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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00433
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 11-01-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00433
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Preceded by: Wakulla County news

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PAGE 1

Special to The NewsAn event to help feed people in need in the county will be held this Saturday, Nov. 3 at Hudson Park. The Empty Bowls Fundraiser is intended to raise money to stock the local food pantries and bring awareness to hunger in the area. In Wakulla County, 4,800 people are dealing with food insecurity, not knowing at one time where their next meal might come from. This equates to 15.3 percent of the countys total population. For $15, participants can pick out their favorite ceramic, hand-painted bowl and then “ ll it with one of 15 different soups made by individuals and community groups and also enjoy fresh homemade bread and drink. There will a also be a silent auction, a bake sale by Harvest Fellowship, craft vendors, music and Stone SoupŽ play performed by local children. Those people or groups who have offered to make soup include Shelley Swenson with the extension of“ ce, roasted pumpkin; Trudy Thompson, red lentil stew; Palaver Tree Theater, ham and potato; Tina Johnson, fall harvest soup; Florida Green Guide Association, green pea; Ribits Ceramics, Cuban black bean; Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, beef vegetable; Rotary Club, chicken noodle; Poseys Steam Room, potato and corn; Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist, chicken and wild rice; Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park, navy bean; Habitat for Humanity, vegetable beef medley; Alan Brock, butternut squash; and Madeleine Carr, barley vegetable. The cost for children under 13 is $5, but does not include a ceramic bowl. The bowls were painted and donated by those in the community including Emily Smith, Bethany Thomas, Ralph Thomas, Eden Springs, Senior Center, Purple Martin Nursery group, Susie Tookes group from United Methodist Womens Organization, Nells Art Class, Esther Ellis group from Christ Church Anglican, Diane Curley, Shelley Swenson, Pat, Sharon, Howard and Ann Kesler, John and Petra Shuff, Alan Brock, Education Enrichment Council of 4-H, AVID (Kelli, Andrew and Analise Bracci, Maggie Metcalf, Jill and Danna Richardson), Leon County Girl Scout Troop 57, Keep Wakulla Beautiful group, Heidi Jackley, Hannah Lanier, Micah and Zoey Lanier and so many more. Continued on Page 15A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 42nd Issue Thursday, November 1, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Taking Care of Business ................................................Page 10A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 12A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 14A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 18A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 8B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 9B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 9B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 11B Comics ...........................................................................Page 12B INDEX OBITUARIES Edward Thomas Ward Early voting is underway Homecoming 2012 KING AND QUEEN: Demetrius Lindsey and Ashley Alvarez were crowned Homecoming King and Queen during the halftime festivities last week. For more photos of the court, see Page 13B. PHOtO BY BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSheriff candidates square off at one last forumEmpty Bowls is SaturdayWILLIAM SNOWDENCandidates and volunteers were out on Saturday, the “ rst day of early voting. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netEarly voting started in Wakulla County, which is apparent by the plethora of political signs around the county and the candidates and supporters who line Crawfordville Highway waving at cars throughout the day. As of Tuesday, Oct. 30, the supervisor of elections of“ ce reported that 2,627 people have turned out to cast their vote early. Thats what we want them to do,Ž Supervisor Henry BuddyŽ Wells said. Get out and vote.Ž Although there is only one week to vote early this year, as opposed to two weeks in 2008, Wells predicts this year may be higher because of the large numbers of voters his of“ ce is seeing every day. In 2008, a total of 5,500 people voted early, he said. Early voting started on Saturday, Oct. 27 and ends this Saturday, Nov. 3. The only place to vote is at the elections of“ ce, and can be done from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Voters need to bring a picture ID with signature. Prior to early voting, there were questions raised about the number of people registered to vote in the county. The number on the supervisor of elections website, the one on the Florida Division of Elections website and one given out to a citizen did not match. The numbers on the property appraisers site and division of elections is the number of active voters, Wells said. These voters are participating voters. There is a difference of about 1,600 people between eligible voters and active voters. Voters become inactive, but still eligible, after they do not participate in a general election, Wells said. The numbers are different between his website and the state because the states numbers are as of Oct. 9, he said. People who were inactive have since become active because they have voted or contacted his of“ ce, he said, which makes them active. Continued on Page 16AQuestions arise over numbers of voters By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe “ nal forum in one of the more heated races of these election season was held on Oct. 25 and included the candidates running for sheriff of Wakulla County, Charlie Creel and Maurice Langston. This race has involved a citizens complaint “ led against Langston over his eligibility to run for the seat, as well as a push poll that focused heavily on Creels past and a negative mailer sent out against Creel funded by a third party. Tensions were high at the Wakulla County Community Center as a crowd of a little more than 100 people listened to the candidates in their last public attempt to sway voters just days before the start of early voting. Opening statements from the candidates set the tone for the rest of the forum. One candidate laid out his quali“ cations and expressed his belief that his opponents experience as a traf“ c patrolman did not qualify him to be sheriff, while the other focused on what he believed was a need for change within the current sheriffs of“ ce. Langston, who works as a major at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office, compared his opponent, Charlie Creel, a retired Florida Highway Patrol trooper, to a puppy being thrown into a fox hunt. While the puppy has teeth, he has claws, he has instincts, he just doesnt have a clue how to use them,Ž Langston said. Creel responded to Langstons comments in his opening statement and stated that the two most dangerous activities of a law enforcement of“ cer involve stopping a vehicle and responding to a domestic violence call. He added that the agency with the most of“ cers killed while on duty in the state of Florida is the highway patrol with 41. I want somebody to go to their families and tell them, Your husband was nothing but a traf“ c cop,Ž Creel said. He added that all law enforcement officers are trained the exact same way. Creel also focused on the countys crime rate as established by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, which he said has gone up 15.4 percent from 2010 to 2011. This is not acceptable,Ž Creel said. We deserve a fresh start and Im the one to offer it.Ž Langston contended that Wakulla County does not have a high crime rate and said taking FDLEs stats and using them to say so was misleading. He added that Wakulla is in the top third of safest counties in the state. Continued on Page 19A JENNIFER JENSENCharlie Creel, left, listens as Maurice Langston answers a question at the forum. Property appraiser candidates also appear at forum. See Page 2A.Painted bowls for the Empty Bowls project.It’s the best fall shing seen in a long time See Page 12A

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com NOVEMBER Get outstanding low prices on quality products. Find the right products for your project and expert advice at True Value. Sale ends 11/30/2012 3361 Crawfordville Hwy • Crawfordville • 926-5559 Mon Fri 7am 6pm • Sat 7:30am 5pm SAVE 33% 999reg. 14.99Black All-Steel Folding Chair SAVE 38% 799reg. 12.9970-Ct. Indoor/ Outdoor Holiday LED Light Set Your choice SPECIAL PURCHASE 997100-Pc. Screwdriver Set 199 Red Mini Solar Path Light SAVE 36%699 reg. 10.994-Pk. BatteryOperated LED Candles SPECIAL PURCHASE997 Santa & Snowman Glitter Snow Globes each 599 20-Lb. Wild Bird Food 497 4-Pc. Tape Measure Set SAVE 50%3499 reg. 69.9930-In. x 72-In. Deluxe Folding Table 699-$3 399 sale price mail-in rebate* FINAL PRICE Gal. 50/50 Antifreeze & Coolant Limit 2 SAVE 44%1999 reg. 35.991-Gal. Micro Wet/Dry Vac SAVE 50%499 reg. 9.9913-Pc. Drill Bit Set SAVE 20% 1999 reg. 24.99 29-Pc. Swift Driver Screwdriver Set Scan here for demo SAVE 50%1999 reg. 39.9912V, 3/8-In. Cordless Drill SAVE 40%2999 reg. 49.996-Ft. Giant LED Spiral Tree SAVE 50%999 reg. 19.993-Pc. LED Twinkle Stake Light Sets Your choice SAVE 30%699 reg. 9.99LED Window Decoration Your choice HOT DEAL899 reg. 10.99300-Ct. Holiday Light Sets Your choice SAVE 50% 1499 reg. 29.99 12-In. Decorated LED Hanging Basket SAVE 37%2499 reg. 39.99200-Ct. LED C6 Light Set Your choice GULF COAST GULF COAST Lumber & Supply Inc. Lumber & Supply Inc. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe last forum for the property appraisers race was held on Oct. 25 and the two candidates seemed to agree on a number of issues. One of the few major disagreements between incumbent Donnie Sparkman and challenger Jim Parham was their estimation of when property values will return to normal. Parham, who has 38 years experience as an appraiser in the private and public sector, predicted the next major boom in real estate will happen around 2020 when the grandchildren of the baby boomers are moving out of their parents homes and purchasing their own. Lets be ready for it to do it the right way,Ž Parham said. Sparkman, who has served as property appraiser for six years and has been a land surveyor and community development director for the county, said 2004-10 was unprecedented and wasnt sure if where the county is right now isnt the normal market now. Until the market is cleared up and mortgage lenders start lending, there wont be any major changes, he said. I dont expect to see a change in my lifetime,Ž he said. The candidates were asked if they felt there was the perception in the county that there is preferential treatment given to the evaluation of certain properties in the county. Parham, who has run on the campaign promise of fairness and no favored treatment to anyone, felt there was that perception in the county and said he has heard this from voters. In order to address this, the office must be more transparent and hold workshops to explain the process to residents, he said. This feeling of distrust is not limited to the property appraisers of“ ce, he added. Sparkman did not feel the same. He wondered why these people who feel this way werent calling his of“ ce. He added that when someone doesnt understand why their property value might be lower or higher than their neighbors, he sits down and explains it to them. Fair and equitable is what we do,Ž he said. He added that sometimes they make mistakes and that is where the citizens can help. When asked how often and how precise property evaluations are, Sparkman said they are performed annually and must report to the Department of Revenue yearly. The evaluations must be within 10 percent. Parham said he would set up a schedule where he and a staff member are out in the “ eld one day a week looking at properties so they can “ nd things that are out of whack.Ž He added that he would also check with the other sources in the private sector to get a better conclusion of value. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe City of St. Marks has begun to take the “ nal steps in cleaning up the old St. Marks re“ nery property, now known as St. Marks Innovation Park. The city completed the removal of the 11 tanks and the associated piping racks earlier this year through a brownfield assessment grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. It now plans to apply for a brown“ eld cleanup grant for $200,000 from EPA. If awarded, this money will be used to remove isolated spots via excavation an off-site disposal and capping impacted areas to eliminate exposure, said Roger Register, director of Cardno TBE, the citys consultant who conducted the most recent phase of the assessment grant. It will take about a year and a half to complete, Register said. Along with the grant, the city is also applying for a hardship waiver of the 20percent match required. The deadline to apply is Nov. 19. It will be awarded in April or May of 2013. Register said the grant is extremely competitive, but St. Marks has a good shot because they were successful with the previous grant. The St. Marks Re“ nery produced jet fuel and diesel. Crude oil was delivered by barge and products were shipped out by truck. The site was owned by American International Petroleum Corporation until the “ rm entered into bankruptcy in 2005. The facility was closed in 2001 and the corporation simply walked away from it. In 2005, Florida Department of Environmental Protection took over the site and spent $20 million to remove the processing equipment, excavating and cleaning it up, as well as conducting an assessment. The 55-acre site was then donated to the city in 2010 through a quit-claim deed. The city divided the 55acre site into two parcels, the west consisting of 47 acres fronting Port Leon Drive and 8 acres adjoining the St. Marks River. The cleanup thus far has focused on the west parcel which contained the 11 storage tanks and two of“ ce buildings. Potential uses for the site, include a commercial or industrial park closest to Port Leon Drive. The two buildings on that site have been renovated and the city has had a couple tenants. The middle part of the site is where the bulk of the processing equipment was and there has been discussion about using it as a solar farm. As for the area closest to the St. Marks River, some have proposed developing it as a boat yard. In other news: A group approached the city about possibly renting the re“ nery property, closest to the road, to hold a swap meet car show. It would be a three-day event that is held three times a year and features antique vintage cars and motorcycles. John Jefferson said the event would be held with veterans affairs and a portion of the proceeds would go to Wounded Warriors. The group would furnish its own insurance and help cleanup the front portion of the property. Mayor Chuck Shield said the city might be OK with renting it to the group for free in exchange for the cleaning up of the property.Candidates for property appraiser appear at forum WILLIAM SNOWDENDonnie Sparkman, left, and Jim Parham at the bi-partisan forum.St. Marks applies for EPA grant Photo by Cardno TBE/Special to The NewsCleanup of the re“ nery site to create St. Marks Innovation Park

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. In accordance with Section 121.055, Florida Statutes, Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners intends to designate the following positions to the Senior Management Service Class in the Florida Retirement System: Director of Inter-Governmental Affairs Director of Probation Services Director of Employee Support ServicesOCTOBER 25, NOVEMBER 1, 2012 SPECIAL MEETING MONDAYNovember 5, 2012 at 5:05 pm Amending Operating Budget of the City of St. Marks for Fiscal Year 2011-2012The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of“ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.NOVEMBER 1, 2012 BUDGET SUMMARYCity of St. Marks Fiscal Year 2011-2012 BUDGET SUMMARYCity of St. Marks Fiscal Year 2011-2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on November 14, 2012, at 5:30pm NOVEMBER 1, 2012 City of Sopchoppy NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe City of Sopchoppy will hold a public hearing on the adoption of Ordinance 2012-03, AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE OPERATING BUDGET FOR THE GENERAL AND WATER FUNDS OF THE CITY OF SOPCHOPPY FOR THE 2011-12 OPERATING YEAR at the regular council meeting, November, 13, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. The public hearing will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. The public is invited and urged to attend. Any person needing special assistance to attend this meeting should contact the Clerks Of“ce 24 hours in advance by calling 962-4611.NOVEMBER 1, 8, 2012 City of Sopchoppy NOTICE OF MEETING CHANGEThe City of Sopchoppy will be changing the date of the regular November meeting from the second Monday to the second Tuesday in November in observance of the Veterans Day Holiday The meeting will be held, November 13, at 6:30 p.m. 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FLNOVEMBER 1, 8, 2012 WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERSSTATE HOUSING INITIATIVES PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM (SHIP) REHABILITATION PROJECT NUMBER: ITB #2012-13 Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Sealed bids for ITB#2012-13, STATE HOUSING INITIATIVES PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM (SHIP) REHABILITATION PROJECT will be received until 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, November 15, 2012. The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners invites interested residential contractors to submit bids for the rehabilitation of two (2) single family homes located in Wakulla County. Bids should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Of“ce, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at which time all bids will be publicly opened. Bids received after the time and date speci“ed will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Bidder. Please direct all questions to: A MANDATORY meeting to provide contractor orientation materials and visit the scheduled project will be held on Thursday, November 8, 2012 at 10:30am at the Housing Of“ce located in the Countys Administration Building, 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. All interested contractors must attend this meeting in order to receive the bid documents and attend the review of the project. The visit to the project will immediately follow the orientation meeting. For contractors that have not been pre-approved, you may obtain a contractor application package by calling Meridian Community Services Group, Inc. at (888) 878-1908 (Toll Free). Please bring your completed application package to the mandatory meeting on November 8, 2012. E. Alan Brock, Chairman Deborah DuBose, OMB CoordinatorWBE/MBE/DBE Firms are encouraged to participate. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Any persons with a quali“ed disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this of“ce by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD).ADMINISTRATIVE: Deborah DuBose Wakulla County BOCC Phone: 850.926.9500 Fax: 850.926.0940 Email: ddubose@mywakulla.com TECHNICAL: Esrone McDaniels Meridian Community Services Group, Inc. 1500 Mahan Drive, Ste. 250, Tallahassee, FL PH: 850.877.1908 Fax: 850-878-8785 emcdaniels@meridserv.comNOVEMBER 1, 2012

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy RACHEL PIENTA Volumes have been written about the accomplishments of President Obamas “ rst term. What will be the deciding factor for most voters on election day? The words of Clinton adviser James Carville, said during the 1992 presidential campaign resonate with me in these “ nal days of the 2012 campaign. Those words are as true today as they were 20 years ago … Its the economy!Ž The presidents opponents like to throw numbers around as evidence in support of their candidate. However, Id like to offer a different take on the economy that tells the rest of the story. Lets talk numbers. At the close of the 2012 “ scal year, the Congressional Budget Of“ ce announced the federal budget de“ cit: $1.1 trillion. That is a number not to be taken lightly. However, the bigger story and the more accurate telling of the numbers story is that the de“ cit was cut by $200 billion in the past year. Furthermore, the CBO has issued budget projections that show the 2013 Obama budget, if we return him to of“ ce, would shrink the de“ cit to (OR BY) $977 billion. That is a four year total of close to $500 billion in de“ cit reduction. How did this Democratic president accomplish this enormous de“ cit reduction? President Obama signed the StatutoryPay-As-You-Go Act in February 2010 that mandates new spending must be offset with spending cuts or new revenue. This visionary act helped reduce the de“ cit and spurred renewed economic growth in ways unseen since the Clinton Administration. What does that mean here at home? Wakullas unemployment was 6.5 percent in September, down from 8.7 percent at the same time last year. Not only is Wakullas unemployment rate lower than the state of Florida, which was 8.6 percent in September, but it is also lower than the national rate … which was at 7.6 percent last month. The economy is on the rebound. President Obama has successfully implemented de“ cit reduction. If it is really about the economy, President Obama is the candidate you should support Nov. 6.Rachel Pienta is the chair of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee.By JONATHAN KILPATRICK When the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics was on the verge of collapse, Mitt Romney was asked to step in and correct the problem. He did just that. When elected the governor of Massachusetts, Romney took of“ ce in a state where the budget was out of balance and the state economy was in disarray. Gov. Romney put his conservative principles to work, and balanced the budget, unemployment fell and businesses returned to the state adding thousands of new jobs. Today the United States faces similar and even greater challenges. The policies of the last four years are not working. Unemployment remains high, with millions of Americans out of work and 43 months with unemployment over 8 percent. The nation now has a $16 trillion national debt, that is over $51,000 dollars for each man, woman and child in the country and $5 trillion of that debt has been added just within the last three and a half years. Businesses are not hiring due to threats of higher taxes and over burdensome regulations. America needs a change. America needs fresh leadership. The current administration has backed away from our allies around the world and has not stood up to those who would seek to harm us. The latest example is the horri“ c events in Benghazi, Libya. This administration did not respond when calls for help were made. Four Americans died while drones ” ew overhead. The world needs America to stand up and be a leader, not lead from behind.Ž Our friends in the world must know we stand with them and our enemies must know we will respond. America needs a change. The United States faces unprecedented challenges. The economy is in shambles, the debt has skyrocketed to unimaginable levels and the world is a very dangerous place. America needs leadership that will attack these challenges head on and put in a plan to get the economy moving again, create jobs and growth, re-engage America as the leader of the free world and create a smaller, simpler and smarter federal government. Romney has presented this plan to the American people. This election presents a clear choice … America needs a change and America needs Mitt Romney for president. For more information about Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan visit the website www. MittRomney.com.Jonathan Kilpatrick is the chair of the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee. readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Sheriff’s Report for Oct. 25 • Get familiar with common poisonous plants • County goes from deficit to surplus • Lane closures on 319 next week • Empty Bowl fundraiser is set for Nov. 3 • War Eagles stay perfect • Questions about outside groups in local campaigns •Stone Crab Festivalthewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.COMMUNITY DEBATE DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: BARACK OBAMA REPUBLICAN RESPONSE: MITT ROMNEYEditor, The News: Several weeks ago there was an incident that took place during the Democratic Convention that really got my attention. When the gentlemen from California (the speaker) had to repeat three times whether to put Gods name back in platform or leave it out because the yeas and nays were so even. That tells me that half the group would deny God. For the life of me I cant see how a person who even believes theres a God much less a Christian could vote for such to lead our country. There has already been so much of our Christian values taken away. We had better wake up while were still allowed to vote before thats taken away also. Thanks, Bill Avery Crawfordville P.S. Im an Alabama transplant. Remember the Ten Commandments removal from the Capitol?Editor, The News: Soups on! Overwhelming reaction to the countys “ rst Empty Bowl event on Saturday, Nov. 3, at Hudson Park. Tickets to “ ll a hand decorated bowl are selling fast and it is time to tell all that no one will be refused delicious soup, even without a painted bowl. The event is from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Entertainment and fellowship guaranteed. So what kind of soups is our community making? After you buy a soup bowl you will go through the line and get a taste of the following soups: Roasted Pumpkin, Red Lentil Stew, Ham and Potato, Fall Harvest, Green Pea, Cuban Black Bean, Vegetable Beef, Chicken and Dumplings, Butternut Squash, Barley Vegetable, Navy Bean, Chicken and Wild Rice, Potato and Corn, Chicken Noodle. Petra Shuff, Winn-Dixie and the Doubletree Hotel are baking and donating bread. These groups painted bowls (and many individuals as well): Rotary Club, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Purple Martin Nursery, Eden Springs, Senior Center, Christ Church Anglican, 4-H, AVID, Nell Schulzs watercolor artists, and Rachel Sutz-Pientas Democratic women. There are also very special hand-made bowls from the Riversprings Middle School students, the Senior Center artists, and Nancy Jeffersons Florida Green Guide Association. I might have omitted a few good souls and I apologize but thank everyone for your generosity in trying to alleviate hunger in Wakulla County. All proceeds from Empty Bowls, organized through the Healing Arts of Wakulla County, go to local food pantries. So, soups on, and we hope to see hundreds and hundreds of you Saturday. Madeleine H. Carr CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: There are more bikes on Wakulla roads these days. Most riders know and follow the rules of the road. But some do not, and are risking their lives needlessly. On a dark night last week, we pulled out to pass a slow moving car and suddenly found a bicyclist wearing dark clothes in our headlights. He was driving facing traf“ c, so that he was not visible until the last possible moment. If he had been on the same side as cars, he would have been seen far ahead. Remember the high school student who was killed a few years ago while biking on the wrong side of the road? Please use this sad reminder to bike safely. Marcia Bjerregaard Shell PointThe issue: Which candidate for president?Editor, The News: This was going to be about the election, but as Sherlock Holmes said, The games afoot!Ž And it aint pretty. The BOCC is trying to change Citizens to be Heard.Ž Unless we do something. At the next county commission meeting, theyll be clarifyingŽ our Citizens to be Heard,Ž As we know, one mans clarifyingŽ is anothers gutting.Ž I “ nd this whole thing extremely suspicious on its face. As important as the subject … open government … is, this item is going directly and quietly on the agenda. In addition: 1). It violates the boards own policy, 2). There was no advance notice of this item, 3). There was no authority to either bring the item up nor spend attorney time on it, 4). There was no public input at any workshop, 5). Could possibly be a violation of the federal Americans with Disabilities Act,Ž 6). Expressly excludes comment, 7). Is vague and subjective, 8). Is an attack on open government, 9). Severely restricts citizen input, 10). Curtails free and open airings of citizens concerns Additionally, I regard this item as a direct slap in the face to the citizens. The existing Citizens to be HeardŽ is simple: three minutes for a citizen to speak … and it works quite well. On Oct. 15, Commissioner Merritt brought citizens to be heardŽ up as a commissioner discussion item.Ž To go forward, this item would have to be voted on and passed unanimously. It was not. No vote was taken. But then, we get this from the county attorney: This agenda item requests Board approval of the proposed amendment to the Meeting Policy, pursuant to previous board direction.Ž But there was no board direction because it was not voted on! This proposed gutting of the Citizens to be HeardŽ policy besides being unjusti“ ed and illegal, is terribly subjective. While Ive read vague and unconstitutionalŽ a lot, I dont think Ive ever read vague and constitutional.Ž To what end? I know. And they know I know. I know they know I know, but theyre doing it anyway. Except now you know. I suggest that we all take the opportunity to speak at what could be the last Citizens to be HeardŽ as we know it, on Monday, Nov. 5. And just in case you havent decided who youre going to vote for yet, keep this in mind in the voting booth. Thank you, Hugh Taylor Crawfordville Soups on at Empty Bowls on Saturday Supporting Willie Meggs for state attorney Why should we do legislatures job? Bicycle riders must follow rules of the road Half of convention would deny God Citizens to be Heard under attackREADERS WRITE: Editor, The News: We elect our Legislators to do a very speci“ c job … enact laws that serve the good of the people. So, why is this years ballot so lengthy as to require two legal pages, front and back, and 65 cents to mail? They are either too busy politicking to do their job or they didnt want to tackle the tough issues and lay claim to some unpopular legislation aimed at aiding special interests. They knew that historically, voters tend to vote yes on constitutional amendments, assuming that the sponsors have our best interests at heart, and not wanting to take the time to understand each issue. All of these amendments were placed on the ballot by our Legislature whose specialty seems to be disservice. The State Constitution should not be “ lled with items more appropriately put into law. Laws are easily amended if needed. The Constitution requires yet another costly amendment on the ballot. The Legislature must stop pushing their responsibility off on the voters. I have voted no on all of the amendments as a matter of principle. George Apthorp CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: I am writing this letter in support of State Attorney Willie Meggs. Willie and my father, Robert Lee, were best friends and worked in law enforcement all of their adult lives. Willie worked two jobs to support his family as he put himself through law school in order to become a prosecutor in the 2nd Judicial Circuit. In 1985 he was “ rst elected as state attorney. I can say that Willie is a man of great character, high morals and incomparable honesty. He was there for my wife and me when I was shot in the line of duty, and then again when my father and my mother passed away. Other than my father, there is no one who has had a greater in” uence in my life. Willie is very involved in the of“ ce, rarely has a day off, and is available to anyone who needs his advice or help 24 hours a day. This is the man I have worked closely with for over 25 years; and I am honored to call Willie Meggs my friend, my boss and my state attorney. Chris Lee Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 5Areaders speak out More OpinionsMORE READERS WRITE:Sheri Crum endorses Maurice Langston e truth gives voters information Taxes have gone down Alan Brock has worked for community Retired deputy endorses Charlie Creel Bobby Pearce has positive e ect on youth Commissioner Artz endorses Emily SmithMore letters onlineJohn Shu compliments opponents on raceEditor, The News: Hi, my name is Jeff Barteld. Many of you may know me from my years working as a Deputy at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. First, let me say that it has been both a privilege and an honor to serve Wakulla County and its residents, many of whom are friends or relatives. I met Charlie Creel early in my career with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. He seemed like a really nice guy. I assumed that he was just another state trooper working in Wakulla County. Charlie never put on any airs about his career with FHP, and I had no idea that he had worked as the Lt. Governors Chief of Security, or that he had been assigned to a task force working with the FBI, let alone that he had achieved the rank of major. I was dispatched to a panic alarm call one night and was the “ rst deputy on scene. Upon arrival another car pulled in behind mine with its lights out. I immediately recognized that it was Charlie on duty in his FHP patrol car. Charlie got out and signaled for me to take one side of the house and indicated that he would take the other. In a very short time we were able to determine that it was a false alarm and I was able to cancel my backup unit. I realized at that time that Charlie was truly concerned for the safety of that family, as well as my safety, as a fellow law enforcement of“ cer. He was not required, nor expected, to assist me on that call. But he did. I later spoke with some of my fellow deputies about it, and several of them said that they had similar experiences with Charlie backing them up on calls also. I am proud to call Charlie Creel a good friend. He is well respected in the law enforcement community, as well as the community as a whole. He has a passion for law enforcement work, and has more training and experience than most of you realize. He is a hands-on, boots on the ground, stand-up guy who will do what he says he will do. It is my choice to support Charlie Creel as the next sheriff of Wakulla County. I hope that you too, will support him, and allow him to take the Wakulla Sheriffs Of“ ce to the next level! I think that youll be proud of what he will accomplish. Jeff Barteld WCSO Deputy Sheriff, Retired Editor, The News: In response to Mike Stewart questions opponents tactics,Ž Opinions, last week: Everything I have done in support of my husband Howard Kesslers campaign has been strictly ethical and legal. The facts are clear: 1. Mike Stewart promised no new taxes without voter approval,Ž but in 2011 he voted for $3.9 million in new and increased taxes and fees without voter approval. 2. Mike Stewart voted YESŽ in 12 out of 12 possible votes to increase County budget or taxes. Stating the truth about someones record relative to the issues is providing a service to the voters so they may make a fully informed decision. Anne Van Meter vanmeteranne@gmail.comEditor, The News: As this election cycle comes to an end, I would like to publicly thank both my opponents in the District 5 County Commission race, Ms. Emily Smith and Mr. Richard Harden, for running above board campaigns that concentrated on their vision for the future of Wakulla County. It has truly been an honor going through the campaign process with these two “ ne individuals. I would also like to openly thank the citizens of Wakulla County who have taken the time to listen to my strategies for moving Wakulla County forward, as well as those citizens that provided me with their valuable insight as to what they see as the priorities for our Board of County Commissioners during the next four years. We are truly blessed to live in a county, and a country, where we can have such conversations at a personal level, which will ultimately lead to the shaping of Wakulla County. In closing, I would like to encourage each and every voter in Wakulla County to get out and vote for their respective candidate. It is my sincere belief that in the District 5 race, we are blessed with three candidates who truly have the best interests of Wakulla County deeply rooted in our hearts, and each of us want Wakulla County to move in the right direction. Although our goal is the same, we each provide a varying path for moving forward based on our own experiences and beliefs of what will ultimately lead to success. The citizens of Wakulla County will decide which path is best suited for ensuring we protect Wakulla Countys beautiful natural resources, all the while ensuring that managed growth will not be brought to a standstill. I humbly request that you provide consideration to my business, professional, and community experiences. Please also consider my availability to amply devote my time researching issues, and developing practical solutions, while living within our means, when making your selection in this race. Once again, thanks go out to my fellow Wakulla County neighbors and to my two opponents, for your hospitality and openness during my campaign to become your next District 5 County Commissioner. Respectfully, John Shuff Candidate for Wakulla County Commissioner District 5 Editor, The News: Wakulla County needs a county commissioner like Emily Smith. She has an abundance of qualities that will make her an outstanding commissioner. Emily is intelligent, informed and thoughtful. She understands that commission decisions have far-reaching impacts. She will make decisions based on solid information and reason, not just opinion or politics. Emily is independent, honest and fair. She believes in public service, not personal or industry gain. She is strong enough to say NoŽ to special interests. She will use tax dollars ef“ ciently and equitably. Emily is positive, nurturing and kind-hearted. She will be available to citizens and responsive to their concerns and wishes. She will be a passionate advocate for children and those less fortunate. She will invest in educational and recreational activities for our youth. Emily will speak for the silent majority and work for the common good. Further, we need a county commission that looks like … and truly represents … all of the people in our county. What a sad day it will be if our county is again governed only by men, or by “ ve people who all hold similar views. When different perspectives are voiced and considered, better decisions are made. Emily will bring much needed diversity and balance to the Commission. Emily is my preferred replacement on the commission because she shares many of my own values and views. Emily will promote smart growth and sustainable communities. She believes in making environmental protection a real priority, not an empty talking point.Ž She will move our County forward with money-saving energy conservation and 21st century infrastructure. Emily will make carefully considered decisions that bene“ t the long-term interests of Wakulla County and its citizens. She will build our countys reputation as a fair, well-managed, and vibrant place to live and do business. Please vote for Emily Smith for county commissioner. Lynn Artz County Commissioner District 5 Editor, The News:With all the emphasis Howard Kessler is placing on taxes, I decided to check my personal records to see just how much my taxes have increased over the years. Referencing my annual escrow statements back to 1998 (which show the actual taxes paid), I was quite surprised to see that my personal taxes have ” uctuated very little over that span of time. Without even taking into account inflation over those 14 years, I paid less last year than I did in 1998 … 7 percent less. I recognize that these “ gures re” ect the combination of school board taxes and county taxes, but the overall county tax requirements over the past few years reinforce my contention. The total ad valorem taxes levied across the entire county have DECREASED every year since 2008. I acknowledge that this years ad valorem reduction is being aided by creation of the Public Service Tax (PST), but I also believe that was a really wonderful thing. With a family of four in a 1,900square-foot house, I have contributed an average of less than $6 per month via that tax since its inception in January. To me, given an offsetting reduction in ad valorem taxes, thats not too much of a price to pay to enable the 826 homesteaded homeowners who pay no ad valorem taxes the opportunity to help fund the county services we all bene“ t from. But I am very appreciative that Mike Stewart exercised leadership and persuaded three of the other four commissioners to opt for a 7 percent PST versus the proposed 10 percent. He also convinced them to exempt the “ rst 500 kilowatt hours from the PST. Im especially thankful that he didnt simply vote NoŽ to the initial proposal even though that might have sounded good to uninformed voters during this campaign. As for the garbage assessment, that is not a tax. Besides, $196 is not a bad price all things considered. Its appreciably less for the roughly 50 percent of the county that formerly had private trash collection service. I had been taking my trash to the land“ ll for $2 per week, so Im paying a little more, but Im saving gas and time so its essentially a wash for me. But the best part is the positive environmental impact with the eliminated dumping and the substantially increased recycling efforts of our citizens. Plus we get to close our land“ ll. Sounds like a win-win situation to me! Ron Huddleston CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: I want to add my endorsement to the many that T.W. Maurice Langston has been receiving from fellow law enforcement officials and citizens to become the next sheriff of Wakulla County. I have worked beside Maurice for many years and know of his commitment and dedication to Wakulla County and the employees of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. Maurice has always been the man that everyone could go to for solid and straight counsel in all matters. I admire him both professionally and personally. Maurice has a strong law enforcement background that covers all aspects of a Sheriffs Of“ ce. From a road patrol deputy, through the ranks as detective, up to a major and undersheriff. His decisions are always based on the best interest of justice and the community. He has a respect for all persons and their constitutional rights. Maurice Langston is capable of working all types of cases from burglary to murder, as well as has the operational experience to manage the budget. He also has the leadership qualities to unite the department and the community. I wholeheartedly offer my endorsement of T. W. Maurice Langston for Sheriff of Wakulla County in 2012. Sincerely, Donnie W. Crum Wakulla County Sheriff Editor, The News: As election day approaches I want to thank the citizens for allowing me the honor of serving as your county commissioner for the past four years. This is a responsibility that I have not taken lightly. Ive been humbled by the chance to serve the Wakulla community that I respect and love so much. I am seeking re-election, and I want to thank my opponents for keeping our race positive. I have been pleased to campaign on the issues, and Ive worked to try to bring the tone of politics back to a civil place in Wakulla County. There are differences between me and my two opponents, but we are all good people who care deeply about Wakulla. I have worked hard to bring our community together over the last four years. Together we have accomplished several impressive goals. We have managed to lower the cost of county government, but still preserve essential programs that we value … like the library, veterans services, the senior center and the rec park. According to Florida Taxwatchs most recent report, Wakulla County collects the least in taxes per capita of any county in the Big Bend. We have done these things by cutting red tape and making our government more ef“ cient. It was a privilege to represent all of you at home and as an advocate beyond our community. As your commissioner, I have worked hard to make sure that Wakulla is included in the landmark Restore Act, which will return tens of millions of dollars to Wakulla to help our local economy and environment recover from the Deep Horizon Oil Spill. The Restore Act takes the “ nes that the responsible parties have to pay to the federal government and redirects the funds back to the communities that were most affected. This will be a major catalyst for change for our community and our whole region. I am very proud to have worked to pass the Restore Act. Since the act passed, I have continued to “ ght, and use my whole sphere of in” uence, to make sure that it is implemented as intended. I am also very proud of leading the effort to implement our new solid waste and recycling collection program. It has proven to be a huge success, and I think the outcome is by far the best of any of the alternatives that were discussed which all included more debt for Wakulla. This program is a success we should all celebrate. I believe in good government, and have worked hard to make Wakulla a model for ef“ cient government. Over the next four years, I hope to continue to serve you as your county commissioner, working to bring our community together. Sincerely, Alan Brock County Commissioner District 1 Editor, The News: I am writing this letter in support of Bobby Pearce for school superintendent. My interactions with Coach Pearce go back to the early 1990s, when he was my high school weightlifting coach and mentor. As a coach, he expertly managed the team and inspired the athletes, all while consistently instilling the importance of education and contributing to the personal development of each student. He led through example and made everyone of us want to be our best. As my mentor, he helped to “ rmly instill my work ethic (which is still instrumental in my life today) and also helped me gain focus in life. While I was still in high school, Mr. Pearce was promoted to principal of the new Medart Elementary School. I remember thinking this was wonderful for Wakulla County. I felt that someone of his caliber, who was also so important to my development, could now have a similar impact on so many more students. After graduating from Wakulla High School, I subsequently went on to spend the next 13 years in some of our nations “ nest universities on my way to becoming an Interventional Spine Specialist. I am now a faculty member in the College of Medicine of the No. 2-rated university in the world, Stanford University. I feel that Wakulla County Schools prepared me well for all my future endeavors. This was due to the perfect combination of exceptional leadership and wonderful teachers that existed throughout the school system, of which Bobby Pearce exempli“ ed. As proud Wakulla High School graduate, it is my sincere hope that Wakulla County is the premier school system in Florida. I “ rmly believe Bobby Pearce has the skills and vision to achieve these goals. I count myself lucky for having him be an in” uence in my life, and I feel strongly his election to superintendent can only have a positive effect on the youth of Wakulla County. David D.J.Ž Kennedy, M.D. Stanford UniversityThank you to all of our readers who submitted Letters to the Editor during this political season. However, because of the volume of letters received, even with adding a second page to run more letters, there has not been enough space to publish all of the political letters weve received. In an e ort to make those political letters available for consideration prior to the Nov. 6 election, the letters will appear online at our website, thewakullanews.com. … William Snowden, editor

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Prayer Walk will conclude By CYNTHIA WEBSTER The 40 days of prayer are easing down. There are only a few walks remaining and one night of hymn and prayer. It has been a journey that has crossed religious denominations, gender, age, economic, social, race, and political lines. People have walked in agreement and harmony with fondness and caring. But how can it be that so many from such varied backgrounds have been able to mold a bond that transcends these differences? Some would say that there are obvious possibilities … short time periods, no intense situations, volunteer participation but actually the most reasonable and honest possibility is that the excitement and anticipation never ended because each walker had their eyes on the same power source. Christians all across the county know that Gods will has been the prayer; faith and trust the tools that each has sought. So simple. It has had nothing to do with exercise, social acceptability or, as I heard one woman claim, political persuasion. It has all been about recognizing that the nation is not, has never been, and cannot be the king. Our founding fathers understood this as they fought for and guaranteed on paper certain inalienable rights endowed by our creator. Abraham Lincoln understood this when he said I have been down many times to my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go.Ž And Dan Cathy knew it when he refused, without malice, to step back from the tenets of his faith. All comes from a Higher Power. The walks have been all about going directly to God, letting him see that His people are aware of the need to put His word back into our lives and the lives of our children, realizing that regardless of what happens in the elections we know it is His will, and that by repenting there will be spiritual renewal. On election eve, Monday, Nov. 5, the 40day prayer walk will culminate in a prayer and hymn service at Azalea Park. Can you but imagine how great that would be … to “ ll the park with people in prayer and song? And we can do it. It just takes each of us to make a decision, a commitment, a promise to be there. Bring a friend, a chair, a jacket if it is cool, a ” ashlight in case it becomes dark before we leave (that is the weekend we set our clocks back), and a prayerful heart. If we begin on time at 5:40 p.m. the program will be over by 6:30 or a bit after --in time to enjoy dinner at one of our local eateries. Note: If Christians do show their great strength, parking will be further from the park. We hope to leave a spot open at the back of the park so that drivers can pull in, drop off passengers and folding chairs, then park. CLERGY SCHEDULE FOR WEEK SIX € Wednesday, Oct. 31, at 10 a.m., Pastor Kevin Hall of Sopchoppy United Methodist Church and Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church. € Thursday, Nov. 1, at 6:45 p.m., the Rev. Matthew Balkman (Ret.) of St. Marks Primitive Baptist Church, Lake Jackson and Mount Pisby Primitive Baptist Church in Tallahassee. € Friday, Nov. 2, at 10 a.m., Ramon Medina, Servant of God. € Saturday, Nov. 3, 10 a.m., Pastor Dawn Gaskin-Knighton of Radical Restoration Ministries. € Monday, Nov. 5, at 5:30 p.m. … Prayer & Hymn, Pastor Henry Jones of River of Life Church. 40 days of prayer to end on election eve, Nov. 5 Church Briefs Chili supper and silent auction at Ochlockonee Bay UMCThe Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church will hold a Chili Supper and Silent Auction on Friday evening, Nov. 2. The supper is just $5 for homemade chili, corn bread or chips, dessert and beverage. Supper hours are 5 to 7 p.m. The silent auction will run from 5 to 8 p.m. and will include antiques, art, crafts, sporting goods, vintage and new items, services, and baskets lled to the brim with good things! Come for the chili, come for the auction, come for both and enjoy! The church is located just off Route 98 at 2780 Surf Road. Call Suzanne at 349-2749 or Joann at 984-5400 for more information. Homecoming revival set atPanacea CongregationalPanacea Congregational Holiness Church will hold homecoming revival Nov. 5 through Nov. 9. Services begin at 7:30 p.m. There will be a different speaker each night. Homecoming supper will be held on Saturday, Nov. 10, at 6 p.m. at the church. Bring a covered dish and join us. Sunday morning service will be at 11 a.m. and Sunday night at 6 p.m. For more information please call (850) 984-5579 or (850) 508-1895.  Quilt is being raf ed by Christ Church AnglicanChrist Church Quilters are raf ing a beautiful hand quilted queen-king size quilt. The pattern is Star-spangled Four Patch. Raf e tickets are now available, six tickets for $5 or $1 each. The drawing will be held after noon on Dec. 9, at Christ Church Anglican, 3383 Coastal Highway. You may call the church at 745-8412 or Mary Lou Martin 210-1203 for more information or for tickets. The children of Wakulla United Methodist Church were delighted to receive help from a clown in preparing Halloween treats for Trunk or Treat Night,Ž Oct. 31, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Wakulla UMC grounds, 1584 Old Woodville Highway in Wakulla Station. All area children are welcome. For more information, please call 421-5741. Trunk or Treat at Wakulla UMCSPECIAL TO THE NEWS While most people in the U.S. are preparing for holiday activities, volunteers with Operation Christmas Child are “ lling shoe box gifts with toys, school supplies and hygiene items for needy children overseas. This year-round project of international Christian relief and evangelism organization Samaritans Purse, headed by Franklin Graham, is ramping up as local businesses, churches and community groups prepare to collect 11,000 gift-“ lled shoe boxes during National Collection Week, Nov. 12 through Nov. 19. The Wakulla collection site is Crawfordville United Methodist Church, 176 Ochlockonee St., in Crawfordville. Beginning Nov. 12, the church will accept donations during the week from 9 a.m. to noon; on Saturday, Nov. 17, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 18, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., and Monday, Nov. 19, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.Gift-“ lled shoe box drive to start

