone else has hung up their ns for the year and are oiling up their ri es for hunting season. As the winter diving season progresses, thermal requests move from thicker wet suit to dry suits. There are plenty of challenges involved in nding the warmest solution for your investment. The question is where to start and what is the progression? Wet suits work by capturing water under a protective garment that your body can heat up. If the suit ts too loosely, this warm water escapes and is continually replaced by cold water the body must reheat (at great expense and discomfort). This garment itself has thermal properties like land clothing, except that it works in water. The thicker the garment, the more heat it can hold from escaping through the material. Wet suits must t tightly to work and be thick enough to keep the heat in. Most think the colder the water, the thicker must be the garment. We must consider what you have been wearing this past year. Remember that new ultra stretch, easy to put on wet suit? Well, it was great for mildly cool water but the price you paid for comfort is offset by the loss of its thermal properties the deeper you dive. Wet suit garments are made of Neoprene, a nitrogen gas matrix in rubber, that is subjected to the same physical gas laws of compression that cause Barotrauma (such as an ear squeeze) and greater breathing gas consumption the deeper we dive. The suit literally shrinks in thickness, the deeper you dive, loosing a corresponding insulating capacity. The next warming step is to layer several garments under the suit such as a T-shirt or a hooded vest. Thirty percent of your bodys heat is lost from the head and neck area. Reducing water ow under the suit will also retain more precious body heated water. Upgrading to a thicker wet suit will be warmer, but most thicker wet suits are also more restrictive. The secret is to keep the water your body has warmed from escaping by neck, wrist and ankle seals. New suit designs are more form tted, joint exing, cloth lined and sealed systems. They keep everything in until you unzip the system or over pressure it. Yes, there are two types of divers out there, those that admit they pee in their wet suits and those that lie about it. Cold water on the skin causes vasoconstriction of the extremity veins and a shunting of blood to the bodys core. This build up of plasma must be disposed of, so the body dumps the extra uid to the bladder, which when released, does make you feel warmer for a short while if you are wearing a wet suit. Several engineers in Maryland came up with a simple and logical next step. Rather than invests up to $2,000 in a dry suit to stay warm during the winter, they heated the water under their sealed wet suit with a battery supported heating pad. Bikers have been using a heating pad under their jackets for years. Divers already carried lead as added buoyancy control, so the lead is now in the battery instead. The cost of the technology is a quarter that of a new dry suit, and has many applications. Dry suits have come a long way as well. They do seal the water out by maintaining an air pocket around the body in which dry clothing keeps you warm. A gas source is required to compensate for increased pressure at depth, and additional training is required to accommodate added buoyancy challenges. But new dry suit designs dive more like wet suits these days, and can accommodate the same heating pads used in wet suits. As our community matures, we incorporate more creature comforts every day. Raye Crews receives her award. Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos presents Mike Harrison with the Recreational Boating Safety Device Award. Advertise your way to Success! Statewide Advertising Refreshing Rates C C all now to advertise your business in over 100 newspapers 866.742.1373 www.facebook.com/AdNetFlorida 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Nov 8, 12 Fri Nov 9, 12 Sat Nov 10, 12 Sun Nov 11, 12 Mon Nov 12, 12 Tue Nov 13, 12 Wed Nov 14, 12 D ate 3.9 ft. 12:27 AM 4.0 ft. 1:05 AM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 2:58 AM 0.9 ft. 4:05 AM 0.4 ft. 5:01 AM -0.1 ft. 5:51 AM -0.6 ft. 6:38 AM -0.9 ft. 7:25 AM -1.0 ft. 8:12 AM L ow 2.8 ft. 8:51 AM 3.0 ft. 10:17 AM 3.3 ft. 11:22 AM 3.5 ft. 12:19 PM 3.7 ft. 1:10 PM 3.7 ft. 1:59 PM 3.6 ft. 2:46 PM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 3:16 PM 1.0 ft. 4:15 PM 1.1 ft. 5:06 PM 1.2 ft. 5:52 PM 1.3 ft. 6:35 PM 1.4 ft. 7:16 PM 1.4 ft. 7:56 PM L ow 3.2 ft. 9:52 PM 3.3 ft. 10:35 PM 3.5 ft. 11:13 PM 3.7 ft. 11:50 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 8, 12 Fri Nov 9, 12 Sat Nov 10, 12 Sun Nov 11, 12 Mon Nov 12, 12 Tue Nov 13, 12 Wed Nov 14, 12 D ate 2.9 ft. 12:19 AM 3.0 ft. 12:57 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 3:09 AM 0.7 ft. 4:16 AM 0.3 ft. 5:12 AM -0.1 ft. 6:02 AM -0.4 ft. 6:49 AM -0.6 ft. 7:36 AM -0.8 ft. 8:23 AM L ow 2.1 ft. 8:43 AM 2.3 ft. 10:09 AM 2.5 ft. 11:14 AM 2.6 ft. 12:11 PM 2.8 ft. 1:02 PM 2.8 ft. 1:51 PM 2.7 ft. 2:38 PM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 3:27 PM 0.7 ft. 4:26 PM 0.8 ft. 5:17 PM 0.9 ft. 6:03 PM 0.9 ft. 6:46 PM 1.0 ft. 7:27 PM 1.0 ft. 8:07 PM L ow 2.4 ft. 9:44 PM 2.5 ft. 10:27 PM 2.6 ft. 11:05 PM 2.8 ft. 11:42 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 8, 12 Fri Nov 9, 12 Sat Nov 10, 12 Sun Nov 11, 12 Mon Nov 12, 12 Tue Nov 13, 12 Wed Nov 14, 12 D ate 3.4 ft. 12:26 AM 3.6 ft. 1:03 AM 3.7 ft. 1:41 AM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 4:02 AM 0.8 ft. 5:09 AM 0.3 ft. 6:05 AM -0.1 ft. 6:55 AM -0.5 ft. 7:42 AM -0.8 ft. 8:29 AM -0.9 ft. 9:16 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 9:27 AM 2.8 ft. 10:53 AM 3.1 ft. 11:58 AM 3.3 ft. 12:55 PM 3.4 ft. 1:46 PM 3.4 ft. 2:35 PM 3.4 ft. 3:22 PM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 4:20 PM 0.9 ft. 5:19 PM 1.0 ft. 6:10 PM 1.1 ft. 6:56 PM 1.2 ft. 7:39 PM 1.2 ft. 8:20 PM 1.3 ft. 9:00 PM L ow 2.9 ft. 10:28 PM 3.1 ft. 11:11 PM 3.3 ft. 11:49 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 8, 12 Fri Nov 9, 12 Sat Nov 10, 12 Sun Nov 11, 12 Mon Nov 12, 12 Tue Nov 13, 12 Wed Nov 14, 12 D ate 3.0 ft. 12:11 AM 3.1 ft. 12:49 AM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 2:37 AM 0.9 ft. 3:44 AM 0.4 ft. 4:40 AM -0.1 ft. 5:30 AM -0.6 ft. 6:17 AM -0.9 ft. 7:04 AM -1.0 ft. 7:51 AM L ow 2.2 ft. 8:35 AM 2.4 ft. 10:01 AM 2.6 ft. 11:06 AM 2.7 ft. 12:03 PM 2.9 ft. 12:54 PM 2.9 ft. 1:43 PM 2.8 ft. 2:30 PM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 2:55 PM 1.0 ft. 3:54 PM 1.1 ft. 4:45 PM 1.1 ft. 5:31 PM 1.2 ft. 6:14 PM 1.3 ft. 6:55 PM 1.4 ft. 7:35 PM L ow 2.5 ft. 9:36 PM 2.6 ft. 10:19 PM 2.7 ft. 10:57 PM 2.9 ft. 11:34 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 8, 12 Fri Nov 9, 12 Sat Nov 10, 12 Sun Nov 11, 12 Mon Nov 12, 12 Tue Nov 13, 12 Wed Nov 14, 12 D ate 4.0 ft. 12:24 AM 4.1 ft. 1:02 AM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 2:55 AM 1.0 ft. 4:02 AM 0.4 ft. 4:58 AM -0.1 ft. 5:48 AM -0.6 ft. 6:35 AM -1.0 ft. 7:22 AM -1.1 ft. 8:09 AM L ow 2.9 ft. 8:48 AM 3.1 ft. 10:14 AM 3.4 ft. 11:19 AM 3.6 ft. 12:16 PM 3.7 ft. 1:07 PM 3.8 ft. 1:56 PM 3.7 ft. 2:43 PM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 3:13 PM 1.1 ft. 4:12 PM 1.2 ft. 5:03 PM 1.3 ft. 5:49 PM 1.4 ft. 6:32 PM 1.5 ft. 7:13 PM 1.5 ft. 7:53 PM L ow 3.2 ft. 9:49 PM 3.4 ft. 10:32 PM 3.6 ft. 11:10 PM 3.8 ft. 11:47 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 8, 12 Fri Nov 9, 12 Sat Nov 10, 12 Sun Nov 11, 12 Mon Nov 12, 12 Tue Nov 13, 12 Wed Nov 14, 12 D ate 3.1 ft. 12:08 AM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 2:45 AM 0.9 ft. 3:44 AM 0.5 ft. 4:34 AM 0.1 ft. 5:20 AM -0.2 ft. 6:05 AM -0.4 ft. 6:51 AM -0.6 ft. 7:39 AM L ow 2.1 ft. 8:21 AM 2.2 ft. 10:02 AM 2.3 ft. 11:32 AM 2.5 ft. 12:49 PM 2.6 ft. 1:56 PM 2.7 ft. 2:57 PM 2.7 ft. 3:54 PM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 2:22 PM 0.9 ft. 3:20 PM 1.2 ft. 4:13 PM 1.4 ft. 5:02 PM 1.6 ft. 5:46 PM 1.7 ft. 6:27 PM 1.8 ft. 7:07 PM L ow 2.6 ft. 9:36 PM 2.7 ft. 10:04 PM 2.7 ft. 10:32 PM 2.9 ft. 11:00 PM 3.0 ft. 11:32 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 8 Nov. 14First Nov. 20 Full Nov. 28 Last Dec. 6 New Nov. 13Major Times 7:42 AM 9:42 AM 8:06 PM 10:06 PM Minor Times 1:15 AM 2:15 AM 2:02 PM 3:02 PM Major Times 8:30 AM 10:30 AM 8:55 PM 10:55 PM Minor Times 2:14 AM 3:14 AM 2:38 PM 3:38 PM Major Times 9:20 AM 11:20 AM 9:46 PM 11:46 PM Minor Times 3:16 AM 4:16 AM 3:16 PM 4:16 PM Major Times 10:13 AM 12:13 PM 10:40 PM 12:40 AM Minor Times 4:20 AM 5:20 AM 3:58 PM 4:58 PM Major Times 11:09 AM 1:09 PM 11:39 PM 1:39 AM Minor Times 5:28 AM 6:28 AM 4:44 PM 5:44 PM Major Times --:---:-12:09 PM 2:09 PM Minor Times 6:37 AM 7:37 AM 5:36 PM 6:36 PM Major Times 12:40 AM 2:40 AM 1:11 PM 3:11 PM Minor Times 7:46 AM 8:46 AM 6:33 PM 7:33 PM Average+ Average Average Good Better Best Better++++6:57 am 5:44 pm 1:16 am 2:03 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:57 am 5:43 pm 2:16 am 2:39 pm 6:58 am 5:43 pm 3:17 am 3:17 pm 6:59 am 5:42 pm 4:22 am 3:59 pm 7:00 am 5:42 pm 5:29 am 4:45 pm 7:01 am 5:41 pm 6:38 am 5:36 pm 7:01 am 5:41 pm 7:47 am 6:34 pm42% 35% 28% 20% 13% 5% 3% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Green Scene Honest Representation at Farmers Market Do you attend farmers markets? If you do attend, have you ever asked the producers if they grew the food or where they obtained it? A recent research project completed at the University of Florida caught my eye. It involved interviewing persons at local farmers markets to learn if shoppers were aware of exactly how much of the food being sold was actually locally grown and if any even cared if the food was locally grown. I was fascinated by the results. The study revealed that some, but not all shoppers cared that some markets sold non-locally grown food. Consumers often assume farmers markets sell only the freshest crops from small, local operations, said Mickie Swisher, an associate professor with UFs IFAS. She noted that since the number of U.S. farmers markets have more than quadrupled since 1994, some big-volume produce dealers sometimes use farmers markets to sell items shipped from other states and even other countries. The study found that when customers became informed of this, some felt outraged while others were totally indifferent. Peoples reactions seem to depend on whether they are committed to eating local or just wanted a pleasant excursion of which a farmers market provides. The findings of this study were published in the current issue of the Journal of HortSciences. It suggests that the organizers of the markets can satisfy both serious and casual shoppers if they require honest labeling. She concluded that is really is just a matter of knowing what consumers want and being honest about what is offered. For example, if the rules governing a farmers market are not made available on the issue of non-local food, locavores (those who want only local foods) would probably want to see that situation changed. Solutions might include barring non-local food, restricting it to certain parts of the market or requiring vendors to indicate where their merchandise was produced. It was suggested that for patrons who want to come to a farmers market to socialize, management should provide amenities such as seating area, especially if any vendors offer ready-to-eat food. Both groups have different intentions for their attendance and one market can satisfy both. The study surveyed more than 120 shoppers at farmers markets in three Florida population centers. They included a major metropolitan area, a medium-sized city and a small town. The survey asked shoppers about their expectation for the food sold at a farmers market. The results showed that a large percentage of the attendees believed that much of the merchandise was locally grown, freshly harvested, organic and sold by the growers themselves. Participants were also asked if they would continue patronizing a farmers market after learning that what they had purchased at times did not meet their expectations. What made a difference in the level of satisfaction? Participants indicated that if they found items less fresh than expected, about 75 percent would continue patronizing the market; if it was not organic, 66 percent would continue; if the items were not grown by the vendor, 62 percent said they would return; and if it wasnt local, only 53 percent would visit the market again. Using additional data analysis tools, the researchers determined which shoppers were most likely to stop visiting a farmers market that offered nonlocal food. Those were the shoppers who believed it is important to buy local food or that patronizing farmers market was somehow better than shopping at supermarkets. The number of U.S. farmers markets increased from over 1,700 in 1994 to almost 7,900 in 2012 according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It is apparent that many people frequent farmers markets for reasons that have nothing to do with food. If you are not a visitor looking for a pleasant outing, it is important that managers honor the wishes of their patrons for truthful representation. As an empowered consumer, individuals should ask questions concerning the source of the foods offered at farmers markets and base purchase decisions on the importance you place on eating locally grown food. As informed shoppers, we should make the farmers market suppliers aware of our interest in this information and our intent to base our buying decisions on the answers provided. 