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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00431
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 10-18-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00431
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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCounty commissioners and county staff expressed deep frustration with FEMA this week over ” ood maps and the agencys failure to cover expenses the county incurred with Tropical Storm Debby. It is incredibly hard getting money back from FEMA,Ž County Administrator David Edwards told commissioners at their meeting on Monday, Oct. 15. Edwards went so far as to warn of the agency: Its very obvious we cannot rely on FEMA at all.Ž Edwards was frustrated by FEMAs apparent unwillingness to cover some $500,000 in Debbyrelated expenses. He said every time he met with FEMA and a response about what the county needed to do to get payment, he would get it done … and FEMA would change the rules the next day, he said. Theres no ifs, ands and buts about it … were going to wind up with about a half-million dollars they arent going to fund,Ž Edwards said. He advised the board to begin building up reserves in order to have some ability to fund storm events.Ž County Commissioner Mike Stewart was adamant in his response: I think we should “ ght the knuckleheads.Ž Commissioners directed Stewart to attend the meeting set for Wednesday with FEMA of“ cials along with County Attorney Heather Encinosa. There was a report on a meeting with FEMA and county staff and of“ cials with the cities of St. Marks and Sopchoppy. County Commissioner Randy Merritt, who is an engineer, noted at that meeting some apparent irregularities in the ” ood zone … especially as mapped in St. Marks. He noted that while most of the city is in the ” ood zone, the City of Tallahassees Purdom Power Plant is somehow excluded. Comparing how Panacea and St. Marks were mapped by FEMA, Merritt said the methodologies were different … with more extrapolation in St. Marks. There was very little change in Panaceas ” ood map, Merritt said, while St. Marks changes were signi“ cant. During citizens to be heard, resident Pierce Withers of Ochlockonee Bay complained that he had just been noti“ ed that his ” ood insurance had gone up to $5,000 a year. Withers asked the board to at least consider what would the ramifications be if the county withdrew from the ” ood insurance program. County Commissioner Jerry Moore, while agreeing to direct the county attorney to look at it, said he was concerned that lenders would pull out of the county. Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 40th Issue Thursday, October 18, 2012 T h r e e S e c t i o n s Three Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Arts & Entertainment ....................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 7B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 8B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 7B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 12B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 12B Comics ...........................................................................Page 15B INDEX OBITUARIES Martha GriffinSee Page 15ABy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net County of“ cials have asked FEMA for more time to challenge the accuracy of the agencys new ” ood maps. It appears, for now, the ticking clock for an appeal has stopped ticking. County of“ cials have warned the new maps would cause signi“ cant “ nancial impact to residents and businesses in the county. After the new maps were unveiled last month, the Wakulla County Commission sent a letter to FEMA asking for more time to appeal the maps. The maps have already been put on the federal register, but County Administrator David Edwards was told by representatives from Northwest Florida Water Management District that they have been told by FEMA to hold up. NFWMD is required to advertise the new maps twice in a local paper. Once that is done, the 90-day clock starts, Edwards said. The county has 90 days to appeal the maps for an error and they were seeking an extra 90 days on top of that. The concerns with the new maps were the base ” ood elevation for the City of St. Marks being raised 10 feet and the ” ood zone going well upriver. Most of the changes are in the coastal area and along the rivers, but also shows expanded ” ooding areas in places such as Wakulla Gardens. I believe it went too far,Ž Edwards said. There is some concern that the process FEMA was supposed to follow was not done. FEMA has been developing the maps for the last 6 years, and Edwards said FEMA staff met with the county three or four years ago and then nothing until this September. Edwards said the county has made a records request for the case “ le dealing with the ” ood maps. County Commissioner Mike Stewart said, We want them to prove to us that they did those steps,Ž Stewart said. The maps are online at Northwest Florida Water Management Districts website, www.nwfwmd.state.” .us, and click on the ” ood information portal.County frustrated with FEMA FEMA MAP/NWFWMD.STATE.FL.US WEBSITEFEMA appears to grant more time for challenge to maps D o l p h i n s f r o l i c i n S h e l l P o i n t Dolphins frolic in Shell Point D o l p h i n s f r o l i c i n S h e l l P o i n t Dolphins frolic in Shell Point PHOTO BY SUE DAMON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net The 4-H National Youth Science Day was held on Oct. 10 and students at schools in Wakulla County joined with other schools from around the country to become scientists for the day and participate in this years experiment. Students created an EcoBot out of a toothbrush, battery and tape. Once the Eco-Bot was completed the students used it to perform a simulated environmental clean-up project and then measured the effectiveness of their Eco-Bot. Its been great,Ž said 4-H Extension Agent Sherri Kraeft. The kids are super excited.Ž Kraeft led the demonstration in the Wakulla County schools and to Margaret Callaghans fourth-grade class at Riversink Elementary School. It gets the kids excited about 4-H and science,Ž Kraeft said. The students broke into groups of three or four and took the head off their toothbrush and then attached a battery to the top of it, turning it into an Eco-Bot. Once they were completed, they were ready for the experiment. The students learned about the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and were given a sheet with bird seed on it that simulated the oil. They were then asked to create a barrier to keep the Eco-Bot in the designated area to clean up the spill. The Eco-Bots had 30 seconds to clean up as much as possible. This year is pertinent because of the oil spill and we talked about how it relates to our county,Ž Kraeft said. Callaghan has been involved in the science day for the last several years and said the students really enjoy it. And its neat to think that all across America kids are doing the exact same thing,Ž she said. Fourth-grader Madison Hooker said she learned experiments can be done with anything. I learned that it was fun too,Ž she said. Another fourth-grader Shane Smith said, You can make small robots that can do big things.Ž Callaghan said the students will continue to do experiments with the EcoBot and coordinate it with math. The 4-H National Youth Science Day is part of 4-Hs One Million New Scientists, One Million New Ideas campaign, which is intended to engage 1 million additional young people in science, engineering and technology programming by 2013.Students build Eco-Bots for 4-H Youth Science Day PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENRiversink Elementary students build Eco-Bots out of toothbrushes and batteries. Event is held to increase awareness of domestic violence

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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net Things are heating up in two local races this election, the sheriffs race and county commission district 3. Residents are receiving calls and mailers targeting speci“ c candidates rather than endorsing or supporting one. From a push pollŽ to ads and mailers, voters are getting information about the candidates, some of whom say the information is factual while others say it is not. SHERIFFS RACE Several residents have received a polling call from a caller identified as representing CCG Research who asks questions about voters opinions of candidates and then proceeds to focus on the sheriffs race. Many are identifying this call as a push poll, which is intended to turn a voter against a candidate by stating negative qualities about him. According to emails received by The News, the questions in the CCG poll asked if they would vote for a candidate who had been divorced, and who had some disciplinary action while serving with the highway patrol. These questions were clearly about candidate Charlie Creel, who is running under no party af“ liation. Both Creel and his opponent Maurice Langston, Republican, say they had nothing to do with the poll. I dont condone that type of strategy, I condemn it,Ž Langston said. Langston said he knew nothing about it until someone told him they had received the call. He did not authorize it and doesnt endorse it, he said. I had nothing to do with any polling and to say I did is misleading, non-factual and an outright untruth,Ž Langston said. The chief law enforcement of“ cer in the county or any law enforcement of“ cer is expected to tell the truth and I respect that Mr. Creel is doing that and I hope he will respect that I am also.Ž Creel found the whole thing despicable. Theyre asking questions about my record that are totally off-base,Ž he said. He continued to say that the only truth was that he had in fact been divorced. The rest is outright lies,Ž he said, and he encouraged anyone who is interested to look at his record. Id like to know where it did come from and who is behind it,Ž Creel said. A phone message was left at the of“ ces of CCG for comment, but a return call had not been received by deadline. CCG is a private company called Conquest Communications Group out of Richmond, Va. CCG provides consulting services, marketing research and public opinion polling. CCG was founded by Vic Gresham and Dave Johnson. Johnson has served previously as the executive director for the Republican Party of Virginia and he has also been with the National Republican Congressional Committee. KESSLER VS. STEWART RACE The other race that has brought out groups who have had ads and mailers not endorsed speci“ cally by a candidate is county commission district 3, with candidates Howard Kessler, who is running under no party affiliation, and Mike Stewart, Republican. A mailer, as well as several ads have been placed labeling Stewart as the tax manŽ and discusses the implementation of new and increased taxes while Stewart has been a commissioner. These have been paid for by the Florida Quality of Life Council in Sarasota. Kessler has said previously that he was not behind the group. State “ nancial records for FQOL show a contribution of $25,000 from Anne Van Meter, Kesslers wife, back in July. When asked about this connection, Kessler said he did not know his wife had done this until she told him on Friday. Neither his campaign money nor his funds were used, he said. Van Meter also con“ rmed that her husband did not know. She added that she did nothing to hide it and has no reservations about it. Kessler said, I may not have chosen that route for me personally, but I understand her frustration and why she did what she did.Ž Van Meter said she did it in response to what happened in the 2010 election when Kessler ran for county commissioner. She said she knows there will be negative ads and mailers that will come out right before the election with false information about her husband and she wanted to be able to make sure the correct information got out. I will not be ” at-footed,Ž she said. She added that nothing in the mailer or ads is untrue or false. It is informational, she said. Kessler said he supports his wife and understand why she chose to do this. And added that from what he has seen, the materials were not negative or personal, but factual. Stewart felt differently. He said the mailer and ads distort the facts. Theyre distorting the numbers,Ž he said. Im just frustrated with all that.Ž He added that he didnt understand why someone would spend that large amount of money for a job that pays $30,000 a year and comes with so many headaches. That bothers me,Ž Stewart said. There have also been ads against Kessler funded by an outside group from Coconut Creek called Floridians for Accountability. Stewart said he has no personal connection to the group and he did not know about the ads prior to them coming out. He said he knows of the group and has informed them that he did not want to be a part of it and not to include his photo. I dont want to be connected to them,Ž Stewart said. Floridians for Accountability has not received a financial contribution since October 2010. However, Floridians for Accountability has purchased ads since then and there is belief by some, such as Van Meter, that mailers are planned in the next couple weeks. WA-KOOLA CALLS There have been recent automated calls with a recorded message that indicated it was being made on behalf of the Wakulla Democratic Party that encourages voters to get absentee ballots. There has been some skepticism expressed about the call since Wakulla is pronounced incorrectly in the recording as Wa-koola.Ž Democratic Chair Rachel Pienta has said the local committee had nothing to do with the calls. Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comIn a Sept. 27 article, Candidate responds to allegations about past,Ž The News reported that Hugh Taylor spoke before the county commission and in other venues to complain that allegations against a candidate for superintendent were racially motivated. Taylor did not make those statements at the meeting or in other venues. We apologize for the errors.CorrectionQuestions about outside groups in local campaigns Concerns about outside groups being involved in local races have come up in the Wakulla sheriff’s race between Charlie Creel and Maurice Langston, above, and in the county commission district 3 race between Howard Kessler and Mike Stewart, below.FILE PHOTOS Over 250 community-minded Wakulla County residents gather to eat tasty seafood, have a good time, and netŽ funding for a growing Big Brothers Big Sisters Wakulla County Mentoring Program. We are trying to raise $7,000 to support the ongoing efforts of the Big Brothers Big Sisters Wakulla County Mentoring Program. With such funding, Big Brothers Big Sisters will help more Wakulla County youth facing adversity overcome HUGE obstacles to dev elop: $10 per plate. Tickets are available online at www.bbbs.org/BIGcatch, at Poseys Steam Room, or at Poseys Dockside Caf.To Sponsor or for More Info: Contact Katie Williams at katie.williams@bigbendmentoring.org or 850.386.6002 5:30PM 8:30PM The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers … if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bar“eld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year. YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible. For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program. Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor ofƒ

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. TAX IMPACT OF VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARDNOTICE The Wakulla County Canvassing Board will meet in the Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections Of“ce at 3115-B Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida on the following dates. All candidates, citizens and press are invited to attend.LOGIC AND ACCURACY TEST NOTICE OPENING OF ABSENTEE BALLOTS Logic and Accuracy : Wednesday-October 24, 2012 @ 9 a.m. Opening of Absentee: Friday-November 2, 2012 @ 9a.m. 2nd Opening of absentee: Tuesday-November 6, 2012 @ 5p.mOCTOBER 18, 2012 The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 5, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider:A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 18, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE OF REFERENDUM NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A REFERENDUM ELECTION has been called by the Board of County Commissioners of Wakulla County, Florida and will be held from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. on November 6,2012, in Wakulla County, Florida, at which time there shall be submitted to the duly quali“ed electors of Wakulla County, as more speci“cally described and provided for in Ordinance No. 2012-17 of the Board of County Commissioners of Wakulla County, Florida, adopted August 6, 2012, the following question published below: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTIONS FOR NEW BUSINESSES AND EXPANSIONS OF EXISTING BUSINESSES Shall the Board of County Commissioners of Wakulla County, Florida, be authorized to grant, pursuant to s. 3, Art. VII of the Florida Constitution, property tax exemptions to new businesses and expansions of existing businesses that are expected to create new, full-time jobs in the County? __ BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA By -sE. Alan Brock, ChairmanOCTOBER 4, 18, 2012 By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net A town hall meeting combined with a ribbon cutting was held at the new location of Talllahassee Community Colleges Wakulla Center on Oct. 10. TCC recently moved into the building that also houses Centennial Bank and celebrated this new spot with a ribbon cutting and reception, but “ rst the night started with a town hall meeting to gather community input about the future of the campus. We were thrilled to combine the two,Ž said TCC President Jim Murdaugh. TCC is in the beginning stages of its strategic planning process and the “ rst step is inviting input from the community, Murdaugh said. They were looking for feedback about what they are currently providing, as well as what people would like to see offered. Some of the similar wants heard from those in attendance included more core classes offered, as well as dual enrollment program for high school students, vocational and technical classes, a testing location, exam preparation classes and partnering with local businesses. Superintendent David Miller said TCC needs to be an expansion of the programs currently offered at the high school. He added that TCC has a great relationship with the school district and he wants it to continue. People were also in agreement that there was a need for better communication among TCC and its students, as well as those in the community. Several ideas that were mentioned have also been brought up at TCC board meeting and TCC is on its way toward implementing some of them. This is just the beginning,Ž Murdaugh said. Where ever we start is not the end.Ž They plan to continue to expand on what is offered at the TCC Wakulla Center. One of the ideas of having the facility serve as a testing site has been scheduled, as well as days when an advisor will be on site, Murdaugh said. I want people to know how much we appreciate the number of people who came and the enthusiasm they have,Ž he said. It takes that for us to be successful.Ž As for TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute planned to open in Wakulla County, Murdaugh said they are still identifying a location and are waiting on accreditation and approval of the courses and degrees that will be offered at the facility. They have also identi“ ed the faculty who will teach at the institute. Some classes offered through the institute will start prior to it being built in January. These classes will be online with online lectures and some “ eld or laboratory experiences.TCC holds town hall meeting WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDENThe Coastal Optimists held their annual fashion show fundraiser on Thursday, Oct. 11, at Wildwood. The models show off some of the out“ ts they wore at the event. Optimist fashionsRelay for Life kicko Mitch Boone, a 16-year-old cancer survivor, shared his story at the kickoff for Relay for Life on Thursday, Oct. 11, at Crawfordville United Methodist Church. In an emotional speech, Boone recounted going through surgery as a 4th grader, questioning why little children should have to endure such pain. Boone is this years honorary chairman for the Relay, which will be held on Saturday, April 27, beginning at 2 p.m. and lasting until Sunday, April 28. The event raises money for cancer research. TCC Wakulla tells of programs offered, and asks the community what they want.

