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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00432
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 10-25-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00432
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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 41st Issue Thursday, October 25, 2012 T h r e e S e c t i o n s Three Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe Wakulla Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Senior Citizens ..............................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Election 2012 ...................................................................Page 8B Thinking Outside the Book ............................................Page 10B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 11B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 11B Comics ...........................................................................Page 13B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 14B INDEX By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netFor the “ rst time in a couple years, the county received some positive signs regarding the economy. County Administrator David Edwards said preliminary numbers for the end of the 2011-12 “ scal year shows the county with a positive of nearly $1 million. This is due to the county not spending all that was budgeted, over collection of ad valorem taxes and state revenues coming in higher than anticipated, he said. The county also learned that the unemployment rate has decreased to 6.5 percent for September, which is the “ fth lowest in the state. This time last year, the unemployment rate was 8.7 percent. These are positive signs for Wakulla County,Ž Edwards said. We feel real good about how we are progressing.Ž In 2009-10, the county ended the year with a deficit of $2 million, said Edwards. Weve recovered from that $2 million de“ cit.Ž Commissioner Mike Stewart said, Were still coming out of this deep hole, but weve come a long way.Ž The county has a plan, Edwards said, and the commission has stuck to that 5-year plan. There have also been some administrative changes to make government run more ef“ ciently and effectively, he said. Such as moving county “ nance back over to the clerk of court. Its really meshed,Ž Edwards said. The idea is to create a good, sound, stable government, he added. In turn, this will bring more businesses to the county which will lower unemployment and help our economy,Ž he said. Creating the 5-year plan for the county caused the administration to perform an internal operational audit, he said. It made us look at changes,Ž Edwards said. Although Edwards said the county government is progressing toward a positive direction, he recognized the upcoming challenges that must be faced. The numbers have not be audited and may not be the “ nal number at the end, added Deputy Clerk Greg James. One challenge is the wastewater treatment plant: It was projected to reach capacity two years from now, but Edwards said it is already there. The county will have to do something this year to increase capacity. Edwards said the county had a plan for upgrading the WWTP, but has to move that up two years. The county plans to use its engineering consultant and have them come up with some options of how to upgrade the plant in the most ef“ cient and cost effective way possible. James said the county will look at state revolving low-interest loans, as well as grants. Edwards also pointed out the possibility of using RESTORE Act funds. But that will depend on how long it takes for the county to see that money. Another factor is recouping money spent on projects due to Tropical Storm Debby from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The county spent around $500,000 and has yet to see a dime. Edwards said he met with FEMA representatives last week and stated the countys case. FEMA has said that some Debbyrelated expenses will not be covered. However, the county is going to continue to “ ght it. FEMA is establishing an of“ ce in Wakulla County to handle the public assistance for governments and some non-pro“ ts. Well see where it goes,Ž Edwards said. Moving forward, the county needs to save and have a reserve for a storm event. We cant rely on FEMA,Ž he said.County goes from deficit to surplusFacing a $2M de“ cit in 2010, the county now has a $1M surplus County Administrator David Edwards By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe second bi-partisan forum by the Wakulla Democratic and Republican committees was held on Oct. 22 and featured the candidates for Florida House District 7 and Wakulla County superintendent of schools. Candidates for the newly created District 7, which includes Calhoun and Liberty counties and portions of Wakulla, Gadsden, Leon and Jackson counties, are Democrat Robert Hill and Republican Halsey Beshears. Hill, of Bristol, currently serves at the clerk of court and county administrator for Liberty County. Beshears, of Monticello, is the chief “ nancial of“ cer of Simpson Nurseries and is the president of Total Landscape Supply. During the forum, it became clear that the candidates agree on numerous issues, including job creation being their top priority, as well as their opposition to prison privatization. Hill said he is 100 percent against privatizing the prisons. In addition to jobs, many correctional institutions have inmate work crews that perform jobs within their counties that saves a lot of money. He added of privatization, Im not convinced its a money-saving situation.Ž Beshears agreed and said privatization only saves a small amount and this is because they do not take medically challenged or dif“ cult inmates. It wouldnt work here,Ž he said. The candidates also agreed that there needed to be oversight of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and less restrictions and regulations on the agriculture and “ shing industries. What the candidates didnt agree on was whether they supported offshore drilling off the coast. Hill said he did not and felt what the coastal communities are dealing with because of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 is scary enough. He added that a spill can threaten the fishing and seafood industries. Beshears was in support of offshore drilling. He added that there can be safe offshore drilling as long as it is monitored so the coast is protected. Hill says his varied experience as a math teacher, school superintendent, county administrator and clerk of court gives him a unique insight to the needs of small rural counties. I am ready to lead,Ž he said. I am ready to serve.Ž Continued on Page 15A Thousands of festival-goers turned out for Saturdays Stone Crab Festival in St. Marks, marking the beginning of stone crab season and those succulent claws. This years event featured a superhero parade in addition to arts & crafts and music and seafood. Here, a young man gets his face painted at a booth at the festival. For more photos, see Page 9B.Staff ReportDrivers can expect lane closures on U.S. 319 on Monday, Oct. 29, and Tuesday, Oct. 30, south of the Wakulla-Leon county line to down to a half-mile north of State Road 267. Lane closures will remain in effect from 6:30 p.m. until 6:30 a.m. A Florida Department of Transportation crew will be performing evaluations on the roadway. Lane closures on 319 next weekStone crab funPHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSEN Forum features House, superintendent candidates CANDIDATES: For House District 7, Halsey Beshears, top left, Robert Hill, top right. For Superintendent of Schools, Kimball Thomas, below left, Bobby Pearce, bottom right. HAPPY HALLOWEEN See Trick-or-Treat Page on 15BFALL FESTIVALSSee listing on Church, Page 6A

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe record of one of the candidates running for Wakulla County sheriff has been the topic of discussion in a mailer sent out to voters last week, as well as a push poll and political ads questioning his qualifications. In an effort to try and set the record straight, candidate Charlie Creel sat down with The News and opened his Florida Highway Patrol personnel “ le last week. In his 30-year career as a trooper, Creel received one letter of reprimand. This reprimand was the subject of a mailer that was sent out last week by the electioneering communications organization, Florida First Forever in Tallahassee. The incident happened in March 1981 and involved a high-speed chase where Creel “ red his revolver at a ” eeing vehicle while in pursuit. According to the internal investigation documents in Creels personnel “ le, Creel pulled the vehicle over to the shoulder, but the driver didnt come to a complete stop and sped away. Creel pursued the vehicle. Other law enforcement agencies joined in the pursuit. The report indicates that the driver ran into the side of pursuing law enforcement cars … and rammed police cars. While giving chase, Creel called in to his supervisor to ask if he could “ re his weapon at the tire to stop the vehicle. His supervisor told him not to fire his weapon, but Creel had already “ red his weapon, missing the tire and hitting the rim. Eventually, the vehicle was surrounded by law enforcement vehicles and came to a stop. Creel said he “ red the weapon before receiving an answer from his supervisor. He had asked for permission to cover himself, he said. But an opportunity presented itself before hearing back from his supervisor and he took it, he said. I stand by my decision,Ž Creel said. Creel fired at the tire when the vehicle had slowed down from 120 mph to 20 mph while making a U-turn. Creel said he was in a non-congested area and there were no civilian vehicles around or houses in the area. The car was right outside Venice and he felt he needed to stop it before it reached the city. We were going into a congested area,Ž Creel said. He added that prior to this, the car he was chasing had rammed a police of“ cers car and he didnt consider it simply a traf“ c violation then. It was a very violent car chase,Ž Creel said. The man was charged with reckless driving, attempting to elude a police of“ cer, aggravated assault with a motor vehicle, resisting arrest without violence, driving while license suspended and improper tag. The North Port Police Department also charged the subject with battery on a police of“ cer. In the internal investigation letter sent by Creels supervisor, Cpl. J.C. Lape, said, At the time Trooper Creel “ red his revolver at the fleeing vehicle only misdemeanor charges were apparent.Ž He added that Creel exceeded his authority in using deadly force to prevent the escape of a fleeing misdemeanant.Ž Creel said originally FHP was going to give him three days off, but lowered it to a letter or reprimand after he stated his case. I feel to this day, I was justi“ ed,Ž Creel said. The mailer that was sent out cites this incident and states that Creels “ le was not exemplary. Creel defends his record in a Letter to the Editor in this weeks News, contending his record is exemplary. Daniel Burns, chair of Florida First Forever, said, We investigated Mr. Creels personnel file and found an event that seems less than exemplary. Mr. Creel was involved in an incident where he appeared to use bad judgment, and blatantly disregarded the chain of command that is so important to the safety of the law enforcement community.Ž Creel contends that one letter of reprimand, no citizens complaints and numerous letters of commendation for a 30-year career is something. My “ le is exemplary,Ž Creel said. Ill put it up against anybodys.Ž Creels opponent Major Maurice Langston said he had nothing to do with the mailer. I dont endorse the mailer at all, and if it were in my power, I would put an end to these third party groups,Ž Langston said. Im focused on telling the voters what my plan is to make Wakulla County the safest community in the state, and I am con“ dent that they will support me based on that, not on anything coming from a third party group.Ž There have been rumors circulating that Langstons consultant hired for his campaign are behind the mailer. When asked about this, Langston said, Ive told my consultant not to engage in third party activities in this race.Ž Burns describes Florida First Forever as a watchdog organization that advocates for smaller government, more accountability from our elected officials, and more transparency from the political process.Ž Some contributors to the group include healthcare and insurance companies, as well as the Florida Chamber of Commerce, Committee for Florida Justice, Citizens for Honesty in Politics and People in Need of Government Accountability. The group also has a connection to Conquest Communications Group, the company that is believed to have performed the push poll in Wakulla County that focused heavily on the sheriffs race. Questions in such polls are framed negatively to pushŽ the voter into a bad opinion of a candidate. In the Creel calls, questions were asked about whether the voter would support a candidate for sheriff who was divorced, or who had been reprimanded. Creel contended the calls distorted his personal and professional life. Florida First Forever paid CCG for services in 2010. There is nothing for CCG listed this year, as of Oct. 23.Candidate defends his record against critical mailer SHERIFF CANDIDATES: Charlie Creel, left, is criticized in a recent mailer for a shooting incident when he was with the Florida Highway Patrol. His opponent in the race, Major Maurice Langston, denied involvement and said he has told his campaign consultant not to engage in third party activities. The mailer received by Wakulla voters, below. 926-6040WWW.SAFEWAYWATERBYSLMCO.COM SafewayWater by SLMCO Whole house “ltration systems Water softeners & conditioners NO-SALT water conditioners Iron & Sulfur removal systems Drinking water systems Expert well water treatment ~ WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT CENTER ~ Better taste ... Better health ... Better on your budget ~ WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT CENTER ~ Better taste... Better health... Better on your budget! WATER QUALITY REPO RT Call today for a free water report For your community!Or call today for a free water test and analysis. We will test for: TDS, IRON, IRON BACTERIA, CHLORINE LEVELS and HARDNESS And give you the results right on the spot!NO OBLIGATION NO PRESSURE NO NONSENSE FACTORY DIRECT PRICING!!!$11700 OFFWITH THIS ADEXPIRES: 10/31/12WHOLE HOUSE SYSTEM!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 5, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 9260919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 25, 2012 The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 5, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 9260919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 25, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 5, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 9260919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 25, 2012 The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, December 3, 2012, beginning at 5:00 P.M., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. The proposed amendment is included in a proposed ordinance entitled: Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.OCTOBER 25, 2012 NO FINAL ACTION ADOPTING THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT WILL BE TAKEN AT THESE MEETINGS. Notice of Public Hearings Concerning Small Scale Map Amendment to the Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map, Change of Zoning and Site Plan Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.OCTOBER 25, 2012 The Wakulla County Planning Commission and/ or Board of County Commissioners propose to consider the following applications. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, December 3, 2012 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.OCTOBER 25, 2012 NOTICEDonnie R. Sparkman, CFA, Property Appraiser for Wakulla County has given “nal certi“cation of the 2012 Wakulla County Tax Roll to the Wakulla County Tax Collector as of October 16, 2012.OCTOBER 25, 2012 In accordance with Section 121.055, Florida Statutes, Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners intends to designate the following positions to the Senior Management Service Class in the Florida Retirement System: Director of Inter-Governmental Affairs Director of Probation Services Director of Employee Support ServicesOCTOBER 25, NOVEMBER 1, 2012

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By RACHEL PIENTA Charles Dickens wrote that, charity begins at home, and justice begins next door.Ž Charity and justice are ” ip sides of the aid coin. If charity means volunteering in a soup kitchen then justice means working to end the inequalities that make soup kitchens necessary. More speci“ cally, foreign aid charity responds to an immediate need … such as hunger. In the foreign aid realm, justice addresses long-term conditions and promotes social change in institutions, policies and systems. When I think about foreign aid, I think about what makes our nation great and think of my own good fortune to have been born an American. Then I consider the words of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who said, We cannot stop terrorism or defeat the ideologies of violent extremism when hundreds of millions of young people see a future with no jobs, no hope, and no way to catch up to the developed world.Ž An oft-quoted axiom originates from Scripture; Romans 3:1-8 tells us that With privilege comes great responsibility.Ž Americans take this phrase to heart. This thinking guides us … regardless of political af“ liation … to be a nation that gives, both at home and overseas. During his administration, President Obama has made foreign aid a priority … as an avenue to ensuring global economic stability and as a national defense strategy. Foreign aid is a good investment in our economy at home as well as in our domestic security. A mere 1.4 percent of the nations annual budget is spent on foreign aid. Known as the International Affairs Budget, that 1.4 percent equated to $48 billion in 2011. That 1.4 percent funds the State Department as well as other aid and assistance programs such as military aid to Israel, a $100,000 grant that led to $61 million of U.S. exports to Morocco, and Counternarcotics programs in Mexico … and funding for budget items such as a $100,000 US Trade & Development Agency grant to a small New Jersey company that created jobs at home. Ernesto Cortes wrote, What is owed in justice should never be given in charity.Ž That doesnt mean we shouldnt feed the hungry, however, it does mean we should also address why the people are hungry in the “ rst place. As the ancient Chinese proverb says, Give a Man a Fish, Feed Him for a Day. Teach a Man to Fish, Feed Him for a Lifetime.Ž With foreign aid, America helps teach the world to “ sh and ensures global security, at home and overseas. Rachel Pienta is the chair of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee.By JONATHAN KILPATRICK Americans have been, and continue to be, an incredibly generous people. Whenever there is a crisis, whether it is an earthquake, tsunami or any disaster anywhere in the world, Americans respond to meet the needs of people in distress. As a nation, our government also gives approximately $70 billion all around the world in foreign aid. Recently Gov. Mitt Romney said that our foreign aid would have three purposes. First, our foreign aid should be used to combat humanitarian crisis when and where it occurs.Ž When the earthquake struck in Haiti, the United States jumped into action. Rescue workers began to ” ow into Haiti almost immediately. The U.S. Air Force developed ” ight plans that would maximize the amount of shipments that could be delivered in the shortest amount of time. Efforts such as these and many like it, are a hallmark of Americas generosity. Secondly, Gov. Romney indicated that U.S. foreign aid should be used to foster a substantial United States strategic interest, be it military, diplomatic or economic.Ž U.S. foreign aid rebuilt Europe after World War II and that policy continues to pay dividends. We have areas of the world that are vital to our national interest and foreign aid today will reduce the risk of military involvement in the future. Lastly, Gov. Romney indicated that his administration would use foreign aid to elevate people and bring lasting change in communities and nations.Ž Freedom is the best way to bring lasting change to people around the world … economic freedom and individual freedom. Bringing free enterprise and economic prosperity allows nations to become self suf“ cient and can minimize the amount of future aid. While foreign aid has its place, when used appropriately, all taxpayer funds must be spent prudently. Sending aid to nations such as China and Russia defy explanation. China holds $1.1 trillion in U.S. debt, and we currently send taxpayer funds to China as foreign aid. We borrow money for China “ lter it through the U.S. federal government and send it back to China. Sending taxpayer money to nations that hate us and hate everything we stand for also should and must be eliminated. Loyalty and friendship of nations cannot and should not be bought with borrowed money.Jonathan Kilpatrick is the chair of the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee. Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Event is held to increase awareness of domestic violence • Questions about outside groups in local campaigns • Underwater Wakulla Oct. 11 • TCC holds town hall meeting • Sopchoppy Opry Gospel Concert to feature Fortress • Solar electric systems installed at 2 local schools • Dolphins frolic in Shell Point • Man killed in Panacea shooting thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.COMMUNITY DEBATE is week e Wakulla News asked the local Democrat ic and Republican party chairs to respond to the question about the role of foreign aid. Leading up to the Nov. 6 election, e News will submit a question each week for the local parties to answer Do you have a question youd like asked, or did the question prompt a response from you? Send it to editor@thewakullanews.net.DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: REPUBLICAN RESPONSE:Editor, The News: An open letter to DEP Secretary Herschel Vinyard: The Panhandle Archaeological Society at Tallahassee (PAST) is pleased that DEP and the Florida Park Service is continuing the long-standing policy of allowing scuba diving in Wakulla Spring only for those with a strictly scienti“ c purpose rather than for recreational purposes. We believe that DEP is rightfully implementing its charge to balance (in the public interest) protection of the natural and cultural resources while affording the public ample recreation opportunity in allowing access to other springs that do not have the nationallyrecognized historic signi“ cance of Wakulla Spring. This propertys archaeological resources are signi“ cant and one archaeological component is the oldest, well-dated archaeological site in Florida with diagnostic artifacts recovered from in place, stratigraphic context (Rink et al. 2012). Because inland water tables were lower prior to 11,000 years ago many early (Paleoindian) sites are not only found above the modern water table on land, they are also found in drowned locations. Inundated sites are particularly important simply because they offer organic preservation of specimens that rarely survive on land such as bone and wood. The Wakulla Springs site (WA24) is an example of one of these inundated archaeological sites. This site includes the remains of an American mastodon (Mammut americanum) in shallow water as well as the famed Bone RoomŽ near the mouth of Wakulla Spring cave in a few hundred feet of water. Only four percent of Floridas human history is covered by written records, the rest is known only through archaeologicallydirected, multi-disciplinary investigations. The earliest and most rare sites, such as Wakulla Spring, are from the Paleoindian period, 13,500 years or more old. Investigation of these sites enables scientists and the general public to understand when and how people “ rst came to America. Such investigations have multi-disciplinary implications that will provide information on changes in earths climate and how people adapted to it. The non-renewable historical resources, such as the bone room in Wakulla Spring, even if they were unintentionally disturbed by recreational divers, would be forever be diminished or lost to scienti“ c inquiry as well as their future interpretation for the general public. Thank you again for DEPs judicious action to preserve Wakulla Spring. Sincerely, James S. Dunbar PhD President, The Panhandle Archaeological Society at Tallahassee Of“ ce at the Department of Anthropology, FSU Editor, The News: The Fall Fashion Show Extravaganza was a tremendous success. The Coastal Optimist Club would like to thank everyone who helped us raise money to fund scholarships for Wakulla High School seniors. We especially appreciate our table sponsors: Bobby Pearce, Charlie Creel, Charles Stratton, PA, Friends By The Sea, LegalShield, North Florida Financial Corporation, Poseys Steam Room, Poseys Dockside Caf, Rock Landing Marina and the Wakulla Insurance Agency. Wed like to thank the generous people and businesses who volunteered or donated items: Badcock Furniture, Kathie Brown, Coastal Corners Store and Gas Station, Crums Mini Mall, Janice David, Dazzles Hair Studio, Howard Kessler, Lees Liquors, Dolly Moody, our music DJKay Gay, LMP Enterprises, Mikes Marine, our auctioneer Jerry Moore, Myra Jeans Restaurant, Brandy Pigott Oliver, ReNu U Spa, Jo Anne Strickland, Wakulla Discount Liquors, Wildwood Country Club and Winn-Dixie. With their fabulous support we were able to accomplish our fundraising efforts and support our students even in these dif“ cult economic times. A big thank you goes to all those who attended the Fashion Show, took home auction or raffle items and made it so much fun. Thank you! Jo Ann Daniels Secretary Carol Ann Williams Director Editor, The News:My minor son was involved in a vehicle accident two weeks ago in Wakulla County. My gratitude goes out to Wakulla EMS, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and Deputy Clint Beam and Wakulla County Fire Rescue. They all went above and beyond the call of duty, even staying to help him locate personal items thrown from the vehicle. The courtesy, compassion and professionalism shown was amazing. I was out of town and could not be there with him, and that is hard for a parent. I TRULY cannot thank you all enough. Sincerely, Samantha Taylor sammyjo3774@yahoo.comThe issue: Foreign aidEditor, The News: In Wakulla local elections, it never is about Democrats or Republicans. Next time youre out and about, take time to look at all the campaign signs on the lawns of many Wakulla homes. Many homes have a mixture of candidates with differing political party af“ liations. Democrat, Republican, NPA. You would think we are a county of independent voters. Thats not a bad thing. What seems to matter is what the individual candidate represents. Voting on pure party af“ liation is not what we are about. Both local parties do a good job in bringing awareness to state and national campaigns where many residents tend to vote on party loyalty. Locally, you may find that both the Democratic and Republican executive committees may even like some of the same candidates from the opposing party. Both local Democratic and Republican executive committees are even mulling over a potential endorsement of candidates from the opposite party. I think the recent joint bi-partisanŽ debates are a good thing for the community, I also think that the two local political parties may have more in common in liking and potentially supporting the same candidates in some local races. I guess you could call that real bi-partisanship. What is driving this? In my opinion, unlike state or national races, local races can have a direct and immediate impact on your future and your life. Why would you back a candidate from your own party if you have a job in Wakulla that is being run by someone from the opposite party that you support? Why would you back someone from your own party when you have a good friend and a candidate that you have known for years and who happens to be from the opposite party? Also, would you vote for a candidate of a party when that candidate does not even act to promote the very basics of the partys reason for existing? Not Republican enoughŽ or Democratic enoughŽ doesnt cut it here locally. When a Republican Party representative is telling you to support a high taxing candidate or a Democratic representative is telling you to support a candidate who wants to slashing of public programs, thats just a bunch of malarkey and really just a code word for vote party and not what may be in your best interest. Oh, and malarkey is a bi-partisan word. Gordon McCleary gmanmac@gmail.com Coastal Optimist Fashion Show was success Gratitude for attention to son in wreck Decision on scuba diving supported Wakulla elections not about partyREADERS WRITE:A letter to the editor in last weeks paper, Remember postage when mailing ballot,Ž gave the impression that if voters dont put enough postage on their absentee ballots, their votes wont be counted. Supervisor of Elections Henry BuddyŽ Wells wanted to reassure voters who are mailing in absentee ballots that his of“ ce has made arrangements with the U.S. Postal Service to have all absentee ballots delivered so they can be counted. Because of the size of the ballot, it costs 65 cents to mail in an absentee. The supervisors of“ ce is covering any insuf“ cient postage.Clari“ cation

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 5Areaders speak out More OpinionsMORE READERS WRITE:Charlie Creels response to mailer Mike Stewart questions opponents tactics Richard Harden explains his candidacy Candidate not at forum was troubling Supporting Emily Smith for commissioner Current sheri administration is excellent John Shu s experience needed on board Editor, The News: I would like to thank The Wakulla News for researching and confirming what was suspected: Howard Kesslers camp was behind the negative mailers that recently came out against me, although they denied they were. It is unimaginable for me to think that my family could ever spend $25,000 to attack my opponent. Three questions that come to mind are: 1. How can a spouse spend $25,000 without their closest con“ dant knowing? 2. If this was done in response to events that happened in the 2010 race, a race I didnt run in, why negatively attack me? 3. Do they have so much extra money that they feel they need to spend an amazing $25,000 on attack ads? If he has that type of money, how can he relate with the hard working locals of Wakulla County? Couple the amount of money he is spending to attack me, with the fact that he is openly running out of his district, and it makes you really wonder why he is so aggressively pursuing being a commissioner again. These are questions that really need to be considered. After the ads came out, I was advised I should use the same tactics. Folks, Im not going there. I will be happy to talk about issues and concerns voters may have, but I will not stoop to the levels demonstrated by the Kessler campaign. If this costs me an election, then so be it. I will walk away with my head held high knowing that my time on the board was spent trying to move Wakulla County in the right direction. As always, those who have questions about the issuesŽ should feel free to contact me. Mike Stewart Candidate County Commission, Dist. 3Editor, The News: I would like to take this opportunity to share with you why I am campaigning for Wakulla County Commissioner District 5 and feel I am the best choice to serve the citizens of our county. I grew up in Wakulla County and was raised on land that has been in our family for six generations, since 1859. From an early age my family taught me the ethics, values and faith that have guided me throughout my life. I graduated from Wakulla High School in 1992 and decided I wanted to serve my country as my grandfather, father, uncles and cousin had done before me. I joined the U.S. Air Force and was stationed overseas for two years in Okinawa and then later spent six months in Saudi Arabia. Sometimes you have to lose what it is you have to really appreciate it and it was during this time away from our county that I “ rst knew that I wanted to one day serve my community. When I came back home, the local state prison, Wakulla Correctional Institution, was being built and I enrolled in Pat Thomas law Enforcement Academy to become a certified correctional officer. I was among the “ rst of“ cers to be hired at the new prison that at the time held less than 100 inmates. Over time as the prison grew both structurally and in population, I grew as well. I learned many valuable leadership principles that have served well as over time as I became more involved in my community. In 2005, an open seat became available on the Sopchoppy City Council and seeing an opportunity to serve my community I was elected as a city council member. The leadership principles I had learned became invaluable as I found continually the same scenario of having to “ nd solutions to challenges with little or no budgeted money to work with. I have been elected four times by the citizens serving over seven years on the city council. In that time I was fortunate to be a part of the visioning and guiding process of many project improvements that have made our community a better place to live. To name just a few, the historic train depot was restored, preserving local history, a new tennis park was built for our citizens to enjoy, improvements were made at the city park, a citywide sewer system was installed also resulting in all new paved streets, a Veterans Memorial was created in cooperation with a Boy Scouts Eagle Scout project, and a new city hall was constructed improving the quality of service being provided to the community. I have known for a while that I one day wanted the opportunity to serve the citizens throughout the entire county and decided that the next time the county commission seat for District 5 became available that I wanted to campaign and allow the citizens to give me an opportunity to serve them on a broader level. I have considered myself a public servant and not a politician. This is because I truly enjoy being part of the process of “ nding solutions to challenges and then seeing others in the community enjoy the bene“ ts. Each time I ride by and see citizens enjoying things that I had a part of creating it grati“ es me that I have made a positive difference in the lives of our community. I am not campaigning on any one issue, just simply the passion of being able to serve others and a desire to serve all of Wakulla County the same way I have our city. I am asking you to elect me and allow me the opportunity to serve our county the next 4 years as Wakulla County Commissioner District 5. I have been careful not to promise anything that I cant deliver on when elected but what I can promise is that I will serve you wholeheartedly and will always listen to your concerns and represent you in a way that you would be proud for me to represent our county anywhere in the state. Thank you and God Bless! Richard Harden SopchoppyEditor, The News: I would like to thank the citizens who attended the last League of Women Voters forum Thursday, Oct. 18, for the position of Sheriff of Wakulla County. I must say, Im disappointed Mr. Maurice Langston did not choose to attend. Surprising to me, especially since Thursday was the day most of the anti-Creel mailers went out. Surprising also, since both the professions of minister and law enforcement of“ cer are expected to be highly trained to handle many dif“ cult situations. Mr. Langstons career encompasses both these professions. I “ nd it hard to believe that Mr. Langstons training nor character to directly answer a few questions posed by the LWV in a public forum troubling. Blaming the Republican party helps neither Mr. Langston nor the citizens when they advised against it. Mr. Langston answered to a few political types instead of answering to the citizens of Wakulla of whom he hopes to represent which is the point of my concern. I would also like to thank Mr. Charlie Creel for his participation in the forum. Mr. Creel seemed to have no problem voicing his platform and answering all questions for this race and addressing the circumstances involved in the mailer, indicating a proactive approach to the position of Sheriff and the character necessary for the of“ ce. Candidate Creel also took the opportunity to speak to the citizens about the circumstances in the ” yerŽ received in the mail just that day. This negative campaign piece, over-sized and over-exaggerated, was addressed bravely, succinctly and very well. The League applauds him for his candor. The League of Women Voters is independent and non-partisan and refuses to be in” uenced by partisan interests as evinced by the local power structure „ that is, Democrat and Republican party chairs who attempted to limit citizen information through their actions on behalf of their candidates. The League is disappointed that all candidates did not participate, As limited information and exposure leaves voters with limited knowledge, which I hope was not the intent, but was the action. But I sincerely believe, the League of Women Voters of Wakulla forums have accomplished its goal: If any one citizen has learned information about candidates or issues that helped that citizen make a determination in casting their vote. I would also like to offer big thank you to Marilynn Wills, former state president and current state board member, for her analysis and review of the many Constitutional Amendments on this ballot. Remember, early voting starts Saturday, Oct. 27 and runs through Nov. 3. Election Day is Nov. 6. Your vote is your voice to ensure you have a say in Wakulla Countys future. Please exercise your right to vote and cast your ballot! Mary Cortese LWV Wakulla Editor, The News: As a candidate for sheriff of Wakulla County, I would like to respond to the citizens about a mailer that was received, last Thursday, by all registered voters (approx. 18,512) of Wakulla County. This is the vilest piece of negative campaigning I have ever witnessed. I made a pledge to which I stand by to this day that I would not revert to negative attack ads to destroy my opponent to win an election. People are tired of this nonsense in this election cycle. As Paul Harvey would say, and here is the rest of the story.Ž The incident alluded to in the mailer happened in 1981 … 31 years ago … and was taken directly from my Florida Highway Patrol personnel “ le. I attempted to stop a vehicle. The vehicle accelerated to a speed of 120 mph and struck several police vehicles. The vehicle then struck another vehicle driven by a City of North Port police of“ cer injuring the of“ cer. As we were entering a congested and wellpopulated area into the city of Venice, I requested from my supervisor permission to shoot the right rear tire of the vehicle in order to disable the vehicle and end the chase. As my supervisor was off duty and at home, before he could respond with an answer I shot the tire before we entered into the congested area. This is the reason I received a letter of reprimand for shooting from a moving vehicle. I gladly accepted it as in my heart I knew I had saved someone from being seriously injured or killed. The mailer also failed to state that the subject was charged and convicted of various traf“ c charges, assault with a motor vehicle and battery on a law enforcement of“ cer, and was a fugitive wanted for violation of probation. The mailer alleged I falsely stated that my law enforcement record was exemplary. I stand by that statement. After a 30-year law enforcement career and this incident being the only negative in my “ le to this day, I consider it exemplary. There may be more smear tactics to come, but they will not come from the Charlie Creel for Sheriff campaign. I would appreciate your vote on Nov. 6, for a truly FRESH START. Charlie Creel Candidate for Sheriff Editor, The News: Emily Smith is our best choice for county commissioner. I have known Emily Smith for several years and am impressed with her resourcefulness and her leadership. Emily is dedicated to making Wakulla County an outstanding rural community with familyoriented goals and an exceptional quality of life. Ive seen Emily work hard at whatever she undertakes. She has studied the issues that affect our countys citizens. Emily attends our County Commission and Planning Commission meetings, as well as many County-sponsored workshops. She has spent time within the Wakulla Gardens subdivision and has discussed possible solutions with local residents. Emilys first-hand knowledge of our countys biggest problems and current economic issues will allow her to help make the informed decisions that are the mark of an excellent commissioner. Emily is a strong leader and will work FOR the people and WITH the Board of County Commissioners to improve our county, with plans for smart growth and protection of our resources. I strongly recommend that voters research the candidates for the upcoming election. You can learn more about Emilys ideas and views by visiting her website: www.emilyforwakulla.com. Please join me in electing Emily Smith as county commissioner on Nov. 6th. Sandy Tedder Sopchoppy Editor, The News: I was very hesitant about writing this, because I know nothing about Charlie Creel or what he might bring to our county. But after a sleepless night and much prayer I felt led to give my opinion on what I do know. I feel the current sheriff administration is doing an excellent job. Over the past couple of years I have noticed such a change in our deputies. They seem to have a Christ-like character that I believe comes from being under submission to men that fear God. During our last ” ood I witnessed so many sheriffs employees standing in the rain, out protecting peoples property and lives. I am very concerned that people always wanting change could hinder what God is doing in our county. Our sheriff administration is teaching our deputies to care about others. They have always shown such courtesy to my wifes business by calling over the intercom for cars to pull out of our driveway when they make a stop. Other agencies dont always give us that respect. I have held off publicly supporting a candidate in this election, because of the way my wifes business was affected by me supporting someone my friends didnt like in the last election. After months of watching Fred Nichols stand beside Maurice Langston even though he knows his job could be affected if Creel wins, it made me realize that you need to stand for what you believe no matter what. I believe Maurice Langston cares about people, not quotas. The men and women under his command have the utmost respect for him. With Maurice Langston as our sheriff, I believe Wakulla will be able to take heed to Emmett Whaleys last message on earth. It was on Hebrews 13:17. Obey them that have the rule over you and submit yourselves for they watch for your souls, as they must give account that they may do it with joy and not grief, for that is unpro“ table for you.Ž Ray Hutton Crawfordville Editor. The News: I am proud to be supporting John Shuff for the County Commission District 5 seat. Johns common sense approach to solving problems, experience working on numerous citizen committees, and love of the outdoors and world class environment we are all so fortunate to have in our backyard, make John my choice to help shape the future of our county. John has served admirably on numerous committees formed by county government over the years. He was a serious participant on the infrastructure committee, landscape committee, and others. He brought good ideas to the table and helped reach common ground and compromise. I like his approach and vision for dealing with the congestion on U.S. Highway 319. Focusing on improvements needed at Crawfordvilles “ ve main intersections while we wait for the funds needed to upgrade the highway between those intersections is a good one. He has also seen how often committees are appointed, work diligently to achieve results, only to have their “ ndings shelved or tabled upon completion. I think this will give John an experienced perspective on the role citizen committees can play in the future. As library director, I had the pleasure of working with John on the building addition to the Wakulla County Public Library. During the construction project, an issue arose concerning wheelchair accessibility. The older main part of the library met all ADA requirements but oversized motorized wheel chairs could not get through the front entrance. They could get into the planned addition, but once inside could still not enter the main library from the addition. By altering the plans slightly, John was able to redesign the entrance at no additional cost to the project. This is only one example of numerous issues that John helped solve. I am also a frequent user of the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center, another public facility built by John Shuff. It is my understanding that John had much input into the design and functionality of that building while keeping costs to a minimum. Today this multi-functional building serves the needs of many seniors and also countess other groups and organizations. Then there is the Old County Courthouse. As a resident occupant of this building from 1985 to 1993 it was quite easy to see what an historical gem it was. The Chamber of Commerce did an excellent job of pursuing grant funds and raising matching funds from the community to restore this one of a kind historic landmark but it was Johns vision and hard work that put the “ nishing touches on the State of Floridas oldest wooden courthouse. Johns experience building institutional structures will be invaluable as the county makes long needed energy ef“ cient upgrades to the heating, air conditioning, and lighting systems in our public buildings. Please join me in voting for John Shuff, County Commission District 5. Sincerely, Doug Jones Crawfordville

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Buckhorn News Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey...  Ivan Assembly: Ivan Assembly of God will be hosting a Fall Festival on the evening of Oct. 31 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the church. Everything is free of charge! Trunk or Treat with games, giveaways, bouncers, hay-ride, cake walk, lots of candy, soup and chili, fried oreos and funnel cakes. Come out and bring the family. The church is located at 202 Ivan Church Road in Crawfordville. Phone number is (850) 926-4826. Wakulla Springs Baptist: Wakulla Springs Baptist Church will have pumpkins for sale through Oct. 31. The pumpkin patch will be open on weekdays from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. All proceeds go towards the garden ministry that supports local food pantries. A Harvest of Hope Pumpkin Patch Festival will be held at the church on Saturday, Oct. 20, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. with fun, food and games. The church is located at 1391 Crawfordville Highway. For more information, call 926-5152. Grace Baptist: Come enjoy an afternoon of free food, fun, games, a cake walk and fellowship for all ages at Grace Baptist Church on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. In addition, on every hour the short drama “The Letter From Hell” will be performed by the Live Out Loud Youth and Drama Ministry, Chosen Generation Youth ministries, and Friends in Christ Youth Ministry. Grace Baptist is located at 803 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 926-3217.  Shady Sea Baptist: Shady Sea Baptist Church in Spring Creek a will be having a family fun day on Oct. 27, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be game booths, exhibits, free prize drawing for the kids every half hour, hay ride and a bounce house plus free hot dogs chips and sodas. There will also be a yard sale and donation drawing for gift certi cates to local restaurants with all proceeds going to the Shady Sea food pantry to help feed the needy in our community. It will be a day of fun and blessing for all so come join us and enjoy the day. Community festival: The third annual Community Fall Festival will be held at Spirit LIfe Church in Sopchoppy on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. There will be games for children and which will also include relay races, pumpkin carving, face painting and storytelling. Skits and live music will be performed by youth from various churches throughout the evening on a outdoor stage. Chili supper. To top off the evening there will be a hay ride. The festival is sponsored by Spirit Life Church, Sopchoppy United Methodist Church, Mt. Beasor Primitive Baptist Church and Panacea First Baptist Church – bringing unity into our communities. The event is free of charge.Light vs. darknessPrayer Walk continuesBy ETHEL SKIPPER Thought for the week: What does it mean to walk in darkness? Jesus is the light of the world. He that followeth him shall not walk in darkness but shall have the light of life. Most children are afraid of the dark. Their own rooms, so familiar and comfortable in the daytime, become strange and mysterious places when the lights are turned off. But what a difference the light makes. A ” ip of the switch and the shadows disappear. Light brings vision, truth, and understanding. Childhood fears do not completely pass away when we grow up. Darkness still has the power to send a shudder through most of us. Who would not prefer to walk down an alley or through a cemetery in the full light of day rather than in the middle of night. Light can take away our fear and show us the way. Many people are walking in the light … they know how Jesus is. The Pharisees were in the dark about who Jesus was … they were also in the dark about who they were or where they came from or where they were going. At Burney Temple Church … New Vision Deliverance Minister invite you to the anniversary of their pastor, Mary Harvey, on Oct. 24 through Oct. 28. Speakers will be Minister Herbert Franklin, Prophet J. Anderson, Minister K. Triplett. On Sunday, the speaker will be Elder A. Sanders. Night services will be at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at 11 a.m. Everyone is welcome. Happy belated birthday on Oct. 18 to Chinesta Smith from your family and friends.Church fall festivalsBy CYNTHIA WEBSTER Could I but be eloquent in my words I would tell you in some remarkable way of the many lessons I have learned over the four weeks of the Prayer Walk. However even though the eloquence is not there and little that I say will be all that remarkable, I am undeterred in sharing some of these things with you. Many of the walkers who come nearly every day have heard me say at one time or another, Oh, I hope someone is here to walk today.Ž Why I say that is a mystery because I know that it is Gods Will as to who comes and who doesnt and, yes, everyday there are walkers. Some days more and others a few less but always a group large enough to please Him. Lesson 1: Faith is not a question of size but rather of strength. And as we stand under those beautiful old trees at Azalea Park waiting for the message and prayer we talk, we laugh, we rest at the picnic tables and we give praise. And then the time arrives to hear from whoever is giving the message for that day. Wakulla County may not have big shopping malls, bowling alleys, movie theatres or skating rinks but we do have men and women of great faith who are unbelievably gifted when sharing Gods Word. As we have listened to all who have come to lead the walk we have heard messages of great beauty, profound insight, intense passion, deep understanding, and powerful love. There are times when I just wish that we had the power to stop the cars going down Crawfordville Highway and tell those inside that they are missing something very special. Lesson 2: Our county is blessed with clergy who have been chosen by God to take His message to the people. The walk itself is a walk for National Healing. I thought that praying for our Nation was important, and it is. I knew that praying for our leaders is important, and it is. I understood that a spiritual reawakening could be sparked if Christians would stand up and stand out on their faith, and this is so. What I had not expected was what would happen to me. I began to see that my prayers were becoming less about things and more about establishing a closer relationship with God. Lesson 3: Be ready for surprises. There are many other lessons to be shared but would it not be so much more exciting to rearrange your schedule and “ nd for yourself friendship, fellowship and the power of prayer under the trees at Azalea Park? CLERGY SCHEDULE FOR WEEK FIVE € Thursday, Oct. 25, at 6:25 p.m., Hudson Park (Note: time and location change so we could be part of the annual National Overdose Prevention and Education Candlelight Vigil) … Pastor Mike Shockley, Crawfordville United Methodist Church. € Friday, Oct. 26, 10 a.m. … Pastor Ethel Skipper, Skipper Temple Church of Christ. € Saturday, Oct. 27, 10 a.m. … Youth Pastor David Allen, Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church. € Monday, Oct. 29, 6:45 p.m. … Pastor John Dunning, Spirit Life Church. € Tuesday, Oct. 30, 6:45 p.m. Pastor Gerald Fielder, Good News Assembly of God. € Wed., Oct. 31, 10 a.m. … Pastor Kevin Hall of Sopchoppy and Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church. Note: Put on your calendar election eve, Monday night, Nov. 5, from 5:40 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. That will be the 40th night of the Forty Day Prayer Walk … a time of prayer and hymn. There will be no walk. We invite every person of faith in Wakulla County to attend. Can you imagine Christians standing shoulder to shoulder, “ lling Azalea Park, lifting their corporate voice to Him? Bring a chair, a ” ashlight in case we run a little late and a jacket. This is a commitment that you can anticipate with joy. PHOTO BY K. MORGAN/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSamuel and Alyssa take part in the Prayer Walk.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 7A Church Briefs Open mic gospel sing at Pioneer BaptistPioneer Baptist Church will host a community-wide Open Microphone Gospel Sing on Friday, Oct. 26, at 7 p.m. It’s free. Anyone who enjoys singing or playing gospel music is invited to participate. Others who enjoy listening are encouraged to attend and have a blessed night of worship through music. Pioneer Baptist Church is located at 486 Beechwood Drive., four miles east of Crawfordville, just north of the MLK Memorial Road and Spring Creek Highway intersection. Call Pastor Dennis Hall at 878-5224 for more information.  Rehearsals begin for Handel’s MessiahA community choir will present Handel’s Messiah on Dec. 9 at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. Reba Mason will direct. The opportunity to be part of this program is available to anyone in the Wakulla community. Practice begins Sunday, Oct. 28 at 2:30 p.m. at the church. For more information, contact Reba Mason at 962-3804..  Quilt is being raf ed by Christ Church AnglicanChrist Church Quilters are raf ing a beautiful hand quilted queen-king size quilt. The pattern is Star-spangled Four Patch. Raf e tickets are now available, 6 tickets for $5 or $1 each. The drawing will be held after noon on Dec. 9, at Christ Church Anglican, 3383 Coastal Highway. You may call the church at745-8412 or Mary Lou Martin 210-1203 for more information or for tickets. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER It happened to me again this past week for the umpteenth time. The last time it happened, I promised myself it would never happen again, as long as I lived. So much for my promises, or maybe I died. I found myself stranded at the neighborhood grocery store. I meant to put gas in my car, honest I did. Somehow, it slipped my mind. I do not mind things slipping my mind if they are not important, and if it does not involve the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Unfortunately for me, this did. I dont mind lectures from my Beloved, if I could sometimes pick the topic. Topics like religion and politics would be a nice change. Her topic, which she never tires of, is my forgetfulness. At least I cant remember any other topic at the moment. My car was de“ nitely out of gas and I was going nowhere in it. My only recourse was to walk across the street to the store, and call my wife to come and bail me out of trouble. Every husband knows how dif“ cult this is because we have to do it so often. I went to the phone booth in the store and made the call.Ž Then I went and took a seat to wait for her arrival. As I was waiting, I noticed an elderly gentleman come into the store. I call him a gentleman, but these days, who knows? This man walked into the store as if he was concerned about being followed. Every few steps he threw a glance over his shoulder as if someone was stalking him. Since I did not have anything to do for the next 20 minutes, I settled back to watch. When he got into the store, he cautiously walked around the store as if casing it. So many stores are being robbed; I didnt know but this man was planning to pull off a heist. My interest piqued, which kept my mind off the trouble I was in with my wife when she arrived to pick me up. When a person is in trouble, it is always a good thing to try to take ones mind off said trouble, and on someone who might be in more trouble than you are at the moment. At least, thats what I told myself at the time. When a person is facing trouble, he will say anything to himself to calm those jagged nerves. The man walked around the store several times, always glancing over his shoulder as if he expected something to happen. As far as I could tell, he was an ordinary man with no special features. He walked with a slow shuf” e, but thats to be expected when a mans body ages. I saw him stand over against a corner for several minutes while he intently watched the front door. A little spooked by this time, I did not know if I should alert the manager or call the police. I envisioned the headlines in the newspapers the next day: Local pastor dies a heros death in the cross“ re.Ž I sure would like to be a hero, but only in my own mind. In scanning the gentleman as best I could, I knew he could not have a large weapon on his person. The loose “ tting shirt revealed no bomb strapped to his chest, which was a little comforting. Then the gentleman began to move and I froze. My life ” ashed before me in an instant … which bored me almost to death. I never want to experience anything like that ever again. My focus once again went to the gentleman in motion. What was he going to do? Gradually he eased up to the bakery department. I almost stood, but at my height, I would be an easy target. Its hard for anyone to miss a barn door, especially one with a ” ashy smile. I braced myself for what would happen next. Then it happened. The elderly gentleman, with one last glance over his shoulder, bought a chocolate clair. I was confused … relieved … but confused. What was all the secrecy about? About this time, I saw him slither toward the bench where I was sitting. Without looking at me, the man sank into the corner as though hiding from someone. He sat there for a few minutes and then he opened his bag with the clair. Just as he took his “ rst bite, someone recognized him, came up and said, Henry, is that a chocolate clair youre eating?Ž He glanced at me and gave me one of those sick smiles that every husband recognizes. No matter how hard you try to keep something (like clairs) from your wife, it is impossible. There is a spiritual lesson here. No matter how hard you try to hide your sin, somewhere, somehow, when you least expect it, someone will see you. An Old Testament scripture lays down an important principle in this regard. But if ye will not do so, behold, ye have sinned against the Lord: and be sure your sin will “ nd you out.Ž (Numbers 32:23 KJV.) David, the Psalmist, knew this and wrote, Search me, O God, and know my heart: try me, and know my thoughts: And see if there be any wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting.Ž (Psalm 139:2324 KJV.) Live your life as though someone was watching you, because, Someone is watching you.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Your sin will find you out OUT TO PASTOR charlieforsheriff@gmail.comwww.charliecreel.comPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Af“liation, for sheriff.Many of you have let me know you were offended by the desperate smear tactics used against me recently in my campaign for sheriff of Wakulla County. THANK YOU FOR STANDING BY ME. Negative campaigning is regrettable for obvious reasons, but especially since it draws attention away from the real issues Wakulla County is facing: a crime rate that is one of the worst in the state, mostly burglaries, which relate to drugs. Its time for law enforcement management that will enforce the laws and put criminals behind bars. As sheriff, I will strengthen the relationships between the sheriffs office, the fire departments, EMS and other law enforcement agencies. We must coordinate our efforts so that we protect what we love about this county, while looking to the future. The color of our uniforms shouldnt matter when “ghting crime; we must work together. This election is about two choices. Either we continue down the same path, or we take a path with new direction, new ideas, where all citizens are treated fairly and equally, a leader with integrity and a positive approach to boost the morale of the deputies, provide innovation and budget consciousness. This election is very important to the future of Wakulla County. For a FRESH START with a FULL-TIME Sheriff, I ask for your vote on November 6th.To the people of Wakulla County, Home Cleaning Service WINNER Polly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065LICENSED AND INSURED CttiClCil R id id id id id id id id i id id d t il Special Touch Cleaning ServiceThank you so much for your constant support. As always, it is an honor and a privilege to serve youŽ TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2012 Thank you Wakulla Readers!Bruce Johnson Construction Voted Best Builder 2012Building Quality Custom Homes for 31 years