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Going Green is good for business, exec says By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Special to The NewsDespite pressing economic worries, the environment remains a top concern for consumers the world over. And that means environmentally-friendly business practices are as necessary for the bottom line as they are for the planet, said Joe Veilleux, president of Euromed USA (euromedusa.com). Being a producer of natural ingredients for pharmaceuticals and health supplements, weve always held environmentalism as a major company value, said Veilleux, a registered pharmacist. Were glad to see that, even when people face unemployment and other economic hardships, theyre still committed to green practices. Recent polls, including BCGs annual International Global Green Consumer Surveys taken throughout the recession, reveal an unwavering commitment to environmentalism, he says. Even at the height of the recession in 2008 and 2009, more than a third of consumers said they were willing to pay a little more for products that are better for the environment, Veilleux said. A majority said they consider a companys environmental credentials when making purchasing decisions. Euromed recently earned green ISO 14001 certi cation for its Barcelona factory by meeting stringent criteria established by the world International Standardization Organization, which sets standards for sustainable and environmentally friendly manufacturing processes. In the ve-year process of re-engineering our factory to meet the ISO 14001 criteria, we learned a lot that can bene t other companies, Veilleux said. Some of the steps we took cost little to nothing; others were, frankly, expensive. But all companies today need to be aware that consumers are looking at what theyre doing to and for the planet, and theyre making buying decisions based on that. These are some of the initiatives undertaken at Euromed Barcelona, which manufactures herbal extracts and natural active substances for customers in the United States and Europe. Recycling biomass the companys manufacturing waste product. Weve found different ways to recycle the post-extraction biomass, depending on the product involved, Veilleux said. Much of the residue is sent to companies that specialize in creating bio-gas speci cally, methane, which is used to generate power, he said. However, the residue left from milk thistle has such a high nutritional value, its actually used to feed farm animals. We ship the waste product to a company that dries it out and cleans it before its added to feed for pigs, chickens, cows, and the like. Wood pallets become compost. At Euromed, wooden pallets are reused until they cant be used any longer. At that point, theyre sent to recycling facilities, which use them in composting products, Veilleux said. This step was easily accomplished by working through waste management companies. Printer toners get re lled. Empty toner cartridges are shipped to the companys supplier, where theyre recharged and returned for use. If not for recycling, the toner cartridges would be deposited in land lls. Cleaner air and water. The company purchased new equipment to accomplish these goals, including on-site wastewater treatment and water puri cation plants, and equipment to decrease atmospheric emissions. All totaled, Euromed spent $1 million to $2 million to upgrade its factory. It was money well spent, Veilleux said. Were excited about the certi cation because it veri es that were one of the worlds leaders in environmentally friendly production, he said. Thats very important to us we rely on plants, the Earths natural, renewable resources,not only for our business but for our personal health. We have a special interest in making everyone aware of how vital it is that we all take steps to prevent environmental damage, he said. Euromed USA supplies standardized botanical and herbal extracts and natural active substances for use in the pharmaceutical, health food and cosmetics industries. Euromed was founded 40 years ago. Its parent company is the 100-year-old Rottapharm-Madaus corporation based in Italy.O ers tips for companies trying to clean up their act The Wakulla News

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Page 13ADear EarthTalk: I heard that the Arctic summer sea ice is at its lowest level since we began recording it. What are the implications of all this melting? Jo Shoemaker Bowie, Md. It is true that on Sept. 16, 2012 the world reached a new low: The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) reported that the extent of sea ice across the Arctic was at its lowest since satellite record-keeping began in 1979. On that date the sea ice reached its summer minimum, 1.32 million square miles, half of what the average size of summer ice was between 1979 and 2000, and almost 20 percent lower than the previous record minimum of 1.61 million square miles set on Sept. 18, 2007. NSIDC added that, despite especially warm conditions in 2007 being much more favorable for sea ice loss than this year, the thinning of sea ice due to climate change has made the ice more vulnerable to breakup and melting. Meanwhile, researchers with the European Space Agencys CryoSat-2 probe reported in August that beyond the loss of sea-ice extent, the thickness and volume of the ice has also been declining signi cantly faster than expected. They found just 1,679 cubic miles this past summer as compared to 3,118 cubic miles in the summer of 2004. They anticipate that the Arctic could be ice-free in the summer for a day or more by the end of the decade. The implications of such melting are potentially immense. For starters, wildlife like polar bears, seals and walruses depend on sea ice for their survival; their habitat is literally being pulled out from under them. Polar bears were added to the federal Endangered Species List in 2008 for this very reason in what environmentalists herald as a great victory in that the federal government officially recognized the existence of global warming and would therefore be able to take more decisive action to rein in carbon pollutionof course, that part of the dream has yet to be realized. Perhaps even more alarming is the fact that melting sea ice and accelerating Arctic warming spur changes in the jet stream that increase the frequency of weather extremes like droughts, oods, heat waves and cold spells in the mid-latitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere. The fact that 2012 has been a scorcher all aroundJuly was the hottest month on record, with twothirds of the U.S. in drought, wild res running rampant and half the counties in the country designated as federal disaster areasonly makes the connection between carbon pollution and the greenhouse effect all the more apparent. Environmentalists argue that we already have the technology and the legal tools to achieve rapid greenhouse pollution reductions Full use of all of the Clean Air Acts successful pollution-reduction programs is our best route to quick reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, says Shaye Wolf, climate science director at the Center for Biological Diversitys Climate Law Institute. The Obama administration, however, has been too slow and timid in using this bedrock law to cut pollution. The polar meltdown shows were teetering on the brink of climate-change catastrophe, adds Wolf. Arctic sea ice plays a critical role in regulating the planets climate. We cant wait any longer to cut carbon pollution. Dear EarthTalk: Whats the latest on the proposal to turn parts of the Northern Forest in Maine into a big national park? Peter Griswold Jaffrey, N.H. The idea of turning a large chunk of forest in central Maine into a national park dates back at least 150 years when Henry David Thoreau himself called for making the region a national preserve in essays about his travels through the area via foot and canoe in the 1850s. To this day most of the areas in central Maine that Thoreau visited are still primarily undeveloped save for intermittent timber extraction. But recent changes in land ownership there are worrying ecologists. The non-profit RESTORE: The North Woods has been carrying the torch for creating a Maine Woods National Park and Preserve for 20 years and reports that, between 1994 and 2005, the share of forest land in Maines 9.3 million acre Unorganized Territory owned by timber companies dropped from 59.2 to 15.5 percent while that owned by investors grew from 3.2 to 32.6 percent. RESTORE is concerned that this dramatic change positions the region for a real estate gold rush. A huge development already planned for the shores of Moosehead Lake in the region is just one example of the kinds of changes afoot that could decimate the regions wilderness qualities. RESTOREs proposal, first aired in 1994, calls for setting aside 3.2-million acres surrounding Baxter State Park (home of Maines tallest peak, Mt. Katahdin, and the northern tip of the Appalachian Trail) as a national park. Bigger than Yellowstone and Yosemite combined, the proposed park would safeguard thousands of miles of rivers and streams while providing unfragmented habitat for wildlife. According to RESTORE, there are no significant chunks of undeveloped wilderness anywhere in the Northeastern United States and that such a large park is needed to protect wildlife habitat on a landscape scale to allow for adaptation in the face of unprecedented climate change. Also, the proposed park would ensure permanent access for outdoor recreation and support a diversi ed and sustainable economy. Although RESTOREs campaign has the backing of a majority of Maine residents, it has failed to gain enough traction to make it before Congress. Some blame local opposition, allied as the Maine Woods Coalition, for convincing the states Congressional delegation not to push for the proposal. A new proposal from Burts bees founder Roxanne Quimby later rekindled the issue: In May 2011 she offered to donate up to 70,000 acres she owns adjacent to Baxter State Park for a new national park, along with a $40 million endowment for park operations. And to appease those opposed to RESTOREs proposal, she offered a similar amount of land for multiple-use, including hunting. Quimbys proposal includes only lands she owns, and would create a much smaller park than what RESTORE envisioned. A few months after Quimby made her offer known U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis held a public listening session in Millinocket, Maine. But then in February 2012, Maines Congressional delegation convinced Secretary Salazar to table the new proposal for the time being. So for now, the fate of millions of treesthe veritable lungs of the Northeastern U.S.and hundreds of wildlife species may just hang in the balance. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine.com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Special to The NewsWilliam O. Bill Cleckley, the Northwest Florida Water Management Districts Director of Land Management and Acquisition, was recognized by Audubon Florida for his achievements managing public forests, lakes, springs and wetlands in northwest Florida. Each year, Audubon presents its Sustainable Forestry Award at the Florida Forestry Associations annual meeting to honor a forester for protecting the states water and wildlife. Throughout his 26 years at the District, Bill has shown an unwavering commitment to protecting and restoring Floridas treasured water and land resources, said District Executive Director Jon Steverson. Thanks to his leadership and dedication, the District has developed one of the most active restoration and recreational programs in the South and natural communities across the panhandle continue to thrive. During his tenure with the District, Cleckley helped acquire more than 122,000 acres key to the protection and preservation of Floridas water resources. He also oversees 212,371 acres of District-owned property and more than 12,400 acres of conservation easements. Using his forestry expertise to focus on habitat restoration, hes led efforts to reforest more than 11,000 acres of longleaf pine uplands and restore groundcover on thousands of acres of upland and wetland wiregrass habitats. Bill Cleckley has done an excellent job of managing and restoring the Districts public lands, which are a resource for people and wildlife alike, said Eric Draper, Audubon Florida Executive Director. Anyone who has used the Districts lands for recreation knows that they provide a gateway to a wonderful assemblage of springs, forests and rivers. Audubon is proud to be associated with the Florida Forestry Association to present this award. The Districts lands protect many important wetland and natural vegetation communities, including river floodplains, recharge areas/ springs, headwater wetlands, coastal marshes and pristine bottomland hardwood and associated upland forests. The Districts acquisitions include more than 85 percent of the oodplains along the Choctawhatchee and Escambia rivers and Econ na Creek. Every acre of Districtowned land is open for sustainable public use, offering a variety of recreational activities, including bird-watching, nature study, photography, hiking, jogging, camping, fishing, hunting, swimming, canoeing, boating and other nature-related outdoor activities. By working cooperatively with local law enforcement agencies, the District is committed to providing family-friendly springs and waterways experiences for Floridians and visitors. Wilderness advocates have been wanting to create a Maine Woods National Park and Preserve for 20 years, but politicians have consistently caved in to opponents, even tabling an offer by Burts Bees founder Roxanne Quimby, who offered to donate land to create a much smaller park alongside Baxter State Park, pictured here.PHOTO BY NASA/GODDARD SCIENTIFIC VISUALIZATION STUDIO NUMBPHOTO, COURTESY FLICKRNWFWMD Land Manager recognized for restoration e orts The Waku lla News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.comWhat are the implications of melting Artic ice? On Sept. 16, 2012 the National Snow and Ice Data Center reported that the extent of sea ice across the Arctic was at its lowest since satellite record-keeping began in 1979. Pictured: Satellite data reveal how the new record low compares to the average minimum extent over the past 30 years. William Bill CleckleySpecial to The NewsOrganic foods are not merely a passing trend. According to statistics tracking food purchases, more consumers are embracing organic foods. Whole Foods Food Shopping Trend Tracker Survey, which was conducted online by Harris Interactive between Aug. 3 and Aug. 7, indicated nearly three out of four Americans (73 percent) do not want to compromise on the food they buy, despite what foods costs at the store. Seventy-one percent of survey participants said they prefer natural and organic foods over conventional foods, particularly if the prices are comparable. Nearly 27 percent of shoppers routinely devote more than 25 percent of their grocery store budgets to organic products, and nearly half are willing to pay higher prices for locally produced foods. Quality, selection and freshness of foods are the things driving many people to purchase organic and natural food items. DID YOU KNOW?Organic foods arent a passing trend30 percent of home energy lost to poorly sealed ductworkAccording to Going Green Today, an estimated 15 to 30 percent of a homes total heating and cooling energy is lost through poorly sealed ductwork, costing consumers about $5 billion dollars annually. A consultation with a heating and cooling technician may reveal where the drafts are located and what can be done to address the problem.