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Pine Straw Baskets: Barbara Rosen turns ‘nature’s discards’ into art • Man killed in Panacea shooting • Sheriff is available for budget questions • Riverside Cafe hosts Chamber luncheon • What the three no-party candidates said at the league forum • From the Dock for Oct. 18 • Drive time • Dying oyster beds are crippling a once thriving industry thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.COMMUNITY DEBATE By JONATHAN KILPATRICKFor the last four years the United States Federal government has spent over $1 trillion dollars per year more than it has received in tax revenues. If spending money is the role of the federal government, the Obama administration can say mission accomplished.Ž Clearly, this approach has not worked in creating jobs or stimulating the economy. Our nation has borrowed and spent funds that future generations will be forced to repay and our unemployment rate still remains high. The most appropriate action our government can do to create jobs and get the economy moving again is to create a tax policy that lets Americans keep more of the money they have earned and eliminate unnecessary regulations and burdens on small business. Most small businesses in America are taxed at the personal tax rate, currently at 35 percent, and in January 2013 will be as high as 39.6 percent. Reducing that tax burden would allow the small business owners in this nation the freedom to expand and hire additional staff. Sending tax money to Washington, then having a federal agency spend that money will not affect the economy nearly as quickly as allowing businesses and individuals to keep and spend their earnings in the local economy. The federal government has a role in issuing regulations; however, burdensome and unnecessary regulation have the effect of sti” ing job creation. Each year the federal government creates approximately 80,000 pages of new regulations. One example: The Federal Food and Drug administration estimates that the food service industry will spend an additional 14 million hours to comply with a federal regulation that all vending machine and chain restaurants display calorie content for all foods. Consumers will have to pay for those 14 million hours and higher prices will lead to less economic activity and fewer jobs created. Our government could see the greatest impact in job creation and economic development by creating a path to energy independence. Simply speeding the permitting process for private sector exploration and drilling would create thousands of jobs in this country. Approving the Keystone pipeline for oil delivery to re“ neries would create hundreds of thousands more. The federal, state and local governments cannot ef“ ciently create jobs. However, by proposing the right tax policy and the right balance of regulations, governments can create the environment where businesses and individuals create jobs and stimulate the economy.Jonathan Kilpatrick is the chair of the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee.By RACHEL PIENTAThe debate over governments role in economic stimulation and job creation has been a key ideological difference in this years presidential election. One particular sound bite, You didnt build thatŽ or the inverse we built thisŽ trope dominated the airwaves and became a pivot point for the economic argument. As Democrats, we believe the government plays a critical role in economic stimulation and job creation. From key healthcare policies which ensure a healthy workforce to support for critical infrastructure elements including roads and sewers, government provides the foundation on which a thriving, successful economy is built. The governments role in educating a quali“ ed 21st Century workforce to meet business demands in the global economy cannot be understated. Efforts to ensure competitive fair lending practices for small business growth and new mortgage creation drive the economic engine with corporate and residential development. The key to economic growth rests within a healthy public-private partnership that encourages entrepreneurship and ingenuity. When the founding fathers envisioned the nation that would become the United States of America we know and love today, the ” edgling republic was the equivalent of a Silicon Valley start-up hatched up in someones garage. From such humble beginnings great nations and successful business ventures grow. Our nations founding fathers were not antigovernment nor were they even anti-tax. They sought fair representation and fair taxation … not the end of government. President Lincoln would later refer to the Union as government of the people, by the people, and for the people. Such a vision of government and our nation embodies a quintessential weŽ … and represents the American bond that unites us as citizens working together to keep the grand vision of the Founding Fathers viable in perpetuity. Im a proud American and, as a Democrat, I say we built this.ŽRachel Pienta is the chair of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee.The issue: Role of government is week e Wakulla News asked the local Democrat ic and Republican party chairs to respond to the question what is the proper role of government. Leading up to the Nov. 6 election, e News will submit a question each week for the local parties to answer Do you have a question youd like asked, or did the question prompt a response from you? Send it to editor@thewakullanews.net.DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: REPUBLICAN RESPONSE: READERS WRITE:The benefits of improved economy ank you for support of senior Luau Remember postage when mailing ballot Fish fry set to fund Historical Society needs By GOV. RICK SCOTT Every day, we are seeing more and more jobs being created and Floridians getting back to work. In August, more than 28,000 Floridians found work in the private sector. Thats 28,000 Floridians who can now better ful“ ll their dreams right here in the Sunshine State. We are hearing stories like Sandra Cimbaros of Boca Raton, who was laid off from her last job in March and, like many Floridians, took advantage of the services at Workforce Alliance in Palm Beach County to help her get back to work. She attended a rsum and interview workshop and began work assessments that the workforce board offered. With hard work and a little help, Sandra was hired by the Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce in August as a communications coordinator. I think its important for all Floridians who are looking for a job to visit their local workforce center to find out more information about how they assist in “ nding a meaningful career. Businesses are choosing Florida to grow and expand. I announced last week that Univision/ABC are opening their new 24hour news network in Miami, creating 342 jobs. The week before that, I helped announce more than 2,000 jobs coming to Central Florida. These new jobs for Floridians are being created by Nemours Childrens Hospital and Prime Therapeutics in Orlando, as well as Accuform Signs in Brooksville. Companies like Nemours, Prime Therapeutics and Accuform Signs have realized that we are doing the right things in Florida to help businesses succeed. Weve lowered taxes and reduced burdensome regulation. Floridas business tax climate is ranked “ fth in the nation according to the Tax Foundations Tax Climate Index. Floridas private-sector is creating jobs and Floridians are seeing the bene“ ts directly. Our state has seen increases in median home prices and housing starts. In the second quarter of this year, Floridas income growth outpaced the nation. In addition, Floridas consumer con“ dence is at a “ ve-year high, according to the University of Florida. A recent economic estimating conference says that Florida is on pace to create 900,000 new jobs by 2018. Of course, we still have a lot of work left to do, but I am working every day to ensure Floridas privatesector continues to grow. In August, our state was second only to Texas in job creation. I am working to make us No. 1. Rick Scott is Governor of Florida.Editor, The News: People might not be aware that sending in the absentee ballot requires 65cents for postage. The envelope weight is over the limit for one regular stamp. Not enough postage? Your vote does not get counted. Madeleine Carr Crawfordville Editor, The News: Eden Springs Third Annual Senior Prom LuauŽ was a huge success, thanks to the staff and residents of Eden Springs Rehab, and our many community supporters, their hours of hard work and untiring efforts made this event the best ever for our residents and families. Without them this would have been impossible. Planning for this event took months, our residents and especially our resident Council President Joseph Smith were excited and worked hard on fundraising events, menu planning, music and decorations. The staff worked with the residents on not only the PromŽ itself but also on the many fund raisers we had in order to fund our prom … some of the events included a live auction conducted by our very own auctioneer Gloria Monk, our “ rst fundraiser in the park, along with many small raf” es, bake sales, hot dog sales and the sale of many TVs that were donated by Amns Sumners. The list of those who contributed includes Clyde Hamilton and Richard Carraway for their creation and construction of our special Tiki Bar which will become a permanent part of our activities, Donna Humeniak for her hand made quilt, Crawfordville Goodwill for the use of their LuauŽ garments, Denise Folh at The Wakulla News for assistance with advertising with all our events, Little Caesars pizza, Maurice, Pizza Hut, Skybox Liquors, Ace Hardware, Medart Assembly of God including Pat Vice and her girls, Mrs. Piggott and the womans club of Lake Ellen Baptist Church, Donut Hole, Panhandle Pizza, Stone Creek Pizza, Evolution Spa, Kutz-n-Kurlz, and Beef O Bradys, a very special thank you to Louise Sloan and Misty Weeks you are the best Thank you all again. Marjorie Hamilton, LPN III /CLTC Activity CoordinatorEden Springs Nursing and Rehab. CenterEditor, The News: This is to thank The Wakulla News for covering the news and events of the Wakulla County Historical Society. Much has been accomplished since the Historical Society was founded in October 1991 to collect, preserve, exhibit, and interpret history of the Wakulla County area. We are particularly thankful for the generous support of the community to make the dream of a Heritage Village Park become reality. Murray McLaughlin, who is vice president for the Heritage Village, said recently the plan will be a footprint for administration, parking, houses, farm, hiking trails, amphitheater, and other ancillary exhibits.Ž Private funding for the plan and county approval is needed before structures can be moved onto the property. The goal is to move each structure to its permanent location and save the cost of a second move.Ž Two buildings need immediate placement on the property, including the TullyMcLaughlin House (c. 1892) which has been parked in Medart for several years. As an initiative to raise funds for the site plan, the Historical Society is having a Fish Fry at Hudson Park in Crawfordville on Friday, Oct. 26 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. The cost is $8 per plate or 2 for $15. All proceeds will bene“ t the Heritage Village Park. We invite everyone to follow our progress by visiting the Museum at 24 High Drive in Crawfordville (open Thursday, Friday, and Saturday) or call us at 850926-1110. Sincerely, Cathy Frank President WCHSAlan Brock has served the county wellEditor, The News: For some one who is not excited over the elections this year, I do have one exception and a certain local candidate that both my husband and I will be voting for … Alan Brock. Alan doesnt come from big money, Alan doesnt have an over abundance of political signs every where you look. The best thing about Alan to me is that Alan is still Alan … the same great guy he was before he took of“ ce and the same great guy that has served the county well with out any drama or name calling. That is class. So yes that is why Alan has our support … he is down home, he is real, he has served us well and he can relate to each one of us better than any one else sitting on that board. Simply put, Alan Brock has morals and class. If you are fed up with all the negative campaigning, fed up with all of the mud slinging and are more confused than ever on who to vote for, Id like to encourage you to consider Alan Brock, District 1 County Commissioner. And for the record, this message has not been approved by, paid for or endorsed in any way by Alan Brock. It is my opinion and likely the only opinion I will feel strongly enough about during this election to have it published. Nancy Posey Parker Wakulla Station

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 5Areaders speak out More OpinionsMORE READERS WRITE:David Miller endorses Bobby Pearce Langston denies negative campaigning Charlie Creel has the credentials for sheri Re-evaluating NRA after endorsement Made up mind for John Shu Howard Kessler is a man of great integrity Jim Parham is a good choice A change in county politicsEditor, The News: As voters in Wakulla County, we face a crucial choice in deciding the direction of local law enforcement. The issue basically boils down to this: do we want change or do we want a continuation of the decades-old status quo? As a longtime Wakulla County resident, I choose change and wholeheartedly support Charlie Creel for sheriff. As for Charlie Creel, his credentials, capabilities and fair minded demeanor speak for themselves. The best evidence is that which comes from his peers. As a retired deputy sheriff and recently retired Executive Director of the Florida Police Benevolent Association and its 30,000 plus law enforcement members in the state, I have had a chance to talk with many members over the past four plus years about Charlie Creel. Out of curiosity, I have asked many state and local of“ cers who have worked with Charlie just what they think about him. Without prompting and without exception, they tell me what a conscientious, hard working, honest, decent and capable person he is. That says it all and says what we need here. Also related and for what it is worth, the letter from Mrs. Lamarche in last weeks Wakulla News (NRA mis“ res in sheriffs endorsement,Ž Oct. 11) was very interesting. She made an awkward, amusing attempt to tie, somehow, the national presidential race, Charlie, and Charlies endorsement by the NRA into some hard-to-fathom plot. Nice try, but as they say in this neck of the woods, that dog wont hunt.Ž I cant speak for Charlie or figure out what national politics has to do with our local sheriffs race, but I do know Marion Hammer of the NRA/Unified Sportsmen of Florida very well. We have worked together at the Capitol, shoulder-toshoulder, on such things as the Concealed Weapons Law (1987) and most recently on the Stand Your Ground Law. Marion and the NRA do not do things on a whim. My educated hunch is that the NRA endorsement of Charlie Creel was well-researched and thought out. In the next several weeks, there will no doubt be more negative attacks against Charlie Creel. The cowardly push poll telephone calls trashing Charlie are probably just a warm up. If you want change, ignore these devious tactics and stand up for what is right. Vote for Charlie Creel. Sincerely, David Murrell dkmurrell1@hotmail.com Editor, The News: I read with interest,a letter sent in by Mrs. Kathleen Lamarche in regards to the NRAs endorsement of Mr. Creel for Sheriff. As a lifetime patron member, Golden Eagle, and recipient of the NRAs National Patriots Medal,Ž I also was curious as to how Mr. Creel was selected by Mrs. Hammer and the NRA for endorsement when only Mr. Langston had produced and published his membership certi“ cate as proof of his alliance with the NRA. Mr. Creel had produced nothing of the sort,except a letter on a letterhead issued by a past president of the NRA with whom he apparently had a professional or passing acquaintance with. I contacted the NRA to enquire of this and was basically told that I was to mind my own business and not to show disrespect for Mrs. Hammer, that the double letterhead (Uni“ ed Sportsmen of Florida, which Mrs Hammer also heads, and the NRA) are of“ cial NRA letterhead,Ž that the NRA had graded both candidates and selected the one … even though both are said to be NRA members. It became apparent to me that the ONLY thing the NRA is interested in is my monetary donations and an inner circleŽ within the NRA forms its leadership who decides who the national membership endorses, without asking the membership of course. I, for one, will be re-evaluating my association with a such an organization. Rev. Dr. Randall Sanders ronHorsesNLthr@aol.com Editor, The News: I would like to share some of what I know about Dr. Howard Kessler, candidate for a Wakulla County Commission seat. Kessler, a man of great integrity, really cares about the welfare of our people. Kessler has great compassion for the less fortunate. This is obvious from the time he has spent as a volunteer doctor with our Childrens Medical Society and Neighborhood Health Services. He served as a volunteer doctor in Haiti treating victims in the aftermath of a disastrous earthquake. When Kessler was a Wakulla County commissioner he had the courage to face unfair criticism and continue to “ ght for programs that were bene“ cial to all our citizens, not just to special interests. He voted against wasteful county budgets that exceeded our citizens capacity to pay for. Likewise, he fought against a bloated top-heavy county government; he favored an administration with more working Indians and less unnecessary expensive chiefs. Kessler is in the forefront “ ghting for open, transparent and accountable government; he insists on letting the sun shine on what our county government is doing. He is very approachable, always ready to listen to what a citizen has to say. He listens to the little guy, no matter how little in” uence they have. The underpinning of Dr. Kesslers philosophy is his concern for protecting our natural resources and way of life. He was the driving force behind enactment of our countys wetlands protection ordinance, so vital to our economy and way of life and a model for other political identities. I will vote for Dr. Kessler in November and strongly urge others to do likewise. Wakulla will be better with Kessler as a Commissioner. Lorraine G. Lambou Crawfordville Editor, The News: I believe Bobby Pearce is the best candidate for Superintendent of Wakulla County Schools for many reasons. He has the leadership skills, “ scal responsibility, integrity, and a true love for the students of Wakulla County. Bobby Pearces leadership skills are tried and true. His experience as principal of an AŽ rated school for 11 consecutive years shows he has the ability to focus on student success by making all aspects of running a school work toward that most important goal. This includes not just educating our children well, but making sure everything from their bus ride to their breakfast, lunch, and after school tutoring experiences are positive. He knows how to work well with parents, teachers, and staff to keep the question of How will this help our students succeed?Ž in the forefront. Now in his role as Assistant Superintendent for Administration, Bobby Pearce has expanded his leadership skills by serving the entire school district. He has a realworld view of how much work it takes to keep a Florida Department of Education designated Academically High Performing DistrictŽ on top, and he has his own vision for taking our school district to even greater heights. Bobby Pearce has also shown that he is a good steward of taxpayer dollars. As a principal, he always managed his school budget soundly and had positive audits. In his current role as Assistant Superintendent for Administration, he now works with the entire school district budget, which also has sound “ nancial audits from the state. He constantly looks for ways to use our limited “ nancial resources wisely, such as costs saved with a new energy ef“ ciency program. He is “ scally responsible with the understanding that students and teachers must be provided with what they need in the classrooms to be successful. In addition, Bobby Pearce has the integrity to lead this school district well. He has 24 years of continuous service as a teacher, coach, principal, and assistant superintendent. In all those years, he has done nothing but positively in” uence students, teachers, and staff to do their best. He is a graduate of Wakulla High School, where his daughter just graduated from the WHS Medical Academy and his son now attends. He has a vested interest in the success of Wakulla County Schools for all of our children. Bobby Pearce has also been married to his wife, a kindergarten teacher, for 22 years. His ethics, integrity, and loyalty are to be commended. Finally, Bobby Pearce is the best candidate for Superintendent of Wakulla County Schools because he truly loves the children of Wakulla County. As principal, he knew every child in his school, and had the philosophy of know you by name and treat you like family.