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By REV. JAMES L. SNYDERI was off to the airport on another trip. I started out early, arrived at the airport on time but when I arrived the plane had canceled and I had to apply for another plane. The next plane headed for my destination was about two hours away. This would in fact, make me miss my connecting ” ight. I suppose I ought to be grateful that I was able to catch a later ” ight. It gave me some time to sit in the airport with nothing to do but think. Talk about a boring afternoon! One of the things I thought about was never ” ying again. But, necessity is the mother of inconvenience, or something like that. While I was thinking in the airport, I thought of a wise old man who, waxing philosophical, once said, Time waits for no man.Ž I know he was wise because he did not include women in his observation. Although time will wait for no man, it has a different approach to women. Usually speaking, a man welcomes the passing of time. Proudly he displays those wrinkles and calluses as marks of manhood. Until recently, gray hair was a crown of authority. Even Solomon, the wisest man said, The hoary [gray] head is a crown of glory, if it be found in the way of righteousnessŽ (Proverbs 16:31 KJV). The grayer the head, the wiser the man. Although, I must confess I have seen my share of dumb gray-headed men. A woman, however, has an altogether different philosophy when it comes to time. As a man with gray hair, I do not fully understand their philosophy. I suppose there are some men who would like to be 25 again. Most men, however, are happy to be as old as they are. Women are different. They live upon the concept of ageless beauty. Who am I, as a man, to counter that philosophy? I discovered this many years ago. A woman casually asked me how old I thought she was. I have long since discovered that this is no casual question and she is not looking for exact information. I, at the time, took it as a challenge and tried to guess her age. Wrong! I have since learned that the correct response to this question is, Why, you dont look a day over 25.Ž I do not know exactly what that means, but I have often gotten smiles from this response. No matter how old the woman is, in her mind she is still 25. The man has a different idea. Im 60,Ž he will boast to whoever will listen, and I can still do a whole days work.Ž Then he will go out and throw his back out just to prove it. Time has a different effect upon a man as it does upon a woman. There is nothing wrong with trying to look younger. I suppose it is an easier task to do if you are a woman than if you are a man. Every morning before I leave the house I try to make myself as non-scary to the public as I possibly can. I will scrape my face, pat down my hair, and douse myself with aftershave and in 10 minutes I am done and ready for the world. Continued on Page 15A www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 7AObituaries Edward Thomas Ward, 81, passed away Saturday, Oct. 20, in North Carolina. He is survived by his wife of 41 years, Mary B. Ward of Crawfordville. He was born in St. Marks, and had lived in Crawfordville for 40 years. He attended St. Marks First Baptist Church, was a retired teacher from Wakulla High School and was a member of the Fishermans Society. His family was the founding family of St. Marks. Funeral services were held Friday, Oct. 26, at 3 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church in St. Marks. Interment followed in St. Marks Cemetery. The family received friends at the church one hour prior to the service. He is also survived by two daughters, Karen L. Ward of Crawfordville and Sherrie Ward of Salt Lake City; two brothers, Tony Bill Ward (Helen) and Bobby Jim Ward (Betty), both of St. Marks; a sister, Elna Sapp of Tallahassee; a granddaughter, Amber Hagland; and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by son, Richard Thomas Ward; and a brother, Jack BuddyŽ Ward. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements. (850/926-3333 or www. bevisfh.com)Edward Thomas Ward Get me to the airport on time OUT TO PASTOR charlieforsheriff@gmail.comwww.charliecreel.comPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Af“liation, for sheriff.We are in the last week of an historic election for Wakulla County „ an election that, with your vote, can change the direction of the Sheriffs of“ce with new leadership, integrity and a full-time commitment. Your vote for Charlie Creel will reduce our serious burglary and drug problems with an attack on crime coordinated with all law enforcement agencies to make our county safer. As a husband, father, son and brother, I know how important it is to be sure your family is safe and secure. As your sheriff, I will use my 35 years of experience as a Florida Certi“ed Law Enforcement Of“cer on the frontline of “ghting crime, as an of“cer trainer; my managerial experience as a supervisor, investigator and security coordinator, and my experience as a consultant on national emergency management to lead the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ce on a new path for the future. The National Rifle Association and Unified Sportsmen of Florida, and the Fraternal Order of Police have endorsed me as the best candidate for Wakulla Countys sheriff, and I am humbled and proud to have received their endorsements. However the most important endorsement will come from you, the citizens of Wakulla County. Your vote for Charlie Creel will send the message that you want honesty and integrity, and a sheriff who will enforce the laws impartially and fairly, while bringing down the high crime rate this county has been experiencing. I ask for your vote in this important election, and I commit to you that I will bring a FRESH START as your FULL-TIME sheriff. With great respect,To the people of Wakulla County, SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY NIGHT SERVICES6:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study3086 Crawfordville Highway (One block south of Courthouse)850-926-7896www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc. 551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Digni“ed Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Response to Mike StewartEverything I have done in support of my husband Howard Kessler’s campaign has been strictly ethical and legal. The facts are clear: 1. Mike Stewart promised “no new taxes without voter approval,” but in 2011 he voted for $3.9 million in new and increased taxes and fees without voter approval. 2. Mike Stewart voted “YES” in 12 out of 12 possible votes to increase County budget or taxes. Stating the truth about someone’s record relative to the issues is providing a service to the voters so they may make a fully informed decision.VOTE FOR HOWARD KESSLERPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Howard Kessler, No Party Af“liation, for County commissioner, District 3. –Anne Van Meter Wakulla Respite Alzheimers Respite Program p p p g g g invites you to join us at our Monday, November 5, 9AM-1PMat Lake Ellen Baptist Church, 4495 Crawfordville Hwy.Please contact Pat Ashley at 850-984-5277 or Mary McMahn 850-510-1253. REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVEDHealthcare agencies and organizations will be providing screenings and Educational Services. Valuable information for seniors will also be available.and ”u shot clinic

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Special to The NewsEdna Wilson and her family would like to thank the more than 100 friends and family that stopped by or called, to express their love and well wishes on her 95th birthday celebration. Five generations shared in the celebration of her life. She has four children, nine grandchildren, 17 greatgrandchildren and 17 greatgreat-grandchildren. Wilson was born and raised in Wakulla County. She retired from the Wakulla County School System as a bus driver after 22 years and also donated her time in the lunch room during those years as well. She has been serving as a pastor, servant and volunteer for 67 years. All that know her, love and respect her and have been blessed to have her in their lives for 95 years and all cherish the days that are to come. Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityDogs ” ying high thanks to three animal loversBy STEVE FULTSSpecial to The NewsIn mid-October, Wakulla County received two new four-legged residents, an Australian Shepherd and a German Shepherd. Liberty and LJ arrived at the Wakulla County airport via a small plane owned and piloted by Tom Autrey, a volunteer with PilotsNPaws. org, whose mission it is to provide free air transport for rescue animals going to adoptive homes. Tracy Needham and Jay Whetstone with AussieAndMe.org became aware Liberty and LJ were close to being euthanized by a North Carolina animal shelter, so they sprung into action by “ nding new homes here in Wakulla and arranging transportation, giving a new lease on life for these K-9 residents. Whetstone explained that some parts of the country have very high euthanasia rates, while others like Florida are much lower. Once out of Autreys Cessna 172, LibertyŽ and LJ were both exuberant, almost as if they knew exactly what a great thing these three selfless animal lovers had done on their behalf. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Countys newest residents, Liberty and LJ, land at the airport with the help of pilot Tom Autrey, Tracy Needham and Jay Whetstone. Edna Wilson Edna Wilson turns 95 Air Force Senior Airman Daniel F. Hauversburk has been named Airman of the Quarter for the 51st Medical Group. Selection was based on the individuals exemplary duty performance, job knowledge, leadership qualities, teamwork, significant self-improvement, personal achievements, notable accomplishments and community service and support. Hauversburk is a biomedical equipment technician assigned to the 51st Fighter Wing at Osan Air Base, Korea. The senior airman has served in the military for four years. He is the son of Dan F. Hauversburk of Crawfordville and Sabra R. Bedsole of Tallahassee. He is the grandson of James D. Bedsole and Frank Hauversburk, both of Opp, Ala.Lions Club “ sh fry is Nov. 3By MARJ LAWSpecial to The NewsIf youre hearing a gentle roar emanating from Sopchoppy, it might be coming from Lions Club members wearing aprons. Thats because the Sopchoppy Lions Club is holding its second Annual Fish Fry on Nov. 3. From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Sopchoppy Hardware Store, Lions will be serving fresh fried “ sh with coleslaw, hushpuppies and iced tea. Some Lions are making their own special pound cakes for dessert. So, for the small donation of $10, you can skip making lunch. Because its the Lions, youll know that your donation may bring a person in our very own county an eye exam, a pair of glasses or assist with the cost of eye surgery. At a time when our economy is fragile, its good to know that our Sopchoppy Lions are a completely volunteer group, and all the funds they raise go towards programs to promote vision and vision health. If you live in the downtown Sopchoppy area and are unable to drive to the fry, a Lion will deliver your meal to you. Just call Lion Arlene Vause in advance at 962-2210. And yes, the well-known Lion brooms will be available at the fry, too. Just in time for Christmas. Theyre surprisingly inexpensive: a great value for your donations! Join your friends at the Hardware store for some plain good food on Saturday. Hauversburk is selected as Airman of the Quarter Wakulla Christian School, in coordination with the Wakulla County Veterans Services Office, is proud to host the Saturday, November 10, 2012 at Hudson Park Games, Vendors Raffles, a Silent Auction, and Lots of Food !!! Parade Starts @ 10:00a.m. A portion of the proceeds from this grand event will be donated to our local Veterans Services Office. Your family or organization is invited to participate in this very special event dedicated to honoring all Veterans and active duty military. Please consider entering a float or vehicle decorated in honor of your loved ones’. For more information or to register your float, please contact the Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee via fax @ 850-926-5186 or email WCVDay@gmail.com “Honoring All Who Served” Soldier Care Packages 6th Annual Veterans Day Parade and Celebration to Support Our Troops and Honor Our Veterans Wakulla Christian School is collecting public donations of items to send to our troops wish list items include individually wrapped beef jerky, Pringles, individually wrapped sunflower seeds, individually wrapped nuts, individually packaged mix of Propel Fitness Water and Gatorade, individually packaged hard candy and gummy bears, white tube socks, protein bars, granola bars, books, soap, razors, sunscreen, na il files, AA batteries and Ziploc bags. For further information, please contact Wakulla County V eterans Day Committee Drop offanyitemsatoneof thefollowing supportivebusinessesinWakulla county: HOME MORTGAGEA MERI F IRST of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief Support850-878-5310 all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ FUND RAISER SILENT AUCTION & STEAK DINNER $ 10.00NOVEMBER 16TH from 5 PM … 8PM at SHELLPOINT FIRE HOUSE FOR TICKETS CONTACT MARION at 926-9023 ALSO AT CENTURY 21 in SHELLPOINTFishing TripJewelry Gift BasketsArt

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools School2 seniors named outstanding participants in National Achievement Program Special to The NewsSuperintendent David Miller, Michael Crouch and Wakulla High School are pleased to announce the inclusion of seniors Chelsi M. Arellano and Michael Schnoor as Outstanding Participants in the National Achievement Scholarship Program. These students scored in the top 3 percent of more than 160,000 African Americans who requested consideration in the 2013 National Achievement Program when they took the 2011 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. A roster of these students names, high schools, and tentative college major choice is being sent to about 1,500 colleges and universities. Schnoor is the son of Lori and Rhett Strickland and Wilfred (Smitty) Smith. He is a veteran percussionist in the WHS Band and he hopes to attend Florida State University or the University of Florida. He is planning on pursuing a career in chemical engineering. Arellano is the daughter of Rhoda Moore and Julio Arellano, Sr. She plays the trombone in the band. She wants to attend the University of South Florida in Tampa and pursue a degree in English education. A reception honoring these two outstanding students was held at Wakulla High School. They are very proud of these students for their achievement, and how it re” ects on the community here in Wakulla County. Pictured above: WHS Principal Michael Crouch, Superintendent David Miller, Assistant Superintendents Beth ODonnell and Bobby Pearce with seniors Michael Schnoor and Chelsi Arellano. Shadeville holds fall festival SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpecial to The NewsOn Saturday, Oct. 6, the day was warm, sunny and truly perfect for Shadevilles 29th Fall Festival. From the giant slide, face painting, pumpkin decorating, sand treasures all around to the super soaker the games were full of fanciful fun. Many thanks to the schools faithful PTO members, business partners, CVFD volunteer “ re“ ghters, school resource of“ cer, faculty and staff, as well as the terri“ c classroom volunteers who put in hours and hours ensuring the event would be a huge success. The festival is the schools only fundraiser of the year, and this year it will see a profit of approximately $28,000. The funds earned will be used to provide each classroom teacher and paraprofessional with additional funds for educational materials, increase the schools educational technology, enhance physical education, music, art and media centers equipment, purchase custodial supplies that keep the school sparkling and create a safe learning environment, as well as continue to support Project Learning Tree activities. This years classroom representatives who took home the coveted crowns for the highest Big Item DrawingŽ ticket sales were: Alexis Strickland and Colton McKenzie from Mrs. Scotts kindergarten, Brooke Millender and Landon Ray from Miss Gerrells “ rst grade, Jayleigh Trop and Jace Estes from Mrs. Hesters second grade, Taylor Tillman and Tristan Silcox from Mrs. Kerces third grade, Sianna McDonald and Michael Griffin from Mrs. Nalls fourth grade, Caitlynn Linville and Cody Quick from Mrs. Marshs “ fth grade and Paige Lamb and Hunter Wells from Mrs. Wards pre“ rst class. These classes have also earned a “ eld trip. A classroom game and pizza party was earned by Mrs. Adams fifth grade, Miss Moores fourth grade, Mrs. Traweeks third grade, Mrs. Bernales second grade, Miss Gerrells first grade, Miss Thomas kindergarten and Mrs. Wards pre-first classroom. A giant heartfelt thanks to the parents, families, businesses and friends who contributed goodies and items to our donation efforts this year. The Fall Festival is always a tremendously rewarding event. I really enjoy seeing so many families having fun together in such a wholesome atmosphere. Although it was a warm and windy day this year, it didnt seem to dampen the spirits of the many, many folks who came and enjoyed the afternoons events,Ž said Principal Susan Brazier. The latest addition to the Shadeville Fall Festival, the super soaker, soaks “ fth grade teacher Kerry Adams. It's time for Wakulla's next chapter Vote for Jim Parham It is all about fairness. The citizens of Wakulla do not mind paying their fair share; they just do not want to pay someone else's. Put "fair" back into fair market value! Qualifications: Achieved highest levels in the appraisal profession (MAI & SRA) Experience: Appraised property over 38 year career in 35 counties of Florida and in North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama and the Caribbean Independent: No Party Affiliation (NPA);Tied to no political party Established recent residency; Uncompromised; Funding own campaign If Wakulla is to become greater it would be good to hire a property appraiser who has worked in and understands the dynamics of greater markets "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www.FairValuesInWakulla.com Paid b y Jim Parham No Part y Affiliation for Pro p ert y A pp raiser We, the Principals of Wakulla County, a Florida DOE "A" School District for seven consecu ve years, do hereby endorse Bobby Pearce as OUR CHOICE for Superintendent of Schools. We encourage you to join us in our e orts to not only maintain but con nue to improve educa onal opportuni es for all Wakulla County students by suppor ng Bobby Pearce Please join Bobby Pearce on facebook at pearce4kids Poli cal adver sement paid for and approved by Bobby Pearce, Democrat, for Superintendent of Schools For

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com T a k i n g C a r e o f B u s i n e s s Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from By PETRA SHUFFof the ChamberMoving towards the end of the hurricane season, the Chamber held its ninth Chamber luncheon, hosted by TCC Wakulla Center, graciously offering the facility for our use. The luncheon was catered by Coastal Restaurant, serving up a buffet of pull pork sandwiches, crispy fried shrimp, chicken, baked beans, fries, hush puppies, slaw, cheese grits and banana pudding for dessert. A big round of applause went out to Richard Nicholson and Chris Sadler. Richard thanked the Chamber for the opportunity the luncheon provided, and in addition to the restaurant is also available for catering events. Bob Ballard, executive director of the Wakulla Environmental Institute, welcomed everyone at the facility, and shared that TCC is excitedly gearing up, and actively looking for property to house the new institute. The Wakulla Environmental Institute will be offering online classes beginning this January. Bonnie Holub, director of TCC Wakulla Center, works closely with Ballard, and followed up on the recently held Listening SessionŽ by saying that TCC is making a considerable investment in our community and Wakulla County will reap bene“ ts educationally, socially, and economically from TCCs presence and resources. Wakulla residents and students are encouraged to add to this investment in our community by using the facility and giving input on what types of classes are needed. TCC Wakulla Center currently offers dual enrollment for local high school students, and introduced beginner math and composition classes. The Green Guide Course is offered in the fall and spring, and Workforce Development Sessions are ongoing. Input from employers is requested to “ nd out what types of classes would be beneficial for helping business owners develop their businesses and for employees continuing education and training. Mary then announced Wakulla County Correctional Institute Warden Jim Coker who joined the Chamber in September. The prison houses about 3,500 inmates, and employs mostly Wakulla and Leon residents. Warden Coker complimented his staff for a job well done taking care of the inmates, and keeping the community safe. The prison staff held a luncheon earlier this year, to get community and business input, and will again invite the community for a tour of the facility and additional input. The Wakulla Springs Lodge joined the Chamber in October and present at the luncheon was Jeff True, formerly with Wildwood Inn, now general manager overseeing the day-to-day functions of the lodge, restaurant, and concessions. Wakulla Springs Lodge is working on upgrading the facility but keeping in line with the wishes of the late Edward Ball. One modern change is in the works, adding Wi-Fi to the lodge, which seems to create a bit of a challenge due to the one foot thick walls. In addition, the restaurant is revamping the menu, and will bring back dishes such as the Navy Bean SoupŽ Mr. Ball introduced decades ago. The park fee will be waived after 5 p.m. until December, and possibly into early spring for restaurant visitors. Another longtime member WOYS Oyster Radios representative Ron Copeland attended, sharing that the radio station recently changed its format, adding Top 40 music. Advertising packages start at $200, and include new business announcements, giving you an opportunity to get your message out through three sources: a newspaper published by the station, ads on the radio, and internet. Jo Ann Palmer handed out ” yers and announced plans for the “ rst-ever fundraiser for Keep Wakulla County Beautiful … KWCBs Blue Jeans and Fast Machines will be held at 3Y Ranch on Nov. 17. It promises to be a lot of fun and an evening of great wheels, dinner and live entertainment. To “ nd out more visit kwcb.org, visit the Chamber events calendar, or call (850) 745.7111. Our cash prize was won by Shirley Howard with Centennial Bank, and we want to thank the following for contributions to our drawing: Mint jars from Certi“ ed Security, ” ashlight from Cook Insurance, earrings from Kim Campbell, pepper jelly from Petra Shuff, gift certi“ cates for shrimp platter from Wakulla Springs Lodge, 1/8 page ad from The Wakulla News, glass vase from Lionell Dazevedo, Bath products gift bag from Farrington Law Of“ ce. As always, Mary thanked all who attended and advised that the location for November luncheon would be announced shortly. Also, just like last year we will not hold a luncheon in December due to the Christmas holidays.Chamber was busy in October FROM THE PRESIDENTTCC Wakulla hosts Chamber luncheon, catered by Coastal WILLIAM SNOWDENThe crowd enjoying the Chamber luncheon at the TCC Wakulla Center. WILLIAM SNOWDENTCC Wakulla Director Bonnie Holub talks to Chamber members. By AMY GEIGERChamber PresidentDear Members: Your Chamber of Commerce is hard at work in the community and I would like to take this opportunity to thank all those who give their time and energy to the mission of the Chamber. To summarize just a few of the events/activities your Chamber has been working on during the last month. Restore Act Committee: The following individuals have been appointed by the Chamber and Economic Development Council to serve on the Restore Act Advisory Committee: € Chamber Designees are Billy Mills and alternate Dan Hinchee. € EDC Designees are Jay Westmark and alternate Kevin Vaughn. The Executive Board was presented with several strong applicants and each would have made an excellent committee member. Political Forum: Thank you to the candidates and all those in attendance for making the Chamber Political Forum on Oct. 9 a success. The forum gave the public an opportunity to meet the candidates and hear their responses to questions provided by the general public. The evening started with Interact serving refreshments provided by Rotary Club of Wakulla and ended just as Chuck Robinson had predicted … right on time. Chuck and his committee deserve a huge round of applause for planning and executing an informative forum. Besides Chuck, the committee included Jo Ann Palmer, Dustin Grubbs, Tammie Bar“ eld and timekeepers, Sherri Kraeft and Courtney Peacock. CHAMBER SUPPORTS PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION ISSUE Economic Development is important for our county to grow and thrive. The tax exemption for new businesses and expansion of existing businesses will attract new companies, help our current businesses grow, and provide job opportunities. A referendum will be placed on the Nov. 6 Ballot to allow the citizens of Wakulla County to vote for or against the tax exemption. The Chamber is supporting the exemptions. The program authorizes the County to grant qualifying businesses an ad valorem tax exemption on real property improvements and tangible personal property of up to 100 percent for up to 10 years. OPPORTUNITY TO HIGHLIGHT WAKULLA COUNTY The Chamber and EDC are excited to announce an opportunity with WTXL-TV to highlight Wakulla County in their new feature titled Our Town,Ž which is designed to share with a vast regional audience the many great amenities and businesses that make our area so special. The feature will promote our area and businesses Dec. 10 through Dec. 14. A representative from WTXL may be contacting you to share how your business can be part of this exciting partnership. Please consider participating in this unique opportunity for the community and your business. This is an excellent way to convey your message to an audience you may have never reached before. COURTHOUSE COMMITTEE The Chamber has been raising funds through our Annual Low Country Boil the last two years to continue to enhance the Old Historic Courthouse. Our Courthouse Committee worked with Mary Jane Lovel to select a material that would preserve the historic nature of the courthouse while supplying a shade that would provide a sound barrier and block out the sun. The shades were recently installed and have already made a huge difference. Again, thank you Mary Jane and the Courthouse Committee for making this initiative a reality. Amy Geiger is president of the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce. CandidateforCircuitJudge, SecondCircuit,Group2 IamaskingforyoursupportandvoteTuesday,November6,2012 -BarbaraHobbsMyfamilyhaslivedinthiscommunityfor vegenerations, andIamaproductofourlocalpublicschoolsand universities.Myjudicialphilosophyisbasedonmyreal lifeexperiencesrighthereinTallahassee.My vebrothers andIlearnedatanearlyagetheconceptofjusticeby watchingmyparentsworktirelesslyasadomesticworker, andjanitor,toensurethatwewouldgrowtobecome responsibleadults.Theirsacri ces,workethic,strong familyvalues,commitmenttotheirchildrenandour community,builtastrongfoundationforallofustofollow. Iamasinglemotheroftwogrownsons,asmallbusiness owner,andIhavebeenapracticingattorneyfor30years. IhaveworkedineverycountycourthouseinCircuit2and understandthemanychallengesdailylifebrings. M an M M M M M M M M a Ibelieveajudgemustfollowthelaw,befair,justandhumble—BarbaraHobbs arbaraHobbs

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 11A S p o t l i g h t o n B u s i n e s s Spotlight on Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Serendipity Salon offers a full service salon. Waxing, paraf“ n wax dips, pedicures, manicures and facials. The salon offers an instant face lift with same day results without needles, botox or pain. The salon also offers all types of texture service, colors, highlights, perms and nails, acrylics and manicures. Serendipity is located at 630 Port Leon Drive in St. Marks. Owner Patricia Ratliff is a native of Wakulla County, who moved away for a short time and returned. The salon offers a relaxed atmosphere where clients get undivided attention. The salon offer consultations before every visit and affordable prices. Walk-ins are always welcome or schedule an appointment by calling 728-8019. ReNu U Rejuvenation Spa: ReNu U Medical Spa is the only facility in the Southeast that focuses on halting the aging process with totally non-invasive procedures. From reducing fat and inches with the Zerona process to eliminating wrinkles, sagging skin and cellulite with the new TriPollar technology ReNu U is able to give you back that youthful appearance. The team at ReNu U consists of Director Kathie Brown, Sonya Cutchin, licensed aesthetician and laser specialist, Kat Nelson, licensed aesthetician and laser specialist, Missy Fogt, certi“ ed laser technician, Michelle Weltman, certi“ ed laser technician and Robert Monahan, licensed massage therapist. They are dedicated to making you more beautiful than you already are and they have more than 40 years of experience in this “ eld. ReNu U Medical Spa offers a number of services and products that help you achieve your goals. From complete body composition analysis to permanent makeup ReNu U Medical Spa offers a wide variety of services. ReNu U is located on Capital Circle in Tallahassee.RIBBON CUTTINGSBusiness: Wakulla Urgent CareOwner: David A. Keen, MD, MPH Tell us about your business: While being the Health Department Director in Wakulla County for 13 years, it was apparent that everything we did medically was done in Tallahassee … basic things like X-rays, lab draws, urgent care and after-hours care. I left for a few years and after honing my skills as an ER physician, I came back to Wakulla County to help bridge that gap in health care delivery by opening my own practice: Wakulla Urgent Care and Diagnostic Center. Initially we were located in Panacea but moved four years ago to Crawfordville to be more effective to more people. While in Panacea we were nominated for a Chamber of Commerce new startupŽ company for 2007, but did not win. While in Crawfordville we did win the Chamber of Commerces very prestigious Business of the Year Award in 2009. We have just been awarded a contract with LabCorp to do blood draws for the county. We have recently been accepted as a CHP medical provider and are accepting new patients. Wakulla Urgent Care is also federally designated as a Rural Health Clinic. What services do you offer? On the clinical side of the business we provide an array of medical services from urgent care to primary care with our medical staff trained to deal with newborn babies all the way to those in the nursing home and everyone in between. We have seen generations of families over the years. WUC provides vaccines including the ” u shot. We have scheduled time slots for our regular patient and walk-in times for our urgent cases. We do “ sh hook removal, laceration repair and mole removals and abscess treatments. We do physicals and even treat the common cold. In addition to all of this, we also have a weight loss clinic. Our diagnostic services include regular X-rays open to the public as well as DEXA bone density, a standard of care test for postmenopausal women. We are now a certified center for pulmonary function tests (PFT). The diagnostic center also provides overnight pulse oxicymitry studies looking for sleep apnea, holter monitoring for abnormal heart beats. We are the contracted site for LabCorp for blood draws in the county. We also do drug testing for large and small companies using the E-Screen system. What sets our company apart for the competition? We are unique and there is none like us in the county. As an urgent care, we have walk-in time slots. We see many of the local practitioners patients when they are busy or cannot handle the problem. We make time for them and provide local and quick service for the residents in the community. It is much faster than driving to Tallahassee, much less waiting in the waiting room. We have the ONLY diagnostic services open to the public which includes Holter monitoring, overnight studies for sleep apnea, bone density studies (a standard of care) and basic X-rays. We do drug screens for several different companies. When the time is right, we will expand the hours to evenings and weekend. We do minor surgical procedures such as mole removal, laceration repair and the like. Like the rest of the medical practices, we provide primary care services taking all major insurances including CHP. What should patients expect when they visit? They should expect to be greeted in a friendly manner by a customer care specialist. We will bring you back as expeditiously as possible and have your medical problem treated by a competent medical practitioner using quality equipment. They should expect to have their problems adequately addressed. They should be properly treated in an ef“ cient and effective manner. It should be a positive experience. How long have you been a Chamber Member? I have been a Chamber member while working at the Health Department during the 1990s, but Wakulla Urgent Care has been a member since its inception in 2007. Why did you join the Chamber? To be a part of the business community. We also joined to have exposure to the other businesses in the community and network. What services have you taken advantage of? We have been to a few Chamber mixers. We also had a Chamber-sponsored open house at our new facility three years ago. My staff has availed themselves of some of the training programs that were Chamber -sponsored. We will continue to seek out educational programs that are chamber sponsored and will help in health related sponsorship programs in the community. What is your reason for Wakulla Residents to Shop Local? The reason for our existence is for Wakulla residents to have services locally. We do not have all of the services yet but we are trying. You do not have to drive to Tallahassee anymore for a basic X-ray, DEXA scan, blood draws, urine drug tests or minor emergencies. How can residents contact you? Simple … we are in the WinnDixie parking lot beside H&R Block, 2615 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite103 in Crawfordville. We are on the web at www. wakullaurgentcare.com. Our main number is (850) 926-3140. Tell us about your community involvement: We have been in a few ” oats and have been at a few local community events every year. We have offered our services to do free blood pressure and blood sugar screenings. At the blue crab festival, we man the “ rst aid booth. We participate in the local school physicals for the school children who could not afford it every year. We also work with a local church to do more sports physicals for their community residents We work with Voc rehab and We Care program to provide services for them in the past. These companies deal with people without health insurance but are in need of medical/ surgical attention. We worked with the health department to take over their patients assistance program, helping people with no means of affording their medications. We have also assisted in sponsoring various clubs and events in the past from Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, school teams, local “ remen and a “ shing tournament. In a more global community, Dr. Keen founded Caribbean American Medical Educational Organization (CAMEO) www. cameomissions.org and has done medical mission trips to seven countries, making “ ve trips per year giving back. ReNu U Rejuvenation Spa Seredipity Salon HOWARD S GOALS Less costly governmentOpen and accessible government Protection of our natural resources to attract businesses and people 3 2 1 LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsIt’s the best fall shing seen in a long time Its Sunday night, supposed to be in the mid-40s tomorrow and I dont know what that will do to the “ shing for a few days, especially on the ” ats. I will tell you it has been the best fall “ shing I have seen in a long time. There are lot of reds on the oyster bars, plenty of speckled trout on the ” ats and some of the biggest silver/white/ gray trout, whatever you want to call them, that I have ever caught. Everyone I have talked to that has been offshore has done extremely well. Grouper are in fairly shallow water though the season goes out the end of October. One day last week while fishing I met some folks “ shing out of Spring Creek and we pulled along side one another and talked. They told me they enjoyed my column and they were from up around the Atlanta area. As it turns out, they were only miles from my in-laws in Lilburn, Ga. Doug and Connie Cowan have been “ shing down here for years and come down quite a bit in the fall. Doug said they had gone offshore with Pat Gill from Alligator Point and had gotten their limit of grouper. Doug also said he caught a cobia that they estimated to weight around 100 pounds. I talked to Capt. Randy Peart and he said “ shing around the Econfina has been pretty good. Most of the trout he has been catching have been out in 10 to 12 feet of water but he has also been catching some big rock bass with them. Redfish have been hard to come by though this cool weather should bunch them up. Capt. David Fife has moved to Destin but is still taking a few charters out of Spring Creek and catching some nice reds using live mullet and mudminnows. He has also been catching some big trout on live bait. I talked with Jimmy at Shell Island Fish Camp and he said the high winds over the weekend kept most people “ shing in the river and that a lot of “ sh were caught up in East River. Last week one of their guides fished over near Pattys Island and did extremely well on trout and reds. I just left there getting shrimp. The wind is howling out of the Northwest and the Wakulla River is about as low as I have seen it. I am supposed to have a charter today but I dont think the water is going to come in enough that I can get my boat down. Fortunately the water is cool enough that the shrimp will live in a basket for days in case we dont get to use them today or even tomorrow. Bill Birdwell said he caught a 37-inch red last week and some pretty big bonito. He was fishing around the Rotary Reef with Gulps and shrimp. Mike Pearson from Tifton took Robert Doolan, Thomas Buckner, Ramsey Willis, Brook McGahee and his daughter Taylor out last weekend and they had a banner day. They didnt leave the dock until 11 a.m. and went to 35 feet of water. Fishing with live pinfish and LYs Mike said by 2 p.m. they had their limit of gag grouper and a near limit of red grouper. And wouldnt you know it, his daughter Taylor caught the biggest grouper of the trip. I have had seven charters in the past two weeks and the “ shing and weather at Shell Point has been excellent. We have limited out on reds on every trip. Last Tuesday morning I got a call from Tom and Karen Tittman from Wisconsin. They were staying on Alligator Point and would be here through the weekend. I told them the only day I had was that day and we decided to start at 11 a.m. When they got here the tide was high and starting to fall. Where I had been catching “ sh was a spot I usually only “ shed on the incoming tide. Since the tide was still relatively high I decided to give it a try for a few minutes. In 20 minutes we had our limit of reds to 26 inches. We ended the day with six reds, nine speckled trout and eight big silver trout. On Wednesday I took Shuford Davis and Steve Reznik from Tallahassee and there were folks sitting on both spots I had been catching “ sh on. We went to another one and it too was covered with reds. We got our limit that day and came in with six reds, 15 speckled trout and 19 big silver trout. Steve also caught and released a 37-inch red. Bill Griffin and Ed de Montluzin “ shed with me last Thursday and Friday and we had our limit of reds each day and quite a few speckled trout and silver trout. On the “ rst day Bill caught and released a 38-inch red. Ed is from Louisiana where they have excellent red “ shing and he said he was pretty impressed with our red fishing. Everything has been caught on live shrimp except the silver trout and those have been caught mostly on the white Gulp. Remember to know those limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good “ shing! How bout them NOLES! Robert Doolan, Thomas Buckner, Ramsey Willis, Brook McGahee and Taylor Pearson with grouper caught with Mike Pearson from Tifton.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS 37 inch red caught and released by Steve Reznik “ shing with Capt. Jody Campbell. From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL WillGracePeytonNicolas“Thank you for voting for Papa Jimmy” Jim Parham for Property Appraiserwww.FairValuesInWakulla.comPolitical advertisememnt paid for and approved by Jim Parham, No Party Af liation, for Property Appraiser. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GET READY FOR HUNTING

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 13A The Bishops Do Not Speak For Us Protect womens healthcare services Respect the separation of church and state Defend religious liberty for all(202) 986-6093 cfc@CatholicsForChoice.org www.CatholicsForChoice.org Paid political advertisement: paid for by Catholics for Choice, 1436 U Street, NW, Suite 301, Washington, DC 20009 and provided in-kind to Vote No on 6 and Vote No on 8.

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It has been said that the Coast Guard will go out often when no one else will. As Sandy was preparing to impact a large portion of the Northeast, the Coast Guard was being called to assist mariners who had to abandon ship off the coast of North Carolina. By the time many of you read this, Sandy will have passed, but her aftermath will just be unfolding. In addition to assisting many in peril, the Coast Guard also gives back a lot to their communities. Thanks you to Duane Treadon for submitting this report of how our community has bene“ ted. Last weekend, several members from Flotilla 12 along with Coast Guard personnel from Station Panama City and Air Training Command Mobile come together in Tallahassee to participate in the U.S. Coast Guard pregame flyover for the FSU vs. Duke football game. This year, fans got to see a HH-65 Dolphin helicopter ” yover Doak Campbell Stadium. Called the most ubiquitous aircraft of the Coast Guard, the Dolphin is certi“ ed to operate in all weather and night operations. The only environmental limitation that can ground the Dolphin is icing conditions. With a top speed of 175 knots and a range of 290 nautical miles, the Dolphin is an excellent platform for near offshore missions and limited far offshore specialty missions. In addition to the ” yover, a team from Coast Guard Station Panama City trailered over a 25-foot Defender Class Safe Boat. Powered by two 225hp engines, the Safe Boat has a maximum speed of 45+ knots. Its speed, range, and maneuverability make this an excellent patrol and rescue vessel. Fans arriving before the game were treated with a tour of the Safe Boat and provided with plentiful safe boating information from our Flotillas information booth. This was the sixth year of Coast Guard flyovers during an FSU home game organized by Flotilla member Tim Ashley. Planning begins early in the year as Tim works with FSU, ATC Mobile, Station Panama City and our members to bring together and enjoyable and informational event that goes beyond the actual ” yover. This year, Tim Ashley, Bob Asztalos, Raye Crews, Phil and Norma Hill, Fran Keating, Dave Rabon, Rich Rasmussen and Duane Treadon represented Flotilla 12. Division Commander and District Captain East Elect Mo Davis also attended. As we say in the Coast Guard and Coast Guard Auxiliary, Bravo Zulu Tim for a job well done. And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Weather is a powerful force that we must be cautious of when planning to be out on the water. Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe helicopters ” yover at Doak Campbell Stadium. The ” ight crew on the “ eld, above, before the ” yover. Auxiliary members and the ” ight crew, left, with Renegade and Osceola. The Public Safety Dive Team. My family has remained glued to the Weather Channel monitoring Hurricane Sandys assault on the East Coast. Our hearts and thoughts are with friends and relatives who must evacuate as the ocean surge waters are driven inland, ” ooding homes, roads, and lives. We empathize because, in Wakulla County, we know what tropical storms can do to a community. When storm water inundates a community, the Public Safety Dive Team becomes a welcome life saving and investigative force. The Public Safety Diver is a “ reman or police of“ cer who has been trained beyond the basic scuba level, to include water rescue and/or underwater investigations, depending upon their specialization. Special teams have organized in various Florida counties. Leon County has a respected county Public Safety Dive Team, once lead by Sgt. Ken McDonald, now retired. Sgt. McDonald participated at my request with Florida State Universitys national Program in Underwater Crime Scene Investigation and published his own manual. He trained my research team through the Florida Department of Law Enforcement Public Safety Diver Program offered at the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy under Tallahassee Community College. We have wonderful regional resources. Wakulla County once had such a Public Safety Dive Team based upon the success of the Leon Countys team. Budget cuts and changes in priorities disbanded our county team. They left behind a signi“ cant dive locker now under lock and key awaiting better economic times. Periodically, I am visited by previous team members at the Wakulla Diving Center expressing their hope one day conditions will permit a return of the team. You can imagine my pleasure when Madison County came to us recently to train their newly forming Public Safety Dive Team. The two month training began this week, working with four sheriffs deputies at our center. This team will begin with the basics and specialize with underwater investigations. We have a shallow pond on our property, in which we will install an obstacle course for problem solving challenges, including a ship wreck, entanglements, overhead obstructions and other topics. I welcome our countys Public Safety Dive Team, currently disbanded, to stop by and collaborate through the center, to refresh their skills and network with Leon and Madison countys dive teams. Perhaps together we can more cost effectively respond to a regional crisis, such as the one currently hitting the New York region along the East Coast. The momentum has started! Lets get organized. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Nov 1, 12 Fri Nov 2, 12 Sat Nov 3, 12 Sun Nov 4, 12 Mon Nov 5, 12 Tue Nov 6, 12 Wed Nov 7, 12 D ate 3.7 ft. 2:13 AM 3.6 ft. 2:42 AM 3.5 ft. 3:15 AM 3.4 ft. 3:51 AM 3.2 ft. 4:36 AM Hi g h -0.0 ft. 9:17 AM 0.1 ft. 9:50 AM 0.2 ft. 10:26 AM 0.4 ft. 11:07 AM 0.6 ft. 11:58 AM 1.7 ft. 12:16 AM 1.6 ft. 1:37 AM L ow 3.4 ft. 3:46 PM 3.3 ft. 4:24 PM 3.1 ft. 5:07 PM 3.0 ft. 5:56 PM 2.9 ft. 6:55 PM 3.0 ft. 5:37 AM 2.8 ft. 7:06 AM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 9:02 PM 1.5 ft. 9:38 PM 1.6 ft. 10:20 PM 1.7 ft. 11:10 PM 0.7 ft. 1:00 PM 0.9 ft. 2:09 PM L ow 2.9 ft. 8:01 PM 3.0 ft. 9:02 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 1, 12 Fri Nov 2, 12 Sat Nov 3, 12 Sun Nov 4, 12 Mon Nov 5, 12 Tue Nov 6, 12 Wed Nov 7, 12 D ate 2.8 ft. 2:05 AM 2.7 ft. 2:34 AM 2.6 ft. 3:07 AM 2.5 ft. 3:43 AM 2.4 ft. 4:28 AM Hi g h -0.0 ft. 9:28 AM 0.1 ft. 10:01 AM 0.2 ft. 10:37 AM 0.3 ft. 11:18 AM 0.4 ft. 12:09 PM 1.3 ft. 12:27 AM 1.2 ft. 1:48 AM L ow 2.5 ft. 3:38 PM 2.4 ft. 4:16 PM 2.3 ft. 4:59 PM 2.3 ft. 5:48 PM 2.2 ft. 6:47 PM 2.2 ft. 5:29 AM 2.1 ft. 6:58 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 9:13 PM 1.1 ft. 9:49 PM 1.1 ft. 10:31 PM 1.2 ft. 11:21 PM 0.5 ft. 1:11 PM 0.6 ft. 2:20 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 7:53 PM 2.3 ft. 8:54 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 1, 12 Fri Nov 2, 12 Sat Nov 3, 12 Sun Nov 4, 12 Mon Nov 5, 12 Tue Nov 6, 12 Wed Nov 7, 12 D ate 3.4 ft. 2:49 AM 3.4 ft. 3:18 AM 3.3 ft. 3:51 AM 3.1 ft. 4:27 AM Hi g h -0.0 ft. 10:21 AM 0.1 ft. 10:54 AM 0.2 ft. 11:30 AM 0.4 ft. 12:11 PM 1.5 ft. 12:14 AM 1.6 ft. 1:20 AM 1.5 ft. 2:41 AM L ow 3.1 ft. 4:22 PM 3.0 ft. 5:00 PM 2.9 ft. 5:43 PM 2.8 ft. 6:32 PM 3.0 ft. 5:12 AM 2.8 ft. 6:13 AM 2.6 ft. 7:42 AM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 10:06 PM 1.3 ft. 10:42 PM 1.4 ft. 11:24 PM 0.5 ft. 1:02 PM 0.7 ft. 2:04 PM 0.8 ft. 3:13 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 7:31 PM 2.7 ft. 8:37 PM 2.8 ft. 9:38 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 1, 12 Fri Nov 2, 12 Sat Nov 3, 12 Sun Nov 4, 12 Mon Nov 5, 12 Tue Nov 6, 12 Wed Nov 7, 12 D ate 2.9 ft. 1:57 AM 2.8 ft. 2:26 AM 2.8 ft. 2:59 AM 2.6 ft. 3:35 AM 2.5 ft. 4:20 AM 2.3 ft. 5:21 AM Hi g h -0.0 ft. 8:56 AM 0.1 ft. 9:29 AM 0.2 ft. 10:05 AM 0.4 ft. 10:46 AM 0.5 ft. 11:37 AM 0.7 ft. 12:39 PM 1.6 ft. 1:16 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 3:30 PM 2.5 ft. 4:08 PM 2.4 ft. 4:51 PM 2.3 ft. 5:40 PM 2.3 ft. 6:39 PM 2.3 ft. 7:45 PM 2.2 ft. 6:50 AM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 8:41 PM 1.4 ft. 9:17 PM 1.5 ft. 9:59 PM 1.6 ft. 10:49 PM 1.7 ft. 11:55 PM 0.8 ft. 1:48 PM L ow 2.3 ft. 8:46 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 1, 12 Fri Nov 2, 12 Sat Nov 3, 12 Sun Nov 4, 12 Mon Nov 5, 12 Tue Nov 6, 12 Wed Nov 7, 12 D ate 3.8 ft. 2:10 AM 3.7 ft. 2:39 AM 3.6 ft. 3:12 AM 3.5 ft. 3:48 AM 3.3 ft. 4:33 AM Hi g h -0.0 ft. 9:14 AM 0.1 ft. 9:47 AM 0.3 ft. 10:23 AM 0.4 ft. 11:04 AM 0.6 ft. 11:55 AM 1.9 ft. 12:13 AM 1.8 ft. 1:34 AM L ow 3.4 ft. 3:43 PM 3.3 ft. 4:21 PM 3.2 ft. 5:04 PM 3.1 ft. 5:53 PM 3.0 ft. 6:52 PM 3.0 ft. 5:34 AM 2.8 ft. 7:03 AM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 8:59 PM 1.6 ft. 9:35 PM 1.7 ft. 10:17 PM 1.8 ft. 11:07 PM 0.8 ft. 12:57 PM 0.9 ft. 2:06 PM L ow 3.0 ft. 7:58 PM 3.1 ft. 8:59 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 1, 12 Fri Nov 2, 12 Sat Nov 3, 12 Sun Nov 4, 12 Mon Nov 5, 12 Tue Nov 6, 12 Wed Nov 7, 12 D ate 3.1 ft. 1:21 AM 3.0 ft. 1:56 AM 3.0 ft. 2:36 AM 2.8 ft. 3:21 AM 2.7 ft. 4:13 AM Hi g h 0.0 ft. 8:46 AM 0.1 ft. 9:18 AM 0.1 ft. 9:54 AM 0.2 ft. 10:35 AM 0.3 ft. 11:25 AM 1.6 ft. 12:06 AM 1.5 ft. 1:32 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 4:57 PM 2.6 ft. 5:38 PM 2.6 ft. 6:21 PM 2.5 ft. 7:06 PM 2.5 ft. 7:50 PM 2.5 ft. 5:18 AM 2.3 ft. 6:42 AM Hi g h 1.8 ft. 8:12 PM 1.8 ft. 8:51 PM 1.8 ft. 9:41 PM 1.7 ft. 10:45 PM 0.4 ft. 12:21 PM 0.6 ft. 1:22 PM L ow 2.6 ft. 8:31 PM 2.6 ft. 9:06 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 1 Nov. 7First Nov. 20 Full Nov. 28 Last Nov. 6 New Nov. 13Major Times 3:11 AM 5:11 AM 3:35 PM 5:35 PM Minor Times 10:13 AM 11:13 AM 8:54 PM 9:54 PM Major Times 3:59 AM 5:59 AM 4:23 PM 6:23 PM Minor Times 11:03 AM 12:03 PM 9:43 PM 10:43 PM Major Times 4:47 AM 6:47 AM 5:11 PM 7:11 PM Minor Times 11:49 AM 12:49 PM 10:34 PM 11:34 PM Major Times 4:35 AM 6:35 AM 4:59 PM 6:59 PM Minor Times 11:32 AM 12:32 PM 10:27 PM 11:27 PM Major Times 5:22 AM 7:22 AM 5:46 PM 7:46 PM Minor Times 12:11 PM 1:11 PM 11:22 PM 12:22 AM Major Times 6:09 AM 8:09 AM 6:32 PM 8:32 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:49 PM 1:49 PM Major Times 6:56 AM 8:56 AM 7:19 PM 9:19 PM Minor Times 12:18 AM 1:18 AM 1:26 PM 2:26 PM Good Average Average Average Average Average+ Average6:51 am 5:49 pm 7:55 pm 9:15 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:52 am 5:48 pm 8:44 pm 10:04 am 6:53 am 5:48 pm 9:35 pm 10:50 am 6:53 am 5:47 pm 10:28 pm 11:33 am 6:54 am 5:46 pm 11:23 pm 12:13 pm 6:55 am 5:45 pm --:-12:51 pm 6:56 am 5:45 pm 12:19 am 1:27 pm85% 79% 73% 67% 61% 55% 48% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance I LIKEMIKE STEWARTREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mike Stewart, Republican candidate for county commissioner, district 3 Wakulla County Memorial Post,VFW POST 4538 Invites the public to enjoy a free pancake and sausage breakfast.Each year, we host a free breakfast as a thank you and to give back to the public for your support throughout the year.The breakfast will be held on Veterans Day, Sunday, November the 11th from 7:00am till 10:00am, at the VFW POST 4538 which is located 1 mile west of the County Court House at 475 Arran Rd, Crawfordville, FL. P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 15APastor: Get me to the airport on timeContinued from Page 7A I have noticed that the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage takes a lot longer than 10 minutes to get ready to face the world. I must admit she does a very good job of it, but I also must admit it takes a long time and it seems each year it gets longer. I do not want to call attention to myself. I just want to get through the day and back home again. I know I am not as young as I used to be but I take consolation in the fact that I am older than I used to be. For me personally, I like to celebrate each birthday as a once-in-a-lifetime celebration. My goal in life is to get as old as I possibly can and with the good help of Father Time, I am well on my way. Time has not stood still for me, for which I am most thankful. Just like getting to the airport on time for my ” ight, I want to be on time for everything happening in my life. I do not want to miss a thing. Too often people look backward, stumble over today, “ nd themselves in tomorrow and do not know how they got there. I want to enjoy the time I have in real time. There is no time like the present to enjoy. Memories are wonderful. Aspirations are delightful. But, nothing can take the place of right now. The Bible has a lot to say about time. We are in a timeline established by God and it will not slow down into we come to the end. The apostle Paul understood this when he wrote, And that, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of sleep: for now is our salvation nearer than when we believedŽ (Romans 13:11 KJV). There is no time like the present that as someone said, This is the “ rst day of the rest of my life.Ž I am going to celebrate my NowŽ with all the energy I have.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. In the Wakulla County Sheriffs Race, Do We Need An Experienced Lawman Trafc Cop? MAURICE LANGSTON CHARLIE CREELOR A Wakulla County Native30 Years of Local Law Enforcement ExperienceWorking Knowledge of Law Enforcement Budget Law Enforcement Management ExperienceServed as Emergency Management Director 11 Promotions For Exemplary ServiceExemplary Personnel File Director and Chaplain at Wakulla County Senior CenterPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY T.W. MAURICE LANGSTON, REPUBLICAN, FOR SHERIFFMaurice Langston has the EXPERIENCE NECESSARY to bring you www.LangstonForSheriff.comMaurice Langston has over 30 years of experience putting criminals behind bars and keeping residents safe in Wakulla County.We need an experienced lawman as Sheriff! Lynn Artz Wakulla County needs a Commissioner like Emily … smart and kind-hearted, yet strong enough to say NoŽ to special interests. Emily will treat people with respect, offer new ideas, and stand up for the common good.Ž Sue Damon Emily will be a full-time commissioner who will work hard to help Wakulla County grow in an impartial, responsible way.Ž Rick Ott & Nelle McCall Emily has unmatched integrity and unwaveringly supports local businesses.Ž Katherine Gilbert Emily has the heart, spirit, and understanding that it will take to protect our springs, rivers, bays, wetlands, and our drinking water for the bene“t of all … and generations to come.Ž Brandy Cowley-Gilbert & Ted Gilbert Emilys work experience in green business and industry will help her attract sustainable businesses to our County.Ž Robert Seidler Emily represents the next generation of leaders in this County. A young, intelligent female Commissioner will inspire and provide an excellent role model for others.Ž The Fortier Family Emily brings a fresh perspective to our community and will bring creative solutions to bene“t us and our children in the future.Ž Jim Hilyer and Chase Emily cares about kids „ and supports a community center with a pool, playground, and more!Ž Judith Harriss With Emily as your commissioner, your input will be sought, valued, and carefully considered … and you will know that complex decisions are being made with the greatest of care.Ž Sandy Tedder Emily will listen to the needs of citizens and make informed decisions for smart growth and protection of our resources.Ž Glen Campbell Emily wants to serve her community (not beŽ a Commissioner). She will study issues and make wise, not selfserving, decisions.Ž Diane Roberts Emily knows that Wakulla Countys future isnt strip malls and big box stores, but sustainable growth, eco-tourism, and green jobs. Shes not beholden to anyone, just to the place she loves.Ž Continued from Page 1A Group donations by Joann Vesecky, Carolyn Metcalf, Emily Smith, Ralph Thomas, Casey Lowe, Christ Church Anglican, Rachel Pienta and Gail Campbell. The event is sponsored by the Healing Arts of Wakulla County and the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth. In addition to the event, Farm Share, a large-scale food bank and charitable packing house, will also be at Hudson Park to distribute a tractor trailer “ lled with fresh produce and nonperishables to local food pantries and those families who are in need. Pantries are invited to receive food from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Families and individuals are invited from noon to 2:30 p.m. For more information, call 567-4212 or 926-3526. To volunteer, contact Bruce Ashley at 528-0046.Empty Bowls is Saturday