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsBlake Ross Nolin, 26, of Crawfordville was arrested on Oct. 25 and charged with possession of a weapon by a convicted felon, burglary, grand theft and grand theft of a firearm. Nine members of the WCSO law enforcement staff executed a search warrant at the suspects home. A rearm from an early October theft case was recovered at the home and seized as evidence. Detectives also discovered a prescription medication bottle that was not owned by the suspect. The search warrant was executed without incident. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: OCTOBER 25 Edward Kimberlin of Crawfordville reported the loss of a tag from a boat trailer. The victim noticed that the tag was missing while working to maintain the trailer. The victim does not believe the tag was stolen. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. John Trice of Crawfordville reported an arson case. A scrap vehicle on the victims property was observed burning. The vehicle was valued at $250. The vehicle re was extinguished and a witness stated he observed two juveniles near the scene prior to the re. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Reserve Deputy Roy Gunnarsson investigated. James Bridwell of Crawfordville reported a hit-and-run crash involving his parked vehicle. The victim was at a Crawfordville business when a witness told him his vehicle had just been struck by another motorist who ed the area. Damage was observed to the right front portion of the car. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. OCTOBER 26 Detectives Lorne Whaley and Nick Boutwell were seeking a wanted person in Crawfordville. While speaking to a suspect in a case, the detectives discovered two marijuana smoking pipes with residue on them. Due to multiple individuals living at the home ownership could not be determined and there were no arrests. The property was seized for disposal. Benjamin T. Moore of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim could not nd his cellular telephone following visits to Crawfordville businesses. He called the number and an unknown male answered the phone. It has not been determined exactly where the phone was lost or stolen. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. Bobby Robison of Crawfordville reported a vehicle fire. The victim reported that his boat caught re in his yard. The victim observed the re and attempted to put it out with a hose. An extension cord was observed at the scene that was used to charge a boat battery. Wakulla re- ghters ruled the re an accident although the exact cause of the re is still under investigation. The boat was a total loss. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. A 15-year-old Crawfordville male was issued a notice to appear in court for resisting an of cer without violence and disorderly conduct. The teenager became unruly at the high school football game and was asked to leave school property. Road patrol deputies offered to drive the teenager home but he refused to calm down and resisted efforts by deputies to assist him. Eventually, deputies secured the teenager in a patrol vehicle at property near the school and transported him to his home where he was issued the NTA. Sgt. Ray Johnson, Sgt. Mike Helms, Detective Matt Helms and Deputy Carl Allen investigated. OCTOBER 27 Charles McCool of Crawfordville reported a hit-and-run at his home. Someone struck the victims mailbox with a motor vehicle. The mailbox is valued at $50 and evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. Ephe Williams of Crawfordville reported the theft of a Wal-Mart gift card. The victim misplaced the card and discovered later that it was used several times to leave a zero balance on the card. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Amanda McCord of Crawfordville reported the theft of an automotive battery from her vehicle. The vehicle was parked at the victims home. The battery is valued at $50. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. Charles Hardeman of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victim loaned the vehicle to a friend who had not returned it. Kelli Marie Taylor, 26, of Sopchoppy met Deputy Clint Beam at the sheriffs of ce and told Deputy Beam the vehicle was in Woodville. Later, a relative of the suspect returned the vehicle and Deputy Beam took possession of the keys. Taylor was arrested for vehicle theft and the vehicle was secured at the WCSO for the victim. Mary Randolph of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim told Deputy Mike Zimba that someone had broken into her home on more than one occasion and stolen food from her kitchen. A forced entry was discovered at the home. The stolen food items are valued at $50. OCTOBER 28 Angela Brower of Skybox Lounge reported a theft. Two suspects consumed $107 worth of alcoholic beverages and left the establishment without paying their bill. The suspects were identified and warrants have been requested for fraud/swindling or defrauding an innkeeper. Deputy Mike Zimba and Reserve Deputy David Pienta investigated. OCTOBER 29 Deputy Mike Zimba discovered an abandoned bicycle in a wooded area on Feli Way in Crawfordville. The bike was found in the woodline and is valued at $75. The owner of the bike is unknown and it was turned into WCSO Evidence for storage. Sgt. Ray Johnson observed a disoriented 14year-old student at lunch at Riversprings Middle School. It was determined that the student may have received some pills from a friend and consumed them. Wakulla EMS transported the student to the hospital for treatment. He was released from the hospital several hours later. Justin Duggan of the Wakulla County Fire Department reported a criminal mischief to a re vehicle. Someone damaged the wiring under the dashboard. Damage is estimated at $800. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. Catrina Auxier of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and a television was stolen along with medications. The missing property is valued at $1,700 and damage to the home is estimated at $150. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. OCTOBER 30 Dorothy Pate of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at the entrance to the Grove subdivision. Lantern covers on the subdivision entrance sign were damaged. Extra patrols were set up in the area. Damage was estimated at $100. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. Frank Simmons of Crawfordville reported an illegal dumping on Spring Creek Highway. Tires were dumped on the vacant lot on which the property owner plans to build a structure. Litter Control Of cer David Roberts was contacted to remove the tires and the WCSO work crew counted 97 tires that weighed 2,500 pounds. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. William Stinson of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim noticed an unauthorized charge of $185 on his bank account from a Wal-Mart in the Orlando area. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. OCTOBER 31 Travis Perez of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. Four unauthorized transactions were observed on the victims bank card. The transactions totaled $223 and were reported in New York. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. NOVEMBER 1 Michael Joseph Butler, 54, of Crawfordville was arrested for fleeing and attempting to elude a law enforcement of cer, driving while license suspended or revoked-habitual offender and resisting an officer with violence following a traf c stop. Deputy Mike Zimba observed the motorist driving at a high r ate of speed on Woodville Highway. He also crossed the road center line and fog lines several times. Butler failed to stop on Kinsey Road as the deputy used his emergency lights and siren and eventually stopped at his home. Butler refused to comply with the directions of Deputy Zimba and cursed the deputy repeatedly. Deputy Zimba used pepper spray to secure Butler when he became combative and refused to follow orders. The length of the attempted traf c stop was ve miles and a DUI investigation was also conducted. The results of the DUI blood draw are pending. Deputy Scott Powell and FHP Trooper John Tallman assisted at the scene. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 965 calls for service during the past week including 17 business and residential alarms; 13 assists to other agencies; 70 citizen contacts; 14 disturbances; 16 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 11 E-911 abandoned regular calls; 18 regular E-911 calls; 36 investigations; 10 loud music/noise complaints; 40 medical emergencies; 357 business and residential security checks; 34 special details; 41 subpoena services; 35 traf c enforcements; 57 traf c stops; 10 disabled vehicles;12 reckless vehicles; 13 wanted people and 22 watch orders.Sheri s Report 5Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2Go to http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click Continue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click Continue. www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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How about you? 40% *Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO Continued from Page 1A Langston had his job title changed from Undersheriff to Major to come into compliance. Langston missed a couple of forums held by groups or individuals he felt wouldnt treat him fairly, but he did attend forums held by the Chamber and a bi-partisan forum of local Republicans and Democrats. The race turned rough with Langston aggressively taking on Creel, labeling him a traffic cop while comparing his own law enforcement quali cations. Creel is a retired Florida Highway Patrol trooper. A third party group sent out a mailer blasting Creel for an incident in South Florida more than 30 years ago in which he red his weapon at a speeding car that had wrecked into several police cars. He took the action without approval from a supervisor and was given a letter of reprimand. Langston denied involvement with the group that sent the mailer. After the long campaign, Creel said he looked forward to bringing the county back together.Charlie Creel is new sheri Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum presented a Distinguished Service Award to Joseph B. and Alida Schaffer of Crawfordville on Wednesday, Oct. 17 for 25 years of dedicated support of the Florida Sheriffs Association Youth Ranches. The award was signed by Sheriff Crum and Highlands County Sheriff Susan Benton, who is president of the Florida Sheriffs Association. We appreciate the support of people like the Schaffers who have supported the Youth Ranches for many years, said Sheriff Crum. It is a great cause. We are happy to do it, said Joseph Schaffer.Special to The NewsThe Florida Sheriffs Association (FSA) announced that a three-week operation of the Florida Sheriffs Task Force (FSTF) resulted in 11,875 felons being removed from the streets. Operation Felon Sweep combined the strengths of 43 Sheriffs Of ces from Sept. 28 to Oct. 22 and focused on removing violent felons and felons with outstanding warrants off the streets. This was a concentrated effort that included targeted enforcement activities as well as adding extra resources to highlight the role Sheriffs and their teams play in crime reduction. Operation Felon Sweep was an aggressive initiative that included proactive enforcement efforts to locate elusive felons, enhance law enforcement presence in certain higher crime areas, provide additional patrols and resources to combat violent crime, and one of the most comprehensive and intense efforts to check the whereabouts and activities of sexual predators and offenders across the state. When the safety of Floridas citizens is threatened, our Sheriffs have developed the resources to act swiftly and strategically to address the issue at hand, said Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd, Florida Sheriffs Task Force chair. FSA is proud of this sweep and the many other successes resulting from great work by the Florida Sheriffs Task Force. The sheriffs of the State of Florida and their deputies work each day to combat threats to the safety of our citizenry and protect their quality of life. Operation Felon Sweep focused primarily on violent felons with outstanding warrants and sexual offenders and predators from our communities. Past initiatives have targeted cyber sexual predators, prescription drug abusers and deadbeat dads, and resulted in arrests statewide. Felony crimes are considered most dangerous, and the Florida Sheriffs Association is proud to lead this initiative to get the most serious criminals off the streets, said Highlands County Sheriff Susan Benton, FSA president. The Florida Sheriffs Task Force will continue to work tirelessly to make Florida one of the safest states in the country. The Florida Sheriffs Task Force pools resources from the 67 Sheriffs Of ces to address specific areas of concern. The Florida Sheriffs Task Force also is the point of contact for statewide initiatives, including helping to staff the State Emergency Operations Center and coordinating Sheriffs of ces responses to storm-ravaged communities during hurricanes and other disasters. WAKULLA COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE statistics: 37 FELONY ARRESTS over the three week period. Fourteen arrested the rst week, 16 arrested the second and seven arrested the third week. Charges included aggravated battery, aggravated assault, kidnapping, rearm offenses, burglary, forgery, fraud and felony battery with two seized rearms and a small seizure of cocaine.Special to The NewsThe U.S. Marshal Service conducted an Absconder/ Department of Corrections Sex Offender Operation from Oct. 29 to Nov. 2 and arrested 15 individuals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden and Liberty counties on a wide variety of charges. Members of local law enforcement agencies, including the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce, take part in U.S. Marshal Operations on a regular basis. The relationship between the U.S. Marshals Of ce and local law enforcement allows the agencies to share manpower, equipment and intelligence for more effective law enforcement. The charges from the operation included: probations violations and other arrests involving theft, firearms, narcotics, battery, arson, witness tampering, assault, driving while license is suspended or revoked and failure to appear. In addition, the Marshals Of ce and local law enforcement agencies conducted 66 sexual offender and sexual predator compliance checks on individuals on Halloween night in the same four counties.Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of ce detectives have arrested an 18-year-old Crawfordville male in connection with a series of sexually related offenses committed against underage children, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Jamal Jerez Gavin faces charges of felony sexual battery with a weapon on a victim of 12 years of age; misdemeanor battery; and felony lewd and lascivious act in the presence of a child under age 16. During the month of October, detectives investigated three complaints involving a 12-year-old male victim, a 13-year-old female victim and a 17-year-old female victim. The male victim told investigators that he was forced to perform a sex act on Gavin while he was at the victims home playing video games. When the victim refused to follow Gavins demand, Gavin produced a knife and threatened the victim. Gavin was charged with sexual battery with a weapon in the case. The 13-year-old female victim told investigators that Gavin touched her inappropriately while she was in a swimming pool during the summer. The victim provided three incidents where Gavin touched her in inappropriate locations. He was charged with a lewd and lascivious act in the case. The 17-year-old female victim disclosed that Gavin grabbed her inappropriately while she was outside a Crawfordville business before she could get away. Gavin was charged with battery in the case. Gavin was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident and remains in the jail with no bond. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSService award presented to Scha ers Gavin is arrested for sexual o enses Jamal Jerez Gavin Marshal conducts sex o ender operation Task force makes 12,000 arrests during sweep Continued from Page 1A I was hoping my message would resonate a little better with voters, Thomas said. Ive been doing this for eight months Ive put in a lot of energy and money into it. I respect the voters voice, Thomas said. I can hold my head up high that I ran a good, clean campaign, he said. Pearce said the biggest thing he learned on the campaign trail is that You cant control a political campaign, you can only hope to guide it. Its very dif cult to maintain the course you set out on. He will be sworn-in on Nov. 19 and take office on Nov. 20 at the School Boards restructuring meeting at which they choose a chair, vice-chair and set meeting dates and times. Pearce also thanked Miller for his role. I would like to say this I have known David Miller most of my life. Hes been a coach, a teacher, a boss, a mentor. Of the situation of an assistant superintendent running for his bosss job, Pearce said there were a lot of things that couldve happened. Ive been treated with grace by him, respect by him. I feel very sure that his endorsement of me was a very big turning point in this race, Pearce said. Of the challenges ahead, Pearce said, Well have to work very hard as s team and we already have a very strong team in place.Pearce takes superintendent of schools race Like us on