Ž What he will ensure for the children of Wakulla County is a world class education that will prepare them for successful careers and citizenship. David Miller Superintendent Wakulla County Schools Editor, The News: Wakulla County would be fortunate to have Jim Parham as its property appraiser. I have known Jim since he was a boy; he and I are “ rst cousins by marriage. While he was in business school at FSU, I encouraged him to consider real estate appraisal; it just seemed a right “ t for his personality and intelligence. After training with FDOT, he worked for me at Investors Realty of Tallahassee and though I didnt know it at the time, he was picking my brain continually and storing away what I had learned in real estate. I was impressed when he left his hometown and moved to the Tampa Bay area to work around some of the pioneers of the appraisal profession without knowing anyone beforehand. He did well; he soughtout mentors, earned the respect of the older generation of appraisers and was awarded the letters behind his name. He broadened his exposure in both urban and rural markets throughout central Florida; from shopping malls to citrus groves. After 20-plus years, Jim returned home to the Big Bend area. I was representing a landowner on a tract the state wanted to buy and became frustrated with the process. I called Jim and we went to look at the property. Within minutes Jim described the unique features of the tract and told me how to deal with the state to get my property owner the money he was due, which I did. I had been brokering and dealing in real estate for 50plus years and the student had come home to teach his former teacher something about real estate! It is with my most sincere conviction that I recommend Jim Parham to you, the citizens of Wakulla County, as being highly quali“ ed and experienced for the of“ ce of property appraiser. He has the integrity to get the job done right for Wakullas future. George K. Walker Tallahassee It has been my observation during this campaign season that there is a difference in realityŽ and perceived reality.Ž Reality is what is really happening and Perceived Reality is what is said over and over and over again to make you, the citizen, believe it is happening. I am here to state that I have NO involvement in any negative campaigning or polling. You can be assured that I am bold enough to stand behind anything I do and will mark it with my approvalŽ as required on that oath I took, both at the Supervisor of Elections Office and the Campaign Pledge sent to Mr. Creel. However, I will continue to point our difference on issues we obviously disagree on, such as: The Budget: Mr. Creel said twice during the last forum he does not understand, I do. The Crime Rate: I do not believe Wakulla County is a dangerous place to live, he does. Management Styles: he wants to bring in out of county consultants to tell him where your money is being spent and how to organize the sheriffs of“ ce. I have the experience to do that. Community Involvement: he wants an advisory committee and citizens to come to himŽ and I am involved in the community and go to you.Ž Our Law Enforcement Experience: his is in traf“ c enforcement, mine is in solving burglaries, murders, child abuse and serving you, not citing you. There is one thing he and I can agree on we have no control on outside sources who chose to exercise their constitutional right to free speech even when their free speech may or may not be right! T.W. Maurice LangstonCandidate for Wakulla County Sheriff Editor, The News: This has been the longest campaign season I can ever remember, and I will be happy when the results are in on Nov. 6. I made up my mind months ago and have not wavered in my choice of John Shuff since his decision to run. John is running an honest, straightforward campaign on positions he takes on important ideas. Being retired, he will dedicate as many hours as needed to resolve problems that arise, and will have an open door policy for our citizens. John has worked hard in and for this community and of the candidates in the District 5 race, has the only real business experience that is critically needed to help manage our taxpayer dollars, set priorities and resolve issues on a county level. John is also the only candidate in the District 5 race who has worked on county-wide issues with diverse groups, and who best understands the importance of positive interaction between our government, our businesses, our citizens, and the vital role they each play in our community. The job of commissioner requires knowledge and experience in dealing with constitutional of“ cers, the county administration, and citizens, as well as the ability to give and take on issues you support and on those you may not support. John has the life experiences that are imperative to lead this county. This years election outcome will potentially be a game changer in the direction of our county. We must elect and re-elect commissioners who have lived here long enough to have a history in our county, and who understand from long term, “ rst-hand experience how unique we are. We must elect a commissioner with a proven economic background who has worked with and around our government and will be prepared on day one. A vote for John Shuff will insure that our board of county commissioners will be a united group supporting sustainable job growth here in Wakulla. John will work to ensure the board does not reverse the positive direction this county has begun under our current leadership. Please help us strengthen Wakulla for the future. Vote Shuff. Charlie Palmer Crawfordville Editor, The News: My name is Cynthia Thomas. I am the wife of Ralph Thomas, who is currently seeking the County Commission seat in District 1. When Ralph approached me about running for of“ ce, there were only three things that I said to him: 1. Remember you are a father. 2. Remember you are a husband. And 3. only get into the race if you can continue to walk the path the Lord has set before you, and remain the man that our Lord has molded you to be. I recently had the pleasure of attending the bi-partisan political forum and the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Political Forum. I would like to say thank you to both of these groups for their time and efforts to deliver a platform for local candidates to allow citizens to learn more about them and their stands on multiple issues affecting our county. Through these forums I realized that there has been a change in what I was hearing and seeing in our candidates. I would speci“ cally like to give a special acknowledgement to the candidates running for District 1. In my opinion, Alan Brock, Jenny Brock, and Ralph Thomas are truly shaping the future of Wakulla politics. These three have truly demonstrated what running a Clean CampaignŽ is all about. They have managed their campaign in such a way that even their supporters re” ect their positive attitudes and are displaying the candidates beliefs. They have kept their platforms to what they believe they can do for our county in the future. I know that they all have the best intentions in their hearts for this county and I am proud that they are standing behind their beliefs and practicing some of the lessons our parents taught us when we were children: Be respectful, be courteous, treat others as you want to be treated, and if you cant say something nice, dont say anything at all. We have become so complacent about negative campaigning that we know its going to happen and just accept it. Well, we shouldnt accept it. We can change the perception about politics if we just get back to the basics. These three candidates continue to demonstrate that they learned these basics growing up and are ready for a change in the politics for Wakulla County. It is clear that the tone of Wakulla politics is changing. Citizens want to hear about the vision a candidate has for our county. Change can occur in politics one race at a time if candidates are strong enough to stay out of the mud. We elect them to be leaders. Lets expect them to show leadership on the campaign trail. Thank you to all the candidates for their willingness to serve and may each of you be blessed for your service. Cynthia Thomas Crawfordville

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Churchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Church BriefsMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... By SHERYL GRIMES On Oct. 7, the Wakulla United Methodist Church, established in the 19th century, hosted its annual Homecoming event with almost 200 attending. Food and fellowship highlighted the day with current members and returning members celebrating the church “ rst pastored by Methodist circuit rider, John Slade, in 1852. Lorrie Gallamore, Hospitality Committee, said, Everyone visited, worshiped and remembered the churchs heritage and former members.Ž Immediately following the service, guests and members enjoyed a covered dish luncheon. Though members built the current log sanctuary in 1998, the small pre-Civil War church still stands beside the sanctuary at 1584 Old Woodville Road. At one time, the small building was located directly across the street and served as a schoolhouse. Local family names, too many to list, dot the churchs history compiled by Bruce Nesmith Alford. Pastor Susie Horner, who came to pastor the church in July, was the featured speaker for the combined church service. We were excited to have all our returning members and guests hear our dynamic new minister, Pastor Horner,Ž said Pastor Parish Relations Committee Chair Don Grimes. On Oct. 7, Marie Ladd and Jeanette Garrison were honored by the Wakulla United Methodist Women, with many family members attending. Clem Bunker, Wakulla UMW President, said These women, though now deceased, are remembered this year for their commitment and service, both to the church and the community.Ž Both ladies have family members who continue to attend and support the church. Being able to come together to remember those saints who were instrumental in the founding of Wakulla United Methodist Church and to celebrate with those who today continue to contribute to the life and well being of our church, congregation and community is a time of great joy. This is a wonderful way of drawing the body of believers closer to God, to one another and to the church,Ž said Pastor Horner. For more information, please call 850 421-5741.Wakulla United Methodist holds HomecomingBy CYNTHIA WEBSTER There is something about making a commitment! It can be exciting, challenging, tiring and often requires endurance. In the case of those who have made a commitment to participate as often as possible in the Footsteps for Faith and Freedom Forty Day Prayer Walk, it has been nothing short of joyful. The national clergy has called for 40 days of prayer before the election because of the deep concern that exists for the spiritual condition of our nation. We are honoring this 40-day call for prayer in a style unique to Wakulla. There may well be other towns that are walking and praying together but it would be hard to imagine any of them being in a setting so uniquely beautiful as what we have right here in our own county. God has blessed us with a rich environment … a spectacular coastline, stunning marshland, natural springs, rich forest land, cattle, pig and horse farms, “ sh in the waters, a wide variety of wildlife and, perhaps most important, good and generous people who honor the Creator for all they have been given. The Church however is being sidelined in todays world, many children are not being exposed to the Word of God and adults often shun His Word as it is the easier path to take. So the 40-day walk is just one way of restoring honor to its rightful place. All the political leaders, all the good intentions, all the money invested wisely or unwisely is only a thimble full of aid and comfort compared to the greatness of God. We encourage all people of Wakulla County to come out and test the watersŽ at Azalea Park for an hour of prayer and walk. Pick a day, call a friend or come alone, but make a decision to take part. Each walk starts with a short message and prayer given by a member of our Wakulla County clergy. For those who cannot walk there are benches and picnic tables … there is an entire group who sit together and do the rosary during walk time. Few have been able to be there every day so no one needs to worry that they will be the only one present for the “ rst time. We are there because, as believers, we know our prayers must be for the spiritual condition of our land, not its politics. CLERGY SCHEDULE FOR WEEK FOUR € Thursday, Oct. 18, 6:45 p.m. … Rev. Dr. Renita Allen-Dixon, Ecclesia Outreach Ministries. € Friday, Oct. 19, 10 a.m. … Bishop Bill Payne, Friendship Primitive Baptist Church. € Saturday, Oct. 20, 10 a.m. … Elder Renson Thompson, Little Salem Primitive Baptist Church. € Monday, Oct. 22, 6:45 p.m. … President Brent R. Tucker, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. € Tuesday, Oct. 23, 6:45 p.m. Citizen Stewart Scott, Miracle Deliverance Center #2. € Wednesday, Oct. 24, 10 a.m. … Pastor Gordon L. Beal, Mt. Elon Church.40 day prayer walk continues Wakulla High senior Danny Moss carried a cross on a recent prayer walk. Marie LaddJeanette Garrison  Pastor Appreciation set at New HopePastor Appreciation for Pastor Fred Cromartie, marking ve years with the church, will be celebrated at New Hope Pentecostal Church of Crawfordville with nightly events Oct. 16 through Sunday, Oct. 21. The nightly events begin at 7:30 p.m. The Sunday event will be held at 3 p.m. with a dinner at the Crawfordville Women's Club . Ivan Assembly to hold Fall FestivalIvan Assembly of God will be hosting a Fall Festival on the evening of Oct. 31 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the church. Everything is free of charge! Trunk or Treat with games, giveaways, bouncers, hay-ride, cake walk, lots of candy, soup and chili, fried oreos and funnel cakes. Come out and bring the family. The church is located at 202 Ivan Church Road in Crawfordville. Phone number is (850) 926-4826. Pumpkin Patch at Wakulla Springs Baptist Wakulla Springs Baptist Church will have pumpkins for sale through Oct. 31. The pumpkin patch will be open on weekdays from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. All proceeds go towards the garden ministry that supports local food pantries. A Harvest of Hope Pumpkin Patch Festival will be held at the church on Saturday, Oct. 20, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. with fun, food and games. The church is located at 1391 Crawfordville Highway. For more information, call 926-5152. Grace Baptist will hold a fall festivalCome enjoy an afternoon of free food, fun, games, a cake walk and fellowship for all ages at Grace Baptist Church on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. In addition, on every hour the short drama "The Letter From Hell" will be performed by the Live Out Loud Youth and Drama Ministry, Chosen Generation Youth ministries, and Friends in Christ Youth Ministry. Grace Baptist is located at 803 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 926-3217.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 7AObituaries Martha Griffin, 78, of Crawfordville, passed away Oct. 11 at her Crawfordville residence. Services were held previously in Crawfordville. Survivors include her husband of 34 years, James F. Grif“ n; sons, Dany Langley and James E. Grif“ n; daughters, Bonnie Stuckey and Wendy Shepard; sister-in-law, Deanna Grif“ n; and four grandchildren, Amanda Fulton, Justin Drasher, Kyle Stuckey, and Ryan Stuckey. Fair“ eld Funeral Home in Tallahassee was in charge of the arrangements.Martha Grif nCashing in on a cashless societyREV. JAMES L. SNYDER I am the kind of person that likes to do business with cash on the barrelhead. I do not like credit because it has a way of biting you in the end. When you have a credit card, there are fees to beat the band. I do have a credit card but I have it hidden so well that I have not been able to “ nd it for seven weeks. I just do not like using it. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage always warns me about the possibility that someone can steal my credit card. Ha ha, I say in de“ ance to her warning. I am never worried about that. If anybody can get money out of my account with my credit card, I would like to work with them and go 50-50 on it. Every time I need money, my credit card is empty. I think there is a conspiracy in this whole thing. Nothing is more embarrassing than going to a checkout counter to pay for goods that I intend to purchase and my credit card is denied. The reason I was using the credit card at the time was I did not have any cash in my pocket. Now, I have no cash in my pocket and my credit card is just grinning at me refusing to cough up the money needed for purchasing these goods. I hate my credit card. And it is reciprocal. My credit card hates me and tries its level best to embarrass me every chance it gets. When I do business, I want to know that I have done business. Nothing is more satisfying than completing a financial transaction with cash. I have noticed a dangerous trend in the area of business in our country. There is a tendency away from cash. I do not understand it. I think the simplest thing to do would be to pay cash for something. But no, some people think that is so old fashion that they have to come up with something new. Now they have this newfangled thing that you can pay your bills online. What is that all about? I like to see the person I am paying and hear from them their gratuitous Thank you,Ž for the transaction. I was just getting used to writing checks and now I do not have to use my checkbook anymore. My creditors want me to pay online. When will all this craziness stop? If cash was good enough for Benjamin Franklin, it certainly is good enough for me. Then the inevitable happened. You know how it is. Well, it happened to me. I went to do a little bit of shopping while I was out of town on a trip recently. I made sure I had cash in my wallet so I stopped at a restaurant in the shopping mall. Normally I do not like shopping malls. I get nervous every time I go into one of these malls wondering if I will ever exit alive. There are just too many people in these malls for my comfort. But the necessity of my trip brought me to this mall and I decided I would treat myself to lunch. One of the great things about treating myself to lunch when my wife is not with me is I can order what I want for my lunch. After all, it is my lunch. I had a great time selecting things from the menu that had nothing whatsoever to do with vegetables. Vegetables are all right in their place, but their place is not on my lunch plate, especially when my wife is not present. I had a scrumptious lunch and then top it off with a nice slice of apple pie la mode. Life does not get any better than this. I sat back in my chair, rubbed my stomach and felt good about the world around me. I was even beginning to think that there might not be so much wrong with malls after all. Finally, it was time to take my ticket up to the cashier and pay for my lunch. I was in for a very rude awakening. I presented my ticket to the cashier and pulled out of my wallet enough cash to cover the ticket. Im sorry, sir,Ž the woman behind the cashier said. We dont accept cash in this restaurant.Ž I was in a good mood and laughed as though I was the vice President of the United States. Thats a good one,Ž I complimented her. Sir, we dont take cash here,Ž she insisted. We are not set up for cash; all we take are credit cards.Ž About this time, I realized she was not joking. I found myself in the proverbial pickle with only cash on my person and no credit card. But all I have is cash.Ž Finally, the manager of the restaurant was called to the front, I was able to settle my ticket with him, giving him cash and he used his credit card to pay the ticket. What is this world coming to when you cannot use cash anymore? What is better than cash in my thinking is Gods gift. For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our LordŽ (Romans 6:23 KJV). Unlike cash, Gods gift to me will never go out of style.