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Re-Elect Donnie Sparkman *Certi“ed Florida Appraiser*-Experienced -DedicatedRe-Elect someone who has always worked with the public concerning land and values... and who will CONTINUE TO WORK FOR YOU! Political Advertisement Paid For And Approved By Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, For Property AppraiserI WILL CONTINUE TO KEEP THE CITIZENS OF WAKULLA COUNTY AT THE FOREFRONT OF ANYTHING I DO. I WILL CONTINUE TO BE RESPECTFUL, HELPFUL, ACCESSIBLE, AND LISTEN TO YOUR CONCERNS. I HAVE THE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH LAND, DEEDS, DESCRIPTIONS, LAND VALUES, TAXES, ETHICS AND THE ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE WITH THE PUBLIC. AS YOUR PROPERTY APPRAISER I WILL CONTINUE TO PROVIDE EFFICIENT, COURTEOUS AND FAIR SERVICE TO ALL! I WILL CONTINUE TO WORK TO IMPROVE THE OFFICE, WEB SITE AND TAX ROLL AND SEE TO IT THAT THEY SERVE THE PUBLIC IN THE BEST POSSIBLE WAY. Wakulla CountyPROPERTY APPRAISER Creating new jobs and closing tax loopholes for corporations that ship American jobs overseas Protecting Social Security and Medicare for today’s seniors and future generations Working to prevent cuts to Pell Grants and Head Start and making college more affordableVOTE EARLY, OCT 27 … NOV 3 VOTE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6 STANDING TALL FOR FLORIDA FAMILIES Facebook.com/AlLawsonJr Lawson4Congress.com FOR CONGRESS d for p e a s u rity u ts a d e ge V 3 R 6 Paid for and authorized by Al Lawson for Congress RALPH THOMASDOESN'T KNOW THE WORD"QUIT"!I have known Ralph Thomas since he was 19 years old. It was in 1984 when I hired him, Ralph worked with me at the Leon County School system for almost “ve years. I followed his 12 year career in the U.S. Navy and he has done exemplary work with the Wakulla Christian Center. I think so highly of Ralph that I feel compelled to write this letter on his behalf and share with you the qualities I know in him. He is a very hard working man He is the most honest person I have ever met He doesn't know the word "quit" He always carries a very positive attitude He is highly intelligent He looks you in the eye when he talks to you He is a devoted family man Enjoys and wants to help people Chris and Kay Alward I have not given recommendations too freely in my life but I do believe in this guy!Paid political advertisement paid for by Chris Alward, 101 Sunset Lane, Crawfordville, Fl 32327 independently of any candidate, This advertisement was not approved by any candidate. Continued from Page 1A His office also wanted to make people aware of fraudulent letters that are being sent out to voters in Florida questioning their citizenship status. This letters are not coming from the election of“ ces. So far, Wells said he hasnt heard of anyone in Wakulla County receiving one, but he encouraged anyone who receives this type of letter to keep it and contact his of“ ce as soon as possible to report it. Election day is Tuesday, Nov. 6 and polls are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. To “ nd a precinct, call the elections of“ ce at 926-7575 or visit their website at www.wakullaelection.com.Early voting is underwaySpecial to The NewsThere has been increased mosquito-borne disease activity in areas of Wakulla County and more than one horse has tested positive for Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus infection. This means that the risk of transmission to humans has been increased. The Wakulla County Health Department reminds residents and visitors to try and avoid being bitten by mosquitoes that may cause encephalitis disease and take the necessary precautions. Wakulla County Mosquito Control and the health department continue surveillance and prevention efforts and encourage everyone to take basic precautions to help limit exposure by following the department of health recommendations. To protect from mosquitoes, remember Drain and CoverŽ: Drain standing water to stop mosquitoes from multiplying. € Drain water from garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, flower pots or any other containers where sprinkler or rain water has collected. € Discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items that arent being used. € Empty and clean birdbaths and pets water bowls at least once or twice a week. € Protect boats and vehicles from rain with tarps that dont accumulate water. € Maintain swimming pools in good condition and appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use. € Cover skin with clothing or repellent. € CLOTHING Wear shoes, socks, long pants and long-sleeves. This type of protection may be necessary for people who must work in areas where mosquitoes are present. € REPELLENT Apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing. € Always use repellents according to the label. Repellents with DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide), picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, and IR3535 are effective. € Use mosquito netting to protect children younger than 2 months old.Increase reported in mosquito-borne illness locally

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 17A WAKULLA COUNTY CAN COUNT ON ROBERT HILL People you trust,TRUST ROBERT HILL... www.RobertHill4House.com | http://twitter.com/hill4house | www.facebook.com/RobertHill4House For Real Experience, Sound Judgment and Proven Experience you can count on, ELECT ROBERT HILL to the Florida House! You can count on my friend Robert Hill. He is a man of integrity, a public servant we can trust and a leader who will listen.  Brent Thurmond, Wakulla County Clerk of the Courts We recommend Robert Hill  To support Public Education To create Jobs To advocate for State Employees To protect Gun Rights To ght Prison Privatization To oppose New Taxes Political advertisement paid for and approved by Robert Hill, Democrat, for Florida House of Representatives District 7 Located at the North Pointe CenterOPEN: Mon Sat 10AM 7PM www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE Smoke and Fire barbecue fundraiser held PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDENFire“ ghters from around the region competed in a barbecue cookoff on Saturday, Oct. 27, to raise money for charities. Besides eating barbecue, there were activities like learning how to properly roll a “ rehose, above, as done by Hunter Wells, 7, and Ayrika Nason, 4. Superintendent of Schools David Miller and Tax Collector Cheryll Olah, top right, were celebrity barbecue judges. And Jenny Brock, bottom right, got dunked in the candidate dunking booth. Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker at the vigil.NOPE Vigil recalls those lost to addictionStaff ReportA candlelight vigil was held last week to remember those people who have been lost because of addiction, especially to prescription drugs. Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker was a speaker, and urged the audience who may have friends or family suffering from addiction to advocate on their behalf. It is not a character issue, it is a chemical issue,Ž she said of addiction. The vigil was held by the Narcotics Overdose Preventation & Education (NOPE) Task Force.

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Page 18A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn Oct. 23, Daniel Morgan Spears, 21, of Crawfordville was seriously injured in a vehicle crash near 963 Crawfordville Highway at 9:01 p.m. An overturned vehicle was observed in the tree line. Spears was southbound on U.S. Highway 319 when he crossed over the fog line on the west side of the road and traveled into a ditch. He then overcorrected and crossed the roadway into the opposite ditch. The vehicle became airborne and crashed into a fence, and rolled over multiple times before landing upside down in the tree line. The driver was ejected from the vehicle and the Chevrolet Blazer was a total loss. A DUI investigation will be conducted following the crash investigation. Spears was transported to the hospital for treatment of his injuries. Lt. Brent Sanders, Sgt. Ronald Mitchell, Deputy Billy Metcalf, Deputy Mike Zimba and FHP Trooper Travis Wilson were all involved in the crash investigation. A fence owned by Joseph Duggar of Crawfordville sustained $1,200 worth of damage. In other activity reported this week by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce: OCTOBER 18 € Brian Jones of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim lost his wallet and contents from inside his vehicle. The value of the wallet and contents is estimated at $52. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € Vicki Morgan of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. The victims credit card was charged $30 over the internet. The charge was determined to be an online credit monitoring company. The services were never requested by the victim. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € A Hardees manager reported a trespass by Derick Lenard Hughes, 45, of Crawfordville. The suspect was located next to the Hardees property by Deputy Scott Powell. The restaurant manager reported that Hughes was disturbing customers in the restaurant parking lot. He was arrested for trespassing after warning and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. € Kelly Boxberger of Funky Fiddler in Panacea reported a business burglary. A forced entry was observed and two glass tabletops were damaged. Evidence was collected at the scene. Damage was estimated at $200. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € Cecil Barbee of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and $1,250 worth of electronics, an air conditioning unit, computer and musical equipment was reported as stolen or damaged. Damage to the home was estimated at $400. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Sgt. Danny Harrell observed Kyle D. Almeda, 19, of Crawfordville in a fast food restaurant parking lot riding what he believed to be a stolen bicycle. Sgt. Harrell made contact with Deanna Powell of Crawfordville who reported the bicycle as stolen on Oct. 17. Powell was able to identify the bicycle as belonging to her. The bike was left at the fast food restaurant. Deputy Scott Powell observed Almeda walking on Wakulla Arran Road where he admitted to taking the bike for transportation. It is valued at $150. Almeda was charged with petit theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. OCTOBER 19 € Katherine Taff of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim noticed unauthorized withdrawals on her bank account. The amount of the fraud was $200 with other pending transactions of $400 from the same company in St. Petersburg. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € Thomas Lee of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim received a $3,997 bill from a company he has never contacted. A business account was opened without the victims consent. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. OCTOBER 20 € Herman Edward Oshields, 57, of Tallahassee was involved in a two vehicle crash at Wakulla Springs Road and Highway 267. Oshields struck a 2000 Honda Accord driven by Angela L. Barr, 32, of Crawfordville from behind. Oshields was driving a 1996 Ford Ranger. The Barr vehicle suffered $1,000 worth of damage and the Oshields vehicle suffered $200 worth of damage. Oshields was charged with DUI, driving while license was suspended or revoked with knowledge, vehicle tag attached not assigned, no vehicle registration and no vehicle insurance at the scene of a crash. Deputy Rachel Wheeler recovered a liquor bottle discarded from the suspect vehicle at a nearby stop sign. A passenger in the Oshields vehicle was not injured and a passenger in the Barr vehicle was not injured. Barr refused transportation to the hospital. Lt. Jimmy Sessor also investigated. OCTOBER 21 € James Harvey of Pilgrim Rest Primitive Baptist Church in Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim reported that someone drove a vehicle on church grounds and damaged the grounds by creating deep doughnuts.Ž Damage to the property is estimated at $150. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. OCTOBER 22 € Debra Leutner of Sopchoppy reported the loss of personal property including personal information and credit cards. The victim was at a Crawfordville business when she was last in possession of the property. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Eric Mills of Crawfordville reported the theft of copper wire. The victim noticed that the electrical power was not working at the property and wire was missing. The value of the wire is estimated at $600. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € Jesse O. Moki of Crawfordville reported a single vehicle crash with a deer on Commerce Blvd. Moki was driving eastbound on Commerce Blvd. when a deer crossed into the path of his vehicle. The Dodge suffered front end damage but there were no injuries. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. OCTOBER 23 € Jeffery L. Smith, 46, of Tallahassee was involved in a traf“ c stop when Deputy Clint Beam observed his vehicle without operational rear running lights. It was determined that Smith had a suspended license. Smith was arrested for operating a motor vehicle with a suspended license with knowledge. A passenger in the vehicle also had a suspended license. € Deputy Clint Beam responded to a two vehicle crash at Bob Miller Road and Old Woodville Highway. Barbara K. Moody of Tallahassee was stopped at the stop sign on Bob Miller Road waiting to turn left onto Old Woodville Highway. Moody failed to yield the right of way and entered the intersection striking a vehicle driven by Jim S. Drew of Tallahassee. Both vehicles suffered damage but there were no injuries. € Donna Strickland of St. Marks reported a criminal mischief at Double A Laundry. Someone kicked a hole in the bathroom door and kicked two washing machines. Damage to the business was estimated at $310. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € Jeremy McCranie of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim left the vehicle unlocked with keys inside and later discovered the four doors opened. McCranie reported the theft of cash and a bank card while Shane Sparks of Crawfordville reported the theft of a “ rearm, circular saw and an oxygen tank from the same vehicle. The combined value of the missing items is $426. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € Joan Barbour of Crawfordville reported the fraudulent use of her credit card. A transaction was reported at a local merchant. It was valued at $176. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Wal-Mart loss prevention staff reported a felony retail theft. Wal-Mart staff observed John Anthony Bartell, 25, of Crawfordville “ ll a shopping cart with $304 worth of large tools including a winch, ” oor jack and auto hitch. The suspect passed the last point of sale when he was stopped by store personnel. He was arrested for grand theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € A 16-year-old Wakulla High School student struck a parked vehicle with his vehicle while attempting to back out of a parking space. The parked vehicle was unoccupied. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. € Elaine Baxley of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A suspect, who has been identified, removed jewelry from the victims home. Other items taken from the victim were returned by the suspect. The missing jewelry is valued at $1,730. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Noreen Britt of the Parks and Recreation Department reported a criminal mischief to the restrooms at the recreation park. Someone started a “ re in the womens restroom by burning toilet paper. Britt put the “ re out and damage was estimated at $5. Juveniles in the area were interviewed. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. OCTOBER 24 € Jason Ellers of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was reported and cash was taken from the home. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € Wal-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft. Store staff observed two suspects pulling tags off items and placing them in their purses while also placing items in a shopping cart. The suspects were observed paying for items in the shopping cart but not the items that were concealed. Tera Lynn Cruson, 19, and Linda Leeann Keith, 23, both of Carrabelle, were arrested for retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The items, valued at $138, were recovered from the suspects. Both women were issued trespass warning for the store. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € Dais L. Richardson of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash on Government Road. The vehicle began to “ sh tail in the sand as the driver negotiated a curve and she struck a tree. There were no injuries reported. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. OCTOBER 25 € Wal-Mart of“ cials reported a retail theft. Three females left the store prior to Deputy Stephen Simmons arrival, but Lt. Sherrell Morrison located the suspect vehicle and conducted a traf“ c stop on U.S. Highway 319 near Highway 267. A 16-year-old juvenile admitted taking the merchandise from Wal-Mart without paying for it. The clothing and other recovered merchandise was valued at $193. The juvenile was transported to the Wakulla County Jail and charged with petit theft. She was released into the custody of a relative. The juvenile and two other individuals in the vehicle were issued trespass warnings for the store. Deputy Sean Wheeler also investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 940 calls for service during the past week including 15 residential and business alarms; 69 citizen contacts; 13 disturbances; 24 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 18 regular E-911 abandoned calls; 14 regular E-911 calls; 51 investigations; 49 medical emergencies; 301 business and residential security checks; 36 special details; 25 subpoena services; 12 suspicious vehicles; 11 traf“ c crashes with no injuries; 42 traffic enforcements; 60 traffic stops; 13 reckless vehicles; and 27 watch orders.Sheri s Report www.mikestewart2012.comPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MIKE STEWART, REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3 facebook.com/ mike.stewart.3363 I LIKEMIKEREElectfo rCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 C CommitmentRaised in Wakulla County learning the value of a strong work ethic and developing a desire to serve others. As I traveled throughout the world during my 20 years in the Navy, I knew that Wakulla was my home and where I wanted to return. My desire is to see our great county grow in a responsible manner all the while preserving those qualities we value as a small rural county. Married to the former Anne Quick for 39 years.Service Oriented years. Character unpopular. qualities such as honesty and integrity. that face the board. hank ou for your upport! HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 19ASpecial to The NewsBostic Pelt Bridge has recently been re-opened and Syfrett Creek Bridge is expected to re-open in November. Both bridges sustained severe damage from Tropical Storm Debby in June. Bostic Pelt Bridge, which connects with Harvey Mill Road and is highly traveled by its residents, was completely destroyed in the aftermath of Debby. Temporary repairs have been completed by the Wakulla County Public Works Department and the bridge is now open. Permanent repairs will be completed in the near future. Syfrett Creek Bridge on County Road 375 is nearing completion. Workers are paving and striping the roadway, as well as completing miscellaneous work. Drivers are reminded to use caution while crossing the temporary bridge while the bridge is under construction. For additional information about Bostic Pelt Bridge, contact Wakulla County Communications and Public Services Director Jessica Welch at (850) 926-0919, ext. 407. For more about the Syfrett Creek Bridge, contact the Florida Department of Transportation District Three, which is handling the repairs. At right, the newly opened bridge at Bostic Pelt.PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRepairs to bridges affected by Debby almost complete You and I are blessed to live in Wakulla County! I humbly ask for your vote on November 6. I will work for you, represent you, and protect our values and our way of life! Poli cal adver sing, paid for and approved by Ralph Thomas, Republican, for County Commission District 1 Ralph Thomas for County Commission District 1 Continued from Page 1A When asked what the major misconception was regarding the sheriffs of“ ce, Creel said it was that the sheriffs of“ ce was the only law enforcement agency that makes house calls within the county. Creel said FHP does in fact make house calls. However, during Langstons rebuttal he said one of the major misconceptions was that FHP shows up to the same crimes that the WCSO shows up to, which he said isnt true. When asked about improving traffic and road safety, Langston explained that the sheriffs of“ ce believes it is an important issue so the traf“ c unit was created to focus on accidents and speeders. He said they continue to work on that problem. We recognize that as a problem,Ž he said. Creel liked the idea of the traf“ c unit, but felt it shouldnt work car accidents with fatalities or ones that might result in a fatality. He said the WCSO needs to work with the FHP and transfer those accidents back over to them. However, before doing so, he acknowledged FHP would need to increase its response time. In closing statements, Creel said, Its time for a fresh start within the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce.Ž He continued that he would work at improving the crime rate, create programs designed to help children and have a transparent budget so citizens know exactly how their tax dollars were being spent. Langston again compared his quali“ cations to his opponents and stated that had the experience to lead the sheriffs of“ ce. This is not an economy to train a baby sheriff,Ž he said. This was the last bi-partisan forum moderated by the Wakulla Democratic and Republican executive committee chairs.Sheriff candidates square off at one last forum You’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A A A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe Wakuulanews

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Page 20A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comIt establishes the tone of many gothic stories set in the south. The peculiar inhabitants of these tales are as overtly benign and vaguely menacing as the Spanish Moss hanging omnipresent and effortlessly above. With the shape shifting ability of a lava lamp, Spanish Moss can literally be what the beholders imagination conjures. A little moonlight and malevolence only serve to intensify the possibilities. Ghostly regional literature aside, Spanish Moss is a common site in Wakulla County with a long and storied history. In years past it has been viewed as a resource, but is presently considered a pest. The plant became known as Spanish Moss in popular lore because it resembled the long grey beards of conquistadors. These explorers trudged through the new worlds regions under the most primitive conditions. Shaving was a nonessential activity for these inquisitive souls, hence the long beards. The scienti“ c name for Spanish Moss, usneoides, means resembling Usnea, the beard lichen. Appearances aside, Spanish moss is not biologically related to lichens or other mosses. It is in the same plant family as the colorful and popular air plants, bromeliads. In the days before Styrofoam peanuts and synthetic padding, Spanish Moss was gathered commercially for a variety of uses. It served as a readily available packing material for delicate objects such as pottery, china, and glassware. It was a handy and popular stuffing for farmers seeking to plump up a scarecrow. It “ t the farm budget and it worked. In frontier Florida, Spanish Moss was the padding of choice for pillows and mattresses. It was comfortable by contemporary standards and accessible to anyone who could reach it. It was common knowledge this plant could be the home of many creatures. A quick dunk into boiling water would neutralize any potential for insect problems, especially chiggers. Chiggers, or red bugs as they are sometimes known, will burrow into the skin of anyone who has the bad luck be exposed to contact. The resulting infestation leaves red whelps and an unending itch. Prior to the arrival of European explorers, the indigenous peoples used Spanish Moss to reinforce some pottery objects. The “ ber strands of the plant provided a sturdy reinforcement webbing. In the 21st century Spanish Moss has the reputation as a tree killer. The impression it kills trees may originate from the plant establishing itself on trees already in decline. The dying trees thinning canopy allows more light to reach the moss, which promotes more growth of the moss. Spanish Moss is covered with permeable scales which catch moisture and nutrients from the air. It has no roots but entangles itself to the host tree by means of long scaly stems. The bulk of the moss may block some sunlight but it uses the tree only for support. Occasionally branches with moss may break under the weight, especially after rain. Spanish Moss is not a big problem for healthy trees, which grow faster than the moss. Moss removal must be done manually as there is no selective herbicide to kill the moss and leave the trees. Contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http0://wakulla.ifas.ufl. edu/ to learn more about Spanish Moss.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931. Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison Spanish Moss is a characteristic of the region PHOTOS BY LES HARRISONCypresses and other trees at Wakulla Springs draped with Spanish Moss, above. A closer look at the moss, below. Its not actually a moss, but an air plant in the bromeliad family. Share your Halloween picturesWillow Kade Tartt, 5 months old, the daughter of Jim and Sunshine Tarttt, is celebrating her “ rst Halloween, and Zaina Kinsey of Kinsey Photography took the photo. Do you have a photo of your family celebrating fall? Carving pumpkins, kids in their Halloween costumes for trick-or-treating, or divvying up the Halloween candy? Send your photos to editor@thewakullanews.net. Bill MontfordFOR STATE SENATE A TRUSTED VOICE FOR THE MIDDLE CLASS I am honored to serve the hardworking families of North Florida in the State Senate. I am committed to improving schools for our children and creating jobs for our middle class so everyone has a fair shot to succeed.Ž STANDING UP FOR THE MIDDLE CLASS Whether its “ghting for a tax system that is fair to hardworking families or giving our children the best education possible, Bill never stops standing up for the middle class. INVESTING IN EDUCATION Bill has dedicated his life to education to make a real dierence for Florida children. He is widely recognized for his commitment to education and to improving the lives of Floridians. ATTRACTING JOBS Bill will work to establish tax incentives to attract businesses and good jobs to North Florida, while making sure we have a well-educated work force to keep them here. Bill Montfordfor State SenateFACEBOOK.COM/BILLMONTFORD WWW.BILLMONTFORD.COM Political advertisement paid for and approved by Bill Montford, Democrat, for State Senate, District 3. ENDORSED BY: AFSCME, Associated Industries of Florida, Florida AFL-CIO, Florida AFSCME Retirees Political Education Committee, Florida Assoc iation of Realtors, Florida Chamber of Commerce, Florida Education Association, Florida Medical Association, Florida Nurses Political Action Committee, Florida Police Benevolent Association, Florida Professional Fire“ghters, Florida Retail Federation, Florida Sheris CCE, Fraternal Order of Police, Grey2K USA, National Association of Soc ial Workers

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netWatching the “ lm, we thought they were the second best team weve faced,Ž Head Coach Scott Klees said of scouting Trinity Christian School of Deltona, the War Eagles opponent last week. Klees and his coaches had warned of an extremely athletic quarterback for Trinity with an ability to make plays. It was an unexpected blowout. The War Eagle offense was firing on all cylinders … and the defense played tough, refusing to give up a big play and swarming to the ball. Fans had barely gotten to their seats when Dillon Norman tore off a run on the “ rst offensive play of the game to score a touchdown. Then he added the extra point. Only 13 seconds had run off the clock. The mercy rule of a running clock was invoked with two minutes left in the “ rst quarter when the War Eagles were up 35-0. The stands were packed for homecoming festivities, but the War Eagles were such an ef“ cient machine on the “ eld that the crowd grew quiet. Even the rabid student section … usually taunting and teasing and holding up signs … watched the game, but the lack of competition took away the fun. By halftime, it was 50-0. The second half had a lot of young Wakulla players on the “ eld. Even Coach Klees took a break, handing over playcalling duties to Assistant Coach James Vernon. It was by far our best game of the year,Ž said Klees. We really played very well at all positions.Ž It set up one of the biggest games of the year this year … Wakullas district rival Godby. Both are undefeated, and both ranked in the Top 5 in the polls of Florida Division 5A schools. In the Maxpreps ranking, Godby is ranked No. 1 and Wakulla comes in at No. 3. Its going to come down to playing physical,Ž Klees said. Thats a key to success. Its also going to come down to turnovers … whoever turns the ball over the least will probably win.Ž Klees take on the two teams is that Wakulla and Godby have two different ways of winning: Godby likes to spread a defense out to get in space and use their speed. Wakulla relies on its upfront guys, Klees said. Basically a running team that likes to pass. The one big injury still facing the War Eagles is linebacker Kevin James. Klees said X-rays were negative so it appears to be an ankle sprain. But whether James, who has been a run-stopper, will play against Godby will be a game time decision, Klees said. Continued on Page 2B Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 sports news and team views SportsWar Eagles in a rout, 56-0Sets up showdown this week against Godby for district crownTHIS WEEK: The War Eagles play Godby at home at J.D. Jones Stadium on Friday, Nov. 2, at 7:30 p.m. BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWar Eagle freshman wide receiver Keith Gavin stretches to bring in a long pass for a touchdown.From Marching War Eagles to FSU’s Marching Chiefs Page 4A RMS cheerleaders go pink at last home game Page 6A Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the top-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011…2012.Ž Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 SM Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Thursday, November 1 Wednesday, November 7 Friday, November 9 Monday, November 12 Tuesday, November 13 Wednesday, November 21 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook Law Oce Est. 1998Fore cl osures Creditor/Debtor Business L aw1 7 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordvi ll e, F l orida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comPlayers of the WeekFELEIPE FRANKS Quarterback 6 for 7 for 137 yards and a touchdown. DALTON NICHOLS Punter averaged 42 yards with two punts in the game FRED CUMMINGS Linebacker 8 tackles, 2 assists and a safetyO ense Defense Special Teams War Eagles in a rout, 56-0Continued from Page 1B As for the Trinity game, the War Eagles scored in the “ rst half almost every time they touched the ball, while the defense didnt even allow Trinity to make a “ rst down in the “ rst quarter. After Dillon Norman scored on the “ rst offensive play, the defense held Trinity to a three and out. Mikal Cromartie had a goo punt return, Monterious Loggins took it down to the 10 on a run, and then quarterback Caleb Stephens hit Demetrius Lindsey for a pass play for a touchdown. On the offensive series, Malik Thomas ran the ball down into the Trinity red zone, and freshman quarterback Feleipe Franks hit Markel Rawls for a touchdown. It was 21-0 with almost 8 minutes still remaining in the “ rst quarter. Thomas scored a touchdown on the next series. Then Caleb Stephens hit freshman Keith Gavin on a 30-yard scoring strike down the sideline for a touchdown to go up 35-0, and start the running clock. A Trinity fumble at their 21 set up Lindsey for a rushing touchdown to make it 42-0. Trinity started having to gamble and went for it on fourth down at mid“ eld and didnt make it. Wakulla couldnt make a “ rst down and punter Dalton Norman kicked the ball to the 6-yard line. Pressure by linebacker Fred Cummings in the endzone forced the Trinity quarterback to throw it away … which was called intentional grounding and resulted in a safety to make it 44-0. Mikal Cromartie scored on the next drive to make it 50-0 before halftime. In the second half, running back Sheldon Johnson scored with just a few minutes remaining in the game to go up 56-0. Feleipe Franks, who Klees described as the back-up everything,Ž attempted the extra point in place of kicker Dillon Norman, but it was no good.WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSQuarterback Feleipe Franks throws a pass to receiver Markel Rawls, 22, who scored on the play. More photos online at thewakullanews.com Speedster Dillon Norman, 1, scores on the “ rst play of the game behind the block of big lineman Chris Grif“ n, 72. Wakulla pee-wee football players, below, led the War Eagles onto the “ eld for the start of the homecoming game. JOHN SHUFF JOHN SHUFF Sustainable Growth = JOBS Sustainable Growth = JOBS Long Term Planning = Ef“cient Spending Long Term Planning = Ef“cient Spending JOHN SHUFF JOHN SHUFF ELECT ELECT Political advertisement paid for and approved by John Shuff, Democrat, for County Commission District 5. FOR COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 5 FOR COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 5 www.ShuffForWakulla .com www.ShuffForWakulla .com PLEASE RE-ELECT OUR “PAP” Donnie Sparkman WAKULLA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERHe Is: Knowledgeable Honest Dedicated to the people of Wakulla County with 42 years of experience Certi ed Florida Appraiser Experienced Land Surveyor (and He Loves US! Brigs, Walker & Reese) Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, for Property Appraiser

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 3B Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Nov. 1  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  WAKULLA GENEALOGY GROUP will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Dick Sherwin will demonstrate and discuss “Navigating Genealogy Websites.” Sherwin has been interested in genealogy for the past 30 years. Since his retirement from the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, he has volunteered at the Family History Center in Tallahassee. Sherwin is a member of the Tallahassee Genealogical Society and the New England Historic Genealogical Society. Friday, Nov. 2  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Nov. 3  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Nov. 4  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Nov. 5  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Nov. 6  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant. Wednesday, Nov. 7  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  WAKULLA COUNTY COALITION FOR YOUTH will meet at noon at the TCC Wakulla Center. Thursday, Nov. 8  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsFriday, Nov. 2  CHILI DINNER AND SILENT AUCTION will be held at Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church. Dinner will be served from 5 to 7 p.m. and includes homemade chili, cornbread, beverage and dessert. Cost is $5. The auction will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. For more information, call 984-0127. Saturday, Nov. 3  SECOND ANNUAL WAKULLA FRIENDS OF SCOUTING FUN SHOOT will be held at the WCSO Shooting Range from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine. A $5 per person entry fee will let you shoot pistols and ri es. There will be various prizes for the best shots. There will be a sporting clays competition, a competitive plate shooting event, shooting demonstrations, gun safety instruction, and a chance drawing for great prizes. This event is open to Boys, Girls, Men and Women of all ages who can shoot safely, as determined by the range safety of cer. Attendees under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Firearms and ammunition will be provided. All proceeds will bene t the Boy Scouts of America including priced concession sales. The WCSO Shooting Range is located at 65 Qualify Lane, Crawfordville. Contact Mike Scibelli at (850) 251-1497 for details.  EMPTY BOWL FUNDRAISER will be held at Hudson park from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tickets are $15 for a soup lunch and hand painted bowl. There will also be live entertainment, including music and Stone Soup play by children. The money raised goes to the area’s food pantries. For more information, contact Haydee Jackley at ribitsceramic@ yahoo.com or (850) 567-4212.  ELECTION for open seat on the Capital Area Community Action Board of Directors will be held at 11 a.m. at Hudson Park in conjunction with the Empty Bowls Fundraiser. Call 222-2043 for more information.  NAMIBIKES EVENT will be held at Tom Brown Park, 1125 Easterwood Drive, in Tallahassee. Check-in and a continental breakfast open at 6 a.m. The bike riding event will raise awareness about mental illness, treatment and recovery. There will be a 100-mile Century ride to Monticello and back and a 64-mile Metric Century ride to Capps and back. There will also be a 30-mile off-road ride, a 6-mile family-ride around the park and a bike rodeo and a safety course. For more information, visit www.FightStigmaAndRide.org, or contact Carol Weber at cweber@nami orida. org or (850) 671-4445.  FOURTH ANNUAL PAT RAMSEY HOSPICE EVENT will be held at noon at Bradfordville Blues. The event will bene t Big Bend Hospice in Ramsey’s honor. He was a well known musician and blues singer. There will be several musical acts inside and outside, including Brett Wellman & the Stone Cold Blues Band, C.S.Holt & Blues Revival, RoadHouse, Acme R&B, Common Zenz, JB’s Zydeco Zoo, Big Poppa & The Shuf e Brothers, Randall “Big Daddy” Webster, Cheap & Easy, The Wiley Coyote Band, Low Flying Planes, Bedhead Betty, Swingin Harpoon and Major Bacon from New Orleans La. Featuring Clyde Ramsey on Harp & Keys and Ontological Elephants “Party Time.”  FREE HOMEOWNER’S SUSTAINABILITY WORKSHOP will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the library. Homeowners interested in having their situations evaluated immediately are asked to bring copies of a recent mortgage statement, homeowners insurance, property tax statement, Homeowners Association dues statement, 60 days of paystubs (for all employed household members), copy of unemployment determination, other source of income: SSI, Child Support, Pension, veri cation of reduction in income for year of hardship and year prior (Tax return, W2’s) and last two months of bank statements. For more information, call 392-6850 or email wakullaworkshop@sahis.org.  FISH FRY will be held by the Sopchoppy Lion’s Club from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Sopchoppy Hardware Store. Tickets are $10 and include fried sh with coleslaw, hushpuppies and iced tea. Sunday, Nov. 4  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE will be held at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and will be on the Florida National Scenic Trail with speaker Dale Allen who brought the trail to St. Marks in the 1980s. Find out about the different hikes available into the St. Marks backcountry. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, “Nature’s Classroom” at St. Marks Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 925-6121 for more information. Monday, Nov. 5  FUNDRAISER will be held for Wakulla High School’s girl’s basketball team at Beef O’Brady’s from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Register to win a pair of Wild Adventure tickets with required purchase. Tuesday, Nov. 6  WAKULLA COUNTY TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED COORDINATING BOARD will meet at 10 a.m. at the Senior Center. Apalachee Regional Planning Council announces this public meeting to which all persons are invited. Thursday, Nov. 8  FOOD PRESERVATION WORKSHOP will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Extension Of ce by David Moody, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge director, and Shelley Swenson, Wakulla County FCS Extension agent. They will be covering the basics of food preservation through pressure canning and dehydrating. Moody has years of experience preserving wildlife and sh and wants to share some of the things that he has learned with others. Swenson will share an overview of the pressure canner, why a pressure canner must be used for low acid vegetables, meats and sh and some basic canning techniques. Sample foods will be provided. Registration fee is $5. Enroll by calling the Wakulla County Extension Of ce at 926-3931. Pre-registration is necessary, but workshop fee can be paid at the workshop. Upcoming EventsSaturday, Nov. 10  SIXTH ANNUAL VETERANS DAY CELEBRATION AND PARADE will be held by Wakulla Christian School to honor all veterans and active duty military. The theme for the 2012 Veteran’s Day Celebration is “Honoring All Who Served.” Parade entries are strongly encouraged to decorate in a patriotic theme. There is no fee to enter the parade, but a donation of toiletry supplies for our active duty military is requested. Sunday, Nov. 11  FREE PANCAKE AND SAUSAGE BREAKFAST will be held by the Wakulla County Memorial Post, VFW POST 4538 from 7 a.m. until 10 a.m. Everyone is invited as a thank you and to give back to the public for its support throughout the year. The VFW post is located at 475 Arran Road, Crawfordville. Saturday, Nov. 17  FIRST BLUE JEANS AND FAST MACHINES EVENT for Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will be held from 5 to 10 p.m. at 3Y Ranch, Crawfordville. There will be dinner and entertainment by Local Motion. Enter a fast machine for $10 per entry. To attend the show only, cost is $5 per car load. Dinner and entertainment is $35 per person. A table sponsorship is $300. For more information, email helpkwcb@gmail.com, call (850) 745-7111 or visit the website www.kwcb.org. Government Meetings Thursday, Nov. 1  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 3 p.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea to discuss and nalize the 2013 Advertising/Marketing Campaign. Monday, Nov. 5  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, Nov. 13  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Wednesday, Nov. 14  WAKULLA COUNTY CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD will hold a public hearing at 5:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorOur overdrive e-book checkout service goes live on Wednesday, Oct. 31. Our e-book collection is a work in progress so as weve asked before, if there is any book or subject youd like to see added please tell us and we will make every effort to accommodate you. Please go to e-books. wildernesscoast.org to get started. There will also be a link on our homepage www.wakullalibrary.org. You will need your library card number to use the service (your PIN is the last four digits of your number). There is a limit of two e-book checkouts per card with a limit of two weeks per checkout. You can returnŽ them early if you wish. In addition to the newŽ e-books which we have purchased, you also have access to 1,000s of works in the public domain like classics (Dickens, Stevenson, Twain, etc) and instructional materials. There are no limits on these works as they are no longer under copyright. Please bear with us through the inevitable growing pains as we are excited and optimistic that this will be a heavily used service. Please contact us with any questions and be on the lookout for workshops on using overdrive to be held here in the coming weeks! Political EventsThursday, Nov. 1-Saturday, Nov. 3 EARLY VOTING for the General Election at the Supervisor of Elections Of ce from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6  ELECTION DAY from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the polls.Library News... Empty Bowl Fundraiser from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park. Wakulla Friends of Scouting Fun Shoot at the range from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. First Sunday at the Refuge on scenic trail and hikes at 2 p.m. Election Day from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the polls. SaturdaySaturdaySundayTuesday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net

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Special to The NewsIn a dazzling display of garnet and gold, seven former Wakulla High School marching War Eagles help entertain a roaring crowd of 50,000 plus at the Florida State football games. They are members of the Florida State University Marching Chiefs and include Blair Mathers, Nicole Pandolphi and Ashley Alvarez twirling baton with the majorette line while Mallory Thompson, Belle Robinson, Cassidy Thompson and Emily Grif“ n twirl ” ags as part of the Color Guard. These girls began the season at a two week intense band camp prior to the “ rst football game. This was just the beginning to daily practices and 7:30 a.m. game day rehearsals. Two hours prior to each home game, the girls can be seen at the FSU baseball “ eld along with the rest of the band warming up and doing a semi-performance, free of charge and open to anyone. Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachOn Saturday, Oct. 27, the WHS cross country teams traveled to Maclay School in Tallahassee to compete in the Tallahassee Open City Cross-Country Championships. The 10 teams entering the competition had different goals in mind for this competition than for most races throughout the season. With the District competitions looming next week, most of the teams used this race as a “ nal tune-up and a less than all outŽ competition. For the local harriers, that was exactly the scenario. During the post-season competitions, each team can only run seven runners in the varsity races. So, for the WHS boys, the main purpose of this race was to try and set the order of runners for the District Meet, especially for runners numbers 4-7. The “ rst three places on the team have been established, but the next four places were up for grabs, with six runners vying for the spots. Before the start, the coaches challenged those runners to do their best and step it up for the team and they did just that. Five of the boys set new personal records (PRs) and “ nished within 14 seconds of each other. We usually try not to put much pressure on the kids for this race, but this year we had to in order to try and establish the order for the District Meet,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. We have “ ve or six boys who are basically interchangeable for four available slots, so we had to try and sort them out,Ž Hoover said. It is a good problem to have, but you kind of hate it because all of them have worked really hard this season and have shown tremendous improvement. They all deserve to run in the varsity race at Districts, they just cant. But the boys still worked together, pulled for each other and really stepped it up,Ž he said. They answered the call today.Ž Travis Parks, the solid third runner on the team, set the pace for the other boys Saturday and ran a solid time of 18:48. Mitchell Atkinson led the charge for the other runners in a new PR time of 18:38, with Lane Williams hot on his heels at 18:39. Ryan Dodson was close behind in 18:48, with Alan Pearson “ nishing in 18:50 and Albert Smythe closing fast in 18:52. Evan Guarino and Riley Welch also ran new PRs and David Sloan ran a season best, varsity time of 21:25. Overall, the boys team “ nished in third place. The situation for the girls team was completely different from the boys. All seven slots for the post season team are pretty “ rmly established and only one of those needed a serious race, so for most of the girls, it was more of a tempo run than an all-out race. Connie Lewis ran a solid race and a new PR, “ nishing in 24:13. Logan Kelley, Ava Shaw and Emily Westmark also recorded new PRs on the multiple loop course. The girls team “ nished in 5th place. Senior co-captain Raychel Gray was scheduled to take the ACT test on Saturday, so instead, decided to run the YMCA Trick or Trot 5K held in Southwood on Friday evening and “ nished as the second overall female in the time of 22:32. The District Meet will be held Saturday, Nov. 3, at the Apalachee Regional Park Cross Country Course. The boys race will begin at 10:30 a.m. and the girls will start at 11 a.m.Girls bball fundraiser set at Beefs on Nov. 5Special to The NewsA fundraiser for Wakulla girls basketball has been set for Monday, Nov. 5, at the Beef OBradys in Crawfordville. The event will be held from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the restaurant. Register to win a pair of Wild Adventures tickets with a purchase. For more information, contact Vicki Carr-McDadden at (850) 728-4414 or carrmcfadden777@gmail.com. CROSS COUNTRYCity championships – the nal tune-up before districts From Marching War Eagles to FSU’s Marching ChiefsMARCHING CHIEFS: Mallory Thompson, Ashley Alvarez, Belle Robinson, Blair Mathers, Cassidy Thompson, Nicole Pandolphi, Emiley Grif“ n Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  P a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICEƒ EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm 12 12 Demetrius Lindsey and Ashley Alvarez my100bank.com z 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 b b b b b b b b b b b k 0 0 b b b b b b k b b b b b b CENTENNIALBANK Member FDIC CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARDWakulla County is currently seeking interested citizens who have a willingness to serve as a member and alternate member on the Code Enforcement Board. There are two vacant seats as an alternate member and two forthcoming as a member appointed by the BOCC that expires December 31, 2012. The vacant seats for each appointment will be for a three year term beginning January 1, 2013, and ending December 31, 2015. The membership of the Code Enforcement Board shall, whenever possible, consist of an architect, a business person, an engineer, a general contractor, a subcontractor, a realtor, and another citizen. These positions are on a volunteer basis only and the members would have the responsibility of being present at each scheduled Code Enforcement Meeting. The alternate members will be noti ed in the event a member is unable to attend a scheduled meeting. These meetings occur on the second Wednesday of every other month, at 5:30p.m. in the Commission Chambers, with the exception of Holidays.Citizens wishing to serve as a member or alternate member can contact Jaime Baze at (850) 926-7636 ext: 423 or jbaze@mywakulla.com by November 28, 2012.