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comThanksgiving is coming and with it all the wonderful traditional dishes from recipes passed down through the generations. Historically, these specialties have been concocted from locally produced foodstuffs, but with that distinctive and unique quality identified with familys pride. Chief among those family culinary treats are the desserts, or offerings which would be desserts under non-holiday conditions. An oft used ingredient in these gastronomic delights is the local tree nuts: pecans, hickory and the occasional walnut. Each nut variety adds a distinctive flavor or texture to cooked icings, sweet potato pie, divinity, and all the other mortal temptations which entice violation of modern dietary restrictions. Alas, there others in Wakulla County who are tempted to gorge on the tree nuts raining down in autumn, and attracted to the trees themselves. The most recognized tree nut poacher is the common gray squirrel, Sciurus carolinensis, sometimes known as a limb rat. It collects nuts in the fall and buries them in caches for later use. Forgotten deposits will rot or germinate. Squirrels produce two litters annually with two to six pups. They are weaned at seven weeks and leave the nest at 10 weeks, ready to eat. Luckily tree nuts are not their only source of nourishment. Walnut caterpillars and Hickory Horned Devils do prefer to feed on foliage of trees in the family Juglandaceae (pecans, hickories and walnuts) and can affect nut yield. Walnut caterpillar moths emerge from the ground in late spring after spending the winter underground in the pupae phase. The moths quickly lay round, white eggs in loose masses of 300 or more on the underside of host plant leaves. The larvae or caterpillars appear soon after. They are animated and commonly feed in groups. Small larvae skeletonize leaves but larger larvae consume all but the center leaf stem. Heavy populations can damage the nut yield. Periodically the caterpillars migrate back to the trunk or larger limbs each time they are ready to shed their skins. An unsightly hairball of shed skins remains on the trunk as the cluster caterpillars returns to the foliage and continues feeding. Populations vary greatly from year to year and from tree to tree. Isolated trees or trees growing in small groups are especially susceptible to infestation. Fortunately these caterpillars are on the menu for a wide variety of birds and small animals. When disturbed or attacked the larvae arch their head and tail into the air to ght off predators. The hickory horned devil is not as common, but is among the largest of our native caterpillars. It is about the size of a large hot dog. The caterpillars are usually bluegreen, but may vary some in tone. The larva has a menacing appearance with multiple horns protruding in almost every direction, but they are harmless to humans. The Hickory Horned Devil is a hearty feeder on local Hickories and pecans, but overwinters in the pupae phase. In late spring it emerges as the regal moth to begin the process again. To learn more about animal which enjoy Wakulla Countys tree nut crop, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u .edu/Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.These pests go after pecans and other nuts Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe most common nut poacher is the common gray squirrel, top; another is the Walnut caterpillar, middle, which feed in groups; and the less common hickory horned devil, bottom. Win or lose (ad deadlines are before election day) We will be forever grateful for the connections with so many wonderful people of Wakulla County Ramsay & Jim Parham "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www.FairValuesInWakulla.com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles made it look easier than it should have, rolling over the district rival Godby Cougars to take the crown as district champions. The undefeated War Eagles (9-0, 3-0 district) moved up to the No. 1 ranking for Division 5A in Maxpreps and No. 16 in the state after knocking off Godby 23-12 on Friday, Nov. 2. We seem to be peaking, Head Coach Scott Klees said of his team, noting the level of play seems to be improving every week. Some observers had expected a drop-off this year from last years War Eagle team that made it to the state championship game, and while Klees acknowledged that Wakulla lost a lot of talented players, this years team has played above a lot of peoples expectations. Some people didnt expect much from this team I did, and my coaching staff did, he said. We are by far a very, very wellrounded team. And a very deep team. While this team has suffered injuries, Klees noted that, For whatever reason, the next guy has been able to step up and do the job. He credited the team with maintaining an even keel during games not letting themselves become too emotional. It showed against Godby, he said after Godby scored rst. The War Eagles had gone threeand-out on their opening drive. But Godby, he noted, On their opening drive, they went right down the eld, boom, boom, boom and scored. But the War Eagles didnt become flustered or lose focus, Klees said. On their rst offensive play after Godbys kickoff, running back Demetrius Lindsey took the ball for a 72-yard run to tie the game at 6 all. Klees said he and his staff have been preaching about maintaining an even keel. Throughout the course of the the game, youre going to make good plays and bad plays. How you react to that can determine the course of the game. The War Eagle defense locked down on the Cougars after that rst score, and the Wakulla defense rattled off 23 unanswered points. In the fourth quarter, with time running out and aided by a couple of Wakulla personal foul penalties Godby did move the ball down the eld and score a touchdown. The two-point conversion failed, and Wakulla recovered the onside kick. On Godbys last possession, freshman Keith Gavin intercepted a pass to seal the victory. But Klees acknowledged that his team did leave points out there plays that could have been made but werent. With a couple of seconds before halftime, Wakulla had the ball at the Godby 2-yard line but couldnt score. A perfectly executed eaflicker trick play worked well, except the pass was dropped by the open receiver. Another pass at the goal line was dropped. Weve got to x those, Klees said. When you get to the playoffs, you cant leave points out there. The win secures home- eld advantage for the rst two games of the playoffs. But the win also came at a cost: The War Eagles lost running back and kicker Dillon Norman for the rest of the season with a torn ACL. Its not clear whos going to replace the speedy Norman in the running back rotation. Nor who can take his place as kicker though both backup quarterback Feleipe Franks and cornerback Brandon Nichols have been practicing. Outstanding offensive lineman John Cole went to the hospital after suffering a contusion on his back. He was injured in the rst quarter but continued playing the rest of the half. Continued on Page 4BSection B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 sports news and team views SportsIGGs gymnastic teams have had good yearPage 2BHalloween pictures Page 7BEmpty Bowl pictures Page 14BDISTRICT CHAMPS!The War Eagles play their best game in a 23-12 domination of Godby Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpeedster Demetrius Lindsey, 11, follows the lead block of freshman back Monterious Loggins, 27. Lindsey would gain 139 yards in 18 carries in a winning effort against the Godby Cougars on Friday night.THIS WEEK: The War Eagles play Escambia County at home at J.D. Jones Stadium on Friday, Nov. 9, at 7:30 p.m. Some things get better with age. Capital Health Plan is one of them. Plan to attend a SEMINAR to LEARN MORE about CHP Advantage Plus (HMO) and CHP Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-8708943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Paid Endorsement. Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 to RSVP or for more information. (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/medicareSeminars will be held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center 1491 Governors Square Blvd.H5938_DP 121 File & Use 09242011Anna Johnson says....Join me and become a member of a Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO) Plan. SMFriday, November 9 Monday, November 12 Tuesday, November 13 Wednesday, November 21 Friday, November 23 Thursday, November 29 Friday, November 30 Wednesday, December 5 Thursday, December 6 At HealthSouth, we understand that recovering from a stroke can be challenging. But no matter where a patient is in his/her recovery process, or how long ago the stroke occurred, our Second Chance Stroke Program could help maximize functional ability, increase independence and improve quality of life. This includes areas of mobility, speech or written communication, swallowing, cognitive functions and activities of daily living. Our program oers: Physical/occupational/speech therapy Certied rehabilitation nurses Therapist trained in neuro developmental treatment Patient/family education Support groups Admission is by referral for a free in-home evaluation. For more information contact us.YOU DESERVE A SECOND CHANCE:HealthSouth Corporation:551344 Law Oce Est. 1998Fore closures Creditor /Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Sq uare Crawfordville, F lorida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator

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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBY PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach On Saturday morning, the Wakulla High School cross country teams were once again at the Apalachee Regional Cross Country Park, this time competing for their respective 2A District titles. The course was in excellent shape, as it is being prepared for this Fridays NCAA Regional Meet, but record high temperatures and a late starting time made the conditions especially challenging for the 2A runners. By the time the races were run and the results tabulated, the local harriers learned that they had won both the boys and girls District Titles. Additionally, junior captain Aaron Smith captured the overall individual boys district title and junior girls co-captain Margaret Wiedeman had earned the district runner-up individual title for the girls. This week the boys race started at 10:30 a.m., with the girls going off at 11 a.m. The boys race was hotly contested with WHSs Smith battling with two Marianna and two Florida High runners for the lead for the rst two miles of the 5K race. At 1.5 miles, as the runners charged up the infamous hill on the course known as the wall, Smith was in fth place, but in close contact. By 2 miles, it was a twoway battle between Smith and Anthony Mahoney, from Florida High. Over the nal mile Smith kept the pressure on and opened a gap that he was able to hold to the nish. His winning time was 17:40, nine seconds ahead of Mahoney, who held on to second place. Third, fourth and fth places were taken by other Florida High and Marianna runners, but then the depth of the local team became evident, as WHS runners captured ve of the next seven places, with J.P. Piotrowski placing sixth, Travis Parks seventh, Lane Willliams ninth, Ryan Dodson 11th and Alan Pearson 12th. Mitchell Atkinson was the nal local varsity runner, finishing in 19th place. This placing gave the local squad a score of 34 points, well ahead of the Marianna (62 points) and Floida High (65 points), Rickards (69) and East Gadsen (140). In cross country, the lowest score wins. The rst three teams and top 13 individuals quali ed for this weeks Regional Meet that will be held at Sunnyhill Farms in Leon County. The top 13 runners were also named to the AllDistrict Team and quali ed individually for the Regional Meet, which included the WHS contingent of Smith, Piotrowski, Parks, Williams, Dodson and Pearson. The Marianna and Florida High teams also advanced to the Regional Meet. GIRLS MEET By the time the girls toed the starting line, the sun had come out and the temperatures were in the 80s, less than ideal conditions for a distance race. However, the local harriers knew what they had to do and went out and took care of business. The meet came down to a team battle with Florida High, with the WHS runners winning handily. In cross country, 15 is a perfect score, meaning that a team takes all of the rst ve places. The WHS girls werent quite able to pull that off, but did nish with the excellent score of 19, with Florida High capturing second place with a score of 37. Both teams will advance to the Regional Meet. Immediately after the starting gun was red, Taylor Countys lone entry in the meet, Meagan Giddens, the Districts top female runner all season, charged into the lead and was never seriously threatened, nishing in 20:54. WHSs Margaret Wiedeman ran a strong and controlled race, finishing in second place in 21:55, 16 seconds ahead of Florida Highs Amanda Toothman. Once again, the WHS depth became evident as local runners captured the fourth, sixth, seventh and eighth places. Senior Raychel Gray r an a good race to nish fourth, with Kasey James coming in sixth, Lydia Wiedeman seventh and Lilianna Broadway eighth. Freshman Connie Lewis also had a solid race, nishing in 13th place and Logan Kelley nished 21st. M. Wiedeman, Gray, James, L. Wiedeman, Broadway and Lewis were all named to the All-District Team and quali ed indvidually, as well as a team, for the Regional Meet. We are extremely proud of the kids and what they have accomplished so far this year, said Coach Paul Hoover. We had speci c goals for this meet and we accomplished almost all of them. We werent really concerned about the times we ran this week, Hoover said, we just concentrated on placing and advancing to the Regional Meet. The boys team this year has really surprised us and a lot of other people. Coming into the season, we were expected to place either third or fourth in the district, but I guess our guys forgot to read that. They have steadily improved all season and have pulled for and challenged each other, with the results being a win Saturday. As near as we can determine, this is the first time in school history that a WHS boys team has won or been the runner-up at the District Meet. Weve had individual champions before, but never a team. Additionally, to see Aaron go from a 27 minute 5K runner just last year to an individual District Champion this year, has been something special. Im not quite sure how you improve that much, but he has through hard work and a heart as big as he is. Our girls have also performed exceptionally well this year, Hoover said. They are absolutely solid, know what they have to do and they go out and do it every week. Margaret was the individual champion last year and I know that she wanted to repeat this year, and she came close, but she has had an excellent season so far and has been our first girl every time she has raced this season. Both of our teams are really looking forward the Regional Meet and the possibility of qualifying for State and I wouldnt bet against them! Chiles High School will host the Regional Meet on Saturday, Nov. 10, at Sunnyhill Farms off Centerville Road in north Leon County. The girls will run at 9:30 a.m. and the boys at 10:15 a.m.sports news and team views SportsCROSS COUNTRYWHS teams sweep District MeetSpecial to The NewsThe International Gold Gymnastics Competitive Teams have had a successful year as they head into the state competitions in November and December. Level 2 team members are McKenzie Anderson, Grace Carroll, Jaleesah Davis, Lucy Edwards, Emily Fondo, Abbott Gauger, Emma Hallaian, Elliyah Hilbert, Lily McMillian, Sydney Revels, Kaylee Sanders, Lily Stolk, and Alexis Wellman. They finished out their season with a second and a third place nish. Level 3 team members are Caroline Barwick, Aubree Bushee, Riley Davis, Jewell Fondo, Hannah Francis, Annika Matlock, Hailey Quick, Makenna Schissler, and Lillie Steinle. They nish out their season with three rst place nishes and a second place nish (missing rst by 0.6). The Level 3 State Competition will be held in Deer eld Beach on Nov. 17 and 18. Level 4 team members are Lacie Blackburn, Katarina Gunnarsson, Sadie Hobby, Haley Hooker, Leah Lewis, Cheyenne Porter, and Hailey Sandberg. They nish out their season with three third place finishes and a fourth place nish. The Level 4 State Competition will be held in Palmetto on Dec. 8 and 9. Level 5 team members are Hannah Bryan, Ansley Dull, Makenna Martindale, Melanie Oglesby, Kristen Romeka, Bailey Strickland, Emily Thomas, and Lindsey Wells. They nish out their season with three third place nishes and a fourth place nish. The Level 5/6 State Competition will be held in Kissimmee on Dec. 1 and 2. Level 6 team members are Brianne Camp, Kristen Romeka and Madisen Rudd. The Level 6 gymnasts competed in two meets to qualify for Level 7 and will be competing Prep-Optional in the spring. Being a gymnast takes a lot of dedication. These girls are in the gym training between four and 14 hours per week, depending on their level. Some of them nd time to participate in other activities as well as maintain academic excellence. GYMNASTICSPHOTO BY SAEEDEH POSEY/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSIGG teams have had a good year www.Ken FieldsPhotography.photoshelter.com Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926685 or 510Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC.THG-12902 G G Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Joint and Muscle soreness Arthritis Back aches