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com. OUT TO PASTORSpecial to The News Big Bend Hospice invites everyone to the annual Services of Remembrance, which are held in each of the counties Big Bend Hospice serves. Big Bend Hospices Service of Remembrance is a non-denominational service that brings together those in the community to honor the memories of loved ones at this very special time of the year. Many times people become overwhelmed with emotions during the holiday season,Ž said Cathy Adkison, Big Bend Hospices President and CEO. Big Bend Hospices Service of Remembrance provides a wonderful opportunity to pause to remember, pay honor and find support,Ž Adkison said. This is a time for remembrance open to everyone in the community,Ž The service is open to the public. The Wakulla County service will be held on Sunday, Dec. 2 at 4 p.m. at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. The services in each county includes music by Music Therapists and words of encouragement from chaplains, all are part of the Big Bend Hospice staff. Big Bend Hospice Grief and Loss Counselors will also be available to talk. The Services conclude with a special candle-lighting ceremony and passing of the candlelight in memory of loved ones. A reception follows, hosted by members from each countys Advisory Council. Other county services are set for: € Franklin County … Saturday, Nov. 10, at 10:30 a.m. at Three Servicemen Statue, 230 Market Street, Apalachicola. € Gadsden County … Thursday, Dec. 13, at 6 p.m. at Magnolia House Assisted Living Facility, 1125 Strong Road, Quincy. € Jefferson County … Monday, Dec. 3, at 6 p.m. at First Church of the Nazarene, 1590 North Jefferson Street, Monticello. € Madison County … Thursday, Dec. 6, at 6 p.m. at St. Marys Episcopal Church, 140 NE Horry Avenue, Madison. € Taylor County … Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 6 p.m., at Perry Garden Club, 206 Forest Park Drive, Perry. Everyone who attends shares a common purpose … to honor and to remember a loved one who has died, to be surrounded by others who are on a similar journey and to connect with loved ones. The service is proof that death ends a life and not a relationship, that the holidays can still be a time of hope and of family, of love and of connection to all the things and all the people who have ever been important to us. If you would like additional information about Big Bend Hospices bereavement services, please contact Pam Mezzina at (850) 878-5310, x799 or pam@bigbendhospice.org. Registration information is also available at www.bigbendhospice.org. Big Bend Hospice will hold Service to RememberService of Remembrance o ers a wonderful opportunity to honor our loved ones as the holiday season begins.Teens who have experienced the death of a parent, grandparent sibling, friend or other signi“ cant person in their life can enjoy a fun, relaxing, and uplifting day at Bradleys Pond in the company of their peers. The event is set for Thursday, Nov. 1, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Retreat at Bradleys Pond in northern Leon County. This retreat will include group activities, music, creative arts, and a special remembrance ceremony. The loss does not have to be recent for a teen to bene“ t from this retreat. Some local school districts consider this an excused absence so please check with your teens school. Light breakfast, lunch, and a complimentary t-shirt or hoodie will be provided. Space is limited, so please contact Caitlin at 878-5310 extension 706 or email at Caitlin@bigbendhospice.org for more information or to register. This retreat is a free service of Big Bend Hospice but donations are graciously accepted.Teen Woe-Be-Gone is for grieving teens YARD SALESFRI & SAT OCT 19 & 20 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS!TWO BIG (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & Exterior Together We Are Providing Employment for Local Craftsman FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings CommunityEvent is held in honor of Austin Fleetwood Special to The NewsOn Wednesday, Sept. 19, community members gathered in memory of Austin Fleetwood. Under the direction of the newly formed 4-H Education Enrichment Council, Wakulla citizens of all ages came together at Beef OBradys to support a local family at a Team Fleetwood Fundraiser. Students from Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School advertised the event, greeted and seated customers, cleared tables and assisted the servers throughout the four-hour event, while maintaining a steady stream of Team Fleetwood T-shirt and bracelet sales. Even when the crowd size created a 30-minute wait for available tables, the customers were cheerful about the delay. WHS junior Makayla Payne said, It was amazing! Our community members do not mind giving to a family in need. We all come together to help. So many young people were there, and it was exciting to be a part of the event. Forever Team Fleetwood.Ž Fleetwood, a popular local high school student, recently lost his battle with cancer, and the event gave community members one more opportunity to honor his family. More than $900 was raised between the spirit night donation from Beefs, community member donations and shirt and bracelet sales. 4-H volunteers for the event were Andrew Bracci, Jillian Richardson, Richard Walker, Danielle Gray, Alexander Lewis, Ciara Harris, Montana Burns and Shalia Godbolt. Leaders were Kelli Bracci and Nancy Floyd Richardson. 4-H Agent Sherri Kraeft and volunteer Jo Ann Palmer were present to support the event as well. For more information on any 4-H Club or event, visit their website at wakulla.ifas. u” .edu or like them on Facebook at Wakulla County 4-H. The 4-H Agent can be reached in the of“ ce at 9263931 or via email at sjkraeft@ u” .edu.Photos by Nancy Floyd Richardson/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents and volunteers sport Team Fleetwood T-shirts, above left, at the recent fundraiser held in honor of Austin Fleetwood, while other students support the cause. Big Catch Charity Fish Fry is planned for Oct. 23Special to The NewsWakulla Countys Big Brothers Big Sisters Mentoring Program will host its third annual BIG Catch Charity Fish Fry on Oct. 23 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Presented by Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend, the dinner event will take place at Poseys Dockside Caf located at 99 Rock Landing Road in Panacea. The events purpose is to raise awareness about Big Brothers Big Sisters in Wakulla County, to raise funds for the growing youth mentoring program and to bring the community together for dinner and good time on a Tuesday night. Host to approximately 250 community-minded Wakulla County residents, the BIG Catch Charity Fish Fry will feature shrimp plates, sides and iced tea catered by Poseys, cash bar, and live music in a relaxing family friendly environment. Commissioner Alan Brock, a dedicated youth mentoring advocate, said, The Big Brothers Big Sisters Mentoring Program in Wakulla County has really gained momentum over the last year. New partnerships are forming with groups throughout the county, and I am even serving as a member of the Big Brothers Big Sisters Wakulla County Advisory Panel. The organization is now focusing on recruiting both volunteers and children to the Wakulla County Program. We hope the BIG Catch Charity Fish Fry will create greater awareness and raise donations to help with recruitment and ongoing Big/ Little case management.Ž With increased funding from the United Way and the addition of a second part-time employee, the Big Brothers Big Sisters Mentoring Program in Wakulla County said Louis Garcia, Big Brothers Big Sisters chief executive of“ cer. Our goal is to strengthen the community by setting more atrisk youth on a path toward success. With the guidance of safe, compatible mentors, the youth we serve have a better shot of reaching their full potential.Ž Its not rocket science,Ž said long-time Wakulla County resident and program coordinator, Stacy Harvey. Children need positive adult role models in their lives. Our volunteer mentors spend time with their Little at least twice a month for a minimum of a year. After a year, these children experience improved self con“ dence, improved relationships with guardians, teachers and peers, avoidance of risky behaviors, and improved academic outcomes. It works, and we have many real life success stories.Ž Tickets are available to purchase at Poseys Steam Room (1506 Coastal Highway), Poseys Dockside Caf (99 Rock Landing Road,) or online at www.bbbs.org/BIGCatch for $10 per plate. For ticket information or to learn more about how to enroll a child or about how to become a mentor, contact Stacy Harvey at wakulla@ bbbsbigbend.org or 366-3865. To sponsor the event, contact Director of Philanthropy Katie Williams at katie.williams@bigbendmentoring. org or at 386-3863. Local student crowned Miss Teen Florida International Special to The NewsRhiannon Dressel-Beattie of Crawfordville was recently crowned Miss Teen Florida International 2013. She will compete for the title of Miss Teen International in July at the Northshore Performing Arts Center in Chicago, Ill. Contestants of the Miss Teen International pageant will compete in the areas of evening gown, aerobic wear, fun fashion wear and personal interview. Dressel-Beattie, a home schooled student, will promote her platform of Helping Hearts during her reign as Miss Teen Florida International and if she should capture the International crown. She chose this platform after her father passed away last July of a heart attack. My platform, Helping Hearts, was inspired by him and his death,Ž said DresselBeattie as well as the experience of helping a loved one with heart disease.Ž Dressel-Beattie is the daughter of Roxann Dressel and the late Dan Stockwell. Although she enjoys competing in pageants this busy teen loves giving back to her community. I was recently a volunteer at the Eden Springs Nursing Home Fundraising event, which raised money for the resident prom, she said. They asked me to be volunteer manager of their country store which is open to serve the residents.Ž Giving her mother credit for raising her to help others before helping herself, Dressel-Beattie has won numerous awards for her community involvement including International Leadership Networks Young Achiever 2012, Relay for Life Star Supporter 2011, Presidential Volunteer Service Award … Gold Level 2010 and World Youth Federations Humanitarian Award 2007. The Miss Teen Florida Pageant is the preliminary to the Miss Teen International Pageant. The Miss International system was developed to promote todays young women, their accomplishments and commitment to family and community. For more information or appearances contact Lauri Rottmayer, New Media Marketing, at foxxytrotmedia@gmail.com or (918) 350-0190. Happy birthday, MadisonHappy “ rst birthday to Madison Manelli Gebhart on Oct. 18. She is the daughter of Heath and Angie Shivers Gebhart of Woodville. Her maternal grandparents are Gary and Rita deMontmollin Shivers of Woodville. Her paternal grandparents are Gary and Nancy Gebhart of Waukeena. Her maternal greatgrandparents are Floyd deMontmollin, Sr. of Woodville and the late Margarita Manelli deMontmollin and Betty Shivers of Crawfordville and the late John BobŽ Shivers. Her paternal greatgrandparents are the late Ellsworth Sponseller, Jr. formerly of Waukeenah, Betty Sponseller, New Oxford, Penn., and the late Leo and Jane Gebhart formerly of Bonneauville, Penn. She has a big brother Wyatt who will be turning 5 years old on Nov. 1. Rhiannon Dressel-Beattie Madison Gebhart Poli cal adver sement, paid for and approved by Ralph Thomas, Republican, for County Commission District 1 W h o i s T h o m a s a n d W h y i s i t t i m e ? My name is Ralph Thomas and I would like to be your next County Commissioner for District 1. At election time, we see candidates step forward and ask us for our vote. Most are very good at telling us what they will do for us, if elected. If you do not already know me, the most important thing I want you to know, is that I have been very involved in Wakulla politics for many years, as a concerned citizen. I’m not just telling you what I “think” I can do, I want you know what I have already done. On 09/06/2011, our County Commissioners imposed a new garbage tax. They also adopted a hardship exemption for those who could not afford the new tax. While this seemed like a noble gesture, they neglected to accurately calculate the cost of the exemption. This is hard to believe considering they spent a year on this project. Realizing their oversight, I did the analysis and I did the math. After understanding the real cost, and sharing it with our Commissioners, they changed the exemption threshold and avoided a very costly mistake. My efforts, saved our tax payers more money than I will earn as a Commissioner over the next four years. I’m sure you have noticed that our current Board of County Commissioners has imposed new taxes for you to pay and also increased others that you were already paying. Most folks understand that taxes are a necessary part of living in a desirable community. I think we also understand that times are hard and we are all operating on less than we did in the past, including county government. Most folks also agree that efficient spending must be achieved before new taxes are imposed on our citizens. I have been working hard to encourage our Commissioners to get their spending under control before asking you to pay additional taxes. We currently pay a 4 cent local option fuel tax, which funds the road department. It has existed since 1993. Since then, the tax has been extended in five year increments, as needed. Earlier this year, our Commissioners were prepared to extend the tax for 30 years. I saw no good reason for this lengthy extension. I spoke to the board with a desire to let citizens know that a 30 year extension would allow our Commissioners to borrow against this revenue stream. I didn’t think it was a good idea to take taxpayers deeper into debt. After raising this issue, all five Commissioners agreed, and changed the extension from 30 to 5 years. After Commissioners approved the purchase of a new truck for the EMS Department, I reviewed the State Purchasing Contract and discovered a truck with more features that was better suited for its intended purpose, and for slightly less money. All five Commissioners agreed with my recommendation and changed the purchase order. You can count on me to keep an eye on the bottom line. It’s your money. You need a Commissioner who will guard it for you and spend it wisely. I humbly ask for your vote and I look forward to the opportunity to serve you! I welcome your call at 559-0608. See for yourself @ h p://youtu.be/0-L5ExMjNDw See for yourself @ h p://youtu.be/24JubiM_EVs See for yourself @ h p://youtu.be/AQRyjsewBT4 See for yourself @ h p://youtu.be/elcaZiIuU8Y An appraiser for Wakulla's next chapter (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser I LIKEMIKE STEWARTREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mike Stewart, Republican candidate for county commissioner, district 3 PLEASE RECYCLE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 9Aeducation news SchoolRMS students express themselves through tie-dye Special to The NewsRiversprings Middle School held two School Pride Tie-DyeŽ days on Friday, Sept. 14 and Friday, Oct. 5. The event was the brain child of RMS Principal Dod Walker. Walker said that he wanted, Students to be able to express individuality and uniqueness, while understanding the value of being part of a group.Ž School Tshirts were made available for the students, faculty and staff. Participants met in the Riversprings courtyard to tie-dye their shirts. The result was a shirt that had a unique “ ngerprint,Ž but also possessed similarity to each other. The coordinator for the event was sixth grade teacher Louis Hernandez. Students had the opportunity to Show school pride through scienti“ c inquiry,Ž according to Hernandez. Hernandez ground troops were Mina Sutton, Amber Allen and Steve Walker. Judging from the number of tie-dyed shirts on campus, the event was an enormous success. So whenever you see a student around the county wearing a RMS tie-dyed shirt, you will know that they are expressing their bear pride. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents prepare to tie-dye their school shirts with the help of teacher, Louis Hernandez, left, and a “ nished product, right. Data shows improvement in subgroups achievementBy BETH ODONNELLAssistant SuperintendentEvery fall after the initial state test data results are released for entire districts and schools in the summer, the Florida Department of Education digs deeper into the data to look at how subgroups performed. This is done so that school districts can see how they are doing with each population in their schools. For example, if the district as a whole does better each year but it does not advance each subgroup, then it needs to look at what it can do to better serve students in that subgroup. Several subgroups in Wakulla showed reading and math scores above the 2012 state averages and also showed an increase in achievement levels over the same 2011 subgroup in Wakulla. In reading, the black student population in Wakulla scored 7 percent higher than the 2012 state average for the same subgroup. Hispanic students in Wakulla scored 15 percent higher than the same 2012 subgroup state average. Economically disadvantaged students in Wakulla scored 10 percent higher than the 2012 state average for economically disadvantaged students. The Asian student population in Wakulla scored 3 percent higher than the same 2012 state subgroup average. All four Wakulla subgroups also increased their achievement levels from the same 2011 Wakulla subgroups. In math, the black student population in Wakulla scored 4 percent over the 2012 state average for the same subgroup. Hispanic students in Wakulla scored 8 percent over the state Hispanic population. Economically disadvantaged students scored 7 percent higher than the state average. Asian students scored 10 percent higher than their state counterparts. The Indian student population scored 13 percent higher than the state average. All “ ve Wakulla subgroups also increased their achievement levels over the previous years same Wakulla subgroups. Every fall we disaggregate this data to see how we can serve all of our students better,Ž said Superintendent David Miller. But we dont just wait until these numbers come out. We have a pretty good idea throughout the year using different assessments so our teachers can help every student get the most out of each school year.ŽFirst Lady Ann Scotts Summer Literary Program endsSpecial to The NewsThroughout the summer, First Lady Ann Scott visited Florida state parks and challenged students to read as many books as possible during the summer break. Now that summer is over, the results of the First Ladys 2012 Summer Literacy Adventure have been tallied and show that students at Wellington Elementary School in Palm Beach County pledged to read 6,248 books … more than any other school in the state. Statewide, nearly 29,000 students pledged to read a total of 102,733 books. I am delighted to congratulate the students of Wellington Elementary for their incredible participation in this years Summer Literacy Adventure,Ž said First Lady Scott. Literacy and reading are the foundation for all learning and these students are well on their way to success.Ž First Lady Scott made the announcement Wednesday during a visit to the school to congratulate the students on their victory. In honor of their accomplishment, Wellington Elementary students and staff will get a free oneday pass good at any state park in Florida from the Department of Environmental Protection. I want to thank Mrs. Scott for her commitment to reading and helping students boost their literacy skills,Ž said Commissioner of Education Pam Stewart. The Summer Reading Adventure is an exciting way for students to discover nature and have fun reading at the same time. I also want to thank our partners who made this years adventure a great success.Ž The 2012 Summer Literacy Adventure is a partnership between First Lady Ann Scott, the Department of Educations Just Read, Florida! office, the Department of Environmental Protection, Scholastic, and MetaMetrics, and is geared toward helping children stay engaged in reading and literacy during the summer break. Children participating in the Summer Literacy Adventure were also encouraged to use a free online tool to search for books based on their reading ability and interests. A unique resource from MetaMetrics called Find a Book, FloridaŽ uses Lexile measures to guide readers to the most appropriate level books for them. To learn about literacy resources available through the Department of Education, visit Just Read, Florida! Local public libraries are also an excellent literacy resource throughout the school year and Florida State Parks enhance learning experiences through exploration and discovery all year long. To view photos of the event, please visit www.facebook.com/FLAnnScott. To learn more about First Lady Ann Scott, follow her on twitter at @FLANNSCOTT. Grant awarded to TCC will help Wakulla studentsSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Department of Education (FDOE) has awarded $670,110 to Tallahassee Community College (TCC) to support a 21st Century Community Learning Center (CCLC) Program that will serve Wakulla County students. The grant project will be a collaborative effort between TCC, Wakulla Christian School (WCS), Wakulla County Schools, Communities in Schools of Florida and local organizations. The program will be based at Wakulla Christian School and will serve students enrolled at eight elementary and middle schools throughout Wakulla County … Crawfordville Elementary, Medart Elementary, Riversink Elementary, Shadeville Elementary, Wakulla Coast Charter, Riversprings Middle, Wakulla Middle and Wakulla Christian School. The 21st CCLC program will play a critically important role in changing the lives of at-risk students by preparing students to succeed at their schools and beyond,Ž said TCC President Jim Murdaugh. TCC is pleased to collaborate on this project with Wakulla Christian School, the Wakulla County Schools and other valued partners. The Florida Department of Educations generous award will enable our partnership to provide academic services of the highest quality to improve student achievement.