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By TIM LINAFELTOn a day when Florida State had its way with Duke, the Blue Devils biggest rival did the Seminoles a huge favor. Despite entering Saturdays game with a 7-1 record and a No. 12 ranking in the Bowl Championship Series, the Seminoles still needed North Carolina State to drop a conference game by the end of the regular season to have a shot at reaching the ACC Championship Game in Charlotte. North Carolinas Gio Bernard did the heavy lifting with a 74-yard punt return for a go-ahead touchdown that gave the Tar Heels a 43-35 victory over the Wolfpack. The loss dropped N.C. State to 5-3, 2-2 in conference play and moved the Wolfpack behind both FSU and Clemson in the Atlantic Division standings. And with their 48-7 rout of Duke, the Seminoles returned to the top of the pack and can secure the division title with wins in their “ nal two ACC games … at Virginia Tech and at Maryland. That was always our perspective at the beginning of the season, but after that devastating loss (to N.C. State), it was kind of a toss-up,Ž FSU safety Lamarcus Joyner said. But now were put back on that pedestal so we have to take advantage of it.Ž The Tar Heels appeared to be cruising to an easy win, building up a 25-7 “ rst-quarter advantage. The Wolfpack, though, seemed determined not to let its division lead slip away, charging back for a 35-25 lead behind Mike Glennons career-high 467 yards and “ ve touchdowns. But with the game eventually tied late in the fourth quarter, Wolfpack coach Tom OBrien opted to play it safe, running the ball toward overtime despite having three timeouts in his pocket. He chose to punt to Bernard with 30 seconds left in regulation. Its a great feeling,Ž quarterback EJ Manuel said. Weve just got to continue to win. If we continue to win out, theres no telling what can happen.Ž FSU coach Jimbo Fisher acknowledged that he was glad to be back atop the standings, but that it wont mean much if the Seminoles cant handle Virginia Tech on a Thursday night in Blacksburg. I didnt even realize it at the time,Ž FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. Thats great. Thats all good, but what weve got to do is just beat Virginia Tech. Weve just got to play it one at a time. Im not worried about the end result of anything. We need to play better, play a good Virginia Tech team and learn to play on the road well.At 4-4, 2-2 in the ACC, the Hokies have fallen short of expectations this season, but Fisher expects a dif“ cult test at Lane Stadium. Thats a hostile environment. Thats one of the toughest environments there is and were going to have to have our A-game, because guess what? Theyll be waiting on us.Ž www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 5B F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State t e Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M at North Carolina A&TSaturday, Nov. 3 at 1:30 PMThe game can be seen on famuathletics.com. Missouri at #7 FloridaSaturday, Nov. 3 at NOONThe game can be seen on ESPN2. #9 Florida StateSaturday, Nov. 3 Bye Week LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO 000CV38 ATTENTIONFIFTH THIRD BANK CUSTOMERS Were you charged a fee for an Early Access cash advance loan? If so, you may be entitled to compensation!Wagner, Vaughan & McLaughlin, P.A. 601 Bayshore Blvd., Suite 910 | Tampa, FL 33606Call Toll Free 866-507-1518Jason K. WhittemoreCall NOW for information concerning your legal rights. 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Advertise your way to Success! Statewide Advertising — Refreshing Rates C C a l l n o w t o a d v e r t i s e y o u r b u s i n e s s i n o v e r 1 0 0 n e w s p a p e r s 866.742.1373 w w w f a c e b o o k c o m / A d N e t F l o r i d a Rodney Smith and FSU pulled away from Duke and into “ rst place in the ACC Atlantic Division.PHOTO BY COLIN HACKLEY/OSCEOLA Thats one of the toughest environments there is and were going to have to have our A-game, Ž…Coach Jimbo Fisher GATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSONThe team that defeated South Carolina looked very different from the team that faced Georgia on Saturday. O f f e n s e n e e d s Offense needs t o b o u n c e b a c k to bounce back Next up… difficult test at Lane StadiumBy THOMAS GOLDKAMPGatorBait.net Staff Writer Floridas offensive line had arguably its worst outing of the year against Georgia, giving up “ ve sacks and allowing quarterback Jeff Driskel to get hit repeatedly, even causing a couple turnovers. Center Jon Harrison is con“ dent Florida will bounce back against Missouri this weekend. Still, center Jon Harrison has a lot of con“ dence in the group, and he had a promise for the Gator Nation on Tuesday. You guys wont see that anymore out of the offensive line,Ž he said. After suffering a crippling loss to Georgia that essentially eliminated Florida from the SEC title game barring an upset of the Bulldogs, theres only one thing the Gators can do. Its to come back and win. Come back swinging,Ž Harrison said. We expect to come out there Saturday and give it our all and just bounce back.Ž Harrison and the rest of the offensive line met as a unit without the coaching staff to talk about the mistakes they made in the Georgia game. They broke things down position-by-position with the sole purpose of making sure Saturdays mistakes dont happen again. The main thing the unit is working on as it heads into its “ nal SEC game of the season is communication. Far too often against Georgia, there wasnt enough of it. Or the communication was downright botched. There was times when there was a miscommunication,Ž Harrison said. It could have been between center and guard, or guard-tackle, whatever it is, tackle-tight end. Whatever the position may be there was a just a communication error, and when that error occurs, then the play will not go as smooth as its supposed to.Ž Like Harrison, offensive coordinator Brent Pease is con“ dent in the lines ability to pass protect and open holes in the run game. The unit isnt going to go away from what it did best early in the year -running the football -just because it has been slowed the past few weeks. We cant get gun-shy on things. Weve got to believe in what were doing,Ž Pease said. Now, can we get better at what were doing? Yeah. Do we have to adjust things here and there? Yeah. But weve kind of got answers to all of that. We try to use those plays appropriately.Ž Harrisons ready to do his part to help an offensive line that was frequently abused in pass protection pick things up against Missouri. For Florida to avoid the type of collapse it had last year after its “ rst loss, the Gators need to bounce back against Missouri. If they do that, its smooth sailing to a 10-1 record heading into Tallahassee. But it starts up front. Last game wasnt our best performance, but weve shown what were capable of and its well known the potential that our offensive line has,Ž Harrison said. I just know were going to bounce back this Saturday and make sure everyone is fundamentally sound on the offensive line.Ž

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsThe Riversprings Middle School cheerleaders went pink in support of Breast Cancer Awareness at the home game against Taylor County on Thursday, Oct. 25. The cheerleaders had their pink pompoms and pink hair bows for the game. By CONNOR HARRISONwakullasports.comIt wasnt the prettiest of wins, but it was a win nonetheless. It was also a matchup with a special twist: it was the return of Tanner Jones, former Wakulla War Eagle standout and son of legendary coach J.D. Jones … for whom the stadium is named … is in his “ rst season at the helm of the Taylor County Middle School program. In the game, the Riversprings Bears were plagued with fumbles. But even with those fumbles, the defense stood its ground and did its best to keep Taylor County out of the end zone. The only scores that the Bulldogs got were big plays, not necessarily long drives … because the Bears defense stopped the run up the middle, and defended the pass well. With a defense limiting their scoring, the Bears ended up winning 20-12. To start the game off, Riversprings elected to receive the kickoff. When the offense took the “ eld they didnt have any big explosive plays until the second half. The plays they did have were ones that just kept the drive alive. When they faced a third and 14, quarterback Zach Norman completed a pass to Jake McCarl for the “ rst down. This made it “ rst and goal. The very next play Demarcus Lindsey ran the ball into the end zone and the two point conversion was good, to make it 8-0. It appeared Riversprings was set to kick it off to the Taylor County Bulldogs, but instead they decided to attempt an onside kick. After a few good bounces, the ball ended up in Lindseys hands. RMS was facing a fourth and 9, and instead of punting the ball away, the offense stayed on the “ eld … and Norman threw the ball to Kody Zanco for a touchdown. The two-point conversion was no good. To end the “ rst quarter the Bears forced a three and out, but the following possession for Riversprings ended up with a fumble, and the Bulldogs recovered. Taylor County took this opportunity to put six points on the board. Next up was the Bears who, once again, fumbled the ball giving Taylor County a chance to add to their score, which they did. A quick speed sweep for the Bulldogs made the score 14-12, with 3:30 left in the half. The ensuing onside kick was corralled in by Hezekiah Gross, giving the Bears a chance to extend their lead going into halftime. The Bulldogs intercepted the pass in the red zone with 31 seconds left in the half, but the RMS defense was stout and managed to get the ball back with one tick on the clock. The Hail Mary pass fell incomplete and took the game into halftime. The second half wasnt nearly as productive as the “ rst, with Riversprings scoring the only touchdown. This lone touchdown came on a punt return from Lindsey, who took the ball on a hop and went from one side of the “ eld to the other on his way to the end zone. The win brings Riversprings season record to 4-3. The final game of the season for RMS is on Tuesday, Nov. 6, at 4:30 p.m. at Kingdom Life Prep in Tallahassee. PHOTO BY SCOTT ROSSOW/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRMS cheerleaders go pink TCCs WAKULLA CENTERWe want you to succeed professionally through education and training. We are here to help.FALL 2012 INFORMATION SESSIONS:OCTOBER 23 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about the Testing Center, Enrollment Services and Student SuccessOCTOBER 30 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about Financial Aid & Scholarship and the Career CenterNOVEMBER 6 | 3 5 P.M.Learn more Financial Aid & Scholarships, Enrollment Services and Student SuccessNOVEMBER 13 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about the Testing Center and the Career CenterTesting is available by appointment every Friday. For more information call (850) 922-6290 Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Re“nance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a ”oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Of“ce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Of“ce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Of“ce: 850.926.1960 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH CONNOR HARRISON/wakullasports.comRiversprings Demarcus Lindsey pulls away from a would-be Bulldog tackler.RMS gets a win over Taylor

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 7B -Janet 000BK82 Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage? By JEAN KRESSYContributor, Relish magazineA few days before Thanksgiving, we add the Butterball hotline number to our speed dial. Weve never used it, but knowing that someone is on call to help with whatever turkey crisis were in is a comfort. We feel the same way about the Pork Board website (www.porkbeinspired.com). Although weve never run into trouble with pork chops or tenderloins and learned years ago that one of the best ways to “ x pork is to braise it with apple cider and fresh vegetables, it always helps to have an expert standing by. As it turns out, the questions the Pork Board gets asked most often are about food safety and overcooking. Most people know to wash their hands before cooking and not use the same plate for uncooked and cooked meat, but in a sign of the times when everyone is a frugal cook, people ask if its safe to cook pork thats been sitting on the counter overnight. Absolutely not! About overcooking, the Board recommends taking pork off the heat or out of the oven when its temperature is 145F. Finally, for help choosing pork, we spoke to Dr. David Meisinger, a meat science expert at Iowa State University. Look for reddish-pink, he said, as it has the best ” avor and is the juiciest. The other white meat,Ž it turns out, refers to pork after its cooked. Cider-Braised Pork Loin with Carrots and Onion 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 (2-pound) boneless pork loin 2 medium onions, vertically sliced (about 2 1/2 cups) 4 medium carrots, cut diagonally into 1/4-inch slices (about 1 1/2 cups) 2 celery stalks with leaves, sliced 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 teaspoon dried rubbed sage 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 teaspoon coarse salt 1/4 t easpoon freshly ground black pepper 1 cup apple cider 1. Heat oil over medium-high heat in a Dutch oven. Add pork and cook until wellbrowned on both sides. Remove to a plate. Add onions, carrots and celery to pan; cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until onions are tender, about 10 minutes. Stir in garlic, sage, thyme, salt and pepper. 2. Return pork and any juices to Dutch oven and pour cider over top. Cover and simmer, basting occasionally, until temperature on meat thermometer inserted in middle reaches 145F, about 1 1/4 hours. Remove roast from pan and let rest 10 minutes. Slice pork and serve with vegetables and pan sauce. Serves 6.For more Relish recipes, log on to relishmag.com. RELISH THE AMERICAN TABLEPork pointersMark Boughton Photography

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Agency Angry Axis Barked Beginning Bitter Bone Busy Buys Cannot Cars Carton Cell Charges Child Coughs Crush Dare Diet Duke File Gate Give Glad Goes Golf Grip Gull Have Keeps Kite Lazy Line Link Loaf Lonely Luckier Nine Occur Out t Pain Panic Path Pats Penned Prism Quack Quick This page sponsored in part by: Raft Ranch Reign Safety Seek Self Sheer Sits Skim Span Teas Tents They Tone Tough T-shirts Uses Wept Whale Wise Woke

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 9B SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements Todays New Ads Cypress Lumber Pecky T&G v Joint Timbers and beams (850) 643-6283 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Medical Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Professional AIRLINE CAREERS-Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Professional AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 Trades/ Skills AFew Pro Drivers Needed.Top Pay & 401K. Need CDLClass ADriving Exp. (877)258-8782 www .drive4melton.com DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport Trades/ Skills Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED /INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. -Tanker Training Available. Call Today! (877)882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE OOp -Regional, PAY INCREASE Multiple Fleets Available. Class A CDL/ Home weekly. Call (800)695-9643 or www .drivefor watkins.com OTR Drivers Wanted.Sign on bonus, Food grade tankers, Class-A CDLw/tanker endorsement. Prefer 2 yrs experience, Competitive pay, Benefits. For information call (800)569-6816 or go to our website www .ottery transportation.com Tire Technician /Mechanic NeededB & B Dugger, Inc. is looking for a part or full-time tire mounting technician that has experience with tire changers. tire balancers and mounting truck & small tractor tires. Additional experience in roadside asssistanceŽ and working in the field is also prefererred. A Florida driver license with a clear MVR is a position requirement. Pay negotiable. Call the business office at (850) 926-2929 or email to office@band bdugger.com to receive an application TransferDrivers:Need 20 Contract Drivers, CDLAor B to relocate vehicles to and from various locations throughout US„No forced dispatch: (800)501-3783 www .mamo transportation.com Trades/ Skills TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 20 12 General Help DRIVERS:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money DownCALL: 888-880-5911 Furniture CHERRYBEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used, brand new in factory boxes. Original cost $4500. Sell for $795. Can deliver. Call Tom (407)574-3067 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET. In original plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice $975. Can deliver. Call Bill (813)298-0221 Garage/ Yard Sales Sat Nov 3rd 8a-12p NO EARLYBIRDS Alittle bit of everything. 31 Scotch Pine Ct The Grove Subdivision off E Ivan, Follow Signs Farm Services BUSH HOGGING ROADS GRADED GARDENS TILLED Have tractor will bush hog finish cut large acerage grade roads driveways till gardens. dbdouge@aol.com or 850-643-6283 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 PANACEAClean SW 2/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $500/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 SPRING CREEK HWY10 acre min-farm, DWMH, 2BR/2BA, Spring Creek & Jack Crum Rd. $550/mo., $550/deposit. SWMH, 2BR/1BA, Irvin Bryant St., Spring Creek. $500/mo., $500/deposit. 850-926-5192. Mobile Homes For Sale 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, Beautiful Kitchen. Huge Master Bedroom Walk In Closets Call Today (850) 576-2106 4 BR Mobile Home on 5 Acres, Ready to Move IN -EZ Payments. Call Me (850) 576-2105 100 Families Needed for Govt Loan Program. Call Today (850) 576-2104 2002 MOBILE HOME 28X76 4Bedroom/2Bath Master Suite with Office, Walk-in Closet, Garden Tub, Shower. Family Room with Fireplace. Separate Living Room. Large Kitchen with Breakfast Nook and Island. Laundry Room. $35,000. MUST MOVE Billy (850) 962-3884 3BR, 2BA-Used Mobile Home. Great Condition Wont Last !!! Call Me ASAP (850) 576-2687 GOTLAND? Need a Home. Use Your Land As your DOWN Payment Call Now (850) 576 2687 Mobile Home with acreage ready to move in, great for pets. Lots of space forthe price, 3Br2Ba, serious offers only, no renters. (850)308-6473 Apartments Unfurnished PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall Mary (850) 984-4811Equal Housing Opportunity TDD 1 800 955 2771 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $700/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. (850) 926-1385 CRAWFORDVILLENICE 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Home in Wakulla Gardens, Lots of extra features, $850. month (850) 926-8948 Vacation Rentals ALLIGATOR POINT2/Bedroom, 2/Bath 1,200 sf, Gulf Front, Vacation Rental 3 blks to white sandy beach, 75ft. to Gulf of Mexico. Beautiful Sunsets $1,000. Wk. (904)687-3397 Real Estate For Sale 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www .sunsetranches.com Auctions Estates 3Br/2Ba W/attached garage On 1.03 acres. Auction 11/13/12-10am @ South Palm Beach County Courthouse. Sharon Sullivan (954)740-2421 Or sharon.w .sullivan@irs.gov Visit www .irsauctions.gov for more info. REALESTATE AUCTION, Blount County, TN:(55) 5+ Acre Tracts, Log Cabin, Commercial Building & (3) Residential Lots. Saturday, Nov. 17. 1-800-4FURROW. TN Lic. #62. Trucks DODGE2010 RAM 2500 STpkg diesel, crewcab, short box, 16K 5th wheel hitch 23,700 mi like new $32,000 352-586-1125 GMC2008 Sierra C/K1500 Denali, Crew Cab, AWD, 25,800miles,black,leather, sunroof, navigation, DVD, excellent condition, warranty, extras, $12200, sndd@netscape.com 5418-1122 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201203652 TO: Russell E. Paul ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. November 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5420-1108 TWN vs. Nelson, Phillip Case No:65-2008-CA-000222FC Notice of Foreclosure Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 65-2008-CA-000222FC US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE CSFB MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2001-HE-17, Plaintiff, PHILLIPA. NELSON; KELLYM. NELSON; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 16th day of October, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000222FC, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE CSFB MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2001-HE-17 is the Plaintiff and PHILLIPA. NELSON, KELLYM. NELSON and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONTLOBBYof WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32326, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT A ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the schedForeclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices WANTEDSUBSTITUTE SCHOOL TEACHERS Wakulla County School District Apply at: wakullaschooldistrict.org Click on “Employment”(All applicants are required to pass background and drug screening, and complete of online sub training.) 4Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1150mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16Ž .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE. CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 OFFICE SPACE LEASEFOR THE BARRY BUILDING ATTHE LOG CABINCrawfordville 850-508-5471$25000/MO Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT The White Elephant 50% OFFON ALL ITEMS in Bob & Marge’s Booth atfrom Nov. 1, thru Nov. 10 nd us across from the courthouse in Crawfordville926-3338 Antique Mall 20960 N.E. Burlington Rd., Hosford, FL 32334 NOVEMBER 3 9AM EST --F&LAUCTION ---FARM EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE AUCTION Tractors, Mowers, Cultivators and all types of Farm EquipmentAuctioneer: Felton Hall, auctioneer license AU426610% BUYERS PREMIUM all consignments are welcomed.For more info: 850-379-8410, Cell: 850-566-6646 TO VIEW PARTIAL LIST OF PHOTOS VISIT www.auctionzip.com The Wakulla County Clerk of Court is accepting applications for Of“cial Records division clerk. Position requires experience with substantial data entry, balance & preparation of cash deposits, knowledge of computer applications (Of“ce Suite and specialty software) and general of“ce equipment. Must possess the ability to climb ladders, to sit or stand for long periods of time, physically lift boxes containing 35lbs + type 35 cwpm. Preference given to legal experience/title research background.Visit our website at www.wakullaclerk.com for additional information and an application. Florida law provides that all applications for employment are open for public inspection. Background check, employment testing and drug screening are required. EOE.

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com uled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 22ND day of October, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk PARCEL1: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,(MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J.K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, N.E., THE DISTANCE OF 1,049.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT DESCRIBED HEREIN. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 560.2 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST 385.36 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LANDS OF GRANVILLE JAMES, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 552.63 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST 420.9 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S. THE DISTANCE OF 1,108.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. THIS LAND IS SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR ASIXTYFOOT WIDE ROADWAYACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED TRACT. LESS AND EXCEPT: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,(MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD) THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 1,049.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY522.91 FEET. THENCE RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 422.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 385.36, FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 560.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING THE SAME PROPERTYAS DEEDED TO ROYE. MERSDORF AND ALICIAL. MERSDORF, HUSBAND AND WIFE BYSTEPHEN M. VELTRI AND MARSHAS VELTRI, HUSBAND AND WIFE RECORDED MAY27, 1993 IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 212, PAGE 302 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL2: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 2,158.22 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT DESCRIBED HEREIN. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES WEST 60 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES WEST 360.9 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 340 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST 360.9 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST 60FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF LOT NO. 69, H.S., 340 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SITUATE LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. THIS LAND IS SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR ASIXTYFOOT WIDE: ROADWAYACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED TRACT. ALSO: APERPETUALEASEMENT SIXTY(60) FEET WIDE FOR AROAD RIGHT-OF-WAYFOR ALLTYPES OF TRAFFIC OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND, TO-WIT: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 672.27 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF ACOUNTYROAD AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT DESCRIBED HEREIN. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAYOF SAID COUNTYROAD THE DISTANCE OF 665.62 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE LANDS OF GRANVILLE JAMES 356.2 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 560.2 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF LOT NO. 69, H.S. 377.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 69 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO: AN EASEMENT SIXTY(60) FEET WIDE FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND, TO-WIT: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (MARKED BYA CONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 1,049.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY522.91 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 422.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 385.36 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 560.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Tax ID: 000006900010116002 Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News November 1 & 8, 2012 08-50754 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5402-1018 TWN vs. Cayson, Donald Ray Case No. 65-2012-CA-000180 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 2011-CA-004095 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. DONALD RAY CAYSON, et. al., Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DONALD RAY CAYSON, and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONALD RAY CAYSON if alive, and/or dead his (their) unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or grantees and all persons or parties claiming by, through, under or against him (them) Last known address is 29 HERRING CIR. CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Action for foreclosure of a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: PLEASE SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DESCRIPTIONŽ has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Iris Hernandez, SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., Attorneys, whose address is 9700 South Dixie Highway, Suite 610, Miami, Florida 33156, (305) 670-2299, Iris.Hernandez@spearhoffman.com within 30 days after the first publication of this notice and to file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this 23 day of January, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Becky Whaley As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT AŽ COMMENCE AT ST. JOE PAPER C0MPANY M0NUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN WEST 638.56 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 355.87 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF A GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 46 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID COUNTY ROAD BOUNDARY 192.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN ALONG SAID SOUTHWESTERLY ROAD BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 46 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 141.22 FEET, THENCE NORTH 48 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 32.78 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 100.35 FEET, THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 78.93 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A POWER LINE EASEMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID COUNTY ROAD BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 24 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 354.81 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 223.39 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TO INCLUDE A: 2000 GENERAL LEASING CO. VINGMHGA1249925046A #79466437 2000 GENERAL LEASING CO. VIN.GMHGA1249925046B #79466459 Length and width of mobile home is 20.8 X 66.3 OCTOBER 25 AND NOVEMBER 1, 2012 5411-1101 TWN vs. Heirs of Roosevelt Wilson Case No. 2004-FC-100 Notice of Action IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2004-FC-100 CIVIL DIVISION JIMMIE WILSON, Petitioner, vs. HEIRS OF ROOSEVELT ALEXANDER WILSON, WILLIE WILSON AND PEARLIE MAE WILSON, AND FERRELL ALLEN, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Alexandria Bramhan Beauford, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 Marla Barnes, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Amended Verified Complaint has been filed in this court. This is an action for determination of heirs, partition and quiet title to certain real property lying in Wakulla County, Florida, and more particularly described as follows: Parcel 1: Wakulla County Parcel No. 16-3S-01E-000-05224-000, the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NE of SW of SW ) of Section Sixteen (16), Township Three South, Range 1 East and a parcel in the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE of SW of SW ) of Section Sixteen (16), containing 14.96 ac., MOL; Parcel 2: Wakulla County Parcel No. 22-3S-01E-000-05405-000, Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company monument marking the Northwest corner of 5415-1108 TWN vs. Harrell, Tracy N. Case No. 65-2010-CA-000282 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000282 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. TRACYN. HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELLAND BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES, et. al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in 65-2010-CA-000282 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP F/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and TRACYN HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELL; BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE; AMYDENISE LALONDE; BRYAN DOLPHIS LALONDE; WAKULLABANK are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front lobby Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. on January 17, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22, WALKERS CROSSING COMMENCING AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 360.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 198.19 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT ; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 212.39 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLYALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU A CENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 31 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.19 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST, 229.82 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 330.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. THE ABOVE LEGALDESCRIPTION BEING MORE RECENTLYSURVEYED BYTHURMAN RODDENBERRYAND ASSOCIATES, DATED APRIL4, 2002, UNDER JOB NO. 01-034, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST, 360.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 200.49 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF CHANCE COURT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE ADISTANCE OF 212.88 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET, THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 38 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 61.66 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 11 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 61.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 232.20 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919); THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 330.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1998 OR 1999 HOMES OF LEGEND SINGLE -WIDE VIN #HL9774AL. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 16th day of October, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 1 & 8, 2012 11-05421 5416-1108 TWN vs. Hummel, Maurice Case No. 10-103-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 10-103-CA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporationauthorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. MAURICE A. HUMMEL, III and DAWN M. HUMMEL, husband and wife; and UNIDENTIFIED JOHN DOE(S) and UNIDENTIFIED JANE DOE (S), Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclo5417-1108 TWN Vs. Dunn, Darrell 2009 CA 000322 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO. 2009 CA 006090 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. DARRELL DAVID DUNN, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed September 20, 2012 entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000322 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and DARRELL DAVID DUNN, et al., are the Defendants. The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 15th day of November, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 6, THE FAIRWAYS AT WILDWOOD AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 51 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an inter est in the surplus fr om the sale, if any, other than the pr operty owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. November 1 & 8, 2012 sure entered on September 19, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on January 17th, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. (EST), in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, the following described property: The North 396 feet of the East 220 feet of the following described parcel: Commencing at the Northwest corner of the Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4) of Section 10, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, and run South along the West boundary of said SW 1/4 the distance of 440 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, continue South along the West boundary line of said SW 1/4 the distance of 392 feet to a point, then at right angles run East 208.7 feet to a point, then run South parallel with the West boundary of said SW 1/4 208.7 feet to a point, then at right angles run East 1024 feet to the West boundary of the Lizzie Taylor property then run North along the West boundary of said Lizzie Taylor land 600.7 feet to a point, then at right angles run West 1232.7 feet back to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Being situate in the SW 1/4 of Section 10, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH an easement for ingress and egress on the North 25 feet of a 16 acre parcel described above which parcel herein conveyed forms a part thereof, running from the East right-of-way line of Bethel Church Road to the West boundary of the 2 acre parcel herein conveyed. Together with a 2005 CMH Riverwood Double wide Mobile Home, serial no. WHC014594GAA & WHC014594GAB Property Address: 84 Gosset Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTERST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: October 8, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK, WAKULLA COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 1 & 8, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 3 South, Range 1 East, Wakulla County, Florida, and run thence South 00 degrees 31 minutes 20 seconds East along the westerley boundry of said Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter 873.80 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds East 245.54 feet to a point on the eastern boundary line of the right-of-way of State Road No. 363, thence run South 16 degrees 12 minutes 52 seconds East 155.81 feet to the point of beginning of the land herein described. From said point of beginning, run North 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds East 247.86 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 31 minutes 20 seconds West 150 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds East 140.12 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 03 minutes 21 seconds East 450.01 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds West 300.04 feet to a point on the eastern boundary line of the right-of-way of State Road No. 363, thence run North 16 degrees 12 minutes 52 seconds West 311.61 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning, containing 2.845 acres, more or less, in the Northwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 3 South, Range 1 East. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on petitioners attorney, whose name and address are: Deirdre A. Farrington, Esq., P.O. Box 392, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 on or before November 26, 2012, and to file the original of the written defenses with the clerk of this court either before service or immediately thereafter. Failure to serve and file written defenses as required may result in a judgment or order for the relief demanded, without further notice. Signed on October 15, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desireee D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk October 25 & November 1, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5412-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.12 TXD013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2424Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-080-000-11508-013LOT 80 HS P-4-13-M-22 COMM AT NE COR OF LOT 81 HS OR 648 P 773 Name in which assessedBEN WITHERS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this11day of October 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 5413-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLCthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2182Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-076-000-10250-008 LOT 76 HS P-7-8-M20-C IN NE 1/4 OF LOT 76 HS OR 148 P 292 OR 219 P 610 Name in which assessedTHE SIGHTS & SOUNDS COMPANY OF WAKULLA INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this12day of October2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities • 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $900 Security Deposit Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2837 Coastal Hwy. Commercial Building $800 mo. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. George's Lighthouse Point Waterfront living Overlooking georgious Ochlockonee Bay Unit 25E, 2BD/2BA, 1,460 sq. ft., washer/dryer, hardwood oors throughout, gated community with pool and tennis court. $1000. mo. No pets

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 11BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 26 … Gov. Rick Scott unveiled his prescription for the future of education in Florida this week as he released details of an agenda that focused on national core standards and putting more faith in charter schools. Following a listening tour that took him across the state, Scott released details of his legislative agenda for education, one of his few major forays outside economic development since taking of“ ce nearly two years ago. Other than that, the looming elections in the politically deadlocked state overshadowed most issues this week. After all, Florida played host to the presidential candidates who debated at Lynn University, the last of three debates before voters cast ballots in the Nov. 6 election. Other guests crisscrossing the state included family members and a string of party luminaries who are turning over every rock to find the elusive undecidedŽ voters who have yet to make up their minds. There was, however, other news as well. Echoing the concerns that almost got Scott sent packing from south Florida, the Florida Chamber of Commerce this week objected to legislation passed earlier this year that would block state and local governments from buying goods and services from companies that have business ties to Cuba. The chambers position had the not-so-surprising effect of angering south Florida Hispanic lawmakers. Speaking of south Florida lawmakers, U.S. Rep. David Rivera, R-Miami, added the Florida Commission on Ethics to a growing list of antagonists as he faces mounting investigations and tries to hold on to the seat he has held since 2010. On the economic front, BP announced this week it was cancelling plans to build a $300-million ethanol plant in Highlands County, ending a four-year commitment to build its “ rst production facility in the United States. The company said it would seek opportunities elsewhere. EDUCATION AGENDA UNVEILED Expanding his priority list from attracting jobs and boosting the economy, Scott this week consolidated a series of previous miniannouncements as he put forth a package of education priorities he says will move the state forward. Arguably the most controversial element of Scotts plan is the increased role of charter schools, public schools that are usually run by third parties and are free of many of the regulations faced by typical schools. Scotts plan would remove enrollment caps on existing charter schools and allow school districts to operate their own charter schools. Scotts agenda would also make other changes, junking some regulations and giving debit cards to teachers to pay for school supplies, with the hopes that businesses would help support the program. The agenda would also require the state not to introduce any new testing that doesnt conform to the Common Core Standards,Ž a national set of curriculum guidelines set to take effect next school year. CHAMBER OPPOSES CUBA-SYRIA CONTRACTING LAW The Florida Chamber of Commerce jumped into the always politically dicey subject of Cuba trade this week as it asked a federal appeals court to continue blocking a new law that would prevent state and local governments from contracting with “ rms that have business links to Cuba or Syria. The chamber “ led a brief Monday in the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that says the law, passed this year by the Legislature, would have far-reaching implications and unintended consequences that will irreparably harm Florida businesses and the states economy.Ž The state is appealing a Miami federal judges decision in June that granted a preliminary injunction against the measure, which was signed into law by Scott. The governor initially said the restrictions would not take effect until Congress passed a law allowing states to impose such sanctions. But he reversed course after an outcry from Hispanic lawmakers. In the brief, the chamber said the law would discourage foreign investment in the state and strain relations with Brazil and Canada. The response of south Florida lawmakers, if not surprising, was at least timely. Quite frankly, we are appalled with your decision to accept providing economic benefits to these states which support terrorism and communism without taking into consideration all those who have suffered and died at the hands of such oppressive regimes,Ž Sen. Rene Garcia, R-Hialeah, wrote in a letter to Chamber Chairman Anthony Connelly. RIVERA FACES ETHICS CHARGES The Florida ethics commission found probable causeŽ to believe that Rivera broke states ethics laws as a state legislator at least 11 times, jolting his re-election bid less than two weeks before Election Day. The ethics commission allegations included that Rivera received income from a company essentially trying to buy his vote; misused campaign funds; didnt report a companys decision to forgive a debt as a gift; and left information off of “ nancial disclosure reports. Rivera is currently locked in a battle for his seat against Democratic challenger Joe Garcia, who has made an issue of allegations of corruption that have been lodged against Rivera. In a statement issued by his campaign, Rivera blasted the timing of the announcement and his political enemies. It is no coincidence that these frivolous complaints from two years ago -one from a major donor to Joe Garcia and another from someone who was convicted of threatening to kill Jeb Bush -were suddenly acted upon just two weeks before the election,Ž Rivera said. BP DROPS PLANS FOR ETHANOL PLANT BPs plans for a 36-million gallon per year ethanol plant in Highlands County have been scrapped, with the company saying it is ending its pursuit of commercial ethanol production in the United States. The companys decision is a blow to the central Florida region, which was hoping to welcome the plant and the 800 construction and operating jobs it would bring. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott unveiled an education package this week in preparation for the 2013 Legislative session. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Lets focus on where were going. Were going to a common core standard that 46 states haveƒ and were going to spend all our time on that.Ž … Gov. Rick Scott on moving away from FCAT to national standards. WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Gov. Scott lays out education messageBrain Teaser 1 13 17 20 23 30 37 42 50 57 61 64 67 2 31 51 3 32 46 4 27 47 18 24 48 62 65 5 14 38 43 68 6 33 58 7 25 28 44 52 63 8 21 29 39 53 59 9 26 49 15 40 45 22 41 60 66 69 10 16 19 34 54 11 35 55 12 36 56 ACROSS 1. Slangy assent 5. Syria's Bashar al__ 10. Bleacher creature 13. Bear in the air 14. Marchers may take them up 16. Hubbub 17. Seer's prop 19. Dove's sound 20. Bob Cousy's team 21. Baby blues 23. Toothpaste tube abbr. 24. Perfume holder 26. Telly 27. __ good deed 28. "Peer Gynt" dancer 30. Taj __ 33. "Ta-ta!" 34. Perry Mason's field 37. Language common in Miami 39. Gate-crash 42. One of a D.C. hundred 43. Blue hue 45. Pays attention to 46. Spoilers of a sort 49. Beiderbecke of jazz 50. Alphonse's friend 52. M, __ "mnemonic" 54. Swabbie's rear 57. Eight-footer? 59. Oran's land 61. "... man __ mouse?" 62. Rocker known as "The Boss" 64. Go astray 65. "Joltin' Joe" or "The Mick" 66. Heche or Rice 67. __ "Kookie" Byrnes 68. Industrious sorts 69. Disney dogDOWN1. New Mexico's state flower 2. Blew it 3. Safe havens 4. "... why __ thou forsaken me?" 5. Tree that yields gum arabic 6. Zesty dip 7. Second-stringer 8. Rush job letters 9. Removal of text 10. 5¢, for a nickel 11. Love to pieces 12. Wild West knot 15. Winter fall 18. Villa d'Este locale 22. The "p" in wpm 25. Chou En-__ 27. Dapper dude? 29. Catch but good 30. Submissions to eds. 31. Knuckle-dragger 32. Heels-over-head maneuver 33. 1987 Best Actress 35. Stick on 36. Jazzman Montgomery 38. Note-taker's tablet 40. Possessions 41. "Oedipus __" 44. Botanist Gray 47. Prefix meaning "ear" 48. __-turvy 49. Places for stagnant water 50. Honker in a skein 51. Pungent-smelling 53. Not as nutty 54. Bout locale 55. Diabolical one 56. Chief Justice, 1836-64 58. First Bond flick 60. List -ending abbr. 63. Tina didn't like him American Prole Hometown Content 10/28/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 12 3 4567 6381 2 46 6741 895 4 692 5638 147 200 9 HometownContent 785 1629 3 4 124359678 639748251 392 514786 567823419 841976523 473 685192 956231847 218497365 Y U C C A M S S G O O S E E R R E D A P E A C R I D A S Y L A H A N D S T A N D H A S T D A N O T O T I V O L I T O P S Y A C A C I A S T E N O P A D S A L S A C H E R D R N O S U B L A I A S A I K E A S A P N A I L S A N E R D E L E T I O N B I L G E S S L E E T T H I N G S P E R R E X E T A L F A C E V A L U E A R E N A A D O R E A D D F I E N D N O O S E W E S T A N E Y Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. 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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 1. LANGUAGE: What is the meaning of the Latin prefix demiŽ? 2. HISTORY: Who wrote the political book The PrinceŽ during the Renaissance? 3. ASTRONOMY: What phase of the moon is opposite of crescent? 4. LITERATURE: What was the real name of the author who assumed the pen name of George Orwell? 5. ART: What are the three primary colors? 6. MUSIC: What is indicated by the musical notation estintoŽ? 7. GEOGRAPHY: What state lies directly east of Utah? 8. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the traditional birthstone for June? 9. MEASUREMENTS: The watt, a unit of electrical power, was named for what famous inventor? 10. ETIQUETTE: Properly speaking, who should host a wedding shower for a bride? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Half 2. Niccolo Machiavelli 3. Gibbous 4. Eric Arthur Blair 5. Red, yellow and blue 6. So soft that it can hardly be heard 7. Colorado 8. Pearl 9. James Watt 10. A friend of the bride YOUR AD HERE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 – Page 13B Favored treatment for others Means higher taxes for you! The county budget remains the same, regardless. A portion of the taxes of the "favored" just shifts to you! It is all about fairness. The citizens of Wakulla do not mind paying their fair share; they just do not want to pay someone else's. Put "fair" back into fair market value! Please help me with your vote "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www.FairValuesInWakulla.com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser In-Home Assessments and Referrals Offered for Comfort and Convenience If falls, weakness or inability to participate in activities become a concern for your loved one, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Tallahassee is here to help. We oer free inhome assessments with no physician orders needed. Once an evaluation is approved, HealthSouths team of professionals develop comprehensive, individualized treatment plans for a safe return home. If you have any questions or need more information contact us. IS YOUR LOVED ONE SAFE AT HOME? 2012:HealthSouth Corporation:551345 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt HOMECOMING 2012 PHOTOS BY BILL ROLLINS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS For more photos, go to thewakullanews.com You’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe Wakuulanews

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By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE … In a debate that touches on the past, present and future of Florida, opponents of a constitutional ban on “ nancially supporting faithbased organizations are asking state voters to pass an amendment to repeal the provision. On each side of the battle over Amendment 8 is a coalition of groups that has its own perception of what caused the no-aidŽ provision to be adopted in the “ rst place, why supporters of the amendment removing that ban are pushing it now and what would happen if it were to be repealed. For supporters of the amendment, failure to adopt it could cripple faithbased organizations, putting them one lawsuit awayŽ from losing vital taxpayer dollars for services like prison ministries, soup kitchens and disaster relief. But opponents say overturning the 127-yearold ban would dismantle a critical bulwark of the separation of church and state and open the door for vouchers that would siphon money away from public education. Those who back the amendment say the original no-aid provision of the constitution was approved as part of a wave of measures, known as Blaine amendmentsŽ for their federal sponsor, adopted in the latter half of the 19th Century to ensure that Catholic private schools would never receive taxpayer money, despite the Protestant tilt of public schools. Aside from school-choice litigation, the provision has largely lingered since then. But supporters of the amendment say it became a threat again after a group known as the Council for Secular Humanism filed suit to cut off state support for two prison ministries run by faith-based organizations. If the suit succeeds, supporters of the amendment fear, a wide swath of social services could be disrupted. Jim Frankowiak, who manages the pro-Amendment 8 campaign for Citizens for Religious Freedom and Non-Discrimination, says the state has paid out close to $400 million over the last couple of years to faith-based groups, many of which provide needed services. These are not luxuries,Ž he said. These are the basics for many people.Ž Many of those services are secular, even if the organization that provides them is faith-based. They include things like hospitals, hospice and substance abuse programs. Frankowiak dismissed concerns that the amendment would weaken the separation of church and state, saying that there are still safeguards against state-backed religion. This does nothing to the establishment clause in the Florida Constitution or the U.S. Constitution,Ž he said. And Frankowiak said the groups legal experts dismiss the idea of a vast voucher program, noting that the uniformity clause, which requires the state to offer public education, has been used to block voucher programs in the past and would remain intact if Amendment 8 passes. So far, the group has raised almost $106,000, according to state records -the vast majority of it coming from Catholic groups. The Archdiocese of Miami has contributed more than $28,000, part of $87,500 that has ” owed from the archdiocese and six dioceses to Citizens for Religious Freedom and Non-Discrimination. Separately, the Florida Conference of Catholic Bishops has kicked in nearly $16,700, according to state records. Opponents of the amendment, though, insist that it would demolish a long-standing protection against citizens being forced to watch their tax dollars go to religious organizations they might disagree with. Its served the state well, and now the supporters want to overturn that and upset the apple cart about the separation of church and state,Ž said Alan Stonecipher, communications director for the Vote No on 8 Committee. Stoneciphers group is supported by the Florida Education Association and other education groups along with the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, Americans United for the Separation of Church and State, the League of Women Voters of Florida, the Anti-Defamation League and the National Council of Jewish Women. They argue that the efforts to repeal the no-aid provision are, in fact, rooted in a long-standing effort by supporters of vouchers to provide public funding for religious schools. This constitutional provision stands directly in their way,Ž Stonecipher said. Vote No on 8 also says talk that the original provision was a form of discrimination against Catholics isnt true. A paper produced last year by the ACLU argued that there were no signs of widespread antiCatholic bigotry in Florida when the ban was approved. Opponents of the amendment also point out that the no-aid provision was essentially re-adopted in later revisions to the Florida Constitution. If there was any hint of bias in its origins, its since been cleansed,Ž Stonecipher said. His group, which hasnt yet reported fundraising “ gures to the Florida Division of Elections, has produced a radio ad and is working through social media to attempt to hold support for the amendment below the 60 percent needed for approval. It is a bar that even supporters of the amendment are concerned about reaching. This is an uphill struggle,Ž Frankowiak said. I guess what concerns me is the misinformation thats out there. And this is not a walk in the park.Ž Page 14B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Battle over Amendment 8 focuses on schools, history