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Nov. 8 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Nov. 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Nov. 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Nov. 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Nov. 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Nov. 13 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. A group of seniors who have lived in Woodville throughout their lives will tell stories about its history. Wednesday, Nov. 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Nov. 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050.Special EventsThursday, Nov. 8 FOOD PRESERVATION WORKSHOP will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Extension Of ce by David Moody, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge director, and Shelley Swenson, Wakulla County FCS Extension agent. They will be covering the basics of food preservation through pressure canning and dehydrating. Moody has years of experience preserving wildlife and sh and wants to share some of the things that he has learned with others. Swenson will share an overview of the pressure canner, why a pressure canner must be used for low acid vegetables, meats and sh and some basic canning techniques. Sample foods will be provided. Registration fee is $5. Enroll by calling the Wakulla County Extension Of ce at 926-3931. Pre-registration is necessary, but workshop fee can be paid at the workshop. Saturday, Nov. 10 SIXTH ANNUAL VETERANS DAY CELEBRATION AND PARADE will start at 10 a.m. at Hudson Park by Wakulla Christian School to honor all veterans and active duty military. Parade entries are encouraged to decorate in a patriotic theme. There is no fee to enter, but a donation of toiletry supplies for active duty military is requested. There will also be games, food, raf e, vendors and silent auction. FREE COMMUNITY FISH FRY will be held by Rocky Mount Church of Christ, which is located at 58 Dogwood Drive in Crawfordville, from 11:30 a.m. until its gone. Everyone is invited to attend. TOCAMOS MAS featuring danceable rhythms and jazz improvisations will perform at 8 p.m. at Posh Java in Sopchoppy. This professional group of musicians combines keyboards, congas, timbales, bass guitar and vocals. The performance will also feature guest artist Richard Bertram on saxophone. The core band consists of William Yazid Johnson, keyboards, Chuck Carbia, bass guitar/lead vocals, and Paul Harvey and Dave Breault, on congas and timbales. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Seats are $10. Posh Java will be closing its doors at the end of December, so take advantage this musical performance. MYERS CARTER SYRUP DAY will be held starting at 10 a.m. at his home. Family and friends will gather for fun and fellowship as music makers entertain. Carter and his helpers will cook, skim, stoke the re and bottle syrup. From the Wakulla County Courthouse take U.S. Highway 319 south 4.5 miles, look for Fish Hawk Trace on the right and follow the signs. Proceeds from the syrup sales will go to the Heritage Village Park project. Sunday, Nov. 11 FREE PANCAKE AND SAUSAGE BREAKFAST will be held by the Wakulla County Memorial Post, VFW POST 4538 from 7 a.m. until 10 a.m. Everyone is invited as a thank you and to give back to the public for its support throughout the year. The VFW post is located at 475 Arran Road, Crawfordville. Wednesday, Nov. 14 ANNUAL FARM CITY BREAKFAST will be held from 7 to 8 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce by the Wakulla County Farm Bureau. The purpose is to recognize the Owen Bellamy Family as the North Florida Fair Associations 2012 Outstanding Farm Family for Wakulla County. The guest speaker will be Adam Basford, Florida Farm Bureau Federation, director of State Legislative Affairs. R.S.V.P. by Nov. 9 by calling 926-3931. Saturday, Nov. 17 THANKSGIVING COMMUNITY FEAST will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park by several Wakulla groups and churches. There will be free food and Christian fellowship. FIRST BLUE JEANS AND FAST MACHINES EVENT for Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will be held from 5 to 10 p.m. at 3Y Ranch, Crawfordville. There will be dinner and entertainment by Local Motion. Enter a fast machine for $10. To attend the show only, cost is $5 per car load. Dinner and entertainment is $35 per person. A table sponsorship is $300. For more information, email helpkwcb@gmail.com, call 745-7111 or visit www.kwcb.org. SOPCHOPPY OPRY will feature local country music legend Hoot Gibson with South Bound Band at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy School Auditorium. Hoot Gibsons career in music spans over 60 years and his November appearance at the Opry has become a tradition. Tickets are $10. Call 962-3711 for tickets. Monday, Nov. 19 WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will hold a public meeting from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. Tuesday, Nov. 20 FREE COUNTY WIDE THANKSGIVING DINNER will be held at the Senior Center, 33 Michael Drive in Crawfordville, from 4 to 7 p.m. For questions, call 926-7145. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Page 3B Government Meetings Thursday, Nov. 8 WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea. ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Tuesday, Nov. 13 SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Administration Of ce. Wednesday, Nov. 14 WAKULLA COUNTY CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD will hold a public hearing at 5:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorWe wanted to thank everyone who has made use of our e-book checkout service over its rst week. Many have come in, sent emails, or called with questions, comments, etc., which makes us very happy. As we continue to build the collection we need your input. What would you like to see? Keeping in mind that not every book is made into an e-book, and due to issues out of our control, not every e-book will be available to us to purchase. Please tell us how we should build the collection. This program opens up doors to easy access to entertainment and information to our patrons and our goal is to make it the best in the area. Please feel free to contact us and keep checking out our collection as we continue to build! For those interested, we will be holding our first workshop on how the overdrive system works on your Kindle next Thursday, Nov. 15 at 6 p.m. in our computer lab to answer any questions or help you learn how to use the system. We will hold workshops on other devices in the coming weeks. Please join us! Friday Night Movie Were happy to show this Friday night at 7 p.m., the newest take on the Spider Man saga. This PG-13 lm tells of Peter Parker nding a clue that might help him understand why his parents disappeared when he was young. His path puts him on a collision course with Dr. Curt Connors, his fathers former partner. With dazzling special effects and a return to Spideys roots, this worldwide hit should start the long weekend off with a thrilling two hours. Bring the family out as we show the lm on the same day its released on DVD! Doors open at 6:45 p.m. and seating will be limited due to re code restrictions. Please have minors be accompanied by a responsible adult and not just dropped off. Computer classes for November and December Our computer class schedule is out for the rest of the year. Were offering, free of charge, everything from the basics, to digital photography, buying and selling on Craigslist, to creating holiday invitations and cards. The classes kick off next Wednesday, Nov. 14 with Craigslist: Buying and Selling at 9:30 a.m. followed by Outlook 2007: Calendars, Tasks, Notes & More at 1:30 p.m. The next day, Nov. 15, we have Desktop Publishing: Creating Invitations & Cards at 9:30 a.m. Please stop by to get a full schedule and register or give us a call. All classes are free but must be signed up for early as seating is limited. Library News... Food preservation workshop at 6:30 p.m. at the extension of ce Veterans Day Parade and Celebration will be held at Hudson Park at 10 a.m. Free pancake breakfast at VFW Post from 7 to 10 a.m. Farm City Breakfast from 7 to 8 a.m. at the extension of ce. ThursdaySaturdaySundayWednesday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Hoot Gibson will play at the Sopchoppy Opry on Nov. 17. Call 962-3711 for tickets.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comPlayers of the WeekDEMETRIUS LINDSEY Running back 18 carries for 139 yards and a touchdown. BRETT BUCKRIDGE Center Long snapper has yet to have a bad snap DALTON BOHANNON Linebacker Big plays all over the eld, caused a fumble The whole defensive squad. It was tough to just pick one player, said Coach Klees.O ense Knock Em Back Defense Special Teams Continued from Page 1BLinebacker Kevin James, who has been a runstopper, did play four or ve plays but re-aggravated his injury, Klees said. UP NEXT: ESCAMBIA The last game of the regular season has Wakulla facing off against Escambia County. A bigger 6A school, Escambia has a 4-5 record. They remind me of Jefferson County, Klees said. Theyre not that big but theyre very fast and very athletic. The biggest challenge, Klees said, is keeping the War Eagles focused after the big win against Godby, and the playoffs coming up the week after Escambia. The trap is a let-down game against Escambia. Weve told them this week, You dont want to lose this game going into the playoffs, Klees said. Looking forward to the playoffs, Klees acknowledged the War Eagles have a huge home eld advantage. It was obvious against Godby fans packed the stands, and the student section was loud and raucous, cheering on the War Eagles. Theres nothing like playing at Wakulla, Klees said. DISTRICT CHAMPS! PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDENLinebacker Michael Sarvis, 59, scoops up the fumble caused by Dalton Bohannons hit on the Godby quarterback. Dillon Norman carries against Godby. The speedy back, who is also kicker, tore his ACL in the game and is out for the year. Jordan Franks, 81, on a wide receiver screen with a block from Lindsey. The student section cheer on the War Eagles against district rival Godby.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Page 5BBy BOB FERRANTETALLAHASSEE EJ Manuel was one of the top high school quarterbacks in the class of 2008, so the options were plentiful. He grew up in Virginia Beach, Va., but schools like Virginia Tech (5.5 hours) and Virginia (three hours) were a long way from home. Manuel visited Blacksburg, Va., for a football camp during his sophomore year, but when Tyrod Taylor committed to the Hokies in 2007 it became clear that Manuel would go elsewhere. So Manuel chose Florida State in the summer before his senior season, took just one unof cial visit and didnt waver. Virginia Tech and Virginia offered him scholarships, but Manuel felt comfortable with Florida State over the in-state schools and offers from programs like LSU, Alabama, Oregon and Tennessee. They both appealed to me, Manuel said of Virginia Tech and Virginia. But at the time I was getting offers and interest from other schools. (Tyrod) helped my decision to move on from Virginia Tech. And now Manuel will return to his home state, albeit a long drive from his hometown, on Thursday night when Florida State (8-1, 5-1 ACC) faces Virginia Tech (4-5, 2-3). Hes expecting a large group of family and friends to make the 320mile trip from Virginia Beach, but for the most part the crowd of 65,000 will be cheering for the Hokies. Theyre not going to like me very much, but thats ne, Manuel said. We just have to go out there and play. Manuel has played quite well at Florida State. Hes 21-5 as a starter. Hes completed 67.3 percent of his passes exactly five percentage points better than Heisman Trophy winner Charlie Ward, who is Florida States current leader. Hes sixth on the schools career passing yards list (6,659), just 213 shy of the quarterback he lled in for so many times, Christian Ponder. And Manuel is sixth on the all-time completions list (498), just 31 shy of Danny Kanell. While the loss to N.C. State took Florida State out of the national title picture and removed Manuel from the Heisman conversation he has played well this season. Manuel has thrown for 2,315 yards, 16 touchdowns and four interceptions (a few of which have been in and out of the hands of receivers). He is completing 70 percent of his passes, tops in the ACC. The guy is playing super football, Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher said. One thing Manuel has never done? Beat a Virginia team as Florida States starter. Manuel and the Seminoles lost to the Cavaliers 14-13 in 2011. And Manuel was an emergency starter for Ponder, who had an injured elbow, in the 2010 ACC Championship game when Florida State fell 44-33 to the Hokies. I dont think I knew I was going to start the game until the game started, said Manuel, who still completed 23 for 31 passes for 288 yards, a touchdown and two interceptions. The whole week of practice, (I was) preparing like I was going to start. We came up short. I know those guys respect us. We respect them, too. The respect is mutual. Virginia Tech coach Frank Beamer has watched Manuel play for years. And Beamer knows that the Manuel his team will face on Thursday is far different from who he saw two years ago. Experience is a wonderful thing, Beamer said. Hes been around. Hes played a lot. His play, and his leadership, has put the Seminoles in this position: if the Seminoles defeat Virginia Tech and then win at Maryland on Nov. 17, Florida State will win the Atlantic Division and play in the ACC Championship game. Virginia Tech is going in the other direction, struggling while losing four of its past ve games. The Hokies are allowing 32.6 points per game in that stretch. And Virginia Tech will face quite a challenge from Manuel & Co. Few teams move the ball up and down the eld with balance like Florida State, which is third in scoring (44.7 points) and seventh in the Football Bowl Subdivision in total yards (524 per game). Theyre about as good as it gets in college football, Beamer said. In many ways it would appear to be a mismatch. Still, of anyone on Florida States roster, Manuel knows the level of talent that Virginia Tech has. And he relishes the opportunity that he has Thursday night. Thats what you want, Manuel said. Growing up, playing in those type of games. The Florida State-Virginia Tech games.FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State t e Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102North Carolina Central at Florida A&MSaturday, Nov. 10 at 3 p.m.The game can be seen on famuathletics.com. Louisiana-Lafayette at #6 Florida (HC)Saturday, Nov. 10 at 12:21 p.m.The game can be seen on SEC Network. #10 Florida State at Virginia TechThursday, Nov. 8 at 7:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. FSUs EJ Manuel returns to his homestate, Virginia, for this weeks game. PHOTO BY COLIN HACKLEY/OSCEOLA GATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSONWide receiver SOLOMON PATTON suffered a season-ending broken arm on this play that sure had the look of an illegal tackle.Season can Season can still be special still be specialBy MARTY COHENGatorBait.net Editor We saw college football at its most unforgiving on Saturday Oct. 27, as Florida showed a charitable side, turning the ball over six times amid a host of mistakes in an agonizing 17-9 setback to Georgia. The loss severely dents the Gators hopes of claiming the SEC East title, which it would have won outright with a win on Saturday. The Gators need Georgia to Auburn on the road not likely. Its the nature of college football, that one loss can severely damage a teams season, a quest for perfection that simply doesnt exist in any other sport. Every other sport you can lose a game, or a bunch of games, heck play just .500 ball in your conference, and still have a shot in the postseason, still win a national championship or professional title. Every one. But not college football one loss and your championship aspirations are severely damaged. Two losses and theyre crushed, unless you happen to be Les Miles and LSU in 2007. So one bad day at the of ce and Floridas season is in the tank, right? Well, not really. The odds are long now regarding their chances to get to Atlanta as SEC East champs. The Gators beat Missouri, but their hopes are pinned on Georgia losing to Auburn, which is not impossible, but its probably not happening. But Florida has a real chance to finish 11-1, which would require beating Louisiana-Lafayette and Jacksonville State all at home before putting all the eggs in the basket in the Thanksgiving trip to Tallahassee against FSU. And in all honesty, should that scenario occur, Florida could conceivably be in a better postseason position then if the Gators had gone to Atlanta. Before I present the scenario, lets make one point clear: losing is never a good thing, losing to Georgia is never, ever a positive thing and not winning the SEC East, especially when its in your hands, is never simply acceptable. Its the goal of every season, whether youre a favorite or a heavy underdog, to be in Atlanta the rst Saturday in December. Period. But lets just say Florida wins out, hardly an inconceivable notion and winds up 11-1. And lets say Georgia faces Alabama in the SEC title game and gets rubbed out by 35 points, which is also quite conceivable. Would a BCS bowl game, say the Sugar Bowl or Orange Bowl, rather have a two-loss Georgia team coming off a beatdown or a one loss Florida team that would be ranked around 5th in the nation? Yes, we know that Georgia beat Florida, but it wouldnt be the rst time the SEC title game loser got bumped to Orlando. Something to ponder, if it makes you feel any better. More Musings . Its easy to play armchair quarterback after the fact, especially when Florida gives you so many opportunities to question what happened on the eld against Georgia. Heres one: Muschamp talked after the game about doing a better job down the eld offensively, which I assume to mean the passing game. If thats the case, then Florida has to consider an occasional pass on rst down. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! FSUs Manuel returns to Virginia