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings CommunityNichols marries KokindaHolly Kokinda and Eli Nichols of Durham, N.C., were married on June 2 at the Lioncrest at the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, N.C. The of“ ciant was the Rev. Darryl Reynolds. The bride is the daughter of Charles and Lynn Kokinda of Moosic, Pa. The groom is the son of John and Susan Nichols of Crawfordville. The maid of honor was Annie Stankevich of Morristown, N.J. The bridesmaids were Shae Anderson of Greenville, N.C., Adya Baker of New York City, N.Y., Hattie Cutcliffe, Kelly Hathorn and Jenna McNeill, all of Durham, N.C., Rose Mathies of Austin, Texas, and Jamie Nichols of Crawfordville, sister of the groom. The ” owers girls were Kira Breeden of Cordova, Tenn., cousin of the groom, and Madelyn Keating of Wyoming, Pa., cousin of the bride. The best man was Chad Hall of Boca Raton. The ushers/groomsmen were Casey Camero of West Palm Beach, Charley Kokinda of Moosic, Pa., Ryan Radloff of Raleigh, N.C., Eli Gerrell of Panama City, Zach Maurides of Durham, N.C., and Zell Robinson of San Diego, Calif. The reception was held at the Lioncrest at the Biltmore Estate. The bride is a 2005 graduate of Wyoming Seminary College Preparatory School and graduated from Duke University in 2009 with a bachelor of science degree in biology. She is attending Duke University School of Medicine. The groom is a 2002 graduate of Wakulla High School and graduated from Duke University in 2006 with a bachelor of science degree in Mechanical Engineering and in 2007 with a Masters in Engineering Management. He is currently employed by Electric Supply Company of North Carolina. Holly Kokinda and Eli Nichols Boy Scout Troop 8s Flo takes “ rst at the Whatever Floats Your Boat Regatta. By DAVID DAMONUnit Commissioner, Troop 8When I “ rst heard about Whatever Floats Your Boat,Ž a boat race using recycled materials sponsored by FSU Marine Lab at Turkey Point, it sounded like a great idea for our Troop 8 Boy Scout program. Water and boats mixed with recycled materials seemed like a natural “ t for our group of scouts. I brought it up at the next troop meeting and the scouts voted to do it. We had access to some used, medium sized plastic barrels and old straps used for binding shipping materials. We had some small trees that had been cut for a previous project involving lashing. Fortunately, in the rules, duct tape was also allowed. With an upcoming camping trip planned for St. George Island the weekend before the race, it was decided that this would be a great weekend project. On that camping Saturday, we began by “ rst duct taping the barrels together so theyd stay in place. Then, using the strapping and the small trees, we strapped and lashed it all together. Before long, we had a small, rather odd looking pontoon boat. After giving her a name and a quick christening ceremony using bottled water, FloŽ was ready for launching. This awkward looking craft moved through the water at a surprisingly quick clip. One week later on Sept. 6, at FSU Marine Lab, a group of strange crafts began to assemble and be assembled. A handful of scouts gathered around Flo, answering questions from the distinguished Whatever Floats Your Boat Regatta judges. After a thorough inspection, Flo was deemed seaworthy enough to take a shot at the race course. As for the other craft assembled, most had never been in the water before and parts tried to ” oat away or were balance-challenged as they hit the water. There was the large sea turtle made from plastic jugs with a crew of greenŽ girls. There was a 4 by 8 sheet of plywood with row after row of milk jugs duct taped to the bottom. There was even a canoeŽ that was strip planked with rows of beer cans duct taped together. A couple even had sails. Finally, all of the contestants were more or less at the starting line as the starting horn was blown. As we rounded the “ rst mark, ahead of the fleet, it became apparent that we would stay ahead as long as Flo stayed together. After rounding two more buoys we headed for the “ nish line with a substantial lead. Troop 8 won the coveted “ rst place trophy. The scouts from Troop 8 were proud to receive the “ rst place trophy made of miscellaneous metal parts welded together, spray painted gold and mounted to a nice wooden base. They were gracious as they towed the very determined turtle and her tired crew over to the line of spectators. After the race everyone gathered for food and music at the FSU Marine Lab. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBoy Scouts paddle to “ rst place at regattaAir Force Reserve Airman 1st Class Christopher T. Dolan graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical “ tness and basic warfare principles and skills. Dolan is the son of Nedine Dolan of Alligator Point. He is a 2007 graduate of Wakulla High School.Dolan graduates from Air Force basic training WAKULLA COUNTY CAN COUNT ON ROBERT HILL People you trust,TRUST ROBERT HILL... www.RobertHill4House.com | http://twitter.com/hill4house | www.facebook.com/RobertHill4House For Real Experience, Sound Judgment and Proven Experience you can count on, ELECT ROBERT HILL to the Florida House! You can count on my friend Robert Hill. He is a man of integrity, a public servant we can trust and a leader who will listen.  Brent Thurmond, Wakulla County Clerk of the Courts We recommend Robert Hill  To support Public Education To create Jobs To advocate for State Employees To protect Gun Rights To ght Prison Privatization To oppose New Taxes Political advertisement paid for and approved by Robert Hill, Democrat, for Florida House of Representatives District 7

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 9Aeducation news SchoolTeachers and employee of the month are announced Special to The NewsOctober Teachers of the Month are Medart Elementary Schools Ginger Pooser and Wakulla Middle Schools Kathy Spivey. Wakulla High Schools Employee of the Month is paraprofessional Patricia Broadway. Superintendent David Miller and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the dependability and dedication these employees bring to the District, as well as the positive attitude they display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. Pooser started her career as a reading teacher at Kate Sullivan Elementary School and was hired as a primary teacher at Sopchoppy Elementary in 1978. Pooser has been a kindergarten teacher at Medart Elementary School since 1995. Pooser grew up in Tallahassee and graduated from FSU with a bachelors degree in Education. Working for the Wakulla County School District has been a dream job for Pooser. She said, Working side by side with dedicated people who work hard encourages me to put forth my best effort.Ž Pooser said, I look for the special qualities of each child. Teaching is never boring. I learn something new every year.Ž Medart Principal Sharon Kemp applauds Poosers dependability and knowledge, Ms. Pooser rarely takes time off during the school year. She comes to work early, assists others and helps with afterschool activities such as Title I Parent Training meetings. As kindergarten grade level chairperson and as a veteran teacher, others teachers and I look to her for guidance.Ž Also recognized as an October Teacher of the Month is Wakulla Middle Schools eighth grade teacher, Kathy Spivey. Originally hired by Bob Myhre, Spivey has dedicated 14 years of service to Wakulla Middle School. Formerly from Ashville, N.C., Spivey attended and graduated from Florida International University in Miami and earned her Masters degree from The University of Phoenix. Spivey believes its a privilege to be a part of her students lives and attributes part of her success to the amazing faculty at Wakulla Middle School. Spivey has served or is currently serving as the WMS AVID Site Coordinator, School Advisory Council member, the Yearbook Sponsor, Technology Coordinator, Teacher Leader, College Reach Out Program Coordinator, Science Fair Coordinator, Science on the Move Parent Night Coordinator, Patriots Pen Contest Coordinator, Mock Election School Coordinator and a committee member for textbook selection. WMS Principal Mike Barwick said, Evidence of Ms. Spiveys hard work can be seen throughout the WMS campus. Whether its a technology issue she is dealing with or coordinating our AVID program, Ms. Spivey always gives her best. Our AVID program would not be where it is today if it were not for Ms. Spiveys dedication to the program. She has bought into the program and is a big reason for its success. She is a real asset to our school and I am proud to have her as a Wildcat.Ž The October Employee of the Month is Broadway. Broadway has been serving the students of Wakulla County since 1999. She started as a Pre-K teacher at Trinity Lutheran and in 2005 she began working at Wakulla Middle School as a PE paraprofessional and oneon-one assistant. Her War Eagle service began in 2010, where she is today. Broadway grew up on the west coast of Central Florida, graduating from Seminole High School. She has attended and graduated from St. Pete Junior College and Tallahassee Community College and is currently working toward the completion of her Bachelor of Science degree at Florida State University. What I like most about my job is knowing that my children and I are a part of one of the top school districts in the state. I enjoy working with the dedicated individuals at Wakulla High School,Ž said Broadway. Watching her students learn and achieve their individual goals are the most rewarding aspects of her job. That is re” ected in her willingness to be a Boy Scouts Leader, a Girl Scouts Leader, and a soccer coach, treasurer and concessions coordinator. WHS Principal Mike Crouch recognizes her enthusiasm and work ethic. He said, Mrs. Broadway always goes the second mile to make sure other students are helped or teachers in her classes are assisted. She is a leader among her peers. She is almost legendary for her effort in cleaning out the old cumulative “ les that had not been purged for many years. Mrs. Broadway is the ultimate team player in a school that needs many team players. We are very thankful to have an employee of Mrs. Broadways caliber as a part of the War Eagle family.Ž Ginger Pooser Patricia Broadway Kathy Spivey WHS AP exam scores exceed national averageSpecial to The NewsAcademic excellence and rigor are among the top priorities at Wakulla High School as evidenced by the schools thriving Advanced Placement program. Advanced Placement (AP) is a nationally recognized curriculum regulated by The College Board that aligns subject matter and rigor with college-level classes. The goal of the program is two-fold: expose and prepare students for college-level work and give students the opportunity to excel by earning college credit by passing an examination at the end of the year. In these exams, Wakulla High School exceeds the national average in subjects such as Literature and Composition, Environmental Science, and U.S. Government and Politics. Teachers have tirelessly participated in workshops in their subject areas, planned lessons that correlate with the Advanced Placement curriculum, and collaborated with other professionals to ensure the success of their students both at Wakulla High School and beyond. Wakulla High School began their Advanced Placement program in 2001 with two courses and twenty-six students and it has grown to boast thirteen courses with an enrollment of over four hundred students. ŽThe success of our AP program, due largely to the commitment of our teachers, gives our students the opportunity to not only learn complex thinking imperative for college, but compete nationally for college admission and lucrative scholarships,Ž said Michael Crouch, principal of Wakulla High School. The continued success of Wakulla High Schools Advanced Placement program has resulted in the addition of courses each year and the assurance that students are prepared to advance to college and be successful when they get there. Scholarship fair is ursday Tallahassee Community Colleges Of“ ce of Financial Aid is hosting its annual Scholarship Fair on Thursday, Oct. 25, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the lobby of the Fine and Performing Arts Center. The Scholarship Fair provides current and prospective TCC students with the chance to meet one-on-one with scholarship administrators, who will be available to provide information regarding the colleges many scholarship opportunities. Information will be provided on the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program and assistance will be provided on how to complete the Free Applications for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Students can submit a scholarship application for the Fall 2013 Semester at TCC at the event or online at www.tcc.” .edu/scholarships. The scholarship application deadline for the Fall 2013 semester is Feb. 1, 2013. For more information on the Scholarship Fair, contact the Of“ ce of Financial Aid at (850) 201-8399. Wakulla Christian School, in coordination with the Wakulla County Veterans Services Office, is proud to host the Saturday, November 10, 2012 at Hudson Park Games, Vendors Raffles, a Silent Auction, and Lots of Food !!! Parade Starts @ 10:00a.m. A portion of the proceeds from this grand event will be donated to our local Veterans Services Office. Your family or organization is invited to participate in this very special event dedicated to honoring all Veterans and active duty military. Please consider entering a float or vehicle decorated in honor of your loved ones’. For more information or to register your floa t, please contact the Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee via fax @ 850-926-5186 or email WCVDay@gmail.com “Honoring All Who Served” Soldier Care Packages 6th Annual Veterans Day Parade and Celebration to Support Our Troops and Honor Our Veterans Wakulla Christian School is collecting public donations of items to send to our troops wish list items include individually wrapped beef jerky, Pringles, individually wrapped sunflower seeds, individually wrapped nuts, individually packaged mix of Propel Fitness Water and Gatorade, individually packaged hard candy and gummy bears, white tube socks, protein bars, granola bars, books, soap, ra zors, sunscreen, nail files, AA batteries and Ziploc bags. For further information, please contact Wakulla County Veter ans Day Committee Drop off any items at one of the followin g supportive businesses in Wakulla county: HOME MORTGAGEA MERI F IRST FUND RAISER SILENT AUCTION & STEAK DINNER $ 10.00NOVEMBER 16TH from 5 PM … 8PM at SHELLPOINT FIRE HOUSE FOR TICKETS CONTACT MARION at 926-9023 ALSO AT CENTURY 21 in SHELLPOINTFishing TripJewelry Gift BasketsArt Panacea Full Gospel AssemblyINVITES OUR COMMUNITY TO JOIN US WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31, 2012 AT 6:00 PMFOR A “HALLOWED BE THY NAME” FALL FESTIVALGAMES, CANDY, FOOD, FUN & FELLOWSHIPFREE TO ALL!Our Father... Hallowed be THY NAME!‘After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.’ Matthew 6:9-10

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBy MARJ LAW The Wrigleys gum people might have said Its two, two, two guns in one!Ž if they advertized this Damascus barrel percussion pistol. Its a cool-looking antique gun. Like my Kentucky Pistol, its a black powder muzzle-loading percussion gun. But unlike any small pistol Ive seen, this strange little thing has two barrels and two triggers and two hammers. The hammers peek up like rabbit ears. In fact, theyre called rabbit-ear hammers. Instead of the smooth round barrel Im used to seeing, these barrels are square on the inside. Thats because they were forged, probably in a blacksmith shop. Someone hammered four heated ” at pieces of steel over a cold round mandrel. The barrels appear round on the outside, but theyre square when you look down them. Just like my Kentucky pistol, you load the gun by pouring the powder down the barrel(s). Then you put the oiled patch over the barrel and the ball over the patch. Push the ball all the way into the barrel. Now that the charge (black powder) and the ball are in, its time to place the percussion cap over the nipple. The gun is ready to “ re. Seems to me, shooting someone was a lot of work. And it took a bit of time to load that gun. If your arm shook, or if you were a bad shot, you were out of luck! The other guy would get you before you could load again! Back in the early 1800s, these two-barreled guns were an answer for personal protection. Revolvers werent around yet, so normally you had your one-shot handgun in your pocket, inside your jacket, or in your purse. However, with this gun, you got another opportunity to defend yourself because of that second barrel. Pull the further trigger, and theres your second chance. A new friend brought this gun for me to see, and Im glad he did. Im also glad I never had to defend myself back in the bad old days.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid gunner in her retirement.Pistol is a relic of days gone by HOME ON THE RANGE SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA Damascus barrel percussion pistol … two barrels, two triggers, two hammers. Normally, one could say here in our Big Bend April and October are our driest months, and also the best temperatures … very pleasant! Plus the bugs generally are on their best behavior. In the fall it is almost desert-like, as we are experiencing now. March is usually our wettest month, so it was with pleasure that Patti and I escaped this predicted rain by going to Arizona last March, to the same cool dry weather were now experiencing. From experience, Patti knew that in the spring in the deserts the wild” owers can be spectacular … IF there have been rains … and the temperatures can be pleasant. Go later and you can roast, earlier and youll “ nd out how cold a desert can be. March/April then are the perfect months to visit the Southwest. Wed hoped for a ” ower show but unfortunately it had been an unusually cold winter freezing many cacti, and also theyd had an exceptionally dry series of months so the whole area was bone dry. Deforestation by our practice of clearing land and having mowed, manicured, and weedless lawns in a great majority of our country was less practiced out there around Tuscon, as there is a trend to go natural, due to severe water restrictions. The desert plants grow right up to the homes, so cacti and other thorny succulents around private properties simply merged into the state and federally protected lands, which is neat. The most obvious of the cactus is the well known Saguaro. They can become giants reaching over 30 feet, and weighing tons! What is amazing is how they can swell up to store water, or shrivel during long dry periods, as we witnessed. They are (you might say) pleated vertically and when thirsty the pleats are close to each other, but after heavy rains the cactus swells, and the pleats spread apart. Many desert plants do this and also are designed to withstand intense heat and cold. Out there the name riverŽ is almost a joke. These arroyos, washes or gulches most of the time are super dry! When rains do occur the hard baked clay in these river beds cant absorb, so they end up with ” ash ” oods that can produce raging currents with wipe out results! We saw a fair amount of birds (three new to me) some neat lizards, and mammals too, and probably our favorite place (other than the crowds of other visitors) was the Desert Museum. But if you wish to really see any desert in its full glory, “ nd out when there have been heavy rains that have germinated ” ower seeds that perhaps have been dormant for a decade, and are starting to bloom. If by plane or car if you get within a few days and hit the peak, youll see the the desert explode into melted rainbows. Flowers everywhere!Wakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHThe contrast of the desert Re-Elect Donnie Sparkman *Certi“ed Florida Appraiser*-Experienced -DedicatedRe-Elect someone who has always worked with the public concerning land and values... and who will CONTINUE TO WORK FOR YOU! Political Advertisement Paid For And Approved By Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, For Property AppraiserI WILL CONTINUE TO KEEP THE CITIZENS OF WAKULLA COUNTY AT THE FOREFRONT OF ANYTHING I DO. I WILL CONTINUE TO BE RESPECTFUL, HELPFUL, ACCESSIBLE, AND LISTEN TO YOUR CONCERNS. I HAVE THE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH LAND, DEEDS, DESCRIPTIONS, LAND VALUES, TAXES, ETHICS AND THE ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE WITH THE PUBLIC. AS YOUR PROPERTY APPRAISER I WILL CONTINUE TO PROVIDE EFFICIENT, COURTEOUS AND FAIR SERVICE TO ALL! I WILL CONTINUE TO WORK TO IMPROVE THE OFFICE, WEB SITE AND TAX ROLL AND SEE TO IT THAT THEY SERVE THE PUBLIC IN THE BEST POSSIBLE WAY. Wakulla CountyPROPERTY APPRAISER Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts • Color • Facial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • Flat TopsFeather Locks • Color • Perms • Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. ce Hair Salon e H l o H a i alo ir Sa c e ce on o on Tues-Sat 545-2905 & t. . . F STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304

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UnderwaterWakullaBy Travis Kersting This past weekend made for some beautiful boating! Thank you to Duane Treadon for sending in the following report. This past Sunday there was a sight on Apalachicola Bay and St. George Sound that had not been seen for quite some time, an Auxiliary patrol ensign. With Mark Rosen as Coxswain, Mike Harrison and Duane Treadon as crew and Dave Rabon as crew trainee the four set out on a safety and familiarization patrol just west of the St. George Island Bridge. The patrol on a 21-foot Sea Dory took the crew west towards West Pass. On the way they motored through Government Cut to spend a short time on the Gulf side. After making way to West Pass the patrol turned east heading back to the bridge. Along the way Dave and Mike, who both have experience boating these waters, pointed out areas of hidden danger just under the surface in the form of oyster bars and areas prone to shoaling. With our area of responsibility reaching beyond St. George Island, there is a great need for our members to become familiar with the area. An emergency is no time to realize we are ill prepared to respond. With a facility now in the area boaters can expect to see more frequent Auxiliary patrols. Several are planned for the remainder of the year and it is hoped to utilize this asset on a regular basis during next years boating season. Next week we will again be out in the St. George area, weather permitting. Continuing with Navigation Rules brings us to Rule 14: Head on Situations. This rule addressed the proper procedure for two boats meeting in a head-on or near-head-on situation. It states that when two power-driven boats (not under sail only) are meeting in a potential head-on situation that involves the risk for collision, BOTH shall alter their course to the starboard (right) so that they pass each other on the port (left) side. This situation exists when a boater sees the other boat ahead, or nearly ahead. It during night hours, the boat would see the masthead lights of the other boat in a line, or nearly in a line and also be able to see both sidelights. If there is any doubt a risk of collision exists, the boater is safe to assume the risk is real and take action to avoid a collision. This rule, and all of the Navigation Rules are available at: www.uscg.mil/directives/cim/16000-16999/ cim_16672_2d.pdf In addition to a patrol Sunday, Saturday is the Annual FSU Flyover. Active Duty personnel from Station Panama City as well as Air Station Mobile will be joining Flotilla 12 Apalachee Bay at Doak Campbell Stadium for the game against Duke. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident, be aware and pay attention to your surroundings, especially in unfamiliar waters. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMike Harrison and Dave Rabon on patrol. Some activities reported by the FWC during the week of Oct. 12 to Oct. 18. WAKULLA COUNTY: Plainclothes of“ cers Jason Carroll and Steven Cook were working information about people harvesting shell“ sh in closed areas. During the investigation, they located two subjects in a closed area harvesting shell“ sh. The area where they were harvesting oysters was consistent with information received by the of“ cers. The two of“ cers stopped the vessel and cited both subjects for harvesting shell“ sh in a closed area. The shellfish were returned to the water. LEON COUNTY: Plainclothes Of“ cer Chris Jones was working a trespass complaint. During the investigation, he encountered two subjects trespassing and “ shing on the property. Both subjects were in possession of numerous undersized bass, cited for possession of undersized bass, and given trespass warnings. € Lt. Kent Harvey responded to a residence where a homeowner had shot a black bear. Upon arrival, of“ cers on scene were taken to the location where the bear was shot. Lieutenant Harvey turned the investigation over to Investigator James Bryant who also responded. The bear and gun were seized; the case is currently under investigation and will be reviewed by the State Attorneys Of“ ce. Of“ cers Jason Carroll and Seth Wagner assisted in the response and investigation. FWC Operations I frequently “ nd myself rummaging through old “ les or documents and sometimes I come across a real gem. I found a brochure from Dive Rite, a local dive equipment manufacturer in Lake City, titled 10 things you can learn from cave divers.Ž I tend to agree, recreational divers could learn a few things from cave divers but arguably todays cave divers could stand to learn a few things from fellow open water divers too. Buoyancy is at the heart of any underwater activity, no one wants to be stuck to the bottom due to overweighting or “ ghting just to sink. Proper use of that in” ator valve and your own lungs can only come with practice and time in the underwater world. Every dive should be a conscious attempt to get better at controlling your position in the water column until you can maintain a precise depth with only your gauges. This skill is vital to a divers safety and to the conservation of our reefs and caves. Trim is a skill which goes hand-in-hand with buoyancy. To be quali“ ed in cave diving these two things must be well tuned. In the open water environment trim will help you move more effortlessly through the water, conserving precious breathing gas, and extending your time on the bottom. Seldom would I argue that equipment will solve a problem over proper practice but when it comes to trim some equipment certainly makes it easier to maintain. Take only what is necessary to complete the dive. We have all done it or seen someone do it. You know, strap every gadget and gizmo available to themselves before jumping into the blue. Base the equipment you take on the mission of the day and stow backup or safety equipment away where its available. If you are shooting video then its unlikely you will require a lift bag, three dive knives and a spear gun. In cave diving we are often faced with the need to carry multiple cylinders, reels, extra lights, etc. and yet none of these should hang below the body. Dangly objects become easy snag hazards and also contribute to a loss of swimming ef“ ciency. In cave diving we dont want things to hang below us because that could snag on rocks, disturb silt on the bottom and impede our exit. Follow the rule of thirds. This rule has been keeping cave divers alive for a long time and we dont see the rule disappearing anytime soon. Open water divers could bene“ t from the added safety margin too. Next time you go diving allow for one-third of your remaining breathing mix (typically 1000psi) as a reserve. That means leaving the bottom or putting that last “ sh on the stringer at about 2000psi. Then when you hit the surface and the swim back to the boat is 300 foot away you can take a bearing, descend to 15 feet and swim without the waves beating you up. This buffer also allows for time to handle an emergency at your max depth or to complete some unplanned decompression. Larger cylinders, double tanks, or side-mounted cylinders diving mean you still get the same bottom time as before (if not more) but you have more than enough gas in reserve. Even if you have no interest in becoming a cave diver you can improve your diving experience by using some of the skills and equipment cave divers use and be that much safer. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Oct 25, 12 Fri Oct 26, 12 Sat Oct 27, 12 Sun Oct 28, 12 Mon Oct 29, 12 Tue Oct 30, 12 Wed Oct 31, 12 D ate 3.3 ft. 12:15 AM 3.5 ft. 12:50 AM 3.6 ft. 12:21 AM 3.7 ft. 12:50 AM 3.7 ft. 1:18 AM 3.7 ft. 1:45 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 5:52 AM 0.6 ft. 6:43 AM 0.3 ft. 7:25 AM 0.0 ft. 7:03 AM -0.1 ft. 7:38 AM -0.1 ft. 8:12 AM -0.1 ft. 8:45 AM L ow 3.2 ft. 12:20 PM 3.4 ft. 1:10 PM 3.5 ft. 1:51 PM 3.5 ft. 1:28 PM 3.5 ft. 2:03 PM 3.5 ft. 2:37 PM 3.5 ft. 3:11 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 6:15 PM 1.2 ft. 6:54 PM 1.3 ft. 7:28 PM 1.3 ft. 6:59 PM 1.3 ft. 7:28 PM 1.3 ft. 7:58 PM 1.4 ft. 8:29 PM L ow Thu Oct 25, 12 Fri Oct 26, 12 Sat Oct 27, 12 Sun Oct 28, 12 Mon Oct 29, 12 Tue Oct 30, 12 Wed Oct 31, 12 D ate 2.5 ft. 12:07 AM 2.6 ft. 12:42 AM 2.7 ft. 12:13 AM 2.8 ft. 12:42 AM 2.8 ft. 1:10 AM 2.8 ft. 1:37 AM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 6:03 AM 0.4 ft. 6:54 AM 0.2 ft. 7:36 AM 0.0 ft. 7:14 AM -0.1 ft. 7:49 AM -0.1 ft. 8:23 AM -0.1 ft. 8:56 AM L ow 2.4 ft. 12:12 PM 2.5 ft. 1:02 PM 2.6 ft. 1:43 PM 2.6 ft. 1:20 PM 2.6 ft. 1:55 PM 2.6 ft. 2:29 PM 2.6 ft. 3:03 PM Hi g h 0.8 ft. 6:26 PM 0.9 ft. 7:05 PM 0.9 ft. 7:39 PM 1.0 ft. 7:10 PM 1.0 ft. 7:39 PM 1.0 ft. 8:09 PM 1.0 ft. 8:40 PM L ow Thu Oct 25, 12 Fri Oct 26, 12 Sat Oct 27, 12 Sun Oct 28, 12 Mon Oct 29, 12 Tue Oct 30, 12 Wed Oct 31, 12 D ate 2.9 ft. 12:12 AM 3.1 ft. 12:51 AM 3.2 ft. 1:26 AM 3.4 ft. 12:57 AM 3.4 ft. 1:26 AM 3.5 ft. 1:54 AM 3.5 ft. 2:21 AM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 6:56 AM 0.5 ft. 7:47 AM 0.2 ft. 8:29 AM 0.0 ft. 8:07 AM -0.1 ft. 8:42 AM -0.1 ft. 9:16 AM -0.1 ft. 9:49 AM L ow 3.0 ft. 12:56 PM 3.1 ft. 1:46 PM 3.2 ft. 2:27 PM 3.3 ft. 2:04 PM 3.3 ft. 2:39 PM 3.3 ft. 3:13 PM 3.2 ft. 3:47 PM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 7:19 PM 1.1 ft. 7:58 PM 1.2 ft. 8:32 PM 1.2 ft. 8:03 PM 1.2 ft. 8:32 PM 1.2 ft. 9:02 PM 1.2 ft. 9:33 PM L ow Thu Oct 25, 12 Fri Oct 26, 12 Sat Oct 27, 12 Sun Oct 28, 12 Mon Oct 29, 12 Tue Oct 30, 12 Wed Oct 31, 12 D ate 2.7 ft. 12:34 AM 2.8 ft. 12:05 AM 2.9 ft. 12:34 AM 2.9 ft. 1:02 AM 2.9 ft. 1:29 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 5:31 AM 0.6 ft. 6:22 AM 0.3 ft. 7:04 AM 0.0 ft. 6:42 AM -0.1 ft. 7:17 AM -0.1 ft. 7:51 AM -0.1 ft. 8:24 AM L ow 2.5 ft. 12:04 PM 2.6 ft. 12:54 PM 2.7 ft. 1:35 PM 2.7 ft. 1:12 PM 2.7 ft. 1:47 PM 2.7 ft. 2:21 PM 2.7 ft. 2:55 PM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 5:54 PM 1.2 ft. 6:33 PM 1.2 ft. 7:07 PM 1.3 ft. 6:38 PM 1.3 ft. 7:07 PM 1.3 ft. 7:37 PM 1.3 ft. 8:08 PM L ow 2.6 ft. 11:59 PM Hi g h Thu Oct 25, 12 Fri Oct 26, 12 Sat Oct 27, 12 Sun Oct 28, 12 Mon Oct 29, 12 Tue Oct 30, 12 Wed Oct 31, 12 D ate 3.4 ft. 12:12 AM 3.6 ft. 12:47 AM 3.7 ft. 12:18 AM 3.8 ft. 12:47 AM 3.8 ft. 1:15 AM 3.8 ft. 1:42 AM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 5:49 AM 0.6 ft. 6:40 AM 0.3 ft. 7:22 AM 0.0 ft. 7:00 AM -0.1 ft. 7:35 AM -0.1 ft. 8:09 AM -0.1 ft. 8:42 AM L ow 3.3 ft. 12:17 PM 3.4 ft. 1:07 PM 3.5 ft. 1:48 PM 3.6 ft. 1:25 PM 3.6 ft. 2:00 PM 3.6 ft. 2:34 PM 3.5 ft. 3:08 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 6:12 PM 1.3 ft. 6:51 PM 1.4 ft. 7:25 PM 1.4 ft. 6:56 PM 1.4 ft. 7:25 PM 1.4 ft. 7:55 PM 1.5 ft. 8:26 PM L ow Thu Oct 25, 12 Fri Oct 26, 12 Sat Oct 27, 12 Sun Oct 28, 12 Mon Oct 29, 12 Tue Oct 30, 12 Wed Oct 31, 12 D ate 2.7 ft. 12:03 AM 2.8 ft. 12:23 AM 2.9 ft. 12:01 AM 3.0 ft. 12:23 AM 3.0 ft. 12:50 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 5:21 AM 0.6 ft. 6:11 AM 0.4 ft. 6:55 AM 0.2 ft. 6:35 AM 0.1 ft. 7:11 AM 0.0 ft. 7:44 AM -0.0 ft. 8:16 AM L ow 2.5 ft. 12:13 PM 2.6 ft. 1:27 PM 2.6 ft. 2:25 PM 2.7 ft. 2:15 PM 2.7 ft. 2:59 PM 2.7 ft. 3:39 PM 2.6 ft. 4:17 PM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 5:40 PM 1.3 ft. 6:20 PM 1.4 ft. 6:53 PM 1.6 ft. 6:22 PM 1.7 ft. 6:48 PM 1.8 ft. 7:13 PM 1.8 ft. 7:40 PM L ow Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacOct. 25 Oct. 31First Nov. 20 Full Oct. 29 Last Nov. 6 New Nov. 13Major Times 10:16 AM 12:16 PM 10:38 PM 12:38 AM Minor Times 3:56 AM 4:56 AM 4:27 PM 5:27 PM Major Times 11:00 AM 1:00 PM 11:22 PM 1:22 AM Minor Times 4:52 AM 5:52 AM 5:00 PM 6:00 PM Major Times --:---:-11:44 AM 1:44 PM Minor Times 5:47 AM 6:47 AM 5:34 PM 6:34 PM Major Times 12:06 AM 2:06 AM 12:29 PM 2:29 PM Minor Times 6:42 AM 7:42 AM 6:09 PM 7:09 PM Major Times 12:51 AM 2:51 AM 1:14 PM 3:14 PM Minor Times 7:36 AM 8:36 AM 6:46 PM 7:46 PM Major Times 1:37 AM 3:37 AM 2:00 PM 4:00 PM Minor Times 8:30 AM 9:30 AM 7:26 PM 8:26 PM Major Times 2:23 AM 4:23 AM 2:47 PM 4:47 PM Minor Times 9:23 AM 10:23 AM 8:08 PM 9:08 PM Average Good Better Better Best Best++++ Better7:46 am 6:55 pm 4:28 pm 3:57 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:47 am 6:54 pm 5:01 pm 4:53 am 7:47 am 6:53 pm 5:35 pm 5:48 am 6:48 am 5:52 pm 5:10 pm 5:43 am 6:49 am 5:52 pm 5:47 pm 6:37 am 6:50 am 5:51 pm 6:26 pm 7:31 am 6:50 am 5:50 pm 7:09 pm 8:24 am71% 78% 84% 90% 97% 97% 91% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Wakulla County Memorial Post,VFW POST 4538 Invites the public to enjoy a free pancake and sausage breakfast.Each year, we host a free breakfast as a thank you and to give back to the public for your support throughout the year.The breakfast will be held on Veterans Day, Sunday, November the 11th from 7:00am till 10:00am, at the VFW POST 4538 which is located 1 mile west of the County Court House at 475 Arran Rd, Crawfordville, FL. I LIKEMIKE STEWARTREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mike Stewart, Republican candidate for county commissioner, district 3

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com W g g g g g g W a k u l l a C o u n t y S e n i o r C i t i z e n s C e l e b r a t e L i f e Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life The Senior Center held a special appreciation program for the Board of Directors of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Council Inc. on Sept. 18. Board Members present were Peggy Mackin, chair; Susan Payne Turner, vice chair; Linda Boles, secretary-treasurer; Maurice Langston, chaplain; along with Ruby Allen, Beulah King, Virginia Moore, Cheryll Olah, James Taylor and Ruth Williams. The report on the boards service and accomplishments included the period beginning at the time they employed me as director. In 1997, the board had very limited funds and attempted to provide senior services within the funds provided by state and federal projects. The boards staff was located in the building that currently houses the Wakulla County Building Department behind the former Health Department on U.S. Highway 319. It was a struggle to raise funds required to match grants. The seniors dining area would seat about 22. Sometimes they sat in the hallways for lunch. The board and staff loved our seniors and knew that there were many in our community that were not served. The board knew that we needed a larger building in order to serve more seniors. They knew that we must raise funds well in excess of current funding to build a new facility. I failed at seeking state or federal funding for a new building but that did not slow our efforts. Our discussion of this need touched our community and they joined the effort to raise funding. Everywhere I visited businesses and their customers would ask about our new building. If I walked into the bank or grocery store, I would hear about our new center. Everyone became charged with the idea. The board and I worked hand-in-hand to make this dream a reality. The “ rst check was donated by an elderly couple who did not appear to be very wealthy. Their donation of $2,500 surprised me and their request to remain anonymous will always be honored. Several people donated from $50 to $100. I decided to approach the late Ruby Snyder. I planned to ask her for $1,000. When we met, she said I dont want to hear your request, Im giving you $3,000 and that is all I can give. I dont think she ever knew how pleased I was that day. A friend from the phone company brought a check for $5,000. He said he would try to get a check from the electric company. They sent a check for $10,000. The friend from the phone company was not pleased that the electric company had donated more. But he was happy for us. You can see that the need was so great that support grew fast. See, good news can also travel fast. The “ rst building obstacle was obtaining land for construction. Board member James Taylor suggested we contact St. Joe to ask for donated land. While I was trying to reach the appropriate person with St. Joe, the county administrator called and offered land in exchange for our old building. Our current Senior Center and Wakulla Trace Apartments are located on that property. Planning the design of the kitchen consumed more time than planning all other areas. Cooking lunch each day for the seniors was the most visible change in services. This could not have happened without the Board working through every step. Changes are regular. The band moved from the library to the Senior Center. We have constructed a pergola. We hatch butter” ies and grow a garden. We now offer yoga, pottery and many forms of art. We have added a generator, constructed a large storage building and a vehicle shelter. We have also added a playground for our Before/After School Program that serves all elementary schools in our county. The Wakulla County School System provides a life-long learning program that adds to the many activities. The Senior Citizens deserve everything we provide. History tells us that societies that do not care for their older population do not survive very long. The Senior Citizens “ nancial impact on Floridas economy is at the top of our “ nancial resources. It is second only to tourism. Our Board of Directors is made up of volunteers. They plan, implement and evaluate all senior services. The Board Appreciation Program was designed to recognize them for all they do for our seniors. Volunteers are not paid NOT because they are worthless, but because they are PRICELESS. The program concluded as each Member was presented a Certi“ cate of AppreciationŽ and comments were made about each members contributions to Senior Services.R.H. Carter is executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center.Appreciation for our Board R.H. Carter Wakulla County Senior Center By MICHELLE HUNTER September was still hot with a lot of rain, but fall is coming. The month started with Labor Day, where the seniors and staff dressed up in the attire they used to wear to work, or brought in pictures of themselves dressed up in uniforms they no longer have, but remember the days. Steve, one of our bus drivers, dressed up in an of“ cial chauffeur uniform, and the seniors on his bus felt very privileged to ride with him. On Monday the seniors start their week doing yoga with Tamara, and a form of chair yoga and stretching with Cynthia, to get moving. They dance on Tuesdays and Fridays with the Pickin and Grinnin Band, and join in on Brain Gym with Elaine on Wednesday. Just Keep MovingŽ is something we encourage here at the Senior Center The center also encourages stimulating the mind and the soul with other activities such as gospel music once a month performed by Charlie and Joan Smith, and others who join in. We were privileged to have Terri Humpfrey volunteer to teach a class on greeting card making. Haydee Jackley and Nancy Jefferson, two HAWC artists, volunteered their time, to instruct the seniors on how to create and paint bowls, which will be used for the Empty Bowls Project coming up on Nov. 3 at Hudson Park. A WCSC Board Appreciation Day was held on Sept. 18, where the seniors were introduced to the board members and learned a little more about each of them. The health and well-being of our seniors is of great concern to the center, so providing health topics and education is something we all bene“ t from. A lecture on congestive heart failure was presented by Lisa Hamilton, RN, with great participation and questions. Sept. 22-28 was Fall Prevention Week. No, we were not trying to prevent the fall season from coming, because we sure are looking forward to the cooler weather. Education on how to prevent falls and injury was provided throughout the week. Topics such as Medication Safety, Strengthening Exercises for balance and Home Safety, were covered by either a lecture or discussing handouts, and word search puzzles, which are some favorite things to do. Medication Safety was presented by Sarah Rodes from Area Agency on Aging. She played games to check what was learned, and gave them containers to senior to organize their medications. September was also Alzheimers Awareness Month. The staff and seniors all wore purple to recognize and support those with Alzheimers disease. We are currently looking for a volunteer to assist the seniors with computer instructions. Please call the center for more information 926-7145.Seniors enjoy Labor Day, yoga, music, crafts and more PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSeniors learn to create and paint bowls for the Empty Bowls project. Making greeting cards with Terri Humpfrey. V V o t e Ralph Thomas for COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 I believe, it’s time to return to Government of the people, by the people, and for the people. it’s time to put the concept of “service” back into public service. people are tired of typical politicians and it’s time for us to elect leaders who think like us and act like us. it’s time for our Government to understand the toll this economy has taken on nearly every household. Since you didn’t cause the problem, you shouldn’t be required to carry the burden of solving the problem, by paying more taxes. during times of limited income, we have to separate our “needs” from our “wants”. It’s time for Government to learn this lesson. it’s time to decrease our debt while increasing our emergency reserves. it’s time for us to stand up for individual freedom and liberty. It’s Poli cal adver sement, paid for and approved by Ralph Thomas, Republican, for County Commission District 1 GET TO A BETTER STATE.’ CALL ME TODAY. 1103208 12/11Get a Free Discount Double Check.’ I can help you save like a champion, with discounts that could add up to XX%* and be worth hundreds of dollars. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, State Farm Indemnity Company, Bloomington, IL *Discounts may vary by state. Aaron Rodgers got his. How about you? 40% *Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 13ABy R.H. CARTERThe Wakulla County Senior Center is always seeking funds for senior services. You seem to always be there to give to this cause. On Sept. 28, we presented A Tribute to Patsy Cline.Ž Margo Anderson and her band presented wonderful music for the audience to enjoy, and they did. About 200 attended this most successful event. To add to the “ nancial success of this event, several sponsorships were provided by our community. The sponsors were In Memory of Betty Arban, Air-Con, Anytime Electric Inc., Associated Services & Supplies, Inc., Capital City Bank, Jason Winn P.A., Metal Building Services, Progress Energy and Total Homecare Solutions. The Senior Center is providing a Free Countywide Thanksgiving Dinner on Nov. 20 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. You are invited to support this event by joining us for dinner. Also, contribution in advance to support this event will be welcome. The Fund Raising Committee is planning a Mystery TheaterŽ dinner in Feb. 2013. The Wakulla High School Drama Department, directed by Susan Solburg, has been preparing for this event since last school year. The Board of Directors is developing potential fundraising activities for 2013. To participate or become an active member of our fundraising committee. If interested call 926-7145 ext. 221. Patsy Cline fundraiser is held Margo Anderson performs as Patsy Cline.About 200 people attend the Patsy Cline concert. Coming up: The free countywide anksgiving Dinner on Nov. 20. Lynn Artz Wakulla County needs a Commissioner like Emily … smart and kind-hearted, yet strong enough to say NoŽ to special interests. Emily will treat people with respect, offer new ideas, and stand up for the common good.Ž Sue Damon Emily will be a full-time commissioner who will work hard to help Wakulla County grow in an impartial, responsible way.Ž Rick Ott & Nelle McCall Emily has unmatched integrity and unwaveringly supports local businesses.Ž Katherine Gilbert Emily has the heart, spirit, and understanding that it will take to protect our springs, rivers, bays, wetlands, and our drinking water for the bene“t of all … and generations to come.Ž Brandy Cowley-Gilbert & Ted Gilbert Emilys work experience in green business and industry will help her attract sustainable businesses to our County.Ž Robert Seidler Emily represents the next generation of leaders in this County. A young, intelligent female Commissioner will inspire and provide an excellent role model for others.Ž The Fortier Family Emily brings a fresh perspective to our community and will bring creative solutions to bene“t us and our children in the future.Ž Jim Hilyer and Chase Emily cares about kids „ and supports a community center with a pool, playground, and more!Ž Judith Harriss With Emily as your commissioner, your input will be sought, valued, and carefully considered … and you will know that complex decisions are being made with the greatest of care.Ž Sandy Tedder Emily will listen to the needs of citizens and make informed decisions for smart growth and protection of our resources.Ž Glen Campbell Emily wants to serve her community (not beŽ a Commissioner). She will study issues and make wise, not selfserving, decisions.Ž Diane Roberts Emily knows that Wakulla Countys future isnt strip malls and big box stores, but sustainable growth, eco-tourism, and green jobs. Shes not beholden to anyone, just to the place she loves.Ž www.mikestewart2012.comPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MIKE STEWART, REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3 facebook.com/ mike.stewart.3363 I LIKEMIKEREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 C CommitmentRaised in Wakulla County learning the value of a strong work ethic and developing a desire to serve others. As I traveled throughout the world during my 20 years in the Navy, I knew that Wakulla was my home and where I wanted to return. My desire is to see our great county grow in a responsible manner all the while preserving those qualities we value as a small rural county. Married to the former Anne Quick for 39 years.Service Oriented years. Character unpopular. qualities such as honesty and integrity. that face the board. hank ou for your upport!