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Special to The NewsAn event to help feed people in need in the county will be held this Saturday, Nov. 3 at Hudson Park. The Empty Bowls Fundraiser is intended to raise money to stock the local food pantries and bring awareness to hunger in the area. In Wakulla County, 4,800 people are dealing with food insecurity, not knowing at one time where their next meal might come from. This equates to 15.3 percent of the countys total population. For $15, participants can pick out their favorite ceramic, hand-painted bowl and then ll it with one of 15 different soups made by individuals and community groups and also enjoy fresh homemade bread and drink. There will a also be a silent auction, a bake sale by Harvest Fellowship, craft vendors, music and Stone Soup play performed by local children. Those people or groups who have offered to make soup include Shelley Swenson with the extension of ce, roasted pumpkin; Trudy Thompson, red lentil stew; Palaver Tree Theater, ham and potato; Tina Johnson, fall harvest soup; Florida Green Guide Association, green pea; Ribits Ceramics, Cuban black bean; Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, beef vegetable; Rotary Club, chicken noodle; Poseys Steam Room, potato and corn; Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist, chicken and wild rice; Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park, navy bean; Habitat for Humanity, vegetable beef medley; Alan Brock, butternut squash; and Madeleine Carr, barley vegetable. The cost for children under 13 is $5, but does not include a ceramic bowl. The bowls were painted and donated by those in the community including Emily Smith, Bethany Thomas, Ralph Thomas, Eden Springs, Senior Center, Purple Martin Nursery group, Susie Tookes group from United Methodist Womens Organization, Nells Art Class, Esther Ellis group from Christ Church Anglican, Diane Curley, Shelley Swenson, Pat, Sharon, Howard and Ann Kesler, John and Petra Shuff, Alan Brock, Education Enrichment Council of 4-H, AVID (Kelli, Andrew and Analise Bracci, Maggie Metcalf, Jill and Danna Richardson), Leon County Girl Scout Troop 57, Keep Wakulla Beautiful group, Heidi Jackley, Hannah Lanier, Micah and Zoey Lanier and so many more. Continued on Page 15A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 42nd Issue Thursday, November 1, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Taking Care of Business ................................................Page 10A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 12A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 14A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 18A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 8B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 9B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 9B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 11B Comics ...........................................................................Page 12BINDEX OBITUARIES Edward Thomas Ward Early voting is underway Homecoming 2012KING AND QUEEN: Demetrius Lindsey and Ashley Alvarez were crowned Homecoming King and Queen during the halftime festivities last week. For more photos of the court, see Page 13B. PHOtO BY BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSheriff candidates square off at one last forumEmpty Bowls is SaturdayWILLIAM SNOWDENCandidates and volunteers were out on Saturday, the rst day of early voting. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netEarly voting started in Wakulla County, which is apparent by the plethora of political signs around the county and the candidates and supporters who line Crawfordville Highway waving at cars throughout the day. As of Tuesday, Oct. 30, the supervisor of elections of ce reported that 2,627 people have turned out to cast their vote early. Thats what we want them to do, Supervisor Henry Buddy Wells said. Get out and vote. Although there is only one week to vote early this year, as opposed to two weeks in 2008, Wells predicts this year may be higher because of the large numbers of voters his of ce is seeing every day. In 2008, a total of 5,500 people voted early, he said. Early voting started on Saturday, Oct. 27 and ends this Saturday, Nov. 3. The only place to vote is at the elections of ce, and can be done from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Voters need to bring a picture ID with signature. Prior to early voting, there were questions raised about the number of people registered to vote in the county. The number on the supervisor of elections website, the one on the Florida Division of Elections website and one given out to a citizen did not match. The numbers on the property appraisers site and division of elections is the number of active voters, Wells said. These voters are participating voters. There is a difference of about 1,600 people between eligible voters and active voters. Voters become inactive, but still eligible, after they do not participate in a general election, Wells said. The numbers are different between his website and the state because the states numbers are as of Oct. 9, he said. People who were inactive have since become active because they have voted or contacted his of- ce, he said, which makes them active. Continued on Page 16AQuestions arise over numbers of voters By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe nal forum in one of the more heated races of these election season was held on Oct. 25 and included the candidates running for sheriff of Wakulla County, Charlie Creel and Maurice Langston. This race has involved a citizens complaint led against Langston over his eligibility to run for the seat, as well as a push poll that focused heavily on Creels past and a negative mailer sent out against Creel funded by a third party. Tensions were high at the Wakulla County Community Center as a crowd of a little more than 100 people listened to the candidates in their last public attempt to sway voters just days before the start of early voting. Opening statements from the candidates set the tone for the rest of the forum. One candidate laid out his quali cations and expressed his belief that his opponents experience as a traf c patrolman did not qualify him to be sheriff, while the other focused on what he believed was a need for change within the current sheriffs of ce. Langston, who works as a major at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office, compared his opponent, Charlie Creel, a retired Florida Highway Patrol trooper, to a puppy being thrown into a fox hunt. While the puppy has teeth, he has claws, he has instincts, he just doesnt have a clue how to use them, Langston said. Creel responded to Langstons comments in his opening statement and stated that the two most dangerous activities of a law enforcement of cer involve stopping a vehicle and responding to a domestic violence call. He added that the agency with the most of cers killed while on duty in the state of Florida is the highway patrol with 41. I want somebody to go to their families and tell them, Your husband was nothing but a traf c cop, Creel said. He added that all law enforcement officers are trained the exact same way. Creel also focused on the countys crime rate as established by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, which he said has gone up 15.4 percent from 2010 to 2011. This is not acceptable, Creel said. We deserve a fresh start and Im the one to offer it. Langston contended that Wakulla County does not have a high crime rate and said taking FDLEs stats and using them to say so was misleading. He added that Wakulla is in the top third of safest counties in the state. Continued on Page 19A JENNIFER JENSENCharlie Creel, left, listens as Maurice Langston answers a question at the forum. Property appraiser candidates also appear at forum. See Page 2A.Painted bowls for the Empty Bowls project.Its the best fall shing seen in a long time See Page 12A

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com NOVEMBER Get outstanding low prices on quality products. Find the right products for your project and expert advice at True Value. Sale ends 11/30/2012 3361 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville 926-5559 Mon Fri 7am 6pm Sat 7:30am 5pm SAVE 33%999reg. 14.99Black All-Steel Folding Chair SAVE 38%799reg. 12.9970-Ct. Indoor/ Outdoor Holiday LED Light Set Your choice SPECIAL PURCHASE997100-Pc. Screwdriver Set 199 Red Mini Solar Path Light SAVE 36%699reg. 10.994-Pk. BatteryOperated LED Candles SPECIAL PURCHASE997Santa & Snowman Glitter Snow Globes each599 20-Lb. Wild Bird Food 497 4-Pc. Tape Measure Set SAVE 50%3499reg. 69.9930-In. x 72-In. Deluxe Folding Table 699-$3399sale price mail-in rebate* FINAL PRICE Gal. 50/50 Antifreeze & Coolant Limit 2 SAVE 44%1999reg. 35.991-Gal. Micro Wet/Dry Vac SAVE 50%499reg. 9.9913-Pc. Drill Bit Set SAVE 20% 1999reg. 24.99 29-Pc. Swift Driver Screwdriver Set Scan here for demo SAVE 50%1999reg. 39.9912V, 3/8-In. Cordless Drill SAVE 40%2999reg. 49.996-Ft. Giant LED Spiral Tree SAVE 50%999reg. 19.993-Pc. LED Twinkle Stake Light Sets Your choice SAVE 30%699reg. 9.99LED Window Decoration Your choice HOT DEAL899reg. 10.99300-Ct. Holiday Light Sets Your choiceSAVE 50% 1499reg. 29.99 12-In. Decorated LED Hanging BasketSAVE 37%2499reg. 39.99200-Ct. LED C6 Light Set Your choice GULF COAST GULF COAST Lumber & Supply Inc. Lumber & Supply Inc. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe last forum for the property appraisers race was held on Oct. 25 and the two candidates seemed to agree on a number of issues. One of the few major disagreements between incumbent Donnie Sparkman and challenger Jim Parham was their estimation of when property values will return to normal. Parham, who has 38 years experience as an appraiser in the private and public sector, predicted the next major boom in real estate will happen around 2020 when the grandchildren of the baby boomers are moving out of their parents homes and purchasing their own. Lets be ready for it to do it the right way, Parham said. Sparkman, who has served as property appraiser for six years and has been a land surveyor and community development director for the county, said 2004-10 was unprecedented and wasnt sure if where the county is right now isnt the normal market now. Until the market is cleared up and mortgage lenders start lending, there wont be any major changes, he said. I dont expect to see a change in my lifetime, he said. The candidates were asked if they felt there was the perception in the county that there is preferential treatment given to the evaluation of certain properties in the county. Parham, who has run on the campaign promise of fairness and no favored treatment to anyone, felt there was that perception in the county and said he has heard this from voters. In order to address this, the office must be more transparent and hold workshops to explain the process to residents, he said. This feeling of distrust is not limited to the property appraisers of ce, he added. Sparkman did not feel the same. He wondered why these people who feel this way werent calling his of ce. He added that when someone doesnt understand why their property value might be lower or higher than their neighbors, he sits down and explains it to them. Fair and equitable is what we do, he said. He added that sometimes they make mistakes and that is where the citizens can help. When asked how often and how precise property evaluations are, Sparkman said they are performed annually and must report to the Department of Revenue yearly. The evaluations must be within 10 percent. Parham said he would set up a schedule where he and a staff member are out in the eld one day a week looking at properties so they can nd things that are out of whack. He added that he would also check with the other sources in the private sector to get a better conclusion of value. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe City of St. Marks has begun to take the nal steps in cleaning up the old St. Marks re nery property, now known as St. Marks Innovation Park. The city completed the removal of the 11 tanks and the associated piping racks earlier this year through a brownfield assessment grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. It now plans to apply for a brown eld cleanup grant for $200,000 from EPA. If awarded, this money will be used to remove isolated spots via excavation an off-site disposal and capping impacted areas to eliminate exposure, said Roger Register, director of Cardno TBE, the citys consultant who conducted the most recent phase of the assessment grant. It will take about a year and a half to complete, Register said. Along with the grant, the city is also applying for a hardship waiver of the 20percent match required. The deadline to apply is Nov. 19. It will be awarded in April or May of 2013. Register said the grant is extremely competitive, but St. Marks has a good shot because they were successful with the previous grant. The St. Marks Re nery produced jet fuel and diesel. Crude oil was delivered by barge and products were shipped out by truck. The site was owned by American International Petroleum Corporation until the rm entered into bankruptcy in 2005. The facility was closed in 2001 and the corporation simply walked away from it. In 2005, Florida Department of Environmental Protection took over the site and spent $20 million to remove the processing equipment, excavating and cleaning it up, as well as conducting an assessment. The 55-acre site was then donated to the city in 2010 through a quit-claim deed. The city divided the 55acre site into two parcels, the west consisting of 47 acres fronting Port Leon Drive and 8 acres adjoining the St. Marks River. The cleanup thus far has focused on the west parcel which contained the 11 storage tanks and two of ce buildings. Potential uses for the site, include a commercial or industrial park closest to Port Leon Drive. The two buildings on that site have been renovated and the city has had a couple tenants. The middle part of the site is where the bulk of the processing equipment was and there has been discussion about using it as a solar farm. As for the area closest to the St. Marks River, some have proposed developing it as a boat yard. In other news: A group approached the city about possibly renting the re nery property, closest to the road, to hold a swap meet car show. It would be a three-day event that is held three times a year and features antique vintage cars and motorcycles. John Jefferson said the event would be held with veterans affairs and a portion of the proceeds would go to Wounded Warriors. The group would furnish its own insurance and help cleanup the front portion of the property. Mayor Chuck Shield said the city might be OK with renting it to the group for free in exchange for the cleaning up of the property.Candidates for property appraiser appear at forum WILLIAM SNOWDENDonnie Sparkman, left, and Jim Parham at the bi-partisan forum.St. Marks applies for EPA grant Photo by Cardno TBE/Special to The NewsCleanup of the re nery site to create St. Marks Innovation Park

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. In accordance with Section 121.055, Florida Statutes, Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners intends to designate the following positions to the Senior Management Service Class in the Florida Retirement System: Director of Inter-Governmental Affairs Director of Probation Services Director of Employee Support ServicesOCTOBER 25, NOVEMBER 1, 2012 SPECIAL MEETING MONDAYNovember 5, 2012 at 5:05 pm Amending Operating Budget of the City of St. Marks for Fiscal Year 2011-2012The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Ofce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.NOVEMBER 1, 2012 BUDGET SUMMARYCity of St. Marks Fiscal Year 2011-2012 BUDGET SUMMARYCity of St. Marks Fiscal Year 2011-2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on November 14, 2012, at 5:30pm NOVEMBER 1, 2012 City of Sopchoppy NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe City of Sopchoppy will hold a public hearing on the adoption of Ordinance 2012-03, AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE OPERATING BUDGET FOR THE GENERAL AND WATER FUNDS OF THE CITY OF SOPCHOPPY FOR THE 2011-12 OPERATING YEAR, at the regular council meeting, November, 13, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. The public hearing will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. The public is invited and urged to attend. Any person needing special assistance to attend this meeting should contact the Clerks Ofce 24 hours in advance by calling 962-4611.NOVEMBER 1, 8, 2012 City of Sopchoppy NOTICE OF MEETING CHANGEThe City of Sopchoppy will be changing the date of the regular November meeting from the second Monday to the second Tuesday in November in observance of the Veterans Day Holiday The meeting will be held, November 13, at 6:30 p.m., 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FLNOVEMBER 1, 8, 2012 WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERSSTATE HOUSING INITIATIVES PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM (SHIP) REHABILITATION PROJECT NUMBER: ITB #2012-13 Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Sealed bids for ITB#2012-13, STATE HOUSING INITIATIVES PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM (SHIP) REHABILITATION PROJECT will be received until 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, November 15, 2012. The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners invites interested residential contractors to submit bids for the rehabilitation of two (2) single family homes located in Wakulla County. Bids should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Ofce, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at which time all bids will be publicly opened. Bids received after the time and date specied will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Bidder. Please direct all questions to: A MANDATORY meeting to provide contractor orientation materials and visit the scheduled project will be held on Thursday, November 8, 2012 at 10:30am at the Housing Ofce located in the Countys Administration Building, 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. All interested contractors must attend this meeting in order to receive the bid documents and attend the review of the project. The visit to the project will immediately follow the orientation meeting. For contractors that have not been pre-approved, you may obtain a contractor application package by calling Meridian Community Services Group, Inc. at (888) 878-1908 (Toll Free). Please bring your completed application package to the mandatory meeting on November 8, 2012. E. Alan Brock, Chairman Deborah DuBose, OMB CoordinatorWBE/MBE/DBE Firms are encouraged to participate. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Any persons with a qualied disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this ofce by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD).ADMINISTRATIVE: Deborah DuBose Wakulla County BOCC Phone: 850.926.9500 Fax: 850.926.0940 Email: ddubose@mywakulla.com TECHNICAL: Esrone McDaniels Meridian Community Services Group, Inc. 1500 Mahan Drive, Ste. 250, Tallahassee, FL PH: 850.877.1908 Fax: 850-878-8785 emcdaniels@meridserv.comNOVEMBER 1, 2012

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy RACHEL PIENTA Volumes have been written about the accomplishments of President Obamas rst term. What will be the deciding factor for most voters on election day? The words of Clinton adviser James Carville, said during the 1992 presidential campaign resonate with me in these nal days of the 2012 campaign. Those words are as true today as they were 20 years ago Its the economy! The presidents opponents like to throw numbers around as evidence in support of their candidate. However, Id like to offer a different take on the economy that tells the rest of the story. Lets talk numbers. At the close of the 2012 scal year, the Congressional Budget Of ce announced the federal budget de cit: $1.1 trillion. That is a number not to be taken lightly. However, the bigger story and the more accurate telling of the numbers story is that the de cit was cut by $200 billion in the past year. Furthermore, the CBO has issued budget projections that show the 2013 Obama budget, if we return him to of ce, would shrink the de cit to (OR BY) $977 billion. That is a four year total of close to $500 billion in de cit reduction. How did this Democratic president accomplish this enormous de cit reduction? President Obama signed the StatutoryPay-As-You-Go Act in February 2010 that mandates new spending must be offset with spending cuts or new revenue. This visionary act helped reduce the de cit and spurred renewed economic growth in ways unseen since the Clinton Administration. What does that mean here at home? Wakullas unemployment was 6.5 percent in September, down from 8.7 percent at the same time last year. Not only is Wakullas unemployment rate lower than the state of Florida, which was 8.6 percent in September, but it is also lower than the national rate which was at 7.6 percent last month. The economy is on the rebound. President Obama has successfully implemented de cit reduction. If it is really about the economy, President Obama is the candidate you should support Nov. 6.Rachel Pienta is the chair of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee.By JONATHAN KILPATRICK When the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics was on the verge of collapse, Mitt Romney was asked to step in and correct the problem. He did just that. When elected the governor of Massachusetts, Romney took of ce in a state where the budget was out of balance and the state economy was in disarray. Gov. Romney put his conservative principles to work, and balanced the budget, unemployment fell and businesses returned to the state adding thousands of new jobs. Today the United States faces similar and even greater challenges. The policies of the last four years are not working. Unemployment remains high, with millions of Americans out of work and 43 months with unemployment over 8 percent. The nation now has a $16 trillion national debt, that is over $51,000 dollars for each man, woman and child in the country and $5 trillion of that debt has been added just within the last three and a half years. Businesses are not hiring due to threats of higher taxes and over burdensome regulations. America needs a change. America needs fresh leadership. The current administration has backed away from our allies around the world and has not stood up to those who would seek to harm us. The latest example is the horri c events in Benghazi, Libya. This administration did not respond when calls for help were made. Four Americans died while drones ew overhead. The world needs America to stand up and be a leader, not lead from behind. Our friends in the world must know we stand with them and our enemies must know we will respond. America needs a change. The United States faces unprecedented challenges. The economy is in shambles, the debt has skyrocketed to unimaginable levels and the world is a very dangerous place. America needs leadership that will attack these challenges head on and put in a plan to get the economy moving again, create jobs and growth, re-engage America as the leader of the free world and create a smaller, simpler and smarter federal government. Romney has presented this plan to the American people. This election presents a clear choice America needs a change and America needs Mitt Romney for president. For more information about Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan visit the website www. MittRomney.com.Jonathan Kilpatrick is the chair of the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee. readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Sheriffs Report for Oct. 25 Get familiar with common poisonous plants County goes from deficit to surplus Lane closures on 319 next week Empty Bowl fundraiser is set for Nov. 3 War Eagles stay perfect Questions about outside groups in local campaigns Stone Crab Festivalthewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.COMMUNITY DEBATE DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: BARACK OBAMA REPUBLICAN RESPONSE: MITT ROMNEYEditor, The News: Several weeks ago there was an incident that took place during the Democratic Convention that really got my attention. When the gentlemen from California (the speaker) had to repeat three times whether to put Gods name back in platform or leave it out because the yeas and nays were so even. That tells me that half the group would deny God. For the life of me I cant see how a person who even believes theres a God much less a Christian could vote for such to lead our country. There has already been so much of our Christian values taken away. We had better wake up while were still allowed to vote before thats taken away also. Thanks, Bill Avery Crawfordville P.S. Im an Alabama transplant. Remember the Ten Commandments removal from the Capitol?Editor, The News: Soups on! Overwhelming reaction to the countys rst Empty Bowl event on Saturday, Nov. 3, at Hudson Park. Tickets to ll a hand decorated bowl are selling fast and it is time to tell all that no one will be refused delicious soup, even without a painted bowl. The event is from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Entertainment and fellowship guaranteed. So what kind of soups is our community making? After you buy a soup bowl you will go through the line and get a taste of the following soups: Roasted Pumpkin, Red Lentil Stew, Ham and Potato, Fall Harvest, Green Pea, Cuban Black Bean, Vegetable Beef, Chicken and Dumplings, Butternut Squash, Barley Vegetable, Navy Bean, Chicken and Wild Rice, Potato and Corn, Chicken Noodle. Petra Shuff, Winn-Dixie and the Doubletree Hotel are baking and donating bread. These groups painted bowls (and many individuals as well): Rotary Club, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Purple Martin Nursery, Eden Springs, Senior Center, Christ Church Anglican, 4-H, AVID, Nell Schulzs watercolor artists, and Rachel Sutz-Pientas Democratic women. There are also very special hand-made bowls from the Riversprings Middle School students, the Senior Center artists, and Nancy Jeffersons Florida Green Guide Association. I might have omitted a few good souls and I apologize but thank everyone for your generosity in trying to alleviate hunger in Wakulla County. All proceeds from Empty Bowls, organized through the Healing Arts of Wakulla County, go to local food pantries. So, soups on, and we hope to see hundreds and hundreds of you Saturday. Madeleine H. Carr CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: There are more bikes on Wakulla roads these days. Most riders know and follow the rules of the road. But some do not, and are risking their lives needlessly. On a dark night last week, we pulled out to pass a slow moving car and suddenly found a bicyclist wearing dark clothes in our headlights. He was driving facing traf c, so that he was not visible until the last possible moment. If he had been on the same side as cars, he would have been seen far ahead. Remember the high school student who was killed a few years ago while biking on the wrong side of the road? Please use this sad reminder to bike safely. Marcia Bjerregaard Shell PointThe issue: Which candidate for president?Editor, The News: This was going to be about the election, but as Sherlock Holmes said, The games afoot! And it aint pretty. The BOCC is trying to change Citizens to be Heard. Unless we do something. At the next county commission meeting, theyll be clarifying our Citizens to be Heard, As we know, one mans clarifying is anothers gutting. I nd this whole thing extremely suspicious on its face. As important as the subject open government is, this item is going directly and quietly on the agenda. In addition: 1). It violates the boards own policy, 2). There was no advance notice of this item, 3). There was no authority to either bring the item up nor spend attorney time on it, 4). There was no public input at any workshop, 5). Could possibly be a violation of the federal Americans with Disabilities Act, 6). Expressly excludes comment, 7). Is vague and subjective, 8). Is an attack on open government, 9). Severely restricts citizen input, 10). Curtails free and open airings of citizens concerns Additionally, I regard this item as a direct slap in the face to the citizens. The existing Citizens to be Heard is simple: three minutes for a citizen to speak and it works quite well. On Oct. 15, Commissioner Merritt brought citizens to be heard up as a commissioner discussion item. To go forward, this item would have to be voted on and passed unanimously. It was not. No vote was taken. But then, we get this from the county attorney: This agenda item requests Board approval of the proposed amendment to the Meeting Policy, pursuant to previous board direction. But there was no board direction because it was not voted on! This proposed gutting of the Citizens to be Heard policy besides being unjusti ed and illegal, is terribly subjective. While Ive read vague and unconstitutional a lot, I dont think Ive ever read vague and constitutional. To what end? I know. And they know I know. I know they know I know, but theyre doing it anyway. Except now you know. I suggest that we all take the opportunity to speak at what could be the last Citizens to be Heard as we know it, on Monday, Nov. 5. And just in case you havent decided who youre going to vote for yet, keep this in mind in the voting booth. Thank you, Hugh Taylor Crawfordville Soups on at Empty Bowls on Saturday Supporting Willie Meggs for state attorney Why should we do legislatures job? Bicycle riders must follow rules of the road Half of convention would deny God Citizens to be Heard under attackREADERS WRITE: Editor, The News: We elect our Legislators to do a very speci c job enact laws that serve the good of the people. So, why is this years ballot so lengthy as to require two legal pages, front and back, and 65 cents to mail? They are either too busy politicking to do their job or they didnt want to tackle the tough issues and lay claim to some unpopular legislation aimed at aiding special interests. They knew that historically, voters tend to vote yes on constitutional amendments, assuming that the sponsors have our best interests at heart, and not wanting to take the time to understand each issue. All of these amendments were placed on the ballot by our Legislature whose specialty seems to be disservice. The State Constitution should not be lled with items more appropriately put into law. Laws are easily amended if needed. The Constitution requires yet another costly amendment on the ballot. The Legislature must stop pushing their responsibility off on the voters. I have voted no on all of the amendments as a matter of principle. George Apthorp CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: I am writing this letter in support of State Attorney Willie Meggs. Willie and my father, Robert Lee, were best friends and worked in law enforcement all of their adult lives. Willie worked two jobs to support his family as he put himself through law school in order to become a prosecutor in the 2nd Judicial Circuit. In 1985 he was rst elected as state attorney. I can say that Willie is a man of great character, high morals and incomparable honesty. He was there for my wife and me when I was shot in the line of duty, and then again when my father and my mother passed away. Other than my father, there is no one who has had a greater in uence in my life. Willie is very involved in the of ce, rarely has a day off, and is available to anyone who needs his advice or help 24 hours a day. This is the man I have worked closely with for over 25 years; and I am honored to call Willie Meggs my friend, my boss and my state attorney. Chris Lee Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 5Areaders speak out More OpinionsMORE READERS WRITE:Sheri Crum endorses Maurice Langston e truth gives voters information Taxes have gone down Alan Brock has worked for community Retired deputy endorses Charlie Creel Bobby Pearce has positive e ect on youth Commissioner Artz endorses Emily SmithMore letters onlineJohn Shu compliments opponents on raceEditor, The News: Hi, my name is Jeff Barteld. Many of you may know me from my years working as a Deputy at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of- ce. First, let me say that it has been both a privilege and an honor to serve Wakulla County and its residents, many of whom are friends or relatives. I met Charlie Creel early in my career with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. He seemed like a really nice guy. I assumed that he was just another state trooper working in Wakulla County. Charlie never put on any airs about his career with FHP, and I had no idea that he had worked as the Lt. Governors Chief of Security, or that he had been assigned to a task force working with the FBI, let alone that he had achieved the rank of major. I was dispatched to a panic alarm call one night and was the rst deputy on scene. Upon arrival another car pulled in behind mine with its lights out. I immediately recognized that it was Charlie on duty in his FHP patrol car. Charlie got out and signaled for me to take one side of the house and indicated that he would take the other. In a very short time we were able to determine that it was a false alarm and I was able to cancel my backup unit. I realized at that time that Charlie was truly concerned for the safety of that family, as well as my safety, as a fellow law enforcement of cer. He was not required, nor expected, to assist me on that call. But he did. I later spoke with some of my fellow deputies about it, and several of them said that they had similar experiences with Charlie backing them up on calls also. I am proud to call Charlie Creel a good friend. He is well respected in the law enforcement community, as well as the community as a whole. He has a passion for law enforcement work, and has more training and experience than most of you realize. He is a hands-on, boots on the ground, stand-up guy who will do what he says he will do. It is my choice to support Charlie Creel as the next sheriff of Wakulla County. I hope that you too, will support him, and allow him to take the Wakulla Sheriffs Of ce to the next level! I think that youll be proud of what he will accomplish. Jeff Barteld WCSO Deputy Sheriff, Retired Editor, The News: In response to Mike Stewart questions opponents tactics, Opinions, last week: Everything I have done in support of my husband Howard Kesslers campaign has been strictly ethical and legal. The facts are clear: 1. Mike Stewart promised no new taxes without voter approval, but in 2011 he voted for $3.9 million in new and increased taxes and fees without voter approval. 2. Mike Stewart voted YES in 12 out of 12 possible votes to increase County budget or taxes. Stating the truth about someones record relative to the issues is providing a service to the voters so they may make a fully informed decision. Anne Van Meter vanmeteranne@gmail.comEditor, The News: As this election cycle comes to an end, I would like to publicly thank both my opponents in the District 5 County Commission race, Ms. Emily Smith and Mr. Richard Harden, for running above board campaigns that concentrated on their vision for the future of Wakulla County. It has truly been an honor going through the campaign process with these two ne individuals. I would also like to openly thank the citizens of Wakulla County who have taken the time to listen to my strategies for moving Wakulla County forward, as well as those citizens that provided me with their valuable insight as to what they see as the priorities for our Board of County Commissioners during the next four years. We are truly blessed to live in a county, and a country, where we can have such conversations at a personal level, which will ultimately lead to the shaping of Wakulla County. In closing, I would like to encourage each and every voter in Wakulla County to get out and vote for their respective candidate. It is my sincere belief that in the District 5 race, we are blessed with three candidates who truly have the best interests of Wakulla County deeply rooted in our hearts, and each of us want Wakulla County to move in the right direction. Although our goal is the same, we each provide a varying path for moving forward based on our own experiences and beliefs of what will ultimately lead to success. The citizens of Wakulla County will decide which path is best suited for ensuring we protect Wakulla Countys beautiful natural resources, all the while ensuring that managed growth will not be brought to a standstill. I humbly request that you provide consideration to my business, professional, and community experiences. Please also consider my availability to amply devote my time researching issues, and developing practical solutions, while living within our means, when making your selection in this race. Once again, thanks go out to my fellow Wakulla County neighbors and to my two opponents, for your hospitality and openness during my campaign to become your next District 5 County Commissioner. Respectfully, John Shuff Candidate for Wakulla County Commissioner District 5 Editor, The News: Wakulla County needs a county commissioner like Emily Smith. She has an abundance of qualities that will make her an outstanding commissioner. Emily is intelligent, informed and thoughtful. She understands that commission decisions have far-reaching impacts. She will make decisions based on solid information and reason, not just opinion or politics. Emily is independent, honest and fair. She believes in public service, not personal or industry gain. She is strong enough to say No to special interests. She will use tax dollars ef- ciently and equitably. Emily is positive, nurturing and kind-hearted. She will be available to citizens and responsive to their concerns and wishes. She will be a passionate advocate for children and those less fortunate. She will invest in educational and recreational activities for our youth. Emily will speak for the silent majority and work for the common good. Further, we need a county commission that looks like and truly represents all of the people in our county. What a sad day it will be if our county is again governed only by men, or by ve people who all hold similar views. When different perspectives are voiced and considered, better decisions are made. Emily will bring much needed diversity and balance to the Commission. Emily is my preferred replacement on the commission because she shares many of my own values and views. Emily will promote smart growth and sustainable communities. She believes in making environmental protection a real priority, not an empty talking point. She will move our County forward with money-saving energy conservation and 21st century infrastructure. Emily will make carefully considered decisions that bene t the long-term interests of Wakulla County and its citizens. She will build our countys reputation as a fair, well-managed, and vibrant place to live and do business. Please vote for Emily Smith for county commissioner. Lynn Artz County Commissioner District 5 Editor, The News:With all the emphasis Howard Kessler is placing on taxes, I decided to check my personal records to see just how much my taxes have increased over the years. Referencing my annual escrow statements back to 1998 (which show the actual taxes paid), I was quite surprised to see that my personal taxes have uctuated very little over that span of time. Without even taking into account inflation over those 14 years, I paid less last year than I did in 1998 7 percent less. I recognize that these gures re ect the combination of school board taxes and county taxes, but the overall county tax requirements over the past few years reinforce my contention. The total ad valorem taxes levied across the entire county have DECREASED every year since 2008. I acknowledge that this years ad valorem reduction is being aided by creation of the Public Service Tax (PST), but I also believe that was a really wonderful thing. With a family of four in a 1,900square-foot house, I have contributed an average of less than $6 per month via that tax since its inception in January. To me, given an offsetting reduction in ad valorem taxes, thats not too much of a price to pay to enable the 826 homesteaded homeowners who pay no ad valorem taxes the opportunity to help fund the county services we all bene t from. But I am very appreciative that Mike Stewart exercised leadership and persuaded three of the other four commissioners to opt for a 7 percent PST versus the proposed 10 percent. He also convinced them to exempt the rst 500 kilowatt hours from the PST. Im especially thankful that he didnt simply vote No to the initial proposal even though that might have sounded good to uninformed voters during this campaign. As for the garbage assessment, that is not a tax. Besides, $196 is not a bad price all things considered. Its appreciably less for the roughly 50 percent of the county that formerly had private trash collection service. I had been taking my trash to the land ll for $2 per week, so Im paying a little more, but Im saving gas and time so its essentially a wash for me. But the best part is the positive environmental impact with the eliminated dumping and the substantially increased recycling efforts of our citizens. Plus we get to close our land ll. Sounds like a win-win situation to me! Ron Huddleston CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: I want to add my endorsement to the many that T.W. Maurice Langston has been receiving from fellow law enforcement officials and citizens to become the next sheriff of Wakulla County. I have worked beside Maurice for many years and know of his commitment and dedication to Wakulla County and the employees of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. Maurice has always been the man that everyone could go to for solid and straight counsel in all matters. I admire him both professionally and personally. Maurice has a strong law enforcement background that covers all aspects of a Sheriffs Of ce. From a road patrol deputy, through the ranks as detective, up to a major and undersheriff. His decisions are always based on the best interest of justice and the community. He has a respect for all persons and their constitutional rights. Maurice Langston is capable of working all types of cases from burglary to murder, as well as has the operational experience to manage the budget. He also has the leadership qualities to unite the department and the community. I wholeheartedly offer my endorsement of T. W. Maurice Langston for Sheriff of Wakulla County in 2012. Sincerely, Donnie W. Crum Wakulla County Sheriff Editor, The News: As election day approaches I want to thank the citizens for allowing me the honor of serving as your county commissioner for the past four years. This is a responsibility that I have not taken lightly. Ive been humbled by the chance to serve the Wakulla community that I respect and love so much. I am seeking re-election, and I want to thank my opponents for keeping our race positive. I have been pleased to campaign on the issues, and Ive worked to try to bring the tone of politics back to a civil place in Wakulla County. There are differences between me and my two opponents, but we are all good people who care deeply about Wakulla. I have worked hard to bring our community together over the last four years. Together we have accomplished several impressive goals. We have managed to lower the cost of county government, but still preserve essential programs that we value like the library, veterans services, the senior center and the rec park. According to Florida Taxwatchs most recent report, Wakulla County collects the least in taxes per capita of any county in the Big Bend. We have done these things by cutting red tape and making our government more ef cient. It was a privilege to represent all of you at home and as an advocate beyond our community. As your commissioner, I have worked hard to make sure that Wakulla is included in the landmark Restore Act, which will return tens of millions of dollars to Wakulla to help our local economy and environment recover from the Deep Horizon Oil Spill. The Restore Act takes the nes that the responsible parties have to pay to the federal government and redirects the funds back to the communities that were most affected. This will be a major catalyst for change for our community and our whole region. I am very proud to have worked to pass the Restore Act. Since the act passed, I have continued to ght, and use my whole sphere of in uence, to make sure that it is implemented as intended. I am also very proud of leading the effort to implement our new solid waste and recycling collection program. It has proven to be a huge success, and I think the outcome is by far the best of any of the alternatives that were discussed which all included more debt for Wakulla. This program is a success we should all celebrate. I believe in good government, and have worked hard to make Wakulla a model for ef cient government. Over the next four years, I hope to continue to serve you as your county commissioner, working to bring our community together. Sincerely, Alan Brock County Commissioner District 1 Editor, The News: I am writing this letter in support of Bobby Pearce for school superintendent. My interactions with Coach Pearce go back to the early 1990s, when he was my high school weightlifting coach and mentor. As a coach, he expertly managed the team and inspired the athletes, all while consistently instilling the importance of education and contributing to the personal development of each student. He led through example and made everyone of us want to be our best. As my mentor, he helped to rmly instill my work ethic (which is still instrumental in my life today) and also helped me gain focus in life. While I was still in high school, Mr. Pearce was promoted to principal of the new Medart Elementary School. I remember thinking this was wonderful for Wakulla County. I felt that someone of his caliber, who was also so important to my development, could now have a similar impact on so many more students. After graduating from Wakulla High School, I subsequently went on to spend the next 13 years in some of our nations nest universities on my way to becoming an Interventional Spine Specialist. I am now a faculty member in the College of Medicine of the No. 2-rated university in the world, Stanford University. I feel that Wakulla County Schools prepared me well for all my future endeavors. This was due to the perfect combination of exceptional leadership and wonderful teachers that existed throughout the school system, of which Bobby Pearce exempli ed. As proud Wakulla High School graduate, it is my sincere hope that Wakulla County is the premier school system in Florida. I rmly believe Bobby Pearce has the skills and vision to achieve these goals. I count myself lucky for having him be an in uence in my life, and I feel strongly his election to superintendent can only have a positive effect on the youth of Wakulla County. David D.J. Kennedy, M.D. Stanford UniversityThank you to all of our readers who submitted Letters to the Editor during this political season. However, because of the volume of letters received, even with adding a second page to run more letters, there has not been enough space to publish all of the political letters weve received. In an e ort to make those political letters available for consideration prior to the Nov. 6 election, the letters will appear online at our website, thewakullanews.com. William Snowden, editor

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Prayer Walk will conclude By CYNTHIA WEBSTER The 40 days of prayer are easing down. There are only a few walks remaining and one night of hymn and prayer. It has been a journey that has crossed religious denominations, gender, age, economic, social, race, and political lines. People have walked in agreement and harmony with fondness and caring. But how can it be that so many from such varied backgrounds have been able to mold a bond that transcends these differences? Some would say that there are obvious possibilities short time periods, no intense situations, volunteer participation but actually the most reasonable and honest possibility is that the excitement and anticipation never ended because each walker had their eyes on the same power source. Christians all across the county know that Gods will has been the prayer; faith and trust the tools that each has sought. So simple. It has had nothing to do with exercise, social acceptability or, as I heard one woman claim, political persuasion. It has all been about recognizing that the nation is not, has never been, and cannot be the king. Our founding fathers understood this as they fought for and guaranteed on paper certain inalienable rights endowed by our creator. Abraham Lincoln understood this when he said I have been down many times to my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go. And Dan Cathy knew it when he refused, without malice, to step back from the tenets of his faith. All comes from a Higher Power. The walks have been all about going directly to God, letting him see that His people are aware of the need to put His word back into our lives and the lives of our children, realizing that regardless of what happens in the elections we know it is His will, and that by repenting there will be spiritual renewal. On election eve, Monday, Nov. 5, the 40day prayer walk will culminate in a prayer and hymn service at Azalea Park. Can you but imagine how great that would be to ll the park with people in prayer and song? And we can do it. It just takes each of us to make a decision, a commitment, a promise to be there. Bring a friend, a chair, a jacket if it is cool, a ashlight in case it becomes dark before we leave (that is the weekend we set our clocks back), and a prayerful heart. If we begin on time at 5:40 p.m. the program will be over by 6:30 or a bit after --in time to enjoy dinner at one of our local eateries. Note: If Christians do show their great strength, parking will be further from the park. We hope to leave a spot open at the back of the park so that drivers can pull in, drop off passengers and folding chairs, then park. CLERGY SCHEDULE FOR WEEK SIX Wednesday, Oct. 31, at 10 a.m., Pastor Kevin Hall of Sopchoppy United Methodist Church and Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church. Thursday, Nov. 1, at 6:45 p.m., the Rev. Matthew Balkman (Ret.) of St. Marks Primitive Baptist Church, Lake Jackson and Mount Pisby Primitive Baptist Church in Tallahassee. Friday, Nov. 2, at 10 a.m., Ramon Medina, Servant of God. Saturday, Nov. 3, 10 a.m., Pastor Dawn Gaskin-Knighton of Radical Restoration Ministries. Monday, Nov. 5, at 5:30 p.m. Prayer & Hymn, Pastor Henry Jones of River of Life Church. 40 days of prayer to end on election eve, Nov. 5 Church Briefs Chili supper and silent auction at Ochlockonee Bay UMCThe Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church will hold a Chili Supper and Silent Auction on Friday evening, Nov. 2. The supper is just $5 for homemade chili, corn bread or chips, dessert and beverage. Supper hours are 5 to 7 p.m. The silent auction will run from 5 to 8 p.m. and will include antiques, art, crafts, sporting goods, vintage and new items, services, and baskets lled to the brim with good things! Come for the chili, come for the auction, come for both and enjoy! The church is located just off Route 98 at 2780 Surf Road. Call Suzanne at 349-2749 or Joann at 984-5400 for more information. Homecoming revival set atPanacea CongregationalPanacea Congregational Holiness Church will hold homecoming revival Nov. 5 through Nov. 9. Services begin at 7:30 p.m. There will be a different speaker each night. Homecoming supper will be held on Saturday, Nov. 10, at 6 p.m. at the church. Bring a covered dish and join us. Sunday morning service will be at 11 a.m. and Sunday night at 6 p.m. For more information please call (850) 984-5579 or (850) 508-1895. Quilt is being raf ed by Christ Church AnglicanChrist Church Quilters are raf ing a beautiful hand quilted queen-king size quilt. The pattern is Star-spangled Four Patch. Raf e tickets are now available, six tickets for $5 or $1 each. The drawing will be held after noon on Dec. 9, at Christ Church Anglican, 3383 Coastal Highway. You may call the church at 745-8412 or Mary Lou Martin 210-1203 for more information or for tickets. The children of Wakulla United Methodist Church were delighted to receive help from a clown in preparing Halloween treats for Trunk or Treat Night, Oct. 31, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Wakulla UMC grounds, 1584 Old Woodville Highway in Wakulla Station. All area children are welcome. For more information, please call 421-5741. Trunk or Treat at Wakulla UMCSPECIAL TO THE NEWS While most people in the U.S. are preparing for holiday activities, volunteers with Operation Christmas Child are lling shoe box gifts with toys, school supplies and hygiene items for needy children overseas. This year-round project of international Christian relief and evangelism organization Samaritans Purse, headed by Franklin Graham, is ramping up as local businesses, churches and community groups prepare to collect 11,000 gift- lled shoe boxes during National Collection Week, Nov. 12 through Nov. 19. The Wakulla collection site is Crawfordville United Methodist Church, 176 Ochlockonee St., in Crawfordville. Beginning Nov. 12, the church will accept donations during the week from 9 a.m. to noon; on Saturday, Nov. 17, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 18, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., and Monday, Nov. 19, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.Gift- lled shoe box drive to start