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTH & FITNESSYou may be wondering what yoga has to do with football. It has everything to do with it. Many NFL teams participate in yoga to improve their endurance and exibility. In fact, last year I accurately predicted that the New York Giants would win the Super Bowl due to their participation in yoga and poses (asanas). Numerous other NFL teams and players implement poses as a means to help them play ball better. In addition, numerous college and high school teams practice asanas for many reasons. The New York Giants are practicing yoga to prepare for Super Bowl again this year. It is smart on their part to prepare for this years Super Bowl in much the same manner. Gwen Lawrence is a yoga instructor who is working with the Giants again this year and has been instructing them for the past 11 years. During the active season, Lawrence focuses on post-game poses as a means to stretch and cool down the muscles. Her favorites are pigeon pose, frog pose and hero pose. The Tennessee Titans defensive tackle, Shaun Smith, lost 22 pounds by participating in Bikram (hot) Yoga during the offseason. Some of his fellow teammates are giving him a hard time because he is participating in a form of exercise that many females also nd bene cial. Let them joke all they want because yoga is for real men and it is not an easy form of exercise. It takes a lot of concentration and commitment. It will help one to shed pounds as well as gain exibility and endurance. It also has the capability to increase muscle mass. MERCYHURST COOLS DOWN WITH YOGA The Mercyhurst University football team makes use of yoga after practice as a way to stretch their muscles and relax. This is a great way to cool down since there are many asanas that stretch numerous muscle groups and help the mind and body unwind. Their instructor, Betty Amatangelo, takes advantage of poses that prevent injury and stretch the muscles used during football practice. K-STATE FOOTBALL PLAYERS UTILIZE YOGA Both receiver Chris Harper and linebacker Arthur Brown of the Kansas State Wildcats participate in yoga to gain exibility. Harper says, The rst time I took it, I was upset because I cant sit Indian style on the ground, and I took it and told the teacher thats what I was trying to do, and I still couldnt do it after the class I didnt feel any better. I took a regular yoga class so I can try to sit Indian style, because the groin area is vital for receivers. If I can sit Indian style I think that would be big. Foley Falcons high school lineman unwinds by practicing yoga. Cameron Svihla, a lineman for the Foley Falcons, participates in yoga once a week after football practice to get a superior stretch. Svihla says, Its just a good stretch. We stretch after practice, but we dont do 20-25 minutes of stretching. Cameron participates in yoga, allowing anyone else on the team that wants to join him come along. Yoga is an excellent way for athletes to warm up, football players included. Hip opening yoga poses (asanas) are important because the hips need to be stretched in order for players to run more speedily. It is also important to stretch the legs and trunk of the body. Before hitting the eld, try one of these top ve hip opening yoga poses by incorporating them into your warm-up. TOP FIVE YOGA POSES FOR FOOTBALL PLAYERS 1. Revolved Triangle Pose (Parivrtta Trikonasana) Begin your five-step yoga warm-up with the revolved triangle pose because it prepares the body for twists and seated poses, especially those that include forward bends. It also stretches both the hips and spine and alleviates minor back pain. This asana is also a counter pose to the extended triangle pose, so you may consider performing this pose after the revolved triangle pose. 2. Bound Angle Pose (Baddha Konasana) Try to fall forward with a straightened back once getting comfortably in the bound angle pose. This pose will warm-up the knees, hips and inner thighs while alleviating stress, tiredness and minor depression. Aim to hold this asana for at least ve breaths. 3. Fire Log Pose (Agnistambhasana) After getting into the re log pose, lean forward so that the hips are over the your legs if you are able to do so. In addition to stretching the hips, this pose provides an excellent stretch to the groin while relieving stress. Hold this posture for about ve breaths before slowly coming out of the asana. 4. Cow Face Pose (Gomukhasana) Aim to sit evenly on both sides once in the cow face pose and hold it for at least 1 minute. This asana stretches the ankles, hips and thighs. It also warms up the chest, shoulders and triceps by providing a super stretch. For an advanced pose, bend forward and allow the torso to rest on the inner top thigh. Try to stay in the forward bend position for at least 20 seconds before breathing in and coming back into the seated pose. 5. One-Legged King Pigeon Pose (Eka Pada Rajakapotasana) Start off in a lunge and slowly make your way into the one-legged king pigeon pose. This asana provides an excellent stretch to the hips, core and thighs. In addition, it stretches the neck, chest and shoulders. Hold this pose for at least 1 minute before gently coming back up into a lunge and repeating the posture on the other side for balance. If you are a football player who has not tried yoga as a warm-up, try something new.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at Focusyoga@yahoo.com or by calling (228) 380-0140.So many people consider the upcoming holiday season an open season for whatever they want to eat and figure they will deal with the weight gain with their New Years resolution. If you have been in the same depressing cycle of weight gain during the holidays and trying desperately to lose it come Jan. 1, you may want to consider a new plan. Think how wonderful you would feel if you not only didnt gain weight this holiday season, you actually lost! You can go into this upcoming new year looking better and feeling better than you ever have! If you commit to a few key principles in your daily life, this is possible Easy? No. Possible? Yes! While there is no magic pill to make you lose weight effortlessly, there are tried and true methods to help you shed pounds safely. I also doubt that anyone in your world is going to suddenly volunteer to watch your kids, clean your house, cook your dinner, etc. so you can go spend a few hours at the gym. You have to make yourself a priority to make yourself healthier and happier, for yourself and for your family. Granted, a gym is the easiest place to get in shape. A variety of classes and weight machines, free weights and an encouraging atmosphere all help you in your pursuit of getting yourself in shape. However, you can get a quality workout in your own home, with little or no equipment. Your most important tool in getting t or losing weight is your attitude. If you can get your family to eat healthy with you and exercise with you, great! If not, you have to have the fortitude to do it anyway. Eat your own meals, do your own workouts. This is about you no one else. Plan ahead. Shop for your healthy foods and stash them wherever you spend a signi cant amount of time. Your car, desk, home everywhere. Commit to some sort of exercise every day. DVDs, walking, running, classes at the gym. Do it no matter what time it is, or what else you would rather be doing. Set small goals: a few minutes more walking, several days of healthy eating in a row whatever motivates you to keep going. Reward yourself when you reach those goals, then set a bigger goal for next time. Its not ashy or dramatic. No one may notice for a while, including you. But if you keep plugging away, youll notice one small gain after another as you make your way to your goal. Keep at it.Gena Davis is a CFT at Body-Tek 24-Hour Fitness Center in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348.What does yoga have to do with football? Everything GET FITBy GENA DAVIS YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Keep plugging away do it for yourselfSpecial to The NewsDo you know whats in your fridge? Believe it or not, there are many ordinary foods in there that have extraordinary nutritional value. Whether its a vegetable or seed, these foods can add avor and health bene ts to any meal or snack. TOPS Club Inc. (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), the nonpro t weight-loss support organization, examines 10 Super Foods that you already have at home. Beans (also known as legumes), including kidney, black, white and red beans, chick peas, and lentils, are a powerful source of protein and complex carbohydrates, as well as ber and important vitamins and minerals. Eating beans has been proven to help reduce cholesterol levels, body weight, the risk of heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, and some instances of cancer. Add a variety of beans to your meal, whether they are fresh, frozen, canned, or dried. Celery is a simple, yet important vegetable, offering vitamins, minerals, and nutrients that can reduce cholesterol and protect against cancer. Add celery to soups, stews, meats, side dishes, and other meals. Garlic with a distinct avor and fragrance, garlic contains anti-in ammatory and anti-oxidative properties that protect against heart disease, reduce blood pressure, lower cholesterol levels, and provide anti-clotting features. It also offers vitamins C and B6, manganese, and selenium. Onion whether theyre sliced, diced, chopped, or pureed, onions have a pungent flavor and a lot of nutrition, containing ber, minerals, and vitamins C and B6. There has also been research to learn more about onions polyphenol and sulfur compounds, which may reduce the risk of cancer and boost immune function and heart health. Peas green and yellow vegetables, including green peas, are often associated with reducing the risk of heart disease. Garden, snow, snap, dried, and other varieties of peas are also loaded with vitamins A, C, K, and B, minerals, ber, and protein. They are a great source for eye-healthy compounds beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. Include peas in a soup or stew, toss them into a salad, or eat them as a snack. Black Pepper This common spice is a great way to boost a meals avor without adding calories. Also, capsaicin, the substance that gives pepper its heat, is known for its anti-cancer properties and in ammation reduction, which is the root of chronic disease. Use ground, cracked, or whole versions of pepper. Bell Peppers come in a variety of vibrant colors green, red, yellow, orange, and purple. Peppers offer powerful anti-oxidants, vitamins, and minerals, which can help lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of certain cancers. Enjoy cooked or raw peppers and their many health bene ts. Sun ower Seeds are a good source of vitamin E, which serves as an antioxidant and contains antiinflammatory properties. They also offer B vitamins, heart-healthy polyunsaturated oil, manganese, magnesium, selenium, and phytosterols, a compound known to reduce blood cholesterol levels. Add sunflower seeds to a fresh salad, mix them into chicken salad, sprinkle them over meat, or grind them up for a spread. Sesame Seeds are a rich source of copper, which can provide arthritis relief. They also contain calcium and magnesium, which may lower blood pressure, protect against osteoporosis, and more. Mix them with steamed vegetables, sauted fish or chicken, or add sesame seeds to homemade bread. Canned Tomatoes are not only a versatile ingredient, but they are also a powerhouse of anti-oxidants and nutrients, including lycopene, vitamin C, ber, potassium, and iron. Keep some in your pantry for pasta and rice dishes, soups, stews, casseroles, ethnic meals, and other concoctions.TOPS Club Inc. (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) is the original weight-loss support and wellness education organization founded more than 64 years ago. A look at 10 under-appreciated Super Foods Special to The NewsHigh cholesterol is an issue for many men and women, who may or may not know that excessive cholesterol in the blood can increase a persons risk of cardiovascular disease. Thats a genuine concern for many people, as the American Heart Association notes that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. The link between high cholesterol and cardiovascular disease has long been established, but the good news is that even men and women with considerably high cholesterol levels can greatly reduce their risk of one day developing cardiovascular disease. Men and women should discuss a plan of attack to lower their cholesterol levels with a physician, who will determine if medication should be a part of the plan. Even if medication is a factor, the following are some lifestyle changes men and women with high or moderate cholesterol levels can make to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease. Shed those extra pounds. According to the Mayo Clinic, losing as little as 5 to 10 percent of your body weight can greatly reduce cholesterol levels. There are a number of ways to lose weight, but the most successful way to lose weight and keep it off typically involves adopting a more active lifestyle and coupling that with a healthy diet. The AHA recommends 30 minutes of physical activity each day. This can include any number of activities that get you off the couch and exercising, including walking, biking, swimming, and jogging. Embrace heart-healthy foods. One of the more effective, yet often most dif cult, ways to lower cholesterol is to make dietary changes, forgoing unhealthy fare for more heartfriendly foods. The idea of changing ones diet does not appeal to many people, but a more heart-healthy diet does not have to be devoid of taste. You can still eat red meat and dairy products, but keep them to a minimum, as both red meat and dairy can raise your bad cholesterol. Also known as low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, bad cholesterol can combine with other substances to form plaque, a thick, hard deposit that can narrow the arteries and make them less exible, increasing ones risk of heart attack and stroke. There are many ways to make more heart-healthy dietary choices, some of which include selecting whole grains (including whole wheat pasta and whole wheat our), loading up on fruits and vegetables that are high in ber (which can lower cholesterol) and choosing entrees rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as certain types of sh, which help lower LDL cholesterol. Stop smoking. Smokers have a sure re way to reduce their cholesterol, though some may nd it more difficult than making any dietary changes. Quitting smoking has an almost immediate impact on the health of your heart, which is at a lower risk of attack within 24 hours of quitting smoking. Within one year of quitting, your risk of heart attack is half that of someone who continues to smoke, and in 15 years your risk of heart disease will be similar to that of someone who has never smoked. Though it might not be easy, quitting smoking might be the most effective way to improve your cholesterol levels while lowering your risk for cardiovascular disease.Easy ways to lower your cholesterol

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Page 7BHALLOWEEN TRICK OR TREATERS Chase, Jess and Roedy Wells. Wakulla News paper carrier Jimmie Smith came to work as the Joker. Trick-or-treaters at The Wakulla News of ce. C0usins Jacob Crum, Andon Christian and Brady Crum on the way to get candy at The Farm. Trick-or-treaters at The Wakulla News of ce. Trick-or-treaters at The Wakulla News of ce. Sophia Michael Gauger, daughter of Mike and Christa Gauger. Arabella and Adalyn Moore with Sophia Gauger before heading out trick-or-treating.

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Actors Adapt Alarm Armor Ashore Attic Beans Beasts Beggar Bench Bombs Books Circulation Congratulates Cooled Coral Crush Dislike Drive Elder Error Green Greys Harsh Hourly Human Killer Loser March Movies Multiplication This page sponsored in part by: Noisy Numeral Opera Passion Relationships Sheds Stage Stock Street Swims Tempo Upside Views Wheat Write Yards

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Page 9B Easy ways to celebrate Veterans DayVeterans Day is an annual holiday in the United States when veterans of the armed forces are honored and celebrated. Many people confuse Veterans Day with Memorial Day. While both days honor members of the armed forces, theres a distinction between the two holidays. Memorial Day, which is celebrated in May, is a day designated for remembering servicemen and servicewomen who died while serving. Veterans Day, which is observed in November, honors all military veterans. The role of the brave men and women who serve in the military is an important one, and its one that warrants appreciation and celebration. The following are a few easy ways to celebrate veterans and their significant contribution to our country this Veterans Day. Offer your thanks. Serving in the military can feel like a thankless job, as those who have not served might not be aware of the risks men and women in the military take and the sacrifices they must make to protect our country and help the less fortunate across the globe. As a result, something as simple as saying Thank you to a current service member or military veteran can go a long way. Veterans know they dont serve in vain, but its still a great idea to let them know how much you appreciate their efforts and sacrifices. Thank businesses who support veterans. Many businesses show their gratitude to veterans by offering them free services on Veterans Day. When a local business shows its appreciation to veterans, patronize that business and let them know you appreciate their efforts to help veterans. Help families of active military. Many service members are currently stationed and serving overseas, and their families back home may need or just appreciate a helping hand. Invite family members of active military over for dinner, offer to do chores like cutting the grass or shoveling the driveway when it snows, or help around the house if something needs fixing. Even if families of active members serving overseas appear to be getting along great, offer your friendship and let them know youre there to help should anything arise. Visit hospitalized veterans. Unfortunately, many veterans are hospitalized after suffering an injury during a tour of duty. These veterans sacrificed their physical well-being to protect our way of life, and many spend extended periods of time in the hospital. Visiting a hospital to get to know a veteran and spend some time with him or her sharing a few laughs and thanking them for their service is a great way to celebrate the holiday and lift a veterans spirits at the same time. Recruit friends and family members to visit hospitalized veterans as well. Pay for a veterans night out on the town. Like many people, veterans appreciate an escape from the daily grind. Men and women who want to show their appreciation to veterans can treat a veteran to a night out on the town. Have extra tickets to a ballgame or play? Donate them to a local VFW or play. Or if you see a veteran out on the town, offer to pay for his meal. Be sure to come out Saturday, Nov. 10, starting at 10 a.m., for the Wakulla County Veterans Day Parade at Hudson Park. American Veterans:STANDING TALL FOR FREEDOMWe proudly salute Americas veterans and active-duty military for their drive and dedication, contributions and courage. Their commitment to our country and our freedom has protected us for generations, and we owe them a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid. This Veterans Day, please join us in honoring the brave men and women of our Armed Forces who have fought, sacri ced and served their country with pride.We thank you, veterans and soldiers!