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On Oct. 13, a 33-year-old female victim reported being taken from a Crawfordville fast food restaurant against her will. The victim was observed on the asphalt of U.S. Highway 319 near the restaurant after falling out of the vehicle. Witnesses also observed the victim being held by the throat inside the vehicle and heard her yelling for help. The suspect, Lucas Dominic Degennaro, 32, of Crawfordville, was arrested at the scene and charged with battery and false imprisonment. Wakulla EMS assisted the victim at the scene but she refused to be transported to a Tallahassee hospital. Deputy Ward Kromer and Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce this week: OCTOBER 11 € Lisa Shields of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief at the County Line Bar. Someone stole a decal from the victims license plate and ” attened a tire. The vehicle tire damage was estimated at $150 and the theft of the vehicle decal was valued at $75. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € James Godwin of Panacea reported a residential burglary to a bank owned home in Crawfordville. A forced entry was observed and there was widespread damage inside the home. Damage to the home was estimated at $15,000. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. OCTOBER 12 € Henry Eggers of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of $265 worth of cash from inside his home. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € Shelly Powell reported recovering a bicycle at a Crawfordville of“ ce building. The bicycle was abandoned at the of“ ce on Crawfordville Highway and was valued at $150. The bike was entered into the FCIC/NCIC data base and information linked the bike to a theft in Cleveland. The owner of the bike was identi“ ed. It was reported stolen on April 25, 2012. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € Patrecia Harvey of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone cut an electrical line which provides water to the home. In addition, vehicle batteries, car radiators, electrical wire, a wheelchair, wooden chair and faucet, valued at $1,350, were reported missing from a storage area. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € An employee at Dux Discount Liquors reported a retail theft as a suspect walked out of the store without paying for a bottle of gin. The liquor was valued at $19. The suspect returned the liquor to the store when confronted by an employee. Evidence was collected at the scene. Reserve Deputy Roy Gunnarsson and Deputy Clint Beam investigated. OCTOBER 13 € Elvis Tyndall of St. Marks reported a traffic crash and hit-and-run. The victim parked his vehicle in St. Marks and an unknown vehicle struck it. Damage was observed on the scene. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € Stanley West of Riverside Caf reported a criminal mischief. A suspect, who has been identi“ ed, cut a telephone line and shut off the water at the business. Damage was estimated at $100. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. OCTOBER 14 € Hubertus Weijers of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash and hit-and-run. Someone damaged the entrance gate of Hunters Trace in Crawfordville. Evidence was collected at the scene and damage to the gate was estimated at $1,500. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € Raymond Spohn of Crawfordville and Stone Creek Pizza reported a business burglary. A forced entry was observed and a small amount of cash was taken from the establishment. Evidence was collected at the scene and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Mike Zimba, Detective Matt Helms and Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated. € Thomas Jones of Crawfordville reported a vehicle “ re. Deputy Billy Metcalf responded to the scene and discovered a tractor fully engulfed in ” ames. The victim was burning materials on his property when a tree branch came into the cab of the tractor and got stuck on the forward pedal causing the tractor to continue forward into the burn pile. The victim was unable to loosen the branch due to it being jammed from the brush pile. He was forced to jump from the tractor when ” ames came in toward the seat area. The tractor, valued at $20,200, was a total loss. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell and Detective Matt Helms also investigated. € Zelda Barron of Crawfordville reported the theft of checkbooks following a burglary. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Horace Privett of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief as someone used a vehicle to damage his yard. A small truck was observed spinning in circles on the victims property. Damage was estimated at $200. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Eddy Mims of Panacea reported a criminal mischief at Mashes Sands Beach. Someone burned the contents of a trash can. Damage was estimated at $25. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Charlene Rogers of Panacea reported a vehicle fire. The victim noticed the vehicle full of smoke at her home. The victims spouse removed items from the trunk to keep the “ re from spreading. Fire“ ghters determined that the “ re originated from a jump box in the trunk. Tools and other miscellaneous items sustained damage in the trunk. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. OCTOBER 15 € Lauren Sweatt of Wakulla Middle School reported that someone stole her cellular telephone from her classroom. Deputy Carl Allen and WMS Assistant Principal Tolar Grif“ n collected evidence that linked a 12-year-old sixth grader at WMS. The juveniles mother was notified and Deputy Allen recovered the stolen telephone. The student text messaged 338 times over an approximately nine hour time period. The juvenile was issued a civil citation and assigned 24 hours of community service. OCTOBER 16 € Theodore W. Lowrie of Sopchoppy reported a theft of a mosquito repelling device, valued at $500. Suspects have been identi“ ed. Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. € Reuben Randolph of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A pressure washer and hedger, valued at $400, were reported missing from the victims shed. Sgt. Andy Curles investigated. € Cardale Stelly of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim stated that someone broke into his home and stole a large sum of cash. A forced entry was observed. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € Jeffrey Crutch“ eld of Tallahassee reported the theft of copper wire from a Crawfordville home. Approximately 60 feet of copper wire was stripped from the breaker box, attic and meter box. The wire is valued at $400. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. OCTOBER 17 € Amanda Davis of Panacea reported a residential burglary. The victim lost clothing, medications and ” owers from her residence. The total loss is estimated at $40. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. € Stewart Ducey of Panacea reported a credit card offense. Four unauthorized internet charges were discovered on the victims bank account which totaled $150. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € Deanna Powell of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from her home. The bike is valued at $150. Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. € Tamisha Edna Harris, 30, of Tallahassee was issued a traffic ticket for an obscured tag after law enforcement conducted a traf“ c stop on U.S. Highway 319 near C.J. Spears Road. Wal-Mart officials contacted law enforcement about three suspicious subjects in the store filling shopping carts with merchandise. The three women left the store without the shopping carts. The traf“ c stop was initiated after Deputy Clint Beam and Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Tallman caught up to the suspicious vehicle. The deputy and trooper observed Harris license tag with paper covering all but two characters. Wal-Mart has not reported anything missing from the store as a result of the suspicious incident complaint. OCTOBER 18 € Reserve Deputy Jerold Finney reported an animal complaint in the Summerwood Drive area of Crawfordville. Two dogs charged the deputys patrol vehicle as he passed a residence. A victim on the road was previously attacked by one of the dogs. The victims injuries were minor. The incident was turned over to Animal Control Of“ cer Bonnie Brinson. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,038 calls for service during the past week including 13 residential and business alarms; 54 investigations; 10 juvenile problems; 38 medical emergencies; 36 traf“ c enforcements; 83 traffic stops; 13 reckless vehicles; and 11 wanted people. Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report HowardKessler.com 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 14,214,813 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ Where Does United WayŽ Money Go?$93,580 went to Alan Brock for consulting in 07-09. Is this the income he said he failed to report, resulting in being put on a Pay-Back PlanŽ? Waste Pro gave $1,000 to Alans Campaign. Should he have abstained on the Trash vote? He Pays No Property Taxes, Do you want him in charge of your Tax Dollars?Say, NoŽ to Commissioner Alan Brock, Dist. 1Even though he has a likeable, bubbly personality.Paid political advertisement paid for by Donna Sanford, P.O. Box 1478, Crawfordville, FL.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 15AContinued from Page 1A Beshears said the government is lacking common sense and a business approach and he would bring that to the legislature. I understand the value of a dollar,Ž he said. SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS RACE The other race on the agenda was for superintendent of schools, with candidates Bobby Pearce and Kimball Thomas. The candidates were asked what their top priority would be after taking of“ ce and their responses differed. Pearce said he would focus on maintaining the excellenceŽ that is currently in place, while also meeting the challenges and mandates that are coming from the state and federal levels. Hard work is whats going to keep our system on track,Ž he said. Thomas said he would make sure the transition was a smooth one and that teachers, staff, administrators, students and the public are comfortable. He would hold public forums to keep the public informed and involve all the stakeholders in the community. The candidates were also asked what area needs the most improvement in the schools. Thomas felt it was closing the achievement gap and also paying teachers and staff what they are worth. The district has to look at more than FCAT scores and get children interested in school. There also needs to be some focus on those students who are scoring a one and two on the FCAT and those who come to the high school as at-risk, he said. Pearce felt the district needed to focus on high school students and offer guidance. He added that the high school needs to expand its individual certi“ cation and dual enrollment programs. The schools must educate the whole child and begin at an early age and connect with the students, he added. Candidates were asked how schools can address the impact of drugs and alcohol. Pearce said the schools need to continue to have a relationship with the sheriffs office and have the Students Against Violence Everywhere program stay in place. He added that schools need to educate parents and then do what they can to be diligent, work hard and be watchful. Education is the key, he said. Its got to start at home.Ž Thomas said education should start with the students. Then there should be a way for students to report incidents anonymously. Schools should educate the students, teach them how to talk about issues and then get the parents involved, he said. He added that students need to know what is expected of them and that there is a zero-tolerance policy. In closing statements, Pearce urged those in attendance to educate themselves on the candidates. You need to know the character of the individual,Ž Pearce said. He added, The past is a predictor of the future.Ž It appeared to be a reference to Thomas and his past. In response, Thomas said, people would be voting for someone who is not perfect and has made mistakes.Ž He added that he has the passion and love for students and wants to go beyond where the school district is currently. I will not be satisfied until we are No. 1 (in the state),Ž he said. The next bi-partisan forum is scheduled for Oct. 25 at 6:30 p.m. at the community center. This forum is for the sheriff and property appraiser races.Forum features House, superintendent candidates PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENBobby Pearce, left, listens as Kimball Thomas, right, answers a question. JOHN SHUFF JOHN SHUFF Sustainable Growth = JOBS Sustainable Growth = JOBS Long Term Planning = Ef“cient Spending Long Term Planning = Ef“cient Spending JOHN SHUFF JOHN SHUFF ELECT ELECT Political advertisement paid for and approved by John Shuff, Democrat, for County Commission District 5. FOR COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 5 FOR COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 5 www.ShuffForWakulla .com www.ShuffForWakulla .com PLEASE RE-ELECT OUR “PAP” Donnie Sparkman WAKULLA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERHe Is: Knowledgeable Honest Dedicated to the people of Wakulla County with 42 years of experience Certi ed Florida Appraiser Experienced Land Surveyor (and He Loves US! Brigs, Walker & Reese) Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, for Property Appraiser The race for State Attorney will be near the top of this years November ballot. Pete Williams is a Tallahassee attorney who is challenging 28 year incumbent Willie Meggs. Williams quali“ed for the position last April, stating that it was time for the voters to have a choice and a change.Ž Williams educational background includes a BA in Economics from Yale University, a MBA from Stanford University and a law degree from the University of Florida. He has over 20 years of service to the State of Florida, working “rst as an Assistant State Attorney, where he handled thousands of violent crimes and tried over 100 jury trials. He then served as Assistant Attorney General, Director of the Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco, and Inspector General for both the Agency for Health Care Administration and the Department of Education. In January 2003, Pete was appointed by then Attorney General Charlie Crist to a four year term as Floridas Statewide Prosecutor. He was based in Tallahassee and supervised 40 Assistant Statewide Prosecutors located in eight of“ces across the state, with an annual budget of $6 million. The Of“ce of Statewide Prosecution was charged with investigating and prosecuting organized criminal activity such as drug traf“cking, government fraud, internet crimes against children and public corruption, and achieved conviction rates of over 95%. Williams is running to reinvigorate the Of“ce of State Attorney. His platform includes resolving cases more quickly, supporting and partnering with law enforcement to achieve a more ef“cient use of prosecutorial resources, more active recruitment and training of young prosecutors, and increased use of new, innovative and cost-effective rehabilitative sentencing programs to help offenders become productive members of society. He believes the current State Attorney has been slow to bring the State Attorneys Of“ce into thea electronic age, and that the main of“ce in Tallahassee suffers from low morale and high turnover among the young prosecutors. All the good, senior prosecutors have retired and the new ones are leaving because they say it is no longer fun to work there,Ž said Williams. Our current State Attorney has done some good things in the past, but the last four years have been marked by too many controversial cases involving special favors, the botched prosecution of the Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives, Ray Sansom, and the sudden retirement for 30 days that was done for no other reason than to allow Mr. Meggs to collect both his regular $150,000 annual salary and another $100,000 a year in retirement pay.Ž Williams added. We should ask our elected leaders to set better examples and act like they are accountable to the voters. I pledge fair and equal justice and I am working hard for your voteŽ Williams is married with four children, three of whom attend Roberts Elementary School in northeast Tallahassee. He has been endorsed by the NRA and the PBA. Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Pete Williams, Republican, for State Attorney, 2 nd Judicial Circuit.ADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENT Pete Williams

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Autumn is the time for enjoying Wakulla Countys great outdoors. There is boating, cycling, hiking, hunting and numerous other leisure time ways to relish the pleasant bene“ ts of nature. It is easy to forget that not all nature has to offer is an enjoyable experience. One consideration before tromping off into unfamiliar woods and other wild terrain is to get familiar with some of the more common poisonous plants. A little knowledge can save hours or days of the uncomfortable after-effects of coming in contact with poisonous plants. Avoiding this unpleasant experience will save money, too. Topical treatments and, in extreme cases, doctors visits will dent the household budget. Poisonous plants can be divided into two groups those which cause skin irritation, and those which cause internal distress, and in rare cases, even death. These plants are found not only in natural settings, they occur almost everywhere soil is exposed to the sun in Wakulla County. Many factors in” uence the toxic nature of a particular plant. The problem substance can be dispersed throughout the plant, or localized in a particular plant part, such as in roots, berries, or seeds. The amount of poison in a plant may vary, even among plants of the same species depending on the time of year, the weather conditions, and the soil. Reactions vary among people coming in contact with a harmful plant. The health and age of the person, and the quantity of the substance contacted will in” uence the symptoms. Poison ivy is a commonly encountered vine which causes an itchy rash. It is often intermingled with Virginia Creeper, a vine with many look-alike features, but no negative side effects. The one constant identifying feature of poison ivy is the leaves always come in threes, with two of them directly opposite each other. Creeper has a cluster “ ve leaves. Neither vine has thorns, unlike blackberries or dewberries which have a three leaf cluster on their canes. Poison ivy will grow in full shade climbing into trees, over fences, and up the side of walls. In the full sun of open “ elds it appears as a shrub. Like creeper, poison ivy has a variety of leaf shapes. Sometime creeper will have a cluster of three leaves on a vine, but “ veleaf clusters will be on the same vine. In autumn both creeper and poison ivy turn cherry red, but there is a slight tint difference between the two. A trained eye can make the distinction between the two shades of color. Poison oak usually appears as a low growing shrub. The slender, upright branches bear lea” et which resemble oak leaves. They also grow in threes, just like poison ivy. The undersides of the leaves commonly are lighter in color because theyre covered with fine hair-like structures. Poison sumac is a coarse woody shrub or small tree. It never grows in the vinelike fashion of poison ivy. It frequently grows near swamps and wetlands, and ranges in height from “ ve or six feet to twenty“ ve feet. Its leaves are divided into seven to thirteen leaflets which grow in pairs. At the end of each stem is a single lea” et. In the spring, leaves are bright orange and velvety in texture. In the summer they become dark green and glossy, with lower leaves a pale green in color. In autumn the leaves take on a russet brown color. To learn more about local poisonous plants, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Office at 850926-3931 or http://wakulla. ifas.u” .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” edu or at (850) 926-3931. Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison Get familiar with common poisonous plants PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSVirginia Creeper vines, above, show the typical three to “ ve leaf cluster. Creeper isnt poisonous but is often intermingled with poison ivy, here in a tree at right, leaves always come in threes, with two of them directly opposite each other. Please Recycle It's time for Wakulla's next chapter Vote for Jim Parham It is all about fairness. The citizens of Wakulla do not mind paying their fair share; they just do not want to pay someone else's. Put "fair" back into fair market value! Qualifications: Achieved highest levels in the appraisal profession (MAI & SRA) Experience: Appraised property over 38 year career in 35 counties of Florida and in North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama and the Caribbean Independent: No Party Affiliation (NPA);Tied to no political party Established recent residency; Uncompromised; Funding own campaign If Wakulla is to become greater it would be good to hire a property appraiser who has worked in and understands the dynamics of greater markets "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www.FairValuesInWakulla.com Paid b y Jim Parham No Part y Affiliation for Pro p ert y A pp raiser IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GET READY FOR HUNTING At HealthSouth, we understand that recovering from a stroke can be challenging. But no matter where a patient is in his/her recovery process, or how long ago the stroke occurred, our Second Chance Stroke Program could help maximize functional ability, increase independence and improve quality of life. This includes areas of mobility, speech or written communication, swallowing, cognitive functions and activities of daily living. Our program oers: € Physical/occupational/speech therapy € Certi“ed rehabilitation nurses € Therapist trained in neuro developmental treatment € Patient/family education € Support groups Admission is by referral for a free in-home evaluation. For more information contact us. YOU DESERVE A SECOND CHANCE 2012:HealthSouth Corporation:551344

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netFriday night was the “ rst time the Wakulla War Eagles went into Live Oak and beat the Suwannee County at their home “ eld, and only the second time Wakulla had beaten the Bulldogs. The War Eagles offense looked strong … generating 500 yards of total offense in the 37-14 win. It improved Wakulla to 7-0 overall and 2-0 in the district, and guaranteed the War Eagles a spot in the district playoffs. Im proud of our kids,Ž Head Coach Scott Klees said after the win. Its the “ rst time weve beaten them over there. Ever.Ž Coming off an open week, the War Eagles got a chance to heal. Running back Demetrius Lindsey, still dinged up with turf toe and unable to practice last week, played extremely, extremely well,Ž Klees said. He got to sit out for a week … that really helped him.Ž Against the Bulldogs, Lindsey had four rushes for 83 yards and a touchdown on the ground, and four catches for 72 yards and a touchdown through the air. Lindseys catch in the back of the end zone was just determination: the pass looked certain to be intercepted with the defender between Lindsey and the ball … but Lindsey went over the top of the defender and took the ball away for the catch. Freshman receiver Keith Gavin also had a good game with four catches for 96 yards. Quarterbacks Caleb Stephens and Feleipe Franks, splitting playing time, both had 116 yards passing. The War Eagle offense was pretty balanced with 296 yards rushing and 232 yards through the air. On defense, cornerback Brandon Nichols continued playing a shut-down corner, with Dalton Nichols also playing well on the other side. Both corners are playing extremely well,Ž Klees said. Besides a couple of scores by the Bulldogs on wide receiver screens, the War Eagle defense was swarming and hitting hard … and included scoring a safety. The only hitch in the War Eagle game, and it has been an ongoing problem, is penalties. Weve had more than 100 yards in penalties in every game except one,Ž Klees said. The coach sounded mystified about what to do about it, especially about the offensive holding calls that frequently seem to stymy some drives. HOMECOMING GAME This week marks the War Eagle Homecoming against Trinity Christian from Deltona. The game starts at 6 p.m. rather than 7:30 p.m. because of Trinitys travel. Their quarterback will probably be the best athlete we have played up to this point,Ž Klees said. Trinity is 5-2 and ranked 9th in the state in their class. It should be a good game,Ž he said. Theyre very athletic, very big.Ž But Trinity is a smaller school with perhaps 30 players, and its expected that the War Eagles will wear down Trinity. SUWANNEE RECAP Both teams struggled to “ nd their rhythm early in the “ rst quarter. With 5 minutes left in the “ rst, the War Eagles recovered a Bulldog fumble at the 35. Continued on Page 6B THIS WEEK: The War Eagles play Trinity Christian on Friday, Oct. 26, at 6 p.m. Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 sports news and team views SportsWar Eagles stay perfect Wakulla remains undefeated with 37-14 trouncing of Suwannee Cross Country: Teams compete at Panhandle Championships Sports, Page 2BTRICK OR TREATPage 15B Riversprings-WMS in shootout for county championship Sports, Page 4B WILLIAM SNOWDENRunning back Sheldon Johnson streaks down the sideline for a big gain. Firefighter’s BBQ Competition and Charity Fundraiser. Fire Equipment on display, Air Methods will have a helicop ter on display! Bouncy House for the kids! SMOKE AND FIRE We Support the Children’s Burn Camp Camp Amigo www.campamigo.com& Firefighter Scholarship FundsSERVING FOOD AT 11AM JUDGING STARTS AT 11:45AMJUDGES: Superintendent of Schools David Miller, Sheriff Donnie Crum, Wakulla News Editor William Snowden, Wakulla Area Times Guinn Haskins, Tax Collector Cheryl Olah, Medart Assembly of God Reverend Jeff McFalls, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church Father Ed Jones, Wakulla Chamber of Commerce Petra Shuff & one suprise judge.5K REGISTRATION FOR FAMILY RUN/WALK AT 8AM. RUN STARTS AT 9AM. You may pre-register at Anytime Fitness in Crawfordville or register the morning of the event at the Rainbow International booth located on the North end of Hudson Park. NEW!! DUNKING BOOTH 12:30Candidates that have volunteered to be in our dunking booth will be called. Any candidate that has volunteered to be in the booth can escape that by giving a $100 donation to our charities. We really don’t want wet candidates, what we really want is money for our charities. Saturday, Oct 27 • 11am 4pm Hudson Park, Crawfordville Chicken $6, Choice of two meats $7, Chicken, Pulled Pork & Ribs $8 (Served with Slaw, baked beans and roll)Lunch Plate prices: Third AnnualThank you to our Sponsors! Call Us for Your Free In-Home Estimate!FLOORING Bevis Funeral Home & CrematoryHarvey-Young Chapel MAURICE LANGSTON HALSEYBESHEARS Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator

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By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachOn Saturday, Oct. 20, the local cross country teams traveled to Marianna to compete in the large and extremely competitive Panhandle Championships. The local harriers joined runners from 30 high school teams, from all classifications, including many of the best schools from around the Big Bend, as they tested the newly revised course. The changes didnt seem to have any signi“ cant effect on the runners, as many top times and personal records (PRs) were recorded. BOYS TEAM Once again, junior Aaron Smith led the charge for the WHS boys, “ nishing in 44th place, in a new PR of 17:25. Also, dipping under the 18:00 minute barrier was sophomore J.P. Piotrowski who ran a new PR in “ nishing in 17:56. The remainder of the top 7 for the boys team, which also ran new PRs, included Travis Parks (18:14), Lane Williams (18:41), Ryan Dodson (18:54), Alan Pearson (18:57) and Albert Smythe (19:00). Other WHS runners who set new PRs on Saturday included Gabe Hutchins (19:26), Nathan Green (19:58), Jimmy French (20:40), Justin Milhon (21:18), Gil Damon (22:19), Justin Goates (22:31), Riley Carrier (22:55), Evan Guarino (23:22), Toby Jordon (23:36) and Riley Welch (24:32). Overall, the boys team claimed 11th place out of 23 full teams. GIRLS TEAM The girls varsity team also faced most of the best teams the Big Bend and Panhandle areas had to offer, including state powerhouses Chiles, Maclay, West Florida Tech, Fort Walton, Niceville and Leon. After the scores were tallied, the local girls “ nished in 9th place out of 17 teams. Junior Marty Wiedeman was the “ rst local “ nisher in the excellent time of 20:38. She “ nished in 23rd place and was also recognized individually for “ nishing in the top 30. Senior Raychel Gray continued her streak of good “ nishes and was once again the teams second “ nisher, running 21:50. Sophomore Lydia Wiedeman sprinted in to finish as the third local runner (22:09), with sophomore Kasey James in close pursuit (22:21). Lilian-na Broadway sophomore, rounded out the scoring by “ nishing as the teams “ fth runner (23:13). Freshman Connie Lewis also ran well, “ nishing in a new PR and running a ŽvarsityŽ qualifying time of 24:27. Other girls setting PRs for the local squad, included Ava Shaw (28:43) and Shelby Shiver (32:35). Riversprings Middle School runner Bryce Cole had another outstanding run, “ nishing second overall in the Middle School 2 Mile Race and clocked a state elite time of 11:57 in the process. The next meet will be this Saturday, Oct. 27, at Maclay High School in Tallahassee. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant – AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerEl Jalisco – Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans – Grilled Chicken Pita with side Hamaknockers – Flatbread HoagiePulled Pork or Chicken Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. € 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99 Mixed Tues. & urs. Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under 926-4329 mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza 9264329 9 2 6 4 3 29 2 9 Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.com Open 7 Days Open 7 Days 926-7530 Restaurant 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville Come in for selected catch each week Seafood Fridays Seafood Fridays Lunch & Dinner at OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Win One Meal from Every Restaurant! E A T I N ’ p a t h … EATIN’ path… O F F OFF t h e the EATIN’ path…OFF the Winner Paula Kilgoredrawn from Coastal Restaurant in PanaceaCROSS COUNTRYTeams compete at the Panhandle Championships 850 926-4737 1 Block South of the Courthouse 850 926-4737 1 Block South of the Courthouse The Great BBQ Discount Card! The Great BBQ Discount Card!Menu & Specials Menu & Specials Re-charge Re-charge Visit us on facebook for Menu & Specials Visit us on facebook for Menu & Specials RIBS – PULLED PORK – CHICKEN RIBS – PULLED PORK – CHICKEN Family Pack Special Family Pack SpecialGET UP TO 20%OFFWITH OUR DISCOUNT & GIFT CARD GET UP TO 20 % OFF WITH OUR DISCOUNT & GIFT CARDTHATS UP TO THATS UP TO PLUS 10% OFF Through November PLUS 10% OFF Through November30%OFF 30 % OFF BRING IN THIS AD BRING IN THIS AD Favored treatment for others Means higher taxes for you! The county budget remains the same, regardless. A portion of the taxes of the "favored" just shifts to you! It is all about fairness. The citizens of Wakulla do not mind paying their fair share; they just do not want to pay someone else's. Put "fair" back into fair market value! Please help me with your vote "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www.FairValuesInWakulla.com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 3B Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Oct. 25  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Oct. 26  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Oct. 27  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Oct. 28  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Oct. 29  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Oct. 30  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant. Wednesday, Oct. 31  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Nov. 1  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsThursday, Oct. 25  CANDLE LIGHT VIGIL will be held by the Narcotics Overdose, Prevention and Education Task Force beginning at 6 p.m. at Hudson Park with a reception. The vigil will begin at 6:30 p.m. Contact Sylvia Hubbard at sylviahubbard@ hotmail.com for more information.  CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for ReNu U Rejuvenation Spa will be held at 4 p.m. at the Chamber of ce, 23 High Drive, Crawfordville.  AREA AGENCY ON AGING for North Florida will hold its Board of Directors and Advisory Council meetings beginning at 10 a.m. at the Area Agency on Aging for North Florida Inc., 2414 Mahan Drive, Tallahassee. The meeting is open to the public. Friday, Oct. 26  ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held by Big Bend Hospice at Wildwood Golf Course. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m., lunch following. Tee-off will begin at 12:30 p.m. For more information call Pam Allbritton 9269308.  FISH FRY FUNDRAISER for The Heritage Village Park and the Wakulla County Historical Society will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. at at Hudson Park. The menu will include mullet, hushpuppies, slaw, choice of potato salad or baked beans and ice tea. Prices are $8 or two for $15. To volunteer in the serving line or prepare sides of potato salad, baked beans or ice tea call Murray McLaughlin at 926-3027.  WHS HOMECOMING AND GAME will be held at 6 p.m. at JD Jones Stadium at Reynolds Field at the high school. Saturday, Oct. 27  THIRD ANNUAL SMOKE AND FIRE BARBECUE COOK-OFF CONTEST will be held at Hudson Park in downtown Crawfordville from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. This event will include re department and law enforcement teams from around the Big Bend area; live music, games for the kids, live demonstrations, assorted re and safety equipment display. The proceeds from this contest will be used to support Camp Amigo, a week long camp for children that have suffered crippling or dis guring burns, the Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund, and to furnish scholarships to local men and women pursuing Fire ghter and Emergency Medical careers. For sponsorships, call Bill Russell at 9840148, or Dan Hinchee at 850-545-2154.  MONARCH BUTTERFLY FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Events will include Monarch tagging demonstrations, a live butter y garden, talks, “people tagging,” crafts, exhibits and gifts for purchase. Tours will be held behind the gates all day. The St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center and Nature’s Classroom/Exhibits and Nature Store is located at 1255 Lighthouse Rd. in St. Marks. Call 850-925-6121 for visit www.fws.gov/saintmarks for more information.  CHELSEA DIX KESSLER AND RED BARNES will perform a mix of country covers, old time and popular standards at 8 p.m. at Posh Java in Sopchoppy. Dix Kessler plays a ddle and her vocals command a strong presence on the stage. Barnes, on the guitar and vocals, adds the perfect blend to the duo. For reservations, contact Posh Java at poshjava@gmail.com or phone (850) 962-1010. Tickets are $10. Posh Java is located on the corner of Rose Street and Winthrop Avenue in downtown Sopchoppy.  THIRD ANNUAL COMMUNITY FALL FESTIVAL will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Spirit Life Church in Sopchoppy. There will be games for children and relay races, pumpkin carving, face painting and storytelling. Skits and live music will be performed by youth from various churches throughout the evening on a outdoor stage. There will be a chili supper and hay ride. The event is free of charge. Sunday, Oct. 28  CHAT-OBERFEST will be held at 1 p.m. at CHAT Adoption Center, 1 Oak St., Crawfordville. There will be a pet costume contest, cook-out and icecream. Cost is $5 per entry in the contest. Visit chatofwakulla.org for more information. Saturday, Nov. 3  SECOND ANNUAL WAKULLA FRIENDS OF SCOUTING FUN SHOOT will be held at the WCSO Shooting Range from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine. A $5 per person entry fee will let you shoot pistols and ri es. There will be various prizes for the best shots. There will be a sporting clays competition, a competitive plate shooting event, shooting demonstrations, gun safety instruction, and a chance drawing for great prizes. This event is open to Boys, Girls, Men and Women of all ages who can shoot safely, as determined by the range safety of cer. Attendees under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Firearms and ammunition will be provided. All proceeds will bene t the Boy Scouts of America including priced concession sales. The WCSO Shooting Range is located at 65 Qualify Lane, Crawfordville. Contact Mike Scibelli at (850) 251-1497 for details.  EMPTY BOWL FUNDRAISER will be held at Hudson park from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tickets are $15 for a soup lunch and hand painted bowl. There will also be live entertainment, including music and Stone Soup play by children. The money raised goes to the area’s food pantries. For more information, contact Haydee Jackley at ribitsceramic@ yahoo.com or (850) 567-4212.  NAMIBIKES EVENT will be held at Tom Brown Park, 1125 Easterwood Drive, in Tallahassee. Check-in and a continental breakfast open at 6 a.m. The bike riding event will raise awareness about mental illness, treatment and recovery. There will be a 100-mile Century ride to Monticello and back and a 64-mile Metric Century ride to Capps and back. There will also be a 30-mile off-road ride, a 6-mile family-ride around the park and a bike rodeo and a safety course. For more information, visit www.FightStigmaAndRide.org, or contact Carol Weber at cweber@nami orida. org or (850) 671-4445.  FOURTH ANNUAL PAT RAMSEY HOSPICE EVENT will be held at noon at Bradfordville Blues. The event will bene t Big Bend Hospice in Ramsey’s honor. He was a well known musician and blues singer. There will be several musical acts inside and outside, including Brett Wellman & the Stone Cold Blues Band, C.S.Holt & Blues Revival, RoadHouse, Acme R&B, Common Zenz, JB’s Zydeco Zoo, Big Poppa & The Shuf e Brothers, Randall “Big Daddy” Webster, Cheap & Easy, The Wiley Coyote Band, Low Flying Planes, Bedhead Betty, Swingin Harpoon and Major Bacon from New Orleans La. Featuring Clyde Ramsey on Harp & Keys and Ontological Elephants “Party Time.” Sunday, Nov. 4  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE will be held at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and will be on the Florida National Scenic Trail with speaker Dale Allen who brought the trail to St. Marks in the 1980s. Find out about the different hikes available into the St. Marks backcountry. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, “Nature’s Classroom” at St. Marks Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 925-6121 for more information. Government Meetings Monday, Nov. 5  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorE-books “ nally here on the Oct. 31Starting on Oct. 31, our e-book system will be up and running! As of this writing, we have 57 current e-books available in addition to thousands of ebooks in the public domain like classics, instructional, etc for you to enjoy. You will have to download the Overdrive Media Console to your reader or mobile device (can be found in your devices app store) and have an Adobe account set up as well (you will be prompted upon downloading the Overdrive app). Both of these are free. If you need assistance, please dont hesitate to come by or give us a call. Those with Amazon.com accounts, but no reader, can also download the Kindle app to your personal computer and check out e-books as well. I will also attach how-to guides to my weekly email and they will also be available at the front desk. In the upcoming weeks I will also hold public how-toŽ workshops at the library to show how the system will work on your devices. Once youve downloaded the Overdrive Media Console you simply click on the Overdrive link on our homepage (www.wakullalibrary.org) and choose what youd like. Those who have overdue books or owe “ nes wont be able to checkout e-books until their account is cleared. As stated before, there is a limit of two e-book checkouts at a time and they will automatically be returned after two weeks if you dont send them back yourselves. Holds can also be placed on e-books that are checked out and you can also (and we encourage that you do) make suggestions as well. As with anything new like this were sure there will be growing pains so please feel free to come by or give us a call if we can help.Friday Night Movie Our Friday Night Movie this week is from the quirky mind of Wes Anderson (Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums). Although our Public Viewing License forbids me to name the “ lm here, I can tell you that the PG-13 (for sexual content and smoking) rated film is set on an island off the coast of New England in the 1960s, as a young boy and girl fall in love they are moved to run away together. Various factions of the town mobilize to search for them and the town is turned upside down … which might not be such a bad thing. Starring Bruce Willis, Edward Norton and Bill Murray among others, this comedy will warm the heart as well as making you laugh. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show. Political EventsThursday, Oct. 25  POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for property appraiser will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the Community Center, followed by a forum for the sheriff candidates at 7:45 p.m. Library News... NOPE Candlelight Vigil will be held at 6 p.m. at Hudson Park. Fish Fry for Heritage Village Park 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. at Hudson Park. Monarch Butter y Festival at St. Marks Refuge from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Chat-Oberfest at 1 p.m. at Chat Adoption Center. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy CONNOR HARRISONof wakullasports.comThe Riverspring Bears are county champs once again with a game that went down to the wire, but the Bears prevailed and won 32-28. The scoring started on the “ rst drive for Riversprings, with Zach Norman completing a pass to Justin Davis for a touchdown, but the two point attempt was no good. The Wildcats decided to answer that score with one of their own and unlike the Bears, Wakulla Middle punched in the two point conversion. Riversprings managed to score another touchdown, but once again, failed to get the two points after the touchdown. Next up was the Wakulla Middle Wildcats who followed up with another touchdown, but couldnt quite get the two points, leaving the score at 14-12. With around “ ve minutes left in the half, RMS was stopped on fourth down, giving the ball back to the Wildcats. Thats when the Bears defense stood up and forced a WMS punt. On that drive, Lindsey broke a huge run up the middle and sprinted all the way to the end zone. Leaving the score at 18-12 in favor of the Bears at half time. Coming out of half time, WMS was set to receive the ball, but a hard hit by Jake McCarl knocked the ball loose from the return man, and Riversprings recovered the fumble. After a single first down, RMS was stopped on third down and ended up letting Kam Rosier punt the ball away and let it roll inside of the 15-yard line. The Wildcats then began driving down the “ eld and soon faced a fourth and “ ve. They elected to go for it and did so successfully, scoring a touchdown on that play. Of course, they attempted the two point conversion only to be stuffed at the line of scrimmage by a host of Bears. This left the score at 20 for WMS and 18 for Riversprings. In an attempt to give themselves a better lead, Wakulla Middle kicked an onside kick, but it was recovered by R.J. Kinard, letting the Bears take over with good “ eld position. Riversprings took full advantage of this opportunity and put together a drive that was topped off with a touchdown and the two point attempt was effective this time. Following the kickoff, the Wildcats crawled back into the lead with a touchdown with 3:14 left in the game. This tied the game up until WMS got two more points following the touchdown, leaving the score 28-26, Wildcats on top. In an attempt to seal the game and run out the clock, Wakulla Middle decided that it was a good idea to try an onside kick. It was recovered by, once again, R.J. Kinard. The usual starting quarterback was Zach Norman, but he was out with an injury, so Jake McCarl took that role. Soon there was under a minute to play, but McCarl took the ball on a busted play, made a few Wildcats miss the tackle, and walked on into the end zone with 39 seconds left. WMS was down 32-28, but still had life as they had the ball, and a time-out remaining. Their quarterback tossed a pass down“ eld, but it landed in the wrong hands and before you know it, RMS has the ball following the turnover. Instead of trying to run the score up, they lined up in victory formation and took a knee to end the game.Connor Harrison covers local sports for www.wakullasports.com. He can be reached at wakulla40@gmail.com.MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLRiversprings Bears are county champs after 32-28 shootout with WMS The “ rst touchdown of the game by Justin Davis. Austin Geiger attempts to make a one handed catch. A long run for a touchdown by Demarcus Lindsey.PHOTOS BY CONNOR HARRISON OF WAKULLASPORTS.COM REGISTRATION DATES: SATURDAY 10/20/12 & SATURDAY 10/27/12 REGISTRATION TIMES: 8:00 A.M. TO 12:00 P.M. OR DURING OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY 10/15/12 TO FRIDAY 10/26/12 8-5PMREGISTRATION DEADLINE: SATURDAY 10/27/12, 12:00 PM REGISTRATION PLACE: MEDART RECREATION PARK 79 Recreation Dr.AGE DETERMINING DATE: SEPTEMBER 1st, 2012COST IS $40.00 PER CHILDAGES: 04 & UNDER DIVISION: 06 & UNDER DIVISION: 08 & UNDER DIVISION: 10 & UNDER DIVISION: 12 & UNDER DIVISION: COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD8 & 9 DIVISION: 10, 11, & 12 DIVISION: All players (basketball & soccer) must provide proof of health insurance or purchase a policy for an additional $10.00. All leagues are coed. If interested in coaching the above sports, please contact the Wakulla County Recreation Department. All volunteers must complete a criminal history background check. !!" 2012 Go to www.bigbendhospice.org to Sign-up Today! 11:30am Registration and Lunch 12:30pm Tee-o October 26, 2012Wildwood Country ClubSAVE THE DATE!For more information, call Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308Wakulla County Big Bend Hospice 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH