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By REV. JAMES L. SNYDERI was off to the airport on another trip. I started out early, arrived at the airport on time but when I arrived the plane had canceled and I had to apply for another plane. The next plane headed for my destination was about two hours away. This would in fact, make me miss my connecting ight. I suppose I ought to be grateful that I was able to catch a later ight. It gave me some time to sit in the airport with nothing to do but think. Talk about a boring afternoon! One of the things I thought about was never ying again. But, necessity is the mother of inconvenience, or something like that. While I was thinking in the airport, I thought of a wise old man who, waxing philosophical, once said, Time waits for no man. I know he was wise because he did not include women in his observation. Although time will wait for no man, it has a different approach to women. Usually speaking, a man welcomes the passing of time. Proudly he displays those wrinkles and calluses as marks of manhood. Until recently, gray hair was a crown of authority. Even Solomon, the wisest man said, The hoary [gray] head is a crown of glory, if it be found in the way of righteousness (Proverbs 16:31 KJV). The grayer the head, the wiser the man. Although, I must confess I have seen my share of dumb gray-headed men. A woman, however, has an altogether different philosophy when it comes to time. As a man with gray hair, I do not fully understand their philosophy. I suppose there are some men who would like to be 25 again. Most men, however, are happy to be as old as they are. Women are different. They live upon the concept of ageless beauty. Who am I, as a man, to counter that philosophy? I discovered this many years ago. A woman casually asked me how old I thought she was. I have long since discovered that this is no casual question and she is not looking for exact information. I, at the time, took it as a challenge and tried to guess her age. Wrong! I have since learned that the correct response to this question is, Why, you dont look a day over 25. I do not know exactly what that means, but I have often gotten smiles from this response. No matter how old the woman is, in her mind she is still 25. The man has a different idea. Im 60, he will boast to whoever will listen, and I can still do a whole days work. Then he will go out and throw his back out just to prove it. Time has a different effect upon a man as it does upon a woman. There is nothing wrong with trying to look younger. I suppose it is an easier task to do if you are a woman than if you are a man. Every morning before I leave the house I try to make myself as non-scary to the public as I possibly can. I will scrape my face, pat down my hair, and douse myself with aftershave and in 10 minutes I am done and ready for the world. Continued on Page 15A www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 7AObituaries Edward Thomas Ward, 81, passed away Saturday, Oct. 20, in North Carolina. He is survived by his wife of 41 years, Mary B. Ward of Crawfordville. He was born in St. Marks, and had lived in Crawfordville for 40 years. He attended St. Marks First Baptist Church, was a retired teacher from Wakulla High School and was a member of the Fishermans Society. His family was the founding family of St. Marks. Funeral services were held Friday, Oct. 26, at 3 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church in St. Marks. Interment followed in St. Marks Cemetery. The family received friends at the church one hour prior to the service. He is also survived by two daughters, Karen L. Ward of Crawfordville and Sherrie Ward of Salt Lake City; two brothers, Tony Bill Ward (Helen) and Bobby Jim Ward (Betty), both of St. Marks; a sister, Elna Sapp of Tallahassee; a granddaughter, Amber Hagland; and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by son, Richard Thomas Ward; and a brother, Jack Buddy Ward. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements. (850/926-3333 or www. bevisfh.com)Edward Thomas Ward Get me to the airport on time OUT TO PASTOR charlieforsheriff@gmail.comwww.charliecreel.comPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Afliation, for sheriff.We are in the last week of an historic election for Wakulla County an election that, with your vote, can change the direction of the Sheriffs ofce with new leadership, integrity and a full-time commitment. Your vote for Charlie Creel will reduce our serious burglary and drug problems with an attack on crime coordinated with all law enforcement agencies to make our county safer. As a husband, father, son and brother, I know how important it is to be sure your family is safe and secure. As your sheriff, I will use my 35 years of experience as a Florida Certied Law Enforcement Ofcer on the frontline of ghting crime, as an ofcer trainer; my managerial experience as a supervisor, investigator and security coordinator, and my experience as a consultant on national emergency management to lead the Wakulla County Sheriffs Ofce on a new path for the future. The National Rifle Association and Unified Sportsmen of Florida, and the Fraternal Order of Police have endorsed me as the best candidate for Wakulla Countys sheriff, and I am humbled and proud to have received their endorsements. However the most important endorsement will come from you, the citizens of Wakulla County. Your vote for Charlie Creel will send the message that you want honesty and integrity, and a sheriff who will enforce the laws impartially and fairly, while bringing down the high crime rate this county has been experiencing. I ask for your vote in this important election, and I commit to you that I will bring a FRESH START as your FULL-TIME sheriff. With great respect,To the people of Wakulla County, SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY NIGHT SERVICES6:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study3086 Crawfordville Highway (One block south of Courthouse)850-926-7896www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc. 551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Dignied Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Response to Mike StewartEverything I have done in support of my husband Howard Kesslers campaign has been strictly ethical and legal. The facts are clear: 1. Mike Stewart promised no new taxes without voter approval, but in 2011 he voted for $3.9 million in new and increased taxes and fees without voter approval. 2. Mike Stewart voted YES in 12 out of 12 possible votes to increase County budget or taxes. Stating the truth about someones record relative to the issues is providing a service to the voters so they may make a fully informed decision.VOTE FOR HOWARD KESSLERPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Howard Kessler, No Party Afliation, for County commissioner, District 3.Anne Van Meter Wakulla Respite Alzheimers Respite Program p p p g g g invites you to join us at our Monday, November 5, 9AM-1PMat Lake Ellen Baptist Church, 4495 Crawfordville Hwy.Please contact Pat Ashley at 850-984-5277 or Mary McMahn 850-510-1253. REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVEDHealthcare agencies and organizations will be providing screenings and Educational Services. Valuable information for seniors will also be available.and u shot clinic

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Special to The NewsEdna Wilson and her family would like to thank the more than 100 friends and family that stopped by or called, to express their love and well wishes on her 95th birthday celebration. Five generations shared in the celebration of her life. She has four children, nine grandchildren, 17 greatgrandchildren and 17 greatgreat-grandchildren. Wilson was born and raised in Wakulla County. She retired from the Wakulla County School System as a bus driver after 22 years and also donated her time in the lunch room during those years as well. She has been serving as a pastor, servant and volunteer for 67 years. All that know her, love and respect her and have been blessed to have her in their lives for 95 years and all cherish the days that are to come. Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityDogs ying high thanks to three animal loversBy STEVE FULTSSpecial to The NewsIn mid-October, Wakulla County received two new four-legged residents, an Australian Shepherd and a German Shepherd. Liberty and LJ arrived at the Wakulla County airport via a small plane owned and piloted by Tom Autrey, a volunteer with PilotsNPaws. org, whose mission it is to provide free air transport for rescue animals going to adoptive homes. Tracy Needham and Jay Whetstone with AussieAndMe.org became aware Liberty and LJ were close to being euthanized by a North Carolina animal shelter, so they sprung into action by nding new homes here in Wakulla and arranging transportation, giving a new lease on life for these K-9 residents. Whetstone explained that some parts of the country have very high euthanasia rates, while others like Florida are much lower. Once out of Autreys Cessna 172, Liberty and LJ were both exuberant, almost as if they knew exactly what a great thing these three selfless animal lovers had done on their behalf. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Countys newest residents, Liberty and LJ, land at the airport with the help of pilot Tom Autrey, Tracy Needham and Jay Whetstone. Edna Wilson Edna Wilson turns 95 Air Force Senior Airman Daniel F. Hauversburk has been named Airman of the Quarter for the 51st Medical Group. Selection was based on the individuals exemplary duty performance, job knowledge, leadership qualities, teamwork, significant self-improvement, personal achievements, notable accomplishments and community service and support. Hauversburk is a biomedical equipment technician assigned to the 51st Fighter Wing at Osan Air Base, Korea. The senior airman has served in the military for four years. He is the son of Dan F. Hauversburk of Crawfordville and Sabra R. Bedsole of Tallahassee. He is the grandson of James D. Bedsole and Frank Hauversburk, both of Opp, Ala.Lions Club sh fry is Nov. 3By MARJ LAWSpecial to The NewsIf youre hearing a gentle roar emanating from Sopchoppy, it might be coming from Lions Club members wearing aprons. Thats because the Sopchoppy Lions Club is holding its second Annual Fish Fry on Nov. 3. From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Sopchoppy Hardware Store, Lions will be serving fresh fried sh with coleslaw, hushpuppies and iced tea. Some Lions are making their own special pound cakes for dessert. So, for the small donation of $10, you can skip making lunch. Because its the Lions, youll know that your donation may bring a person in our very own county an eye exam, a pair of glasses or assist with the cost of eye surgery. At a time when our economy is fragile, its good to know that our Sopchoppy Lions are a completely volunteer group, and all the funds they raise go towards programs to promote vision and vision health. If you live in the downtown Sopchoppy area and are unable to drive to the fry, a Lion will deliver your meal to you. Just call Lion Arlene Vause in advance at 962-2210. And yes, the well-known Lion brooms will be available at the fry, too. Just in time for Christmas. Theyre surprisingly inexpensive: a great value for your donations! Join your friends at the Hardware store for some plain good food on Saturday. Hauversburk is selected as Airman of the Quarter Wakulla Christian School, in coordination with the Wakulla County Veterans Services Office, is proud to host the Saturday, November 10, 2012 at Hudson Park Games, Vendors Raffles, a Silent Auction, and Lots of Food !!! Parade Starts @ 10:00a.m. A portion of the proceeds from this grand event will be donated to our local Veterans Services Office. Your family or organization is invited to participate in this very special event dedicated to honoring all Veterans and active duty military. Please consider entering a float or vehicle decorated in honor of your loved ones. For more information or to register your float, please contact the Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee via fax @ 850-926-5186 or email WCVDay@gmail.com Honoring All Who Served Soldier Care Packages 6th Annual Veterans Day Parade and Celebration to Support Our Troops and Honor Our Veterans Wakulla Christian School is collecting public donations of items to send to our troops wish list items include individually wrapped beef jerky, Pringles, individually wrapped sunflower seeds, individually wrapped nuts, individually packaged mix of Propel Fitness Water and Gatorade, individually packaged hard candy and gummy bears, white tube socks, protein bars, granola bars, books, soap, razors, sunscreen, na il files, AA batteries and Ziploc bags. For further information, please contact Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee Drop offanyitemsatoneof thefollowing supportivebusinessesinWakulla county: HOME MORTGAGEA MERI F IRST of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief Support850-878-5310 all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor FUND RAISER SILENT AUCTION & STEAK DINNER $ 10.00NOVEMBER 16TH from 5 PM 8PM at SHELLPOINT FIRE HOUSE FOR TICKETS CONTACT MARION at 926-9023 ALSO AT CENTURY 21 in SHELLPOINTFishing TripJewelry Gift BasketsArt

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools School2 seniors named outstanding participants in National Achievement Program Special to The NewsSuperintendent David Miller, Michael Crouch and Wakulla High School are pleased to announce the inclusion of seniors Chelsi M. Arellano and Michael Schnoor as Outstanding Participants in the National Achievement Scholarship Program. These students scored in the top 3 percent of more than 160,000 African Americans who requested consideration in the 2013 National Achievement Program when they took the 2011 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. A roster of these students names, high schools, and tentative college major choice is being sent to about 1,500 colleges and universities. Schnoor is the son of Lori and Rhett Strickland and Wilfred (Smitty) Smith. He is a veteran percussionist in the WHS Band and he hopes to attend Florida State University or the University of Florida. He is planning on pursuing a career in chemical engineering. Arellano is the daughter of Rhoda Moore and Julio Arellano, Sr. She plays the trombone in the band. She wants to attend the University of South Florida in Tampa and pursue a degree in English education. A reception honoring these two outstanding students was held at Wakulla High School. They are very proud of these students for their achievement, and how it re ects on the community here in Wakulla County. Pictured above: WHS Principal Michael Crouch, Superintendent David Miller, Assistant Superintendents Beth ODonnell and Bobby Pearce with seniors Michael Schnoor and Chelsi Arellano. Shadeville holds fall festival SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpecial to The NewsOn Saturday, Oct. 6, the day was warm, sunny and truly perfect for Shadevilles 29th Fall Festival. From the giant slide, face painting, pumpkin decorating, sand treasures all around to the super soaker the games were full of fanciful fun. Many thanks to the schools faithful PTO members, business partners, CVFD volunteer re ghters, school resource of cer, faculty and staff, as well as the terri c classroom volunteers who put in hours and hours ensuring the event would be a huge success. The festival is the schools only fundraiser of the year, and this year it will see a profit of approximately $28,000. The funds earned will be used to provide each classroom teacher and paraprofessional with additional funds for educational materials, increase the schools educational technology, enhance physical education, music, art and media centers equipment, purchase custodial supplies that keep the school sparkling and create a safe learning environment, as well as continue to support Project Learning Tree activities. This years classroom representatives who took home the coveted crowns for the highest Big Item Drawing ticket sales were: Alexis Strickland and Colton McKenzie from Mrs. Scotts kindergarten, Brooke Millender and Landon Ray from Miss Gerrells rst grade, Jayleigh Trop and Jace Estes from Mrs. Hesters second grade, Taylor Tillman and Tristan Silcox from Mrs. Kerces third grade, Sianna McDonald and Michael Griffin from Mrs. Nalls fourth grade, Caitlynn Linville and Cody Quick from Mrs. Marshs fth grade and Paige Lamb and Hunter Wells from Mrs. Wards pre- rst class. These classes have also earned a eld trip. A classroom game and pizza party was earned by Mrs. Adams fifth grade, Miss Moores fourth grade, Mrs. Traweeks third grade, Mrs. Bernales second grade, Miss Gerrells first grade, Miss Thomas kindergarten and Mrs. Wards pre-first classroom. A giant heartfelt thanks to the parents, families, businesses and friends who contributed goodies and items to our donation efforts this year. The Fall Festival is always a tremendously rewarding event. I really enjoy seeing so many families having fun together in such a wholesome atmosphere. Although it was a warm and windy day this year, it didnt seem to dampen the spirits of the many, many folks who came and enjoyed the afternoons events, said Principal Susan Brazier. The latest addition to the Shadeville Fall Festival, the super soaker, soaks fth grade teacher Kerry Adams. It's time for Wakulla's next chapter Vote for Jim Parham It is all about fairness. The citizens of Wakulla do not mind paying their fair share; they just do not want to pay someone else's. Put "fair" back into fair market value! Qualifications: Achieved highest levels in the appraisal profession (MAI & SRA) Experience: Appraised property over 38 year career in 35 counties of Florida and in North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama and the Caribbean Independent: No Party Affiliation (NPA);Tied to no political party Established recent residency; Uncompromised; Funding own campaign If Wakulla is to become greater it would be good to hire a property appraiser who has worked in and understands the dynamics of greater markets "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www.FairValuesInWakulla.com Paid b y Jim Parham No Part y Affiliation for Pro p ert y A pp raiser We, the Principals of Wakulla County, a Florida DOE "A" School District for seven consecu ve years, do hereby endorse Bobby Pearce as OUR CHOICE for Superintendent of Schools. We encourage you to join us in our e orts to not only maintain but con nue to improve educa onal opportuni es for all Wakulla County students by suppor ng Bobby Pearce Please join Bobby Pearce on facebook at pearce4kids Poli cal adversement paid for and approved by Bobby Pearce, Democrat, for Superintendent of Schools For

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Taking Care of Business Taking Care of BusinessBusiness News from Business News from By PETRA SHUFFof the ChamberMoving towards the end of the hurricane season, the Chamber held its ninth Chamber luncheon, hosted by TCC Wakulla Center, graciously offering the facility for our use. The luncheon was catered by Coastal Restaurant, serving up a buffet of pull pork sandwiches, crispy fried shrimp, chicken, baked beans, fries, hush puppies, slaw, cheese grits and banana pudding for dessert. A big round of applause went out to Richard Nicholson and Chris Sadler. Richard thanked the Chamber for the opportunity the luncheon provided, and in addition to the restaurant is also available for catering events. Bob Ballard, executive director of the Wakulla Environmental Institute, welcomed everyone at the facility, and shared that TCC is excitedly gearing up, and actively looking for property to house the new institute. The Wakulla Environmental Institute will be offering online classes beginning this January. Bonnie Holub, director of TCC Wakulla Center, works closely with Ballard, and followed up on the recently held Listening Session by saying that TCC is making a considerable investment in our community and Wakulla County will reap bene ts educationally, socially, and economically from TCCs presence and resources. Wakulla residents and students are encouraged to add to this investment in our community by using the facility and giving input on what types of classes are needed. TCC Wakulla Center currently offers dual enrollment for local high school students, and introduced beginner math and composition classes. The Green Guide Course is offered in the fall and spring, and Workforce Development Sessions are ongoing. Input from employers is requested to nd out what types of classes would be beneficial for helping business owners develop their businesses and for employees continuing education and training. Mary then announced Wakulla County Correctional Institute Warden Jim Coker who joined the Chamber in September. The prison houses about 3,500 inmates, and employs mostly Wakulla and Leon residents. Warden Coker complimented his staff for a job well done taking care of the inmates, and keeping the community safe. The prison staff held a luncheon earlier this year, to get community and business input, and will again invite the community for a tour of the facility and additional input. The Wakulla Springs Lodge joined the Chamber in October and present at the luncheon was Jeff True, formerly with Wildwood Inn, now general manager overseeing the day-to-day functions of the lodge, restaurant, and concessions. Wakulla Springs Lodge is working on upgrading the facility but keeping in line with the wishes of the late Edward Ball. One modern change is in the works, adding Wi-Fi to the lodge, which seems to create a bit of a challenge due to the one foot thick walls. In addition, the restaurant is revamping the menu, and will bring back dishes such as the Navy Bean Soup Mr. Ball introduced decades ago. The park fee will be waived after 5 p.m. until December, and possibly into early spring for restaurant visitors. Another longtime member WOYS Oyster Radios representative Ron Copeland attended, sharing that the radio station recently changed its format, adding Top 40 music. Advertising packages start at $200, and include new business announcements, giving you an opportunity to get your message out through three sources: a newspaper published by the station, ads on the radio, and internet. Jo Ann Palmer handed out yers and announced plans for the rst-ever fundraiser for Keep Wakulla County Beautiful KWCBs Blue Jeans and Fast Machines will be held at 3Y Ranch on Nov. 17. It promises to be a lot of fun and an evening of great wheels, dinner and live entertainment. To nd out more visit kwcb.org, visit the Chamber events calendar, or call (850) 745.7111. Our cash prize was won by Shirley Howard with Centennial Bank, and we want to thank the following for contributions to our drawing: Mint jars from Certi ed Security, ashlight from Cook Insurance, earrings from Kim Campbell, pepper jelly from Petra Shuff, gift certi cates for shrimp platter from Wakulla Springs Lodge, 1/8 page ad from The Wakulla News, glass vase from Lionell Dazevedo, Bath products gift bag from Farrington Law Of ce. As always, Mary thanked all who attended and advised that the location for November luncheon would be announced shortly. Also, just like last year we will not hold a luncheon in December due to the Christmas holidays.Chamber was busy in October FROM THE PRESIDENTTCC Wakulla hosts Chamber luncheon, catered by Coastal WILLIAM SNOWDENThe crowd enjoying the Chamber luncheon at the TCC Wakulla Center. WILLIAM SNOWDENTCC Wakulla Director Bonnie Holub talks to Chamber members. By AMY GEIGERChamber PresidentDear Members: Your Chamber of Commerce is hard at work in the community and I would like to take this opportunity to thank all those who give their time and energy to the mission of the Chamber. To summarize just a few of the events/activities your Chamber has been working on during the last month. Restore Act Committee: The following individuals have been appointed by the Chamber and Economic Development Council to serve on the Restore Act Advisory Committee: Chamber Designees are Billy Mills and alternate Dan Hinchee. EDC Designees are Jay Westmark and alternate Kevin Vaughn. The Executive Board was presented with several strong applicants and each would have made an excellent committee member. Political Forum: Thank you to the candidates and all those in attendance for making the Chamber Political Forum on Oct. 9 a success. The forum gave the public an opportunity to meet the candidates and hear their responses to questions provided by the general public. The evening started with Interact serving refreshments provided by Rotary Club of Wakulla and ended just as Chuck Robinson had predicted right on time. Chuck and his committee deserve a huge round of applause for planning and executing an informative forum. Besides Chuck, the committee included Jo Ann Palmer, Dustin Grubbs, Tammie Bar eld and timekeepers, Sherri Kraeft and Courtney Peacock. CHAMBER SUPPORTS PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION ISSUE Economic Development is important for our county to grow and thrive. The tax exemption for new businesses and expansion of existing businesses will attract new companies, help our current businesses grow, and provide job opportunities. A referendum will be placed on the Nov. 6 Ballot to allow the citizens of Wakulla County to vote for or against the tax exemption. The Chamber is supporting the exemptions. The program authorizes the County to grant qualifying businesses an ad valorem tax exemption on real property improvements and tangible personal property of up to 100 percent for up to 10 years. OPPORTUNITY TO HIGHLIGHT WAKULLA COUNTY The Chamber and EDC are excited to announce an opportunity with WTXL-TV to highlight Wakulla County in their new feature titled Our Town, which is designed to share with a vast regional audience the many great amenities and businesses that make our area so special. The feature will promote our area and businesses Dec. 10 through Dec. 14. A representative from WTXL may be contacting you to share how your business can be part of this exciting partnership. Please consider participating in this unique opportunity for the community and your business. This is an excellent way to convey your message to an audience you may have never reached before. COURTHOUSE COMMITTEE The Chamber has been raising funds through our Annual Low Country Boil the last two years to continue to enhance the Old Historic Courthouse. Our Courthouse Committee worked with Mary Jane Lovel to select a material that would preserve the historic nature of the courthouse while supplying a shade that would provide a sound barrier and block out the sun. The shades were recently installed and have already made a huge difference. Again, thank you Mary Jane and the Courthouse Committee for making this initiative a reality. Amy Geiger is president of the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce. CandidateforCircuitJudge, SecondCircuit,Group2 IamaskingforyoursupportandvoteTuesday,November6,2012 -BarbaraHobbsMyfamilyhaslivedinthiscommunityfor vegenerations, andIamaproductofourlocalpublicschoolsand universities.Myjudicialphilosophyisbasedonmyreal lifeexperiencesrighthereinTallahassee.My vebrothers andIlearnedatanearlyagetheconceptofjusticeby watchingmyparentsworktirelesslyasadomesticworker, andjanitor,toensurethatwewouldgrowtobecome responsibleadults.Theirsacri ces,workethic,strong familyvalues,commitmenttotheirchildrenandour community,builtastrongfoundationforallofustofollow. Iamasinglemotheroftwogrownsons,asmallbusiness owner,andIhavebeenapracticingattorneyfor30years. IhaveworkedineverycountycourthouseinCircuit2and understandthemanychallengesdailylifebrings. M an M M M M M M M M a Ibelieveajudgemustfollowthelaw,befair,justandhumbleBarbaraHobbs arbaraHobbs

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 11A Spotlight on Business Spotlight on BusinessBusiness News from Business News from Serendipity Salon offers a full service salon. Waxing, paraf n wax dips, pedicures, manicures and facials. The salon offers an instant face lift with same day results without needles, botox or pain. The salon also offers all types of texture service, colors, highlights, perms and nails, acrylics and manicures. Serendipity is located at 630 Port Leon Drive in St. Marks. Owner Patricia Ratliff is a native of Wakulla County, who moved away for a short time and returned. The salon offers a relaxed atmosphere where clients get undivided attention. The salon offer consultations before every visit and affordable prices. Walk-ins are always welcome or schedule an appointment by calling 728-8019. ReNu U Rejuvenation Spa: ReNu U Medical Spa is the only facility in the Southeast that focuses on halting the aging process with totally non-invasive procedures. From reducing fat and inches with the Zerona process to eliminating wrinkles, sagging skin and cellulite with the new TriPollar technology ReNu U is able to give you back that youthful appearance. The team at ReNu U consists of Director Kathie Brown, Sonya Cutchin, licensed aesthetician and laser specialist, Kat Nelson, licensed aesthetician and laser specialist, Missy Fogt, certi ed laser technician, Michelle Weltman, certi ed laser technician and Robert Monahan, licensed massage therapist. They are dedicated to making you more beautiful than you already are and they have more than 40 years of experience in this eld. ReNu U Medical Spa offers a number of services and products that help you achieve your goals. From complete body composition analysis to permanent makeup ReNu U Medical Spa offers a wide variety of services. ReNu U is located on Capital Circle in Tallahassee.RIBBON CUTTINGSBusiness: Wakulla Urgent CareOwner: David A. Keen, MD, MPH Tell us about your business: While being the Health Department Director in Wakulla County for 13 years, it was apparent that everything we did medically was done in Tallahassee basic things like X-rays, lab draws, urgent care and after-hours care. I left for a few years and after honing my skills as an ER physician, I came back to Wakulla County to help bridge that gap in health care delivery by opening my own practice: Wakulla Urgent Care and Diagnostic Center. Initially we were located in Panacea but moved four years ago to Crawfordville to be more effective to more people. While in Panacea we were nominated for a Chamber of Commerce new startup company for 2007, but did not win. While in Crawfordville we did win the Chamber of Commerces very prestigious Business of the Year Award in 2009. We have just been awarded a contract with LabCorp to do blood draws for the county. We have recently been accepted as a CHP medical provider and are accepting new patients. Wakulla Urgent Care is also federally designated as a Rural Health Clinic. What services do you offer? On the clinical side of the business we provide an array of medical services from urgent care to primary care with our medical staff trained to deal with newborn babies all the way to those in the nursing home and everyone in between. We have seen generations of families over the years. WUC provides vaccines including the u shot. We have scheduled time slots for our regular patient and walk-in times for our urgent cases. We do sh hook removal, laceration repair and mole removals and abscess treatments. We do physicals and even treat the common cold. In addition to all of this, we also have a weight loss clinic. Our diagnostic services include regular X-rays open to the public as well as DEXA bone density, a standard of care test for postmenopausal women. We are now a certified center for pulmonary function tests (PFT). The diagnostic center also provides overnight pulse oxicymitry studies looking for sleep apnea, holter monitoring for abnormal heart beats. We are the contracted site for LabCorp for blood draws in the county. We also do drug testing for large and small companies using the E-Screen system. What sets our company apart for the competition? We are unique and there is none like us in the county. As an urgent care, we have walk-in time slots. We see many of the local practitioners patients when they are busy or cannot handle the problem. We make time for them and provide local and quick service for the residents in the community. It is much faster than driving to Tallahassee, much less waiting in the waiting room. We have the ONLY diagnostic services open to the public which includes Holter monitoring, overnight studies for sleep apnea, bone density studies (a standard of care) and basic X-rays. We do drug screens for several different companies. When the time is right, we will expand the hours to evenings and weekend. We do minor surgical procedures such as mole removal, laceration repair and the like. Like the rest of the medical practices, we provide primary care services taking all major insurances including CHP. What should patients expect when they visit? They should expect to be greeted in a friendly manner by a customer care specialist. We will bring you back as expeditiously as possible and have your medical problem treated by a competent medical practitioner using quality equipment. They should expect to have their problems adequately addressed. They should be properly treated in an ef cient and effective manner. It should be a positive experience. How long have you been a Chamber Member? I have been a Chamber member while working at the Health Department during the 1990s, but Wakulla Urgent Care has been a member since its inception in 2007. Why did you join the Chamber? To be a part of the business community. We also joined to have exposure to the other businesses in the community and network. What services have you taken advantage of? We have been to a few Chamber mixers. We also had a Chamber-sponsored open house at our new facility three years ago. My staff has availed themselves of some of the training programs that were Chamber -sponsored. We will continue to seek out educational programs that are chamber sponsored and will help in health related sponsorship programs in the community. What is your reason for Wakulla Residents to Shop Local? The reason for our existence is for Wakulla residents to have services locally. We do not have all of the services yet but we are trying. You do not have to drive to Tallahassee anymore for a basic X-ray, DEXA scan, blood draws, urine drug tests or minor emergencies. How can residents contact you? Simple we are in the WinnDixie parking lot beside H&R Block, 2615 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite103 in Crawfordville. We are on the web at www. wakullaurgentcare.com. Our main number is (850) 926-3140. Tell us about your community involvement: We have been in a few oats and have been at a few local community events every year. We have offered our services to do free blood pressure and blood sugar screenings. At the blue crab festival, we man the rst aid booth. We participate in the local school physicals for the school children who could not afford it every year. We also work with a local church to do more sports physicals for their community residents We work with Voc rehab and We Care program to provide services for them in the past. These companies deal with people without health insurance but are in need of medical/ surgical attention. We worked with the health department to take over their patients assistance program, helping people with no means of affording their medications. We have also assisted in sponsoring various clubs and events in the past from Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, school teams, local remen and a shing tournament. In a more global community, Dr. Keen founded Caribbean American Medical Educational Organization (CAMEO) www. cameomissions.org and has done medical mission trips to seven countries, making ve trips per year giving back. ReNu U Rejuvenation Spa Seredipity Salon HOWARD S GOALSLess costly governmentOpen and accessible government Protection of our natural resources to attract businesses and people 3 2 1 LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsIts the best fall shing seen in a long time Its Sunday night, supposed to be in the mid-40s tomorrow and I dont know what that will do to the shing for a few days, especially on the ats. I will tell you it has been the best fall shing I have seen in a long time. There are lot of reds on the oyster bars, plenty of speckled trout on the ats and some of the biggest silver/white/ gray trout, whatever you want to call them, that I have ever caught. Everyone I have talked to that has been offshore has done extremely well. Grouper are in fairly shallow water though the season goes out the end of October. One day last week while fishing I met some folks shing out of Spring Creek and we pulled along side one another and talked. They told me they enjoyed my column and they were from up around the Atlanta area. As it turns out, they were only miles from my in-laws in Lilburn, Ga. Doug and Connie Cowan have been shing down here for years and come down quite a bit in the fall. Doug said they had gone offshore with Pat Gill from Alligator Point and had gotten their limit of grouper. Doug also said he caught a cobia that they estimated to weight around 100 pounds. I talked to Capt. Randy Peart and he said shing around the Econfina has been pretty good. Most of the trout he has been catching have been out in 10 to 12 feet of water but he has also been catching some big rock bass with them. Redfish have been hard to come by though this cool weather should bunch them up. Capt. David Fife has moved to Destin but is still taking a few charters out of Spring Creek and catching some nice reds using live mullet and mudminnows. He has also been catching some big trout on live bait. I talked with Jimmy at Shell Island Fish Camp and he said the high winds over the weekend kept most people shing in the river and that a lot of sh were caught up in East River. Last week one of their guides fished over near Pattys Island and did extremely well on trout and reds. I just left there getting shrimp. The wind is howling out of the Northwest and the Wakulla River is about as low as I have seen it. I am supposed to have a charter today but I dont think the water is going to come in enough that I can get my boat down. Fortunately the water is cool enough that the shrimp will live in a basket for days in case we dont get to use them today or even tomorrow. Bill Birdwell said he caught a 37-inch red last week and some pretty big bonito. He was fishing around the Rotary Reef with Gulps and shrimp. Mike Pearson from Tifton took Robert Doolan, Thomas Buckner, Ramsey Willis, Brook McGahee and his daughter Taylor out last weekend and they had a banner day. They didnt leave the dock until 11 a.m. and went to 35 feet of water. Fishing with live pinfish and LYs Mike said by 2 p.m. they had their limit of gag grouper and a near limit of red grouper. And wouldnt you know it, his daughter Taylor caught the biggest grouper of the trip. I have had seven charters in the past two weeks and the shing and weather at Shell Point has been excellent. We have limited out on reds on every trip. Last Tuesday morning I got a call from Tom and Karen Tittman from Wisconsin. They were staying on Alligator Point and would be here through the weekend. I told them the only day I had was that day and we decided to start at 11 a.m. When they got here the tide was high and starting to fall. Where I had been catching sh was a spot I usually only shed on the incoming tide. Since the tide was still relatively high I decided to give it a try for a few minutes. In 20 minutes we had our limit of reds to 26 inches. We ended the day with six reds, nine speckled trout and eight big silver trout. On Wednesday I took Shuford Davis and Steve Reznik from Tallahassee and there were folks sitting on both spots I had been catching sh on. We went to another one and it too was covered with reds. We got our limit that day and came in with six reds, 15 speckled trout and 19 big silver trout. Steve also caught and released a 37-inch red. Bill Griffin and Ed de Montluzin shed with me last Thursday and Friday and we had our limit of reds each day and quite a few speckled trout and silver trout. On the rst day Bill caught and released a 38-inch red. Ed is from Louisiana where they have excellent red shing and he said he was pretty impressed with our red fishing. Everything has been caught on live shrimp except the silver trout and those have been caught mostly on the white Gulp. Remember to know those limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing! How bout them NOLES! Robert Doolan, Thomas Buckner, Ramsey Willis, Brook McGahee and Taylor Pearson with grouper caught with Mike Pearson from Tifton.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS 37 inch red caught and released by Steve Reznik shing with Capt. Jody Campbell. From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Will Grace Peyton NicolasThank you for voting for Papa Jimmy Jim Parham for Property Appraiserwww.FairValuesInWakulla.comPolitical advertisememnt paid for and approved by Jim Parham, No Party Af liation, for Property Appraiser. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GET READY FOR HUNTING

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 13A The Bishops Do Not Speak For UsProtect womens healthcare services Respect the separation of church and state Defend religious liberty for all(202) 986-6093 cfc@CatholicsForChoice.org www.CatholicsForChoice.org Paid political advertisement: paid for by Catholics for Choice, 1436 U Street, NW, Suite 301, Washington, DC 20009 and provided in-kind to Vote No on 6 and Vote No on 8.

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It has been said that the Coast Guard will go out often when no one else will. As Sandy was preparing to impact a large portion of the Northeast, the Coast Guard was being called to assist mariners who had to abandon ship off the coast of North Carolina. By the time many of you read this, Sandy will have passed, but her aftermath will just be unfolding. In addition to assisting many in peril, the Coast Guard also gives back a lot to their communities. Thanks you to Duane Treadon for submitting this report of how our community has bene ted. Last weekend, several members from Flotilla 12 along with Coast Guard personnel from Station Panama City and Air Training Command Mobile come together in Tallahassee to participate in the U.S. Coast Guard pregame flyover for the FSU vs. Duke football game. This year, fans got to see a HH-65 Dolphin helicopter yover Doak Campbell Stadium. Called the most ubiquitous aircraft of the Coast Guard, the Dolphin is certi ed to operate in all weather and night operations. The only environmental limitation that can ground the Dolphin is icing conditions. With a top speed of 175 knots and a range of 290 nautical miles, the Dolphin is an excellent platform for near offshore missions and limited far offshore specialty missions. In addition to the yover, a team from Coast Guard Station Panama City trailered over a 25-foot Defender Class Safe Boat. Powered by two 225hp engines, the Safe Boat has a maximum speed of 45+ knots. Its speed, range, and maneuverability make this an excellent patrol and rescue vessel. Fans arriving before the game were treated with a tour of the Safe Boat and provided with plentiful safe boating information from our Flotillas information booth. This was the sixth year of Coast Guard flyovers during an FSU home game organized by Flotilla member Tim Ashley. Planning begins early in the year as Tim works with FSU, ATC Mobile, Station Panama City and our members to bring together and enjoyable and informational event that goes beyond the actual yover. This year, Tim Ashley, Bob Asztalos, Raye Crews, Phil and Norma Hill, Fran Keating, Dave Rabon, Rich Rasmussen and Duane Treadon represented Flotilla 12. Division Commander and District Captain East Elect Mo Davis also attended. As we say in the Coast Guard and Coast Guard Auxiliary, Bravo Zulu Tim for a job well done. And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Weather is a powerful force that we must be cautious of when planning to be out on the water. Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe helicopters yover at Doak Campbell Stadium. The ight crew on the eld, above, before the yover. Auxiliary members and the ight crew, left, with Renegade and Osceola. The Public Safety Dive Team. My family has remained glued to the Weather Channel monitoring Hurricane Sandys assault on the East Coast. Our hearts and thoughts are with friends and relatives who must evacuate as the ocean surge waters are driven inland, ooding homes, roads, and lives. We empathize because, in Wakulla County, we know what tropical storms can do to a community. When storm water inundates a community, the Public Safety Dive Team becomes a welcome life saving and investigative force. The Public Safety Diver is a reman or police of cer who has been trained beyond the basic scuba level, to include water rescue and/or underwater investigations, depending upon their specialization. Special teams have organized in various Florida counties. Leon County has a respected county Public Safety Dive Team, once lead by Sgt. Ken McDonald, now retired. Sgt. McDonald participated at my request with Florida State Universitys national Program in Underwater Crime Scene Investigation and published his own manual. He trained my research team through the Florida Department of Law Enforcement Public Safety Diver Program offered at the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy under Tallahassee Community College. We have wonderful regional resources. Wakulla County once had such a Public Safety Dive Team based upon the success of the Leon Countys team. Budget cuts and changes in priorities disbanded our county team. They left behind a signi cant dive locker now under lock and key awaiting better economic times. Periodically, I am visited by previous team members at the Wakulla Diving Center expressing their hope one day conditions will permit a return of the team. You can imagine my pleasure when Madison County came to us recently to train their newly forming Public Safety Dive Team. The two month training began this week, working with four sheriffs deputies at our center. This team will begin with the basics and specialize with underwater investigations. We have a shallow pond on our property, in which we will install an obstacle course for problem solving challenges, including a ship wreck, entanglements, overhead obstructions and other topics. I welcome our countys Public Safety Dive Team, currently disbanded, to stop by and collaborate through the center, to refresh their skills and network with Leon and Madison countys dive teams. Perhaps together we can more cost effectively respond to a regional crisis, such as the one currently hitting the New York region along the East Coast. The momentum has started! Lets get organized. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Nov 1, 12 Fri Nov 2, 12 Sat Nov 3, 12 Sun Nov 4, 12 Mon Nov 5, 12 Tue Nov 6, 12 Wed Nov 7, 12 D ate 3.7 ft. 2:13 AM 3.6 ft. 2:42 AM 3.5 ft. 3:15 AM 3.4 ft. 3:51 AM 3.2 ft. 4:36 AM Hi g h -0.0 ft. 9:17 AM 0.1 ft. 9:50 AM 0.2 ft. 10:26 AM 0.4 ft. 11:07 AM 0.6 ft. 11:58 AM 1.7 ft. 12:16 AM 1.6 ft. 1:37 AM L ow 3.4 ft. 3:46 PM 3.3 ft. 4:24 PM 3.1 ft. 5:07 PM 3.0 ft. 5:56 PM 2.9 ft. 6:55 PM 3.0 ft. 5:37 AM 2.8 ft. 7:06 AM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 9:02 PM 1.5 ft. 9:38 PM 1.6 ft. 10:20 PM 1.7 ft. 11:10 PM 0.7 ft. 1:00 PM 0.9 ft. 2:09 PM L ow 2.9 ft. 8:01 PM 3.0 ft. 9:02 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 1, 12 Fri Nov 2, 12 Sat Nov 3, 12 Sun Nov 4, 12 Mon Nov 5, 12 Tue Nov 6, 12 Wed Nov 7, 12 D ate 2.8 ft. 2:05 AM 2.7 ft. 2:34 AM 2.6 ft. 3:07 AM 2.5 ft. 3:43 AM 2.4 ft. 4:28 AM Hi g h -0.0 ft. 9:28 AM 0.1 ft. 10:01 AM 0.2 ft. 10:37 AM 0.3 ft. 11:18 AM 0.4 ft. 12:09 PM 1.3 ft. 12:27 AM 1.2 ft. 1:48 AM L ow 2.5 ft. 3:38 PM 2.4 ft. 4:16 PM 2.3 ft. 4:59 PM 2.3 ft. 5:48 PM 2.2 ft. 6:47 PM 2.2 ft. 5:29 AM 2.1 ft. 6:58 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 9:13 PM 1.1 ft. 9:49 PM 1.1 ft. 10:31 PM 1.2 ft. 11:21 PM 0.5 ft. 1:11 PM 0.6 ft. 2:20 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 7:53 PM 2.3 ft. 8:54 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 1, 12 Fri Nov 2, 12 Sat Nov 3, 12 Sun Nov 4, 12 Mon Nov 5, 12 Tue Nov 6, 12 Wed Nov 7, 12 D ate 3.4 ft. 2:49 AM 3.4 ft. 3:18 AM 3.3 ft. 3:51 AM 3.1 ft. 4:27 AM Hi g h -0.0 ft. 10:21 AM 0.1 ft. 10:54 AM 0.2 ft. 11:30 AM 0.4 ft. 12:11 PM 1.5 ft. 12:14 AM 1.6 ft. 1:20 AM 1.5 ft. 2:41 AM L ow 3.1 ft. 4:22 PM 3.0 ft. 5:00 PM 2.9 ft. 5:43 PM 2.8 ft. 6:32 PM 3.0 ft. 5:12 AM 2.8 ft. 6:13 AM 2.6 ft. 7:42 AM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 10:06 PM 1.3 ft. 10:42 PM 1.4 ft. 11:24 PM 0.5 ft. 1:02 PM 0.7 ft. 2:04 PM 0.8 ft. 3:13 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 7:31 PM 2.7 ft. 8:37 PM 2.8 ft. 9:38 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 1, 12 Fri Nov 2, 12 Sat Nov 3, 12 Sun Nov 4, 12 Mon Nov 5, 12 Tue Nov 6, 12 Wed Nov 7, 12 D ate 2.9 ft. 1:57 AM 2.8 ft. 2:26 AM 2.8 ft. 2:59 AM 2.6 ft. 3:35 AM 2.5 ft. 4:20 AM 2.3 ft. 5:21 AM Hi g h -0.0 ft. 8:56 AM 0.1 ft. 9:29 AM 0.2 ft. 10:05 AM 0.4 ft. 10:46 AM 0.5 ft. 11:37 AM 0.7 ft. 12:39 PM 1.6 ft. 1:16 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 3:30 PM 2.5 ft. 4:08 PM 2.4 ft. 4:51 PM 2.3 ft. 5:40 PM 2.3 ft. 6:39 PM 2.3 ft. 7:45 PM 2.2 ft. 6:50 AM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 8:41 PM 1.4 ft. 9:17 PM 1.5 ft. 9:59 PM 1.6 ft. 10:49 PM 1.7 ft. 11:55 PM 0.8 ft. 1:48 PM L ow 2.3 ft. 8:46 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 1, 12 Fri Nov 2, 12 Sat Nov 3, 12 Sun Nov 4, 12 Mon Nov 5, 12 Tue Nov 6, 12 Wed Nov 7, 12 D ate 3.8 ft. 2:10 AM 3.7 ft. 2:39 AM 3.6 ft. 3:12 AM 3.5 ft. 3:48 AM 3.3 ft. 4:33 AM Hi g h -0.0 ft. 9:14 AM 0.1 ft. 9:47 AM 0.3 ft. 10:23 AM 0.4 ft. 11:04 AM 0.6 ft. 11:55 AM 1.9 ft. 12:13 AM 1.8 ft. 1:34 AM L ow 3.4 ft. 3:43 PM 3.3 ft. 4:21 PM 3.2 ft. 5:04 PM 3.1 ft. 5:53 PM 3.0 ft. 6:52 PM 3.0 ft. 5:34 AM 2.8 ft. 7:03 AM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 8:59 PM 1.6 ft. 9:35 PM 1.7 ft. 10:17 PM 1.8 ft. 11:07 PM 0.8 ft. 12:57 PM 0.9 ft. 2:06 PM L ow 3.0 ft. 7:58 PM 3.1 ft. 8:59 PM Hi g h Thu Nov 1, 12 Fri Nov 2, 12 Sat Nov 3, 12 Sun Nov 4, 12 Mon Nov 5, 12 Tue Nov 6, 12 Wed Nov 7, 12 D ate 3.1 ft. 1:21 AM 3.0 ft. 1:56 AM 3.0 ft. 2:36 AM 2.8 ft. 3:21 AM 2.7 ft. 4:13 AM Hi g h 0.0 ft. 8:46 AM 0.1 ft. 9:18 AM 0.1 ft. 9:54 AM 0.2 ft. 10:35 AM 0.3 ft. 11:25 AM 1.6 ft. 12:06 AM 1.5 ft. 1:32 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 4:57 PM 2.6 ft. 5:38 PM 2.6 ft. 6:21 PM 2.5 ft. 7:06 PM 2.5 ft. 7:50 PM 2.5 ft. 5:18 AM 2.3 ft. 6:42 AM Hi g h 1.8 ft. 8:12 PM 1.8 ft. 8:51 PM 1.8 ft. 9:41 PM 1.7 ft. 10:45 PM 0.4 ft. 12:21 PM 0.6 ft. 1:22 PM L ow 2.6 ft. 8:31 PM 2.6 ft. 9:06 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 1 Nov. 7First Nov. 20 Full Nov. 28 Last Nov. 6 New Nov. 13Major Times 3:11 AM 5:11 AM 3:35 PM 5:35 PM Minor Times 10:13 AM 11:13 AM 8:54 PM 9:54 PM Major Times 3:59 AM 5:59 AM 4:23 PM 6:23 PM Minor Times 11:03 AM 12:03 PM 9:43 PM 10:43 PM Major Times 4:47 AM 6:47 AM 5:11 PM 7:11 PM Minor Times 11:49 AM 12:49 PM 10:34 PM 11:34 PM Major Times 4:35 AM 6:35 AM 4:59 PM 6:59 PM Minor Times 11:32 AM 12:32 PM 10:27 PM 11:27 PM Major Times 5:22 AM 7:22 AM 5:46 PM 7:46 PM Minor Times 12:11 PM 1:11 PM 11:22 PM 12:22 AM Major Times 6:09 AM 8:09 AM 6:32 PM 8:32 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:49 PM 1:49 PM Major Times 6:56 AM 8:56 AM 7:19 PM 9:19 PM Minor Times 12:18 AM 1:18 AM 1:26 PM 2:26 PM Good Average Average Average Average Average+ Average6:51 am 5:49 pm 7:55 pm 9:15 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:52 am 5:48 pm 8:44 pm 10:04 am 6:53 am 5:48 pm 9:35 pm 10:50 am 6:53 am 5:47 pm 10:28 pm 11:33 am 6:54 am 5:46 pm 11:23 pm 12:13 pm 6:55 am 5:45 pm --:-12:51 pm 6:56 am 5:45 pm 12:19 am 1:27 pm85% 79% 73% 67% 61% 55% 48% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance I LIKEMIKE STEWARTREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mike Stewart, Republican candidate for county commissioner, district 3 Wakulla County Memorial Post,VFW POST 4538 Invites the public to enjoy a free pancake and sausage breakfast.Each year, we host a free breakfast as a thank you and to give back to the public for your support throughout the year.The breakfast will be held on Veterans Day, Sunday, November the 11th from 7:00am till 10:00am, at the VFW POST 4538 which is located 1 mile west of the County Court House at 475 Arran Rd, Crawfordville, FL. P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 15APastor: Get me to the airport on timeContinued from Page 7A I have noticed that the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage takes a lot longer than 10 minutes to get ready to face the world. I must admit she does a very good job of it, but I also must admit it takes a long time and it seems each year it gets longer. I do not want to call attention to myself. I just want to get through the day and back home again. I know I am not as young as I used to be but I take consolation in the fact that I am older than I used to be. For me personally, I like to celebrate each birthday as a once-in-a-lifetime celebration. My goal in life is to get as old as I possibly can and with the good help of Father Time, I am well on my way. Time has not stood still for me, for which I am most thankful. Just like getting to the airport on time for my ight, I want to be on time for everything happening in my life. I do not want to miss a thing. Too often people look backward, stumble over today, nd themselves in tomorrow and do not know how they got there. I want to enjoy the time I have in real time. There is no time like the present to enjoy. Memories are wonderful. Aspirations are delightful. But, nothing can take the place of right now. The Bible has a lot to say about time. We are in a timeline established by God and it will not slow down into we come to the end. The apostle Paul understood this when he wrote, And that, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of sleep: for now is our salvation nearer than when we believed (Romans 13:11 KJV). There is no time like the present that as someone said, This is the rst day of the rest of my life. I am going to celebrate my Now with all the energy I have.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. In the Wakulla County Sheriffs Race, Do We Need An Experienced Lawman Trafc Cop? MAURICE LANGSTON CHARLIE CREELOR A Wakulla County Native30 Years of Local Law Enforcement ExperienceWorking Knowledge of Law Enforcement BudgetLaw Enforcement Management ExperienceServed as Emergency Management Director 11 Promotions For Exemplary ServiceExemplary Personnel FileDirector and Chaplain at Wakulla County Senior CenterPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY T.W. MAURICE LANGSTON, REPUBLICAN, FOR SHERIFFMaurice Langston has the EXPERIENCE NECESSARY to bring you www.LangstonForSheriff.comMaurice Langston has over 30 years of experience putting criminals behind bars and keeping residents safe in Wakulla County.We need an experienced lawman as Sheriff! Lynn Artz Wakulla County needs a Commissioner like Emily smart and kind-hearted, yet strong enough to say No to special interests. Emily will treat people with respect, offer new ideas, and stand up for the common good. Sue Damon Emily will be a full-time commissioner who will work hard to help W akulla County grow in an impartial, responsible way. Rick Ott & Nelle McCall Emily has unmatched integrity and unwaveringly supports local businesses. Katherine Gilbert Emily has the heart, spirit, and understanding that it will take to protect our springs, rivers, bays, wetlands, and our drinking water for the benet of all and generations to come. Brandy Cowley-Gilbert & Ted Gilbert Emilys work experience in green business and industry will help her attract sustainable businesses to our County. Robert Seidler Emily represents the next generation of leaders in this County. A young, intelligent female Commissioner will inspire and provide an excellent role model for others. The Fortier Family Emily brings a fresh perspective to our community and will bring creative solutions to benet us and our children in the future. Jim Hilyer and Chase Emily cares about kids and supports a community center with a pool, playground, and more! Judith Harriss With Emily as your commissioner, your input will be sought, valued, and carefully considered and you will know that complex decisions are being made with the greatest of care. Sandy Tedder Emily will listen to the needs of citizens and make informed decisions for smart growth and protection of our resources. Glen Campbell Emily wants to serve her community (not be a Commissioner). She will study issues and make wise, not selfser ving, decisions. Diane Roberts Emily knows that W akulla Countys future isnt strip malls and big box stores, but sustainable growth, eco-tourism, and green jobs. Shes not beholden to anyone, just to the place she loves. Continued from Page 1A Group donations by Joann Vesecky, Carolyn Metcalf, Emily Smith, Ralph Thomas, Casey Lowe, Christ Church Anglican, Rachel Pienta and Gail Campbell. The event is sponsored by the Healing Arts of Wakulla County and the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth. In addition to the event, Farm Share, a large-scale food bank and charitable packing house, will also be at Hudson Park to distribute a tractor trailer lled with fresh produce and nonperishables to local food pantries and those families who are in need. Pantries are invited to receive food from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Families and individuals are invited from noon to 2:30 p.m. For more information, call 567-4212 or 926-3526. To volunteer, contact Bruce Ashley at 528-0046.Empty Bowls is Saturday