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Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Professional AIRLINE CAREERS-Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Professional AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AV AILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 Trades/ Skills AFew Pro Drivers Needed.Top Pay & 401K. Need CDLClass ADriving Exp. (877)258-8782 www .addrivers.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in 15 days! 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A Florida driver license with a clear MVR is a position requirement. Pay negotiable. Call the business office at (850) 926-2929 or email to office@band bdugger.com to receive an application Schools/ Instruction ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call www.Centura Online.com 888-203-3179 Furniture CHERRYBEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used, brand new in factory boxes. Original cost $4500. Sell for $795. Can deliver. Call Tom (407)574-3067 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET. In original plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice $975. Can deliver. Call Bill (813)298-0221 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLEFri & Sat 8am -until Multi -Family Furn. tools & Households 155 Jane Drive CRAWFORDVILLE Sat, Nov 9am to 1pm hunters camel, bikers leathers, Coleman pop-up camper, MLK to Palomino, right turn follow signs Garage/ Yard Sales River Plantation Subdivision-Wide Sat. 8am-4pm Furniture, sm appliances. Vintage linens & jewerly. China, glassware,tools, & much more. Gate will be open. 850-745-84394 YARD SALE & FISH FRYPanacea Fire Department, Coastal Hwy Sat Nov 10th 9:00 to 2:00. Dinner starts at 11:00. Fundraiser to benefit Sopchoppy/Ochlockonee Bay UMC Youth. Collectibles, household items and more. Farm Services BUSH HOGGING ROADS GRADED GARDENS TILLED Have tractor will bush hog finish cut large acerage grade roads driveways till gardens. dbdouge@aol.com or 850-643-6283 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 PANACEAClean SW 2/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $500/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 SOPCHOPPY2/1.5 Singlewide $575.REVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 SPRING CREEK HWY10 acre min-farm, DWMH, 2BR/2BA, Spring Creek & Jack Crum Rd. $550/mo., $550/deposit. SWMH, 2BR/1BA, Irvin Bryant St., Spring Creek. $500/mo., $500/deposit. 850-926-5192. Mobile Homes For Sale 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, Beautiful Kitchen. Huge Master Bedroom Walk In Closets Call Today (850) 576-2106 4 BR Mobile Home on 5 Acres, Ready to Move IN -EZ Payments. Call Me (850) 576-2105 100 Families Needed for Govt Loan Program. Call Today (850) 576-2104 3BR, 2BA-Used Mobile Home. Great Condition Wont Last !!! Call Me ASAP (850) 576-2687 GOTLAND? Need a Home. Use Your Land As your DOWN Payment Call Now (850) 576 2687 Mobile Homes For Sale 2002 MOBILE HOME 28X76 4Bedroom/2Bath Master Suite with Office, Walk-in Closet, Garden Tub, Shower. Family Room with Fireplace. Separate Living Room. Large Kitchen with Breakfast Nook and Island. Laundry Room. $35,000. MUST MOVE Billy (850) 962-3884 Mobile Home with land, ready to move in, great value. Approx 1500 sq ft, 3Br2Ba, serious offers only, no renters. (850)308-6473 Apartments Unfurnished PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall Mary (850) 984-4811Equal Housing Opportunity TDD 1 800 955 2771 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLENICE 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Home in Wakulla Gardens, Lots of extra features, $850. month (850) 926-8948 CRAWFORDVILLEResidential/ Commercial House for Rent in the Center of Crawfordville For More Details Call (850) 926-9782 SOPCHOPPY2/1For Rent, $600 month On CanalREVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Real Estate For Sale 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www .sunsetranches.com Auctions Estates AUCTION 106+/Residential Lots in Florida Minimum Bid $300/lot Online Auction Nov 6-14 249+/-Lots in Southeast FL, GA, SC, NC, TN, VA Tranzon Driggers FL Lic#AU707 & AB3145 Tranzon.com (877)374-4437 Auctions Estates REALESTATE AUCTION, Blount County, TN:(55) 5+ Acre Tracts, Log Cabin, Commercial Building & (3) Residential Lots. Saturday, Nov. 17. 1-800-4FURROW. TN Lic. #62. Citrus Hills Homes Forest Ridge Villages Updated, move in ready, 2/2/2, Private lot 352-746-0002 Cars FORD1994 Taurus Good motor, has some body damage. $700 (850)926-8548 5418-1122 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201203652 TO: Russell E. Paul ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. November 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5420-1108 TWN vs. Nelson, Phillip Case No:65-2008-CA-000222FC Notice of Foreclosure Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 65-2008-CA-000222FC US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE CSFB MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2001-HE-17, Plaintiff, PHILLIPA. NELSON; KELLYM. NELSON; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE 5424-1115 TWN vs. Diaz, Sarah Case No. 652012CA000233CAXXXX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 652012CA000233CAXXXX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. SARAH S. DIAZ A/K/A SARAH SIMONDS PATTON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SARAH S. DIAZ A/K/A SARAH SIMONDS PATTON, DAVID DIAZ A/K/A DAVID C. DIAZ, JOHN TENANT, JANE TENANT, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID DIAZ and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SARAH S. DIAZ RESIDENT:Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:469 WHIDDON LAKE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-0029 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in WAKULLA County, Florida: Commence at an old concrete monument marking the Southwest corner of Section 7, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 00 degrees 01 minutes 27 seconds East along the West boundary of said Section 7, a distance of 674.17 feet to an old concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 50 minutes 33 seconds East 156.70 feet to a concrete monument on the Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary of Whiddon Lake Road, thence run North 15 degrees 30 minutes 51 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 210.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 14 degrees 52 minutes 25 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 122.61 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point OF Beginning, continue North 14 degrees 52 minutes 25 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 149.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 41 minutes 03 seconds East 331.49 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 09 minutes 27 seconds East 224.25 feet, thence run North 78 degrees 02 minutes 43 seconds West 378.56 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 1.50 acres, more or less. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy to your written defenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan PLC, attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, either before December 7, 2012 or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in The Wakulla News. DATED:October 19, 2012 Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk of the CourtCopies furnished to: Phelan Hallinan PLC 2727 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion noticed has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 8 & 15, 2012 PH #28623 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net The White Elephant50% OFFON ALL ITEMS in Bob & Marges Booth atfrom Nov. 1, thru Nov. 10nd us across from the courthouse in Crawfordville926-3338 Antique Mall 4Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16 .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE.CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 OFFICE SPACE LEASEFORTHE BARRY BUILDING ATTHE LOG CABINCrawfordville 850-508-5471$25000/MO Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Page 911B NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 16th day of October, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000222FC, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE CSFB MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2001-HE-17 is the Plaintiff and PHILLIPA. NELSON, KELLYM. NELSON and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONTLOBBYof WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32326, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT A ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 22ND day of October, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk PARCEL1: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,(MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J.K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, N.E., THE DISTANCE OF 1,049.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT DESCRIBED HEREIN. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 560.2 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST 385.36 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LANDS OF GRANVILLE JAMES, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 552.63 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST 420.9 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S. THE DISTANCE OF 1,108.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. THIS LAND IS SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR ASIXTYFOOT WIDE ROADWAYACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED TRACT. LESS AND EXCEPT: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,(MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD) THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 1,049.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY522.91 FEET. THENCE RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 422.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 385.36, FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 560.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING THE SAME PROPERTYAS DEEDED TO ROYE. MERSDORF AND ALICIAL. MERSDORF, HUSBAND AND WIFE BYSTEPHEN M. VELTRI AND MARSHAS VELTRI, HUSBAND AND WIFE RECORDED MAY27, 1993 IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 212, PAGE 302 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL2: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 2,158.22 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT DESCRIBED HEREIN. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES WEST 60 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES WEST 360.9 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 340 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST 360.9 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST 60FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF LOT NO. 69, H.S., 340 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SITUATE LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. THIS LAND IS SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR ASIXTYFOOT WIDE: ROADWAYACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED TRACT. ALSO: APERPETUALEASEMENT SIXTY(60) FEET WIDE FOR AROAD RIGHT-OF-WAYFOR ALLTYPES OF TRAFFIC OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND, TO-WIT: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 672.27 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF ACOUNTYROAD AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT DESCRIBED HEREIN. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAYOF SAID COUNTYROAD THE DISTANCE OF 665.62 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE LANDS OF GRANVILLE JAMES 356.2 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 560.2 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF LOT NO. 69, H.S. 377.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 69 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO: AN EASEMENT SIXTY(60) FEET WIDE FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND, TO-WIT: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (MARKED BYA CONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 1,049.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY522.91 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 422.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 385.36 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 560.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Tax ID: 000006900010116002 Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News November 1 & 8, 2012 08-50754 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5415-1108 TWN vs. Harrell, Tracy N. Case No. 65-2010-CA-000282 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000282 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. TRACYN. HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELLAND BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES, et. al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in 65-2010-CA-000282 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP F/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and TRACYN HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELL; BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE; AMYDENISE LALONDE; BRYAN DOLPHIS LALONDE; WAKULLABANK are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front lobby Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. on January 17, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22, WALKERS CROSSING COMMENCING AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 360.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 198.19 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT ; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 212.39 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLYALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU A CENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 31 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.19 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST, 229.82 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 330.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. THE ABOVE LEGALDESCRIPTION BEING MORE RECENTLYSURVEYED BYTHURMAN RODDENBERRYAND ASSOCIATES, DATED APRIL4, 2002, UNDER JOB NO. 01-034, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST, 360.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 200.49 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF CHANCE COURT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE ADISTANCE OF 212.88 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET, THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 38 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 61.66 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 11 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 61.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 232.20 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919); THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 330.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1998 OR 1999 HOMES OF LEGEND SINGLE -WIDE VIN #HL9774AL. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. 5416-1108 TWN vs. Hummel, Maurice Case No. 10-103-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 10-103-CA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporationauthorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. MAURICE A. HUMMEL, III and DAWN M. HUMMEL, husband and wife; and UNIDENTIFIED JOHN DOE(S) and UNIDENTIFIED JANE DOE (S), Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on September 19, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on January 17th, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. (EST), in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, the following described property: The North 396 feet of the East 220 feet of the following described parcel: Commencing at the Northwest corner of the Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4) of Section 10, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, and run South along the West boundary of said SW 1/4 the distance of 440 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, continue South along the West boundary line of said SW 1/4 the distance of 392 feet to a point, then at right angles run East 208.7 feet to a point, then run South parallel with the West boundary of said SW 1/4 208.7 feet to a point, then at right angles run East 1024 feet to the West boundary of the Lizzie Taylor property then run North along the West boundary of said Lizzie Taylor land 600.7 feet to a point, then at right angles run West 1232.7 feet back to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Being situate in the SW 1/4 of Section 10, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH an easement for ingress and egress on the North 25 feet of a 16 acre parcel described above which parcel herein conveyed forms a part thereof, running from the East right-of-way line of Bethel Church Road to the West boundary of the 2 acre parcel herein conveyed. Together with a 2005 CMH Riverwood Double wide Mobile Home, serial no. WHC014594GAA & WHC014594GAB Property Address: 84 Gosset Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTERST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: October 8, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK, WAKULLA COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 1 & 8, 2012 5417-1108 TWN Vs. Dunn, Darrell 2009 CA 000322 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO. 2009 CA 006090 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. DARRELL DAVID DUNN, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed September 20, 2012 entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000322 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and DARRELL DAVID DUNN, et al., are the Defendants. The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 15th day of November, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 6, THE FAIRWAYS AT WILDWOOD AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 51 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an inter est in the surplus fr om the sale, if any, other than the pr operty owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. November 1 & 8, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5412-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.12 TXD013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2424Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-080-000-11508-013 LOT 80 HS P-413-M-22 COMM AT NE COR OF LOT 81 HS OR 648 P 773 Name in which assessedBEN WITHERS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this11 day of October 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 5413-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLCthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2182Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-076-000-10250-008 LOT 76 HS P-7-8-M-20-C IN NE 1/4 OF LOT 76 HS OR 148 P 292 OR 219 P 610 Name in which assessedTHE SIGHTS & SOUNDS COMPANY OF WAKULLA INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this12day of October2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5419-1115 