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By TIM LINAFELTHis game Saturday night wont just erase all the pain that Devonta Freeman has felt for the past few weeks. But it at least will give him something to smile about. Nearly a month after Anthony Darling, a cousin who Freeman grew up with and considered a brother, was shot and killed, Freeman returned to his hometown of Miami for the “ rst time in a Florida State uniform. Playing in front of his friends, family and former high school coaches, Freeman posted a teamhigh 70 rushing yards and two fourth-quarter touchdown runs that lifted the Seminoles to a 33-20 victory over the Miami Hurricanes. It feels absolutely great,Ž Freeman said, to come out here in front of my fans and stuff. It just feels so good to be playing in front of my home crowd once again.Ž Freeman, who played high school football at Miami Central, said he did he best to focus on the game, but afterward Darlings memory came rushing back to him. During the game, I just set it aside,Ž he said. Then after the game, I talked to him and just let him know that was for him.Ž Freeman led FSU in rushing as a freshman in 2011, but the return of senior Chris Thompson and emergence of sophomore James Wilder Jr. led to a decreased role for Freeman during the seasons “ rst half … through seven games, he carried the ball just 31 times. That changed in a big way early in the second quarter when Thompson hauled in a 32-yard completion and went down with a left knee injury, later revealed to be a torn ACL that will sideline him for the rest of the season. But when Thompson went down, Freeman stepped up. He took his “ rst carry of the game “ ve yards then two carries later ripped off a 33-yarder that took FSU to the Miami 15-yard line and set up a Dustin Hopkins “ eld goal. By the time the fourth quarter arrived, Freeman received the opportunities hed been waiting all year for. With the Seminoles nursing a 16-13 lead early in the final period, FSU drove to the Miami 13-yard line then handed to Freeman three straight times. He responded with runs of three yards, seven yards, and, “ nally, a three-yard touchdown that effectively sealed the game. Devonta, being from down here, he played great,Ž FSU quarterback EJ Manuel said. I told him at halftime, Youve got to step up. And he already knew.Ž Freeman, though, wasnt quite done. After FSU took over on downs late in the fourth quarter at Miamis 21-yard line, the Seminoles called Freemans number again, this time for a 5-yard TD run that made it 33-13. It felt good getting in the end zone twice in Miami,Ž he said. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 5BBy MARTY COHENLets take a moment to turn back the hands of time: ƒThus began the cavalcade of mistakes and poor play in all three phases that led to the thoroughly dominating Gamecock victory. And it got nasty. The sea of blue (Urban) Meyer envisioned as a thunderous wave from the stands to carry his team to victory turned into an invective of blue thoughts and words. As Floridas woes mounted, fans booed lustily with each failed offensive series, music to the ears of rival recruiters who will undoubtedly remind the pack of premier prospects in the South Endzone how Floridas fabled Swamp had turned on its own players. In the end, the momentum the Gators had gathered from victories over mediocre Georgia and hapless Vanderbilt dissolved into the crisp night air. It turned into a sullen night in The Swamp, all the magic the theater used to produce gone in a hardto-fathom third straight home setback. And to South Carolina, which had never won any sort of championship laced contest, plus native son Steve Spurrier to bootƒ Its almost hard to believe that after 57 wins in (Meyers “ rst) “ ve years, after the glorious championship seasons, that Florida football has seemingly lost its way. Getting it back, restoring the identity of Florida football, is the type of challenge Meyer has never faced before. It will be interesting, to say the least, to watch the re-construction process unfoldƒŽ Ugh. This was penned by yours truly on Nov. 14, 2010, just hours after the crash of the Meyer Regime was complete, the humbling 36-14 shellacking by South Carolina that gave the Gamecocks the SEC East title and a reason to frolic on Florida Field. Meyer would step aside for good about a month later, leaving that reconstruction process to Will Muschamp. So here we are, some 672 days later, and its time for another visit by South Carolina and the Head Ball Coach. Sure theres the obligatory questions, and midweek stories, about Spurrier coming back to Gainesville, blah, blah, blah. I realize the beat writers have a weeks worth of copy to churn out, but cmon, this is an old, played-out tale. This will be the eighth installment of Florida vs. Spurrier/ South Carolina, and the fourth meeting in The Swamp. Spurrier has been gone for 11 years, and while the shadow he cast over the program will never go away, now that he has built the Gamecocks into a contender after an initial five fruitless seasons, the storyline is now Florida vs. South Carolina, and all the rami“ cations embraced in the showdown. A sportswriter pal, searching in vain for the ultimate statement angle, said he was planning to write how Muschamp needs this win to validate his footing with Gator fans, that much like Meyer in his second season at UF in 2006, he needs to topple Spurrier. F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State t e Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&MSaturday, Oct. 27 Bye Week #2 Florida at #10 GeorgiaSaturday, Oct. 27 at 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on CBS. Duke at #12 Florida StateSaturday, Oct. 27 at 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPNU. S h o w d o w n Showdown s t a n d s o n i t s stands on its o w n m e r i t own merit FSUs Devonta Freeman puts up big numbers in Saturdays game against Miami. The defensive brain trust on the sidelines: WILL MUSCHAMP along with DAN QUINN (right) and TRAVARIS ROBINSON.Happy homecoming for FSU’s FreemanPhoto By TRAVIS REGISTERGATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt Jacksonville, Florida —Behind Argyle Shopping Center Preview at 11:00a.m., Auction at noon Brewer Auction Service (386)497-4438 or (904)838-1575 au#2604 ab#1940 Onsite Estate AuctionSaturday, October 27thAntiques, furniture, dolls, unique pieces from 18th century! Visit www.BrewerAuctions.com for pictures and more information. 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comPlayers of the WeekCHRIS GRIFFIN Scored 92 percent. Just about every TD was right behind him, Klees said. DANIEL SANDERS 3 tackles and several key blocks JAMES DOUIN 7 tackles, 3 assists, caused fumble and had an interceptionO ense Defense Special Teams War Eagles stay perfect Continued from Page 1B Freshman quarterback Feleipe Franks connected with Keith Gavin, who took the ball down to the Bulldog 20. A couple of plays later, Franks tossed the ball to receiver Brandon Nichols … the defensive back on the play had gotten turned around, lost sight of the ball, and Nichols caught it at the 2 and walked into the end zone. Dillon Norman added the extra point and the War Eagles were up 7-0 with 2:41 remaining in the quarter. The Bulldogs scored in response, with a wide receiver screen that went for 75 yards. The extra point was good, to make it 7-7 with 1:36 remaining. Unable to move the ball, the War Eagles punted and the Bulldogs took over deep in their own territory. Trying to run an option play, the War Eagles disrupted the play and forced a fumble … which was recovered by Suwannee in the end zone for a safety. Mikal Cromartie returned the kickoff to the Bulldog 35, and Lindsey scored a touchdown on a speed sweep down the sideline. Normans PAT was good, and the War Eagles were up 16-7. Suwannee was stopped on their next series, and on the next offensive drive, Lindsey took a pass down to the 15-yard line. After pushing the ball inside the 10, Malik Thomas scored on a sweep to the right side. Normans extra point was good, to make it 23-7 with 4:23 remaining in the half. On the Bulldogs next possession, War Eagle linebacker Dequon Simmons ran down a runner in the open “ eld to save a touchdown. Suwannee was unable to move the ball and was forced to punt … which was blocked and recovered by Wakulla on the Bulldog side of mid“ eld. With time running out, Lindsey made his acrobatic catch in the back of the end zone, turning what looked like a sure interception into a touchdown. The extra point was good and the War Eagles were up 30-7 with 1:21 left in the half. But the Bulldogs were still game, and they drove the ball down the “ eld and scored on a reverse with just 11 seconds remaining to make it 30-14 at the half. In the second half, Klees started rotating in some clean uniforms to get playing time. In the third quarter, quarterback Caleb Stephens, showing no signs of knee problems, made a long run down the sideline to the 11, which set up running back Sheldon Johnson to score on a speed sweep. The extra point was good to make it 37-14. The fourth quarter was scoreless. Wakullas swarming defense … with linebacker Hunter Hurst, 65, safety Mikal Cromartie, 20, and Kieryn Parson, 5, tackling a Bulldog receiver. Celebrating the win by singing the school song after the game. TCCs WAKULLA CENTERWe want you to succeed professionally through education and training. We are here to help.FALL 2012 INFORMATION SESSIONS:OCTOBER 23 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about the Testing Center, Enrollment Services and Student SuccessOCTOBER 30 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about Financial Aid & Scholarship and the Career CenterNOVEMBER 6 | 3 5 P.M.Learn more Financial Aid & Scholarships, Enrollment Services and Student SuccessNOVEMBER 13 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about the Testing Center and the Career CenterTesting is available by appointment every Friday. For more information call (850) 922-6290 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for quali“ed applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and ”oor rate of 2.5% I LIKEMIKE STEWARTREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mike Stewart, Republican candidate for county commissioner, district 3 www.Ken FieldsPhotography.photoshelter.com Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & Exterior Together We Are Providing Employment for Local Craftsman FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 7B -Janet By SCOTT ROSEContributor, Relish magazineThe oyster pan roast is a New York City culinary landmark. Velvety, hearty and delectable, this popular comfort food has been served at the legendary Oyster Bar and Restaurant, located deep under the Beaux Arts grandeur of Manhattans Grand Central Station since 1913. Despite its name, an oyster pan roast isnt a roast at all but rather a seafood stew. Sandy Ingber, executive chef at the Oyster Bar and Restaurant, says that in preparing a pan roast, he uses a professional utensil called a steam-jacketed kettle. The device is similar to a double boiler, but more intense. No worry if you dont have one; Chef Ingber says the recipe takes longer in a double boiler but turns out “ ne. He does caution that the inside pot of your double boiler should be a perfect “ t. Asked for other tips on preparing a distinctive oyster pan roast, he says Its a timing thing. After you add the half-andhalf, you must take the mixture out of the pan the split second before it reaches the boiling point. Otherwise, the half-and-half could become mottled.Ž You can “ nd variations on the traditional oyster pan roast: here a trumpet mushroom, there a dash of nutmeg, there again an artichoke heart. Yet no version so soothes the soul as this one based on the Oyster Bar and Restaurants recipe. OYSTER PAN ROAST 1 tablespoon butter 1/2 cup clam broth or juice 1/2 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1/4 teaspoon celery salt 10 shucked oysters with juice 2 tablespoons sweet chili sauce, such as Heinz 1 cup whole milk 2 slices toasted white bread 1 teaspoon sweet Hungarian paprika 1/2 cup oyster crackers 1. In a double boiler with water boiling on high, combine clam juice, butter, celery salt and Worcestershire sauce. Once butter melts, add oysters and cook for 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Add chili sauce and stir well. 2. Add half-and-half and milk and cook for a few minutes until heated through, but not boiling. 3. Place a slice of white toast in a warm 9-inch soup plate. Using a slotted spoon, place oysters over toast. Pour hot liquid over oysters, “ lling to about -inch beneath the rim. Garnish with a paprika. Serve with oyster crackers. Serves 2. Per serving: 290 calories, 13g fat, 50mg chol., 11g prot., 33g carbs., 2g “ ber, 930mg sodium.For more Relish recipes and to sign up for our newsletters, log on to relish.com. RELISH THE AMERICAN TABLEMake the world your oyster PHOTO BY MARK BOUGHTON PHOTOGRAPHY / STYLING BY TERESA BLACKBURNAn oyster pan roast isnt a roast at all, but a seafood stew. NEED HEARING AIDS?HEARING AIDS AT NO COST TO FEDERAL BCBS WORKERS AND RETIREES!?That’s Rights… No Co-Pay! No Exam Fee! No Adjustment Fee! Discover How Much Better Your World Can Sound… The Name You’ve Come To Trust Serving Your Hearing Needs For Over 60 yearsBlue Cross Blue Shield Federal Insurance pays total cost of 2 Miracle Ear ME2100 series aids. If you have Federal Government Insurance with enrollment code #104, #105, #111, or #112, you are covered for hearing aids with no out of pocket expenses. 3 yr. warranty. If you have a basic plan, we have factory pricing for non-qualifiers Miracle EarHearing Aid Center is NOW Offering CRAWFORDVILLE3295 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY THE LOG CABIN, BARRY BUILDING TALLAHASSEESEARS MIRACLE EAR GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL 1500 Apalachee ParkwayANN HENNESSY, MA, CCC-A CERTIFIED & LICENSED AUDIOLOGISTCall for an appointment 850-942-4007 Toll Free 1-866-942-4007HUNTERS… ACT NOW & ORDER HEARING PROTECTIONMIRACLE EAR GUARDIAN*Hearing evaluation and video otoscope inspection are always free. Hearing evaluation is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnosis, nor are they intended to replace a physician's care. If you suspect a medical problem, please seek treatment from your doctor. No Acreage Limitations! Financing for Rural Homes www.FarmCredit-Fl.com Charlotte Dodson NMLS #700260850-656-2920 | Tallahassee, FL Oering loans with:

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By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE … An amendment before Florida voters on the November ballot would tighten the states rarely-used revenue cap, potentially giving it more teeth … something supporters say will restrain reckless spending but opponents say would gut vital services. Under Amendment 3, the amount of revenue the state would be allowed to collect and spend would no longer be tied to the growth in the economy -a cap that the state has never bumped into. Instead, it would follow a formula combining inflation and population growth. For supporters, the proposal will help avoid the wild swings that Floridas budget has taken over the last decade, smoothing out spending and providing a more robust savings account for when the state falls on more dif“ cult economic times. Voting yes on Amendment 3 will send a message to our state leaders that the size of Floridas government shouldnt grow faster than the taxpayers capacity to pay for it,Ž said Edie Ousley, a spokeswoman for the Florida Chamber of Commerce, in an email. But opponents say the amendment would force the Legislature to slavishly follow a rigid formula instead of adjusting spending as necessary. And they say it would handcuff lawmakers from addressing the states loophole-ridden tax code in a way that might bring in additional money for schools and infrastructure. We do not need to reduce our future to a mathematical formula,Ž said Charles Misted, associate state director for the AARP. The force behind Amendment 3, approved by the Legislature in 2011, was Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island. At the time, Haridopolos was gearing up to challenge Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, though Haridopolos eventually abandoned his bid. But as he leaves of“ ce because of term limits, Haridopolos said his proposal will help future legislative leaders avoid the headaches he and others had to deal with after years of spending in” ated by an economic boom gave way to deep cuts triggered by an economic bust. What were trying to do with this amendment is just provide common-sense consistency,Ž he said. Haridopolos also noted that some of the support for those opposing Amendment 3 comes from out-ofstate groups. Opponents, though, sense an effort to protect special interest tax breaks and constrict funding for public services under the guise of lowering taxes and responsible government. I know a wolf when I see one,Ž thundered Richard Dunn, senior pastor at Faith Community Baptist Church in Miami and a former Miami-Dade commissioner, during a rally Monday on the steps of the old Capitol. This Amendment 3 is a wolf. And its a wolf in sheeps clothing.Ž Critics say government costs often grow faster than inflation, artificially keeping the new limits too low. Theyve taken to citing a study by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities -a left-leaning think tank based in Washington, D.C. … saying the proposal would slash $11 billion from state spending by 2021, including more than $2 billion in the “ nal year. That contrasts sharply with estimates from legislative staff, which said in a 2011 analysis that the state would stay well below the cap until at least the 2019-20 “ scal year. Rich Temple of the AFLCIO, one of the groups “ ghting the proposal, mocked supporters argument that the amendment would provide certainty to businesses. It certainly guarantees that Florida will continue to remain at the bottom in all of the key indicators of a healthy society forever,Ž he said. Exhibit A for opponents of the proposal is Colorado. Voters there approved a similar measure in 1992, but eventually suspended the measure because of an effect known as ratcheting,Ž which limited lawmakers ability to use the revenues from an economic recovery to offset earlier reductions. Jeanette Baust, a Denver sociologist, said Florida would follow the same path if it accepted the snake oilŽ that was sold to Colorado voters. History will repeat itself if you do the same thing Colorado did and pass this amendment,Ž she said. Haridopolos said thats not true. He said Colorado ran into some of its problems because of spending requirements in Colorado in areas like education. And the Florida amendments provide safeguards, he said, that would allow a two-thirds majority in the Legislature to spend more money than the cap would allow if theres an urgent need to do. We learned from the Colorado success,Ž he said, and some of their dif“ culties.Ž Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comStaff reportThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners approved placing a referendum on the Nov. 6 General Election Ballot to allow the citizens of Wakulla County to vote for or against a economic development property tax exemption for new businesses and expansions of existing businesses. The purpose of this property tax exemption program is to encourage the establishment of new businesses in Wakulla and for existing businesses to expand and create new jobs in the county. The program authorizes the county commission to grant qualifying businesses an ad valorem tax exemption on real property improvements and tangible personal property of up to 100 percent for up to 10 years. Economic Development continues to be a priority and this is another way for us to attract industries to open their doors here, it will help our current businesses grow, and will provide job opportunities for our citizens,Ž said Commissioner Mike Stewart. There is a list of criteria for businesses to qualify for an exemption, including the creation of new jobs. Not all new businesses or those looking to expand would qualify. All qualifying businesses would come before the county commission for approval and it would be done on a case-by-case basis. This program does not change any tax liabilities except for property owners who are exempted under the program. Additionally, it is anticipated to generate new tax revenue that will be added to the tax base from the improvements and tangible personal property after the exemption period. It is subject to the approval of a majority vote at the General Election. To learn more about this program and eligibility criteria, visit the county website (www.mywakulla.com) or contact the County Administration Of“ ce at 926-0919. Early voting starts this Saturday, Oct. 27 for the general election. It will be held from Oct. 27 to Nov. 3 at the Supervisor of Elections Of ce, 3115-B Crawfordville Highway. Hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 7 p.m. Make sure to bring a picture ID with signature. Election Day is Nov. 6. For more information, call the elections of ce at (850) 926-7575 or visit www.wakullaelection.com.Amendment 3: Fight over how tightly to cap taxesWakulla to vote on economic development tax exemptionEarly voting starts Oct. 27 Caf THURSDAY DRINK SPECIALS Perfect Weather to head to the Coast Sunday ThursdayALL U CAN EATSpecials Catfish ......$11.95 Shrimp ....,$13.95 Scallops ..$13.95Includes Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies30 SHRIMP10 Fried • 10 Grilled • 10 BlackenedServed with Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies$12.95Winter hours: Tues. Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 • Sunday 4-9984-52431506 Coastal Hwy., Scenic BiWay4P.M. 6P.M.2 for 1 DRINKSTHURSDAY SPECIALSALL U CAN EATShrimp .....$12.95 Scallops....$13.95 Baby Back Ribs $9.95 Dozen Oysters $3.00 Beer $1.50 Well $2.00 Wine $3.00Winter Hours: Thurs. 4-9 Fri. 4-10 • Sat. 11-10 Sunday 11-9 713-001499 Rock Landing Rd. Overlooking Beautiful Dickerson Bay 000CV38 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 9BSt. Marks Stone Crab Festival FESTIVAL SCENES: Clockwise from top left, the parade featured superheroes such as Batman, Iron Man, and Capt. America; a stone crab as a hero; Katy Hill, 4, works a mallet to get some crab meat; COAST students perform at the festival.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers … if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bar“eld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year. YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible. For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program. Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor ofƒ One Click. Job Resources. Real Results. The Employ Florida network helped me to improve my professional skills and connected me with a training opportunity.Ž THE RESULT: Elizabeth Matthews was trained and hired by Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point. Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disa bilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. T THE RESU L T : T T Elizabeth Matthews w w as tra i ne d an d hi re d b y R e gi ona l M M edical Center Bayonet Point.ELIZABETH MATTHEWS Monitor Technician and Unit Secretary Hudson, FL R R R R R R e e a a a l l l R R R e e e s s s s u u u u l l l t t t s s s . HIRED EmployFlorida.com1-866-FLA-2345 Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-7 Closed Sun. & Wed.

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Acting Aging Belts Bright Covers Drowning Drying Eagle Estate Excused Fuels Going Hearty Helping Honored Lawyer Nectar Novels Onion Oranges Other Possibilities Ready Reign Reply Resign Revolt Rings Sadly Second Sells Shoes Sized Sleek Sleeps Slices This page sponsored in part by: Sweeter System Table Tarts Tasty Tease Thick Tight Twins Uncles Vehicle Volunteers You’ve

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 11B SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements Todays New Ads Cypress Lumber Pecky T&G v Joint Timbers and beams (850) 643-6283 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Child Care Personnel BABY SITTER NEEDEDIn my home, in Sopchoppy, alternate weekends, some weekdays, 12 year old well behaved boy. Call Nanci (850) 363-1650 Medical Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Professional AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 Trades/ Skills Apply Now, 13 Drivers.Top 5% Pay & Benefits. Need CDLClass ADriving Exp (877)258-8782 www .drive4melton.com DRIVERS100% OwnerOperatorCo. Pay increase / Home weekly, Regional & Dedicated Class A-CDL1yr. Exp. In last 3 Call (800)695-9643 or www .driveforwatkins.com DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED /INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today! (877)882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Trades/ Skills Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Tire Technician /Mechanic NeededB & B Dugger, Inc. is looking for a part or full-time tire mounting technician that has experience with tire changers. tire balancers and mounting truck & small tractor tires. Additional experience in roadside asssistanceŽ and working in the field is also prefererred. A Florida driver license with a clear MVR is a position requirement. Pay negotiable. Call the business office at (850) 926-2929 or email to office@band bdugger.com to receive an application TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 20 12 Schools/ Instruction ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTTRAINEES NEEDED! Online Training with SC Train gets you job ready ASAP! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Job placement assistance when program completed. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed. (888)212-5888 Schools/ Instruction MEDICALBILLINGTRAINING!Train forMedical Billing Careers at SCT rain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placement assistance aftertraining! HS/GED/PC Needed (888)872-4677 Furniture CHERRYBEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used, brand new in factory boxes. Original cost $4500. Sell for $795. Can deliver. Call Tom (407)574-3067 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET. In original plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice $975. Can deliver. Call Bill (813)298-0221 Farm Services BUSH HOGGING ROADS GRADED GARDENS TILLED Have tractor will bush hog finish cut large acerage grade roads driveways till gardens. dbdouge@aol.com or 850-643-6283 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3 BD\2BA SW on 3 Acres in AŽ rated schools, No smoking, $500 per pet Avail. Nov. first /last/dep $675. ea 850-926-6766 SOPCHOPPY2/1.5 Singlewide $575.REVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Mobile Homes For Sale 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, Beautiful Kitchen. Huge Master Bedroom Walk In Closets Call Today (850) 576-2106 4 BR Mobile Home on 5 Acres, Ready to Move IN -EZ Payments. Call Me (850) 576-2105 100 Families Needed for Govt Loan Program. Call Today (850) 576-2104 Mobile Homes For Sale 3BR, 2BA-Used Mobile Home. Great Condition Wont Last !!! Call Me ASAP (850) 576-2687 GOTLAND? Need a Home. Use Your Land As your DOWN Payment Call Now (850) 576 2687 Apartments Unfurnished PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall Mary (850) 984-4811Equal Housing Opportunity TDD 1 800 955 2771 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $700/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1937 CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Bedroom / 2 Bath, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 CRAWFORDVILLENice 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Home in Wakulla Gardens, Lots of extra features, $895. month (850) 926-8948 N. Crawfordville2/1 Mobile Home $575 monthREVELL REALTY 850-962-2212 SHELL POINTWaterfront 1 Bedroom Home, large great room screen porch. Beautiful sunset view over water. $675 mo. (850) 570-5712 (850) 926-3808 SOPCHOPPY2/1For Rent, $600 month On CanalREVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Rentals Wanted WAKULACOUNTYWant to Rent 2 bedroom. 1 bath. House Dec -May...prefer Panacea/Sopchoppy area. Call 231-256-7648 Auctions Estates AUCTION -Real Estate & Personal Property Cliffside Mansion & Cottages, 216+/-Acre Country Estates, Offered in 17 Tracts in Carroll County and Galax, VA. Long frontage on New River Trail and Chestnut Creek. Guaranteed to Sell Over $699,000. November 8, 10 am -Personal Property; November 9, 10 am Personal Property, Real Estate sells at NOON. Sale held On-Site-Tract 7, 506 Cliffview Road, Galax, VA 24333. 5% Buyers Premium on Real Estate, 10% Buyers Premium on Personal Property. For more information, go to woltz.com or call Woltz & Associates, Inc, Brokers & Auctioneers, (VA# 321) Roanoke, VA, (800)551-3588. Home/Office Cleaning Need your house or office cleaned? Call Renee at 850-590-6720 for information about my cleaning services, experience and pricing. References available. Rent: Houses Unfurnished 5414-1025 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Michael Keller Doing business as: That Place on 319 Fictitious Name Notices at 2302 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327 with a mailing address of 2302 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida 32327 desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Fictitious Name Notices Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 18th day of October, 2012 /s/Michael Keller Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News October 25, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices 5410-1025 TWN 11/08 sale PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE Affordable Title & Lien, Inc. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78 of the Florida Statutes on November 8, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Lien Notices *AUCTION WILL OCCUR WHERE EACH VEHICLE IS LOCATED* 1993 CHEVROLET VIN # 2G1FP22S8P2111901 Located at: 2235 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Wakulla Any person(s) claiming any interest(s) in the above Lien Notices vehicles contact: Affordable Title & Lien, Inc, (954) 416-1779 *ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE* Some of the vehicles may have been released prior to auction LIC #AB-0003126 October 25, 2012 Lien Notices 5402-1018 TWN vs. Cayson, Donald Ray Case No. 65-2012-CA-000180 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 2011-CA-004095 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. 5411-1101 TWN vs. Heirs of Roosevelt Wilson Case No. 2004-FC-100 Notice of Action IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2004-FC-100 CIVIL DIVISION JIMMIE WILSON, Petitioner, vs. HEIRS OF ROOSEVELT ALEXANDER WILSON, WILLIE WILSON AND PEARLIE MAE WILSON, AND FERRELL ALLEN, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Alexandria Bramhan Beauford, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 Marla Barnes, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Amended Verified Complaint has been filed in this court. This is an action for determination of heirs, partition and quiet title to certain real property lying in Wakulla County, Florida, and more particularly described as follows: Parcel 1: Wakulla County Parcel No. 16-3S-01E-000-05224-000, the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NE of SW of SW ) of Section Sixteen (16), Township Three South, Range 1 East and a parcel in the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE of SW of SW ) of Section Sixteen (16), containing 14.96 ac., MOL; Parcel 2: Wakulla County Parcel No. 22-3S-01E-000-05405-000, Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company monument marking the Northwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 3 South, Range 1 East, Wakulla County, Florida, and run thence South 00 degrees 31 minutes 20 seconds East along the westerley boundry of said Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter 873.80 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds East 245.54 feet to a point on the eastern boundary line of the right-of-way of State Road No. 363, thence run South 16 degrees 12 minutes 52 seconds East 155.81 feet to the point of beginning of the land herein described. From said point of beginning, run North 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds East 247.86 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 31 minutes 20 seconds West 150 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds East 140.12 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 03 minutes 21 seconds East 450.01 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds West 300.04 feet to a point on the eastern boundary line of the right-of-way of State Road No. 363, thence run North 16 degrees 12 minutes 52 seconds West 311.61 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning, containing 2.845 acres, more or less, in the Northwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 3 South, Range 1 East. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on petitioners attorney, whose name and address are: Deirdre A. Farrington, Esq., P.O. Box 392, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 on or before November 26, 2012, and to file the original of the written defenses with the clerk of this court either before service or immediately thereafter. Failure to serve and file written defenses as required may result in a judgment or order for the relief demanded, without further notice. Signed on October 15, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desireee D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk October 25 & November 1, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 4Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1150mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $675mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. WANTEDSUBSTITUTE SCHOOL TEACHERS Wakulla County School District Apply at: wakullaschooldistrict.org Click on “Employment”(All applicants are required to pass background and drug screening, and complete of online sub training.) 20960 N.E. Burlington Rd., Hosford, FL 32334 NOVEMBER 3 9AM EST --F&LAUCTION ---FARM EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE AUCTION Tractors, Mowers, Cultivators and all types of Farm EquipmentAuctioneer: Felton Hall, auctioneer license AU426610% BUYERS PREMIUM all consignments are welcomed.For more info: 850-379-8410, Cell: 850-566-6646 TO VIEW PARTIAL LIST OF PHOTOS VISIT www.auctionzip.com AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 OFFICE SPACE LEASEFOR THE BARRY BUILDING ATTHE LOG CABINCrawfordville 850-508-5471$25000/MO Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Susan Jones, GRIRealtor 566-7584 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-4 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-4148 Longleaf 3BD/2BA home on 1.74 acres with screened in-ground pool. Spacious oor-plan with large screened in porch with hot tub, fenced in yard, relaxing rocking chair front porch and a peaceful yard... Price reduced to $138,000 Call for more details or to preview!! PRICE REDUCED RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities • 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $900 Security Deposit • 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA home $800 mo. • 31 Chehaw 3BR/2BA DWMH $650mo. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!55 Allison Dr. Panacea 3BR/2BA Nice Dock and Boardwalk, Furnished or Unfurnished. GREAT FISHING on Dickerson Bay! $950 mo. No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2837 Coastal Hwy. Commercial Building $800 mo. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Commercial building 4,300 square foot heated and cooled building on 1 acre of land Rents out for $1,800.00. Building is in excellent condition. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets DONALD RAY CAYSON, et. al., Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DONALD RAY CAYSON, and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONALD RAY CAYSON if alive, and/or dead his (their) unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or grantees and all persons or parties claiming by, through, under or against him (them) Last known address is 29 HERRING CIR. CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Action for foreclosure of a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: PLEASE SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DESCRIPTIONŽ has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Iris Hernandez, SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., Attorneys, whose address is 9700 South Dixie Highway, Suite 610, Miami, Florida 33156, (305) 670-2299, Iris.Hernandez@spearhoffman.com within 30 days after the first publication of this notice and to file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this 23 day of January, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Becky Whaley As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT AŽ COMMENCE AT ST. JOE PAPER C0MPANY M0NUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN WEST 638.56 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 355.87 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF A GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 46 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID COUNTY ROAD BOUNDARY 192.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN ALONG SAID SOUTHWESTERLY ROAD BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 46 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 141.22 FEET, THENCE NORTH 48 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 32.78 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 100.35 FEET, THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 78.93 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A POWER LINE EASEMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID COUNTY ROAD BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 24 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 354.81 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 223.39 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5412-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.12 TXD013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2424Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-080-000-11508-013LOT 80 HS P-4-13-M-22 COMM AT NE COR OF LOT 81 HS OR 648 P 773 Name in which assessedBEN WITHERS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this11day of October 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 5413-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLCthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2182Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-076-000-10250-008 LOT 76 HS P-7-8-M-20-C IN NE 1/4 OF LOT 76 HS OR 148 P 292 OR 219 P 610 Name in which assessedTHE SIGHTS & SOUNDS COMPANY OF WAKULLA INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this12day of October2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices TO INCLUDE A: 2000 GENERAL LEASING CO. VINGMHGA1249925046A #79466437 2000 GENERAL LEASING CO. VIN.GMHGA1249925046B #79466459 Length and width of mobile home is 20.8 X 66.3 OCTOBER 25 AND NOVEMBER 1, 2012 The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON OCTOBER 15, 2012The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Patricia Broadway was recognized as Employee of the month. Virginia Pooser and Katherine Spivey were recognized as Teachers of the Month. All were congratulated and presented with a plaque by Chairman Scott. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Evans. All Board Members and Superintendent Miller were in attendance. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the agenda as amended. The amendment included the addition of items #12 and #13. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the following consent items: 1.Approved Minutes of the Meeting of September 10, 2012 and October 1, 2012. 2.Approved the following Employment of Personnel: New Hires: 10 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Henderson, ErinPre-K/WECTeacher10/03/12-06/04/13 Sharin, KristaWHSGuidance Counselor10/03/12-06/04/13 9 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Andrews, AmyWMSESE Paraprofessional09/17/12-06/04/13 Osteen, HeatherPre-K/WECParaprofessional10/01/12-06/04/13 Peltier, StephenCESCustodian09/14/12-06/04/13 9 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Youngblood, MaryTransportationBus Driver09/21/12-05/31/13 Transfers: NamePosition From Program From Position ToProgram ToTerm of Service 9 Month 12 Month NamePosition From Program From Position ToProgram ToTerm of Service Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Crowe, SeanWHSRemediation Teacher09/17/12-12/06/12 Fielder, SuzanneWHSRemediation Teacher09/17/12-12/06/12 Pearce, BeccaTransportationOf“ce/Other10/01/12-05/31/13 Rentz, MelanieWHSRemediation Teacher09/25/12-05/31/12 Supplemental Positions: NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Galladay, AmyWMSGirls Soccer Assistant Coach2012-2013 Kathryn Gibson/effective September 17, 2012 Mary Williams/effective September 10, 2012 Melisa Taylor/effective November 14, 2012. 5.Approved the Disposal of Equipment. (See Supplemental File #22) 9.Approve Warrants for payment. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Memorandum of Understanding (Master Teacher Contract.) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the Wakulla COAST Charter School Annual Financial Audit. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Postsecondary Education Readiness Test Assessments Grant (PERT.) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the amended 403(b) Adoption Agreement. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the School Parent Connection, A Parents Guide to Wakulla County Schools for 2012-2013. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the District Volunteer/Volunteer Coordinator Handbook revisions. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the Middle School Social Studies revisions. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve Termination of Employee. (See Supplemental File #22) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. tion. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the termination of a contract for Employee Relations Services, Educational Management Consultant Services by virtue of their resignation. (See Supplemental File #22) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. OCTOBER 25, 2012

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 13B 1. GEOGRAPHY: Where are the Balearic Islands located? 2. ANATOMY: Where is the ulna located in the human body? 3. ANCIENT WORLD: Who kidnapped Helen of Troy, an event that started the Trojan War? 4. LITERATURE: Who wrote the novel Light in AugustŽ? 5. HISTORY: In what year was the first Zeppelin flight? 6. INVENTIONS: What did Elisha Otis invent? 7. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: Where is original Mayo Clinic located? 8. U.S. STATES: In what state is Mount Rushmore located? 9. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is a group of ducks called? 10. RELIGION: What is a more common name for the religious group called United Society of Believers in Christs Second Appearing? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Mediterranean Sea 2. Forearm 3. Paris 4. William Faulkner 5. 1900 6. Elevator safety brake 7. Rochester, Minn. 8. South Dakota 9. A gaggle 10. Shakers YOUR AD HERE

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Page 14B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 19 … In the second to last week before voting starts, Florida this past week played its usual role as a state where presidential candidates go to make or break their fortunes. But the state also may have emerged as a place where other elections are also competitive. For the better part of the last decade, hard-to-predict elections farther down on the ticket have been few and far between in Florida, due at least in part to the way districts have been drawn. But new redistricting rules recently enshrined in the state Constitution actually might have worked, at least a little, to make for more competitive elections. Early this week, a couple of state Senate races were actually thought hard to call … at least until the last few days when Republicans seemed to surge on a number of fronts. Political watchers still had their Senate eyes “ xed on the race between Republican Dorothy Hukill and Democrat Frank Bruno in northeast Florida, and the race between two incumbents, Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale, and Sen. Maria Sachs, D-Delray Beach, who were drawn into the same very competitive district. Theres also plenty of interest in the Orlando-Kissimmee area between Democratic Rep. Darren Soto and Republican Will McBride. When was the last time there were three state Senate races that were truly competitive? All six campaigns were busy this week, along with several House candidates who were actually campaigning in the last several days … with voting set to start next weekend on Oct. 27. Competitive House races are something that havent been seen a lot in recent years. This time around, lots of House candidates are still really going at it in late October, in contrast to past years when lots of races were sewn up by qualifying day. In a couple of races, the candidates were busy, not on the campaign trail, but in court. A state appeals court on Friday sided with Democrat Rep. Jeff Clemens in a case over the contested Senate District 27 race in Palm Beach County. The 1st District Court of Appeal refused to change his 17-vote win over fellow Democrat Mack Bernard, who then conceded, essentially putting Clemens in the Senate. Another contested House election from South Florida was decided in court this week in favor of Rep. Barbara Watson, whose narrow win over fellow Democratic Rep. John Patrick Julien was upheld by a Leon County circuit court. While Julien has no plans to appeal further in court, he is considering contesting Watsons seating in the House, which under the state constitution is the ultimate arbiter of who can be a member. Most Senate and House candidates, however, spent the week scouring their district for last minute undecideds, hitting the Tiger Bay and chicken dinner circuit yet again. It was also evident that in presidential politics, Florida is still the magic kingdom. Joe Biden was in Sun City on Friday on the heels of Paul Ryans visit to the area this week. Mitt Romney was to be in Daytona Beach on Friday evening and his wife Ann Romney was in Florida, too. Both presidential candidates will be in the state next week for their final debate at Lynn University in Boca Raton Monday evening. Obama will stick around Tuesday morning to campaign at the Delray Beach Tennis Center. It would be a stretch to say that attention fully turned this week to policy matters, but the faint beginnings of the policy debates expected in the Capitol this coming year began to take shape. Executive agencies this week had to put out their proposed budgets for next year … an admittedly early event in the long and subject-to-major-change budgeting process, but still a good window into agency priorities. PRISON PRIVATIZATION AGAIN? Among the highlights: the Department of Corrections hinted that it may look for more privatization, though it hasnt nailed down any speci“ c plans. The prisons agency was at the center of a huge “ ght this past year over plans to privatize the prisons in the southern third of the state. That effort failed in a rare dramatic vote in the Senate this year, so one might question the legislative appetite for more debate on the idea. But the Senate could be a different place this year (see above mention of competitive legislative races.) The big opponents of prison privatization are both gone from the Senate end of the Capitol. Sen. Paula Dockery, R-Lakeland, is out of of“ ce entirely come next month and Sen. Mike Fasano, who led the revolt against the prison privatization plan last session, will be Rep. Mike Fasano come next month. He was term-limited and so ran to return to the House, and wont have an opponent on the November ballot. OTHER POLICY ISSUES The Department of Juvenile Justice made it clear it wants to upgrade several facilities, while the Department of Children and Families put lawmakers on notice that it believes in helping parents of children in the welfare system with drug treatment. € The Department of Economic Opportunity let it be known that the state isnt happy about throwing money at an animation company that later went bankrupt. In its legislative budget request, DEO asked lawmakers to set aside $500,000 to hire lawyers to go after the company, Digital Domain, to try to recoup some of the millions the state lost when it gave the company incentives only to see it close quickly and lay off almost everyone. € The state license plate agency, which technically goes by the unwieldy name of the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, said it plans to push forward with a plan to roll out new license plates that are more readable so cameras in toll booths dont make as many mistakes that cost the state money. € The agency also wants to centralize the distribution of plates, which is currently done by the various county tax collectors, but those tax collectors said this week theyll “ ght to keep that part of their job, in part because they fear theyll be blamed if some vendor gets it wrong. That issue will be discussed this coming week at the Tuesday Cabinet meeting. There was still more discussion of policy this week in Tallahassee … with two potentially wide-reaching and controversial issues being ” oated. TIGHTENING ETHICS AND ELECTIONS LAWS Incoming Senate President Don Gaetz said he wants to tighten state ethics and elections laws and maybe make some changes to the campaign finance system. The Niceville Republican said he wants to toughen con” ict-of-interest rules for lawmakers and make it easier for people to “ nd out about their legislators “ nances. One of his more controversial ideas may be to clamp down on elected officials who also get paychecks from other government agencies. Gaetz said he would like to prevent elected of“ cials from accepting other public-sector jobs … think university professor … if they dont have the background or prior competencyŽ to qualify for the jobs. Theres no detailed proposal yet, so watch for the issue to evolve over the coming several months. And Gov. Rick Scott, who has never looked very comfortable in political settings, got involved in a policy debate this week when he reacted to the strategic plan of the state Board of Education, which clumsily, perhaps, injected open discussion of racial disparities into the debate over how to eliminate those disparities. With an ultimate goal of getting all students to test at grade level, the board earlier this month put out a blueprint for improving student performance that included lower short-term achievement goals for black and Hispanic students than their white peers. The chairman of the board, Gary Chartrand, said it only makes sense that it will take longer for some underachieving students to reach certain benchmarks because theyre starting from a disadvantage. That those underachieving students are often minorities isnt always voiced, but the department set its goals by race rather than economic status or current achievement status. That led some black lawmakers to complain that the plan smacked of the racism of low expectations,Ž to borrow a phrase from former Gov. Jeb Bush. After the controversy came to light, Scott put out a statement acknowledging that the plan was poorly communicated. The actions taken last week by the State Board of Education in adopting their strategic plan did not clearly articulate our shared commitment to fully close that achievement gap for all students, regardless of race, geography, gender or other circumstance,Ž Scott said in a statement this week. Just as Scott has reached out of late to some of his previous adversaries … such as the state teachers union … on other issues, his willingness to concede the boards badly worded plan bought him some good will with African-American Democrats, at least for now. STORY OF THE WEEK: While the looming election continues to dominate the political and government landscape, the broad strokes of the legislative year began to take shape this week as state agencies put out budget outlines and the incoming Senate president rolled out an ethics idea. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: In an effort to maximize the states resources during dif“ cult economic times, the department proposes privatizing additional facilities.Ž That one sparse sentence … and only that sentence spelled out the Department of Corrections current thinking on the possibility of more efforts to privatize prisons.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)When’s the election? And, nally, some policyBrain Teaser 1 14 17 26 32 39 43 51 55 62 66 69 2 20 27 52 3 28 53 4 29 47 5 23 40 21 33 48 56 63 67 70 6 15 18 34 41 44 57 7 30 58 8 31 54 9 24 45 49 25 35 42 50 64 68 71 10 16 19 22 46 59 11 36 60 12 37 61 13 38 65 ACROSS 1. Workbench gripper 6. Take rudely 10. Con job 14. Lofty lair 15. Casino city 16. Hankering 17. Places for plaques 18. Familiar with 19. Bog fuel 20. ACE 22. Singer James or Jones 23. Demolition need 24. Let out, as fishing line 26. Daytona 500 org. 30. Boxing ring boundaries 32. Baltic Sea feeder 33. With cubes 35. Marsh plant 39. Edgar, painter of ballerinas 41. Mil. mail drop 42. Bald tire's lack 43. After-school 66Across, e.g. 44. Stinging remark 46. Peddle in the bleachers 47. __-face (show o f affection) 49. Fuel provides it 51. Syrian city 54. Sis's sib 55. __ sci (coll. major) 56. ACE 62. Place for a cooling pie 63. Horn sound 64. Stiller's mate 66. Twistable cookie 67. Slaughter in baseball 68. Passion 69. Shipped off 70. __ a soul (no one) 71. On the lamDOWN1. Crow's cry 2. Wife of Jacob 3. Folk's Guthrie 4. Place for grist 5. Pre-euro Barcelona buck 6. Sty sound 7. Taken-back car 8. Auth. unknown 9. Cram for an exam 10. ACE 11. Minotaur's home 12. Playing marble 13 Heavy __ music 21. Calvary letters 25. Digs made of twigs 26. Silent assents 27. Yemeni port 28. Nintendo rival 29. ACE 30. Satisfy, as a debt 31. Limburger emanation 34. Semi compartments 36. "In the headlights" critter 37. "West Side Story" faction 38. Whirling water 40. Go directly from first to third grade, say 45. Titanic totaler 48. Use saddle soap on, say 50. 98.6, body temperature-wise 51. Lhasa __ (Tibetan dogs) 52. River of Tours 53. Barkin or Burstyn 54. __ Wetsy (old doll) 57. Scottish isle 58. The Koh-i-__ d iamond 59. Prefix with dyne or drome 60. Carpentry groove 61. Libidinous god 65. "__ you for real?" American Prole Hometown Content 10/21/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 2 3 4356 378 7 8629 93 23417 8 32 7564 951 200 9 HometownContent 951 2684 3 7 748319562 623574981 517 843629 869752314 234691758 486 137295 175926843 392485176 C A W N O D S A P S O S L E A H A D E N L O I R E A R L O S E G A E L L E N M I L L C R A C K P I L O T P E S E T A S K I P I N R I S O F T E N G R U N T C A B S I O N A R E P O R E P A Y N O O R A N O N O D O R B E T S Y B O N E U P B E R G N E S T N O R M A L S U P E R S E R V E A E R O C R E T E D E E R D A D O A G A T E G A N G E R O S M E T A L E D D Y A R E St Marks River Cantina(850) 925-9908 Halloween Party & Costume ContestAnd Karaoke An An d Ka ra ok ok e e Saturday, October 27 7 pm 11 pm859 Port Leon Dr, Saint Marks, Fl 32355 MON-THURS. 10 am 10 pm SAT-SUN 10 am 11 pm 859 Port MO S Come dressed as your favorite spook

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Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Office deputies on road patrol Wednesday, Oct. 31 will have candy to distribute to children. If you see a road patrol deputy in your neighborhood, say hello and trick-or-treat at their vehicles. Sheriff Donnie Crum reminds residents that Halloween can be a fun holiday for children to dress up and trick-or-treat for candy, but there are a number of things to remember to make Halloween memorable for all the right reasons. Halloween is one of the most exciting times of the year for children, but sometimes the most hectic for parents. Nearly 94 percent of children between the ages of four and 12 participate in Halloween activities each year. € CHOOSE bright, ” ameretardant costumes or add re” ective tape to costumes and candy bags so children can be easily seen in the dark. In addition, carry a glow stick or ” ashlight. € PLAN a trick-or-treating route in familiar neighborhoods with well-lit streets. Avoid unfamiliar neighborhoods, streets that are isolated or homes that are poorly lit inside or outside. € NEVER send young children out alone. They should always be accompanied by a parent or another trusted adult. Older children should always travel in groups. € ALWAYS walk younger children to the door to receive treats and dont let children enter a home unless you are with them. € BE SURE children do not approach any vehicle, occupied or not, unless you are with them. € DISCUSS basic pedestrian safety rules that children should use when walking to and from houses. € CONSIDER organizing a home or community party as an alternative to trick-ortreating.Ž € MAKE sure children know their home phone number and address in case you get separated. Teach children how to call 911 in an emergency. € TEACH children to say NO!Ž or this is not my mother/fatherŽ in a loud voice if someone tries to get them to go somewhere, accept anything other than a treat, or leave with them. And teach them that they should make every effort to get away by kicking, screaming and resisting. € REMIND children to remain alert and report suspicious incidents to parents and/or law enforcement. CONSIDER checking the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) web site for information regarding sex offenders and predators in the area you intend to trick-or-treat. Child safety is vital year round, but Halloween is an especially important time for parents and children to pay extra attention to their surroundings and not let their guard down,Ž said Sheriff Crum. Parents need to exercise a few basic safety precautions to help ensure that Halloween is both fun and safe. Halloween is a time of special fun and making special memories with your children. Dont let that be spoiled by not taking time to ensure your childs safety.Ž www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 – Page 15B Happy Halloween Trick-or-treat tips CRAWFORDVILLE_______________ GULF COAST LUMBER & SUPPLY ....ALL DAY ‘TIL 5 THE WAKULLA NEWS ...................................... ‘TIL 5 WAKULLA COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTION’S OFFICE ........................ALL DAY ‘TIL 5 WAKULLA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER’S OFFICE ..............................................ALL DAY ‘TIL 5 SONIC DRIVE IN ........................................ALL DAY WINN DIXIE ................................................ALL DAY ADVANCE AUTO PARTS .................ALL DAY ‘TIL 8 BADCOCK HOME FURNITURE AND MORE ......................................ALL DAY ‘TIL 6 BLUEWATER REALTY ROSE ALLEY ..........12 6NORTH POINTE CENTER______________________ AMERIFIRST HOME MORTGAGE .ALL DAY ‘TIL 5 LISA’S LISTINGS REAL ESTATE ..................3 6 THE LITTLE BLACK DRESS ..........................3 6 THE LEARNING CURVE ...............................4 6MEDART _________ EDEN SPRINGS NURSING & REHAB .........FALL FESTIVAL ........6:30 8:30 KANGAROO EXPRESS ...............................2 8 MIKE’S PAINT & BODY ...............ALL DAY ‘TIL 6 AMS MARINE SUPPLY ....................................... ALL DAY ‘TIL 6 BEST WESTERN PLUS Wakulla Inn & Suites ..........................DAY ‘TIL 7 THE INN AT WILDWOOD ..................DAY ‘TIL 8Offered to Costumed Children The Following Businesses Wish you a Safe and Happy Halloween AND Invite You to Stop By for Trick or Treats CHAT of Wakulla, Inc. (Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment ) Pet Costume Contest Entry Fee $ 5 (Registration 1 pm) Categories: Best Costume Scariest Costume Prettiest Costume Prizes for first, second and third place Sunday, October 28th, 2012 CHAT Adop on Center, 1 Oak St., Crawfordville, FL Free ice cream for fosters and volunteers P e t C o s t u m e C o n t e s t P e t C o s t u m e C o n t e s t P e t C o s t u m e C o n t e s t C o o k O u t & I c e C r e a m C o o k O u t & I c e C r ea m C o o k O u t & I c e C r e a m (Donation) (Donation) (Donation) The fun starts at 1pm The fun starts at 1pm The fun starts at 1pm Visit chatofwakulla.org for more information, and registration forms ALSO OFFERED: AKC Good Citizens Te st. For more information visit http://www.akc.org/. Cer cate can be obtained from AKC for $8 Cost: $ 15 per dog

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Page 16B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy SHERRI KRAEFT Wakulla 4-H AgentKids and animals are a natural “ t. The animals will patiently listen to all the youthful fantasies and challenges, and the children learn to be responsible for a dependent creature. The UF/IFAS Wakulla County 4-H program offers youth a wide variety of animal projects designed to develop the skills and knowledge required to properly care for an animal. We currently have a dairy goat club, Kapra Kids, as well as a horse club, Horsemasters. For the younger youth, small animal projects include dogs, cats, rabbits and hamsters and are open to children six years of age to 18 years of age. Large animal projects include horses, cattle and swine, and are open to children eight years of age to 18 years of age. Youth in the older category can exhibit large animals in 4-H sponsored shows and, with some restrictions, in open shows. The North Florida livestock show circuit also offers other 4-H opportunities. For a number of years, youth from Wakulla County have participated in the North Florida Fair, Area A shows as well as the State Fair in Tampa with their goat and horse projects. Youth can participate in livestock judging competitions and exhibit their knowledge of a particular species. UF/IFAS 4-H sponsored shows are held in Gadsden, Madison and Jackson Counties and welcome 4-Hers from north Florida and south Georgia. 4-Hers with livestock projects can add to their awards resume in these shows. Area open shows where eligible 4-Hers can practice their skills include the North Florida Fair and the Wakulla County Youth Fair Association Swine show. To prepare 4-Hers with livestock project for the show season, a series of classes is being held at the UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce. There will be two series of classes offered depending on the age of the youth interested. For youth who are between the ages of “ ve and seven as of Sept. 1, we will be offering Pocket PetsŽ classes designed to introduce small, live animals to children. These activities will include a farm tour, basic grooming and care as well as feeding and selecting the appropriate animal for a particular interest. Pocket pets include rabbits, chickens, cats, dogs as well as gerbils, hamsters and aquarium animals. For the older youth, activities to learn about animal husbandry, care and nutrition as well as traditional and agricultural practices as well as safety precautions will be discussed. Each experience will be utilizing many local resource instructors as well as animal and youth professionals to teach at each activity. Older youth are encouraged to participate with larger show animals that include swine, sheep, goats, or steers. Youth wishing to participate should contact the Wakulla County 4-H Agent at the Extension Of“ ce at 9263931 for details about how to enroll in 4-H and when meetings will take place. For more information on 4-H and 4-H Livestock project, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce at 850-926-3931 or at Wakulla. ifas.u” .edu or like Wakulla County 4-H on Facebook. Staff ReportOn Saturday, Nov. 3, at Hudson Park hundreds of people will come together for a single purpose, to raise awareness of hunger that exists in Wakulla County. The “ rst Empty Bowls event will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Hundreds of handpainted bowls by those in the community will be on display and available to purchase along with a bowl of soup for $15. The bowls will serve as a reminder of all the empty bowls in the county and the people who are struggling to put food on the table. Participants will be able to pick out their favorite bowl and then “ ll it with one of 15 different soups made by those in the community. There will also be fresh bread and a drink included. Along with the soup, there will also be music and a play, Stone Soup,Ž performed by children, a bake sale and craft vendors. All proceeds from this event will go to purchase food for the local food pantries. Along with the event, Farm Share will be at Hudson Park from noon to 3 p.m. to distribute nonperishable and some fresh produce to the seven food pantries, as well as families who are in need. The goal is to continue awareness raising about food insecurity in Wakulla at the same time that we provide food distribution and some money in the bank to help our pantries,Ž said Gail Campbell, executive director of Healing Arts of Wakulla County, which is sponsoring the event. Call 926-3526 or 5674212 for tickets. Children, 13 and under, are $5 at the event, ceramic bowl is not included.4-H has variety of animal programs for youthEmpty Bowl fundraiser is set for Nov. 3 Painted ceramic bowls for the Empty Bowl event.