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Re-Elect Donnie Sparkman*Certied Florida Appraiser*-Experienced -DedicatedRe-Elect someone who has always worked with the public concerning land and values... and who will CONTINUE TO WORK FOR YOU! Political Advertisement Paid For And Approved By Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, For Property AppraiserI WILL CONTINUE TO KEEP THE CITIZENS OF WAKULLA COUNTY AT THE FOREFRONT OF ANYTHING I DO. I WILL CONTINUE TO BE RESPECTFUL, HELPFUL, ACCESSIBLE, AND LISTEN TO YOUR CONCERNS. I HAVE THE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH LAND, DEEDS, DESCRIPTIONS, LAND VALUES, TAXES, ETHICS AND THE ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE WITH THE PUBLIC. AS YOUR PROPERTY APPRAISER I WILL CONTINUE TO PROVIDE EFFICIENT, COURTEOUS AND FAIR SERVICE TO ALL! I WILL CONTINUE TO WORK TO IMPROVE THE OFFICE, WEB SITE AND TAX ROLL AND SEE TO IT THAT THEY SERVE THE PUBLIC IN THE BEST POSSIBLE WAY. Wakulla CountyPROPERTY APPRAISER Creating new jobs and closing tax loopholes f or corporations that ship American jobs overseas Protecting Social Security and Medicar e for todays seniors and future generations Working to prevent cuts to P ell Grants and Head Start and making college more affordableVOTE EARLY, OCT 27 NOV 3 VOTE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6 STANDING TALL FOR FLORIDA FAMILIESFacebook.com/AlLawsonJr Lawson4Congress.com FOR CONGRESS d for p e a s u rity u ts a d e ge V 3 R 6 Paid for and authorized by Al Lawson for Congress RALPH THOMASDOESN'T KNOW THE WORD"QUIT"!I have known Ralph Thomas since he was 19 years old. It was in 1984 when I hired him, Ralph worked with me at the Leon County School system for almost ve years. I followed his 12 year career in the U.S. Navy and he has done exemplary work with the Wakulla Christian Center. I think so highly of Ralph that I feel compelled to write this letter on his behalf and share with you the qualities I know in him. He is a very hard working man He is the most honest person I have ever met He doesn't know the word "quit" He always carries a very positive attitude He is highly intelligent He looks you in the eye when he talks to you He is a devoted family man Enjoys and wants to help people Chris and Kay Alward I have not given recommendations too freely in my life but I do believe in this guy!Paid political advertisement paid for by Chris Alward, 101 Sunset Lane, Crawfordville, Fl 32327 independently of any candidate, This advertisement was not approved by any candidate. Continued from Page 1A His office also wanted to make people aware of fraudulent letters that are being sent out to voters in Florida questioning their citizenship status. This letters are not coming from the election of ces. So far, Wells said he hasnt heard of anyone in Wakulla County receiving one, but he encouraged anyone who receives this type of letter to keep it and contact his of ce as soon as possible to report it. Election day is Tuesday, Nov. 6 and polls are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. To nd a precinct, call the elections of ce at 926-7575 or visit their website at www.wakullaelection.com.Early voting is underwaySpecial to The NewsThere has been increased mosquito-borne disease activity in areas of Wakulla County and more than one horse has tested positive for Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus infection. This means that the risk of transmission to humans has been increased. The Wakulla County Health Department reminds residents and visitors to try and avoid being bitten by mosquitoes that may cause encephalitis disease and take the necessary precautions. Wakulla County Mosquito Control and the health department continue surveillance and prevention efforts and encourage everyone to take basic precautions to help limit exposure by following the department of health recommendations. To protect from mosquitoes, remember Drain and Cover: Drain standing water to stop mosquitoes from multiplying. Drain water from garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, flower pots or any other containers where sprinkler or rain water has collected. Discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items that arent being used. Empty and clean birdbaths and pets water bowls at least once or twice a week. Protect boats and vehicles from rain with tarps that dont accumulate water. Maintain swimming pools in good condition and appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use. Cover skin with clothing or repellent. CLOTHING Wear shoes, socks, long pants and long-sleeves. This type of protection may be necessary for people who must work in areas where mosquitoes are present. REPELLENT Apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing. Always use repellents according to the label. Repellents with DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide), picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, and IR3535 are effective. Use mosquito netting to protect children younger than 2 months old.Increase reported in mosquito-borne illness locally

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 17A WAKULLA COUNTY CAN COUNT ON ROBERT HILL People you trust,TRUST ROBERT HILL... www.RobertHill4House.com | http://twitter.com/hill4house | www.facebook.com/RobertHill4House For Real Experience, Sound Judgment and Proven Experience you can count on, ELECT ROBERT HILL to the Florida House! You can count on my friend Robert Hill. He is a man of integrity, a public servant we can trust and a leader who will listen. Brent Thurmond, Wakulla County Clerk of the Courts We recommend Robert Hill To support Public Education To create Jobs To advocate for State Employees To protect Gun Rights To ght Prison Privatization To oppose New Taxes Political advertisement paid for and approved by Robert Hill, Democrat, for Florida House of Representatives District 7 Located at the North Pointe CenterOPEN: Mon Sat 10AM 7PM www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Smoke and Fire barbecue fundraiser held PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDENFire ghters from around the region competed in a barbecue cookoff on Saturday, Oct. 27, to raise money for charities. Besides eating barbecue, there were activities like learning how to properly roll a rehose, above, as done by Hunter Wells, 7, and Ayrika Nason, 4. Superintendent of Schools David Miller and Tax Collector Cheryll Olah, top right, were celebrity barbecue judges. And Jenny Brock, bottom right, got dunked in the candidate dunking booth. Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker at the vigil.NOPE Vigil recalls those lost to addictionStaff ReportA candlelight vigil was held last week to remember those people who have been lost because of addiction, especially to prescription drugs. Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker was a speaker, and urged the audience who may have friends or family suffering from addiction to advocate on their behalf. It is not a character issue, it is a chemical issue, she said of addiction. The vigil was held by the Narcotics Overdose Preventation & Education (NOPE) Task Force.

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Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn Oct. 23, Daniel Morgan Spears, 21, of Crawfordville was seriously injured in a vehicle crash near 963 Crawfordville Highway at 9:01 p.m. An overturned vehicle was observed in the tree line. Spears was southbound on U.S. Highway 319 when he crossed over the fog line on the west side of the road and traveled into a ditch. He then overcorrected and crossed the roadway into the opposite ditch. The vehicle became airborne and crashed into a fence, and rolled over multiple times before landing upside down in the tree line. The driver was ejected from the vehicle and the Chevrolet Blazer was a total loss. A DUI investigation will be conducted following the crash investigation. Spears was transported to the hospital for treatment of his injuries. Lt. Brent Sanders, Sgt. Ronald Mitchell, Deputy Billy Metcalf, Deputy Mike Zimba and FHP Trooper Travis Wilson were all involved in the crash investigation. A fence owned by Joseph Duggar of Crawfordville sustained $1,200 worth of damage. In other activity reported this week by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce: OCTOBER 18 Brian Jones of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim lost his wallet and contents from inside his vehicle. The value of the wallet and contents is estimated at $52. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Vicki Morgan of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. The victims credit card was charged $30 over the internet. The charge was determined to be an online credit monitoring company. The services were never requested by the victim. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. A Hardees manager reported a trespass by Derick Lenard Hughes, 45, of Crawfordville. The suspect was located next to the Hardees property by Deputy Scott Powell. The restaurant manager reported that Hughes was disturbing customers in the restaurant parking lot. He was arrested for trespassing after warning and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Kelly Boxberger of Funky Fiddler in Panacea reported a business burglary. A forced entry was observed and two glass tabletops were damaged. Evidence was collected at the scene. Damage was estimated at $200. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Cecil Barbee of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and $1,250 worth of electronics, an air conditioning unit, computer and musical equipment was reported as stolen or damaged. Damage to the home was estimated at $400. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Sgt. Danny Harrell observed Kyle D. Almeda, 19, of Crawfordville in a fast food restaurant parking lot riding what he believed to be a stolen bicycle. Sgt. Harrell made contact with Deanna Powell of Crawfordville who reported the bicycle as stolen on Oct. 17. Powell was able to identify the bicycle as belonging to her. The bike was left at the fast food restaurant. Deputy Scott Powell observed Almeda walking on Wakulla Arran Road where he admitted to taking the bike for transportation. It is valued at $150. Almeda was charged with petit theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. OCTOBER 19 Katherine Taff of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim noticed unauthorized withdrawals on her bank account. The amount of the fraud was $200 with other pending transactions of $400 from the same company in St. Petersburg. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Thomas Lee of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim received a $3,997 bill from a company he has never contacted. A business account was opened without the victims consent. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. OCTOBER 20 Herman Edward Oshields, 57, of Tallahassee was involved in a two vehicle crash at Wakulla Springs Road and Highway 267. Oshields struck a 2000 Honda Accord driven by Angela L. Barr, 32, of Crawfordville from behind. Oshields was driving a 1996 Ford Ranger. The Barr vehicle suffered $1,000 worth of damage and the Oshields vehicle suffered $200 worth of damage. Oshields was charged with DUI, driving while license was suspended or revoked with knowledge, vehicle tag attached not assigned, no vehicle registration and no vehicle insurance at the scene of a crash. Deputy Rachel Wheeler recovered a liquor bottle discarded from the suspect vehicle at a nearby stop sign. A passenger in the Oshields vehicle was not injured and a passenger in the Barr vehicle was not injured. Barr refused transportation to the hospital. Lt. Jimmy Sessor also investigated. OCTOBER 21 James Harvey of Pilgrim Rest Primitive Baptist Church in Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim reported that someone drove a vehicle on church grounds and damaged the grounds by creating deep doughnuts. Damage to the property is estimated at $150. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. OCTOBER 22 Debra Leutner of Sopchoppy reported the loss of personal property including personal information and credit cards. The victim was at a Crawfordville business when she was last in possession of the property. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Eric Mills of Crawfordville reported the theft of copper wire. The victim noticed that the electrical power was not working at the property and wire was missing. The value of the wire is estimated at $600. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Jesse O. Moki of Crawfordville reported a single vehicle crash with a deer on Commerce Blvd. Moki was driving eastbound on Commerce Blvd. when a deer crossed into the path of his vehicle. The Dodge suffered front end damage but there were no injuries. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. OCTOBER 23 Jeffery L. Smith, 46, of Tallahassee was involved in a traf c stop when Deputy Clint Beam observed his vehicle without operational rear running lights. It was determined that Smith had a suspended license. Smith was arrested for operating a motor vehicle with a suspended license with knowledge. A passenger in the vehicle also had a suspended license. Deputy Clint Beam responded to a two vehicle crash at Bob Miller Road and Old Woodville Highway. Barbara K. Moody of Tallahassee was stopped at the stop sign on Bob Miller Road waiting to turn left onto Old Woodville Highway. Moody failed to yield the right of way and entered the intersection striking a vehicle driven by Jim S. Drew of Tallahassee. Both vehicles suffered damage but there were no injuries. Donna Strickland of St. Marks reported a criminal mischief at Double A Laundry. Someone kicked a hole in the bathroom door and kicked two washing machines. Damage to the business was estimated at $310. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. Jeremy McCranie of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim left the vehicle unlocked with keys inside and later discovered the four doors opened. McCranie reported the theft of cash and a bank card while Shane Sparks of Crawfordville reported the theft of a rearm, circular saw and an oxygen tank from the same vehicle. The combined value of the missing items is $426. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. Joan Barbour of Crawfordville reported the fraudulent use of her credit card. A transaction was reported at a local merchant. It was valued at $176. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Wal-Mart loss prevention staff reported a felony retail theft. Wal-Mart staff observed John Anthony Bartell, 25, of Crawfordville ll a shopping cart with $304 worth of large tools including a winch, oor jack and auto hitch. The suspect passed the last point of sale when he was stopped by store personnel. He was arrested for grand theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. A 16-year-old Wakulla High School student struck a parked vehicle with his vehicle while attempting to back out of a parking space. The parked vehicle was unoccupied. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. Elaine Baxley of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A suspect, who has been identified, removed jewelry from the victims home. Other items taken from the victim were returned by the suspect. The missing jewelry is valued at $1,730. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Noreen Britt of the Parks and Recreation Department reported a criminal mischief to the restrooms at the recreation park. Someone started a re in the womens restroom by burning toilet paper. Britt put the re out and damage was estimated at $5. Juveniles in the area were interviewed. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. OCTOBER 24 Jason Ellers of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was reported and cash was taken from the home. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. Wal-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft. Store staff observed two suspects pulling tags off items and placing them in their purses while also placing items in a shopping cart. The suspects were observed paying for items in the shopping cart but not the items that were concealed. Tera Lynn Cruson, 19, and Linda Leeann Keith, 23, both of Carrabelle, were arrested for retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The items, valued at $138, were recovered from the suspects. Both women were issued trespass warning for the store. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. Dais L. Richardson of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash on Government Road. The vehicle began to sh tail in the sand as the driver negotiated a curve and she struck a tree. There were no injuries reported. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. OCTOBER 25 Wal-Mart of cials repor ted a retail theft. Three females left the store prior to Deputy Stephen Simmons arrival, but Lt. Sherrell Morrison located the suspect vehicle and conducted a traf c stop on U.S. Highway 319 near Highway 267. A 16-year-old juvenile admitted taking the merchandise from Wal-Mart without paying for it. The clothing and other recovered merchandise was valued at $193. The juvenile was transported to the Wakulla County Jail and charged with petit theft. She was released into the custody of a relative. The juvenile and two other individuals in the vehicle were issued trespass warnings for the store. Deputy Sean Wheeler also investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 940 calls for service during the past week including 15 residential and business alarms; 69 citizen contacts; 13 disturbances; 24 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 18 regular E-911 abandoned calls; 14 regular E-911 calls; 51 investigations; 49 medical emergencies; 301 business and residential security checks; 36 special details; 25 subpoena services; 12 suspicious vehicles; 11 traf- c crashes with no injuries; 42 traffic enforcements; 60 traffic stops; 13 reckless vehicles; and 27 watch orders.Sheri s Report www.mikestewart2012.comPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MIKE STEWART, REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3 facebook.com/ mike.stewart.3363 I LIKEMIKEREElectfo rCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 C CommitmentRaised in Wakulla County learning the value of a strong work ethic and developing a desire to serve others. As I traveled throughout the world during my 20 years in the Navy, I knew that Wakulla was my home and where I wanted to return. My desire is to see our great county grow in a responsible manner all the while preserving those qualities we value as a small rural county. Married to the former Anne Quick for 39 years.Service Oriented years. Character unpopular. qualities such as honesty and integrity. that face the board. hank ou for your upport! HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 19ASpecial to The NewsBostic Pelt Bridge has recently been re-opened and Syfrett Creek Bridge is expected to re-open in November. Both bridges sustained severe damage from Tropical Storm Debby in June. Bostic Pelt Bridge, which connects with Harvey Mill Road and is highly traveled by its residents, was completely destroyed in the aftermath of Debby. Temporary repairs have been completed by the Wakulla County Public Works Department and the bridge is now open. Permanent repairs will be completed in the near future. Syfrett Creek Bridge on County Road 375 is nearing completion. Workers are paving and striping the roadway, as well as completing miscellaneous work. Drivers are reminded to use caution while crossing the temporary bridge while the bridge is under construction. For additional information about Bostic Pelt Bridge, contact Wakulla County Communications and Public Services Director Jessica Welch at (850) 926-0919, ext. 407. For more about the Syfrett Creek Bridge, contact the Florida Department of Transportation District Three, which is handling the repairs. At right, the newly opened bridge at Bostic Pelt.PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRepairs to bridges affected by Debby almost complete You and I are blessed to live in Wakulla County! I humbly ask for your vote on November 6. I will work for you, represent you, and protect our values and our way of life! Poli cal adver sing, paid for and approved by Ralph Thomas, Republican, for County Commission District 1 Ralph Thomas for County Commission District 1 Continued from Page 1A When asked what the major misconception was regarding the sheriffs of ce, Creel said it was that the sheriffs of ce was the only law enforcement agency that makes house calls within the county. Creel said FHP does in fact make house calls. However, during Langstons rebuttal he said one of the major misconceptions was that FHP shows up to the same crimes that the WCSO shows up to, which he said isnt true. When asked about improving traffic and road safety, Langston explained that the sheriffs of ce believes it is an important issue so the traf c unit was created to focus on accidents and speeders. He said they continue to work on that problem. We recognize that as a problem, he said. Creel liked the idea of the traf c unit, but felt it shouldnt work car accidents with fatalities or ones that might result in a fatality. He said the WCSO needs to work with the FHP and transfer those accidents back over to them. However, before doing so, he acknowledged FHP would need to increase its response time. In closing statements, Creel said, Its time for a fresh start within the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. He continued that he would work at improving the crime rate, create programs designed to help children and have a transparent budget so citizens know exactly how their tax dollars were being spent. Langston again compared his quali cations to his opponents and stated that had the experience to lead the sheriffs of ce. This is not an economy to train a baby sheriff, he said. This was the last bi-partisan forum moderated by the Wakulla Democratic and Republican executive committee chairs.Sheriff candidates square off at one last forum Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A A A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews

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Page 20A THE WAKULLA NEWS, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comIt establishes the tone of many gothic stories set in the south. The peculiar inhabitants of these tales are as overtly benign and vaguely menacing as the Spanish Moss hanging omnipresent and effortlessly above. With the shape shifting ability of a lava lamp, Spanish Moss can literally be what the beholders imagination conjures. A little moonlight and malevolence only serve to intensify the possibilities. Ghostly regional literature aside, Spanish Moss is a common site in Wakulla County with a long and storied history. In years past it has been viewed as a resource, but is presently considered a pest. The plant became known as Spanish Moss in popular lore because it resembled the long grey beards of conquistadors. These explorers trudged through the new worlds regions under the most primitive conditions. Shaving was a nonessential activity for these inquisitive souls, hence the long beards. The scienti c name for Spanish Moss, usneoides, means resembling Usnea, the beard lichen. Appearances aside, Spanish moss is not biologically related to lichens or other mosses. It is in the same plant family as the colorful and popular air plants, bromeliads. In the days before Styrofoam peanuts and synthetic padding, Spanish Moss was gathered commercially for a variety of uses. It served as a readily available packing material for delicate objects such as pottery, china, and glassware. It was a handy and popular stuffing for farmers seeking to plump up a scarecrow. It t the farm budget and it worked. In frontier Florida, Spanish Moss was the padding of choice for pillows and mattresses. It was comfortable by contemporary standards and accessible to anyone who could reach it. It was common knowledge this plant could be the home of many creatures. A quick dunk into boiling water would neutralize any potential for insect problems, especially chiggers. Chiggers, or red bugs as they are sometimes known, will burrow into the skin of anyone who has the bad luck be exposed to contact. The resulting infestation leaves red whelps and an unending itch. Prior to the arrival of European explorers, the indigenous peoples used Spanish Moss to reinforce some pottery objects. The ber strands of the plant provided a sturdy reinforcement webbing. In the 21st century Spanish Moss has the reputation as a tree killer. The impression it kills trees may originate from the plant establishing itself on trees already in decline. The dying trees thinning canopy allows more light to reach the moss, which promotes more growth of the moss. Spanish Moss is covered with permeable scales which catch moisture and nutrients from the air. It has no roots but entangles itself to the host tree by means of long scaly stems. The bulk of the moss may block some sunlight but it uses the tree only for support. Occasionally branches with moss may break under the weight, especially after rain. Spanish Moss is not a big problem for healthy trees, which grow faster than the moss. Moss removal must be done manually as there is no selective herbicide to kill the moss and leave the trees. Contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http0://wakulla.ifas.ufl. edu/ to learn more about Spanish Moss.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931. Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison Spanish Moss is a characteristic of the region PHOTOS BY LES HARRISONCypresses and other trees at Wakulla Springs draped with Spanish Moss, above. A closer look at the moss, below. Its not actually a moss, but an air plant in the bromeliad family. Share your Halloween picturesWillow Kade Tartt, 5 months old, the daughter of Jim and Sunshine Tarttt, is celebrating her rst Halloween, and Zaina Kinsey of Kinsey Photography took the photo. Do you have a photo of your family celebrating fall? Carving pumpkins, kids in their Halloween costumes for trick-or-treating, or divvying up the Halloween candy? Send your photos to editor@thewakullanews.net. Bill MontfordFOR STATE SENATE A TRUSTED VOICE FOR THE MIDDLE CLASS I am honored to serve the hardworking families of North Florida in the State Senate. I am committed to improving schools for our children and creating jobs for our middle class so everyone has a fair shot to succeed. STANDING UP FOR THE MIDDLE CLASS Whether its ghting for a tax system that is fair to har dworking families or giving our children the best education possible, Bill never stops standing up for the middle class. INVESTING IN EDUCATION Bill has dedicated his life to education to make a r eal dierence for Florida children. He is widely recognized for his commitment to education and to improving the lives of Floridians. ATTRACTING JOBS Bill will work to establish tax incentives to attract businesses and good jobs to N orth Florida, while making sure we have a well-educated work force to keep them here.Bill Montfordfor State SenateFACEBOOK.COM/BILLMONTFORD WWW.BILLMONTFORD.COMPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Bill Montford, Democrat, for State Senate, District 3. ENDORSED BY: AFSCME, Associated Industries of Florida, Florida AFL-CIO, Florida AFSCME Retirees Political Education Committee, Florida Association of Realtors, Florida Chamber of Commerce, Florida Education Association, Florida Medical Association, Florida Nurses Political Action Committee, Florida Police Benevolent Association, Florida Professional Fireghters, Florida Retail Federation, Florida Sheris CCE, Fraternal Order of Police, Grey2K USA, National Association of Social Workers

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netWatching the lm, we thought they were the second best team weve faced, Head Coach Scott Klees said of scouting Trinity Christian School of Deltona, the War Eagles opponent last week. Klees and his coaches had warned of an extremely athletic quarterback for Trinity with an ability to make plays. It was an unexpected blowout. The War Eagle offense was firing on all cylinders and the defense played tough, refusing to give up a big play and swarming to the ball. Fans had barely gotten to their seats when Dillon Norman tore off a run on the rst offensive play of the game to score a touchdown. Then he added the extra point. Only 13 seconds had run off the clock. The mercy rule of a running clock was invoked with two minutes left in the rst quarter when the War Eagles were up 35-0. The stands were packed for homecoming festivities, but the War Eagles were such an ef cient machine on the eld that the crowd grew quiet. Even the rabid student section usually taunting and teasing and holding up signs watched the game, but the lack of competition took away the fun. By halftime, it was 50-0. The second half had a lot of young Wakulla players on the eld. Even Coach Klees took a break, handing over playcalling duties to Assistant Coach James Vernon. It was by far our best game of the year, said Klees. We really played very well at all positions. It set up one of the biggest games of the year this year Wakullas district rival Godby. Both are undefeated, and both ranked in the Top 5 in the polls of Florida Division 5A schools. In the Maxpreps ranking, Godby is ranked No. 1 and Wakulla comes in at No. 3. Its going to come down to playing physical, Klees said. Thats a key to success. Its also going to come down to turnovers whoever turns the ball over the least will probably win. Klees take on the two teams is that Wakulla and Godby have two different ways of winning: Godby likes to spread a defense out to get in space and use their speed. Wakulla relies on its upfront guys, Klees said. Basically a running team that likes to pass. The one big injury still facing the War Eagles is linebacker Kevin James. Klees said X-rays were negative so it appears to be an ankle sprain. But whether James, who has been a run-stopper, will play against Godby will be a game time decision, Klees said. Continued on Page 2B Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 sports news and team views SportsWar Eagles in a rout, 56-0Sets up showdown this week against Godby for district crownTHIS WEEK: The War Eagles play Godby at home at J.D. Jones Stadium on Friday, Nov. 2, at 7:30 p.m. BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWar Eagle freshman wide receiver Keith Gavin stretches to bring in a long pass for a touchdown.From Marching War Eagles to FSUs Marching ChiefsPage 4A RMS cheerleaders go pink at last home gamePage 6A Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the t op-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011. Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943 ) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 SM Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Thursday, November 1 W ednesday, November 7 Friday, November 9 Monday, November 12 Tuesday, November 13 Wednesday, November 21 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111 Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook Law Oce Est. 1998Fore closures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, F lorida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comPlayers of the WeekFELEIPE FRANKS Quarterback 6 for 7 for 137 yards and a touchdown. DALTON NICHOLS Punter averaged 42 yards with two punts in the game FRED CUMMINGS Linebacker 8 tackles, 2 assists and a safetyO ense Defense Special Teams War Eagles in a rout, 56-0Continued from Page 1B As for the Trinity game, the War Eagles scored in the rst half almost every time they touched the ball, while the defense didnt even allow Trinity to make a rst down in the rst quarter. After Dillon Norman scored on the rst offensive play, the defense held Trinity to a three and out. Mikal Cromartie had a goo punt return, Monterious Loggins took it down to the 10 on a run, and then quarterback Caleb Stephens hit Demetrius Lindsey for a pass play for a touchdown. On the offensive series, Malik Thomas ran the ball down into the Trinity red zone, and freshman quarterback Feleipe Franks hit Markel Rawls for a touchdown. It was 21-0 with almost 8 minutes still remaining in the rst quarter. Thomas scored a touchdown on the next series. Then Caleb Stephens hit freshman Keith Gavin on a 30-yard scoring strike down the sideline for a touchdown to go up 35-0, and start the running clock. A Trinity fumble at their 21 set up Lindsey for a rushing touchdown to make it 42-0. Trinity started having to gamble and went for it on fourth down at mid eld and didnt make it. Wakulla couldnt make a rst down and punter Dalton Norman kicked the ball to the 6-yard line. Pressure by linebacker Fred Cummings in the endzone forced the Trinity quarterback to throw it away which was called intentional grounding and resulted in a safety to make it 44-0. Mikal Cromartie scored on the next drive to make it 50-0 before halftime. In the second half, running back Sheldon Johnson scored with just a few minutes remaining in the game to go up 56-0. Feleipe Franks, who Klees described as the back-up everything, attempted the extra point in place of kicker Dillon Norman, but it was no good.WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSQuarterback Feleipe Franks throws a pass to receiver Markel Rawls, 22, who scored on the play. More photos online at thewakullanews.comSpeedster Dillon Norman, 1, scores on the rst play of the game behind the block of big lineman Chris Grif n, 72. Wakulla pee-wee football players, below, led the War Eagles onto the eld for the start of the homecoming game. JOHN SHUFF JOHN SHUFF Sustainable Growth = JOBS Sustainable Growth = JOBS Long Term Planning = Efcient Spending Long Term Planning = Efcient Spending JOHN SHUFF JOHN SHUFF ELECT ELECT Political advertisement paid for and approved by John Shuff, Democrat, for County Commission District 5. FOR COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 5 FOR COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 5 www.ShuffForWakulla.com www.ShuffForWakulla.com PLEASE RE-ELECT OUR PAP Donnie Sparkman WAKULLA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERHe Is: Knowledgeable Honest Dedicated to the people of Wakulla County with 42 years of experience Certi ed Florida Appraiser Experienced Land Surveyor (and He Loves US! Brigs, Walker & Reese)Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, for Property Appraiser

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 3B Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Nov. 1 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. WAKULLA GENEALOGY GROUP will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Dick Sherwin will demonstrate and discuss Navigating Genealogy Websites. Sherwin has been interested in genealogy for the past 30 years. Since his retirement from the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, he has volunteered at the Family History Center in Tallahassee. Sherwin is a member of the Tallahassee Genealogical Society and the New England Historic Genealogical Society. Friday, Nov. 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Nov. 3 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Nov. 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Nov. 5 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Nov. 6 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Wednesday, Nov. 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. WAKULLA COUNTY COALITION FOR YOUTH will meet at noon at the TCC Wakulla Center. Thursday, Nov. 8 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsFriday, Nov. 2 CHILI DINNER AND SILENT AUCTION will be held at Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church. Dinner will be served from 5 to 7 p.m. and includes homemade chili, cornbread, beverage and dessert. Cost is $5. The auction will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. For more information, call 984-0127. Saturday, Nov. 3 SECOND ANNUAL WAKULLA FRIENDS OF SCOUTING FUN SHOOT will be held at the WCSO Shooting Range from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine. A $5 per person entry fee will let you shoot pistols and ri es. There will be various prizes for the best shots. There will be a sporting clays competition, a competitive plate shooting event, shooting demonstrations, gun safety instruction, and a chance drawing for great prizes. This event is open to Boys, Girls, Men and Women of all ages who can shoot safely, as determined by the range safety of cer. Attendees under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Firearms and ammunition will be provided. All proceeds will bene t the Boy Scouts of America including priced concession sales. The WCSO Shooting Range is located at 65 Qualify Lane, Crawfordville. Contact Mike Scibelli at (850) 251-1497 for details. EMPTY BOWL FUNDRAISER will be held at Hudson park from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tickets are $15 for a soup lunch and hand painted bowl. There will also be live entertainment, including music and Stone Soup play by children. The money raised goes to the areas food pantries. For more information, contact Haydee Jackley at ribitsceramic@ yahoo.com or (850) 567-4212. ELECTION for open seat on the Capital Area Community Action Board of Directors will be held at 11 a.m. at Hudson Park in conjunction with the Empty Bowls Fundraiser. Call 222-2043 for more information. NAMIBIKES EVENT will be held at Tom Brown Park, 1125 Easterwood Drive, in Tallahassee. Check-in and a continental breakfast open at 6 a.m. The bike riding event will raise awareness about mental illness, treatment and recovery. There will be a 100-mile Century ride to Monticello and back and a 64-mile Metric Century ride to Capps and back. There will also be a 30-mile off-road ride, a 6-mile family-ride around the park and a bike rodeo and a safety course. For more information, visit www.FightStigmaAndRide.org, or contact Carol Weber at cweber@nami orida. org or (850) 671-4445. FOURTH ANNUAL PAT RAMSEY HOSPICE EVENT will be held at noon at Bradfordville Blues. The event will bene t Big Bend Hospice in Ramseys honor. He was a well known musician and blues singer. There will be several musical acts inside and outside, including Brett Wellman & the Stone Cold Blues Band, C.S.Holt & Blues Revival, RoadHouse, Acme R&B, Common Zenz, JBs Zydeco Zoo, Big Poppa & The Shuf e Brothers, Randall Big Daddy Webster, Cheap & Easy, The Wiley Coyote Band, Low Flying Planes, Bedhead Betty, Swingin Harpoon and Major Bacon from New Orleans La. Featuring Clyde Ramsey on Harp & Keys and Ontological Elephants Party Time. FREE HOMEOWNERS SUSTAINABILITY WORKSHOP will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the library. Homeowners interested in having their situations evaluated immediately are asked to bring copies of a recent mortgage statement, homeowners insurance, property tax statement, Homeowners Association dues statement, 60 days of paystubs (for all employed household members), copy of unemployment determination, other source of income: SSI, Child Support, Pension, veri cation of reduction in income for year of hardship and year prior (Tax return, W2s) and last two months of bank statements. For more information, call 392-6850 or email wakullaworkshop@sahis.org. FISH FRY will be held by the Sopchoppy Lions Club from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Sopchoppy Hardware Store. Tickets are $10 and include fried sh with coleslaw, hushpuppies and iced tea. Sunday, Nov. 4 FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE will be held at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and will be on the Florida National Scenic Trail with speaker Dale Allen who brought the trail to St. Marks in the 1980s. Find out about the different hikes available into the St. Marks backcountry. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures Classroom at St. Marks Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 925-6121 for more information. Monday, Nov. 5 FUNDRAISER will be held for Wakulla High Schools girls basketball team at Beef OBradys from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Register to win a pair of Wild Adventure tickets with required purchase. Tuesday, Nov. 6 WAKULLA COUNTY TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED COORDINATING BOARD will meet at 10 a.m. at the Senior Center. Apalachee Regional Planning Council announces this public meeting to which all persons are invited. Thursday, Nov. 8 FOOD PRESERVATION WORKSHOP will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Extension Of ce by David Moody, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge director, and Shelley Swenson, Wakulla County FCS Extension agent. They will be covering the basics of food preservation through pressure canning and dehydrating. Moody has years of experience preserving wildlife and sh and wants to share some of the things that he has learned with others. Swenson will share an overview of the pressure canner, why a pressure canner must be used for low acid vegetables, meats and sh and some basic canning techniques. Sample foods will be provided. Registration fee is $5. Enroll by calling the Wakulla County Extension Of ce at 926-3931. Pre-registration is necessary, but workshop fee can be paid at the workshop. Upcoming EventsSaturday, Nov. 10 SIXTH ANNUAL VETERANS DAY CELEBRATION AND PARADE will be held by Wakulla Christian School to honor all veterans and active duty military. The theme for the 2012 Veterans Day Celebration is Honoring All Who Served. Parade entries are strongly encouraged to decorate in a patriotic theme. There is no fee to enter the parade, but a donation of toiletry supplies for our active duty military is requested. Sunday, Nov. 11 FREE PANCAKE AND SAUSAGE BREAKFAST will be held by the Wakulla County Memorial Post, VFW POST 4538 from 7 a.m. until 10 a.m. Everyone is invited as a thank you and to give back to the public for its support throughout the year. The VFW post is located at 475 Arran Road, Crawfordville. Saturday, Nov. 17 FIRST BLUE JEANS AND FAST MACHINES EVENT for Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will be held from 5 to 10 p.m. at 3Y Ranch, Crawfordville. There will be dinner and entertainment by Local Motion. Enter a fast machine for $10 per entry. To attend the show only, cost is $5 per car load. Dinner and entertainment is $35 per person. A table sponsorship is $300. For more information, email helpkwcb@gmail.com, call (850) 745-7111 or visit the website www.kwcb.org. Government Meetings Thursday, Nov. 1 WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 3 p.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea to discuss and nalize the 2013 Advertising/Marketing Campaign. Monday, Nov. 5 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, Nov. 13 SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Wednesday, Nov. 14 WAKULLA COUNTY CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD will hold a public hearing at 5:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorOur overdrive e-book checkout service goes live on Wednesday, Oct. 31. Our e-book collection is a work in progress so as weve asked before, if there is any book or subject youd like to see added please tell us and we will make every effort to accommodate you. Please go to e-books. wildernesscoast.org to get started. There will also be a link on our homepage www.wakullalibrary.org. You will need your library card number to use the service (your PIN is the last four digits of your number). There is a limit of two e-book checkouts per card with a limit of two weeks per checkout. You can return them early if you wish. In addition to the new e-books which we have purchased, you also have access to 1,000s of works in the public domain like classics (Dickens, Stevenson, Twain, etc) and instructional materials. There are no limits on these works as they are no longer under copyright. Please bear with us through the inevitable growing pains as we are excited and optimistic that this will be a heavily used service. Please contact us with any questions and be on the lookout for workshops on using overdrive to be held here in the coming weeks! Political EventsThursday, Nov. 1-Saturday, Nov. 3 EARLY VOTING for the General Election at the Supervisor of Elections Of ce from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6 ELECTION DAY from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the polls.Library News... Empty Bowl Fundraiser from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park. Wakulla Friends of Scouting Fun Shoot at the range from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. First Sunday at the Refuge on scenic trail and hikes at 2 p.m. Election Day from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the polls. SaturdaySaturdaySundayTuesday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net

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Special to The NewsIn a dazzling display of garnet and gold, seven former Wakulla High School marching War Eagles help entertain a roaring crowd of 50,000 plus at the Florida State football games. They are members of the Florida State University Marching Chiefs and include Blair Mathers, Nicole Pandolphi and Ashley Alvarez twirling baton with the majorette line while Mallory Thompson, Belle Robinson, Cassidy Thompson and Emily Grif n twirl ags as part of the Color Guard. These girls began the season at a two week intense band camp prior to the rst football game. This was just the beginning to daily practices and 7:30 a.m. game day rehearsals. Two hours prior to each home game, the girls can be seen at the FSU baseball eld along with the rest of the band warming up and doing a semi-performance, free of charge and open to anyone. Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachOn Saturday, Oct. 27, the WHS cross country teams traveled to Maclay School in Tallahassee to compete in the Tallahassee Open City Cross-Country Championships. The 10 teams entering the competition had different goals in mind for this competition than for most races throughout the season. With the District competitions looming next week, most of the teams used this race as a nal tune-up and a less than all out competition. For the local harriers, that was exactly the scenario. During the post-season competitions, each team can only run seven runners in the varsity races. So, for the WHS boys, the main purpose of this race was to try and set the order of runners for the District Meet, especially for runners numbers 4-7. The rst three places on the team have been established, but the next four places were up for grabs, with six runners vying for the spots. Before the start, the coaches challenged those runners to do their best and step it up for the team and they did just that. Five of the boys set new personal records (PRs) and nished within 14 seconds of each other. We usually try not to put much pressure on the kids for this race, but this year we had to in order to try and establish the order for the District Meet, said Coach Paul Hoover. We have ve or six boys who are basically interchangeable for four available slots, so we had to try and sort them out, Hoover said. It is a good problem to have, but you kind of hate it because all of them have worked really hard this season and have shown tremendous improvement. They all deserve to run in the varsity race at Districts, they just cant. But the boys still worked together, pulled for each other and really stepped it up, he said. They answered the call today. Travis Parks, the solid third runner on the team, set the pace for the other boys Saturday and ran a solid time of 18:48. Mitchell Atkinson led the charge for the other runners in a new PR time of 18:38, with Lane Williams hot on his heels at 18:39. Ryan Dodson was close behind in 18:48, with Alan Pearson nishing in 18:50 and Albert Smythe closing fast in 18:52. Evan Guarino and Riley Welch also ran new PRs and David Sloan ran a season best, varsity time of 21:25. Overall, the boys team nished in third place. The situation for the girls team was completely different from the boys. All seven slots for the post season team are pretty rmly established and only one of those needed a serious race, so for most of the girls, it was more of a tempo run than an all-out race. Connie Lewis ran a solid race and a new PR, nishing in 24:13. Logan Kelley, Ava Shaw and Emily Westmark also recorded new PRs on the multiple loop course. The girls team nished in 5th place. Senior co-captain Raychel Gray was scheduled to take the ACT test on Saturday, so instead, decided to run the YMCA Trick or Trot 5K held in Southwood on Friday evening and nished as the second overall female in the time of 22:32. The District Meet will be held Saturday, Nov. 3, at the Apalachee Regional Park Cross Country Course. The boys race will begin at 10:30 a.m. and the girls will start at 11 a.m.Girls bball fundraiser set at Beefs on Nov. 5Special to The NewsA fundraiser for Wakulla girls basketball has been set for Monday, Nov. 5, at the Beef OBradys in Crawfordville. The event will be held from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the restaurant. Register to win a pair of Wild Adventures tickets with a purchase. For more information, contact Vicki Carr-McDadden at (850) 728-4414 or carrmcfadden777@gmail.com. CROSS COUNTRYCity championships the nal tune-up before districts From Marching War Eagles to FSUs Marching ChiefsMARCHING CHIEFS: Mallory Thompson, Ashley Alvarez, Belle Robinson, Blair Mathers, Cassidy Thompson, Nicole Pandolphi, Emiley Grif n Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S P a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm 12 12 Demetrius Lindsey and Ashley Alvarez my100bank.com z 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 b b b b b b b b b b b k 0 0 b b b b b b k b b b b b b CENTENNIALBANKMember FDIC CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARDWakulla County is currently seeking interested citizens who have a willingness to serve as a member and alternate member on the Code Enforcement Board. There are two vacant seats as an alternate member and two forthcoming as a member appointed by the BOCC that expires December 31, 2012. The vacant seats for each appointment will be for a three year term beginning January 1, 2013, and ending December 31, 2015. The membership of the Code Enforcement Board shall, whenever possible, consist of an architect, a business person, an engineer, a general contractor, a subcontractor, a realtor, and another citizen. These positions are on a volunteer basis only and the members would have the responsibility of being present at each scheduled Code Enforcement Meeting. The alternate members will be noti ed in the event a member is unable to attend a scheduled meeting. These meetings occur on the second Wednesday of every other month, at 5:30p.m. in the Commission Chambers, with the exception of Holidays.Citizens wishing to serve as a member or alternate member can contact Jaime Baze at (850) 926-7636 ext: 423 or jbaze@mywakulla.com by November 28, 2012.