TWN Dept. of Child Services, 09C01-1207-JT Termination of Parental Rights PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF INDIANA, COUNTY OF CASS, IN THE CASS CIRCUIT COURT Logansport, INDIANA IN THE MATTER OF THE TERMINATION OF THE PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP OF: CRISTINA SALTER, SELENA SALTER, and JOBANY SALTER, children And SERGIO SANCHEZ, father Cause No.: 09C01-1207-JT-17 Cause No. 09C01-1207-JT-18 Cause No. 09C01-1207-JT-19 SUMMONS FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION & NOTICE OF TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the above noted parent, whose whereabouts are unknown, and who is the parent of Cristina Salter (date of birth 2-2-2007), Selena Salter (date of birth 11-26-2009), and Jobany Salter (date of birth 10-22-2010) that a Petition for Involuntary Termination of your Parental Rights in the above named Children, has been filed by the Indiana Department of Child Services, Cass County Office, in the Cass County Circuit Court, and YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED TO APPEAR before the Judge of said Court at the Cass County Courthouse, second floor, in Logansport, Indiana, telephone (574) 753-7339, on the 9th day of January, 2013 at 1:00 oclock P.M., to attend an Initial hearing/Termination hearing and to answer the Petition for Termination of your Parental Rights in said Children, and YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED that if the allegations in said petition are true, and/or if you fail to appear at the hearing, the Juvenile Court may terminate your parent-child relationship; and if the court terminates your parent-child relationship you will lose all parental rights, powers, privileges, immunities, duties and obligations including any rights to custody, control, visitation, or support in said Children; and if the court terminates your parent-child relationship, it will be permanently terminated, and thereafter you may not contest an adoption or other placement of said children, and YOU ARE ENTITLED TO REPRESENTATION BY AN ATTORNEY, provided by the State if applicable, throughout these proceedings to terminate the parent-child relationship. YOU MUST RESPOND by appearing in the case in person or by attorney within thirty (30) days after the last publication of this notice, and in the event you fail to do so, an adjudication on said petition and termination of your parental rights may be entered against you without further notice. THE ATTORNEY REPRESENTING THE INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF CHILD SERVICES, is Tricia Thompson, 300 E. Broadway Street, Suite 502, Logansport, IN 46947; telephone (574)722-3677. Date this 19th day of October, 2012 Clerk of Cass County November 8, 15 & 22, 2012 Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Termination of Parental Rights Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Dated this 16th day of October, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 1 & 8, 2012 11-05421 Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2837 Coastal Hwy. Commercial Building $800 mo. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. George's Lighthouse Point Waterfront living Overlooking georgious Ochlockonee Bay Unit 25E, 2BD/2BA, 1,460 sq. ft., washer/dryer, hardwood oors throughout, gated community with pool and tennis court. $1000. mo. No pets RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 2 As former Hurricane Sandy and its remnants slammed the Northeast, politicos and observers in Florida were focused on the calm before the storm: Speci cally, the final run-up to Election Day. Calm might be too strong a word. With President Barack Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney battling for the states 29 electoral votes, Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson looking for reelection against Republican Congressman Connie Mack and all 160 legislative seats and 27 congressional seats up for grabs in a redistricting year, there was no lack of action. STORM WAVES Sandy never even really threatened Florida, continuing a season that has been relatively quiet for the state with less than a month to go. But the fallout was felt, with President Barack Obama nixing his appearance at a Florida event to y back to the White House to deal with the storm. About the same time, GOP vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan canceled a pair of appearances early in the week out of respect for the unfolding tragedy. What might have been a more welcome campaignrelated respite for weary Florida voters an end to the storm surge of ads that continued to push its way into their favorite programming never came. Despite the lack of direct hits, it was the second time the Sunshine States political season has been interrupted by decidedly cloudy weather. A near-miss by Hurricane Isaac forced the Republican National Convention to be shortened by a day in August. Gov. Rick Scott said the state is ready to help with the recovery from Sandy if needed. FLORIDA, FLORIDA, FLORIDA Even with the two-day hiatus from campaigning that Sandy caused early in the week, it was hard to find a day when at least one gure from one of the national campaigns wasnt in the state, often taking a bus trip or hop-scotching the state in some form that conveniently touched on several of Floridas 10 media markets. But party spin wasnt limited to the campaign trail. The two camps also warred over who was winning the early vote, with the Obama campaign periodically sending emails to reporters highlighting how the numbers stacked up to last years a dubious exercise given a change in the number of days when early voting was allowed and the GOP and Romney arguing that their ground game was a step above U.S. Sen. John McCains losing effort in 2008. No one wanted to wait a whole week to nd out the winner. Democrats overtake GOP in ballots cast, a post on the state Democratic Party website boasted early in the week. So the Democrats might crow about a very slight edge in total returns, but it is nowhere near the numbers that they need to run up to be in position for victory on Election Day, the Republican Party of Florida responded. Meanwhile, candidates for state of ce kept up their efforts. Attention was particularly focused on a few races, including former Republican lawmaker Nancy Argenzianos independent bid to knock off Rep. Jimmie Smith, R-Inverness, and the Senates sole incumbentvs.-incumbent race, in a Broward and Palm Beach district where Republican Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff is battling Democratic Sen. Maria Sachs. And the fallout from an earlier campaign echoed in Congressional District 26, where alleged straw candidate Justin Lamar Sternad opted to plead the Fifth Amendment rather than le a report in the FEC. Sternad lost the Democratic primary in the seat before media reports bubbled up that the FBI and other law enforcement were looking into whether Republican Congressman David Rivera helped Sternad criticize the eventual Democratic nominee, Joe Garcia. Rivera has denied those charges. HOW MANY ELECTION DAYS? Early voting lines spilled out in the streets and around corners, prompting Democrats to ask for the hours to be extended much as then-Republican Gov. Charlie Crist did in 2008, when Obama carried Florida with help from the early vote. It was, they said, all in the name of good government. In light of the record turnout this year, we call on Governor Scott to extend early voting hours in every county across Florida through Sunday, so that Florida citizens can exercise their constitutionally guaranteed right and freedom to participate in this election, Florida Democratic Party Chairman Rod Smith said. Perhaps not surprisingly, Scott and Republicans said no dice assuring everyone that their decision was in keeping with the clear law. For one side to demand that we break the law because they feel like they are losing is wrong, Republican Party of Florida executive director Mike Grissom said. MORTGAGE PAYMENTS In some areas, policy intruded, rudely interrupting a week devoted to candidates on the hustings. The week ended with Attorney General Pam Bondi and legislative leaders striking a deal over how to spend the $300 million windfall from a national foreclosure settlement. The money comes from a total of $8 billion in relief Florida is supposed to get from the $25 billion settlement, announced in February. Lawmakers didnt want Bondi spending the money without their say-so. As part of the deal, Bondi said she would seek legislative approval in the coming weeks to spend $60 million of the proceeds for down payment assistance, foreclosure-related legal assistance and education programs and efforts to ease the backlog of cases now in the clogging civil courts across the states. The remaining $240 million will be dispersed through the regular legislative appropriations process including $40 million will of general revenue that lawmakers can use however they would like, adding to $34 million in civil penalties already placed there. Over at the Agency for Health Care Administration, officials announced hospital rates would be reduced to stay in line with the limits lawmakers put in the budget. And the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida announced Thursday that it was going to federal court to protect the rights of a DeFuniak Springs employee who was red for refusing to take a random drug test required by the city. At the same time, a federal appeals court in Atlanta was hearing arguments over the states plan to drug-test Floridians applying for public bene ts. STORY OF THE WEEK: Even with Hurricane Sandy hammering the Northeast, campaigning continued apace across Florida. Every legislative and congressional seat is up for grabs, and President Obama and U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson are both hoping to keep the state blue at the federal level. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Johns running against Mount Rushmore. Hes running against a political legend in South Florida, Gwen Margolis. Incoming Senate President Don Gaetz discussing Republican Senate candidate John Couriels campaign.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Is it the frenetic calm before the storm?By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 5 Even in the nal hours before Election Day, the changes to early voting that roiled the states election system for more than a year and sparked weeks of court challenges remained controversial and led to one last bit of litigation. All of it came as elections supervisors in a handful of Florida counties worked to nd ways to allow more voters to cast ballots as the state continues to play a pivotal role in the electoral calculations of President Barack Obama, a Democrat, and his Republican challenger, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. Also in the balance were the fates of 190 state and federal lawmakers and hundreds of local of cials. The Florida Democratic Party rushed to court over the weekend to attempt to keep elections of ces open and allow in-person absentee voting after the time for early voting under the new rules ran out. They won a case in Orange County, where a voting site had been evacuated based on a bomb scare. A county supervisor has discretion about whether and when to accept in-person absentee votes, which differ only slightly from early voting. Some counties even opened of ces Sunday to make up for a reduction in early voting days from at least 12 to no more than eight, a change approved by the Legislature in 2011. Democrats eventually struck an agreement with the supervisors chie y in Broward County, which agreed to allow in-person absentee voting until at least 5 p.m. Monday and then from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday. This is an important step in making sure that all those who are eligible to vote have the opportunity to do so, said Scott Arceneaux, the partys executive director. Some counties have long allowed voters to cast in-person absentee ballots in the nal days before an election. But the process took on extra signi cance this year with the early-voting changes. Leon County Elections Supervisor Ion Sancho, a critic of the early-voting changes, said his county has seen an uptick in other methods of voting this year. I think citizens that wanted to access the process have availed themselves of all the available methods to do so, Sancho said. Leon County of ces did not open Sunday but did accept in-person absentee voting Monday. The Democratic Partys action had been spurred by long lines. Some voters reportedly waited in line several hours to cast their ballots on Saturday, the last of cial day of early voting, with some voting in the wee hours of Sunday morning. A nal scrum over early voting Brain Teaser 1 14 17 26 33 41 44 52 59 64 68 71 2 20 27 53 3 28 54 4 23 34 47 60 5 29 42 55 21 35 48 65 69 72 6 15 18 45 56 7 30 49 61 8 24 36 57 9 31 43 22 37 50 66 70 73 10 16 19 32 46 58 11 25 38 51 62 12 39 63 13 40 67 ACROSS 1. Lincoln Continental model of the late '70s 6. "Serpico" writer Peter 10. Bauxite and galena 14. Big name in appliances 15. Sax type 16. Low-lying area 17. Classic column style 18. False god 19. Sea of __ (Don River's terminus) 20. Enclosure with an ear doctor's bill? 23. Seeks damages 24. Bard's nightfall 25. Stimpy's TV pal 26. __-Mart Stores, Inc. 29. Fictional spy Helm 31. Crater edge 33. Oodles 35. Coral formation 37. Like Thor or Odin 41. Ear doctor's favorite statesman? 44. Dummy Mortim er 45. Tallow source 46. Cassini of fashion 47. Final: Abbr. 49. Clobber with snowballs 51. Ram's ma'am 52. Nile slitherer 55. Greek goddess of dawn 57. Balzac's "Le __ Goriot" 59. Cause problems for an ear doctor? 64. Metered vehicle 65. Apple throwaway 66. Ballerina Shearer 68. March 17 slogan word 69. Tilling tools 70. Williams of "Happy Days" 71. Smell something fierce 72. Fraternal fellows 73. Lake Malawi, as it's also knownDOWN1. Alfred E. Neuman's mag 2. Love personified 3. Hard to come by 4. Makes bootees 5. Appliance that sucks 6. Principal streets, slangily 7. Pierce player on "M*A*S*H" 8. Do penance 9. You, right now 10. Pennsylvania Avenue office shape 11. Five o'clock shadow remover 12. Flee to hitch 13. A natural, in craps 21. Supply more weapons to 22. How a confident 9Down may work 26. Rolls of bills 27. Astronaut Shepard 28. Theater box 30. Prepare to hit a drive 32. Voodoo charm 34. NO __ TRAFFIC 36. Major Detroit newspaper 38. Part to play 39. Bumped off, biblically 40. Add fringe to 42. Freud contemporary 43. "Great" pope of the 5th cen. 48. Fen cer's "You got me!" 50. "The buck stops here" president 52. Autumn bloomer 53. Look impolitely 54. Tinker Bell, for one 56. Thread holder 58. Black wood 60. Hockey venue 61. Travel like Kirk 62. "Mona __" 63. Love personified 67. Santa __, CAAmerican Prole Hometown Content 11/04/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 12 345 46 3718 7 45 6829 193 9 682 94 83561 2009 HometownContent 162 8349 7 5 487596123 395721468 279 483516 638175249 541269837 913 648752 756912384 824357691 M A D W A D S A S T E R A M O R A L A N S T A R E R A R E L O G E P I X I E K N I T S T H R U R I N K V A C U U M A D L E R R E A R M T O U C H E M A I N S T E M S S P O O L A L D A T E E U P T R E K A T O N E F R E E P R E S S S O L V E R S T L E O I N I N K T R U M A N O V A L M O J O E B O N Y R A Z O R R O L E L I S A E L O P E S L E W E R O S S E V E N E D G E A N A

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 Page 13B 1. LANGUAGE: Variety magazine coined the term oater to describe what kind of entertainment? 2. MATH: What is the Arabic equivalent of the Roman numeral LXXX? 3. STYLE: What is the function of furniture called an etagere? 4. FOOD: What is the chief ingredient in caponata? 5. MEASUREMENTS: What did the Binet-Simon Scale measure? 6. GEOGRAPHY: On which continent is the country of Paraguay located? 7. MEDICINE: What is digitalis used to treat? 8. ENTERTAINMENT: Which humorist created the fictional town of Lake Wobegon? 9. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is an aqueduct? 10. LITERATURE: Who wrote the novel The Portrait of a Lady? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. A Western film 2. 80 3. Its a stand with open shelves for display 4. Eggplant 5. Intelligence 6. South America 7. Congestive heart failure 8. Garrison Keillor 9. An artificial channel to bring water to a town 10. Henry James YOUR AD HERE

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Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Empty Bowls fundraiser is held Herb Donaldson and Gail Campbell address the crowd before soup is served. Searching for a bowl before sampling the various soups. Relaxing with a bowl of soup and bread at the Empty Bowls fundraiser on Saturday at Hudson Park. The Green Guides were one group serving soup green pea, of course. Members of the Rotary Club of Wakulla served up chicken noodle soup.Staff ReportThe first-ever Empty Bowls fundraiser was widely hailed as a success. Held Saturday, Nov. 3, at Hudson Park, the event was an effort to raise money to stock local food pantries. At Empty Bowls, $15 got a ceramic bowl and an opportunity to sample the many soups on hand, made by various groups and individuals. Organizer Gail Campbell said the group sold out of the nearly 350 bowls that were painted and donated for the event, and more than $6,000 was raised. In addition, Farm Share, a large-scale food bank, was on hand with a tractor trailer lled with fresh produce for food pantries and families in need. Campbell said more than 100 families received food. She also noted that two more food pantries, operated by local churches, were added to the list of those distributing food. The Empty Bowl event was sponsored by the Healing Arts of Wakulla County and the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth.PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN Special entertainment by Local Motion Join us for an evening of GREAT WHEELS, DINNER & ENTERTAINMENT! SATURDAY NOVEMBER 17, 5:00 10:00 p.m. 3Y RANCH CRAWFORDVILLE Enter your Wheels $10.00 per entry Wheels Show ONLY $5.00 a car load at the gate Dinner and entertainment $35.00 per person Cash Bar Table Sponsorship $300.00 Enter your wheels for free with purchase of a dinner ticket (Limit 1 per ticket) Were looking for: Best Original, Best Classic, Hottest Hog, Best Huntn Truck, Best Dressed Bike and more. Lots of Prizes! F O R M O R E I N F O R M A T I O N C O N T A C T h e l p k w c b @ g m a i l c o m ( 8 5 0 ) 7 4 5 7 1 1 1 V i s i t o u r w e b s i t e : K W C B O R G S p e c i a a l entert a i n m e n n us f o r a a n e e ve ni n g g o f f S S S S S S i i i i l l l l l t t t t t t i i i i i i t b b b L L l l M M i i J J J J J i f f f f i i i i i f f f f 1st Annual KEEP WAKULLA COUNTY BEAUTIFUL BLUE JEANS & FAST MACHINES Register to enter your car, truck, motorcycle, classic, custom, and antique wheels! All proceeds go to our educational grants, beautification projects and annual projects such as Hazardous Waste Collection Day, National Forest and Coastal Cleanups. KWCB is a 501 (C) (3) organization. LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t