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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 41st Issue Thursday, October 25, 2012 Three Sections Three Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe Wakulla Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Senior Citizens ..............................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Election 2012 ...................................................................Page 8B Thinking Outside the Book ............................................Page 10B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 11B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 11B Comics ...........................................................................Page 13B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 14B INDEX By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netFor the rst time in a couple years, the county received some positive signs regarding the economy. County Administrator David Edwards said preliminary numbers for the end of the 2011-12 scal year shows the county with a positive of nearly $1 million. This is due to the county not spending all that was budgeted, over collection of ad valorem taxes and state revenues coming in higher than anticipated, he said. The county also learned that the unemployment rate has decreased to 6.5 percent for September, which is the fth lowest in the state. This time last year, the unemployment rate was 8.7 percent. These are positive signs for Wakulla County, Edwards said. We feel real good about how we are progressing. In 2009-10, the county ended the year with a deficit of $2 million, said Edwards. Weve recovered from that $2 million de cit. Commissioner Mike Stewart said, Were still coming out of this deep hole, but weve come a long way. The county has a plan, Edwards said, and the commission has stuck to that 5-year plan. There have also been some administrative changes to make government run more ef ciently and effectively, he said. Such as moving county nance back over to the clerk of court. Its really meshed, Edwards said. The idea is to create a good, sound, stable government, he added. In turn, this will bring more businesses to the county which will lower unemployment and help our economy, he said. Creating the 5-year plan for the county caused the administration to perform an internal operational audit, he said. It made us look at changes, Edwards said. Although Edwards said the county government is progressing toward a positive direction, he recognized the upcoming challenges that must be faced. The numbers have not be audited and may not be the nal number at the end, added Deputy Clerk Greg James. One challenge is the wastewater treatment plant: It was projected to reach capacity two years from now, but Edwards said it is already there. The county will have to do something this year to increase capacity. Edwards said the county had a plan for upgrading the WWTP, but has to move that up two years. The county plans to use its engineering consultant and have them come up with some options of how to upgrade the plant in the most ef cient and cost effective way possible. James said the county will look at state revolving low-interest loans, as well as grants. Edwards also pointed out the possibility of using RESTORE Act funds. But that will depend on how long it takes for the county to see that money. Another factor is recouping money spent on projects due to Tropical Storm Debby from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The county spent around $500,000 and has yet to see a dime. Edwards said he met with FEMA representatives last week and stated the countys case. FEMA has said that some Debbyrelated expenses will not be covered. However, the county is going to continue to ght it. FEMA is establishing an of ce in Wakulla County to handle the public assistance for governments and some non-pro ts. Well see where it goes, Edwards said. Moving forward, the county needs to save and have a reserve for a storm event. We cant rely on FEMA, he said.County goes from deficit to surplusFacing a $2M de cit in 2010, the county now has a $1M surplus County Administrator David Edwards By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe second bi-partisan forum by the Wakulla Democratic and Republican committees was held on Oct. 22 and featured the candidates for Florida House District 7 and Wakulla County superintendent of schools. Candidates for the newly created District 7, which includes Calhoun and Liberty counties and portions of Wakulla, Gadsden, Leon and Jackson counties, are Democrat Robert Hill and Republican Halsey Beshears. Hill, of Bristol, currently serves at the clerk of court and county administrator for Liberty County. Beshears, of Monticello, is the chief nancial of cer of Simpson Nurseries and is the president of Total Landscape Supply. During the forum, it became clear that the candidates agree on numerous issues, including job creation being their top priority, as well as their opposition to prison privatization. Hill said he is 100 percent against privatizing the prisons. In addition to jobs, many correctional institutions have inmate work crews that perform jobs within their counties that saves a lot of money. He added of privatization, Im not convinced its a money-saving situation. Beshears agreed and said privatization only saves a small amount and this is because they do not take medically challenged or dif- cult inmates. It wouldnt work here, he said. The candidates also agreed that there needed to be oversight of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and less restrictions and regulations on the agriculture and shing industries. What the candidates didnt agree on was whether they supported offshore drilling off the coast. Hill said he did not and felt what the coastal communities are dealing with because of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 is scary enough. He added that a spill can threaten the fishing and seafood industries. Beshears was in support of offshore drilling. He added that there can be safe offshore drilling as long as it is monitored so the coast is protected. Hill says his varied experience as a math teacher, school superintendent, county administrator and clerk of court gives him a unique insight to the needs of small rural counties. I am ready to lead, he said. I am ready to serve. Continued on Page 15A Thousands of festival-goers turned out for Saturdays Stone Crab Festival in St. Marks, marking the beginning of stone crab season and those succulent claws. This years event featured a superhero parade in addition to arts & crafts and music and seafood. Here, a young man gets his face painted at a booth at the festival. For more photos, see Page 9B.Staff ReportDrivers can expect lane closures on U.S. 319 on Monday, Oct. 29, and Tuesday, Oct. 30, south of the Wakulla-Leon county line to down to a half-mile north of State Road 267. Lane closures will remain in effect from 6:30 p.m. until 6:30 a.m. A Florida Department of Transportation crew will be performing evaluations on the roadway. Lane closures on 319 next weekStone crab funPHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSEN Forum features House, superintendent candidates CANDIDATES: For House District 7, Halsey Beshears, top left, Robert Hill, top right. For Superintendent of Schools, Kimball Thomas, below left, Bobby Pearce, bottom right.HAPPY HALLOWEENSee Trick-or-Treat Page on 15BFALL FESTIVALSSee listing on Church, Page 6A

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe record of one of the candidates running for Wakulla County sheriff has been the topic of discussion in a mailer sent out to voters last week, as well as a push poll and political ads questioning his qualifications. In an effort to try and set the record straight, candidate Charlie Creel sat down with The News and opened his Florida Highway Patrol personnel le last week. In his 30-year career as a trooper, Creel received one letter of reprimand. This reprimand was the subject of a mailer that was sent out last week by the electioneering communications organization, Florida First Forever in Tallahassee. The incident happened in March 1981 and involved a high-speed chase where Creel red his revolver at a eeing vehicle while in pursuit. According to the internal investigation documents in Creels personnel le, Creel pulled the vehicle over to the shoulder, but the driver didnt come to a complete stop and sped away. Creel pursued the vehicle. Other law enforcement agencies joined in the pursuit. The report indicates that the driver ran into the side of pursuing law enforcement cars and rammed police cars. While giving chase, Creel called in to his supervisor to ask if he could re his weapon at the tire to stop the vehicle. His supervisor told him not to fire his weapon, but Creel had already red his weapon, missing the tire and hitting the rim. Eventually, the vehicle was surrounded by law enforcement vehicles and came to a stop. Creel said he red the weapon before receiving an answer from his supervisor. He had asked for permission to cover himself, he said. But an opportunity presented itself before hearing back from his supervisor and he took it, he said. I stand by my decision, Creel said. Creel fired at the tire when the vehicle had slowed down from 120 mph to 20 mph while making a U-turn. Creel said he was in a non-congested area and there were no civilian vehicles around or houses in the area. The car was right outside Venice and he felt he needed to stop it before it reached the city. We were going into a congested area, Creel said. He added that prior to this, the car he was chasing had rammed a police of cers car and he didnt consider it simply a traf c violation then. It was a very violent car chase, Creel said. The man was charged with reckless driving, attempting to elude a police of cer, aggravated assault with a motor vehicle, resisting arrest without violence, driving while license suspended and improper tag. The North Port Police Department also charged the subject with battery on a police of cer. In the internal investigation letter sent by Creels supervisor, Cpl. J.C. Lape, said, At the time Trooper Creel red his revolver at the fleeing vehicle only misdemeanor charges were apparent. He added that Creel exceeded his authority in using deadly force to prevent the escape of a fleeing misdemeanant. Creel said originally FHP was going to give him three days off, but lowered it to a letter or reprimand after he stated his case. I feel to this day, I was justi ed, Creel said. The mailer that was sent out cites this incident and states that Creels le was not exemplary. Creel defends his record in a Letter to the Editor in this weeks News, contending his record is exemplary. Daniel Burns, chair of Florida First Forever, said, We investigated Mr. Creels personnel file and found an event that seems less than exemplary. Mr. Creel was involved in an incident where he appeared to use bad judgment, and blatantly disregarded the chain of command that is so important to the safety of the law enforcement community. Creel contends that one letter of reprimand, no citizens complaints and numerous letters of commendation for a 30-year career is something. My le is exemplary, Creel said. Ill put it up against anybodys. Creels opponent Major Maurice Langston said he had nothing to do with the mailer. I dont endorse the mailer at all, and if it were in my power, I would put an end to these third party groups, Langston said. Im focused on telling the voters what my plan is to make Wakulla County the safest community in the state, and I am con dent that they will support me based on that, not on anything coming from a third party group. There have been rumors circulating that Langstons consultant hired for his campaign are behind the mailer. When asked about this, Langston said, Ive told my consultant not to engage in third party activities in this race. Burns describes Florida First Forever as a watchdog organization that advocates for smaller government, more accountability from our elected officials, and more transparency from the political process. Some contributors to the group include healthcare and insurance companies, as well as the Florida Chamber of Commerce, Committee for Florida Justice, Citizens for Honesty in Politics and People in Need of Government Accountability. The group also has a connection to Conquest Communications Group, the company that is believed to have performed the push poll in Wakulla County that focused heavily on the sheriffs race. Questions in such polls are framed negatively to push the voter into a bad opinion of a candidate. In the Creel calls, questions were asked about whether the voter would support a candidate for sheriff who was divorced, or who had been reprimanded. Creel contended the calls distorted his personal and professional life. Florida First Forever paid CCG for services in 2010. There is nothing for CCG listed this year, as of Oct. 23.Candidate defends his record against critical mailer SHERIFF CANDIDATES: Charlie Creel, left, is criticized in a recent mailer for a shooting incident when he was with the Florida Highway Patrol. His opponent in the race, Major Maurice Langston, denied involvement and said he has told his campaign consultant not to engage in third party activities. The mailer received by Wakulla voters, below. 926-6040WWW.SAFEWAYWATERBYSLMCO.COM SafewayWater by SLMCOWhole house ltration systems Water softeners & conditioners NO-SALT water conditioners Iron & Sulfur removal systems Drinking water systems Expert well water treatment ~ WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT CENTER ~ Better taste ... Better health ... Better on your budget ~ WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT CENTER ~ Better taste... Better health... Better on your budget! WATER QUALITY REPO RT Call today for a free water report For your community!Or call today for a free water test and analysis. We will test for: TDS, IRON, IRON BACTERIA, CHLORINE LEVELS and HARDNESS And give you the results right on the spot!NO OBLIGATION NO PRESSURE NO NONSENSE FACTORY DIRECT PRICING!!!$11700 OFFWITH THIS ADEXPIRES: 10/31/12WHOLE HOUSE SYSTEM!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 5, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 9260919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 25, 2012 The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 5, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 9260919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 25, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 5, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 9260919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 25, 2012 The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, December 3, 2012, beginning at 5:00 P.M., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. The proposed amendment is included in a proposed ordinance entitled: Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.OCTOBER 25, 2012 NO FINAL ACTION ADOPTING THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT WILL BE TAKEN AT THESE MEETINGS. Notice of Public Hearings Concerning Small Scale Map Amendment to the Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map, Change of Zoning and Site Plan Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.OCTOBER 25, 2012 The Wakulla County Planning Commission and/ or Board of County Commissioners propose to consider the following applications. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, December 3, 2012 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.OCTOBER 25, 2012 NOTICEDonnie R. Sparkman, CFA, Property Appraiser for Wakulla County has given nal certication of the 2012 Wakulla County Tax Roll to the Wakulla County Tax Collector as of October 16, 2012.OCTOBER 25, 2012 In accordance with Section 121.055, Florida Statutes, Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners intends to designate the following positions to the Senior Management Service Class in the Florida Retirement System: Director of Inter-Governmental Affairs Director of Probation Services Director of Employee Support ServicesOCTOBER 25, NOVEMBER 1, 2012

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By RACHEL PIENTA Charles Dickens wrote that, charity begins at home, and justice begins next door. Charity and justice are ip sides of the aid coin. If charity means volunteering in a soup kitchen then justice means working to end the inequalities that make soup kitchens necessary. More speci cally, foreign aid charity responds to an immediate need such as hunger. In the foreign aid realm, justice addresses long-term conditions and promotes social change in institutions, policies and systems. When I think about foreign aid, I think about what makes our nation great and think of my own good fortune to have been born an American. Then I consider the words of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who said, We cannot stop terrorism or defeat the ideologies of violent extremism when hundreds of millions of young people see a future with no jobs, no hope, and no way to catch up to the developed world. An oft-quoted axiom originates from Scripture; Romans 3:1-8 tells us that With privilege comes great responsibility. Americans take this phrase to heart. This thinking guides us regardless of political af liation to be a nation that gives, both at home and overseas. During his administration, President Obama has made foreign aid a priority as an avenue to ensuring global economic stability and as a national defense strategy. Foreign aid is a good investment in our economy at home as well as in our domestic security. A mere 1.4 percent of the nations annual budget is spent on foreign aid. Known as the International Affairs Budget, that 1.4 percent equated to $48 billion in 2011. That 1.4 percent funds the State Department as well as other aid and assistance programs such as military aid to Israel, a $100,000 grant that led to $61 million of U.S. exports to Morocco, and Counternarcotics programs in Mexico and funding for budget items such as a $100,000 US Trade & Development Agency grant to a small New Jersey company that created jobs at home. Ernesto Cortes wrote, What is owed in justice should never be given in charity. That doesnt mean we shouldnt feed the hungry, however, it does mean we should also address why the people are hungry in the rst place. As the ancient Chinese proverb says, Give a Man a Fish, Feed Him for a Day. Teach a Man to Fish, Feed Him for a Lifetime. With foreign aid, America helps teach the world to sh and ensures global security, at home and overseas. Rachel Pienta is the chair of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee.By JONATHAN KILPATRICK Americans have been, and continue to be, an incredibly generous people. Whenever there is a crisis, whether it is an earthquake, tsunami or any disaster anywhere in the world, Americans respond to meet the needs of people in distress. As a nation, our government also gives approximately $70 billion all around the world in foreign aid. Recently Gov. Mitt Romney said that our foreign aid would have three purposes. First, our foreign aid should be used to combat humanitarian crisis when and where it occurs. When the earthquake struck in Haiti, the United States jumped into action. Rescue workers began to ow into Haiti almost immediately. The U.S. Air Force developed ight plans that would maximize the amount of shipments that could be delivered in the shortest amount of time. Efforts such as these and many like it, are a hallmark of Americas generosity. Secondly, Gov. Romney indicated that U.S. foreign aid should be used to foster a substantial United States strategic interest, be it military, diplomatic or economic. U.S. foreign aid rebuilt Europe after World War II and that policy continues to pay dividends. We have areas of the world that are vital to our national interest and foreign aid today will reduce the risk of military involvement in the future. Lastly, Gov. Romney indicated that his administration would use foreign aid to elevate people and bring lasting change in communities and nations. Freedom is the best way to bring lasting change to people around the world economic freedom and individual freedom. Bringing free enterprise and economic prosperity allows nations to become self suf cient and can minimize the amount of future aid. While foreign aid has its place, when used appropriately, all taxpayer funds must be spent prudently. Sending aid to nations such as China and Russia defy explanation. China holds $1.1 trillion in U.S. debt, and we currently send taxpayer funds to China as foreign aid. We borrow money for China lter it through the U.S. federal government and send it back to China. Sending taxpayer money to nations that hate us and hate everything we stand for also should and must be eliminated. Loyalty and friendship of nations cannot and should not be bought with borrowed money.Jonathan Kilpatrick is the chair of the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee. Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Event is held to increase awareness of domestic violence Questions about outside groups in local campaigns Underwater Wakulla Oct. 11 TCC holds town hall meeting Sopchoppy Opry Gospel Concert to feature Fortress Solar electric systems installed at 2 local schools Dolphins frolic in Shell Point Man killed in Panacea shooting thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.COMMUNITY DEBATE is week e Wakulla News asked the local Democrat ic and Republican party chairs to respond to the question about the role of foreign aid. Leading up to the Nov. 6 election, e News will submit a question each week for the local parties to answer Do you have a question youd like asked, or did the question prompt a response from you? Send it to editor@thewakullanews.net.DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: REPUBLICAN RESPONSE:Editor, The News: An open letter to DEP Secretary Herschel Vinyard: The Panhandle Archaeological Society at Tallahassee (PAST) is pleased that DEP and the Florida Park Service is continuing the long-standing policy of allowing scuba diving in Wakulla Spring only for those with a strictly scienti c purpose rather than for recreational purposes. We believe that DEP is rightfully implementing its charge to balance (in the public interest) protection of the natural and cultural resources while affording the public ample recreation opportunity in allowing access to other springs that do not have the nationallyrecognized historic signi cance of Wakulla Spring. This propertys archaeological resources are signi cant and one archaeological component is the oldest, well-dated archaeological site in Florida with diagnostic artifacts recovered from in place, stratigraphic context (Rink et al. 2012). Because inland water tables were lower prior to 11,000 years ago many early (Paleoindian) sites are not only found above the modern water table on land, they are also found in drowned locations. Inundated sites are particularly important simply because they offer organic preservation of specimens that rarely survive on land such as bone and wood. The Wakulla Springs site (WA24) is an example of one of these inundated archaeological sites. This site includes the remains of an American mastodon (Mammut americanum) in shallow water as well as the famed Bone Room near the mouth of Wakulla Spring cave in a few hundred feet of water. Only four percent of Floridas human history is covered by written records, the rest is known only through archaeologicallydirected, multi-disciplinary investigations. The earliest and most rare sites, such as Wakulla Spring, are from the Paleoindian period, 13,500 years or more old. Investigation of these sites enables scientists and the general public to understand when and how people rst came to America. Such investigations have multi-disciplinary implications that will provide information on changes in earths climate and how people adapted to it. The non-renewable historical resources, such as the bone room in Wakulla Spring, even if they were unintentionally disturbed by recreational divers, would be forever be diminished or lost to scienti c inquiry as well as their future interpretation for the general public. Thank you again for DEPs judicious action to preserve Wakulla Spring. Sincerely, James S. Dunbar, PhD President, The Panhandle Archaeological Society at Tallahassee Of ce at the Department of Anthropology, FSU Editor, The News: The Fall Fashion Show Extravaganza was a tremendous success. The Coastal Optimist Club would like to thank everyone who helped us raise money to fund scholarships for Wakulla High School seniors. We especially appreciate our table sponsors: Bobby Pearce, Charlie Creel, Charles Stratton, PA, Friends By The Sea, LegalShield, North Florida Financial Corporation, Poseys Steam Room, Poseys Dockside Caf, Rock Landing Marina and the Wakulla Insurance Agency. Wed like to thank the generous people and businesses who volunteered or donated items: Badcock Furniture, Kathie Brown, Coastal Corners Store and Gas Station, Crums Mini Mall, Janice David, Dazzles Hair Studio, Howard Kessler, Lees Liquors, Dolly Moody, our music DJKay Gay, LMP Enterprises, Mikes Marine, our auctioneer Jerry Moore, Myra Jeans Restaurant, Brandy Pigott Oliver, ReNu U Spa, Jo Anne Strickland, Wakulla Discount Liquors, Wildwood Country Club and Winn-Dixie. With their fabulous support we were able to accomplish our fundraising efforts and support our students even in these dif cult economic times. A big thank you goes to all those who attended the Fashion Show, took home auction or raffle items and made it so much fun. Thank you! Jo Ann Daniels Secretary Carol Ann Williams Director Editor, The News:My minor son was involved in a vehicle accident two weeks ago in Wakulla County. My gratitude goes out to Wakulla EMS, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and Deputy Clint Beam and Wakulla County Fire Rescue. They all went above and beyond the call of duty, even staying to help him locate personal items thrown from the vehicle. The courtesy, compassion and professionalism shown was amazing. I was out of town and could not be there with him, and that is hard for a parent. I TRULY cannot thank you all enough. Sincerely, Samantha Taylor sammyjo3774@yahoo.comThe issue: Foreign aidEditor, The News: In Wakulla local elections, it never is about Democrats or Republicans. Next time youre out and about, take time to look at all the campaign signs on the lawns of many Wakulla homes. Many homes have a mixture of candidates with differing political party af liations. Democrat, Republican, NPA. You would think we are a county of independent voters. Thats not a bad thing. What seems to matter is what the individual candidate represents. Voting on pure party af liation is not what we are about. Both local parties do a good job in bringing awareness to state and national campaigns where many residents tend to vote on party loyalty. Locally, you may find that both the Democratic and Republican executive committees may even like some of the same candidates from the opposing party. Both local Democratic and Republican executive committees are even mulling over a potential endorsement of candidates from the opposite party. I think the recent joint bi-partisan debates are a good thing for the community, I also think that the two local political parties may have more in common in liking and potentially supporting the same candidates in some local races. I guess you could call that real bi-partisanship. What is driving this? In my opinion, unlike state or national races, local races can have a direct and immediate impact on your future and your life. Why would you back a candidate from your own party if you have a job in Wakulla that is being run by someone from the opposite party that you support? Why would you back someone from your own party when you have a good friend and a candidate that you have known for years and who happens to be from the opposite party? Also, would you vote for a candidate of a party when that candidate does not even act to promote the very basics of the partys reason for existing? Not Republican enough or Democratic enough doesnt cut it here locally. When a Republican Party representative is telling you to support a high taxing candidate or a Democratic representative is telling you to support a candidate who wants to slashing of public programs, thats just a bunch of malarkey and really just a code word for vote party and not what may be in your best interest. Oh, and malarkey is a bi-partisan word. Gordon McCleary gmanmac@gmail.com Coastal Optimist Fashion Show was success Gratitude for attention to son in wreck Decision on scuba diving supported Wakulla elections not about partyREADERS WRITE:A letter to the editor in last weeks paper, Remember postage when mailing ballot, gave the impression that if voters dont put enough postage on their absentee ballots, their votes wont be counted. Supervisor of Elections Henry Buddy Wells wanted to reassure voters who are mailing in absentee ballots that his of- ce has made arrangements with the U.S. Postal Service to have all absentee ballots delivered so they can be counted. Because of the size of the ballot, it costs 65 cents to mail in an absentee. The supervisors of ce is covering any insuf cient postage.Clari cation

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 5Areaders speak out More OpinionsMORE READERS WRITE:Charlie Creels response to mailer Mike Stewart questions opponents tactics Richard Harden explains his candidacy Candidate not at forum was troubling Supporting Emily Smith for commissioner Current sheri administration is excellent John Shu s experience needed on board Editor, The News: I would like to thank The Wakulla News for researching and confirming what was suspected: Howard Kesslers camp was behind the negative mailers that recently came out against me, although they denied they were. It is unimaginable for me to think that my family could ever spend $25,000 to attack my opponent. Three questions that come to mind are: 1. How can a spouse spend $25,000 without their closest con dant knowing? 2. If this was done in response to events that happened in the 2010 race, a race I didnt run in, why negatively attack me? 3. Do they have so much extra money that they feel they need to spend an amazing $25,000 on attack ads? If he has that type of money, how can he relate with the hard working locals of Wakulla County? Couple the amount of money he is spending to attack me, with the fact that he is openly running out of his district, and it makes you really wonder why he is so aggressively pursuing being a commissioner again. These are questions that really need to be considered. After the ads came out, I was advised I should use the same tactics. Folks, Im not going there. I will be happy to talk about issues and concerns voters may have, but I will not stoop to the levels demonstrated by the Kessler campaign. If this costs me an election, then so be it. I will walk away with my head held high knowing that my time on the board was spent trying to move Wakulla County in the right direction. As always, those who have questions about the issues should feel free to contact me. Mike Stewart Candidate County Commission, Dist. 3Editor, The News: I would like to take this opportunity to share with you why I am campaigning for Wakulla County Commissioner District 5 and feel I am the best choice to serve the citizens of our county. I grew up in Wakulla County and was raised on land that has been in our family for six generations, since 1859. From an early age my family taught me the ethics, values and faith that have guided me throughout my life. I graduated from Wakulla High School in 1992 and decided I wanted to serve my country as my grandfather, father, uncles and cousin had done before me. I joined the U.S. Air Force and was stationed overseas for two years in Okinawa and then later spent six months in Saudi Arabia. Sometimes you have to lose what it is you have to really appreciate it and it was during this time away from our county that I rst knew that I wanted to one day serve my community. When I came back home, the local state prison, Wakulla Correctional Institution, was being built and I enrolled in Pat Thomas law Enforcement Academy to become a certified correctional officer. I was among the rst of cers to be hired at the new prison that at the time held less than 100 inmates. Over time as the prison grew both structurally and in population, I grew as well. I learned many valuable leadership principles that have served well as over time as I became more involved in my community. In 2005, an open seat became available on the Sopchoppy City Council and seeing an opportunity to serve my community I was elected as a city council member. The leadership principles I had learned became invaluable as I found continually the same scenario of having to nd solutions to challenges with little or no budgeted money to work with. I have been elected four times by the citizens serving over seven years on the city council. In that time I was fortunate to be a part of the visioning and guiding process of many project improvements that have made our community a better place to live. To name just a few, the historic train depot was restored, preserving local history, a new tennis park was built for our citizens to enjoy, improvements were made at the city park, a citywide sewer system was installed also resulting in all new paved streets, a Veterans Memorial was created in cooperation with a Boy Scouts Eagle Scout project, and a new city hall was constructed improving the quality of service being provided to the community. I have known for a while that I one day wanted the opportunity to serve the citizens throughout the entire county and decided that the next time the county commission seat for District 5 became available that I wanted to campaign and allow the citizens to give me an opportunity to serve them on a broader level. I have considered myself a public servant and not a politician. This is because I truly enjoy being part of the process of nding solutions to challenges and then seeing others in the community enjoy the bene ts. Each time I ride by and see citizens enjoying things that I had a part of creating it grati es me that I have made a positive difference in the lives of our community. I am not campaigning on any one issue, just simply the passion of being able to serve others and a desire to serve all of Wakulla County the same way I have our city. I am asking you to elect me and allow me the opportunity to serve our county the next 4 years as Wakulla County Commissioner District 5. I have been careful not to promise anything that I cant deliver on when elected but what I can promise is that I will serve you wholeheartedly and will always listen to your concerns and represent you in a way that you would be proud for me to represent our county anywhere in the state. Thank you and God Bless! Richard Harden SopchoppyEditor, The News: I would like to thank the citizens who attended the last League of Women Voters forum Thursday, Oct. 18, for the position of Sheriff of Wakulla County. I must say, Im disappointed Mr. Maurice Langston did not choose to attend. Surprising to me, especially since Thursday was the day most of the anti-Creel mailers went out. Surprising also, since both the professions of minister and law enforcement of cer are expected to be highly trained to handle many dif cult situations. Mr. Langstons career encompasses both these professions. I nd it hard to believe that Mr. Langstons training nor character to directly answer a few questions posed by the LWV in a public forum troubling. Blaming the Republican party helps neither Mr. Langston nor the citizens when they advised against it. Mr. Langston answered to a few political types instead of answering to the citizens of Wakulla of whom he hopes to represent which is the point of my concern. I would also like to thank Mr. Charlie Creel for his participation in the forum. Mr. Creel seemed to have no problem voicing his platform and answering all questions for this race and addressing the circumstances involved in the mailer, indicating a proactive approach to the position of Sheriff and the character necessary for the of ce. Candidate Creel also took the opportunity to speak to the citizens about the circumstances in the yer received in the mail just that day. This negative campaign piece, over-sized and over-exaggerated, was addressed bravely, succinctly and very well. The League applauds him for his candor. The League of Women Voters is independent and non-partisan and refuses to be in uenced by partisan interests as evinced by the local power structure that is, Democrat and Republican party chairs who attempted to limit citizen information through their actions on behalf of their candidates. The League is disappointed that all candidates did not participate, As limited information and exposure leaves voters with limited knowledge, which I hope was not the intent, but was the action. But I sincerely believe, the League of Women Voters of Wakulla forums have accomplished its goal: If any one citizen has learned information about candidates or issues that helped that citizen make a determination in casting their vote. I would also like to offer big thank you to Marilynn Wills, former state president and current state board member, for her analysis and review of the many Constitutional Amendments on this ballot. Remember, early voting starts Saturday, Oct. 27 and runs through Nov. 3. Election Day is Nov. 6. Your vote is your voice to ensure you have a say in Wakulla Countys future. Please exercise your right to vote and cast your ballot! Mary Cortese LWV Wakulla Editor, The News: As a candidate for sheriff of Wakulla County, I would like to respond to the citizens about a mailer that was received, last Thursday, by all registered voters (approx. 18,512) of Wakulla County. This is the vilest piece of negative campaigning I have ever witnessed. I made a pledge to which I stand by to this day that I would not revert to negative attack ads to destroy my opponent to win an election. People are tired of this nonsense in this election cycle. As Paul Harvey would say, and here is the rest of the story. The incident alluded to in the mailer happened in 1981 31 years ago and was taken directly from my Florida Highway Patrol personnel le. I attempted to stop a vehicle. The vehicle accelerated to a speed of 120 mph and struck several police vehicles. The vehicle then struck another vehicle driven by a City of North Port police of cer injuring the of cer. As we were entering a congested and wellpopulated area into the city of Venice, I requested from my supervisor permission to shoot the right rear tire of the vehicle in order to disable the vehicle and end the chase. As my supervisor was off duty and at home, before he could respond with an answer I shot the tire before we entered into the congested area. This is the reason I received a letter of reprimand for shooting from a moving vehicle. I gladly accepted it as in my heart I knew I had saved someone from being seriously injured or killed. The mailer also failed to state that the subject was charged and convicted of various traf c charges, assault with a motor vehicle and battery on a law enforcement of cer, and was a fugitive wanted for violation of probation. The mailer alleged I falsely stated that my law enforcement record was exemplary. I stand by that statement. After a 30-year law enforcement career and this incident being the only negative in my le to this day, I consider it exemplary. There may be more smear tactics to come, but they will not come from the Charlie Creel for Sheriff campaign. I would appreciate your vote on Nov. 6, for a truly FRESH START. Charlie Creel Candidate for Sheriff Editor, The News: Emily Smith is our best choice for county commissioner. I have known Emily Smith for several years and am impressed with her resourcefulness and her leadership. Emily is dedicated to making Wakulla County an outstanding rural community with familyoriented goals and an exceptional quality of life. Ive seen Emily work hard at whatever she undertakes. She has studied the issues that affect our countys citizens. Emily attends our County Commission and Planning Commission meetings, as well as many County-sponsored workshops. She has spent time within the Wakulla Gardens subdivision and has discussed possible solutions with local residents. Emilys first-hand knowledge of our countys biggest problems and current economic issues will allow her to help make the informed decisions that are the mark of an excellent commissioner. Emily is a strong leader and will work FOR the people and WITH the Board of County Commissioners to improve our county, with plans for smart growth and protection of our resources. I strongly recommend that voters research the candidates for the upcoming election. You can learn more about Emilys ideas and views by visiting her website: www.emilyforwakulla.com. Please join me in electing Emily Smith as county commissioner on Nov. 6th. Sandy Tedder Sopchoppy Editor, The News: I was very hesitant about writing this, because I know nothing about Charlie Creel or what he might bring to our county. But after a sleepless night and much prayer I felt led to give my opinion on what I do know. I feel the current sheriff administration is doing an excellent job. Over the past couple of years I have noticed such a change in our deputies. They seem to have a Christ-like character that I believe comes from being under submission to men that fear God. During our last ood I witnessed so many sheriffs employees standing in the rain, out protecting peoples property and lives. I am very concerned that people always wanting c hange could hinder what God is doing in our county. Our sheriff administration is teaching our deputies to care about others. They have always shown such courtesy to my wifes business by calling over the intercom for cars to pull out of our driveway when they make a stop. Other agencies dont always give us that respect. I have held off publicly supporting a candidate in this election, because of the way my wifes business was affected by me supporting someone my friends didnt like in the last election. After months of watching Fred Nichols stand beside Maurice Langston even though he knows his job could be affected if Creel wins, it made me realize that you need to stand for what you believe no matter what. I believe Maurice Langston cares about people, not quotas. The men and women under his command have the utmost respect for him. With Maurice Langston as our sheriff, I believe Wakulla will be able to take heed to Emmett Whaleys last message on earth. It was on Hebrews 13:17. Obey them that have the rule over you and submit yourselves for they watch for your souls, as they must give account that they may do it with joy and not grief, for that is unpro table for you. Ray Hutton Crawfordville Editor. The News: I am proud to be supporting John Shuff for the County Commission District 5 seat. Johns common sense approach to solving problems, experience working on numerous citizen committees, and love of the outdoors and world class environment we are all so fortunate to have in our backyard, make John my choice to help shape the future of our county. John has served admirably on numerous committees formed by county government over the years. He was a serious participant on the infrastructure committee, landscape committee, and others. He brought good ideas to the table and helped reach common ground and compromise. I like his approach and vision for dealing with the congestion on U.S. Highway 319. Focusing on improvements needed at Crawfordvilles ve main intersections while we wait for the funds needed to upgrade the highway between those intersections is a good one. He has also seen how often committees are appointed, work diligently to achieve results, only to have their ndings shelved or tabled upon completion. I think this will give John an experienced perspective on the role citizen committees can play in the future. As library director, I had the pleasure of working with John on the building addition to the Wakulla County Public Library. During the construction project, an issue arose concerning wheelchair accessibility. The older main part of the library met all ADA requirements but oversized motorized wheel chairs could not get through the front entrance. They could get into the planned addition, but once inside could still not enter the main library from the addition. By altering the plans slightly, John was able to redesign the entrance at no additional cost to the project. This is only one example of numerous issues that John helped solve. I am also a frequent user of the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center, another public facility built by John Shuff. It is my understanding that John had much input into the design and functionality of that building while keeping costs to a minimum. Today this multi-functional building serves the needs of many seniors and also countess other groups and organizations. Then there is the Old County Courthouse. As a resident occupant of this building from 1985 to 1993 it was quite easy to see what an historical gem it was. The Chamber of Commerce did an excellent job of pursuing grant funds and raising matching funds from the community to restore this one of a kind historic landmark but it was Johns vision and hard work that put the nishing touches on the State of Floridas oldest wooden courthouse. Johns experience building institutional structures will be invaluable as the county makes long needed energy ef cient upgrades to the heating, air conditioning, and lighting systems in our public buildings. Please join me in voting for John Shuff, County Commission District 5. Sincerely, Doug Jones Crawfordville

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Buckhorn NewsMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Ivan Assembly: Ivan Assembly of God will be hosting a Fall Festival on the evening of Oct. 31 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the church. Everything is free of charge! Trunk or Treat with games, giveaways, bouncers, hay-ride, cake walk, lots of candy, soup and chili, fried oreos and funnel cakes. Come out and bring the family. The church is located at 202 Ivan Church Road in Crawfordville. Phone number is (850) 926-4826. Wakulla Springs Baptist: Wakulla Springs Baptist Church will have pumpkins for sale through Oct. 31. The pumpkin patch will be open on weekdays from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. All proceeds go towards the garden ministry that supports local food pantries. A Harvest of Hope Pumpkin Patch Festival will be held at the church on Saturday, Oct. 20, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. with fun, food and games. The church is located at 1391 Crawfordville Highway. For more information, call 926-5152. Grace Baptist: Come enjoy an afternoon of free food, fun, games, a cake walk and fellowship for all ages at Grace Baptist Church on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. In addition, on every hour the short drama The Letter From Hell will be performed by the Live Out Loud Youth and Drama Ministry, Chosen Generation Youth ministries, and Friends in Christ Youth Ministry. Grace Baptist is located at 803 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 926-3217. Shady Sea Baptist: Shady Sea Baptist Church in Spring Creek a will be having a family fun day on Oct. 27, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be game booths, exhibits, free prize drawing for the kids every half hour, hay ride and a bounce house plus free hot dogs chips and sodas. There will also be a yard sale and donation drawing for gift certi cates to local restaurants with all proceeds going to the Shady Sea food pantry to help feed the needy in our community. It will be a day of fun and blessing for all so come join us and enjoy the day. Community festival: The third annual Community Fall Festival will be held at Spirit LIfe Church in Sopchoppy on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. There will be games for children and which will also include relay races, pumpkin carving, face painting and storytelling. Skits and live music will be performed by youth from various churches throughout the evening on a outdoor stage. Chili supper. To top off the evening there will be a hay ride. The festival is sponsored by Spirit Life Church, Sopchoppy United Methodist Church, Mt. Beasor Primitive Baptist Church and Panacea First Baptist Church bringing unity into our communities. The event is free of charge.Light vs. darknessPrayer Walk continuesBy ETHEL SKIPPER Thought for the week: What does it mean to walk in darkness? Jesus is the light of the world. He that followeth him shall not walk in darkness but shall have the light of life. Most children are afraid of the dark. Their own rooms, so familiar and comfortable in the daytime, become strange and mysterious places when the lights are turned off. But what a difference the light makes. A ip of the switch and the shadows disappear. Light brings vision, truth, and understanding. Childhood fears do not completely pass away when we grow up. Darkness still has the power to send a shudder through most of us. Who would not prefer to walk down an alley or through a cemetery in the full light of day rather than in the middle of night. Light can take away our fear and show us the way. Many people are walking in the light they know how Jesus is. The Pharisees were in the dark about who Jesus was they were also in the dark about who they were or where they came from or where they were going. At Burney Temple Church New Vision Deliverance Minister invite you to the anniversary of their pastor, Mary Harvey, on Oct. 24 through Oct. 28. Speakers will be Minister Herbert Franklin, Prophet J. Anderson, Minister K. Triplett. On Sunday, the speaker will be Elder A. Sanders. Night services will be at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at 11 a.m. Everyone is welcome. Happy belated birthday on Oct. 18 to Chinesta Smith from your family and friends.Church fall festivalsBy CYNTHIA WEBSTER Could I but be eloquent in my words I would tell you in some remarkable way of the many lessons I have learned over the four weeks of the Prayer Walk. However even though the eloquence is not there and little that I say will be all that remarkable, I am undeterred in sharing some of these things with you. Many of the walkers who come nearly every day have heard me say at one time or another, Oh, I hope someone is here to walk today. Why I say that is a mystery because I know that it is Gods Will as to who comes and who doesnt and, yes, everyday there are walkers. Some days more and others a few less but always a group large enough to please Him. Lesson 1: Faith is not a question of size but rather of strength. And as we stand under those beautiful old trees at Azalea Park waiting for the message and prayer we talk, we laugh, we rest at the picnic tables and we give praise. And then the time arrives to hear from whoever is giving the message for that day. Wakulla County may not have big shopping malls, bowling alleys, movie theatres or skating rinks but we do have men and women of great faith who are unbelievably gifted when sharing Gods Word. As we have listened to all who have come to lead the walk we have heard messages of great beauty, profound insight, intense passion, deep understanding, and powerful love. There are times when I just wish that we had the power to stop the cars going down Crawfordville Highway and tell those inside that they are missing something very special. Lesson 2: Our county is blessed with clergy who have been chosen by God to take His message to the people. The walk itself is a walk for National Healing. I thought that praying for our Nation was important, and it is. I knew that praying for our leaders is important, and it is. I understood that a spiritual reawakening could be sparked if Christians would stand up and stand out on their faith, and this is so. What I had not expected was what would happen to me. I began to see that my prayers were becoming less about things and more about establishing a closer relationship with God. Lesson 3: Be ready for surprises. There are many other lessons to be shared but would it not be so much more exciting to rearrange your schedule and nd for yourself friendship, fellowship and the power of prayer under the trees at Azalea Park? CLERGY SCHEDULE FOR WEEK FIVE Thursday, Oct. 25, at 6:25 p.m., Hudson Park (Note: time and location change so we could be part of the annual National Overdose Prevention and Education Candlelight Vigil) Pastor Mike Shockley, Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Friday, Oct. 26, 10 a.m. Pastor Ethel Skipper, Skipper Temple Church of Christ. Saturday, Oct. 27, 10 a.m. Youth Pastor David Allen, Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church. Monday, Oct. 29, 6:45 p.m. Pastor John Dunning, Spirit Life Church. Tuesday, Oct. 30, 6:45 p.m. Pastor Gerald Fielder, Good News Assembly of God. Wed., Oct. 31, 10 a.m. Pastor Kevin Hall of Sopchoppy and Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church. Note: Put on your calendar election eve, Monday night, Nov. 5, from 5:40 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. That will be the 40th night of the Forty Day Prayer Walk a time of prayer and hymn. There will be no walk. We invite every person of faith in Wakulla County to attend. Can you imagine Christians standing shoulder to shoulder, lling Azalea Park, lifting their corporate voice to Him? Bring a chair, a ashlight in case we run a little late and a jacket. This is a commitment that you can anticipate with joy. PHOTO BY K. MORGAN/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSamuel and Alyssa take part in the Prayer Walk.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 7A Church Briefs Open mic gospel sing at Pioneer BaptistPioneer Baptist Church will host a community-wide Open Microphone Gospel Sing on Friday, Oct. 26, at 7 p.m. Its free. Anyone who enjoys singing or playing gospel music is invited to participate. Others who enjoy listening are encouraged to attend and have a blessed night of worship through music. Pioneer Baptist Church is located at 486 Beechwood Drive., four miles east of Crawfordville, just north of the MLK Memorial Road and Spring Creek Highway intersection. Call Pastor Dennis Hall at 878-5224 for more information. Rehearsals begin for Handels MessiahA community choir will present Handels Messiah on Dec. 9 at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. Reba Mason will direct. The opportunity to be part of this program is available to anyone in the Wakulla community. Practice begins Sunday, Oct. 28 at 2:30 p.m. at the church. For more information, contact Reba Mason at 962-3804.. Quilt is being raf ed by Christ Church AnglicanChrist Church Quilters are raf ing a beautiful hand quilted queen-king size quilt. The pattern is Star-spangled Four Patch. Raf e tickets are now available, 6 tickets for $5 or $1 each. The drawing will be held after noon on Dec. 9, at Christ Church Anglican, 3383 Coastal Highway. You may call the church at745-8412 or Mary Lou Martin 210-1203 for more information or for tickets. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER It happened to me again this past week for the umpteenth time. The last time it happened, I promised myself it would never happen again, as long as I lived. So much for my promises, or maybe I died. I found myself stranded at the neighborhood grocery store. I meant to put gas in my car, honest I did. Somehow, it slipped my mind. I do not mind things slipping my mind if they are not important, and if it does not involve the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Unfortunately for me, this did. I dont mind lectures from my Beloved, if I could sometimes pick the topic. Topics like religion and politics would be a nice change. Her topic, which she never tires of, is my forgetfulness. At least I cant remember any other topic at the moment. My car was de nitely out of gas and I was going nowhere in it. My only recourse was to walk across the street to the store, and call my wife to come and bail me out of trouble. Every husband knows how dif cult this is because we have to do it so often. I went to the phone booth in the store and made the call. Then I went and took a seat to wait for her arrival. As I was waiting, I noticed an elderly gentleman come into the store. I call him a gentleman, but these days, who knows? This man walked into the store as if he was concerned about being followed. Every few steps he threw a glance over his shoulder as if someone was stalking him. Since I did not have anything to do for the next 20 minutes, I settled back to watch. When he got into the store, he cautiously walked around the store as if casing it. So many stores are being robbed; I didnt know but this man was planning to pull off a heist. My interest piqued, which kept my mind off the trouble I was in with my wife when she arrived to pick me up. When a person is in trouble, it is always a good thing to try to take ones mind off said trouble, and on someone who might be in more trouble than you are at the moment. At least, thats what I told myself at the time. When a person is facing trouble, he will say anything to himself to calm those jagged nerves. The man walked around the store several times, always glancing over his shoulder as if he expected something to happen. As far as I could tell, he was an ordinary man with no special features. He walked with a slow shuf e, but thats to be expected when a mans body ages. I saw him stand over against a corner for several minutes while he intently watched the front door. A little spooked by this time, I did not know if I should alert the manager or call the police. I envisioned the headlines in the newspapers the next day: Local pastor dies a heros death in the cross re. I sure would like to be a hero, but only in my own mind. In scanning the gentleman as best I could, I knew he could not have a large weapon on his person. The loose tting shirt revealed no bomb strapped to his chest, which was a little comforting. Then the gentleman began to move and I froze. My life ashed before me in an instant which bored me almost to death. I never want to experience anything like that ever again. My focus once again went to the gentleman in motion. What was he going to do? Gradually he eased up to the bakery department. I almost stood, but at my height, I would be an easy target. Its hard for anyone to miss a barn door, especially one with a ashy smile. I braced myself for what would happen next. Then it happened. The elderly gentleman, with one last glance over his shoulder, bought a chocolate clair. I was confused relieved but confused. What was all the secrecy about? About this time, I saw him slither toward the bench where I was sitting. Without looking at me, the man sank into the corner as though hiding from someone. He sat there for a few minutes and then he opened his bag with the clair. Just as he took his rst bite, someone recognized him, came up and said, Henry, is that a chocolate clair youre eating? He glanced at me and gave me one of those sick smiles that every husband recognizes. No matter how hard you try to keep something (like clairs) from your wife, it is impossible. There is a spiritual lesson here. No matter how hard you try to hide your sin, somewhere, somehow, when you least expect it, someone will see you. An Old Testament scripture lays down an important principle in this regard. But if ye will not do so, behold, ye have sinned against the Lord: and be sure your sin will nd you out. (Numbers 32:23 KJV.) David, the Psalmist, knew this and wrote, Search me, O God, and know my heart: try me, and know my thoughts: And see if there be any wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting. (Psalm 139:2324 KJV.) Live your life as though someone was watching you, because, Someone is watching you.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Your sin will find you out OUT TO PASTOR charlieforsheriff@gmail.comwww.charliecreel.comPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Afliation, for sheriff.Many of you have let me know you were offended by the desperate smear tactics used against me recently in my campaign for sheriff of Wakulla County. THANK YOU FOR STANDING BY ME. Negative campaigning is regrettable for obvious reasons, but especially since it draws attention away from the real issues Wakulla County is facing: a crime rate that is one of the worst in the state, mostly burglaries, which relate to drugs. Its time for law enforcement management that will enforce the laws and put criminals behind bars. As sheriff, I will strengthen the relationships between the sheriffs office, the fire departments, EMS and other law enforcement agencies. We must coordinate our efforts so that we protect what we love about this county, while looking to the future. The color of our uniforms shouldnt matter when ghting crime; we must work together. This election is about two choices. Either we continue down the same path, or we take a path with new direction, new ideas, where all citizens are treated fairly and equally, a leader with integrity and a positive approach to boost the morale of the deputies, provide innovation and budget consciousness. This election is very important to the future of Wakulla County. For a FRESH START with a FULL-TIME Sheriff, I ask for your vote on November 6th.To the people of Wakulla County, Home Cleaning Service WINNER Polly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065LICENSED AND INSURED CttiClCil R id id id id id id id id i id id d t il Special Touch Cleaning ServiceThank you so much for your constant support. As always, it is an honor and a privilege to serve you TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2012 Thank you Wakulla Readers!Bruce Johnson Construction Voted Best Builder 2012Building Quality Custom Homes for 31 years