Ž The new project will build on TCCs extensive experience in providing after-school academic enrichment activities through 21st CCLC programs in Gadsden and Jefferson counties. Like its predecessors, the Wakulla County project will aim to increase students academic performance, increase awareness of healthy behaviors and increase family involvement of adult caregivers. The Wakulla Christian School site will deliver services for 140 students in pre-k through eighth grade during afterschool, weekends, holidays and summer. The project will be led by Bonnie Holub, Director of the TCC Wakulla Center. Although TCC will receive $670,110 for the 2012-13 academic year, the FDOE award is renewable annually for a “ ve-project performance period with maximum total funding of $2,948,484. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFirst Lady Ann Scott reads to children at an elementary school in Florida. TCCs WAKULLA CENTERWe want you to succeed professionally through education and training. We are here to help.FALL 2012 INFORMATION SESSIONS:OCTOBER 23 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about the Testing Center, Enrollment Services and Student SuccessOCTOBER 30 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about Financial Aid & Scholarship and the Career CenterNOVEMBER 6 | 3 5 P.M.Learn more Financial Aid & Scholarships, Enrollment Services and Student SuccessNOVEMBER 13 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about the Testing Center and the Career CenterTesting is available by appointment every Friday. For more information call (850) 922-6290 GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWell, here it is the middle of October and Sunday felt like summertime when the wind quit out on the ” ats. Its supposed to cool down starting Tuesday and I can tell you I am looking forward to some cooler weather. According to Alan Lamarche, grouper “ shing is outstanding and you dont have to go very deep to “ nd “ sh. On Friday, Alan took Plantation Security officers Joe Martelli and Grady Phelps. They started by checking a pin“ sh rap out on the Ochlockonee Shoals and noticed a lot of activity in 3 to 4 feet of water. It turned out to be big bull reds. They used pin“ sh to catch a release several of them before heading on out in search of grouper. They got their limit of grouper using LYs and live pin“ sh. Grouper season closes the end of October. Jeff May, a U.S. Marshal from the Atlanta area brought several other marshals down last weekend and spent the first day “ shing a shallow reef where they caught some ” ounder and one legal cobia and lost a bigger one. On Saturday, they headed offshore and came in with four nice grouper and 25 big seabass. While making an arrest in Atlanta, Jeff slipped and broke his leg, which kept him from “ shing the entire weekend, but he was able to drive the boat. Capt. David Fife of Spring Creek “ shed three half-days with some friends from Destin. They “ shed mostly with live bull minnows and cut bait. They caught 15 reds, 20 speckled trout and 30 big silver trout during those days. Mike Falk Jr. said he “ shed Sunday before last with his 5 year old son and they caught a lot of “ sh. Using a white Gulp with a chartreuse tail, under the Cajun Thunder, they caught about 30 trout off the Shell Point Reef. They went back Sunday but the winds kept them from “ shing that area so they “ shed the ” ats until the winds died. They then ran to the Ochlockonee Shoals. Carson caught a 24-inch trout “ shing a Gulp very slowly on the bottom. Mike said he made the cast, set the hook and brought the trout to the boat and all he had to do was net it. He said they went through a bunch of Gulps because of the large number of black seabass, Spanish and ladyfish out there. Mike said when they go to Wal-Mart his son immediately goes to the “ shing department. Bill Birdwell of Shell Point had his 8-year-old grandson Wyatt Goode from Chattanooga down while on a fall break and they fished several days. Wyatt caught a 20-inch trout using a Gulp under a Cajun Thunder and Bill said he had another one on that big that a shark bit half into. They were “ shing the ” ats east of Live Oak Island. Capt. Luke Frazier at Angies Marine in Medart said they fished last week at the mouth of the Ochlockonee River. He said they fished the Clam Bar and other places where they have generally done real well and couldnt catch a “ sh. They moved into the oyster bars at the mouth of the river where quite a few boats were getting oysters. They anchored about 40 feet from them and started casting jigs and ended up with eight big trout. Luke has started guiding again. What he is doing is guiding people who have their own boats but just cant seem to catch “ sh or dont know where to go. If you “ t into this category, drop by AMS in Medart and look Luke up. Hell put you on the “ sh. Week before last I took out Jim Jaynes from Conyers, Ga. Jim works for Bass Pro in Atlanta and was down with his wife for two weeks. We fished Oyster Bay and caught a lot of “ sh. The “ rst spot we “ shed we caught a lot of silver trout but they werent real big. We went to another spot and everyone there was over 15 inches long they were very hungry. We probably caught and released about 30 of them and then went to a spot for trout. The trout were stacked up like cordwood but most were 14 inches long though we did manage to catch several big enough to keep. When the tide got up good we went to the flats and using the Gulp under the Cajun Thunder we caught more nice speckled trout. Yesterday I “ shed with Kevin Walsh, his son Matthew and Matthews friend Caleen. The wind was out of the east and I “ shed the same spots I had “ shed with Jim but they just werent there. We “ shed hard for trout most of the day and ended up with three trout, one Spanish and a ” ounder. Fortunately the reds cooperated and we ended up with seven nice reds and threw back about 10 or 12. Everything was caught on live shrimp. The weather is going to cool down this weekend and should push more “ sh around the oyster bars and into the creeks. Hopefully it will bunch up the reds a little more. Right now there are plenty of “ sh out on the Ochlockonee Shoals as well and at the mouth of the Ochlockonee River. I dont know that I have ever seen as many mullet on the ” ats as I have this past week and also a lot of bait. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Weather should cool, moving sh to oyster bars, creeksWyatt Goode with a 20 1/2 inch trout caught while “ shing with grandfather Bill Birdwell of Shell Point.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Special to The News The U.S. Forest Service will soon begin their prescribed “ re season for 2013. Approximately 100,000 acres in the Apalachicola National Forest are planned for prescribed “ re to help prevent wild“ res and promote a healthy forest. Plants and animals native to the longleaf pine habitats in the Apalachicola National Forest depend on natural “ re cycles, which are mimicked through the use of prescribed “ res to balance habitat and food sources. Prescribed burning is also one of the most effective land management tools used in preventing the outbreak and spread of wild“ res. Prescribed “ re is a safe way to apply a natural process, ensure ecosystem health and reduce wild“ re risk. Land managers and ecologists understand the natural process; “ res have been part of the system since the beginning of time and are as natural and important as wind and rain,Ž said Steve Parrish, U.S. Forest Service “ re management of“ cer for the Apalachicola National Forest. Drivers and residents are reminded of the possibility of unexpected shifting winds that could increase the risk of smoke on the road during prescribed burns. If you have questions regarding the prescribed “ re burning season, contact the Apalachicola National Forest Wakulla Ranger District Of“ ce at (850) 926-3561.Prescribed burning to begin in national forest 926-6040WWW.SAFEWAYWATERBYSLMCO.COM SafewayWater by SLMCO Whole house “ltration systems Water softeners & conditioners NO-SALT water conditioners Iron & Sulfur removal systems Drinking water systems Expert well water treatment ~ WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT CENTER ~ Better taste ... Better health ... Better on your budget ~ WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT CENTER ~ Better taste... Better health... Better on your budget! WATER QUALITY REPO RT Call today for a free water report For your community!Or call today for a free water test and Analysis. We will test for: TDS, IRON, IRON BACTERIA, CHLORINE LEVELS and HARDINESS And give you the results right on the spot!NO OBLIGATION NO PRESSURE NO NONSENSE FACTORY DIRECT PRICING!!!$11700 OFFWITH THIS ADEXPIRES: 10/31/12WHOLE HOUSE SYSTEM!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton I must start this week with a thank you to a valued reader. Two weeks ago the column covered Rule 13 discusses the overtaking, or passing, of one boat by another. It was brought to my attention that there was an error in my description of the rule. It should have read: To be overtaking, or passing another boat the rule states that you must be more than 22.5 degrees abaft (behind) the beam (mid-line of the boat). In this position, the passing boat will only be able to see the white sternlight of the boat being passed. I had stated the white anchor light. This past week Division 1 held our fall conference and business meeting. Saturday offered conference attendees a choice of six trainings to attend. Some lasted a half-day while others were scheduled for the entire day. Our Staff Officer for Member Training Anne DelBello worked hard with the conference organizer Ellena Rolland to make sure everything went well. Flotilla 12 member Duane Treadon was asked to be an instructor for WOW, a website design/ maintenance program. Other training included rules of the road, operations, aids to navigation, paddleboard sports, the Coast Guard noti“ cation system Everbridge and others. Saturday ended with an awards banquet. Sunday morning was the business meeting. This is a time for all the Flotilla Commanders and Division Staff Of“ cers to come together with representatives from Sector Mobile, DIRAUX, Station Destin and Station Panama City. At this meeting we were fortunate to welcome Commander Muller from Sector Mobile; Lt. John Autherment, MSD from Station Panama City; Jeff Brooks … District Captain East and Jeff Davis … aviation liaison to Sector Mobile. Throughout the meeting, the importance of increasing awareness and educating commercial “ shing vessels on the need for inspections was discussed. As of Oct. 15, 2012, all U.S. commercial fishing vessels operating beyond three nautical miles offshore will be required to have a U.S. Coast Guard dockside safety examination. The mandatory dockside examination requirement, called for in legislation enacted in 2010, affects commercial fishing vessels nationwide, and includes all commercial fishing, fish tender and “ sh processing vessels. Although commercial “ shing vessels operating beyond three nautical miles from the coast must have a safety examination, all U.S. commercial “ shing vessels, regardless of where they operate, can request an exam and are encouraged to do soŽ (http:// www.uscgnews.com/go/ doc/4007/1556011/Safetyexaminations-requiredfor-commercial-fishingvessels-). Both Commander Muller and Lieutenant Autherment stressed the bene“ t the Auxiliary can provide with increasing education for commercial “ shing vessels and captains in the future. In addition to the typical business, The fall conference is also the time elections are held for the upcoming year. Current Division Commander Mo Davis has completed his two year term and was recently elected to the position of District Captain East. It is with great pride that I announce to you the newly elected and already installed Division Commander and Division vice Commander Gordon Schmidt and Eric DeVuyst. Following the election, the former elected leadership passed down their shoulder boards to the new elected leadership, a tradition started several years ago. Shoulder boards designate the highest office held by a member of the auxiliary, either elected or appointed. Staff Of“ cer for communications Dallas Cochran discussed the completion of a mobile communications station that will be available to ” otillas across the division as well as the active duty if needed. With the potential for bad weather that may limit access or take of” ine our communications throughout the Division, this is a great asset. Bravo Zulu to all who helped make this a reality! All in all it was a very successful meeting! It is always great to see other auxiliarists and reconnect. We will not have another Division meeting until February 2013. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident, neither is safe “ shing. Schedule your vessel exam today! Mo Davis, Eric DeVyst, Gordon Schmidt, Jeff Brooks District Captain East Jeff Brooks administers the oath to newly elected division leadership.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Dive Education Now that the summer is over, the weather is cooling down and the number of requests for basic diver training has gone up. Folks are preparing for the adventures of next spring now that school is back in session and the family shifts into a different routine. I have been training people to breathe compressed gases underwater for 45 years. The answer to a request for diver training is seldom the same. I ask what the anticipated outcome from this requested training might be? Parents want their kids to dive with them. Spouses want to accompany each other underwater. Fishermen want to spear “ sh in their native habitat. Scientists want to collect data below the surface. Police want to collect evidence or a body that has been dumped in a sinkhole. Clam “ shermen want to harvest their catch. People want to dive for good health. Photographers want to capture images of the silent world. People want to build arti“ cial reefs. Mostly, people want to see beautiful reef “ sh. I am always pleased at the variety of things we want to do or see underwater. I begin by encouraging them, regardless of age, to get a mask, snorkel and “ ns and learn how to breathhold dive. Just about any age can do this activity called snorkel diving. We usually collect scallops by holding our breath and brie” y sliding below the surface to search for the blueeyed swimmers. And kids can practice in their supervised family pool, strengthening swimming skills until they are old enough to move to the next step. As a family, I took my kids into surface supplied diving “ rst. I placed a compressor on the boat and supervised them breathing from a regulated gas supply while watching from the surface until they were con“ dent and informed enough to join me at very shallow depths. This approach works for adults also. There is no heavy cylinder on your back and you are on a leash! Freedom from any connection to the surface is the ultimate objective however, and a Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus is what most folks want. A traditional quality scuba class will take “ ve days, include lectures to learn details about the physics and physiology of the environment, local residents and the technology. Pool training to master skin and scuba skills takes the same amount of time. The last two days of the class are dedicated to checkout dives, hopefully in clear and somewhat warm water. How this class is bundled together is up to the instructor and students to arrange, either as weeknight lectures with weekend water work, or morning lecture with afternoon pool sessions. In the end, the certi“ cation earned is a learners permit to depths no deeper than 60 feet. Classes with couples are taught differently from those with kids and different again from training police of“ cers. They each have their charm and challenges. I understand that Wakulla High School has a new Engineering Program. I wonder if they might be interested in our Dive Engineer curriculum taught along these same lines? Safety through education! Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Oct 18, 12 Fri Oct 19, 12 Sat Oct 20, 12 Sun Oct 21, 12 Mon Oct 22, 12 Tue Oct 23, 12 Wed Oct 24, 12 D ate 4.2 ft. 3:43 AM 4.1 ft. 4:21 AM 3.9 ft. 5:05 AM Hi g h -0.5 ft. 10:55 AM -0.3 ft. 11:47 AM 0.1 ft. 12:46 PM 1.8 ft. 12:04 AM 1.9 ft. 1:18 AM 1.8 ft. 3:02 AM 1.5 ft. 4:42 AM L ow 3.5 ft. 5:25 PM 3.2 ft. 6:17 PM 2.9 ft. 7:16 PM 3.6 ft. 6:00 AM 3.2 ft. 7:23 AM 3.0 ft. 9:32 AM 3.1 ft. 11:14 AM Hi g h 1.6 ft. 10:30 PM 1.7 ft. 11:11 PM 0.5 ft. 1:54 PM 0.8 ft. 3:10 PM 1.0 ft. 4:25 PM 1.1 ft. 5:27 PM L ow 2.8 ft. 8:27 PM 2.8 ft. 9:43 PM 2.9 ft. 10:47 PM 3.1 ft. 11:36 PM Hi g h Thu Oct 18, 12 Fri Oct 19, 12 Sat Oct 20, 12 Sun Oct 21, 12 Mon Oct 22, 12 Tue Oct 23, 12 Wed Oct 24, 12 D ate 3.2 ft. 3:35 AM 3.1 ft. 4:13 AM 2.9 ft. 4:57 AM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 11:06 AM -0.2 ft. 11:58 AM 0.1 ft. 12:57 PM 1.3 ft. 12:15 AM 1.4 ft. 1:29 AM 1.3 ft. 3:13 AM 1.1 ft. 4:53 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 5:17 PM 2.4 ft. 6:09 PM 2.2 ft. 7:08 PM 2.7 ft. 5:52 AM 2.4 ft. 7:15 AM 2.2 ft. 9:24 AM 2.3 ft. 11:06 AM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 10:41 PM 1.3 ft. 11:22 PM 0.3 ft. 2:05 PM 0.6 ft. 3:21 PM 0.7 ft. 4:36 PM 0.8 ft. 5:38 PM L ow 2.1 ft. 8:19 PM 2.1 ft. 9:35 PM 2.2 ft. 10:39 PM 2.3 ft. 11:28 PM Hi g h Thu Oct 18, 12 Fri Oct 19, 12 Sat Oct 20, 12 Sun Oct 21, 12 Mon Oct 22, 12 Tue Oct 23, 12 Wed Oct 24, 12 D ate 3.9 ft. 4:19 AM 3.8 ft. 4:57 AM Hi g h -0.5 ft. 11:59 AM -0.2 ft. 12:51 PM 1.6 ft. 12:15 AM 1.7 ft. 1:08 AM 1.7 ft. 2:22 AM 1.6 ft. 4:06 AM 1.3 ft. 5:46 AM L ow 3.3 ft. 6:01 PM 3.0 ft. 6:53 PM 3.6 ft. 5:41 AM 3.3 ft. 6:36 AM 3.0 ft. 7:59 AM 2.8 ft. 10:08 AM 2.9 ft. 11:50 AM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 11:34 PM 0.1 ft. 1:50 PM 0.4 ft. 2:58 PM 0.7 ft. 4:14 PM 0.9 ft. 5:29 PM 1.0 ft. 6:31 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 7:52 PM 2.6 ft. 9:03 PM 2.6 ft. 10:19 PM 2.7 ft. 11:23 PM Hi g h Thu Oct 18, 12 Fri Oct 19, 12 Sat Oct 20, 12 Sun Oct 21, 12 Mon Oct 22, 12 Tue Oct 23, 12 Wed Oct 24, 12 D ate 3.3 ft. 3:27 AM 3.2 ft. 4:05 AM 3.0 ft. 4:49 AM 2.8 ft. 5:44 AM Hi g h -0.5 ft. 10:34 AM -0.3 ft. 11:26 AM 0.1 ft. 12:25 PM 0.5 ft. 1:33 PM 1.9 ft. 12:57 AM 1.8 ft. 2:41 AM 1.4 ft. 4:21 AM L ow 2.7 ft. 5:09 PM 2.5 ft. 6:01 PM 2.3 ft. 7:00 PM 2.2 ft. 8:11 PM 2.5 ft. 7:07 AM 2.3 ft. 9:16 AM 2.4 ft. 10:58 AM Hi g h 1.6 ft. 10:09 PM 1.7 ft. 10:50 PM 1.8 ft. 11:43 PM 0.7 ft. 2:49 PM 0.9 ft. 4:04 PM 1.0 ft. 5:06 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 9:27 PM 2.3 ft. 10:31 PM 2.4 ft. 11:20 PM Hi g h Thu Oct 18, 12 Fri Oct 19, 12 Sat Oct 20, 12 Sun Oct 21, 12 Mon Oct 22, 12 Tue Oct 23, 12 Wed Oct 24, 12 D ate 4.3 ft. 3:40 AM 4.2 ft. 4:18 AM 4.0 ft. 5:02 AM Hi g h -0.6 ft. 10:52 AM -0.3 ft. 11:44 AM 0.1 ft. 12:43 PM 2.0 ft. 12:01 AM 2.1 ft. 1:15 AM 1.9 ft. 2:59 AM 1.6 ft. 4:39 AM L ow 3.6 ft. 5:22 PM 3.3 ft. 6:14 PM 3.0 ft. 7:13 PM 3.6 ft. 5:57 AM 3.2 ft. 7:20 AM 3.0 ft. 9:29 AM 3.1 ft. 11:11 AM Hi g h 1.7 ft. 10:27 PM 1.9 ft. 11:08 PM 0.5 ft. 1:51 PM 0.8 ft. 3:07 PM 1.0 ft. 4:22 PM 1.2 ft. 5:24 PM L ow 2.8 ft. 8:24 PM 2.8 ft. 9:40 PM 3.0 ft. 10:44 PM 3.2 ft. 11:33 PM Hi g h Thu Oct 18, 12 Fri Oct 19, 12 Sat Oct 20, 12 Sun Oct 21, 12 Mon Oct 22, 12 Tue Oct 23, 12 Wed Oct 24, 12 D ate 3.4 ft. 3:00 AM 3.4 ft. 3:42 AM 3.3 ft. 4:31 AM 3.1 ft. 5:31 AM Hi g h -0.1 ft. 10:21 AM 0.0 ft. 11:21 AM 0.2 ft. 12:30 PM 0.3 ft. 1:45 PM 1.8 ft. 1:17 AM 1.6 ft. 3:01 AM 1.3 ft. 4:20 AM L ow 2.8 ft. 6:37 PM 2.7 ft. 7:46 PM 2.6 ft. 8:56 PM 2.5 ft. 9:55 PM 2.8 ft. 6:49 AM 2.6 ft. 8:32 AM 2.5 ft. 10:32 AM Hi g h 2.0 ft. 9:41 PM 2.0 ft. 10:25 PM 2.0 ft. 11:34 PM 0.5 ft. 2:56 PM 0.7 ft. 4:00 PM 0.9 ft. 4:54 PM L ow 2.5 ft. 10:39 PM 2.6 ft. 11:12 PM 2.6 ft. 11:40 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacOct. 18 Oct. 24First Oct. 21 Full Oct. 29 Last Nov. 6 New Nov. 13Major Times 4:00 AM 6:00 AM 4:31 PM 6:31 PM Minor Times 11:08 AM 12:08 PM 9:51 PM 10:51 PM Major Times 5:01 AM 7:01 AM 5:32 PM 7:32 PM Minor Times 12:09 PM 1:09 PM 10:53 PM 11:53 PM Major Times 6:01 AM 8:01 AM 6:30 PM 8:30 PM Minor Times 1:05 PM 2:05 PM 11:56 PM 12:56 AM Major Times 6:59 AM 8:59 AM 7:26 PM 9:26 PM Minor Times --:---:-1:55 PM 2:55 PM Major Times 7:52 AM 9:52 AM 8:18 PM 10:18 PM Minor Times 12:59 AM 1:59 AM 2:38 PM 3:38 PM Major Times 8:43 AM 10:43 AM 9:07 PM 11:07 PM Minor Times 2:00 AM 3:00 AM 3:17 PM 4:17 PM Major Times 9:30 AM 11:30 AM 9:53 PM 11:53 PM Minor Times 2:59 AM 3:59 AM 3:53 PM 4:53 PM Average Average Average Average Average Average+ Average7:41 am 7:02 pm 11:09 am 9:52 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:42 am 7:01 pm 12:10 pm 10:54 pm 7:42 am 7:00 pm 1:06 pm 11:57 pm 7:43 am 6:59 pm 1:55 pm --:-7:44 am 6:58 pm 2:39 pm 1:00 am 7:44 am 6:57 pm 3:18 pm 2:01 am 7:45 am 6:56 pm 3:54 pm 3:00 am21% 29% 37% 44% 51% 58% 65% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Vote Against Alan BrockAs of September, he raised $24,125 For his campaign. $20,000 came from OUTSIDE our County & State .Do we want OUTSIDE People & MONEY INFLUENCING a Commissioner? NO Alan Does Not Pay Property Taxes!Poli cal adver sement paid for and approved by Donna Sanford.