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By TIM LINAFELTOn a day when Florida State had its way with Duke, the Blue Devils biggest rival did the Seminoles a huge favor. Despite entering Saturdays game with a 7-1 record and a No. 12 ranking in the Bowl Championship Series, the Seminoles still needed North Carolina State to drop a conference game by the end of the regular season to have a shot at reaching the ACC Championship Game in Charlotte. North Carolinas Gio Bernard did the heavy lifting with a 74-yard punt return for a go-ahead touchdown that gave the Tar Heels a 43-35 victory over the Wolfpack. The loss dropped N.C. State to 5-3, 2-2 in conference play and moved the Wolfpack behind both FSU and Clemson in the Atlantic Division standings. And with their 48-7 rout of Duke, the Seminoles returned to the top of the pack and can secure the division title with wins in their nal two ACC games at Virginia Tech and at Maryland. That was always our perspective at the beginning of the season, but after that devastating loss (to N.C. State), it was kind of a toss-up, FSU safety Lamarcus Joyner said. But now were put back on that pedestal so we have to take advantage of it. The Tar Heels appeared to be cruising to an easy win, building up a 25-7 rst-quarter advantage. The Wolfpack, though, seemed determined not to let its division lead slip away, charging back for a 35-25 lead behind Mike Glennons career-high 467 yards and ve touchdowns. But with the game eventually tied late in the fourth quarter, Wolfpack coach Tom OBrien opted to play it safe, running the ball toward overtime despite having three timeouts in his pocket. He chose to punt to Bernard with 30 seconds left in regulation. Its a great feeling, quarterback EJ Manuel said. Weve just got to continue to win. If we continue to win out, theres no telling what can happen. FSU coach Jimbo Fisher acknowledged that he was glad to be back atop the standings, but that it wont mean much if the Seminoles cant handle Virginia Tech on a Thursday night in Blacksburg. I didnt even realize it at the time, FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. Thats great. Thats all good, but what weve got to do is just beat Virginia Tech. Weve just got to play it one at a time. Im not worried about the end result of anything. We need to play better, play a good Virginia Tech team and learn to play on the road well.At 4-4, 2-2 in the ACC, the Hokies have fallen short of expectations this season, but Fisher expects a dif cult test at Lane Stadium. Thats a hostile environment. Thats one of the toughest environments there is and were going to have to have our A-game, because guess what? Theyll be waiting on us. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 5BFLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State t e Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M at North Carolina A&TSaturday, Nov. 3 at 1:30 PMThe game can be seen on famuathletics.com. Missouri at #7 FloridaSaturday, Nov. 3 at NOONThe game can be seen on ESPN2. #9 Florida StateSaturday, Nov. 3 Bye Week LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO 000CV38 ATTENTIONFIFTH THIRD BANK CUSTOMERS Were you charged a fee for an Early Access cash advance loan? If so, you may be entitled to compensation!Wagner, Vaughan & McLaughlin, P.A. 601 Bayshore Blvd., Suite 910 | Tampa, FL 33606Call Toll Free 866-507-1518Jason K. WhittemoreCall NOW for information concerning your legal rights. 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Advertise your way to Success! Statewide Advertising Refreshing Rates C C all now to advertise your business in over 100 newspapers 866.742.1373 www.facebook.com/AdNetFlorida Rodney Smith and FSU pulled away from Duke and into rst place in the ACC Atlantic Division.PHOTO BY COLIN HACKLEY/OSCEOLA Thats one of the toughest environments there is and were going to have to have our A-game, Coach Jimbo Fisher GATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSONThe team that defeated South Carolina looked very different from the team that faced Georgia on Saturday. Offense needs Offense needs to bounce back to bounce back Next up difficult test at Lane StadiumBy THOMAS GOLDKAMPGatorBait.net Staff Writer Floridas offensive line had arguably its worst outing of the year against Georgia, giving up ve sacks and allowing quarterback Jeff Driskel to get hit repeatedly, even causing a couple turnovers. Center Jon Harrison is con dent Florida will bounce back against Missouri this weekend. Still, center Jon Harrison has a lot of con dence in the group, and he had a promise for the Gator Nation on Tuesday. You guys wont see that anymore out of the offensive line, he said. After suffering a crippling loss to Georgia that essentially eliminated Florida from the SEC title game barring an upset of the Bulldogs, theres only one thing the Gators can do. Its to come back and win. Come back swinging, Harrison said. We expect to come out there Saturday and give it our all and just bounce back. Harrison and the rest of the offensive line met as a unit without the coaching staff to talk about the mistakes they made in the Georgia game. They broke things down position-by-position with the sole purpose of making sure Saturdays mistakes dont happen again. The main thing the unit is working on as it heads into its nal SEC game of the season is communication. Far too often against Georgia, there wasnt enough of it. Or the communication was downright botched. There was times when there was a miscommunication, Harrison said. It could have been between center and guard, or guard-tackle, whatever it is, tackle-tight end. Whatever the position may be there was a just a communication error, and when that error occurs, then the play will not go as smooth as its supposed to. Like Harrison, offensive coordinator Brent Pease is con dent in the lines ability to pass protect and open holes in the run game. The unit isnt going to go away from what it did best early in the year -running the football -just because it has been slowed the past few weeks. We cant get gun-shy on things. Weve got to believe in what were doing, Pease said. Now, can we get better at what were doing? Yeah. Do we have to adjust things here and there? Yeah. But weve kind of got answers to all of that. We try to use those plays appropriately. Harrisons ready to do his part to help an offensive line that was frequently abused in pass protection pick things up against Missouri. For Florida to avoid the type of collapse it had last year after its rst loss, the Gators need to bounce back against Missouri. If they do that, its smooth sailing to a 10-1 record heading into Tallahassee. But it starts up front. Last game wasnt our best performance, but weve shown what were capable of and its well known the potential that our offensive line has, Harrison said. I just know were going to bounce back this Saturday and make sure everyone is fundamentally sound on the offensive line.

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsThe Riversprings Middle School cheerleaders went pink in support of Breast Cancer Awareness at the home game against Taylor County on Thursday, Oct. 25. The cheerleaders had their pink pompoms and pink hair bows for the game. By CONNOR HARRISONwakullasports.comIt wasnt the prettiest of wins, but it was a win nonetheless. It was also a matchup with a special twist: it was the return of Tanner Jones, former Wakulla War Eagle standout and son of legendary coach J.D. Jones for whom the stadium is named is in his rst season at the helm of the Taylor County Middle School program. In the game, the Riversprings Bears were plagued with fumbles. But even with those fumbles, the defense stood its ground and did its best to keep Taylor County out of the end zone. The only scores that the Bulldogs got were big plays, not necessarily long drives because the Bears defense stopped the run up the middle, and defended the pass well. With a defense limiting their scoring, the Bears ended up winning 20-12. To start the game off, Riversprings elected to receive the kickoff. When the offense took the eld they didnt have any big explosive plays until the second half. The plays they did have were ones that just kept the drive alive. When they faced a third and 14, quarterback Zach Norman completed a pass to Jake McCarl for the rst down. This made it rst and goal. The very next play Demarcus Lindsey ran the ball into the end zone and the two point conversion was good, to make it 8-0. It appeared Riversprings was set to kick it off to the Taylor County Bulldogs, but instead they decided to attempt an onside kick. After a few good bounces, the ball ended up in Lindseys hands. RMS was facing a fourth and 9, and instead of punting the ball away, the offense stayed on the eld and Norman threw the ball to Kody Zanco for a touchdown. The two-point conversion was no good. To end the rst quarter the Bears forced a three and out, but the following possession for Riversprings ended up with a fumble, and the Bulldogs recovered. Taylor County took this opportunity to put six points on the board. Next up was the Bears who, once again, fumbled the ball giving Taylor County a chance to add to their score, which they did. A quick speed sweep for the Bulldogs made the score 14-12, with 3:30 left in the half. The ensuing onside kick was corralled in by Hezekiah Gross, giving the Bears a chance to extend their lead going into halftime. The Bulldogs intercepted the pass in the red zone with 31 seconds left in the half, but the RMS defense was stout and managed to get the ball back with one tick on the clock. The Hail Mary pass fell incomplete and took the game into halftime. The second half wasnt nearly as productive as the rst, with Riversprings scoring the only touchdown. This lone touchdown came on a punt return from Lindsey, who took the ball on a hop and went from one side of the eld to the other on his way to the end zone. The win brings Riversprings season record to 4-3. The final game of the season for RMS is on Tuesday, Nov. 6, at 4:30 p.m. at Kingdom Life Prep in Tallahassee. PHOTO BY SCOTT ROSSOW/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRMS cheerleaders go pink TCCs WAKULLA CENTERWe want you to succeed professionally through education and training. We are here to help.FALL 2012 INFORMATION SESSIONS:OCTOBER 23 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about the Testing Center, Enrollment Services and Student SuccessOCTOBER 30 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about Financial Aid & Scholarship and the Career CenterNOVEMBER 6 | 3 5 P.M.Learn more Financial Aid & Scholarships, Enrollment Services and Student SuccessNOVEMBER 13 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about the Testing Center and the Career CenterTesting is available by appointment every Friday. For more information call (850) 922-6290 Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Renance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Ofce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Ofce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Ofce: 850.926.1960 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926685 or 510Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH CONNOR HARRISON/wakullasports.comRiversprings Demarcus Lindsey pulls away from a would-be Bulldog tackler.RMS gets a win over Taylor

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 7B -Janet 000BK82 Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage? By JEAN KRESSYContributor, Relish magazineA few days before Thanksgiving, we add the Butterball hotline number to our speed dial. Weve never used it, but knowing that someone is on call to help with whatever turkey crisis were in is a comfort. We feel the same way about the Pork Board website (www.porkbeinspired.com). Although weve never run into trouble with pork chops or tenderloins and learned years ago that one of the best ways to x pork is to braise it with apple cider and fresh vegetables, it always helps to have an expert standing by. As it turns out, the questions the Pork Board gets asked most often are about food safety and overcooking. Most people know to wash their hands before cooking and not use the same plate for uncooked and cooked meat, but in a sign of the times when everyone is a frugal cook, people ask if its safe to cook pork thats been sitting on the counter overnight. Absolutely not! About overcooking, the Board recommends taking pork off the heat or out of the oven when its temperature is 145F. Finally, for help choosing pork, we spoke to Dr. David Meisinger, a meat science expert at Iowa State University. Look for reddish-pink, he said, as it has the best avor and is the juiciest. The other white meat, it turns out, refers to pork after its cooked. Cider-Braised Pork Loin with Carrots and Onion 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 (2-pound) boneless pork loin 2 medium onions, vertically sliced (about 2 1/2 cups) 4 medium carrots, cut diagonally into 1/4-inch slices (about 1 1/2 cups) 2 celery stalks with leaves, sliced 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 teaspoon dried rubbed sage 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 teaspoon coarse salt 1/4 t easpoon freshly ground black pepper 1 cup apple cider 1. Heat oil over medium-high heat in a Dutch oven. Add pork and cook until wellbrowned on both sides. Remove to a plate. Add onions, carrots and celery to pan; cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until onions are tender, about 10 minutes. Stir in garlic, sage, thyme, salt and pepper. 2. Return pork and any juices to Dutch oven and pour cider over top. Cover and simmer, basting occasionally, until temperature on meat thermometer inserted in middle reaches 145F, about 1 1/4 hours. Remove roast from pan and let rest 10 minutes. Slice pork and serve with vegetables and pan sauce. Serves 6.For more Relish recipes, log on to relishmag.com. RELISH THE AMERICAN TABLEPork pointersMark Boughton Photography

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Agency Angry Axis Barked Beginning Bitter Bone Busy Buys Cannot Cars Carton Cell Charges Child Coughs Crush Dare Diet Duke File Gate Give Glad Goes Golf Grip Gull Have Keeps Kite Lazy Line Link Loaf Lonely Luckier Nine Occur Out t Pain Panic Path Pats Penned Prism Quack Quick This page sponsored in part by: Raft Ranch Reign Safety Seek Self Sheer Sits Skim Span Teas Tents They Tone Tough T-shirts Uses Wept Whale Wise Woke

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Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 Trades/ Skills AFew Pro Drivers Needed.Top Pay & 401K. Need CDLClass ADriving Exp. (877)258-8782 www .drive4melton.com DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport Trades/ Skills Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED /INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. -Tanker Training Available. Call Today! (877)882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE OOp -Regional, PAY INCREASE Multiple Fleets Available. Class A CDL/ Home weekly. Call (800)695-9643 or www .drivefor watkins.com OTR Drivers Wanted.Sign on bonus, Food grade tankers, Class-A CDLw/tanker endorsement. Prefer 2 yrs experience, Competitive pay, Benefits. For information call (800)569-6816 or go to our website www .ottery transportation.com Tire Technician /Mechanic NeededB & B Dugger, Inc. is looking for a part or full-time tire mounting technician that has experience with tire changers. tire balancers and mounting truck & small tractor tires. Additional experience in roadside asssistance and working in the field is also prefererred. A Florida driver license with a clear MVR is a position requirement. Pay negotiable. Call the business office at (850) 926-2929 or email to office@band bdugger.com to receive an application TransferDrivers:Need 20 Contract Drivers, CDLAor B to relocate vehicles to and from various locations throughout USNo forced dispatch: (800)501-3783 www .mamo transportation.com Trades/ Skills TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 General Help DRIVERS:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money DownCALL: 888-880-5911 Furniture CHERRYBEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used, brand new in factory boxes. Original cost $4500. Sell for $795. Can deliver. Call Tom (407)574-3067 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET. In original plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice $975. Can deliver. Call Bill (813)298-0221 Garage/ Yard Sales Sat Nov 3rd 8a-12p NO EARLYBIRDS Alittle bit of everything. 31 Scotch Pine Ct The Grove Subdivision off E Ivan, Follow Signs Farm Services BUSH HOGGING ROADS GRADED GARDENS TILLED Have tractor will bush hog finish cut large acerage grade roads driveways till gardens. dbdouge@aol.com or 850-643-6283 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 PANACEAClean SW 2/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $500/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 SPRING CREEK HWY10 acre min-farm, DWMH, 2BR/2BA, Spring Creek & Jack Crum Rd. $550/mo., $550/deposit. SWMH, 2BR/1BA, Irvin Bryant St., Spring Creek. $500/mo., $500/deposit. 850-926-5192. Mobile Homes For Sale 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, Beautiful Kitchen. Huge Master Bedroom Walk In Closets Call Today (850) 576-2106 4 BR Mobile Home on 5 Acres, Ready to Move IN -EZ Payments. Call Me (850) 576-2105 100 Families Needed for Govt Loan Program. Call Today (850) 576-2104 2002 MOBILE HOME 28X76 4Bedroom/2Bath Master Suite with Office, Walk-in Closet, Garden Tub, Shower. Family Room with Fireplace. Separate Living Room. Large Kitchen with Breakfast Nook and Island. Laundry Room. $35,000. MUST MOVE Billy (850) 962-3884 3BR, 2BA-Used Mobile Home. Great Condition Wont Last !!! Call Me ASAP (850) 576-2687 GOTLAND? Need a Home. Use Your Land As your DOWN Payment Call Now (850) 576 2687 Mobile Home with acreage ready to move in, great for pets. Lots of space forthe price, 3Br2Ba, serious offers only, no renters. (850)308-6473 Apartments Unfurnished PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall Mary (850) 984-4811Equal Housing Opportunity TDD 1 800 955 2771 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $700/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. (850) 926-1385 CRAWFORDVILLENICE 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Home in Wakulla Gardens, Lots of extra features, $850. month (850) 926-8948 Vacation Rentals ALLIGATOR POINT2/Bedroom, 2/Bath, 1,200 sf, Gulf Front, Vacation Rental 3 blks to white sandy beach, 75ft. to Gulf of Mexico. Beautiful Sunsets $1,000. Wk. (904)687-3397 Real Estate For Sale 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www .sunsetranches.com Auctions Estates 3Br/2Ba W/attached garage On 1.03 acres. Auction 11/13/12-10am @ South Palm Beach County Courthouse. Sharon Sullivan (954)740-2421 Or sharon.w .sullivan@irs.gov Visit www .irsauctions.gov for more info. REALESTATE AUCTION, Blount County, TN:(55) 5+ Acre Tracts, Log Cabin, Commercial Building & (3) Residential Lots. Saturday, Nov. 17. 1-800-4FURROW. TN Lic. #62. Trucks DODGE2010 RAM 2500 STpkg diesel, crewcab, short box, 16K 5th wheel hitch 23,700 mi like new $32,000 352-586-1125 GMC2008 Sierra C/K1500 Denali, Crew Cab, AWD, 25,800miles,black,leather, sunroof, navigation, DVD, excellent condition, warranty, extras, $12200, sndd@netscape.com 5418-1122 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201203652 TO: Russell E. Paul ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. November 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5420-1108 TWN vs. Nelson, Phillip Case No:65-2008-CA-000222FC Notice of Foreclosure Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 65-2008-CA-000222FC US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE CSFB MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2001-HE-17, Plaintiff, PHILLIPA. NELSON; KELLYM. NELSON; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 16th day of October, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000222FC, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE CSFB MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2001-HE-17 is the Plaintiff and PHILLIPA. NELSON, KELLYM. NELSON and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONTLOBBYof WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32326, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT A ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the schedForeclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices WANTEDSUBSTITUTE SCHOOL TEACHERS Wakulla County School District Apply at: wakullaschooldistrict.org Click on Employment(All applicants are required to pass background and drug screening, and complete of online sub training.) 4Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1150mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16 .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE.CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 OFFICE SPACE LEASEFORTHE BARRY BUILDING ATTHE LOG CABINCrawfordville 850-508-5471$25000/MO Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT The White Elephant50% OFFON ALL ITEMS in Bob & Marges Booth atfrom Nov. 1, thru Nov. 10nd us across from the courthouse in Crawfordville926-3338 Antique Mall 20960 N.E. Burlington Rd., Hosford, FL 32334 NOVEMBER 3 9AM EST--F&LAUCTION ---FARM EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE AUCTIONTractors, Mowers, Cultivators and all types of Farm EquipmentAuctioneer: Felton Hall, auctioneer license AU426610% BUYERS PREMIUM all consignments are welcomed.For more info: 850-379-8410, Cell: 850-566-6646 TO VIEW PARTIAL LIST OF PHOTOS VISIT www.auctionzip.com The Wakulla County Clerk of Court is accepting applications for Ofcial Records division clerk. Position requires experience with substantial data entry, balance & preparation of cash deposits, knowledge of computer applications (Ofce Suite and specialty software) and general ofce equipment. Must possess the ability to climb ladders, to sit or stand for long periods of time, physically lift boxes containing 35lbs + type 35 cwpm. Preference given to legal experience/title research background.Visit our website at www.wakullaclerk.com for additional information and an application. Florida law provides that all applications for employment are open for public inspection. Background check, employment testing and drug screening are required. EOE.

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com uled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 22ND day of October, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk PARCEL1: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,(MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J.K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, N.E., THE DISTANCE OF 1,049.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT DESCRIBED HEREIN. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 560.2 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST 385.36 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LANDS OF GRANVILLE JAMES, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 552.63 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST 420.9 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S. THE DISTANCE OF 1,108.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. THIS LAND IS SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR ASIXTYFOOT WIDE ROADWAYACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED TRACT. LESS AND EXCEPT: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,(MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD) THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 1,049.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY522.91 FEET. THENCE RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 422.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 385.36, FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 560.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING THE SAME PROPERTYAS DEEDED TO ROYE. MERSDORF AND ALICIAL. MERSDORF, HUSBAND AND WIFE BYSTEPHEN M. VELTRI AND MARSHAS VELTRI, HUSBAND AND WIFE RECORDED MAY27, 1993 IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 212, PAGE 302 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL2: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 2,158.22 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT DESCRIBED HEREIN. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES WEST 60 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES WEST 360.9 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 340 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST 360.9 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST 60FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF LOT NO. 69, H.S., 340 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SITUATE LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. THIS LAND IS SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR ASIXTYFOOT WIDE: ROADWAYACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED TRACT. ALSO: APERPETUALEASEMENT SIXTY(60) FEET WIDE FOR AROAD RIGHT-OF-WAYFOR ALLTYPES OF TRAFFIC OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND, TO-WIT: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 672.27 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF ACOUNTYROAD AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT DESCRIBED HEREIN. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAYOF SAID COUNTYROAD THE DISTANCE OF 665.62 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE LANDS OF GRANVILLE JAMES 356.2 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 560.2 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF LOT NO. 69, H.S. 377.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 69 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO: AN EASEMENT SIXTY(60) FEET WIDE FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND, TO-WIT: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (MARKED BYA CONCRETE MONUMENT BURIED IN THE J. K. MOORE ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYLINE OF LOT NO. 69, H.S., THE DISTANCE OF 1,049.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY522.91 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 422.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 385.36 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 560.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Tax ID: 000006900010116002 Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News November 1 & 8, 2012 08-50754 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5402-1018 TWN vs. Cayson, Donald Ray Case No. 65-2012-CA-000180 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 2011-CA-004095 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. DONALD RAY CAYSON, et. al., Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DONALD RAY CAYSON, and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONALD RAY CAYSON if alive, and/or dead his (their) unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or grantees and all persons or parties claiming by, through, under or against him (them). Last known address is 29 HERRING CIR. CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Action for foreclosure of a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: PLEASE SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DESCRIPTION has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Iris Hernandez, SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., Attorneys, whose address is 9700 South Dixie Highway, Suite 610, Miami, Florida 33156, (305) 670-2299, Iris.Hernandez@spearhoffman.com within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, and to file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this 23 day of January, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Becky Whaley As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT ST. JOE PAPER C0MPANY M0NUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN WEST 638.56 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 355.87 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF A GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 46 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID COUNTY ROAD BOUNDARY 192.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN ALONG SAID SOUTHWESTERLY ROAD BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 46 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 141.22 FEET, THENCE NORTH 48 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 32.78 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 100.35 FEET, THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 78.93 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A POWER LINE EASEMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID COUNTY ROAD BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 24 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 354.81 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 223.39 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TO INCLUDE A: 2000 GENERAL LEASING CO. VINGMHGA1249925046A #79466437 2000 GENERAL LEASING CO. VIN.GMHGA1249925046B #79466459 Length and width of mobile home is 20.8 X 66.3 OCTOBER 25 AND NOVEMBER 1, 2012 5411-1101 TWN vs. Heirs of Roosevelt Wilson Case No. 2004-FC-100 Notice of Action IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2004-FC-100 CIVIL DIVISION JIMMIE WILSON, Petitioner, vs. HEIRS OF ROOSEVELT ALEXANDER WILSON, WILLIE WILSON AND PEARLIE MAE WILSON, AND FERRELL ALLEN, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Alexandria Bramhan Beauford, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 Marla Barnes, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Amended Verified Complaint has been filed in this court. This is an action for determination of heirs, partition and quiet title to certain real property lying in Wakulla County, Florida, and more particularly described as follows: Parcel 1: Wakulla County Parcel No. 16-3S-01E-000-05224-000, the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NE of SW of SW ) of Section Sixteen (16), Township Three South, Range 1 East and a parcel in the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE of SW of SW ) of Section Sixteen (16), containing 14.96 ac., MOL; Parcel 2: Wakulla County Parcel No. 22-3S-01E-000-05405-000, Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company monument marking the Northwest corner of 5415-1108 TWN vs. Harrell, Tracy N. Case No. 65-2010-CA-000282 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000282 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. TRACYN. HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELLAND BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES, et. al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in 65-2010-CA-000282 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP F/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and TRACYN HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELL; BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE; AMYDENISE LALONDE; BRYAN DOLPHIS LALONDE; WAKULLABANK are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front lobby Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. on January 17, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22, WALKERS CROSSING COMMENCING AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 360.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 198.19 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT ; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 212.39 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLYALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU A CENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 31 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.19 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST, 229.82 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 330.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. THE ABOVE LEGALDESCRIPTION BEING MORE RECENTLYSURVEYED BYTHURMAN RODDENBERRYAND ASSOCIATES, DATED APRIL4, 2002, UNDER JOB NO. 01-034, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST, 360.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 200.49 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF CHANCE COURT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE ADISTANCE OF 212.88 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET, THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 38 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 61.66 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 11 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 61.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 232.20 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919); THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 330.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1998 OR 1999 HOMES OF LEGEND SINGLE -WIDE VIN #HL9774AL. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 16th day of October, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 1 & 8, 2012 11-05421 5416-1108 TWN vs. Hummel, Maurice Case No. 10-103-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 10-103-CA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporationauthorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. MAURICE A. HUMMEL, III and DAWN M. HUMMEL, husband and wife; and UNIDENTIFIED JOHN DOE(S) and UNIDENTIFIED JANE DOE (S), Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclo5417-1108 TWN Vs. Dunn, Darrell 2009 CA 000322 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO. 2009 CA 006090 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. DARRELL DAVID DUNN, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed September 20, 2012 entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000322 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and DARRELL DAVID DUNN, et al., are the Defendants. The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 15th day of November, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 6, THE FAIRWAYS AT WILDWOOD AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 51 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an inter est in the surplus fr om the sale, if any, other than the pr operty owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. November 1 & 8, 2012 sure entered on September 19, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on January 17th, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. (EST), in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, the following described property: The North 396 feet of the East 220 feet of the following described parcel: Commencing at the Northwest corner of the Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4) of Section 10, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, and run South along the West boundary of said SW 1/4 the distance of 440 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, continue South along the West boundary line of said SW 1/4 the distance of 392 feet to a point, then at right angles run East 208.7 feet to a point, then run South parallel with the West boundary of said SW 1/4 208.7 feet to a point, then at right angles run East 1024 feet to the West boundary of the Lizzie Taylor property then run North along the West boundary of said Lizzie Taylor land 600.7 feet to a point, then at right angles run West 1232.7 feet back to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Being situate in the SW 1/4 of Section 10, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH an easement for ingress and egress on the North 25 feet of a 16 acre parcel described above which parcel herein conveyed forms a part thereof, running from the East right-of-way line of Bethel Church Road to the West boundary of the 2 acre parcel herein conveyed. Together with a 2005 CMH Riverwood Double wide Mobile Home, serial no. WHC014594GAA & WHC014594GAB Property Address: 84 Gosset Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTERST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: October 8, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK, WAKULLA COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 1 & 8, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 3 South, Range 1 East, Wakulla County, Florida, and run thence South 00 degrees 31 minutes 20 seconds East along the westerley boundry of said Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter 873.80 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds East 245.54 feet to a point on the eastern boundary line of the right-of-way of State Road No. 363, thence run South 16 degrees 12 minutes 52 seconds East 155.81 feet to the point of beginning of the land herein described. From said point of beginning, run North 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds East 247.86 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 31 minutes 20 seconds West 150 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds East 140.12 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 03 minutes 21 seconds East 450.01 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds West 300.04 feet to a point on the eastern boundary line of the right-of-way of State Road No. 363, thence run North 16 degrees 12 minutes 52 seconds West 311.61 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning, containing 2.845 acres, more or less, in the Northwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 3 South, Range 1 East. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on petitioners attorney, whose name and address are: Deirdre A. Farrington, Esq., P.O. Box 392, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 on or before November 26, 2012, and to file the original of the written defenses with the clerk of this court either before service or immediately thereafter. Failure to serve and file written defenses as required may result in a judgment or order for the relief demanded, without further notice. Signed on October 15, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desireee D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk October 25 & November 1, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5412-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.12 TXD013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2424Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-080-000-11508-013LOT 80 HS P-4-13-M-22 COMM AT NE COR OF LOT 81 HS OR 648 P 773 Name in which assessedBEN WITHERS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this11day of October 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 5413-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLCthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2182Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-076-000-10250-008 LOT 76 HS P-7-8-M20-C IN NE 1/4 OF LOT 76 HS OR 148 P 292 OR 219 P 610 Name in which assessedTHE SIGHTS & SOUNDS COMPANY OF WAKULLA INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this12day of October2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $900 Security Deposit Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2837 Coastal Hwy. Commercial Building $800 mo. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. George's Lighthouse Point Waterfront living Overlooking georgious Ochlockonee Bay Unit 25E, 2BD/2BA, 1,460 sq. ft., washer/dryer, hardwood oors throughout, gated community with pool and tennis court. $1000. mo. No pets

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 11BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 26 Gov. Rick Scott unveiled his prescription for the future of education in Florida this week as he released details of an agenda that focused on national core standards and putting more faith in charter schools. Following a listening tour that took him across the state, Scott released details of his legislative agenda for education, one of his few major forays outside economic development since taking of ce nearly two years ago. Other than that, the looming elections in the politically deadlocked state overshadowed most issues this week. After all, Florida played host to the presidential candidates who debated at Lynn University, the last of three debates before voters cast ballots in the Nov. 6 election. Other guests crisscrossing the state included family members and a string of party luminaries who are turning over every rock to find the elusive undecided voters who have yet to make up their minds. There was, however, other news as well. Echoing the concerns that almost got Scott sent packing from south Florida, the Florida Chamber of Commerce this week objected to legislation passed earlier this year that would block state and local governments from buying goods and services from companies that have business ties to Cuba. The chambers position had the not-so-surprising effect of angering south Florida Hispanic lawmakers. Speaking of south Florida lawmakers, U.S. Rep. David Rivera, R-Miami, added the Florida Commission on Ethics to a growing list of antagonists as he faces mounting investigations and tries to hold on to the seat he has held since 2010. On the economic front, BP announced this week it was cancelling plans to build a $300-million ethanol plant in Highlands County, ending a four-year commitment to build its rst production facility in the United States. The company said it would seek opportunities elsewhere. EDUCATION AGENDA UNVEILED Expanding his priority list from attracting jobs and boosting the economy, Scott this week consolidated a series of previous miniannouncements as he put forth a package of education priorities he says will move the state forward. Arguably the most controversial element of Scotts plan is the increased role of charter schools, public schools that are usually run by third parties and are free of many of the regulations faced by typical schools. Scotts plan would remove enrollment caps on existing charter schools and allow school districts to operate their own charter schools. Scotts agenda would also make other changes, junking some regulations and giving debit cards to teachers to pay for school supplies, with the hopes that businesses would help support the program. The agenda would also require the state not to introduce any new testing that doesnt conform to the Common Core Standards, a national set of curriculum guidelines set to take effect next school year. CHAMBER OPPOSES CUBA-SYRIA CONTRACTING LAW The Florida Chamber of Commerce jumped into the always politically dicey subject of Cuba trade this week as it asked a federal appeals court to continue blocking a new law that would prevent state and local governments from contracting with rms that have business links to Cuba or Syria. The chamber led a brief Monday in the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that says the law, passed this year by the Legislature, would have far-reaching implications and unintended consequences that will irreparably harm Florida businesses and the states economy. The state is appealing a Miami federal judges decision in June that granted a preliminary injunction against the measure, which was signed into law by Scott. The governor initially said the restrictions would not take effect until Congress passed a law allowing states to impose such sanctions. But he reversed course after an outcry from Hispanic lawmakers. In the brief, the chamber said the law would discourage foreign investment in the state and strain relations with Brazil and Canada. The response of south Florida lawmakers, if not surprising, was at least timely. Quite frankly, we are appalled with your decision to accept providing economic benefits to these states which support terrorism and communism without taking into consideration all those who have suffered and died at the hands of such oppressive regimes, Sen. Rene Garcia, R-Hialeah, wrote in a letter to Chamber Chairman Anthony Connelly. RIVERA FACES ETHICS CHARGES The Florida ethics commission found probable cause to believe that Rivera broke states ethics laws as a state legislator at least 11 times, jolting his re-election bid less than two weeks before Election Day. The ethics commission allegations included that Rivera received income from a company essentially trying to buy his vote; misused campaign funds; didnt report a companys decision to forgive a debt as a gift; and left information off of nancial disclosure reports. Rivera is currently locked in a battle for his seat against Democratic challenger Joe Garcia, who has made an issue of allegations of corruption that have been lodged against Rivera. In a statement issued by his campaign, Rivera blasted the timing of the announcement and his political enemies. It is no coincidence that these frivolous complaints from two years ago -one from a major donor to Joe Garcia and another from someone who was convicted of threatening to kill Jeb Bush -were suddenly acted upon just two weeks before the election, Rivera said. BP DROPS PLANS FOR ETHANOL PLANT BPs plans for a 36-million gallon per year ethanol plant in Highlands County have been scrapped, with the company saying it is ending its pursuit of commercial ethanol production in the United States. The companys decision is a blow to the central Florida region, which was hoping to welcome the plant and the 800 construction and operating jobs it would bring. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott unveiled an education package this week in preparation for the 2013 Legislative session. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Lets focus on where were going. Were going to a common core standard that 46 states have and were going to spend all our time on that. Gov. Rick Scott on moving away from FCAT to national standards. WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Gov. Scott lays out education messageBrain Teaser 1 13 17 20 23 30 37 42 50 57 61 64 67 2 31 51 3 32 46 4 27 47 18 24 48 62 65 5 14 38 43 68 6 33 58 7 25 28 44 52 63 8 21 29 39 53 59 9 26 49 15 40 45 22 41 60 66 69 10 16 19 34 54 11 35 55 12 36 56 ACROSS 1. Slangy assent 5. Syria's Bashar al__ 10. Bleacher creature 13. Bear in the air 14. Marchers may take them up 16. Hubbub 17. Seer's prop 19. Dove's sound 20. Bob Cousy's team 21. Baby blues 23. Toothpaste tube abbr. 24. Perfume holder 26. Telly 27. __ good deed 28. "Peer Gynt" dancer 30. Taj __ 33. "Ta-ta!" 34. Perry Mason's field 37. Language common in Miami 39. Gate-crash 42. One of a D.C. hundred 43. Blue hue 45. Pays attention to 46. Spoilers of a sort 49. Beiderbecke of jazz 50. Alphonse's friend 52. M, __ "mnemonic" 54. Swabbie's rear 57. Eight-footer? 59. Oran's land 61. "... man __ mouse?" 62. Rocker known as "The Boss" 64. Go astray 65. "Joltin' Joe" or "The Mick" 66. Heche or Rice 67. __ "Kookie" Byrnes 68. Industrious sorts 69. Disney dogDOWN1. New Mexico's state flower 2. Blew it 3. Safe havens 4. "... why __ thou forsaken me?" 5. Tree that yields gum arabic 6. Zesty dip 7. Second-stringer 8. Rush job letters 9. Removal of text 10. 5, for a nickel 11. Love to pieces 12. Wild West knot 15. Winter fall 18. Villa d'Este locale 22. The "p" in wpm 25. Chou En-__ 27. Dapper dude? 29. Catch but good 30. Submissions to eds. 31. Knuckle-dragger 32. Heels-over-head maneuver 33. 1987 Best Actress 35. Stick on 36. Jazzman Montgomery 38. Note-taker's tablet 40. Possessions 41. "Oedipus __" 44. Botanist Gray 47. Prefix meaning "ear" 48. __-turvy 49. Places for stagnant water 50. Honker in a skein 51. Pungent-smelling 53. Not as nutty 54. Bout locale 55. Diabolical one 56. Chief Justice, 1836-64 58. First Bond flick 60. List -ending abbr. 63. Tina didn't like himAmerican Prole Hometown Content 10/28/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 12 3 4567 6381 2 46 6741 895 4 692 5638 147 2009 HometownContent 785 1629 3 4 124359678 639748251 392 514786 567823419 841976523 473 685192 956231847 218497365 Y U C C A M S S G O O S E E R R E D A P E A C R I D A S Y L A H A N D S T A N D H A S T D A N O T O T I V O L I T O P S Y A C A C I A S T E N O P A D S A L S A C H E R D R N O S U B L A I A S A I K E A S A P N A I L S A N E R D E L E T I O N B I L G E S S L E E T T H I N G S P E R R E X E T A L F A C E V A L U E A R E N A A D O R E A D D F I E N D N O O S E W E S T A N E Y Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. 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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 1. LANGUAGE: What is the meaning of the Latin prefix demi? 2. HISTORY: Who wrote the political book The Prince during the Renaissance? 3. ASTRONOMY: What phase of the moon is opposite of crescent? 4. LITERATURE: What was the real name of the author who assumed the pen name of George Orwell? 5. ART: What are the three primary colors? 6. MUSIC: What is indicated by the musical notation estinto? 7. GEOGRAPHY: What state lies directly east of Utah? 8. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the traditional birthstone for June? 9. MEASUREMENTS: The watt, a unit of electrical power, was named for what famous inventor? 10. ETIQUETTE: Properly speaking, who should host a wedding shower for a bride? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Half 2. Niccolo Machiavelli 3. Gibbous 4. Eric Arthur Blair 5. Red, yellow and blue 6. So soft that it can hardly be heard 7. Colorado 8. Pearl 9. James Watt 10. A friend of the bride YOUR AD HERE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 Page 13B Favored treatment for others Means higher taxes for you! The county budget remains the same, regardless. A portion of the taxes of the "favored" just shifts to you! It is all about fairness. The citizens of Wakulla do not mind paying their fair share; they just do not want to pay someone else's. Put "fair" back into fair market value! Please help me with your vote "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www.FairValuesInWakulla.com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser In-Home Assessments and Referrals Offered for Comfort and Convenience If falls, weakness or inability to participate in activities become a concern for your loved one, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Tallahassee is here to help. We oer free inhome assessments with no physician orders needed. Once an evaluation is approved, HealthSouths team of professionals develop comprehensive, individualized treatment plans for a safe return home. If you have any questions or need more information contact us.IS YOUR LOVED ONE SAFE AT HOME?:HealthSouth Corporation:551345 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt HOMECOMING 2012 PHOTOS BY BILL ROLLINS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFor more photos, go to thewakullanews.com Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews

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By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE In a debate that touches on the past, present and future of Florida, opponents of a constitutional ban on nancially supporting faithbased organizations are asking state voters to pass an amendment to repeal the provision. On each side of the battle over Amendment 8 is a coalition of groups that has its own perception of what caused the no-aid provision to be adopted in the rst place, why supporters of the amendment removing that ban are pushing it now and what would happen if it were to be repealed. For supporters of the amendment, failure to adopt it could cripple faithbased organizations, putting them one lawsuit away from losing vital taxpayer dollars for services like prison ministries, soup kitchens and disaster relief. But opponents say overturning the 127-yearold ban would dismantle a critical bulwark of the separation of church and state and open the door for vouchers that would siphon money away from public education. Those who back the amendment say the original no-aid provision of the constitution was approved as part of a wave of measures, known as Blaine amendments for their federal sponsor, adopted in the latter half of the 19th Century to ensure that Catholic private schools would never receive taxpayer money, despite the Protestant tilt of public schools. Aside from school-choice litigation, the provision has largely lingered since then. But supporters of the amendment say it became a threat again after a group known as the Council for Secular Humanism filed suit to cut off state support for two prison ministries run by faith-based organizations. If the suit succeeds, supporters of the amendment fear, a wide swath of social services could be disrupted. Jim Frankowiak, who manages the pro-Amendment 8 campaign for Citizens for Religious Freedom and Non-Discrimination, says the state has paid out close to $400 million over the last couple of years to faith-based groups, many of which provide needed services. These are not luxuries, he said. These are the basics for many people. Many of those services are secular, even if the organization that provides them is faith-based. They include things like hospitals, hospice and substance abuse programs. Frankowiak dismissed concerns that the amendment would weaken the separation of church and state, saying that there are still safeguards against state-backed religion. This does nothing to the establishment clause in the Florida Constitution or the U.S. Constitution, he said. And Frankowiak said the groups legal experts dismiss the idea of a vast voucher program, noting that the uniformity clause, which requires the state to offer public education, has been used to block voucher programs in the past and would remain intact if Amendment 8 passes. So far, the group has raised almost $106,000, according to state records -the vast majority of it coming from Catholic groups. The Archdiocese of Miami has contributed more than $28,000, part of $87,500 that has owed from the archdiocese and six dioceses to Citizens for Religious Freedom and Non-Discrimination. Separately, the Florida Conference of Catholic Bishops has kicked in nearly $16,700, according to state records. Opponents of the amendment, though, insist that it would demolish a long-standing protection against citizens being forced to watch their tax dollars go to religious organizations they might disagree with. Its served the state well, and now the supporters want to overturn that and upset the apple cart about the separation of church and state, said Alan Stonecipher, communications director for the Vote No on 8 Committee. Stoneciphers group is supported by the Florida Education Association and other education groups along with the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, Americans United for the Separation of Church and State, the League of Women Voters of Florida, the Anti-Defamation League and the National Council of Jewish Women. They argue that the efforts to repeal the no-aid provision are, in fact, rooted in a long-standing effort by supporters of vouchers to provide public funding for religious schools. This constitutional provision stands directly in their way, Stonecipher said. Vote No on 8 also says talk that the original provision was a form of discrimination against Catholics isnt true. A paper produced last year by the ACLU argued that there were no signs of widespread antiCatholic bigotry in Florida when the ban was approved. Opponents of the amendment also point out that the no-aid provision was essentially re-adopted in later revisions to the Florida Constitution. If there was any hint of bias in its origins, its since been cleansed, Stonecipher said. His group, which hasnt yet reported fundraising gures to the Florida Division of Elections, has produced a radio ad and is working through social media to attempt to hold support for the amendment below the 60 percent needed for approval. It is a bar that even supporters of the amendment are concerned about reaching. This is an uphill struggle, Frankowiak said. I guess what concerns me is the misinformation thats out there. And this is not a walk in the park. Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Battle over Amendment 8 focuses on schools, history