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings CommunityNichols marries KokindaHolly Kokinda and Eli Nichols of Durham, N.C., were married on June 2 at the Lioncrest at the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, N.C. The of ciant was the Rev. Darryl Reynolds. The bride is the daughter of Charles and Lynn Kokinda of Moosic, Pa. The groom is the son of John and Susan Nichols of Crawfordville. The maid of honor was Annie Stankevich of Morristown, N.J. The bridesmaids were Shae Anderson of Greenville, N.C., Adya Baker of New York City, N.Y., Hattie Cutcliffe, Kelly Hathorn and Jenna McNeill, all of Durham, N.C., Rose Mathies of Austin, Texas, and Jamie Nichols of Crawfordville, sister of the groom. The owers girls were Kira Breeden of Cordova, Tenn., cousin of the groom, and Madelyn Keating of Wyoming, Pa., cousin of the bride. The best man was Chad Hall of Boca Raton. The ushers/groomsmen were Casey Camero of West Palm Beach, Charley Kokinda of Moosic, Pa., Ryan Radloff of Raleigh, N.C., Eli Gerrell of Panama City, Zach Maurides of Durham, N.C., and Zell Robinson of San Diego, Calif. The reception was held at the Lioncrest at the Biltmore Estate. The bride is a 2005 graduate of Wyoming Seminary College Preparatory School and graduated from Duke University in 2009 with a bachelor of science degree in biology. She is attending Duke University School of Medicine. The groom is a 2002 graduate of Wakulla High School and graduated from Duke University in 2006 with a bachelor of science degree in Mechanical Engineering and in 2007 with a Masters in Engineering Management. He is currently employed by Electric Supply Company of North Carolina. Holly Kokinda and Eli Nichols Boy Scout Troop 8s Flo takes rst at the Whatever Floats Your Boat Regatta. By DAVID DAMONUnit Commissioner, Troop 8When I rst heard about Whatever Floats Your Boat, a boat race using recycled materials sponsored by FSU Marine Lab at Turkey Point, it sounded like a great idea for our Troop 8 Boy Scout program. Water and boats mixed with recycled materials seemed like a natural t for our group of scouts. I brought it up at the next troop meeting and the scouts voted to do it. We had access to some used, medium sized plastic barrels and old straps used for binding shipping materials. We had some small trees that had been cut for a previous project involving lashing. Fortunately, in the rules, duct tape was also allowed. With an upcoming camping trip planned for St. George Island the weekend before the race, it was decided that this would be a great weekend project. On that camping Saturday, we began by rst duct taping the barrels together so theyd stay in place. Then, using the strapping and the small trees, we strapped and lashed it all together. Before long, we had a small, rather odd looking pontoon boat. After giving her a name and a quick christening ceremony using bottled water, Flo was ready for launching. This awkward looking craft moved through the water at a surprisingly quick clip. One week later on Sept. 6, at FSU Marine Lab, a group of strange crafts began to assemble and be assembled. A handful of scouts gathered around Flo, answering questions from the distinguished Whatever Floats Your Boat Regatta judges. After a thorough inspection, Flo was deemed seaworthy enough to take a shot at the race course. As for the other craft assembled, most had never been in the water before and parts tried to oat away or were balance-challenged as they hit the water. There was the large sea turtle made from plastic jugs with a crew of green girls. There was a 4 by 8 sheet of plywood with row after row of milk jugs duct taped to the bottom. There was even a canoe that was strip planked with rows of beer cans duct taped together. A couple even had sails. Finally, all of the contestants were more or less at the starting line as the starting horn was blown. As we rounded the rst mark, ahead of the fleet, it became apparent that we would stay ahead as long as Flo stayed together. After rounding two more buoys we headed for the nish line with a substantial lead. Troop 8 won the coveted rst place trophy. The scouts from Troop 8 were proud to receive the rst place trophy made of miscellaneous metal parts welded together, spray painted gold and mounted to a nice wooden base. They were gracious as they towed the very determined turtle and her tired crew over to the line of spectators. After the race everyone gathered for food and music at the FSU Marine Lab. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBoy Scouts paddle to rst place at regattaAir Force Reserve Airman 1st Class Christopher T. Dolan graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical tness and basic warfare principles and skills. Dolan is the son of Nedine Dolan of Alligator Point. He is a 2007 graduate of Wakulla High School.Dolan graduates from Air Force basic training WAKULLA COUNTY CAN COUNT ON ROBERT HILL People you trust,TRUST ROBERT HILL... www.RobertHill4House.com | http://twitter.com/hill4house | www.facebook.com/RobertHill4House For Real Experience, Sound Judgment and Proven Experience you can count on, ELECT ROBERT HILL to the Florida House! You can count on my friend Robert Hill. He is a man of integrity, a public servant we can trust and a leader who will listen. Brent Thurmond, Wakulla County Clerk of the Courts We recommend Robert Hill To support Public Education To create Jobs To advocate for State Employees To protect Gun Rights To ght Prison Privatization To oppose New Taxes Political advertisement paid for and approved by Robert Hill, Democrat, for Florida House of Representatives District 7

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 9Aeducation news SchoolTeachers and employee of the month are announced Special to The NewsOctober Teachers of the Month are Medart Elementary Schools Ginger Pooser and Wakulla Middle Schools Kathy Spivey. Wakulla High Schools Employee of the Month is paraprofessional Patricia Broadway. Superintendent David Miller and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the dependability and dedication these employees bring to the District, as well as the positive attitude they display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. Pooser started her career as a reading teacher at Kate Sullivan Elementary School and was hired as a primary teacher at Sopchoppy Elementary in 1978. Pooser has been a kindergarten teacher at Medart Elementary School since 1995. Pooser grew up in Tallahassee and graduated from FSU with a bachelors degree in Education. Working for the Wakulla County School District has been a dream job for Pooser. She said, Working side by side with dedicated people who work hard encourages me to put forth my best effort. Pooser said, I look for the special qualities of each child. Teaching is never boring. I learn something new every year. Medart Principal Sharon Kemp applauds Poosers dependability and knowledge, Ms. Pooser rarely takes time off during the school year. She comes to work early, assists others and helps with afterschool activities such as Title I Parent Training meetings. As kindergarten grade level chairperson and as a veteran teacher, others teachers and I look to her for guidance. Also recognized as an October Teacher of the Month is Wakulla Middle Schools eighth grade teacher, Kathy Spivey. Originally hired by Bob Myhre, Spivey has dedicated 14 years of service to Wakulla Middle School. Formerly from Ashville, N.C., Spivey attended and graduated from Florida International University in Miami and earned her Masters degree from The University of Phoenix. Spivey believes its a privilege to be a part of her students lives and attributes part of her success to the amazing faculty at Wakulla Middle School. Spivey has served or is currently serving as the WMS AVID Site Coordinator, School Advisory Council member, the Yearbook Sponsor, Technology Coordinator, Teacher Leader, College Reach Out Program Coordinator, Science Fair Coordinator, Science on the Move Parent Night Coordinator, Patriots Pen Contest Coordinator, Mock Election School Coordinator and a committee member for textbook selection. WMS Principal Mike Barwick said, Evidence of Ms. Spiveys hard work can be seen throughout the WMS campus. Whether its a technology issue she is dealing with or coordinating our AVID program, Ms. Spivey always gives her best. Our AVID program would not be where it is today if it were not for Ms. Spiveys dedication to the program. She has bought into the program and is a big reason for its success. She is a real asset to our school and I am proud to have her as a Wildcat. The October Employee of the Month is Broadway. Broadway has been serving the students of Wakulla County since 1999. She started as a Pre-K teacher at Trinity Lutheran and in 2005 she began working at Wakulla Middle School as a PE paraprofessional and oneon-one assistant. Her War Eagle service began in 2010, where she is today. Broadway grew up on the west coast of Central Florida, graduating from Seminole High School. She has attended and graduated from St. Pete Junior College and Tallahassee Community College and is currently working toward the completion of her Bachelor of Science degree at Florida State University. What I like most about my job is knowing that my children and I are a part of one of the top school districts in the state. I enjoy working with the dedicated individuals at Wakulla High School, said Broadway. Watching her students learn and achieve their individual goals are the most rewarding aspects of her job. That is re ected in her willingness to be a Boy Scouts Leader, a Girl Scouts Leader, and a soccer coach, treasurer and concessions coordinator. WHS Principal Mike Crouch recognizes her enthusiasm and work ethic. He said, Mrs. Broadway always goes the second mile to make sure other students are helped or teachers in her classes are assisted. She is a leader among her peers. She is almost legendary for her effort in cleaning out the old cumulative les that had not been purged for many years. Mrs. Broadway is the ultimate team player in a school that needs many team players. We are very thankful to have an employee of Mrs. Broadways caliber as a part of the War Eagle family. Ginger Pooser Patricia Broadway Kathy Spivey WHS AP exam scores exceed national averageSpecial to The NewsAcademic excellence and rigor are among the top priorities at Wakulla High School as evidenced by the schools thriving Advanced Placement program. Advanced Placement (AP) is a nationally recognized curriculum regulated by The College Board that aligns subject matter and rigor with college-level classes. The goal of the program is two-fold: expose and prepare students for college-level work and give students the opportunity to excel by earning college credit by passing an examination at the end of the year. In these exams, Wakulla High School exceeds the national average in subjects such as Literature and Composition, Environmental Science, and U.S. Government and Politics. Teachers have tirelessly participated in workshops in their subject areas, planned lessons that correlate with the Advanced Placement curriculum, and collaborated with other professionals to ensure the success of their students both at Wakulla High School and beyond. Wakulla High School began their Advanced Placement program in 2001 with two courses and twenty-six students and it has grown to boast thirteen courses with an enrollment of over four hundred students. The success of our AP program, due largely to the commitment of our teachers, gives our students the opportunity to not only learn complex thinking imperative for college, but compete nationally for college admission and lucrative scholarships, said Michael Crouch, principal of Wakulla High School. The continued success of Wakulla High Schools Advanced Placement program has resulted in the addition of courses each year and the assurance that students are prepared to advance to college and be successful when they get there. Scholarship fair is ursday Tallahassee Community Colleges Of ce of Financial Aid is hosting its annual Scholarship Fair on Thursday, Oct. 25, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the lobby of the Fine and Performing Arts Center. The Scholarship Fair provides current and prospective TCC students with the chance to meet one-on-one with scholarship administrators, who will be available to provide information regarding the colleges many scholarship opportunities. Information will be provided on the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program and assistance will be provided on how to complete the Free Applications for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Students can submit a scholarship application for the Fall 2013 Semester at TCC at the event or online at www.tcc. .edu/scholarships. The scholarship application deadline for the Fall 2013 semester is Feb. 1, 2013. For more information on the Scholarship Fair, contact the Of ce of Financial Aid at (850) 201-8399. Wakulla Christian School, in coordination with the Wakulla County Veterans Services Office, is proud to host the Saturday, November 10, 2012 at Hudson Park Games, Vendors Raffles, a Silent Auction, and Lots of Food !!! Parade Starts @ 10:00a.m. A portion of the proceeds from this grand event will be donated to our local Veterans Services Office. Your family or organization is invited to participate in this very special event dedicated to honoring all Veterans and active duty military. Please consider entering a float or vehicle decorated in honor of your loved ones. For more information or to register your floa t, please contact the Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee via fax @ 850-926-5186 or email WCVDay@gmail.com Honoring All Who Served Soldier Care Packages 6th Annual Veterans Day Parade and Celebration to Support Our Troops and Honor Our Veterans Wakulla Christian School is collecting public donations of items to send to our troops wish list items include individually wrapped beef jerky, Pringles, individually wrapped sunflower seeds, individually wrapped nuts, individually packaged mix of Propel Fitness Water and Gatorade, individually packaged hard candy and gummy bears, white tube socks, protein bars, granola bars, books, soap, ra zors, sunscreen, nail files, AA batteries and Ziploc bags. For further information, please contact Wakulla County Veter ans Day Committee Drop off any items at one of the followin g supportive businesses in Wakulla county: HOME MORTGAGEA MERI F IRST FUND RAISER SILENT AUCTION & STEAK DINNER $ 10.00NOVEMBER 16TH from 5 PM 8PM at SHELLPOINT FIRE HOUSE FOR TICKETS CONTACT MARION at 926-9023 ALSO AT CENTURY 21 in SHELLPOINTFishing TripJewelry Gift BasketsArt Panacea Full Gospel AssemblyINVITES OUR COMMUNITY TO JOIN US WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31, 2012 AT 6:00 PMFOR A HALLOWED BE THY NAME FALL FESTIVALGAMES, CANDY, FOOD, FUN & FELLOWSHIPFREE TO ALL!Our Father... Hallowed be THY NAME!After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. Matthew 6:9-10

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBy MARJ LAW The Wrigleys gum people might have said Its two, two, two guns in one! if they advertized this Damascus barrel percussion pistol. Its a cool-looking antique gun. Like my Kentucky Pistol, its a black powder muzzle-loading percussion gun. But unlike any small pistol Ive seen, this strange little thing has two barrels and two triggers and two hammers. The hammers peek up like rabbit ears. In fact, theyre called rabbit-ear hammers. Instead of the smooth round barrel Im used to seeing, these barrels are square on the inside. Thats because they were forged, probably in a blacksmith shop. Someone hammered four heated at pieces of steel over a cold round mandrel. The barrels appear round on the outside, but theyre square when you look down them. Just like my Kentucky pistol, you load the gun by pouring the powder down the barrel(s). Then you put the oiled patch over the barrel and the ball over the patch. Push the ball all the way into the barrel. Now that the charge (black powder) and the ball are in, its time to place the percussion cap over the nipple. The gun is ready to re. Seems to me, shooting someone was a lot of work. And it took a bit of time to load that gun. If your arm shook, or if you were a bad shot, you were out of luck! The other guy would get you before you could load again! Back in the early 1800s, these two-barreled guns were an answer for personal protection. Revolvers werent around yet, so normally you had your one-shot handgun in your pocket, inside your jacket, or in your purse. However, with this gun, you got another opportunity to defend yourself because of that second barrel. Pull the further trigger, and theres your second chance. A new friend brought this gun for me to see, and Im glad he did. Im also glad I never had to defend myself back in the bad old days.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid gunner in her retirement.Pistol is a relic of days gone by HOME ON THE RANGE SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA Damascus barrel percussion pistol two barrels, two triggers, two hammers. Normally, one could say here in our Big Bend April and October are our driest months, and also the best temperatures very pleasant! Plus the bugs generally are on their best behavior. In the fall it is almost desert-like, as we are experiencing now. March is usually our wettest month, so it was with pleasure that Patti and I escaped this predicted rain by going to Arizona last March, to the same cool dry weather were now experiencing. From experience, Patti knew that in the spring in the deserts the wild owers can be spectacular IF there have been rains and the temperatures can be pleasant. Go later and you can roast, earlier and youll nd out how cold a desert can be. March/April then are the perfect months to visit the Southwest. Wed hoped for a ower show but unfortunately it had been an unusually cold winter freezing many cacti, and also theyd had an exceptionally dry series of months so the whole area was bone dry. Deforestation by our practice of clearing land and having mowed, manicured, and weedless lawns in a great majority of our country was less practiced out there around Tuscon, as there is a trend to go natural, due to severe water restrictions. The desert plants grow right up to the homes, so cacti and other thorny succulents around private properties simply merged into the state and federally protected lands, which is neat. The most obvious of the cactus is the well known Saguaro. They can become giants reaching over 30 feet, and weighing tons! What is amazing is how they can swell up to store water, or shrivel during long dry periods, as we witnessed. They are (you might say) pleated vertically and when thirsty the pleats are close to each other, but after heavy rains the cactus swells, and the pleats spread apart. Many desert plants do this and also are designed to withstand intense heat and cold. Out there the name river is almost a joke. These arroyos, washes or gulches most of the time are super dry! When rains do occur the hard baked clay in these river beds cant absorb, so they end up with ash oods that can produce raging currents with wipe out results! We saw a fair amount of birds (three new to me) some neat lizards, and mammals too, and probably our favorite place (other than the crowds of other visitors) was the Desert Museum. But if you wish to really see any desert in its full glory, nd out when there have been heavy rains that have germinated ower seeds that perhaps have been dormant for a decade, and are starting to bloom. If by plane or car if you get within a few days and hit the peak, youll see the the desert explode into melted rainbows. Flowers everywhere!Wakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHThe contrast of the desert Re-Elect Donnie Sparkman*Certied Florida Appraiser*-Experienced -DedicatedRe-Elect someone who has always worked with the public concerning land and values... and who will CONTINUE TO WORK FOR YOU! Political Advertisement Paid For And Approved By Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, For Property AppraiserI WILL CONTINUE TO KEEP THE CITIZENS OF WAKULLA COUNTY AT THE FOREFRONT OF ANYTHING I DO. I WILL CONTINUE TO BE RESPECTFUL, HELPFUL, ACCESSIBLE, AND LISTEN TO YOUR CONCERNS. I HAVE THE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH LAND, DEEDS, DESCRIPTIONS, LAND VALUES, TAXES, ETHICS AND THE ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE WITH THE PUBLIC. AS YOUR PROPERTY APPRAISER I WILL CONTINUE TO PROVIDE EFFICIENT, COURTEOUS AND FAIR SERVICE TO ALL! I WILL CONTINUE TO WORK TO IMPROVE THE OFFICE, WEB SITE AND TAX ROLL AND SEE TO IT THAT THEY SERVE THE PUBLIC IN THE BEST POSSIBLE WAY. Wakulla CountyPROPERTY APPRAISER Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts Color Facial Waxings Specialty Cuts Flat TopsFeather Locks Color Perms Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. ce Hair Salon e H l o H a i alo ir Sa c e ce on o on Tues-Sat 545-2905 & t. . . F STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304

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UnderwaterWakullaBy Travis Kersting This past weekend made for some beautiful boating! Thank you to Duane Treadon for sending in the following report. This past Sunday there was a sight on Apalachicola Bay and St. George Sound that had not been seen for quite some time, an Auxiliary patrol ensign. With Mark Rosen as Coxswain, Mike Harrison and Duane Treadon as crew and Dave Rabon as crew trainee the four set out on a safety and familiarization patrol just west of the St. George Island Bridge. The patrol on a 21-foot Sea Dory took the crew west towards West Pass. On the way they motored through Government Cut to spend a short time on the Gulf side. After making way to West Pass the patrol turned east heading back to the bridge. Along the way Dave and Mike, who both have experience boating these waters, pointed out areas of hidden danger just under the surface in the form of oyster bars and areas prone to shoaling. With our area of responsibility reaching beyond St. George Island, there is a great need for our members to become familiar with the area. An emergency is no time to realize we are ill prepared to respond. With a facility now in the area boaters can expect to see more frequent Auxiliary patrols. Several are planned for the remainder of the year and it is hoped to utilize this asset on a regular basis during next years boating season. Next week we will again be out in the St. George area, weather permitting. Continuing with Navigation Rules brings us to Rule 14: Head on Situations. This rule addressed the proper procedure for two boats meeting in a head-on or near-head-on situation. It states that when two power-driven boats (not under sail only) are meeting in a potential head-on situation that involves the risk for collision, BOTH shall alter their course to the starboard (right) so that they pass each other on the port (left) side. This situation exists when a boater sees the other boat ahead, or nearly ahead. It during night hours, the boat would see the masthead lights of the other boat in a line, or nearly in a line and also be able to see both sidelights. If there is any doubt a risk of collision exists, the boater is safe to assume the risk is real and take action to avoid a collision. This rule, and all of the Navigation Rules are available at: www.uscg.mil/directives/cim/16000-16999/ cim_16672_2d.pdf In addition to a patrol Sunday, Saturday is the Annual FSU Flyover. Active Duty personnel from Station Panama City as well as Air Station Mobile will be joining Flotilla 12 Apalachee Bay at Doak Campbell Stadium for the game against Duke. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident, be aware and pay attention to your surroundings, especially in unfamiliar waters. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMike Harrison and Dave Rabon on patrol. Some activities reported by the FWC during the week of Oct. 12 to Oct. 18. WAKULLA COUNTY: Plainclothes of cers Jason Carroll and Steven Cook were working information about people harvesting shell sh in closed areas. During the investigation, they located two subjects in a closed area harvesting shell sh. The area where they were harvesting oysters was consistent with information received by the of cers. The two of cers stopped the vessel and cited both subjects for harvesting shell sh in a closed area. The shellfish were returned to the water. LEON COUNTY: Plainclothes Of cer Chris Jones was working a trespass complaint. During the investigation, he encountered two subjects trespassing and shing on the property. Both subjects were in possession of numerous undersized bass, cited for possession of undersized bass, and given trespass warnings. Lt. Kent Harvey responded to a residence where a homeowner had shot a black bear. Upon arrival, of cers on scene were taken to the location where the bear was shot. Lieutenant Harvey turned the investigation over to Investigator James Bryant who also responded. The bear and gun were seized; the case is currently under investigation and will be reviewed by the State Attorneys Of ce. Of cers Jason Carroll and Seth Wagner assisted in the response and investigation. FWC Operations I frequently nd myself rummaging through old les or documents and sometimes I come across a real gem. I found a brochure from Dive Rite, a local dive equipment manufacturer in Lake City, titled 0 things you can learn from cave divers. I tend to agree, recreational divers could learn a few things from cave divers but arguably todays cave divers could stand to learn a few things from fellow open water divers too. Buoyancy is at the heart of any underwater activity, no one wants to be stuck to the bottom due to overweighting or ghting just to sink. Proper use of that in ator valve and your own lungs can only come with practice and time in the underwater world. Every dive should be a conscious attempt to get better at controlling your position in the water column until you can maintain a precise depth with only your gauges. This skill is vital to a divers safety and to the conservation of our reefs and caves. Trim is a skill which goes hand-in-hand with buoyancy. To be quali ed in cave diving these two things must be well tuned. In the open water environment trim will help you move more effortlessly through the water, conserving precious breathing gas, and extending your time on the bottom. Seldom would I argue that equipment will solve a problem over proper practice but when it comes to trim some equipment certainly makes it easier to maintain. Take only what is necessary to complete the dive. We have all done it or seen someone do it. You know, strap every gadget and gizmo available to themselves before jumping into the blue. Base the equipment you take on the mission of the day and stow backup or safety equipment away where its available. If you are shooting video then its unlikely you will require a lift bag, three dive knives and a spear gun. In cave diving we are often faced with the need to carry multiple cylinders, reels, extra lights, etc. and yet none of these should hang below the body. Dangly objects become easy snag hazards and also contribute to a loss of swimming ef ciency. In cave diving we dont want things to hang below us because that could snag on rocks, disturb silt on the bottom and impede our exit. Follow the rule of thirds. This rule has been keeping cave divers alive for a long time and we dont see the rule disappearing anytime soon. Open water divers could bene t from the added safety margin too. Next time you go diving allow for one-third of your remaining breathing mix (typically 1000psi) as a reserve. That means leaving the bottom or putting that last sh on the stringer at about 2000psi. Then when you hit the surface and the swim back to the boat is 300 foot away you can take a bearing, descend to 15 feet and swim without the waves beating you up. This buffer also allows for time to handle an emergency at your max depth or to complete some unplanned decompression. Larger cylinders, double tanks, or side-mounted cylinders diving mean you still get the same bottom time as before (if not more) but you have more than enough gas in reserve. Even if you have no interest in becoming a cave diver you can improve your diving experience by using some of the skills and equipment cave divers use and be that much safer. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Oct 25, 12 Fri Oct 26, 12 Sat Oct 27, 12 Sun Oct 28, 12 Mon Oct 29, 12 Tue Oct 30, 12 Wed Oct 31, 12 D ate 3.3 ft. 12:15 AM 3.5 ft. 12:50 AM 3.6 ft. 12:21 AM 3.7 ft. 12:50 AM 3.7 ft. 1:18 AM 3.7 ft. 1:45 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 5:52 AM 0.6 ft. 6:43 AM 0.3 ft. 7:25 AM 0.0 ft. 7:03 AM -0.1 ft. 7:38 AM -0.1 ft. 8:12 AM -0.1 ft. 8:45 AM L ow 3.2 ft. 12:20 PM 3.4 ft. 1:10 PM 3.5 ft. 1:51 PM 3.5 ft. 1:28 PM 3.5 ft. 2:03 PM 3.5 ft. 2:37 PM 3.5 ft. 3:11 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 6:15 PM 1.2 ft. 6:54 PM 1.3 ft. 7:28 PM 1.3 ft. 6:59 PM 1.3 ft. 7:28 PM 1.3 ft. 7:58 PM 1.4 ft. 8:29 PM L ow Thu Oct 25, 12 Fri Oct 26, 12 Sat Oct 27, 12 Sun Oct 28, 12 Mon Oct 29, 12 Tue Oct 30, 12 Wed Oct 31, 12 D ate 2.5 ft. 12:07 AM 2.6 ft. 12:42 AM 2.7 ft. 12:13 AM 2.8 ft. 12:42 AM 2.8 ft. 1:10 AM 2.8 ft. 1:37 AM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 6:03 AM 0.4 ft. 6:54 AM 0.2 ft. 7:36 AM 0.0 ft. 7:14 AM -0.1 ft. 7:49 AM -0.1 ft. 8:23 AM -0.1 ft. 8:56 AM L ow 2.4 ft. 12:12 PM 2.5 ft. 1:02 PM 2.6 ft. 1:43 PM 2.6 ft. 1:20 PM 2.6 ft. 1:55 PM 2.6 ft. 2:29 PM 2.6 ft. 3:03 PM Hi g h 0.8 ft. 6:26 PM 0.9 ft. 7:05 PM 0.9 ft. 7:39 PM 1.0 ft. 7:10 PM 1.0 ft. 7:39 PM 1.0 ft. 8:09 PM 1.0 ft. 8:40 PM L ow Thu Oct 25, 12 Fri Oct 26, 12 Sat Oct 27, 12 Sun Oct 28, 12 Mon Oct 29, 12 Tue Oct 30, 12 Wed Oct 31, 12 D ate 2.9 ft. 12:12 AM 3.1 ft. 12:51 AM 3.2 ft. 1:26 AM 3.4 ft. 12:57 AM 3.4 ft. 1:26 AM 3.5 ft. 1:54 AM 3.5 ft. 2:21 AM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 6:56 AM 0.5 ft. 7:47 AM 0.2 ft. 8:29 AM 0.0 ft. 8:07 AM -0.1 ft. 8:42 AM -0.1 ft. 9:16 AM -0.1 ft. 9:49 AM L ow 3.0 ft. 12:56 PM 3.1 ft. 1:46 PM 3.2 ft. 2:27 PM 3.3 ft. 2:04 PM 3.3 ft. 2:39 PM 3.3 ft. 3:13 PM 3.2 ft. 3:47 PM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 7:19 PM 1.1 ft. 7:58 PM 1.2 ft. 8:32 PM 1.2 ft. 8:03 PM 1.2 ft. 8:32 PM 1.2 ft. 9:02 PM 1.2 ft. 9:33 PM L ow Thu Oct 25, 12 Fri Oct 26, 12 Sat Oct 27, 12 Sun Oct 28, 12 Mon Oct 29, 12 Tue Oct 30, 12 Wed Oct 31, 12 D ate 2.7 ft. 12:34 AM 2.8 ft. 12:05 AM 2.9 ft. 12:34 AM 2.9 ft. 1:02 AM 2.9 ft. 1:29 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 5:31 AM 0.6 ft. 6:22 AM 0.3 ft. 7:04 AM 0.0 ft. 6:42 AM -0.1 ft. 7:17 AM -0.1 ft. 7:51 AM -0.1 ft. 8:24 AM L ow 2.5 ft. 12:04 PM 2.6 ft. 12:54 PM 2.7 ft. 1:35 PM 2.7 ft. 1:12 PM 2.7 ft. 1:47 PM 2.7 ft. 2:21 PM 2.7 ft. 2:55 PM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 5:54 PM 1.2 ft. 6:33 PM 1.2 ft. 7:07 PM 1.3 ft. 6:38 PM 1.3 ft. 7:07 PM 1.3 ft. 7:37 PM 1.3 ft. 8:08 PM L ow 2.6 ft. 11:59 PM Hi g h Thu Oct 25, 12 Fri Oct 26, 12 Sat Oct 27, 12 Sun Oct 28, 12 Mon Oct 29, 12 Tue Oct 30, 12 Wed Oct 31, 12 D ate 3.4 ft. 12:12 AM 3.6 ft. 12:47 AM 3.7 ft. 12:18 AM 3.8 ft. 12:47 AM 3.8 ft. 1:15 AM 3.8 ft. 1:42 AM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 5:49 AM 0.6 ft. 6:40 AM 0.3 ft. 7:22 AM 0.0 ft. 7:00 AM -0.1 ft. 7:35 AM -0.1 ft. 8:09 AM -0.1 ft. 8:42 AM L ow 3.3 ft. 12:17 PM 3.4 ft. 1:07 PM 3.5 ft. 1:48 PM 3.6 ft. 1:25 PM 3.6 ft. 2:00 PM 3.6 ft. 2:34 PM 3.5 ft. 3:08 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 6:12 PM 1.3 ft. 6:51 PM 1.4 ft. 7:25 PM 1.4 ft. 6:56 PM 1.4 ft. 7:25 PM 1.4 ft. 7:55 PM 1.5 ft. 8:26 PM L ow Thu Oct 25, 12 Fri Oct 26, 12 Sat Oct 27, 12 Sun Oct 28, 12 Mon Oct 29, 12 Tue Oct 30, 12 Wed Oct 31, 12 D ate 2.7 ft. 12:03 AM 2.8 ft. 12:23 AM 2.9 ft. 12:01 AM 3.0 ft. 12:23 AM 3.0 ft. 12:50 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 5:21 AM 0.6 ft. 6:11 AM 0.4 ft. 6:55 AM 0.2 ft. 6:35 AM 0.1 ft. 7:11 AM 0.0 ft. 7:44 AM -0.0 ft. 8:16 AM L ow 2.5 ft. 12:13 PM 2.6 ft. 1:27 PM 2.6 ft. 2:25 PM 2.7 ft. 2:15 PM 2.7 ft. 2:59 PM 2.7 ft. 3:39 PM 2.6 ft. 4:17 PM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 5:40 PM 1.3 ft. 6:20 PM 1.4 ft. 6:53 PM 1.6 ft. 6:22 PM 1.7 ft. 6:48 PM 1.8 ft. 7:13 PM 1.8 ft. 7:40 PM L ow Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacOct. 25 Oct. 31First Nov. 20 Full Oct. 29 Last Nov. 6 New Nov. 13Major Times 10:16 AM 12:16 PM 10:38 PM 12:38 AM Minor Times 3:56 AM 4:56 AM 4:27 PM 5:27 PM Major Times 11:00 AM 1:00 PM 11:22 PM 1:22 AM Minor Times 4:52 AM 5:52 AM 5:00 PM 6:00 PM Major Times --:---:-11:44 AM 1:44 PM Minor Times 5:47 AM 6:47 AM 5:34 PM 6:34 PM Major Times 12:06 AM 2:06 AM 12:29 PM 2:29 PM Minor Times 6:42 AM 7:42 AM 6:09 PM 7:09 PM Major Times 12:51 AM 2:51 AM 1:14 PM 3:14 PM Minor Times 7:36 AM 8:36 AM 6:46 PM 7:46 PM Major Times 1:37 AM 3:37 AM 2:00 PM 4:00 PM Minor Times 8:30 AM 9:30 AM 7:26 PM 8:26 PM Major Times 2:23 AM 4:23 AM 2:47 PM 4:47 PM Minor Times 9:23 AM 10:23 AM 8:08 PM 9:08 PM Average Good Better Better Best Best++++ Better7:46 am 6:55 pm 4:28 pm 3:57 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:47 am 6:54 pm 5:01 pm 4:53 am 7:47 am 6:53 pm 5:35 pm 5:48 am 6:48 am 5:52 pm 5:10 pm 5:43 am 6:49 am 5:52 pm 5:47 pm 6:37 am 6:50 am 5:51 pm 6:26 pm 7:31 am 6:50 am 5:50 pm 7:09 pm 8:24 am71% 78% 84% 90% 97% 97% 91% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Wakulla County Memorial Post,VFW POST 4538 Invites the public to enjoy a free pancake and sausage breakfast.Each year, we host a free breakfast as a thank you and to give back to the public for your support throughout the year.The breakfast will be held on Veterans Day, Sunday, November the 11th from 7:00am till 10:00am, at the VFW POST 4538 which is located 1 mile west of the County Court House at 475 Arran Rd, Crawfordville, FL. I LIKEMIKE STEWARTREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mike Stewart, Republican candidate for county commissioner, district 3

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com W g g g g g g Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate LifeThe Senior Center held a special appreciation program for the Board of Directors of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Council Inc. on Sept. 18. Board Members present were Peggy Mackin, chair; Susan Payne Turner, vice chair; Linda Boles, secretary-treasurer; Maurice Langston, chaplain; along with Ruby Allen, Beulah King, Virginia Moore, Cheryll Olah, James Taylor and Ruth Williams. The report on the boards service and accomplishments included the period beginning at the time they employed me as director. In 1997, the board had very limited funds and attempted to provide senior services within the funds provided by state and federal projects. The boards staff was located in the building that currently houses the Wakulla County Building Department behind the former Health Department on U.S. Highway 319. It was a struggle to raise funds required to match grants. The seniors dining area would seat about 22. Sometimes they sat in the hallways for lunch. The board and staff loved our seniors and knew that there were many in our community that were not served. The board knew that we needed a larger building in order to serve more seniors. They knew that we must raise funds well in excess of current funding to build a new facility. I failed at seeking state or federal funding for a new building but that did not slow our efforts. Our discussion of this need touched our community and they joined the effort to raise funding. Everywhere I visited businesses and their customers would ask about our new building. If I walked into the bank or grocery store, I would hear about our new center. Everyone became charged with the idea. The board and I worked hand-in-hand to make this dream a reality. The rst check was donated by an elderly couple who did not appear to be very wealthy. Their donation of $2,500 surprised me and their request to remain anonymous will always be honored. Several people donated from $50 to $100. I decided to approach the late Ruby Snyder. I planned to ask her for $1,000. When we met, she said I dont want to hear your request, Im giving you $3,000 and that is all I can give. I dont think she ever knew how pleased I was that day. A friend from the phone company brought a check for $5,000. He said he would try to get a check from the electric company. They sent a check for $10,000. The friend from the phone company was not pleased that the electric company had donated more. But he was happy for us. You can see that the need was so great that support grew fast. See, good news can also travel fast. The rst building obstacle was obtaining land for construction. Board member James Taylor suggested we contact St. Joe to ask for donated land. While I was trying to reach the appropriate person with St. Joe, the county administrator called and offered land in exchange for our old building. Our current Senior Center and Wakulla Trace Apartments are located on that property. Planning the design of the kitchen consumed more time than planning all other areas. Cooking lunch each day for the seniors was the most visible change in services. This could not have happened without the Board working through every step. Changes are regular. The band moved from the library to the Senior Center. We have constructed a pergola. We hatch butter ies and grow a garden. We now offer yoga, pottery and many forms of art. We have added a generator, constructed a large storage building and a vehicle shelter. We have also added a playground for our Before/After School Program that serves all elementary schools in our county. The Wakulla County School System provides a life-long learning program that adds to the many activities. The Senior Citizens deserve everything we provide. History tells us that societies that do not care for their older population do not survive very long. The Senior Citizens nancial impact on Floridas economy is at the top of our nancial resources. It is second only to tourism. Our Board of Directors is made up of volunteers. They plan, implement and evaluate all senior services. The Board Appreciation Program was designed to recognize them for all they do for our seniors. Volunteers are not paid NOT because they are worthless, but because they are PRICELESS. The program concluded as each Member was presented a Certi cate of Appreciation and comments were made about each members contributions to Senior Services.R.H. Carter is executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center.Appreciation for our Board R.H. Carter Wakulla County Senior Center By MICHELLE HUNTER September was still hot with a lot of rain, but fall is coming. The month started with Labor Day, where the seniors and staff dressed up in the attire they used to wear to work, or brought in pictures of themselves dressed up in uniforms they no longer have, but remember the days. Steve, one of our bus drivers, dressed up in an of cial chauffeur uniform, and the seniors on his bus felt very privileged to ride with him. On Monday the seniors start their week doing yoga with Tamara, and a form of chair yoga and stretching with Cynthia, to get moving. They dance on Tuesdays and Fridays with the Pickin and Grinnin Band, and join in on Brain Gym with Elaine on Wednesday. Just Keep Moving is something we encourage here at the Senior Center The center also encourages stimulating the mind and the soul with other activities such as gospel music once a month performed by Charlie and Joan Smith, and others who join in. We were privileged to have Terri Humpfrey volunteer to teach a class on greeting card making. Haydee Jackley and Nancy Jefferson, two HAWC artists, volunteered their time, to instruct the seniors on how to create and paint bowls, which will be used for the Empty Bowls Project coming up on Nov. 3 at Hudson Park. A WCSC Board Appreciation Day was held on Sept. 18, where the seniors were introduced to the board members and learned a little more about each of them. The health and well-being of our seniors is of great concern to the center, so providing health topics and education is something we all bene t from. A lecture on congestive heart failure was presented by Lisa Hamilton, RN, with great participation and questions. Sept. 22-28 was Fall Prevention Week. No, we were not trying to prevent the fall season from coming, because we sure are looking forward to the cooler weather. Education on how to prevent falls and injury was provided throughout the week. Topics such as Medication Safety, Strengthening Exercises for balance and Home Safety, were covered by either a lecture or discussing handouts, and word search puzzles, which are some favorite things to do. Medication Safety was presented by Sarah Rodes from Area Agency on Aging. She played games to check what was learned, and gave them containers to senior to organize their medications. September was also Alzheimers Awareness Month. The staff and seniors all wore purple to recognize and support those with Alzheimers disease. We are currently looking for a volunteer to assist the seniors with computer instructions. Please call the center for more information 926-7145.Seniors enjoy Labor Day, yoga, music, crafts and more PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSeniors learn to create and paint bowls for the Empty Bowls project. Making greeting cards with Terri Humpfrey. V V ote Ralph Thomas for COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 I believe, its time to return to Government of the people, by the people, and for the people. its time to put the concept of service back into public service. people are tired of typical politicians and its time for us to elect leaders who think like us and act like us. its time for our Government to understand the toll this economy has taken on nearly every household. Since you didnt cause the problem, you shouldnt be required to carry the burden of solving the problem, by paying more taxes. during times of limited income, we have to separate our needs from our wants. Its time for Government to learn this lesson. its time to decrease our debt while increasing our emergency reserves. its time for us to stand up for individual freedom and liberty. Its Poli cal adversement, paid for and approved by Ralph Thomas, Republican, for County Commission District 1 GET TO A BETTER STATE. CALL ME TODAY.1103208 12/11Get a Free Discount Double Check. I can help you save like a champion, with discounts that could add up to XX%* and be worth hundreds of dollars. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, State Farm Indemnity Company, Bloomington, IL *Discounts may vary by state. Aaron Rodgers got his. How about you? 40% *Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 13ABy R.H. CARTERThe Wakulla County Senior Center is always seeking funds for senior services. You seem to always be there to give to this cause. On Sept. 28, we presented A Tribute to Patsy Cline. Margo Anderson and her band presented wonderful music for the audience to enjoy, and they did. About 200 attended this most successful event. To add to the nancial success of this event, several sponsorships were provided by our community. The sponsors were In Memory of Betty Arban, Air-Con, Anytime Electric Inc., Associated Services & Supplies, Inc., Capital City Bank, Jason Winn P.A., Metal Building Services, Progress Energy and Total Homecare Solutions. The Senior Center is providing a Free Countywide Thanksgiving Dinner on Nov. 20 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. You are invited to support this event by joining us for dinner. Also, contribution in advance to support this event will be welcome. The Fund Raising Committee is planning a Mystery Theater dinner in Feb. 2013. The Wakulla High School Drama Department, directed by Susan Solburg, has been preparing for this event since last school year. The Board of Directors is developing potential fundraising activities for 2013. To participate or become an active member of our fundraising committee. If interested call 926-7145 ext. 221. Patsy Cline fundraiser is held Margo Anderson performs as Patsy Cline.About 200 people attend the Patsy Cline concert. Coming up: The free countywide anksgiving Dinner on Nov. 20. Lynn Artz Wakulla County needs a Commissioner like Emily smart and kind-hearted, yet strong enough to say No to special interests. Emily will treat people with respect, offer new ideas, and stand up for the common good. Sue Damon Emily will be a full-time commissioner who will work hard to help W akulla County grow in an impartial, responsible way. Rick Ott & Nelle McCall Emily has unmatched integrity and unwaveringly supports local businesses. Katherine Gilbert Emily has the heart, spirit, and understanding that it will take to protect our springs, rivers, bays, wetlands, and our drinking water for the benet of all and generations to come. Brandy Cowley-Gilbert & Ted Gilbert Emilys work experience in green business and industry will help her attract sustainable businesses to our County. Robert Seidler Emily represents the next generation of leaders in this County. A young, intelligent female Commissioner will inspire and provide an excellent role model for others. The Fortier Family Emily brings a fresh perspective to our community and will bring creative solutions to benet us and our children in the future. Jim Hilyer and Chase Emily cares about kids and supports a community center with a pool, playground, and more! Judith Harriss With Emily as your commissioner, your input will be sought, valued, and carefully considered and you will know that complex decisions are being made with the greatest of care. Sandy Tedder Emily will listen to the needs of citizens and make informed decisions for smart growth and protection of our resources. Glen Campbell Emily wants to serve her community (not be a Commissioner). She will study issues and make wise, not selfser ving, decisions. Diane Roberts Emily knows that W akulla Countys future isnt strip malls and big box stores, but sustainable growth, eco-tourism, and green jobs. Shes not beholden to anyone, just to the place she loves. www.mikestewart2012.comPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MIKE STEWART, REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3 facebook.com/ mike.stewart.3363 I LIKEMIKEREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 C CommitmentRaised in Wakulla County learning the value of a strong work ethic and developing a desire to serve others. As I traveled throughout the world during my 20 years in the Navy, I knew that Wakulla was my home and where I wanted to return. My desire is to see our great county grow in a responsible manner all the while preserving those qualities we value as a small rural county. Married to the former Anne Quick for 39 years.Service Oriented years. Character unpopular. qualities such as honesty and integrity. that face the board. hank ou for your upport!

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On Oct. 13, a 33-year-old female victim reported being taken from a Crawfordville fast food restaurant against her will. The victim was observed on the asphalt of U.S. Highway 319 near the restaurant after falling out of the vehicle. Witnesses also observed the victim being held by the throat inside the vehicle and heard her yelling for help. The suspect, Lucas Dominic Degennaro, 32, of Crawfordville, was arrested at the scene and charged with battery and false imprisonment. Wakulla EMS assisted the victim at the scene but she refused to be transported to a Tallahassee hospital. Deputy Ward Kromer and Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: OCTOBER 11 Lisa Shields of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief at the County Line Bar. Someone stole a decal from the victims license plate and attened a tire. The vehicle tire damage was estimated at $150 and the theft of the vehicle decal was valued at $75. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. James Godwin of Panacea reported a residential burglary to a bank owned home in Crawfordville. A forced entry was observed and there was widespread damage inside the home. Damage to the home was estimated at $15,000. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. OCTOBER 12 Henry Eggers of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of $265 worth of cash from inside his home. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Shelly Powell reported recovering a bicycle at a Crawfordville of ce building. The bicycle was abandoned at the of ce on Crawfordville Highway and was valued at $150. The bike was entered into the FCIC/NCIC data base and information linked the bike to a theft in Cleveland. The owner of the bike was identi ed. It was reported stolen on April 25, 2012. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Patrecia Harvey of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone cut an electrical line which provides water to the home. In addition, vehicle batteries, car radiators, electrical wire, a wheelchair, wooden chair and faucet, valued at $1,350, were reported missing from a storage area. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. An employee at Dux Discount Liquors reported a retail theft as a suspect walked out of the store without paying for a bottle of gin. The liquor was valued at $19. The suspect returned the liquor to the store when confronted by an employee. Evidence was collected at the scene. Reserve Deputy Roy Gunnarsson and Deputy Clint Beam investigated. OCTOBER 13 Elvis Tyndall of St. Marks reported a traffic crash and hit-and-run. The victim parked his vehicle in St. Marks and an unknown vehicle struck it. Damage was observed on the scene. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Stanley West of Riverside Caf reported a criminal mischief. A suspect, who has been identi ed, cut a telephone line and shut off the water at the business. Damage was estimated at $100. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. OCTOBER 14 Hubertus Weijers of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash and hit-and-run. Someone damaged the entrance gate of Hunters Trace in Crawfordville. Evidence was collected at the scene and damage to the gate was estimated at $1,500. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Raymond Spohn of Crawfordville and Stone Creek Pizza reported a business burglary. A forced entry was observed and a small amount of cash was taken from the establishment. Evidence was collected at the scene and a suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Mike Zimba, Detective Matt Helms and Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated. Thomas Jones of Crawfordville reported a vehicle re. Deputy Billy Metcalf responded to the scene and discovered a tractor fully engulfed in ames. The victim was burning materials on his property when a tree branch came into the cab of the tractor and got stuck on the forward pedal causing the tractor to continue forward into the burn pile. The victim was unable to loosen the branch due to it being jammed from the brush pile. He was forced to jump from the tractor when ames came in toward the seat area. The tractor, valued at $20,200, was a total loss. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell and Detective Matt Helms also investigated. Zelda Barron of Crawfordville reported the theft of checkbooks following a burglary. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Horace Privett of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief as someone used a vehicle to damage his yard. A small truck was observed spinning in circles on the victims property. Damage was estimated at $200. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Eddy Mims of Panacea reported a criminal mischief at Mashes Sands Beach. Someone burned the contents of a trash can. Damage was estimated at $25. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Charlene Rogers of Panacea reported a vehicle fire. The victim noticed the vehicle full of smoke at her home. The victims spouse removed items from the trunk to keep the re from spreading. Fire ghters determined that the re originated from a jump box in the trunk. Tools and other miscellaneous items sustained damage in the trunk. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. OCTOBER 15 Lauren Sweatt of Wakulla Middle School reported that someone stole her cellular telephone from her classroom. Deputy Carl Allen and WMS Assistant Principal Tolar Grif n collected evidence that linked a 12-year-old sixth grader at WMS. The juveniles mother was notified and Deputy Allen recovered the stolen telephone. The student text messaged 338 times over an approximately nine hour time period. The juvenile was issued a civil citation and assigned 24 hours of community service. OCTOBER 16 Theodore W. Lowrie of Sopchoppy reported a theft of a mosquito repelling device, valued at $500. Suspects have been identi ed. Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. Reuben Randolph of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A pressure washer and hedger, valued at $400, were reported missing from the victims shed. Sgt. Andy Curles investigated. Cardale Stelly of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim stated that someone broke into his home and stole a large sum of cash. A forced entry was observed. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. Jeffrey Crutch eld of Tallahassee reported the theft of copper wire from a Cr awfordville home. Approximately 60 feet of copper wire was stripped from the breaker box, attic and meter box. The wire is valued at $400. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. OCTOBER 17 Amanda Davis of Panacea reported a residential burglary. The victim lost clothing, medications and owers from her residence. The total loss is estimated at $40. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. Stewart Ducey of Panacea reported a credit card offense. Four unauthorized internet charges were discovered on the victims bank account which totaled $150. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Deanna Powell of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from her home. The bike is valued at $150. Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. Tamisha Edna Harris, 30, of Tallahassee was issued a traffic ticket for an obscured tag after law enforcement conducted a traf c stop on U.S. Highway 319 near C.J. Spears Road. Wal-Mart officials contacted law enforcement about three suspicious subjects in the store filling shopping carts with merchandise. The three women left the store without the shopping carts. The traf c stop was initiated after Deputy Clint Beam and Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Tallman caught up to the suspicious vehicle. The deputy and trooper observed Harris license tag with paper covering all but two characters. Wal-Mart has not reported anything missing from the store as a result of the suspicious incident complaint. OCTOBER 18 Reserve Deputy Jerold Finney reported an animal complaint in the Summerwood Drive area of Crawfordville. Two dogs charged the deputys patrol vehicle as he passed a residence. A victim on the road was previously attacked by one of the dogs. The victims injuries were minor. The incident was turned over to Animal Control Of cer Bonnie Brinson. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,038 calls for service during the past week including 13 residential and business alarms; 54 investigations; 10 juvenile problems; 38 medical emergencies; 36 traf c enforcements; 83 traffic stops; 13 reckless vehicles; and 11 wanted people. Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report HowardKessler.com 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 14,214,813 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor Where Does United Way Money Go?$93,580 went to Alan Brock for consulting in -09. Is this the income he said he failed to report, resulting in being put on a Pay-Back Plan? Waste Pro gave $1,000 to Alans Campaign. Should he have abstained on the Trash vote? He Pays No Property Taxes, Do you want him in charge of your Tax Dollars?Say, No to Commissioner Alan Brock, Dist. 1Even though he has a likeable, bubbly personality.Paid political advertisement paid for by Donna Sanford, P.O. Box 1478, Crawfordville, FL.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 15AContinued from Page 1A Beshears said the government is lacking common sense and a business approach and he would bring that to the legislature. I understand the value of a dollar, he said. SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS RACE The other race on the agenda was for superintendent of schools, with candidates Bobby Pearce and Kimball Thomas. The candidates were asked what their top priority would be after taking of ce and their responses differed. Pearce said he would focus on maintaining the excellence that is currently in place, while also meeting the challenges and mandates that are coming from the state and federal levels. Hard work is whats going to keep our system on track, he said. Thomas said he would make sure the transition was a smooth one and that teachers, staff, administrators, students and the public are comfortable. He would hold public forums to keep the public informed and involve all the stakeholders in the community. The candidates were also asked what area needs the most improvement in the schools. Thomas felt it was closing the achievement gap and also paying teachers and staff what they are worth. The district has to look at more than FCAT scores and get children interested in school. There also needs to be some focus on those students who are scoring a one and two on the FCAT and those who come to the high school as at-risk, he said. Pearce felt the district needed to focus on high school students and offer guidance. He added that the high school needs to expand its individual certi cation and dual enrollment programs. The schools must educate the whole child and begin at an early age and connect with the students, he added. Candidates were asked how schools can address the impact of drugs and alcohol. Pearce said the schools need to continue to have a relationship with the sheriffs office and have the Students Against Violence Everywhere program stay in place. He added that schools need to educate parents and then do what they can to be diligent, work hard and be watchful. Education is the key, he said. Its got to start at home. Thomas said education should start with the students. Then there should be a way for students to report incidents anonymously. Schools should educate the students, teach them how to talk about issues and then get the parents involved, he said. He added that students need to know what is expected of them and that there is a zero-tolerance policy. In closing statements, Pearce urged those in attendance to educate themselves on the candidates. You need to know the character of the individual, Pearce said. He added, The past is a predictor of the future. It appeared to be a reference to Thomas and his past. In response, Thomas said, people would be voting for someone who is not perfect and has made mistakes. He added that he has the passion and love for students and wants to go beyond where the school district is currently. I will not be satisfied until we are No. 1 (in the state), he said. The next bi-partisan forum is scheduled for Oct. 25 at 6:30 p.m. at the community center. This forum is for the sheriff and property appraiser races.Forum features House, superintendent candidates PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENBobby Pearce, left, listens as Kimball Thomas, right, answers a question. JOHN SHUFF JOHN SHUFF Sustainable Growth = JOBS Sustainable Growth = JOBS Long Term Planning = Efcient Spending Long Term Planning = Efcient Spending JOHN SHUFF JOHN SHUFF ELECT ELECT Political advertisement paid for and approved by John Shuff, Democrat, for County Commission District 5. FOR COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 5 FOR COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 5 www.ShuffForWakulla.com www.ShuffForWakulla.com PLEASE RE-ELECT OUR PAP Donnie Sparkman WAKULLA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERHe Is: Knowledgeable Honest Dedicated to the people of Wakulla County with 42 years of experience Certi ed Florida Appraiser Experienced Land Surveyor (and He Loves US! Brigs, Walker & Reese)Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, for Property Appraiser The race for State Attorney will be near the top of this years November ballot. Pete Williams is a Tallahassee attorney who is challenging 28 year incumbent Willie Meggs. Williams qualied for the position last April, stating that it was time for the voters to have a choice and a change. Williams educational background includes a BA in Economics from Yale University, a MBA from Stanford University and a law degree from the University of Florida. He has over 20 years of service to the State of Florida, working rst as an Assistant State Attorney, where he handled thousands of violent crimes and tried over 100 jury trials. He then served as Assistant Attorney General, Director of the Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco, and Inspector General for both the Agency for Health Care Administration and the Department of Education. In January 2003, Pete was appointed by then Attorney General Charlie Crist to a four year term as Floridas Statewide Prosecutor. He was based in Tallahassee and supervised 40 Assistant Statewide Prosecutors located in eight ofces across the state, with an annual budget of $6 million. The Ofce of Statewide Prosecution was charged with investigating and prosecuting organized criminal activity such as drug trafcking, government fraud, internet crimes against children and public corruption, and achieved conviction rates of over 95%. Williams is running to reinvigorate the Ofce of State Attorney. His platform includes resolving cases more quickly, supporting and partnering with law enforcement to achieve a more efcient use of prosecutorial resources, more active recruitment and training of young prosecutors, and increased use of new, innovative and cost-effective rehabilitative sentencing programs to help offenders become productive members of society. He believes the current State Attorney has been slow to bring the State Attorneys Ofce into thea electronic age, and that the main ofce in Tallahassee suffers from low morale and high turnover among the young prosecutors. All the good, senior prosecutors have retired and the new ones are leaving because they say it is no longer fun to work there, said Williams. Our current State Attorney has done some good things in the past, but the last four years have been marked by too many controversial cases involving special favors, the botched prosecution of the Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives, Ray Sansom, and the sudden retirement for 30 days that was done for no other reason than to allow Mr. Meggs to collect both his regular $150,000 annual salary and another $100,000 a year in retirement pay. Williams added. We should ask our elected leaders to set better examples and act like they are accountable to the voters. I pledge fair and equal justice and I am working hard for your vote Williams is married with four children, three of whom attend Roberts Elementary School in northeast Tallahassee. He has been endorsed by the NRA and the PBA. Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Pete Williams, Republican, for State Attorney, 2 nd Judicial Circuit.ADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENT Pete Williams

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Autumn is the time for enjoying Wakulla Countys great outdoors. There is boating, cycling, hiking, hunting and numerous other leisure time ways to relish the pleasant bene ts of nature. It is easy to forget that not all nature has to offer is an enjoyable experience. One consideration before tromping off into unfamiliar woods and other wild terrain is to get familiar with some of the more common poisonous plants. A little knowledge can save hours or days of the uncomfortable after-effects of coming in contact with poisonous plants. Avoiding this unpleasant experience will save money, too. Topical treatments and, in extreme cases, doctors visits will dent the household budget. Poisonous plants can be divided into two groups those which cause skin irritation, and those which cause internal distress, and in rare cases, even death. These plants are found not only in natural settings, they occur almost everywhere soil is exposed to the sun in Wakulla County. Many factors in uence the toxic nature of a particular plant. The problem substance can be dispersed throughout the plant, or localized in a particular plant part, such as in roots, berries, or seeds. The amount of poison in a plant may vary, even among plants of the same species depending on the time of year, the weather conditions, and the soil. Reactions vary among people coming in contact with a harmful plant. The health and age of the person, and the quantity of the substance contacted will in uence the symptoms. Poison ivy is a commonly encountered vine which causes an itchy rash. It is often intermingled with Virginia Creeper, a vine with many look-alike features, but no negative side effects. The one constant identifying feature of poison ivy is the leaves always come in threes, with two of them directly opposite each other. Creeper has a cluster ve leaves. Neither vine has thorns, unlike blackberries or dewberries which have a three leaf cluster on their canes. Poison ivy will grow in full shade climbing into trees, over fences, and up the side of walls. In the full sun of open elds it appears as a shrub. Like creeper, poison ivy has a variety of leaf shapes. Sometime creeper will have a cluster of three leaves on a vine, but veleaf clusters will be on the same vine. In autumn both creeper and poison ivy turn cherry red, but there is a slight tint difference between the two. A trained eye can make the distinction between the two shades of color. Poison oak usually appears as a low growing shrub. The slender, upright branches bear lea et which resemble oak leaves. They also grow in threes, just like poison ivy. The undersides of the leaves commonly are lighter in color because theyre covered with fine hair-like structures. Poison sumac is a coarse woody shrub or small tree. It never grows in the vinelike fashion of poison ivy. It frequently grows near swamps and wetlands, and ranges in height from ve or six feet to twenty- ve feet. Its leaves are divided into seven to thirteen leaflets which grow in pairs. At the end of each stem is a single lea et. In the spring, leaves are bright orange and velvety in texture. In the summer they become dark green and glossy, with lower leaves a pale green in color. In autumn the leaves take on a russet brown color. To learn more about local poisonous plants, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Office at 850926-3931 or http://wakulla. ifas.u .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u edu or at (850) 926-3931. Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison Get familiar with common poisonous plants PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSVirginia Creeper vines, above, show the typical three to ve leaf cluster. Creeper isnt poisonous but is often intermingled with poison ivy, here in a tree at right, leaves always come in threes, with two of them directly opposite each other.Please Recycle It's time for Wakulla's next chapter Vote for Jim Parham It is all about fairness. The citizens of Wakulla do not mind paying their fair share; they just do not want to pay someone else's. Put "fair" back into fair market value! Qualifications: Achieved highest levels in the appraisal profession (MAI & SRA) Experience: Appraised property over 38 year career in 35 counties of Florida and in North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama and the Caribbean Independent: No Party Affiliation (NPA);Tied to no political party Established recent residency; Uncompromised; Funding own campaign If Wakulla is to become greater it would be good to hire a property appraiser who has worked in and understands the dynamics of greater markets "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www.FairValuesInWakulla.com Paid b y Jim Parham No Part y Affiliation for Pro p ert y A pp raiser IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GET READY FOR HUNTING At HealthSouth, we understand that recovering from a stroke can be challenging. But no matter where a patient is in his/her recovery process, or how long ago the stroke occurred, our Second Chance Stroke Program could help maximize functional ability, increase independence and improve quality of life. This includes areas of mobility, speech or written communication, swallowing, cognitive functions and activities of daily living. Our program oers: Physical/occupational/speech therapy Certied rehabilitation nurses Therapist trained in neuro developmental treatment Patient/family education Support groups Admission is by referral for a free in-home evaluation. For more information contact us.YOU DESERVE A SECOND CHANCE:HealthSouth Corporation:551344

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netFriday night was the rst time the Wakulla War Eagles went into Live Oak and beat the Suwannee County at their home eld, and only the second time Wakulla had beaten the Bulldogs. The War Eagles offense looked strong generating 500 yards of total offense in the 37-14 win. It improved Wakulla to 7-0 overall and 2-0 in the district, and guaranteed the War Eagles a spot in the district playoffs. Im proud of our kids, Head Coach Scott Klees said after the win. Its the rst time weve beaten them over there. Ever. Coming off an open week, the War Eagles got a chance to heal. Running back Demetrius Lindsey, still dinged up with turf toe and unable to practice last week, played extremely, extremely well, Klees said. He got to sit out for a week that really helped him. Against the Bulldogs, Lindsey had four rushes for 83 yards and a touchdown on the ground, and four catches for 72 yards and a touchdown through the air. Lindseys catch in the back of the end zone was just determination: the pass looked certain to be intercepted with the defender between Lindsey and the ball but Lindsey went over the top of the defender and took the ball away for the catch. Freshman receiver Keith Gavin also had a good game with four catches for 96 yards. Quarterbacks Caleb Stephens and Feleipe Franks, splitting playing time, both had 116 yards passing. The War Eagle offense was pretty balanced with 296 yards rushing and 232 yards through the air. On defense, cornerback Brandon Nichols continued playing a shut-down corner, with Dalton Nichols also playing well on the other side. Both corners are playing extremely well, Klees said. Besides a couple of scores by the Bulldogs on wide receiver screens, the War Eagle defense was swarming and hitting hard and included scoring a safety. The only hitch in the War Eagle game, and it has been an ongoing problem, is penalties. Weve had more than 100 yards in penalties in every game except one, Klees said. The coach sounded mystified about what to do about it, especially about the offensive holding calls that frequently seem to stymy some drives. HOMECOMING GAME This week marks the War Eagle Homecoming against Trinity Christian from Deltona. The game starts at 6 p.m. rather than 7:30 p.m. because of Trinitys travel. Their quarterback will probably be the best athlete we have played up to this point, Klees said. Trinity is 5-2 and ranked 9th in the state in their class. It should be a good game, he said. Theyre very athletic, very big. But Trinity is a smaller school with perhaps 30 players, and its expected that the War Eagles will wear down Trinity. SUWANNEE RECAP Both teams struggled to nd their rhythm early in the rst quarter. With 5 minutes left in the rst, the War Eagles recovered a Bulldog fumble at the 35. Continued on Page 6B THIS WEEK: The War Eagles play Trinity Christian on Friday, Oct. 26, at 6 p.m. Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 sports news and team views SportsWar Eagles stay perfect Wakulla remains undefeated with 37-14 trouncing of SuwanneeCross Country: Teams compete at Panhandle Championships Sports, Page 2BTRICK OR TREATPage 15B Riversprings-WMS in shootout for county championship Spor ts, Page 4B WILLIAM SNOWDENRunning back Sheldon Johnson streaks down the sideline for a big gain. Firefighters BBQ Competition and Charity Fundraiser. Fire Equipment on display, Air Methods will have a helicop ter on display! Bouncy House for the kids! SMOKE AND FIRE We Support the Childrens Burn Camp Camp Amigo www.campamigo.com& Firefighter Scholarship FundsSERVING FOOD AT 11AM JUDGING STARTS AT 11:45AMJUDGES: Superintendent of Schools David Miller, Sheriff Donnie Crum, Wakulla News Editor William Snowden, Wakulla Area Times Guinn Haskins, Tax Collector Cheryl Olah, Medart Assembly of God Reverend Jeff McFalls, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church Father Ed Jones, Wakulla Chamber of Commerce Petra Shuff & one suprise judge.5K REGISTRATION FOR FAMILY RUN/WALK AT 8AM. RUN STARTS AT 9AM. You may pre-register at Anytime Fitness in Crawfordville or register the morning of the event at the Rainbow International booth located on the North end of Hudson Park. NEW!! DUNKING BOOTH 12:30Candidates that have volunteered to be in our dunking booth will be called. Any candidate that has volunteered to be in the booth can escape that by giving a $100 donation to our charities. We really dont want wet candidates, what we really want is money for our charities. Saturday, Oct 27 11am 4pm Hudson Park, Crawfordville Chicken $6, Choice of two meats $7, Chicken, Pulled Pork & Ribs $8 (Served with Slaw, baked beans and roll)Lunch Plate prices:Third AnnualThank you to our Sponsors! Call Us for Your Free In-Home Estimate!FLOORING Bevis Funeral Home & CrematoryHarvey-Young Chapel MAURICE LANGSTON HALSEYBESHEARS Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator

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By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachOn Saturday, Oct. 20, the local cross country teams traveled to Marianna to compete in the large and extremely competitive Panhandle Championships. The local harriers joined runners from 30 high school teams, from all classifications, including many of the best schools from around the Big Bend, as they tested the newly revised course. The changes didnt seem to have any signi cant effect on the runners, as many top times and personal records (PRs) were recorded. BOYS TEAM Once again, junior Aaron Smith led the charge for the WHS boys, nishing in 44th place, in a new PR of 17:25. Also, dipping under the 18:00 minute barrier was sophomore J.P. Piotrowski who ran a new PR in nishing in 17:56. The remainder of the top 7 for the boys team, which also ran new PRs, included Travis Parks (18:14), Lane Williams (18:41), Ryan Dodson (18:54), Alan Pearson (18:57) and Albert Smythe (19:00). Other WHS runners who set new PRs on Saturday included Gabe Hutchins (19:26), Nathan Green (19:58), Jimmy French (20:40), Justin Milhon (21:18), Gil Damon (22:19), Justin Goates (22:31), Riley Carrier (22:55), Evan Guarino (23:22), Toby Jordon (23:36) and Riley Welch (24:32). Overall, the boys team claimed 11th place out of 23 full teams. GIRLS TEAM The girls varsity team also faced most of the best teams the Big Bend and Panhandle areas had to offer, including state powerhouses Chiles, Maclay, West Florida Tech, Fort Walton, Niceville and Leon. After the scores were tallied, the local girls nished in 9th place out of 17 teams. Junior Marty Wiedeman was the rst local nisher in the excellent time of 20:38. She nished in 23rd place and was also recognized individually for nishing in the top 30. Senior Raychel Gray continued her streak of good nishes and was once again the teams second nisher, running 21:50. Sophomore Lydia Wiedeman sprinted in to finish as the third local runner (22:09), with sophomore Kasey James in close pursuit (22:21). Lilianna Broadway sophomor e, rounded out the scoring by nishing as the teams fth runner (23:13). Freshman Connie Lewis also ran well, nishing in a new PR and running a varsity qualifying time of 24:27. Other girls setting PRs for the local squad, included Ava Shaw (28:43) and Shelby Shiver (32:35). Riversprings Middle School runner Bryce Cole had another outstanding run, nishing second overall in the Middle School 2 Mile Race and clocked a state elite time of 11:57 in the process. The next meet will be this Saturday, Oct. 27, at Maclay High School in Tallahassee. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerEl Jalisco Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with side Hamaknockers Flatbread HoagiePulled Pork or Chicken Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99 Mixed Tues. & urs. Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under 926-4329mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza 9264329 9 2 6 4 3 29 2 9 Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.com Open 7 Days Open 7 Days 926-7530 Restaurant 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville Come in for selected catch each week Seafood Fridays Seafood FridaysLunch & Dinner at OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringWin One Meal from Every Restaurant!EATIN path EATIN pathOFF OFF the theEATIN pathOFF the Winner Paula Kilgoredrawn from Coastal Restaurant in PanaceaCROSS COUNTRYTeams compete at the Panhandle Championships 850 926-4737 1 Block South of the Courthouse 850 926-4737 1 Block South of the Courthouse The Great BBQ Discount Card! The Great BBQ Discount Card!Menu & Specials Menu & Specials Re-charge Re-charge Visit us on facebook for Menu & Specials Visit us on facebook for Menu & Specials RIBS PULLED PORK CHICKEN RIBS PULLED PORK CHICKEN Family Pack Special Family Pack SpecialGET UP TO 20%OFFWITH OUR DISCOUNT & GIFT CARD GET UP TO 20 % OFF WITH OUR DISCOUNT & GIFT CARDTHATS UP TO THATS UP TO PLUS 10% OFF Through November PLUS 10% OFF Through November30%OFF 30 % OFF BRING IN THIS AD BRING IN THIS AD Favored treatment for others Means higher taxes for you! The county budget remains the same, regardless. A portion of the taxes of the "favored" just shifts to you! It is all about fairness. The citizens of Wakulla do not mind paying their fair share; they just do not want to pay someone else's. Put "fair" back into fair market value! Please help me with your vote "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www.FairValuesInWakulla.com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 3B Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Oct. 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Oct. 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Oct. 27 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Oct. 28 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Oct. 29 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Oct. 30 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Wednesday, Oct. 31 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Nov. 1 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsThursday, Oct. 25 CANDLE LIGHT VIGIL will be held by the Narcotics Overdose, Prevention and Education Task Force beginning at 6 p.m. at Hudson Park with a reception. The vigil will begin at 6:30 p.m. Contact Sylvia Hubbard at sylviahubbard@ hotmail.com for more information. CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for ReNu U Rejuvenation Spa will be held at 4 p.m. at the Chamber of ce, 23 High Drive, Crawfordville. AREA AGENCY ON AGING for North Florida will hold its Board of Directors and Advisory Council meetings beginning at 10 a.m. at the Area Agency on Aging for North Florida Inc., 2414 Mahan Drive, Tallahassee. The meeting is open to the public. Friday, Oct. 26 ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held by Big Bend Hospice at Wildwood Golf Course. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m., lunch following. Tee-off will begin at 12:30 p.m. For more information call Pam Allbritton 9269308. FISH FRY FUNDRAISER for The Heritage Village Park and the Wakulla County Historical Society will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. at at Hudson Park. The menu will include mullet, hushpuppies, slaw, choice of potato salad or baked beans and ice tea. Prices are $8 or two for $15. To volunteer in the serving line or prepare sides of potato salad, baked beans or ice tea call Murray McLaughlin at 926-3027. WHS HOMECOMING AND GAME will be held at 6 p.m. at JD Jones Stadium at Reynolds Field at the high school. Saturday, Oct. 27 THIRD ANNUAL SMOKE AND FIRE BARBECUE COOK-OFF CONTEST will be held at Hudson Park in downtown Crawfordville from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. This event will include re department and law enforcement teams from around the Big Bend area; live music, games for the kids, live demonstrations, assorted re and safety equipment display. The proceeds from this contest will be used to support Camp Amigo, a week long camp for children that have suffered crippling or dis guring burns, the Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund, and to furnish scholarships to local men and women pursuing Fire ghter and Emergency Medical careers. For sponsorships, call Bill Russell at 9840148, or Dan Hinchee at 850-545-2154. MONARCH BUTTERFLY FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Events will include Monarch tagging demonstrations, a live butter y garden, talks, people tagging, crafts, exhibits and gifts for purchase. Tours will be held behind the gates all day. The St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center and Natures Classroom/Exhibits and Nature Store is located at 1255 Lighthouse Rd. in St. Marks. Call 850-925-6121 for visit www.fws.gov/saintmarks for more information. CHELSEA DIX KESSLER AND RED BARNES will perform a mix of country covers, old time and popular standards at 8 p.m. at Posh Java in Sopchoppy. Dix Kessler plays a ddle and her vocals command a strong presence on the stage. Barnes, on the guitar and vocals, adds the perfect blend to the duo. For reservations, contact Posh Java at poshjava@gmail.com or phone (850) 962-1010. Tickets are $10. Posh Java is located on the corner of Rose Street and Winthrop Avenue in downtown Sopchoppy. THIRD ANNUAL COMMUNITY FALL FESTIVAL will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Spirit Life Church in Sopchoppy. There will be games for children and relay races, pumpkin carving, face painting and storytelling. Skits and live music will be performed by youth from various churches throughout the evening on a outdoor stage. There will be a chili supper and hay ride. The event is free of charge. Sunday, Oct. 28 CHAT-OBERFEST will be held at 1 p.m. at CHAT Adoption Center, 1 Oak St., Crawfordville. There will be a pet costume contest, cook-out and icecream. Cost is $5 per entry in the contest. Visit chatofwakulla.org for more information. Saturday, Nov. 3 SECOND ANNUAL WAKULLA FRIENDS OF SCOUTING FUN SHOOT will be held at the WCSO Shooting Range from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine. A $5 per person entry fee will let you shoot pistols and ri es. There will be various prizes for the best shots. There will be a sporting clays competition, a competitive plate shooting event, shooting demonstrations, gun safety instruction, and a chance drawing for great prizes. This event is open to Boys, Girls, Men and Women of all ages who can shoot safely, as determined by the range safety of cer. Attendees under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Firearms and ammunition will be provided. All proceeds will bene t the Boy Scouts of America including priced concession sales. The WCSO Shooting Range is located at 65 Qualify Lane, Crawfordville. Contact Mike Scibelli at (850) 251-1497 for details. EMPTY BOWL FUNDRAISER will be held at Hudson park from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tickets are $15 for a soup lunch and hand painted bowl. There will also be live entertainment, including music and Stone Soup play by children. The money raised goes to the areas food pantries. For more information, contact Haydee Jackley at ribitsceramic@ yahoo.com or (850) 567-4212. NAMIBIKES EVENT will be held at Tom Brown Park, 1125 Easterwood Drive, in Tallahassee. Check-in and a continental breakfast open at 6 a.m. The bike riding event will raise awareness about mental illness, treatment and recovery. There will be a 100-mile Century ride to Monticello and back and a 64-mile Metric Century ride to Capps and back. There will also be a 30-mile off-road ride, a 6-mile family-ride around the park and a bike rodeo and a safety course. For more information, visit www.FightStigmaAndRide.org, or contact Carol Weber at cweber@nami orida. org or (850) 671-4445. FOURTH ANNUAL PAT RAMSEY HOSPICE EVENT will be held at noon at Bradfordville Blues. The event will bene t Big Bend Hospice in Ramseys honor. He was a well known musician and blues singer. There will be several musical acts inside and outside, including Brett Wellman & the Stone Cold Blues Band, C.S.Holt & Blues Revival, RoadHouse, Acme R&B, Common Zenz, JBs Zydeco Zoo, Big Poppa & The Shuf e Brothers, Randall Big Daddy Webster, Cheap & Easy, The Wiley Coyote Band, Low Flying Planes, Bedhead Betty, Swingin Harpoon and Major Bacon from New Orleans La. Featuring Clyde Ramsey on Harp & Keys and Ontological Elephants Party Time. Sunday, Nov. 4 FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE will be held at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and will be on the Florida National Scenic Trail with speaker Dale Allen who brought the trail to St. Marks in the 1980s. Find out about the different hikes available into the St. Marks backcountry. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures Classroom at St. Marks Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 925-6121 for more information. Government Meetings Monday, Nov. 5 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorE-books nally here on the Oct. 31Starting on Oct. 31, our e-book system will be up and running! As of this writing, we have 57 current e-books available in addition to thousands of ebooks in the public domain like classics, instructional, etc for you to enjoy. You will have to download the Overdrive Media Console to your reader or mobile device (can be found in your devices app store) and have an Adobe account set up as well (you will be prompted upon downloading the Overdrive app). Both of these are free. If you need assistance, please dont hesitate to come by or give us a call. Those with Amazon.com accounts, but no reader, can also download the Kindle app to your personal computer and check out e-books as well. I will also attach how-to guides to my weekly email and they will also be available at the front desk. In the upcoming weeks I will also hold public how-to workshops at the library to show how the system will work on your devices. Once youve downloaded the Overdrive Media Console you simply click on the Overdrive link on our homepage (www.wakullalibrary.org) and choose what youd like. Those who have overdue books or owe nes wont be able to checkout e-books until their account is cleared. As stated before, there is a limit of two e-book checkouts at a time and they will automatically be returned after two weeks if you dont send them back yourselves. Holds can also be placed on e-books that are checked out and you can also (and we encourage that you do) make suggestions as well. As with anything new like this were sure there will be growing pains so please feel free to come by or give us a call if we can help.Friday Night Movie Our Friday Night Movie this week is from the quirky mind of Wes Anderson (Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums). Although our Public Viewing License forbids me to name the lm here, I can tell you that the PG-13 (for sexual content and smoking) rated film is set on an island off the coast of New England in the 1960s, as a young boy and girl fall in love they are moved to run away together. Various factions of the town mobilize to search for them and the town is turned upside down which might not be such a bad thing. Starring Bruce Willis, Edward Norton and Bill Murray among others, this comedy will warm the heart as well as making you laugh. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show. Political EventsThursday, Oct. 25 POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for property appraiser will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the Community Center, followed by a forum for the sheriff candidates at 7:45 p.m. Library News... NOPE Candlelight Vigil will be held at 6 p.m. at Hudson Park. Fish Fry for Heritage Village Park 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. at Hudson Park. Monarch Butter y Festival at St. Marks Refuge from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Chat-Oberfest at 1 p.m. at Chat Adoption Center. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy CONNOR HARRISONof wakullasports.comThe Riverspring Bears are county champs once again with a game that went down to the wire, but the Bears prevailed and won 32-28. The scoring started on the rst drive for Riversprings, with Zach Norman completing a pass to Justin Davis for a touchdown, but the two point attempt was no good. The Wildcats decided to answer that score with one of their own and unlike the Bears, Wakulla Middle punched in the two point conversion. Riversprings managed to score another touchdown, but once again, failed to get the two points after the touchdown. Next up was the Wakulla Middle Wildcats who followed up with another touchdown, but couldnt quite get the two points, leaving the score at 14-12. With around ve minutes left in the half, RMS was stopped on fourth down, giving the ball back to the Wildcats. Thats when the Bears defense stood up and forced a WMS punt. On that drive, Lindsey broke a huge run up the middle and sprinted all the way to the end zone. Leaving the score at 18-12 in favor of the Bears at half time. Coming out of half time, WMS was set to receive the ball, but a hard hit by Jake McCarl knocked the ball loose from the return man, and Riversprings recovered the fumble. After a single first down, RMS was stopped on third down and ended up letting Kam Rosier punt the ball away and let it roll inside of the 15-yard line. The Wildcats then began driving down the eld and soon faced a fourth and ve. They elected to go for it and did so successfully, scoring a touchdown on that play. Of course, they attempted the two point conversion only to be stuffed at the line of scrimmage by a host of Bears. This left the score at 20 for WMS and 18 for Riversprings. In an attempt to give themselves a better lead, Wakulla Middle kicked an onside kick, but it was recovered by R.J. Kinard, letting the Bears take over with good eld position. Riversprings took full advantage of this opportunity and put together a drive that was topped off with a touchdown and the two point attempt was effective this time. Following the kickoff, the Wildcats crawled back into the lead with a touchdown with 3:14 left in the game. This tied the game up until WMS got two more points following the touchdown, leaving the score 28-26, Wildcats on top. In an attempt to seal the game and run out the clock, Wakulla Middle decided that it was a good idea to try an onside kick. It was recovered by, once again, R.J. Kinard. The usual starting quarterback was Zach Norman, but he was out with an injury, so Jake McCarl took that role. Soon there was under a minute to play, but McCarl took the ball on a busted play, made a few Wildcats miss the tackle, and walked on into the end zone with 39 seconds left. WMS was down 32-28, but still had life as they had the ball, and a time-out remaining. Their quarterback tossed a pass down eld, but it landed in the wrong hands and before you know it, RMS has the ball following the turnover. Instead of trying to run the score up, they lined up in victory formation and took a knee to end the game.Connor Harrison covers local sports for www.wakullasports.com. He can be reached at wakulla40@gmail.com.MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLRiversprings Bears are county champs after 32-28 shootout with WMS The rst touchdown of the game by Justin Davis. Austin Geiger attempts to make a one handed catch. A long run for a touchdown by Demarcus Lindsey.PHOTOS BY CONNOR HARRISON OF WAKULLASPORTS.COM REGISTRATION DATES: SATURDAY 10/20/12 & SATURDAY 10/27/12 REGISTRATION TIMES: 8:00 A.M. TO 12:00 P.M. OR DURING OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY 10/15/12 TO FRIDAY 10/26/12 8-5PMREGISTRATION DEADLINE: SATURDAY 10/27/12, 12:00 PM REGISTRATION PLACE: MEDART RECREATION PARK 79 Recreation Dr.AGE DETERMINING DATE: SEPTEMBER 1st, 2012COST IS $40.00 PER CHILDAGES: 04 & UNDER DIVISION: 06 & UNDER DIVISION: 08 & UNDER DIVISION: 10 & UNDER DIVISION: 12 & UNDER DIVISION: COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD8 & 9 DIVISION: 10, 11, & 12 DIVISION: All players (basketball & soccer) must provide proof of health insurance or purchase a policy for an additional $10.00. All leagues are coed. If interested in coaching the above sports, please contact the Wakulla County Recreation Department. All volunteers must complete a criminal history background check. !!" 2012 Go to www.bigbendhospice.org to Sign-up Today! 11:30am Registration and Lunch 12:30pm Tee-o October 26, 2012Wildwood Country ClubSAVE THE DATE!For more information, call Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308Wakulla County Big Bend Hospice 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926685 or 510Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH

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By TIM LINAFELTHis game Saturday night wont just erase all the pain that Devonta Freeman has felt for the past few weeks. But it at least will give him something to smile about. Nearly a month after Anthony Darling, a cousin who Freeman grew up with and considered a brother, was shot and killed, Freeman returned to his hometown of Miami for the rst time in a Florida State uniform. Playing in front of his friends, family and former high school coaches, Freeman posted a teamhigh 70 rushing yards and two fourth-quarter touchdown runs that lifted the Seminoles to a 33-20 victory over the Miami Hurricanes. It feels absolutely great, Freeman said, to come out here in front of my fans and stuff. It just feels so good to be playing in front of my home crowd once again. Freeman, who played high school football at Miami Central, said he did he best to focus on the game, but afterward Darlings memory came rushing back to him. During the game, I just set it aside, he said. Then after the game, I talked to him and just let him know that was for him. Freeman led FSU in rushing as a freshman in 2011, but the return of senior Chris Thompson and emergence of sophomore James Wilder Jr. led to a decreased role for Freeman during the seasons rst half through seven games, he carried the ball just 31 times. That changed in a big way early in the second quarter when Thompson hauled in a 32-yard completion and went down with a left knee injury, later revealed to be a torn ACL that will sideline him for the rest of the season. But when Thompson went down, Freeman stepped up. He took his rst carry of the game ve yards then two carries later ripped off a 33-yarder that took FSU to the Miami 15-yard line and set up a Dustin Hopkins eld goal. By the time the fourth quarter arrived, Freeman received the opportunities hed been waiting all year for. With the Seminoles nursing a 16-13 lead early in the final period, FSU drove to the Miami 13-yard line then handed to Freeman three straight times. He responded with runs of three yards, seven yards, and, nally, a three-yard touchdown that effectively sealed the game. Devonta, being from down here, he played great, FSU quarterback EJ Manuel said. I told him at halftime, Youve got to step up. And he already knew. Freeman, though, wasnt quite done. After FSU took over on downs late in the fourth quarter at Miamis 21-yard line, the Seminoles called Freemans number again, this time for a 5-yard TD run that made it 33-13. It felt good getting in the end zone twice in Miami, he said. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 5BBy MARTY COHENLets take a moment to turn back the hands of time: Thus began the cavalcade of mistakes and poor play in all three phases that led to the thoroughly dominating Gamecock victory. And it got nasty. The sea of blue (Urban) Meyer envisioned as a thunderous wave from the stands to carry his team to victory turned into an invective of blue thoughts and words. As Floridas woes mounted, fans booed lustily with each failed offensive series, music to the ears of rival recruiters who will undoubtedly remind the pack of premier prospects in the South Endzone how Floridas fabled Swamp had turned on its own players. In the end, the momentum the Gators had gathered from victories over mediocre Georgia and hapless Vanderbilt dissolved into the crisp night air. It turned into a sullen night in The Swamp, all the magic the theater used to produce gone in a hardto-fathom third straight home setback. And to South Carolina, which had never won any sort of championship laced contest, plus native son Steve Spurrier to boot Its almost hard to believe that after 57 wins in (Meyers rst) ve years, after the glorious championship seasons, that Florida football has seemingly lost its way. Getting it back, restoring the identity of Florida football, is the type of challenge Meyer has never faced before. It will be interesting, to say the least, to watch the re-construction process unfold Ugh. This was penned by yours truly on Nov. 14, 2010, just hours after the crash of the Meyer Regime was complete, the humbling 36-14 shellacking by South Carolina that gave the Gamecocks the SEC East title and a reason to frolic on Florida Field. Meyer would step aside for good about a month later, leaving that reconstruction process to Will Muschamp. So here we are, some 672 days later, and its time for another visit by South Carolina and the Head Ball Coach. Sure theres the obligatory questions, and midweek stories, about Spurrier coming back to Gainesville, blah, blah, blah. I realize the beat writers have a weeks worth of copy to churn out, but cmon, this is an old, played-out tale. This will be the eighth installment of Florida vs. Spurrier/ South Carolina, and the fourth meeting in The Swamp. Spurrier has been gone for 11 years, and while the shadow he cast over the program will never go away, now that he has built the Gamecocks into a contender after an initial five fruitless seasons, the storyline is now Florida vs. South Carolina, and all the rami cations embraced in the showdown. A sportswriter pal, searching in vain for the ultimate statement angle, said he was planning to write how Muschamp needs this win to validate his footing with Gator fans, that much like Meyer in his second season at UF in 2006, he needs to topple Spurrier.FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State t e Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&MSaturday, Oct. 27 Bye Week #2 Florida at #10 GeorgiaSaturday, Oct. 27 at 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on CBS. Duke at #12 Florida StateSaturday, Oct. 27 at 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPNU.Showdown Showdown stands on its stands on its own merit own merit FSUs Devonta Freeman puts up big numbers in Saturdays game against Miami. The defensive brain trust on the sidelines: WILL MUSCHAMP along with DAN QUINN (right) and TRAVARIS ROBINSON.Happy homecoming for FSUs FreemanPhoto By TRAVIS REGISTERGATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt Jacksonville, Florida Behind Argyle Shopping Center Preview at 11:00a.m., Auction at noon Brewer Auction Service (386)497-4438 or (904)838-1575 au#2604 ab#1940 Onsite Estate AuctionSaturday, October 27thAntiques, furniture, dolls, unique pieces from 18th century! Visit www.BrewerAuctions.com for pictures and more information. 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comPlayers of the WeekCHRIS GRIFFIN Scored 92 percent. Just about every TD was right behind him, Klees said. DANIEL SANDERS 3 tackles and several key blocks JAMES DOUIN 7 tackles, 3 assists, caused fumble and had an interceptionO ense Defense Special Teams War Eagles stay perfect Continued from Page 1B Freshman quarterback Feleipe Franks connected with Keith Gavin, who took the ball down to the Bulldog 20. A couple of plays later, Franks tossed the ball to receiver Brandon Nichols the defensive back on the play had gotten turned around, lost sight of the ball, and Nichols caught it at the 2 and walked into the end zone. Dillon Norman added the extra point and the War Eagles were up 7-0 with 2:41 remaining in the quarter. The Bulldogs scored in response, with a wide receiver screen that went for 75 yards. The extra point was good, to make it 7-7 with 1:36 remaining. Unable to move the ball, the War Eagles punted and the Bulldogs took over deep in their own territory. Trying to run an option play, the War Eagles disrupted the play and forced a fumble which was recovered by Suwannee in the end zone for a safety. Mikal Cromartie returned the kickoff to the Bulldog 35, and Lindsey scored a touchdown on a speed sweep down the sideline. Normans PAT was good, and the War Eagles were up 16-7. Suwannee was stopped on their next series, and on the next offensive drive, Lindsey took a pass down to the 15-yard line. After pushing the ball inside the 10, Malik Thomas scored on a sweep to the right side. Normans extra point was good, to make it 23-7 with 4:23 remaining in the half. On the Bulldogs next possession, War Eagle linebacker Dequon Simmons ran down a runner in the open eld to save a touchdown. Suwannee was unable to move the ball and was forced to punt which was blocked and recovered by Wakulla on the Bulldog side of mid eld. With time running out, Lindsey made his acrobatic catch in the back of the end zone, turning what looked like a sure interception into a touchdown. The extra point was good and the War Eagles were up 30-7 with 1:21 left in the half. But the Bulldogs were still game, and they drove the ball down the eld and scored on a reverse with just 11 seconds remaining to make it 30-14 at the half. In the second half, Klees started rotating in some clean uniforms to get playing time. In the third quarter, quarterback Caleb Stephens, showing no signs of knee problems, made a long run down the sideline to the 11, which set up running back Sheldon Johnson to score on a speed sweep. The extra point was good to make it 37-14. The fourth quarter was scoreless. Wakullas swarming defense with linebacker Hunter Hurst, 65, safety Mikal Cromartie, 20, and Kieryn Parson, 5, tackling a Bulldog receiver. Celebrating the win by singing the school song after the game. TCCs WAKULLA CENTERWe want you to succeed professionally through education and training. We are here to help.FALL 2012 INFORMATION SESSIONS:OCTOBER 23 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about the Testing Center, Enrollment Services and Student SuccessOCTOBER 30 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about Financial Aid & Scholarship and the Career CenterNOVEMBER 6 | 3 5 P.M.Learn more Financial Aid & Scholarships, Enrollment Services and Student SuccessNOVEMBER 13 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about the Testing Center and the Career CenterTesting is available by appointment every Friday. For more information call (850) 922-6290 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for qualied applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and oor rate of 2.5% I LIKEMIKE STEWARTREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mike Stewart, Republican candidate for county commissioner, district 3 www.Ken FieldsPhotography.photoshelter.com Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & ExteriorTogether We Are Providing Employment for Local CraftsmanFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 7B -Janet By SCOTT ROSEContributor, Relish magazineThe oyster pan roast is a New York City culinary landmark. Velvety, hearty and delectable, this popular comfort food has been served at the legendary Oyster Bar and Restaurant, located deep under the Beaux Arts grandeur of Manhattans Grand Central Station since 1913. Despite its name, an oyster pan roast isnt a roast at all but rather a seafood stew. Sandy Ingber, executive chef at the Oyster Bar and Restaurant, says that in preparing a pan roast, he uses a professional utensil called a steam-jacketed kettle. The device is similar to a double boiler, but more intense. No worry if you dont have one; Chef Ingber says the recipe takes longer in a double boiler but turns out ne. He does caution that the inside pot of your double boiler should be a perfect t. Asked for other tips on preparing a distinctive oyster pan roast, he says Its a timing thing. After you add the half-andhalf, you must take the mixture out of the pan the split second before it reaches the boiling point. Otherwise, the half-and-half could become mottled. You can nd variations on the traditional oyster pan roast: here a trumpet mushroom, there a dash of nutmeg, there again an artichoke heart. Yet no version so soothes the soul as this one based on the Oyster Bar and Restaurants recipe. OYSTER PAN ROAST 1 tablespoon butter 1/2 cup clam broth or juice 1/2 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1/4 teaspoon celery salt 10 shucked oysters with juice 2 tablespoons sweet chili sauce, such as Heinz 1 cup whole milk 2 slices toasted white bread 1 teaspoon sweet Hungarian paprika 1/2 cup oyster crackers 1. In a double boiler with water boiling on high, combine clam juice, butter, celery salt and Worcestershire sauce. Once butter melts, add oysters and cook for 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Add chili sauce and stir well. 2. Add half-and-half and milk and cook for a few minutes until heated through, but not boiling. 3. Place a slice of white toast in a warm 9-inch soup plate. Using a slotted spoon, place oysters over toast. Pour hot liquid over oysters, lling to about -inch beneath the rim. Garnish with a paprika. Serve with oyster crackers. Serves 2. Per serving: 290 calories, 13g fat, 50mg chol., 11g prot., 33g carbs., 2g ber, 930mg sodium.For more Relish recipes and to sign up for our newsletters, log on to relish.com. RELISH THE AMERICAN TABLEMake the world your oyster PHOTO BY MARK BOUGHTON PHOTOGRAPHY / STYLING BY TERESA BLACKBURNAn oyster pan roast isnt a roast at all, but a seafood stew. NEED HEARING AIDS?HEARING AIDS AT NO COST TO FEDERAL BCBS WORKERS AND RETIREES!?Thats Rights No Co-Pay! No Exam Fee! No Adjustment Fee! Discover How Much Better Your World Can Sound The Name Youve Come To Trust Serving Your Hearing Needs For Over 60 yearsBlue Cross Blue Shield Federal Insurance pays total cost of 2 Miracle Ear ME2100 series aids. If you have Federal Government Insurance with enrollment code #104, #105, #111, or #112, you are covered for hearing aids with no out of pocket expenses. 3 yr. warranty. If you have a basic plan, we have factory pricing for non-qualifiers Miracle EarHearing Aid Center is NOW Offering CRAWFORDVILLE3295 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY THE LOG CABIN, BARRY BUILDING TALLAHASSEESEARS MIRACLE EAR GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL 1500 Apalachee ParkwayANN HENNESSY, MA, CCC-A CERTIFIED & LICENSED AUDIOLOGISTCall for an appointment 850-942-4007 Toll Free 1-866-942-4007HUNTERS ACT NOW & ORDER HEARING PROTECTIONMIRACLE EAR GUARDIAN*Hearing evaluation and video otoscope inspection are always free. Hearing evaluation is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnosis, nor are they intended to replace a physician's care. If you suspect a medical problem, please seek treatment from your doctor. No Acreage Limitations! Financing for Rural Homes www.FarmCredit-Fl.com Charlotte Dodson NMLS #700260850-656-2920 | Tallahassee, FL Oering loans with:

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By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE An amendment before Florida voters on the November ballot would tighten the states rarely-used revenue cap, potentially giving it more teeth something supporters say will restrain reckless spending but opponents say would gut vital services. Under Amendment 3, the amount of revenue the state would be allowed to collect and spend would no longer be tied to the growth in the economy -a cap that the state has never bumped into. Instead, it would follow a formula combining inflation and population growth. For supporters, the proposal will help avoid the wild swings that Floridas budget has taken over the last decade, smoothing out spending and providing a more robust savings account for when the state falls on more dif cult economic times. Voting yes on Amendment 3 will send a message to our state leaders that the size of Floridas government shouldnt grow faster than the taxpayers capacity to pay for it, said Edie Ousley, a spokeswoman for the Florida Chamber of Commerce, in an email. But opponents say the amendment would force the Legislature to slavishly follow a rigid formula instead of adjusting spending as necessary. And they say it would handcuff lawmakers from addressing the states loophole-ridden tax code in a way that might bring in additional money for schools and infrastructure. We do not need to reduce our future to a mathematical formula, said Charles Misted, associate state director for the AARP. The force behind Amendment 3, approved by the Legislature in 2011, was Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island. At the time, Haridopolos was gearing up to challenge Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, though Haridopolos eventually abandoned his bid. But as he leaves of ce because of term limits, Haridopolos said his proposal will help future legislative leaders avoid the headaches he and others had to deal with after years of spending in ated by an economic boom gave way to deep cuts triggered by an economic bust. What were trying to do with this amendment is just provide common-sense consistency, he said. Haridopolos also noted that some of the support for those opposing Amendment 3 comes from out-ofstate groups. Opponents, though, sense an effort to protect special interest tax breaks and constrict funding for public services under the guise of lowering taxes and responsible government. I know a wolf when I see one, thundered Richard Dunn, senior pastor at Faith Community Baptist Church in Miami and a former Miami-Dade commissioner, during a rally Monday on the steps of the old Capitol. This Amendment 3 is a wolf. And its a wolf in sheeps clothing. Critics say government costs often grow faster than inflation, artificially keeping the new limits too low. Theyve taken to citing a study by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities -a left-leaning think tank based in Washington, D.C. saying the proposal would slash $11 billion from state spending by 2021, including more than $2 billion in the nal year. That contrasts sharply with estimates from legislative staff, which said in a 2011 analysis that the state would stay well below the cap until at least the 2019-20 scal year. Rich Temple of the AFLCIO, one of the groups ghting the proposal, mocked supporters argument that the amendment would provide certainty to businesses. It certainly guarantees that Florida will continue to remain at the bottom in all of the key indicators of a healthy society forever, he said. Exhibit A for opponents of the proposal is Colorado. Voters there approved a similar measure in 1992, but eventually suspended the measure because of an effect known as ratcheting, which limited lawmakers ability to use the revenues from an economic recovery to offset earlier reductions. Jeanette Baust, a Denver sociologist, said Florida would follow the same path if it accepted the snake oil that was sold to Colorado voters. History will repeat itself if you do the same thing Colorado did and pass this amendment, she said. Haridopolos said thats not true. He said Colorado ran into some of its problems because of spending requirements in Colorado in areas like education. And the Florida amendments provide safeguards, he said, that would allow a two-thirds majority in the Legislature to spend more money than the cap would allow if theres an urgent need to do. We learned from the Colorado success, he said, and some of their dif culties. Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comStaff reportThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners approved placing a referendum on the Nov. 6 General Election Ballot to allow the citizens of Wakulla County to vote for or against a economic development property tax exemption for new businesses and expansions of existing businesses. The purpose of this property tax exemption program is to encourage the establishment of new businesses in Wakulla and for existing businesses to expand and create new jobs in the county. The program authorizes the county commission to grant qualifying businesses an ad valorem tax exemption on real property improvements and tangible personal property of up to 100 percent for up to 10 years. Economic Development continues to be a priority and this is another way for us to attract industries to open their doors here, it will help our current businesses grow, and will provide job opportunities for our citizens, said Commissioner Mike Stewart. There is a list of criteria for businesses to qualify for an exemption, including the creation of new jobs. Not all new businesses or those looking to expand would qualify. All qualifying businesses would come before the county commission for approval and it would be done on a case-by-case basis. This program does not change any tax liabilities except for property owners who are exempted under the program. Additionally, it is anticipated to generate new tax revenue that will be added to the tax base from the improvements and tangible personal property after the exemption period. It is subject to the approval of a majority vote at the General Election. To learn more about this program and eligibility criteria, visit the county website (www.mywakulla.com) or contact the County Administration Of ce at 926-0919. Early voting starts this Saturday, Oct. 27 for the general election. It will be held from Oct. 27 to Nov. 3 at the Supervisor of Elections Of ce, 3115-B Crawfordville Highway. Hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 7 p.m. Make sure to bring a picture ID with signature. Election Day is Nov. 6. For more information, call the elections of ce at (850) 926-7575 or visit www.wakullaelection.com.Amendment 3: Fight over how tightly to cap taxesWakulla to vote on economic development tax exemptionEarly voting starts Oct. 27 Caf THURSDAY DRINK SPECIALS Perfect Weather to head to the CoastSunday ThursdayALL U CAN EATSpecials Catfish ......$11.95 Shrimp ....,$13.95 Scallops ..$13.95Includes Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies30 SHRIMP10 Fried 10 Grilled 10 BlackenedServed with Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies$12.95Winter hours: Tues. Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 Sunday 4-9984-52431506 Coastal Hwy., Scenic BiWay4P.M. 6P.M.2 for 1 DRINKSTHURSDAY SPECIALSALL U CAN EATShrimp .....$12.95 Scallops....$13.95 Baby Back Ribs $9.95 Dozen Oysters $3.00 Beer $1.50 Well $2.00 Wine $3.00Winter Hours: Thurs. 4-9 Fri. 4-10 Sat. 11-10 Sunday 11-9 713-001499 Rock Landing Rd. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 9BSt. Marks Stone Crab Festival FESTIVAL SCENES: Clockwise from top left, the parade featured superheroes such as Batman, Iron Man, and Capt. America; a stone crab as a hero; Katy Hill, 4, works a mallet to get some crab meat; COAST students perform at the festival.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bareld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of One Click. Job Resources. Real Results.The Employ Florida network helped me to improve my professional skills and connected me with a training opportunity. THE RESULT: Elizabeth Matthews was trained and hired by Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point.Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. T THE RESU L T : T T Elizabeth Matthews w w as tra i ne d an d hi re d b y R e gi ona l M M edical Center Bayonet Point.ELIZABETH MATTHEWS Monitor Technician and Unit Secretary Hudson, FL R R R R R R e e a a a l l l R R R e e e s s s s u u u u l l l t t t s s s . HIRED EmployFlorida.com1-866-FLA-2345 Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-7 Closed Sun. & Wed.

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Call Bill (813)298-0221 Farm Services BUSH HOGGING ROADS GRADED GARDENS TILLED Have tractor will bush hog finish cut large acerage grade roads driveways till gardens. dbdouge@aol.com or 850-643-6283 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3 BD\2BA SW on 3 Acres in A rated schools, No smoking, $500 per pet Avail. Nov. first /last/dep $675. ea 850-926-6766 SOPCHOPPY2/1.5 Singlewide $575.REVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Mobile Homes For Sale 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, Beautiful Kitchen. Huge Master Bedroom Walk In Closets Call Today (850) 576-2106 4 BR Mobile Home on 5 Acres, Ready to Move IN -EZ Payments. Call Me (850) 576-2105 100 Families Needed for Govt Loan Program. Call Today (850) 576-2104 Mobile Homes For Sale 3BR, 2BA-Used Mobile Home. Great Condition Wont Last !!! Call Me ASAP (850) 576-2687 GOTLAND? Need a Home. Use Your Land As your DOWN Payment Call Now (850) 576 2687 Apartments Unfurnished PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall Mary (850) 984-4811Equal Housing Opportunity TDD 1 800 955 2771 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $700/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1937 CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Bedroom / 2 Bath, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 CRAWFORDVILLENice 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Home in Wakulla Gardens, Lots of extra features, $895. month (850) 926-8948 N. Crawfordville2/1 Mobile Home $575 monthREVELL REALTY 850-962-2212 SHELL POINTWaterfront 1 Bedroom Home, large great room screen porch. Beautiful sunset view over water. $675 mo. (850) 570-5712 (850) 926-3808 SOPCHOPPY2/1For Rent, $600 month On CanalREVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Rentals Wanted WAKULACOUNTYWant to Rent 2 bedroom. 1 bath. House Dec -May...prefer Panacea/Sopchoppy area. Call 231-256-7648 Auctions Estates AUCTION -Real Estate & Personal Property Cliffside Mansion & Cottages, 216+/-Acre Country Estates, Offered in 17 Tracts in Carroll County and Galax, VA. Long frontage on New River Trail and Chestnut Creek. Guaranteed to Sell Over $699,000. November 8, 10 am -Personal Property; November 9, 10 am Personal Property, Real Estate sells at NOON. Sale held On-Site-Tract 7, 506 Cliffview Road, Galax, VA 24333. 5% Buyers Premium on Real Estate, 10% Buyers Premium on Personal Property. For more information, go to woltz.com or call Woltz & Associates, Inc, Brokers & Auctioneers, (VA# 321) Roanoke, VA, (800)551-3588. Home/Office Cleaning Need your house or office cleaned? Call Renee at 850-590-6720 for information about my cleaning services, experience and pricing. References available. Rent: Houses Unfurnished 5414-1025 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Michael Keller Doing business as: That Place on 319 Fictitious Name Notices at 2302 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327 with a mailing address of 2302 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida 32327 desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Fictitious Name Notices Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 18th day of October, 2012 /s/Michael Keller Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News October 25, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices 5410-1025 TWN 11/08 sale PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE Affordable Title & Lien, Inc. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78 of the Florida Statutes on November 8, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Lien Notices *AUCTION WILL OCCUR WHERE EACH VEHICLE IS LOCATED* 1993 CHEVROLET VIN # 2G1FP22S8P2111901 Located at: 2235 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Wakulla Any person(s) claiming any interest(s) in the above Lien Notices vehicles contact: Affordable Title & Lien, Inc, (954) 416-1779 *ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE* Some of the vehicles may have been released prior to auction LIC #AB-0003126 October 25, 2012 Lien Notices 5402-1018 TWN vs. Cayson, Donald Ray Case No. 65-2012-CA-000180 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 2011-CA-004095 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. 5411-1101 TWN vs. Heirs of Roosevelt Wilson Case No. 2004-FC-100 Notice of Action IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2004-FC-100 CIVIL DIVISION JIMMIE WILSON, Petitioner, vs. HEIRS OF ROOSEVELT ALEXANDER WILSON, WILLIE WILSON AND PEARLIE MAE WILSON, AND FERRELL ALLEN, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Alexandria Bramhan Beauford, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 Marla Barnes, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Amended Verified Complaint has been filed in this court. This is an action for determination of heirs, partition and quiet title to certain real property lying in Wakulla County, Florida, and more particularly described as follows: Parcel 1: Wakulla County Parcel No. 16-3S-01E-000-05224-000, the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NE of SW of SW ) of Section Sixteen (16), Township Three South, Range 1 East and a parcel in the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE of SW of SW ) of Section Sixteen (16), containing 14.96 ac., MOL; Parcel 2: Wakulla County Parcel No. 22-3S-01E-000-05405-000, Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company monument marking the Northwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 3 South, Range 1 East, Wakulla County, Florida, and run thence South 00 degrees 31 minutes 20 seconds East along the westerley boundry of said Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter 873.80 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds East 245.54 feet to a point on the eastern boundary line of the right-of-way of State Road No. 363, thence run South 16 degrees 12 minutes 52 seconds East 155.81 feet to the point of beginning of the land herein described. From said point of beginning, run North 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds East 247.86 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 31 minutes 20 seconds West 150 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds East 140.12 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 03 minutes 21 seconds East 450.01 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 28 minutes 40 seconds West 300.04 feet to a point on the eastern boundary line of the right-of-way of State Road No. 363, thence run North 16 degrees 12 minutes 52 seconds West 311.61 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning, containing 2.845 acres, more or less, in the Northwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 3 South, Range 1 East. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on petitioners attorney, whose name and address are: Deirdre A. Farrington, Esq., P.O. Box 392, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 on or before November 26, 2012, and to file the original of the written defenses with the clerk of this court either before service or immediately thereafter. Failure to serve and file written defenses as required may result in a judgment or order for the relief demanded, without further notice. Signed on October 15, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desireee D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk October 25 & November 1, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 4Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1150mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $675mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. WANTEDSUBSTITUTE SCHOOL TEACHERS Wakulla County School District Apply at: wakullaschooldistrict.org Click on Employment(All applicants are required to pass background and drug screening, and complete of online sub training.) 20960 N.E. Burlington Rd., Hosford, FL 32334 NOVEMBER 3 9AM EST--F&LAUCTION ---FARM EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE AUCTIONTractors, Mowers, Cultivators and all types of Farm EquipmentAuctioneer: Felton Hall, auctioneer license AU426610% BUYERS PREMIUM all consignments are welcomed.For more info: 850-379-8410, Cell: 850-566-6646 TO VIEW PARTIAL LIST OF PHOTOS VISIT www.auctionzip.com AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 OFFICE SPACE LEASEFORTHE BARRY BUILDING ATTHE LOG CABINCrawfordville 850-508-5471$25000/MO Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Susan Jones, GRIRealtor 566-7584 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-4 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-4148 Longleaf 3BD/2BA home on 1.74 acres with screened in-ground pool. Spacious oor-plan with large screened in porch with hot tub, fenced in yard, relaxing rocking chair front porch and a peaceful yard... Price reduced to $138,000 Call for more details or to preview!! PRICE REDUCED RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $900 Security Deposit 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA home $800 mo. 31 Chehaw 3BR/2BA DWMH $650mo. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!55 Allison Dr. Panacea 3BR/2BA Nice Dock and Boardwalk, Furnished or Unfurnished. GREAT FISHING on Dickerson Bay! $950 mo. No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2837 Coastal Hwy. Commercial Building $800 mo. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Commercial building 4,300 square foot heated and cooled building on 1 acre of land Rents out for $1,800.00. Building is in excellent condition. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets DONALD RAY CAYSON, et. al., Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DONALD RAY CAYSON, and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONALD RAY CAYSON if alive, and/or dead his (their) unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or grantees and all persons or parties claiming by, through, under or against him (them). Last known address is 29 HERRING CIR. CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Action for foreclosure of a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: PLEASE SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DESCRIPTION has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Iris Hernandez, SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., Attorneys, whose address is 9700 South Dixie Highway, Suite 610, Miami, Florida 33156, (305) 670-2299, Iris.Hernandez@spearhoffman.com within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, and to file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this 23 day of January, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Becky Whaley As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT ST. JOE PAPER C0MPANY M0NUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN WEST 638.56 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 355.87 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF A GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 46 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID COUNTY ROAD BOUNDARY 192.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN ALONG SAID SOUTHWESTERLY ROAD BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 46 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 141.22 FEET, THENCE NORTH 48 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 32.78 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 100.35 FEET, THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 78.93 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A POWER LINE EASEMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID COUNTY ROAD BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 24 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 354.81 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 223.39 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5412-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.12 TXD013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2424Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-080-000-11508-013LOT 80 HS P-4-13-M-22 COMM AT NE COR OF LOT 81 HS OR 648 P 773 Name in which assessedBEN WITHERS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this11day of October 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 5413-1115 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLCthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #2182Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-076-000-10250-008 LOT 76 HS P-7-8-M-20-C IN NE 1/4 OF LOT 76 HS OR 148 P 292 OR 219 P 610 Name in which assessedTHE SIGHTS & SOUNDS COMPANY OF WAKULLA INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 5 day of December, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this12day of October2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 25 and November 1, 8, & 15, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices TO INCLUDE A: 2000 GENERAL LEASING CO. VINGMHGA1249925046A #79466437 2000 GENERAL LEASING CO. VIN.GMHGA1249925046B #79466459 Length and width of mobile home is 20.8 X 66.3 OCTOBER 25 AND NOVEMBER 1, 2012 The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON OCTOBER 15, 2012The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Patricia Broadway was recognized as Employee of the month. Virginia Pooser and Katherine Spivey were recognized as Teachers of the Month. All were congratulated and presented with a plaque by Chairman Scott. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Evans. All Board Members and Superintendent Miller were in attendance. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the agenda as amended. The amendment included the addition of items #12 and #13. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the following consent items: 1.Approved Minutes of the Meeting of September 10, 2012 and October 1, 2012. 2.Approved the following Employment of Personnel: New Hires: 10 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Henderson, ErinPre-K/WECTeacher10/03/12-06/04/13 Sharin, KristaWHSGuidance Counselor10/03/12-06/04/13 9 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Andrews, AmyWMSESE Paraprofessional09/17/12-06/04/13 Osteen, HeatherPre-K/WECParaprofessional10/01/12-06/04/13 Peltier, StephenCESCustodian09/14/12-06/04/13 9 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Youngblood, MaryTransportationBus Driver09/21/12-05/31/13 Transfers: NamePosition From Program From Position ToProgram ToTerm of Service 9 Month 12 Month NamePosition From Program From Position ToProgram ToTerm of Service Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Crowe, SeanWHSRemediation Teacher09/17/12-12/06/12 Fielder, SuzanneWHSRemediation Teacher09/17/12-12/06/12 Pearce, BeccaTransportationOfce/Other10/01/12-05/31/13 Rentz, MelanieWHSRemediation Teacher09/25/12-05/31/12 Supplemental Positions: NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Galladay, AmyWMSGirls Soccer Assistant Coach2012-2013 Kathryn Gibson/effective September 17, 2012 Mary Williams/effective September 10, 2012 Melisa Taylor/effective November 14, 2012. 5.Approved the Disposal of Equipment. (See Supplemental File #22) 9.Approve Warrants for payment. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Memorandum of Understanding (Master Teacher Contract.) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the Wakulla COAST Charter School Annual Financial Audit. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Postsecondary Education Readiness Test Assessments Grant (PERT.) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the amended 403(b) Adoption Agreement. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the School Parent Connection, A Parents Guide to Wakulla County Schools for 2012-2013. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the District Volunteer/Volunteer Coordinator Handbook revisions. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the Middle School Social Studies revisions. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve Termination of Employee. (See Supplemental File #22) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. tion. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the termination of a contract for Employee Relations Services, Educational Management Consultant Services by virtue of their resignation. (See Supplemental File #22) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. OCTOBER 25, 2012

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 13B 1. GEOGRAPHY: Where are the Balearic Islands located? 2. ANATOMY: Where is the ulna located in the human body? 3. ANCIENT WORLD: Who kidnapped Helen of Troy, an event that started the Trojan War? 4. LITERATURE: Who wrote the novel Light in August? 5. HISTORY: In what year was the first Zeppelin flight? 6. INVENTIONS: What did Elisha Otis invent? 7. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: Where is original Mayo Clinic located? 8. U.S. STATES: In what state is Mount Rushmore located? 9. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is a group of ducks called? 10. RELIGION: What is a more common name for the religious group called United Society of Believers in Christs Second Appearing? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Mediterranean Sea 2. Forearm 3. Paris 4. William Faulkner 5. 1900 6. Elevator safety brake 7. Rochester, Minn. 8. South Dakota 9. A gaggle 10. Shakers YOUR AD HERE

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Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 19 In the second to last week before voting starts, Florida this past week played its usual role as a state where presidential candidates go to make or break their fortunes. But the state also may have emerged as a place where other elections are also competitive. For the better part of the last decade, hard-to-predict elections farther down on the ticket have been few and far between in Florida, due at least in part to the way districts have been drawn. But new redistricting rules recently enshrined in the state Constitution actually might have worked, at least a little, to make for more competitive elections. Early this week, a couple of state Senate races were actually thought hard to call at least until the last few days when Republicans seemed to surge on a number of fronts. Political watchers still had their Senate eyes xed on the race between Republican Dorothy Hukill and Democrat Frank Bruno in northeast Florida, and the race between two incumbents, Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale, and Sen. Maria Sachs, D-Delray Beach, who were drawn into the same very competitive district. Theres also plenty of interest in the Orlando-Kissimmee area between Democratic Rep. Darren Soto and Republican Will McBride. When was the last time there were three state Senate races that were truly competitive? All six campaigns were busy this week, along with several House candidates who were actually campaigning in the last several days with voting set to start next weekend on Oct. 27. Competitive House races are something that havent been seen a lot in recent years. This time around, lots of House candidates are still really going at it in late October, in contrast to past years when lots of races were sewn up by qualifying day. In a couple of races, the candidates were busy, not on the campaign trail, but in court. A state appeals court on Friday sided with Democrat Rep. Jeff Clemens in a case over the contested Senate District 27 race in Palm Beach County. The 1st District Court of Appeal refused to change his 17-vote win over fellow Democrat Mack Bernard, who then conceded, essentially putting Clemens in the Senate. Another contested House election from South Florida was decided in court this week in favor of Rep. Barbara Watson, whose narrow win over fellow Democratic Rep. John Patrick Julien was upheld by a Leon County circuit court. While Julien has no plans to appeal further in court, he is considering contesting Watsons seating in the House, which under the state constitution is the ultimate arbiter of who can be a member. Most Senate and House candidates, however, spent the week scouring their district for last minute undecideds, hitting the Tiger Bay and chicken dinner circuit yet again. It was also evident that in presidential politics, Florida is still the magic kingdom. Joe Biden was in Sun City on Friday on the heels of Paul Ryans visit to the area this week. Mitt Romney was to be in Daytona Beach on Friday evening and his wife Ann Romney was in Florida, too. Both presidential candidates will be in the state next week for their final debate at Lynn University in Boca Raton Monday evening. Obama will stick around Tuesday morning to campaign at the Delray Beach Tennis Center. It would be a stretch to say that attention fully turned this week to policy matters, but the faint beginnings of the policy debates expected in the Capitol this coming year began to take shape. Executive agencies this week had to put out their proposed budgets for next year an admittedly early event in the long and subject-to-major-change budgeting process, but still a good window into agency priorities. PRISON PRIVATIZATION AGAIN? Among the highlights: the Department of Corrections hinted that it may look for more privatization, though it hasnt nailed down any speci c plans. The prisons agency was at the center of a huge ght this past year over plans to privatize the prisons in the southern third of the state. That effort failed in a rare dramatic vote in the Senate this year, so one might question the legislative appetite for more debate on the idea. But the Senate could be a different place this year (see above mention of competitive legislative races.) The big opponents of prison privatization are both gone from the Senate end of the Capitol. Sen. Paula Dockery, R-Lakeland, is out of of ce entirely come next month and Sen. Mike Fasano, who led the revolt against the prison privatization plan last session, will be Rep. Mike Fasano come next month. He was term-limited and so ran to return to the House, and wont have an opponent on the November ballot. OTHER POLICY ISSUES The Department of Juvenile Justice made it clear it wants to upgrade several facilities, while the Department of Children and Families put lawmakers on notice that it believes in helping parents of children in the welfare system with drug treatment. The Department of Economic Opportunity let it be known that the state isnt happy about throwing money at an animation company that later went bankrupt. In its legislative budget request, DEO asked lawmakers to set aside $500,000 to hire lawyers to go after the company, Digital Domain, to try to recoup some of the millions the state lost when it gave the company incentives only to see it close quickly and lay off almost everyone. The state license plate agency, which technically goes by the unwieldy name of the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, said it plans to push forward with a plan to roll out new license plates that are more readable so cameras in toll booths dont make as many mistakes that cost the state money. The agency also wants to centralize the distribution of plates, which is currently done by the various county tax collectors, but those tax collectors said this week theyll ght to keep that part of their job, in part because they fear theyll be blamed if some vendor gets it wrong. That issue will be discussed this coming week at the Tuesday Cabinet meeting. There was still more discussion of policy this week in Tallahassee with two potentially wide-reaching and controversial issues being oated. TIGHTENING ETHICS AND ELECTIONS LAWS Incoming Senate President Don Gaetz said he wants to tighten state ethics and elections laws and maybe make some changes to the campaign finance system. The Niceville Republican said he wants to toughen con ict-of-interest rules for lawmakers and make it easier for people to nd out about their legislators nances. One of his more controversial ideas may be to clamp down on elected officials who also get paychecks from other government agencies. Gaetz said he would like to prevent elected of cials from accepting other public-sector jobs think university professor if they dont have the background or prior competency to qualify for the jobs. Theres no detailed proposal yet, so watch for the issue to evolve over the coming several months. And Gov. Rick Scott, who has never looked very comfortable in political settings, got involved in a policy debate this week when he reacted to the strategic plan of the state Board of Education, which clumsily, perhaps, injected open discussion of racial disparities into the debate over how to eliminate those disparities. With an ultimate goal of getting all students to test at grade level, the board earlier this month put out a blueprint for improving student performance that included lower short-term achievement goals for black and Hispanic students than their white peers. The chairman of the board, Gary Chartrand, said it only makes sense that it will take longer for some underachieving students to reach certain benchmarks because theyre starting from a disadvantage. That those underachieving students are often minorities isnt always voiced, but the department set its goals by race rather than economic status or current achievement status. That led some black lawmakers to complain that the plan smacked of the racism of low e xpectations, to borrow a phrase from former Gov. Jeb Bush. After the controversy came to light, Scott put out a statement acknowledging that the plan was poorly communicated. The actions taken last week by the State Board of Education in adopting their strategic plan did not clearly articulate our shared commitment to fully close that achievement gap for all students, regardless of race, geography, gender or other circumstance, Scott said in a statement this week. Just as Scott has reached out of late to some of his previous adversaries such as the state teachers union on other issues, his willingness to concede the boards badly worded plan bought him some good will with African-American Democrats, at least for now. STORY OF THE WEEK: While the looming election continues to dominate the political and government landscape, the broad strokes of the legislative year began to take shape this week as state agencies put out budget outlines and the incoming Senate president rolled out an ethics idea. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: In an effort to maximize the states resources during dif cult economic times, the department proposes privatizing additional facilities. That one sparse sentence and only that sentence spelled out the Department of Corrections current thinking on the possibility of more efforts to privatize prisons.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Whens the election? And, nally, some policyBrain Teaser 1 14 17 26 32 39 43 51 55 62 66 69 2 20 27 52 3 28 53 4 29 47 5 23 40 21 33 48 56 63 67 70 6 15 18 34 41 44 57 7 30 58 8 31 54 9 24 45 49 25 35 42 50 64 68 71 10 16 19 22 46 59 11 36 60 12 37 61 13 38 65 ACROSS 1. Workbench gripper 6. Take rudely 10. Con job 14. Lofty lair 15. Casino city 16. Hankering 17. Places for plaques 18. Familiar with 19. Bog fuel 20. ACE 22. Singer James or Jones 23. Demolition need 24. Let out, as fishing line 26. Daytona 500 org. 30. Boxing ring boundaries 32. Baltic Sea feeder 33. With cubes 35. Marsh plant 39. Edgar, painter of ballerinas 41. Mil. mail drop 42. Bald tire's lack 43. After-school 66Across, e.g. 44. Stinging remark 46. Peddle in the bleachers 47. __-face (show o f affection) 49. Fuel provides it 51. Syrian city 54. Sis's sib 55. __ sci (coll. major) 56. ACE 62. Place for a cooling pie 63. Horn sound 64. Stiller's mate 66. Twistable cookie 67. Slaughter in baseball 68. Passion 69. Shipped off 70. __ a soul (no one) 71. On the lamDOWN1. Crow's cry 2. Wife of Jacob 3. Folk's Guthrie 4. Place for grist 5. Pre-euro Barcelona buck 6. Sty sound 7. Taken-back car 8. Auth. unknown 9. Cram for an exam 10. ACE 11. Minotaur's home 12. Playing marble 13 Heavy __ music 21. Calvary letters 25. Digs made of twigs 26. Silent assents 27. Yemeni port 28. Nintendo rival 29. ACE 30. Satisfy, as a debt 31. Limburger emanation 34. Semi compartments 36. "In the headlights" critter 37. "West Side Story" faction 38. Whirling water 40. Go directly from first to third grade, say 45. Titanic totaler 48. Use saddle soap on, say 50. 98.6, body temperature-wise 51. Lhasa __ (Tibetan dogs) 52. River of Tours 53. Barkin or Burstyn 54. __ Wetsy (old doll) 57. Scottish isle 58. The Koh-i-__ d iamond 59. Prefix with dyne or drome 60. Carpentry groove 61. Libidinous god 65. "__ you for real?"American Prole Hometown Content 10/21/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 1 2 3 4356 378 7 8629 93 23417 8 32 7564 951 2009 HometownContent 951 2684 3 7 748319562 623574981 517 843629 869752314 234691758 486 137295 175926843 392485176 C A W N O D S A P S O S L E A H A D E N L O I R E A R L O S E G A E L L E N M I L L C R A C K P I L O T P E S E T A S K I P I N R I S O F T E N G R U N T C A B S I O N A R E P O R E P A Y N O O R A N O N O D O R B E T S Y B O N E U P B E R G N E S T N O R M A L S U P E R S E R V E A E R O C R E T E D E E R D A D O A G A T E G A N G E R O S M E T A L E D D Y A R E St Marks River Cantina(850) 925-9908 Halloween Party & Costume ContestAnd Karaoke An An d Ka ra ok ok e e Saturday, October 27 7 pm 11 pm859 Port Leon Dr, Saint Marks, Fl 32355 MON-THURS. 10 am 10 pm SAT-SUN 10 am 11 pm 859 Port MO S Come dressed as your favorite spook!

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Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Office deputies on road patrol Wednesday, Oct. 31 will have candy to distribute to children. If you see a road patrol deputy in your neighborhood, say hello and trick-or-treat at their vehicles. Sheriff Donnie Crum reminds residents that Halloween can be a fun holiday for children to dress up and trick-or-treat for candy, but there are a number of things to remember to make Halloween memorable for all the right reasons. Halloween is one of the most exciting times of the year for children, but sometimes the most hectic for parents. Nearly 94 percent of children between the ages of four and 12 participate in Halloween activities each year. CHOOSE bright, ameretardant costumes or add re ective tape to costumes and candy bags so children can be easily seen in the dark. In addition, carry a glow stick or ashlight. PLAN a trick-or-treating route in familiar neighborhoods with well-lit streets. Avoid unfamiliar neighborhoods, streets that are isolated or homes that are poorly lit inside or outside. NEVER send young children out alone. They should always be accompanied by a parent or another trusted adult. Older children should always travel in groups. ALWAYS walk younger children to the door to receive treats and dont let children enter a home unless you are with them. BE SURE children do not approach any vehicle, occupied or not, unless you are with them. DISCUSS basic pedestrian safety rules that children should use when walking to and from houses. CONSIDER organizing a home or community party as an alternative to trick-ortreating. MAKE sure children know their home phone number and address in case you get separated. Teach children how to call 911 in an emergency. TEACH children to say NO! or this is not my mother/father in a loud voice if someone tries to get them to go somewhere, accept anything other than a treat, or leave with them. And teach them that they should make every effort to get away by kicking, screaming and resisting. REMIND children to remain alert and report suspicious incidents to parents and/or law enforcement. CONSIDER checking the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) web site for information regarding sex offenders and predators in the area you intend to trick-or-treat. Child safety is vital year round, but Halloween is an especially important time for parents and children to pay extra attention to their surroundings and not let their guard down, said Sheriff Crum. Parents need to exercise a few basic safety precautions to help ensure that Halloween is both fun and safe. Halloween is a time of special fun and making special memories with your children. Dont let that be spoiled by not taking time to ensure your childs safety. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 15BHappy HalloweenTrick-or-treat tips CRAWFORDVILLE_______________ GULF COAST LUMBER & SUPPLY ....ALL DAY TIL 5 THE WAKULLA NEWS ...................................... TIL 5 WAKULLA COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS OFFICE ........................ALL DAY TIL 5 WAKULLA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERS OFFICE ..............................................ALL DAY TIL 5 SONIC DRIVE IN ........................................ALL DAY WINN DIXIE ................................................ALL DAY ADVANCE AUTO PARTS .................ALL DAY TIL 8 BADCOCK HOME FURNITURE AND MORE ......................................ALL DAY TIL 6 BLUEWATER REALTY ROSE ALLEY ..........12 6NORTH POINTE CENTER______________________ AMERIFIRST HOME MORTGAGE .ALL DAY TIL 5 LISAS LISTINGS REAL ESTATE ..................3 6 THE LITTLE BLACK DRESS ..........................3 6 THE LEARNING CURVE ...............................4 6MEDART _________ EDEN SPRINGS NURSING & REHAB .........FALL FESTIVAL ........6:30 8:30 KANGAROO EXPRESS ...............................2 8 MIKES PAINT & BODY ...............ALL DAY TIL 6 AMS MARINE SUPPLY ....................................... ALL DAY TIL 6 BEST WESTERN PLUS Wakulla Inn & Suites ..........................DAY TIL 7 THE INN AT WILDWOOD ..................DAY TIL 8Offered to Costumed Children The Following Businesses Wish you a Safe and Happy Halloween AND Invite You to Stop By for Trick or Treats CHAT of Wakulla, Inc. (Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment ) Pet Costume Contest Entry Fee $ 5 (Registration 1 pm) Categories: Best Costume Scariest Costume Prettiest Costume Prizes for first, second and third place Sunday, October 28th, 2012 CHAT Adop on Center, 1 Oak St., Crawfordville, FL Free ice cream for fosters and volunteers Pet Costume Contest Pet Costume Contest Pet Costume Contest Cook Out & Ice Cream Cook Out & Ice Cream Cook Out & Ice Cream (Donation) (Donation) (Donation) The fun starts at 1pm The fun starts at 1pm The fun starts at 1pm Visit chatofwakulla.org for more information, and registration forms ALSO OFFERED: AKC Good Citizens Te st. For more information visit http://www.akc.org/. Cer cate can be obtained from AKC for $8 Cost: $ 15 per dog

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Page 16B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy SHERRI KRAEFT Wakulla 4-H AgentKids and animals are a natural t. The animals will patiently listen to all the youthful fantasies and challenges, and the children learn to be responsible for a dependent creature. The UF/IFAS Wakulla County 4-H program offers youth a wide variety of animal projects designed to develop the skills and knowledge required to properly care for an animal. We currently have a dairy goat club, Kapra Kids, as well as a horse club, Horsemasters. For the younger youth, small animal projects include dogs, cats, rabbits and hamsters and are open to children six years of age to 18 years of age. Large animal projects include horses, cattle and swine, and are open to children eight years of age to 18 years of age. Youth in the older category can exhibit large animals in 4-H sponsored shows and, with some restrictions, in open shows. The North Florida livestock show circuit also offers other 4-H opportunities. For a number of years, youth from Wakulla County have participated in the North Florida Fair, Area A shows as well as the State Fair in Tampa with their goat and horse projects. Youth can participate in livestock judging competitions and exhibit their knowledge of a particular species. UF/IFAS 4-H sponsored shows are held in Gadsden, Madison and Jackson Counties and welcome 4-Hers from north Florida and south Georgia. 4-Hers with livestock projects can add to their awards resume in these shows. Area open shows where eligible 4-Hers can practice their skills include the North Florida Fair and the Wakulla County Youth Fair Association Swine show. To prepare 4-Hers with livestock project for the show season, a series of classes is being held at the UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce. There will be two series of classes offered depending on the age of the youth interested. For youth who are between the ages of ve and seven as of Sept. 1, we will be offering Pocket Pets classes designed to introduce small, live animals to children. These activities will include a farm tour, basic grooming and care as well as feeding and selecting the appropriate animal for a particular interest. Pocket pets include rabbits, chickens, cats, dogs as well as gerbils, hamsters and aquarium animals. For the older youth, activities to learn about animal husbandry, care and nutrition as well as traditional and agricultural practices as well as safety precautions will be discussed. Each experience will be utilizing many local resource instructors as well as animal and youth professionals to teach at each activity. Older youth are encouraged to participate with larger show animals that include swine, sheep, goats, or steers. Youth wishing to participate should contact the Wakulla County 4-H Agent at the Extension Of ce at 9263931 for details about how to enroll in 4-H and when meetings will take place. For more information on 4-H and 4-H Livestock project, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 850-926-3931 or at Wakulla. ifas.u .edu or like Wakulla County 4-H on Facebook. Staff ReportOn Saturday, Nov. 3, at Hudson Park hundreds of people will come together for a single purpose, to raise awareness of hunger that exists in Wakulla County. The rst Empty Bowls event will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Hundreds of handpainted bowls by those in the community will be on display and available to purchase along with a bowl of soup for $15. The bowls will serve as a reminder of all the empty bowls in the county and the people who are struggling to put food on the table. Participants will be able to pick out their favorite bowl and then ll it with one of 15 different soups made by those in the community. There will also be fresh bread and a drink included. Along with the soup, there will also be music and a play, Stone Soup, performed by children, a bake sale and craft vendors. All proceeds from this event will go to purchase food for the local food pantries. Along with the event, Farm Share will be at Hudson Park from noon to 3 p.m. to distribute nonperishable and some fresh produce to the seven food pantries, as well as families who are in need. The goal is to continue awareness raising about food insecurity in Wakulla at the same time that we provide food distribution and some money in the bank to help our pantries, said Gail Campbell, executive director of Healing Arts of Wakulla County, which is sponsoring the event. Call 926-3526 or 5674212 for tickets. Children, 13 and under, are $5 at the event, ceramic bowl is not included.4-H has variety of animal programs for youthEmpty Bowl fundraiser is set for Nov. 3 Painted ceramic bowls for the Empty Bowl event.