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comFifty-two years ago the beautiful St. Marks Lighthouse went automatic.Ž For me, and probably many others in Wakulla County, it marked the end of an era, and a sad one at that. No longer would keepersŽ or as they were called after the Coast Guard took charge, Of“ cers-in-Charge,Ž be on duty there to properly maintain the structure, respond to emergencies in their area of responsibility, give courtesies to minor requests from mariners, and provide constant attention to aids to navigation. Since 1960, the lighthouse would simply become a large beacon to mark the entrance to the St. Marks River. But my friends, there was a time that I can remember when there were people, often entire families at our lighthouse. One such family was that of my mother, who lived there with her parents and two brothers and “ ve sisters. That house was not very large, only two bedrooms, living room, and dining room. But somehow they managed to make it a home and a very happy one. My grandfather, John Y. Gresham, left his position as Assistant Keeper at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse in Gulf County in 1918 to take a promotion as Keeper at our St. Marks Lighthouse. He ended up staying there longer than any other Keeper, 31 years, until his retirement in 1949. Mother lived there until she got married in 1936. She passed away in 1999, but many years before that, she wrote a narrative, Life at the Lighthouse,Ž and here it is: LIFE AT THE LIGHTHOUSE My family moved to Cape San Blas Lighthouse in the winter of 1916 when I was 3 years old. My father was the Assistant Keeper there for a year and from there was transferred to St. Marks Lighthouse as Keeper, a promotion. Both these lighthouses are on the Gulf of Mexico on the northwest coast of Florida. Our family consisted of only four children when we moved to the lighthouse but grew to eight of us, six girls and two boys. The nearest town was eight miles away, a small “ shing village, St. Marks. My father would go to St. Marks on Saturday, an hours run in his small, 20-foot launch. He would get the mail and a weeks supply of groceries and always brought candy for us children. Our main problem was school. My father had been reared in a very poor environment and had little schooling so was determined that we should have as much training as he could afford. He taught us himself when he had time. He subscribed to several magazines and we had to read them and tell him what he had learned. Every night of my life that I lived with my father I had to listen to Lowell Thomas give the news. Keeping a lighthouse is not a dif“ cult occupation, but rearing eight children at once is. In order to supplement the small salary paid by the government my father fished with a net at night. The lighthouse had to be kept immaculately clean, like a ship, at all times. With all the chores to be done there was little time left to teach the children so we advertised in several northern papers for a teacher who wished to spend the three summer months in Florida at a lighthouse and teach. We were swamped with mail! It was hard to choose someone from all the letters. When my father decided on a particular one he would write them the details. The teacher had to live in the house with the family and was paid a small salary, part by the government and part by my father. The teacher would arrive by train in St. Marks and we would meet them in the small launch. That was always an exciting day for us, meeting the teacher who would be our constant companion for three months. We always had a new teacher each summer except for one who came three consecutive summers. We had a room, the living room, made into a classroom with school desks and blackboard. We went to class promptly at eight in the morning, and my mother would have our lunch prepared at noon. We returned to the class room at 1 p.m. and stayed until 3:30 in the afternoon. There were always four or “ ve pupils, the smaller children being too young and the older ones going away to school or work as they grew up. We were, of course, each in a different grade and would make a grade in three months. We all went through the eighth grade this way. I stayed home longer than the others and just to have something to do went over the 8th grade three times. Our teacher, usually a lady, became a dear friend. She not only taught us our books but all about the way other people lived. She would tell us about going to movies, to parties, about neighbors and things that we read about but never did. She taught us girls how to “ x our hair pretty and discussed clothes, and, if she were young, boys. We, in turn, would take her rowing or sailing, “ shing and in swimming. Our way of life was as fascinating to her as hers was to us. We often corresponded for years after they returned home. My mother had a sister who lived in St. Marks who we visited at least once a month. We would go to St. Marks in the launch on Sunday and attend the small church and eat at my aunts house. We always looked forward to these visits. Often we would plan to go and the wind would blow hard from the south and cause the water to be rough and our trip had to be postponed until another Sunday. I remember how unhappy this would make me. We often went as long as three months in the winter without seeing anyone outside the family. Now that I live in a city I look back and remember that I was never lonely at all. With our large family we were always busy and thoroughly entertained. We didnt know what it was like to have friends and neighbors so didnt miss it. When the weather was bad sponge fishermen would come in near the lighthouse and anchor about a mile offshore, and there were always other “ shing boats anchored near or passing. My two brothers knew a lot of the “ shermen and on days that both our parents were away the boys would run the American ” ag up the pole as a signal that we were alone and this was an invitation to come up to see us. On these occasions we would play the piano and sing, play the phonograph and fry “ sh for dinner. When I was 13 years old we had a young man, 21 years old, to come teach us one summer. He had taught a term of school in St. Marks and my father knew him and asked him to teach us the following summer. He liked it so much at the lighthouse he stayed on longer and helped with the painting and cleaning. This young man was very serious minded and strict with us and I didnt care for him at all. Some 10 years later when I was attending business school in Tallahassee, he wrote me a letter and asked to visit me. Two years later we were married in the same room at the lighthouse where he had taught me. Years have gone by … both my husband and father have passed away. The lighthouse is not used as a home anymore. The windows and doors are shuttered and the light is automatic, but nothing can change my happy memories of my life at the lighthouse. … Vera Gresham Roberts Tallahassee. & LIfe at the St. Marks Lighthouse SPECIAL TO THE NEWSST. MARKS LIGHTHOUSE, 1918: The Greshams, Alton, Lela (mother), Vera (author of this account), Ella, and John Y. (Keeper, father) Red Clay Footprints By John Roberts e Wakulla Historical Society will hold a genealogy seminar on Saturday, Oct. 20, at Wakulla County Extension Facility. Join us and start your family tree. Registration will be held beginning at 8:15 a.m., breakfast and lunch included and two guest speakers. For more information call (850) 926-1110 or (850) 524-5334. I LIKEMIKEREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 C WAKULLA COUNTY VOTERS HAVE TWO CHOICES: 1. VOTE FOR MIKE STEWART WHO IN CONCERT WITH FELLOW BOARD MEMBERS TOOK ON THE TOUCH TASK OF DOWNSIZING OUR LOCAL GOVERNMENT, WHILE STILL PROVIDING ESSENTIAL SERVICES, AS WELL AS BUILDING BACK OUR DEPLETED RESERVES. 2. VOTE FOR HOWARD KESSLER WHO DURING HIS LAST TERM IN OFFICE ALLOWED LOCAL GOVERNMENT TO BECOME BLOATED AND INEFFICIENT, DEPLETING OUR RESERVES AND EARNING THE COUNTY A VERY POOR AUDIT REPORT. ITS YOUR CHOICE... ƒ BUT I LIKE MIKE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3www.mikestewart2012.comPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MIKE STEWART, REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3facebook.com/ mike.stewart.3363 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts • Color • F acial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • F lat T ops F eather Locks • Color • P erms • Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. c e H a i r S a l o n e H l o H a i a l o i r S a c e c e o n o o n Tu es -S at 54 529 05 & t. . . . . F STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 13ABy BILL RUSSELLVolunteer Fire“ ghterFall is upon us and in the South that means three things: politics, college football, and festivals. On Oct. 27 at Hudson Park, the third annual Smoke and Fire Fire“ ghters Barbecue Contest and Charity Fundraiser will be held and we have found a way to incorporate all three of our favorite fall pasttimes: a barbecue contest, dunking booths with political candidates in them, and this event starts early enough for you to grab several to-goŽ plates to take to FSUs homecoming game against Duke. The money raised goes to support the Childrens Burn Camp (Camp Amigo) and to assist local Emergency workers in furthering their education and advancing their skills. No one “ re department makes money from this event … it strictly bene“ ts the children that have suffered severe burns and it helps the entire county have better trained emergency workers. The day will kick off with registration for a 5K family run/walk at 8 a.m., with the run starting at 9 a.m. You may pre-register for this event at Anytime Fitness in Crawfordville or register the morning of the event at the Rainbow International location on the north end of Hudson Park. The serving of food should begin at 11 a.m. and the barbecue judging will begin at 11:45 a.m. The judges will have their work cut out for them as 16 teams are in the contest this year. The contest was opened to law enforcement last year and there are now two teams from the Wakulla Sheriffs Of“ ce and one from Leon County Sheriffs Of“ ce. Fire department teams are from Tallahassee Fire, Perry Fire, Blountstown Fire, St. Marks Powder, Gadsden County EMS and several of our own county departments. While barbecue plates are being sold, and the judging is going on, political candidates will be called who have volunteered to be in the dunking booth. Since all of the proceeds go to great causes and we want to raise as much as possible, and in keeping with the spirit of politics, we have provided a loopholeŽ for these candidates … any candidate who has volunteered to be in the booth can escape by providing a $100 donation to the charities. Most candidates are a part of this fundraiser, so give a little to your favorite candidates, earmarkedŽ for this event. For kids (and those still kids at heart) there will be “ re equipment on display, Air Methods will have a helicopter on display, and there will also be a bounce house. The menu will include lunch plate tickets at $6 for chicken, $7 for two meats and $8 for chicken, pulled pork and ribs. Since early voting starts that day, we will give you $1 off of any plate if you go to the Supervisor of Elections Of“ ce and vote early. Just wear your I VotedŽ sticker to receive the discount. Bill Russell is a Wakulla County Volunteer Fire“ ghter.The Sopchoppy Opry, located in historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium, 164 Yellow Jacket Avenue, cordially invites all to the second annual Gospel Concert on Saturday, Oct. 27, at 7 p.m. featuring Fortress, one of the areas premier Gospel groups! Tickets are $10 and may be reserved by calling (850) 962-3711. Fortress is comprised of lead vocalist and keyboard player Ken Hosford; alto vocalist Georgia Anne Hosford; tenor vocalist Orville Eddy and bass vocalist Russell Hosford. The vocal ensemble is accompanied by rhythm guitarist Earnie Sumner, bass guitarist Will Hosford, and percussionist Jim Johnson. The Sopchoppy Opry, now in its 13th year, is a fundraising activity of the Wakulla County School Board and Sopchoppy High School Alumni Association. All concert proceeds are used for the restoration of historic Sopchoppy High School. The ticket office and caf open at 5:30 p.m. on before the concert. For more information about Fortress and the Opry, go to www.sopchoppyopry.com. By DEBBIE DIXSpecial to The NewsNashville based songwriters David Olney and Sergio Webb will return for their third Posh Java performance, to entertain the audience with intelligent and original rockabilly/ Americana music, on Friday, Oct. 19, at 8 p.m. Olney stands out like a jalapeno in a bowl of vanilla pudding,Ž one reviewer wrote. His music is deep and thoughtful, intellectually rich and socially true. Olney has written music performed by Emmylou Harris, Linda Ronstadt and Del McCoury. Tony Laiolo wrote, Olney doesnt defy categorization so much as he rises above it. There is simply no one else like him.Ž Sergio, Olneys sidekick on guitar and ukulele and whatever else he can pick up (a megaphone?) is amazing. A humble, gentle character, in real life, he is right thereŽ on any instrument that he plays. Both men are stellar musicians. Visit DavidOlney.com or you tube to listen to the music. The show for these two performers has been sold out in the past. For reservations contact Posh Java at poshjava@gmail.com or phone: (850) 962-1010. Cover is $15. Performing on Saturday, Oct. 20, at 8 p.m. is Nikki Talley. Talley has been described as a hardworking, energetic, mountain girl with a big voice.Ž Touring with her husband, Jason Sharp, this duo is from Asheville, N.C. and has been performing a lot in Florida. Between the two of them, they play acoustic guitar, clawhammer banjo, “ nger style and ” at picking guitar, bass, and of course, vocals. Critics and reviewers have compared Talley to Patty Loveless and Gillian Welch, but comparisons do a disservice to her “ ery stage performances, her hauntingly seductive and raw gritty lyrics, and by a voice lifted up that harkens back to her Appalachian roots, and shores up on the edges of contemporary country, folk, and old time. Listen to Talley at www. nikkitalley.com, www.facebook.com/nikkitalleysongs, or on youtube. For reservations contact Posh Java at poshjava@ gmail.com or phone: (850) 962-1010. Cover for the Talley show is $10. Dinner before the show will be served by reservation only. BYOB. Sopchoppy Opry Gospel Concert to feature FortressSmoke and Fire fundraiser setTwo concerts at Posh Java this weekend David Olney and Sergio Webb. PLEASE RE-ELECT OUR “PAP” Donnie Sparkman WAKULLA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERHe Is: Knowledgeable Honest Dedicated to the people of Wakulla County with 42 years of experience Certi ed Florida Appraiser Experienced Land Surveyor (and He Loves US! Brigs, Walker & Reese) Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, for Property Appraiser I LIKEMIKE STEWARTREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mike Stewart, Republican candidate for county commissioner, district 3 FELLOW RESIDENTSThis is YOUR opportunity to VOTE for YOUR VERY OWN $250 TRAFFIC TICKET!State of Florida Troopers are Charged with Enforcement of TRAFFIC LAWS.Their whole career is TRAFFIC Enforcement. They are not a State Police in Florida as in Many States.Play safer and VOTE for MAURICE LANGSTON for SHERIFFPolitical advertisement paid for by Jack Collins, 16 Fonigan Rd., Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 Independently of any Candidate This Advertisement was not Approved by any Candidate. Taxpayers Beware!Vote NO on the Wakulla County Referendum, theLast item on the Ballot!Poli cal adver sement paid for and approved by Donna Sanford. 000CV38 HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Oct. 6, three victims from Crawfordville and Tallahassee reported suspicious activity as a motorist drove into their travel lane on Commerce Boulevard and pointed a weapon at them. The victims were riding motorcycles at the time of the incident. A total of “ ve motorcycle drivers were able to escape the motorist without injury. Deputy Randy Phillips and Sgt. Andy Curles investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week:OCTOBER 3€ Kalie Galasso of Crawfordville was involved in a traffic crash when she was westbound on Highway 267. She lost control of her vehicle and struck a power pole. Damage to her vehicle was estimated at $7,000. She was not injured. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated.OCTOBER 4€ Hannah Louise Williams, 27, of Crawfordville was charged with retail theft at Wal-Mart. Asset Protection staff observed the suspect placing items in a shopping cart but she allegedly failed to stop and pay at the last point of sale. She was detained and $122 worth of merchandise was recovered from the cart. € Andrew Carter of Crawfordville reported the theft of a tree stand from his hunting property. The tree stand was removed by juveniles and was returned to the owner. The victim decided not to pursue any charges. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated an animal complaint in Sopchoppy. An animal control of“ cer witnessed a dog at a residence that was emaciated and suffering from a skin condition. The animal was transported to a veterinarian for treatment. Conditions of additional dogs at the residence are also being investigated.OCTOBER 5€ A 17-year-old male from Crawfordville was involved in a single vehicle crash on U.S. Highway 319 north of Highway 267. The vehicle left the highway, ” ipped and ended up in a wooded area. The juvenile reported that he swerved to miss a deer and lost control of his truck. The victim declined medical treatment and was turned over to a friend due to his mother being out of town. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € James Bevis of Shell Island Fish Camp in St. Marks reported the theft of a boat gas tank. The tank was removed from a boat in the boatyard and is valued at $35. The perpetrator was in the process of removing the outboard motor when he was interrupted and he left the scene with the motor barely attached to the boat. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € Leonard Tartt of the City of Sopchoppy reported a criminal mischief to a city vehicle. Someone cut the gas “ ll tube that connects to the gas tank. Damage is estimated at $150. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € David Arnett of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported five unauthorized withdrawals from his bank account for a total of $600. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € Geneva Prince of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to a swimming pool. A bullet hole was observed in the above ground pool. Damage was estimated at $250. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € Misty Lynn Attewell, 25, of Crawfordville was charged with felony retail theft at Wal-Mart. Loss Prevention of“ cials observed the suspect placing merchandise into recyclable shopping bags in her cart. Attewell walked to the last point of sale and purchased only a movie. The stolen items included fabric, related sewing items and other items reportedly valued at $467. € Maranda Sherrod of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief at the County Line Bar. The victim was leaving the bar when she observed her vehicle window shattered. A beer bottle was used to break the glass. Damage was estimated at $250. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated.OCTOBER 6€ John Davidson of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victim awoke in the morning and his vehicle was gone. The vehicle was not locked and the keys were inside. Climbing gear for the victims work was also reported missing. The climbing gear is valued at approximately $2,500 and the vehicle is valued at $2,000. The vehicle was entered in the FCIC/NCIC data base. Later, the vehicle was reported recovered on property owned by John Conley of Crawfordville a few miles away. The climbing property was also recovered. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € Tommy Joe Nazworth of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A suspect, who has been identi“ ed, removed two nail guns from the victims property. The property is valued at $750. Sgt. Andy Curles investigated. € On Oct. 6, off duty Sgt. Ronald Mitchell and Deputy Vicki Mitchell were traveling behind Dana H. Crum, 28, of Crawfordville when Crum crashed her vehicle into a tree on Horseshoe Trail in Crawfordville. Sgt. Andy Curles and Deputy Stephen Simmons assisted at the accident scene until EMS arrived on scene and transported her to the hospital for multiple lacerations. € Charles W. Montford of Crawfordville reported an animal incident. The victim was bitten by a dog while he was riding a motorcycle at Summerwind Circle North and Old Woodville Highway. The dog bite tore the victims pants and broke the skin. He declined medical attention. Deputy Randy Phillips and Animal Control Of“ cer Bonnie Brinson investigated but were unable to locate the animal. € Henry Carter of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary at his home. A window was broken out. Damage to the home was estimated at $500. Nothing appeared to have been taken from inside. Lt. Jimmy Sessor and Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € Oneida Hollett of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim reported the loss of her credit card and quickly contacted her bank. The bank noted that an unauthorized charge was made on the card for $129. Deputy Will Hudson investigated.OCTOBER 7€ Richard Armstrong of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim was in the process of moving out of his residence when he discovered that someone broke into his home, camper and vehicle. Damage to the victims property was estimated at $450. A “ re extinguisher was taken from the camper and discharged inside the victims vehicle. Damage to the Mercedes was estimated at $200. One of the perpetrators cut his hand on the broken glass and blood soaked napkins were collected as evidence. While investigating the Armstrong case, deputies were called to investigate another burglary nearby on property owned by Ashley Duane Gowdy. The investigation determined that $1,100 worth of damage was created at the unoccupied home. Bags of rye grass seed were also torn open inside a barn on the property. Damage to the seed bags was estimated at $300. As deputies investigated a report of paint cans on Happy Time Drive, three juveniles were observed hiding behind a residence. Deputy Sean Wheeler and Deputy Will Hudson spoke to the juveniles who had paint on their hands. With their guardians present, the juveniles, ages 10, 13 and 14, admitted to entering the two residences and creating the damage. One of the juveniles suffered a deep cut on his hand after punching out a window. The juveniles were charged with three counts each of burglary of a conveyance and three counts each of criminal mischief in the Armstrong case and two counts each of burglary and two counts each of criminal mischief in the Gowdy case. The juveniles did not score high enough to be taken to the juvenile detention center and were released to their parents. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston also investigated. € WCSO Jail inmate Garrett Mizell Revell, 26, of Crawfordville was charged with battery by a person detained in a jail facility after correctional staff observed Revell striking a 25-year-old victim with a closed “ st. Deputies Reed Brown, Lisa Hummel and Lt. Cliff Carroll investigated.OCTOBER 8€ Tabitha Mathers of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The vehicle was on property owned by a relative and was removed without her permission. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated. € Linda Cyr of Crawfordville reported a structure “ re. Deputy Ian Dohme entered the home while the “ re was still active and used his agency issued “ re extinguisher to knock down small “ res within the kitchen. Wakulla “ re“ ghters also came to the scene and put out the blaze which included burning blankets used by the victim to attempt to put out the “ re. The “ re originated on the stove as the victim attempted to fry food. Damage was estimated at $500 and the “ re was ruled accidental. € Wayne Morgan of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A computer and jewelry, valued at $1,200, was reported missing from the victims home. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € Deputy Gibby Gibson and Reserve Deputy David Pienta investigated a report of an infant possibly in distress inside a vehicle in the WalMart parking lot. An infant was crying inside the vehicle with no ventilation. Due to the childs appearance, EMS was called to the scene to check the child. EMS provided the child with an ice pack to cool him down and determined the child was healthy. No charges were “ led, however contact was made with the Department of Children and Families regarding the incident. € Deputy Katie Deal reported “ nding property while working with the Litter Control Unit near Sopchoppy. A wallet and make-up bag was recovered and contact was made with the owner, Sara Weaver. The victim reported that her vehicle was broken into in Franklin County and her wallet was stolen on Oct. 7. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated.OCTOBER 9€ Sara Weaver of Crawfordville also “ led a fraud complaint over the unauthorized use of her credit card. The victim discovered eight unauthorized charges on her account for $842. The transactions were completed in Wakulla County and evidence was collected at multiple scenes. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € Wal-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft involving Robyn Lynn Scott, 50, of Crawfordville. The suspect gathered items as she went through the store and was observed placing items in her purse. The suspect failed to pay for the items before leaving the last point of sale. The stolen items included toothbrushes, DVDs and meat, valued at $93. Scott was arrested for retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. She was also issued a trespass warning for the store. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated.OCTOBER 10€ Deputy Sean Wheeler conducted a traf“ c stop of a vehicle with only one working headlight. The driver, Cristepher Joe Smith, 21, of Crawfordville, did not possess a driver license. It was determined that Smith was driving while his license was suspended or revoked habitual. Deputy Wheeler issued Smith a traf“ c warning for faulty equipment and arrested Smith for DWLSR habitual. € Danny Sellers of St. Marks reported a vehicle theft. The victim launched his boat in St. Marks to go “ shing. When he returned his trailer was missing. The trailer was entered into the FCIC/NCIC data base and is valued at $1,500. The victims truck was not tampered with. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € Androphojus Jemica Inge, 25, of Tallahassee was arrested and charged with leaving the scene of an accident involving property damage, reckless driving, high speed ” eeing and eluding with lights and sirens activated, falsely identifying himself to law enforcement and driving while driver license is suspended or revoked third or subsequent conviction. Deputy Stephen Simmons responded to a reckless vehicle call at the 3600 block of Crawfordville Highway. Deputy Simmons observed the motorist pass vehicles on the right and left sides and pass a school bus in a no passing zone. Motorists had to get off the road to avoid a crash with the vehicle which was traveling at a high rate of speed. Deputy Simmons attempted to stop the vehicle as it passed a second school bus. Due to the heavy traf“ c and extreme speeds of 70 miles per hour in a 55 mile per hour zone, the law enforcement pursuit was discontinued. However, Deputy Simmons observed the motorist crash into a dirt embankment and fence line on the east side of the road near Donaldson-Williams Road. The vehicle was unoccupied but driver was observed coming out of a “ eld with no shoes or pants on. Pants were observed caught on a wire fence nearby. The driver eventually admitted to Major Shepard Bruner that he was the driver and only occupant of the vehicle. The vehicle struck a large electrical wire near a power line before crashing. € Jack Tedder of Smith Creek and Perry reported the theft of 14 50-pound bags of corn on the cob from his shed in Smith Creek. The missing corn is valued at $112. It is used to feed deer. Sgt. Mike Helms investigated. € Mishele Eaton of Sopchoppy reported the theft of a piece of furniture from her home. A suspect has been identi“ ed. The couch is valued at $1,000. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. € Julie Edmondson of Panacea reported the theft of household goods and a GPS, valued at $280, from her home. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. € Frank Payne of Panacea reported a fraud. The victim reported that individuals have attempted to open credit card accounts in his name. The card requests came from Malaysia and Missouri. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 943 calls for service during the past week. 000BK81 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 15A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and to bring attention to this cause, to those who are struggling to free themselves from it, the ones who help “ ght it and remember those who have been lost at the hand of domestic violence, the Domestic Violence Task Force held a program on Oct. 10. Those in attendance heard from Judge Jackie Fulford about her experiences dealing with domestic violence cases while she was a prosecutor. Fulford said her “ rst experiences with domestic violence were not good ones and many times, the victim would eventually recant her story and try and drop the charges against the person who was abusing her. If the state attorneys of“ ce pursued charges against the abuser, Fulford said the victim would “ ght them the entire time. I couldnt understand why they fought us,Ž Fulford said. Then she attended a seminar on domestic violence and began to understand the cycle of violence and became moved to “ ght for people who couldnt “ ght for themselves. After this, one of her “ rst cases in Wakulla County involved a woman from Mississippi who was picked up with her significant other for boating under the in” uence. Of“ cers noticed the woman was bruised and found out that the man constantly beat and raped her. It was part of their relationship,Ž Judge Fulford said. Fulford got the woman to agree to press charges against the man. She also told her about Refuge House. However, Fulford was gone for a few days and when she came back she was informed the woman had dropped the charges and recanted her statement. The man was then let out on bail and took her back to Mississippi. She ended up going missing and Fulford was convinced the man had harmed her. The woman was found dead at the bottom of a river and her death was ruled an accidental drowning. Eventually, with Fulfords persistence, the man was charged with her death and sent to prison. Kathy Asbell, of the task force and Refuge House, said she remembered this case and it was one that was extremely dif“ cult. This woman, even in her death, received justice,Ž Asbell said. Fulford told the crowd that she wished she could say this was her only tragic case. Its a very real problem,Ž she said. There are no boundaries for domestic and sexual violence.Ž People in these very real situations need to be taught that they can live in a relationship where they are lived, Fulford said. To the victims I say, get out,Ž she said. There are people to help you.Ž Following Fulfords presentation, a candle was lit by Barbara Strickland, Leslie Drews mother, for the three women who have died at the hands of domestic violence. Drew was killed in 2009 by her boyfriend. Domestic violence affects everyone,Ž said Strickland, who has been an advocate for the cause of raising awareness of domestic violence. Its been almost three years, but its still fresh,Ž she said of her daughters death. Meg Baldwin, director of Refuge House, called Strickland one of her personal heroes.Ž She added that the role of those involved in Refuge House and other places and people who help those dealing with domestic violence must confront the cruelty head on and continue the “ ght and to be there for those who need help. They also must continue to have faith in human beings, she said. And to know there are people who are capable of rising to the occasion to see through one persons lies to see the truth.ŽEvent is held to increase awareness of domestic violence PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENCircuit Judge Jackie Fulford speaks to the crowd. Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce detectives arrested a 30-year-old Tallahassee woman Oct. 15 in connection with the theft and fraudulent use of credit cards stolen from a Crawfordville victim on Oct. 7 in Franklin County. Elizabeth Lauren Watts faces 10 counts of fraudulent use of a credit card, four counts of forgery and one count of grand theft. She is incarcerated in the Wakulla County Jail under an $11,500 bond. The Crawfordville victim reported a vehicle burglary in the Alligator Point area of Franklin County where her purse, identi“ cation and credit cards were stolen. Detectives determined that the victims credit cards were used fraudulently for $922 in purchases. Watts was arrested in Panacea without incident.Woman arrested in fraud case

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LES HARRISONExtension Director The western part of Wakulla County hides a ” eeting treasure available to only those with a curious mind and a will to witness the ageless autumn display. Fall wildflowers have marshaled a colorful shout against the muted and inevitable silence of a coming winter. A leisurely ride out Smith Creek Road into the Apalachicola National Forest provides the opportunity to observe vibrant displays in and under the pines, palmettos and other permanent residents of the area. In the current cul-desac lifestyle of two-income homes and crammed schedules, even for the children, the autumn forest provides a stark contrast. A GPS is recommended for the novice observers venturing off Smith Creek Road, or at least a compass for basic headings. The forest roads can be confusing and remember the sun sets in the west. The aptly named Golden rods are common in clumps and individuals. This native plant has the unjust reputation for causing hay fever. Research has shown its pollen is too heavy to be windblown. The culprit causing the red eyes and sneezing is ragweed, which blooms nondescriptly at the same time. Golden rods were once considered a strategic resource critical to national security. Thomas Edison used ” amboyant perennials to produce a natural rubber when offshore sources were threatened by world politics. A ball of golden rod rubber currently resides at Edisons winter home in Fort Myers. On the other end of the color spectrum is the Blazing Star. This plant produces lavender blooms on an eight to 12 inch spike. The clusters are frequently seen on roadsides because the plant has a need for exposure to sunlight. The Pitcher Plant, while not a wild” ower, is a colorful local inhabitant of wetter terrain. Sometimes located in a roadside ditch, sometimes found on the edge of swampy areas, the plant is frequently found in a group. The Pitcher Plant is a carnivorous plant whose unique prey-trapping mechanism features a deep cavity “ lled with a liquid. Unsuspecting insects are attracted by lures into the cavity formed by the cupped leaf. The interior sides of the pitcher are slippery and leave nothing for a fatigued insect to rest upon. Soon the prey is drowned and its body is gradually dissolved providing the plant with needed nutrients. Ladies Hatpins are commonly found with pitcher plants in wet areas. The diminutive button-like bloom clusters are located on the end of a ramrod straight stalk. These perennials bloom throughout the warm seasons of the year. Blue Mist” owers are aggressive colonizers that spread by underground runners. The dense deep blue and purple blooms appear as autumn progresses. Like the blazing stars, they are frequently seen on roadside habitats because of their requirement for sunlight. And there are so many more not mentioned here: Asters, False Foxgloves, Sunflowers, Deer Tongue and the list goes on. However, as the days get shorter, so does the treasure of autumn 2012. To learn more about local wild” ower, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u” .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@ufl.edu or at (850) 926-3931.Fall wild owers give us color before the coming winter PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCarnivorous Pitcher Plants capture insects to get needed nutrients. Blazing Star features lavender ” owers on a spike. A leisurely ride out Smith Creek Road into the Apalachicola National Forest provides the opportunity to observe vibrant displays of wild” owers. Firefighter’s BBQ Competition and Charity Fundraiser. Fire Equipment on display, Air Methods will have a helicop ter on display! Bouncy House for the kids! SMOKE AND FIRE We Support the Children’s Burn Camp Camp Amigo www.campamigo.com& Firefighter Scholarship FundsSERVING FOOD AT 11AM JUDGING STARTS AT 11:45AM 5K REGISTRATION FOR FAMILY RUN/WALK AT 8AM. RUN STARTS AT 9AM. You may pre-register at Anytime Fitness in Crawfordville or register the morning of the event at the Rainbow International booth located on the North end of Hudson Park. NEW!! DU N KI N G BOOTH!Candidates that have volunteered to be in our dunking booth will be called. Any candidate that has volunteered to be in the booth can escape that by giving a $100 donation to our charities. We really don’t want wet candidates, what we really want is money for our charities. Saturday, Oct 27 • 11am 4pm Hudson Park, Crawfordville Chicken $6, Choice of two meats $7, Chicken, Pulled Pork & Ribs $8 (Served with Slaw, baked beans and roll)Lunch Plate prices: Third AnnualThank you to our Sponsors! Call Us for Your Free In-Home Estimate!FLOORING Bevis Funeral Home & CrematoryHarvey-Young Chapel MAURICE LANGSTON HALSEYBESHEARS

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 sports news and team views Sports Cross Country: Runner up nish at Mosley Dolphin Dash Sports, Page 3BVarsity prepares for game against Suwannee CountySports, Page 4B Being sucked into the election vortex Weekly Roundup, Page 8B By CONNOR HARRISONof wakullasports.comThe Wakulla War Eagle JV football team continued their dominance with a win over the Taylor County Bulldogs winning 52-26. The Bulldogs were the ones to strike “ rst with a quick drive that ended up in the end zone. Wakulla answered that score with one of their own and then the two teams traded off another pair of touchdowns. These scores made the game appear that it would be a tight game. Thats when the War Eagles decided to start to pull away. Wakulla had several explosive plays and then they had the smaller ones, but they all add up in the end. These explosions earned the team some fast scoring drives, leading Wakulla to have a comfortable lead going into the half. To open the second half, Wakulla was set to receive the ball and they made to most of the kick return, taking it past the Taylor County Bulldogs on their way to the end zone. Later in the game, after a third down stop, the Bulldogs were forced to punt the ball away but things did not go according to plan as the War Eagles rushed in and blocked the punt. The ball was recovered by Wakulla and on the very next play they managed to get a rushing touchdown. As the second half progressed and the game kept playing out in Wakullas favor, the coaches decided to put the back-up players in. Even with these players in, they stood their ground and didnt allow any long runs or passes. Occasionally the War Eagles would let an opposing player get behind them, leading to a Taylor County touchdown on a long pass. If they learn from these mistakes and get better over the week at practice, they should keep their winning ways at their next game up at Rickards. The coaches called the right plays at the right time and just coached better than Taylor County did. Even though Wakulla had a few plays that didnt quite work out, a lot of the plays were either for positive yardage on offense or, on defense, solid tackles that kept the Bulldogs away from the end zone. Coaching wasnt the only factor either, there was also the crowd. The crowd was very into the game, applauding when their War Eagles broke a big run, or returned a kickoff from one end of the “ eld to the other. With the crowd getting loud with each deep pass and huge run, there was a lot of noise since there were a lot of these kinds of plays. All in all, the players showed great sportsmanship with congratulating the other players on a good and hard fought game. Now theyre just one game away from having a perfect season.Connor Harrison covers local sports for www. wakullasports.com. He can be reached at wakulla40@ gmail.com.FOOTBALLWar Eagle JV one win from perfect season PHOTO BY CONNOR HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY CONNOR HARRISON SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakullas Antonio Morris “ ghts through a tackle to take the ball inside the 15 yard line. War Eagle Cody Ochat dives in to block the punt. More game photos on Page 4B and online at thewakullanews.com Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the top-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011…2012.Ž Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 SMChoose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Tuesday, October 23 Friday, October 26 Monday, October 29 Thursday, November 1 Wednesday, November 7 Friday, November 9 Monday, November 12 Tuesday, November 13 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA In-Home Assessments and Referrals Offered for Comfort and Convenience If falls, weakness or inability to participate in activities become a concern for your loved one, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Tallahassee is here to help. We oer free inhome assessments with no physician orders needed. Once an evaluation is approved, HealthSouths team of professionals develop comprehensive, individualized treatment plans for a safe return home. If you have any questions or need more information contact us. IS YOUR LOVED ONE SAFE AT HOME? 2012:HealthSouth Corporation:551345 IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle G E T READY FOR HUN T IN G

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Oct. 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  WAKULLA COUNTY EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea at 7 p.m. Those who would like, please join us at 6 p.m. for conversation and a meal. All Republican candidates will be given time to update the committee on their campaign.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Oct. 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Oct. 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Oct. 21  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Oct. 22  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Oct. 23  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant. Wednesday, Oct. 24  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Oct. 25  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsFriday, Oct. 19  BABYSITTING WORKSHOP for ages 12 to 18 years old will be held at the county extension of ce from 7:30 a.m. to 5 :30 p.m. $25 fee includes snacks and CPR certi cation. Limited to 20 openings.Please contact Sherri Kraeft at 926-3931 or sjkraeft@u .edu FORE THE BUILD GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held to bene t Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County at Wildwood Golf Course. This tournament will help fund the 2012 Habitat Home Build. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Cost is $50 per person or $200 per team. To enter contact Doris Crosby at 545-7425. Saturday, Oct. 20  STONE CRAB FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in downtown St. Marks. There will be food, music, parade, children’s activities, educational displays and dozens of vendors. The parade will be held at 11 a.m. Walking, golf carts and antique cars are allowed. The theme is super hero, so dress up or decorate a golf cart or antique car as a super hero. Call 925-6224 or email cityofst.marks@ comcast.net for additional details on the parade.  ANNUAL HORSE-O-WEEN will be held at noon the Wakulla County Equestrian Center, Lawhon Mill Road in Sopchoppy, by the Wakulla County Horseman’s Association. Horse and rider costume class, monthly horse show and fun classes between regular show classes. There will be fun games with prizes for everyone, even if you don’t have a horse. Concessions are on site.  WATERS JOURNEY: Following the Water to Wakulla Springs will be held from 8 a.m. to noon. Florida Springs expert, Jim Stevenson, will lead attendees on an overland tour by car caravan which traces the fascinating journey of our water south from Tallahassee to the World Famous Wakulla Springs. Advance registration is recommended. Tour departs from the TCC campus parking lot closest to the intersection of Pensacola Street and Appleyard Drive at 8 a.m. and ends at the tower overlooking the spring at noon. Cost is $18 and includes the entrance fee to Wakulla Springs State Park. A portion of the fee will be contributed to the Wakulla Springs Alliance and the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park. For more information, call 926-3376. Monday, Oct. 22  SCHOOL ADVISORY COUNCIL meeting will be held for Wakulla High School at the WHS library from 3 to 5 p.m. Anyone interested in attending the meeting is invited. Tuesday, Oct. 23  BIG CATCH CHARITY FISH FRY will be held from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Posey’s Dockside in Panacea to bene t Wakulla County Big Brothers Big Sisters. Tickets are $10.  DRIVER SAFETY CLASS will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the library offered by AARP to seniors which will give a discount on auto insurance for 3 years. Contact Ernie Conte at 926-4605 for details. Wednesday, Oct. 24  CHILDREN’S FLU SHOT CLINIC will be held at the Wakulla County Health Department for children age 6 months to 18 years old from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. The focus of this shot clinic will be for those children who are on Medicaid or uninsured children; shots for others will be provided for a fee of $25.For additional information please contact us at (850)926-0400.  NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held at TCC Wakulla Center in Crawfordville, catered by Coastal Restaurant, from noon to 1:15 p.m. RSVP to the Chamber of ce at 926-1848. Thursday, Oct. 25  CANDLELIGHT VIGIL will be held by the Narcotics Overdose, Prevention and Education Task Force beginning at 6 p.m. at Hudson Park with a reception. The vigil will begin at 6:30 p.m. Contact Sylvia Hubbard at sylviahubbard@hotmail.com for more information.  CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for ReNu U Rejuvenation Spa will be held at 4 p.m. at the Chamber of ce, 23 High Drive, Crawfordville. Upcoming EventsSaturday, Oct. 27  THIRD ANNUAL SMOKE AND FIRE BARBECUE COOK-OFF CONTEST will be held at Hudson Park in downtown Crawfordville from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. This event will include re department and law enforcement teams from around the Big Bend area; live music, games for the kids, live demonstrations, assorted re and safety equipment display. The proceeds from this contest will be used to support Camp Amigo, a week long camp for children that have suffered crippling or dis guring burns, the Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund, and to furnish scholarships to local men and women pursuing Fire ghter and Emergency Medical careers. For sponsorships, call Bill Russell at 984-0148, or Dan Hinchee at 850-545-2154.  MONARCH BUTTERFLY FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Events will include Monarch tagging demonstrations, a live butter y garden, talks, “people tagging,” crafts, exhibits and gifts for purchase. Tours will be held behind the gates all day. No advance reservations will be taken; tours will be given on a rst comerst served basis. The St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center and Nature’s Classroom/Exhibits and Nature Store is located at 1255 Lighthouse Rd. in St. Marks. Call 850-925-6121 for visit www.fws.gov/saintmarks for more information. Saturday, Nov. 3  SECOND ANNUAL WAKULLA FRIENDS OF SCOUTING FUN SHOOT will be held at the WCSO Shooting Range from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost is $5 per person. There will be a sporting clays competition, a competitive plate shooting event, shooting demonstrations, prizes and gun safety instruction. This event is open to everyone. Attendees under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Firearms and ammunition will be provided. All proceeds will bene t the Boy Scouts of America. The shooting range is located at 65 Qualify Lane, Crawfordville. Contact Mike Scibelli at (850) 251-1497 for details.  EMPTY BOWL FUNDRAISER will be held at Hudson park from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tickets are $15 for a soup lunch and hand painted bowl. There will also be live entertainment, including music and Stone Soup play by children. The money raised is used to buy food for the area’s food pantries. For more information, contact Haydee Jackley at ribitsceramic@yahoo.com or (850) 567-4212.  NAMIBIKES EVENT will be held at Tom Brown Park, 1125 Easterwood Drive, in Tallahassee. Check-in and a continental breakfast open at 6 a.m. The bike riding event will raise awareness about mental illness, treatment and recovery. For rigorous cyclists, there will be a 100mile ‘Century’ ride to Monticello and back and a 64-mile ‘Metric Century’ ride to Capps, Fla. and back. There will also be a 30-mile off-road ride, a 6-mile family-ride around the park and a ‘bike rodeo,’ a safety course where kids can learn safety skills like navigating cones, stopping and proper helmet t. For more information about NAMIBikes, how to donate, or how to ride or volunteer, please visit www. FightStigmaAndRide.org, or contact Carol Weber at cweber@nami orida.org or (850) 671-4445. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Government Meetings Monday, Oct. 22  WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 7 p.m. at the library. Political EventsThursday, Oct. 18  POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for sheriff will be held at 7 p.m. at the library by the League of Women Voters of Wakulla County. Saturday, Oct. 20  MEET PETE WILLIAMS, candidate for State Attorney, from noon to 2:30 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant, Crawfordville. This is a free event and lunch and drinks will be served. Monday, Oct. 22  POLITICAL FORUM for candidates in the state house district 7 and county school superintendent races will be held starting at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. The superintendent forum will follow at 7:45 p.m. This forum is held by the Wakulla Republican and Wakulla Democratic executive committees. Thursday, Oct. 25  POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for property appraiser will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the Community Center, followed by a forum for the sheriff candidates at 7:45 p.m. by the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee and the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee. Fore the Build golf tournament at 8:30 a.m. at Wildwood Golf Course. St. Marks Stone Crab Festival from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in St. Marks. Political forum at 6:30 p.m. at the Community Center. BIg Catch Charity Fish Fry from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Posey’s Dockside. FridaySaturdayMondayTuesday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Nikki Talley performs at Posh Java on Saturday, Oct. 20. See story in Arts & Entertainment, Page 13A.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 3Bsports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERTrack CoachOn Saturday, Oct. 13, 16 boys and 14 girls teams toed the starting line at the Fifth Annual Mosley Dolphin Dash cross country 5K run in Lynn Haven. After the dust had settled and the scores were tabulated, the WHS boys and girls teams both claimed runner-up titles. Only perennial state powerhouse Ft. Walton Beach High School bested the local harriers. The course was an accurate, ” at two-loop course that circled the Lynn Haven Recreation Center and allowed for frequent views of the runners as they battled for their places. Junior captain Aaron Smith led the charge for the WHS boys in the excellent time of 17:33, a new personal record (PR) and a State Elite time. He was followed by J.P. Piotrowski (18:07, PR), Travis Parks (18:24, PR), Mitchell Atkinson (18:45, PR), Alan Pearson (19:06, PR), Lane Williams (19:09), Albert Smythe (19:18, PR), Ryan Dodson (19:35, PR) and Gabe Hutchins (19:53). In the attendant Open/ JV race, Riversinks Middle School runner Bryce Cole also ran an outstanding race, clocking a State Elite time of 19:14. Numerous other Wakulla runners also had an excellent day and recorded new PRs, including: Nathan Green, Jimmy French, Justin Milhon, Riley Carrier, Justin Goates, Toby Jordon, Jake Herr, Evan Guarino, Mark Veerapan, Riley Welch and Tyler Westcott. The girls race had a little extra drama associated with it, as two of the top seven runners were unable to compete, which meant that the five remaining varsity runners all had to perform extremely well and that there was no margin for error on their part. The “ ve girls all ran outstanding races and handled the extra pressure like true, seasoned veterans. Captains Marty Wiedeman (21:10State Elite Time) and Raychel Gray (21:40, PR) led the way with Lydia Wiedeman (22:08), Kasey James (22:23) and Lilianna Broadway (23:42) in tow. Wiedman and Gray were also recognized for placing in the Top 10 overall, with Wiedeman placing 6th and Gray 10th. In the Open/JV race, Logan Kelley, Ava Shaw, Emily Westmark and Shelby Shiver also set new PRs. This was the race weve been waiting for,Ž said Assistant Coach Greg James. The course and conditions were the best so far this year and the kids took advantage of it and ran some really outstanding times. We had 23 runners who set new PRs and we know the course was accurately measured, so they ran great! Ž The teams will compete next on Saturday, Oct. 20, at the large and extremely competitive Panhandle Championships hosted by Marianna High School. CROSS COUNTRYTeams nab runner-up nishes at Dolphin Dash PHOTO BY KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAaron Smith crosses the “ nish line at the Dolphin Dash with a State Elite time and Personal Record of 17:33.Margaret Wiedeman and Raychel Gray both placed in the Top 10 Girls at the Mosley Dolphin Dash. REGISTRATION DATES: SATURDAY 10/20/12 & SATURDAY 10/27/12 REGISTRATION TIMES: 8:00 A.M. TO 12:00 P.M. OR DURING OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY 10/15/12 TO FRIDAY 10/26/12 8-5PMREGISTRATION DEADLINE: SATURDAY 10/27/12, 12:00 PM REGISTRATION PLACE: MEDART RECREATION PARK 79 Recreation Dr.AGE DETERMINING DATE: SEPTEMBER 1st, 2012COST IS $40.00 PER CHILDAGES: 04 & UNDER DIVISION: 06 & UNDER DIVISION: 08 & UNDER DIVISION: 10 & UNDER DIVISION: 12 & UNDER DIVISION: COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD8 & 9 DIVISION: 10, 11, & 12 DIVISION: All players (basketball & soccer) must provide proof of health insurance or purchase a policy for an additional $10.00. All leagues are coed. If interested in coaching the above sports, please contact the Wakulla County Recreation Department. All volunteers must complete a criminal history background check. Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 NEED HEARING AIDS?HEARING AIDS AT NO COST TO FEDERAL BCBS WORKERS AND RETIREES!?That’s Rights… No Co-Pay! No Exam Fee! No Adjustment Fee! 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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netAfter watching the “ lm of upcoming opponent Suwannee, Head Football Coach Scott Klees said he anticipates a tough game. From an historical standpoint, last year was the “ rst time ever that the War Eagles have beat Suwannee and Klees said hes hoping to start a streak. Suwannee has a very talented quarterback, very fast,Ž Klees said. And a couple of good linemen. Its a game that, if were ready to play and do what we should, we should win,Ž the coach said. But Klees warned that Suwannee (3-3, 0-1 in the district) lost a district foe Godby, and that could make them dangerous. With another district loss to Wakulla, Suwannee would be effectively eliminated from the playoffs. As a team, their backs are against the wall … they have to win,Ž Klees said. Facing a desparate opponent and traveling to Live Oak creates a dangerous spot for the War Eagles. We have to make sure to keep our focus,Ž Klees said. In the open week, the War Eagles are trying to heal up from their injuries. Running back Demetrius Lindsey hasnt practiced this week because of turf toe. Brandon Nichols has a sprained ankle and only recently returned to practice. His brother Bryan Nichols has been out with a sore shoulder. Everybody else has been practicing, Klees said. Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comWar Eagle JV one win from perfect seasonBy BRIANA FORDHAMSpecial to The NewsWakulla High School will be hosting a community event on Oct. 23, beginning at 6 p.m. The Powder Puff Game between junior and senior girls will kickoff at 6 p.m. The community pep rally will begin at 7 p.m. and is expected to last until 8 p.m. There will be refreshments and food for sale at the concession stand. During the pep rally, the 2012 Homecoming Court will be announced and youll be able to familiarize yourself with the faces that are eligible to win the title of king and queen for 2012. We are accepting a $1 donation entry fee at the gate. Please come out to the event and show your community spirit. If you have any questions, you may contact Briana Fordham at Wakulla High School. Community pep rally set Oct. 23 Sebastian Garner gets tackled around the ankles. Michael Duhart “ ghts for every yard. Isiah Youmas pushes past a defender.PHOTO BY CONNOR HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY CONNOR HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY CONNOR HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS THIS WEEK: The War Eagles travel to play Suwannee High School in Live Oak on Friday, Oct. 19, at 7:30 p.m. JV close to win recordThe Wakulla High School record for straight wins is 22, set by the JV girls volleyball team several years ago. With the most recent win, the JV football team is at 20 wins in a row … with a win next week against Rickards move to 21. They wont be able to try to tie the all-time school win streak until next year. The varsity win record is 21 in a row, set by the 1979-80 baseball team, which was coached by now-Superintendent of Schools David Miller. The closest game the JV War Eagles have had this year was Madison County, who they beat 20-12.… William SnowdenVARSITY FOOTBALL Big game coming up against Suwannee FALL CONTRACTORS AUCTION Saturday, Oct. 20 10 AM MARTIN & MARTIN AUCTIONEERS, INC. For More Info: Call 601-450-6200 or Visit WWW.MMAOFMS.COMJeff Martin MSAL #1255Featuring: Trucks, Trailers, Construction Equipment, Farm Equipment, Related Items, Plus MUCH, MUCH MORE. Many Items From Ingalls Shipyard Will Be Sold ABSOLUTE! 2236 Hwy. 49, Brooklyn (Hattiesburg), MS 39425 Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. THG-12901 Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Joint pain € Arthritis pain € Muscle pain € Back pain Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 5B Our Retail SEAFOOD MARKET Carries FRESH SEAFOOD STRAIGHT from OUR FLEET of BOATSBUY ANYTHING IN OUR SEAFOOD MARKET AND WE WILL PREPARE IT FOR $5. per Meal. The Same is Offered when BRINGING IN YOUR OWN CATCH!!!Thursday Night is Come Check Out Our Great Lobster Prices 984–FISH(3474)Open Mon. Thur. 11-9 Fri. 11-10 Sat. 7-10 • Sun. 7-9 EVERY NIGHT!!Thurs. Sun. Come Visit O-We-Go Lounge 1/2 OFF Appetizers & Drinks 4:30 6:00LUNCH & DINNER MenuFRESH LOCAL OYSTERS or SUN RAY CLAMS Doz. Raw Oysters on 1/2 Shell... $8 Dozen Steamed Oyster on 1/2 Shell Served with Lemon Butter... $8 Dozen Garlic & Parmesan Oysters on 1/2 Shell... $9 Dozen Bacon & Cheddar... $9 Greek Oysters... $9 P.K. Oysters includes Curry, Butter & Parm Cheese... $9 Sit at the Bar and have your Oysters Shucked in Front of You!BASKETSFried Mullet... $9 All You Can Eat Mullet... $10 Beer Battered Fish... $9 Fresh Fried Alligator... $13 Fried Popcorn Shrimp... $10 BLKN $11 Pound of Snow Crab... $12 Fried Shrimp... $14 All Baskets Come with a Choice of FF, Coleslaw or Cheese Grits Substitute a cup of Soup or Salad... $2 or Greek Trim for Salad... $3 Add Cheese on FF... $2SPECIALTIES Fried Pork Chops... $12 grilled... $13Steak & Shrimp10 oz. Steak and 7 Lightly Beer Battered Fresh Local Shrimp... $16 Broiled add... $1Hamburger Steak... $9 add onion gravy... $2, add Cheese & Tomatoes... $3Shrimp & Grits Sauteed Shrimp in a Green Chili Sauce over a bed of Cheese Grits topped with Bacon, Cheddar Cheese, and Parmesan Cheese Comes with one side... $9Fried or Broiled Grouper Fingers... $16 All Specialties served with Choice of 2 Sides Salad, Veggie of the Day, Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw, Soups, Steamed New Potatoes, or French Fries. Greek Trim for Salad... $2SANDWICHESHamburger... $7 Cheeseburger... $8Fish Sandwich Fried... $7, Blackened... $8Philly Cheese Streak Thinly Sliced Steak, Mushrooms, Onions, and Green Peppers... $8#1 Cuban Slow Roasted Pork, Cooked Ham (Hand Sliced No Deli Meat Here), Mustard, Mayo, Pickle on Toasted Cuban Roll... Half... $5, Whole... $8Prime Rib Sandwich Thick Cut of Slow Roasted Prime Rib, Melted Swiss, Sun Dried Tomato & Bacon Mayonnaise & Horseradish Sauce on Toasted French Bread... Half... $6, Whole... $10Bacon Jumbo Slaw Dog Premium Hot Dog Wrapped in Bacon on a Hoagie Roll topped with Asiar Slaw and a Slightly Spicy Sauce... $5Gyro Sliced Lamb, Tomato, Lettuce, Tzatziki Sauce in a Pita... $7Gobble the Gook Smoked Turkey, Bacon, Swiss Cheese, Guacamole, lettuce, on a Ciabatta Roll with Sun Dried Tomato and Bacon Mayonnaise... $9Home Style Reuben Smoked Corn Beef, Swiss Cheese, Sauerkraut, Thousand Island on Marble Rye Bread... $9The Ultimate Soft Shell Sandwich Fried Soft Shell Crab topped with Cole Slaw and Fried Onion Rings with Spicy Tarter Sauce... $11Shrimp Po’ Boy Fried Shrimp, Lettuce, Tomatoes, Homemade Spicy Tarter Sauce on Cuban Roll... $11 All Sandwiches Served with Choice of FF, Coleslaw or Cheese Grits Substitute a cup of Soup or Salad... $2 Greek Trim for Salad... $3 Add Cheese on FF... $2SALADS & SOUPSSoups of the Day Always Fresh and Always Homemade Cup... $3, Bowl... $5Dinner Salad... $5 Greek Salad... $6 add Shrimp... $4 Blue Cheese Wedge Salad 1/4 Wedge Iceberg Lettuce with Crispy Bacon, Tomatoes, Bleu Cheese Crumbles and Homemade Bleu Cheese Dressing... $7Breakfast MenuSATURDAY & SUNDAY 7a.m. 11a.m. Creole Eggs -2 Eggs Poached in our Spicy Homemade Creole Sauce Served with Cheese Grits & Choice of Toast or Sambo’s Homemade Biscuits... $6Shrimp & Grits Cheese Grits & 2 Fried Eggs Topped with Homemade Green Chili Sauce and Popcorn Shrimp... $65 oz. Grilled Ham Steak, 2 Eggs with Home Fries and Cheese Grits... $8Homemade Pancakes... $42 Eggs, Cheese Grits, Choice of Patty Sausage or Bacon... $4.50Biscuits & GravySambo’s 2 Homemade Biscuits Topped with Sausage Gravy... $5Steak & Eggs... $13Over the Top OMELETS... and so much more!OMELETES Comes with Choice of American, Swiss, Cheddar, or Pepper Jack Cheese and Served with Grits or Home Fries & ToastSimply Cheesy Choose any Cheese or mix ‘em... $6 only .50¢ per extra kind of CheeseMeat and Cheese Country Ham, Bacon, Sausage, and Cheese... $7Everything but the Kitchen Sink Ham, Bacon, Onions, Peppers, Mushrooms, Tomatoes, Greek Peppers, Choise of Cheese, and Topped with Green Chili Pepper Sauce... $8Philly Cheese Shredded Steak, Green Peppers, Onions, Mushrooms, and Choice of Cheese... $8Western Omelete Ham, Green Peppers, Onion, Tomatoes, and Choice of Cheese... $7THE GREEK Feta Cheese, Tomatoesm Onions, and Tzatziki Sauce...$7ADD Your Favorite Ingredient to Any OmeleteSUCH AS Shrimp Dinner with 2 sides ... $17.95 Flounder Dinner with 2 Sides ... $16.95 SEAFOOD PLATTER #1Shrimp, Deviled Crab, Oysters, Scallop, Grouper Fingers with 2 Sides ... $17.95 SEAFOOD PLATTER #2Head on Shrimp, Shrimp, Oysters, Deviled Crab with 2 Sides ... $22.95 14 oz. New York Strip Dinner ... $13.95Be Sure to ask about the Greek Trim for your SaladFULLY STOCKED BARBIG SCREEN TVs to Watch your Favorite Team!!!Great Weather for Dining on the Deck Overlooking the Bay and Watching the Sun Go Down!Everyday Great Seafood Prices PANACEA, at the Bridge; FLORIDASEAFOOD RESTAURANT 850-984-5168 Oyster Bar~Restaurant Seafood Market91 Coastal Highway, Ochlockonee Bay3 BIG SCREEN TVS TO WATCH YOUR FAVORITE TEAM Huge Selection of AppetizersWings~Smoked Fish Dip~ U-Peel Shrimp & so much more!BEER and WINE – $2 Drafts Friday is Greek Day SOFT SHELL CRABS RIB EYESCUT TO ORDER $8 LB.FRESH SHRIMP & GROUPERFLORIDA LOBSTERLIVE CRABS-$6 DOZ.LOCAL CLAMS Mushrooms .65¢ Cheese (each slice) .55¢ Tomatoes .50¢ Ham .80¢ Green Peppers .55¢ Onions 40¢ Sausage Gravy $1All Items subject to availabilityMimosa’s $4.50

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 10 … As the race for the White House tightens, Republicans and Democrats are battling for every congressional seat they have a chance of winning. And in a north Florida district, Democrats are targeting “ rst-term U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland in an increasingly competitive clash with former state Senate Democratic Leader Al Lawson. The race had not been widely considered up for grabs. Southerland, a tea party favorite from Panama City, has a money advantage over Lawson and upset seven-term Congressman Allen Boyd, D-Monticello, to take the seat in 2010. But last week Politico listed the race among its five potential House upsets,Ž noting a growing consensus among strategists from both parties that Southerland is suddenly in a dog“ ghtŽ for re-election. Also last week, the National Republican Congressional Committee made its “ rst ad buy in the district, spending nearly $150,000 for television ads in the Panama City and Tallahassee markets. Lawson voted to raise his pay 50 percent, with automatic increases every year,Ž intones the announcer in an NRCC ad for Southerland, just like a sneaky politician. Al Lawson: pay raise for him, higher taxes for you.Ž Lawson denied the charge at a campaign event Tuesday, telling the Progressive Democrats of Tallahassee that legislative salaries had been tied to state workers pay. I started off in the Legislature in 1982, and they paid me $12,000 a year,Ž he said. It took 20 years for me to make as much money as my opponent made in two years in Washington.Ž As of July 25, the last date for which “ gures are available, Southerland had raised $1,212,911 in contributions, with 35 percent from political action committees, and had $716,650 on hand. Lawson had raised $187,376, with 7 percent from PACs, and had $101,733 on hand. Lawson represented most of the district in the state Senate for years. He ran against Boyd in the 2010 Democratic primary for Congress, but lost 51 to 49 percent. That set the scene for newcomer Southerland to beat Boyd by 53 to 41 percent, with independent voters playing a large role. Although Democrats have outnumbered Republicans in the district for years, 2008 GOP presidential candidate John McCain beat Democrat Barack Obama in the area by a 52 to 47 percent margin. In 2010, however, Republican gubernatorial candidate Rick Scott lost to Democrat Alex Sink by 51.6 to 44.8 percent. The district is nearly 40 percent rural, stretching from the eastern part of the Florida Panhandle into the Big Bend and north-central Florida. It includes Tallahassee, where Lawson has been an insurance agent for 35 years, and Panama City, where Southerlands family has run a funeral home for nearly 60 years. While there are more registered Democrats than Republicans in the district, Southerland said many will vote for him instead of Lawson. I get the reports every month from the supervisors of elections, and theres a lot of people in our neck of the woods that are leaving the Democratic Party,Ž he said at a Florida delegation event in late August. A huge issue in the race is Medicare, the federal program that provides health care for seniors. Lawsons campaign charged in a statement that Southerland has voted to end Medicare as we know it and turn it into a voucher system. In 2011, Southerland voted against a measure that would have protected Social Security benefits from privatization.Ž Southerland has made a point of saying in a radio ad that he wont cut Medicare. On Tuesday, however, when he spoke at a Network of Entrepreneurs and Business Advocates luncheon in Tallahassee, he said, You dont hear many people telling you that Medicare is insolvent and [will be] broke in nine yearsƒa program that seniors have saved for, that seniors have worked for, that seniors depend upon. So weve got to make some changes.Ž Southerland said the changes he supports wont affect anyone 55 years and older. He said those 54 and younger will have a program that would mirror the health care plan that members of Congress and federal employees already enjoy.Ž Guess what? If youre wealthy, you may pay more,Ž Southerland said. But if youre hurting, and you dont have the meansƒyou wont pay a dime more.Ž Democrats have charged that Southerland voted to raise health care costs for Floridas seniors while also supporting tax breaks for the wealthy. According to Lawsons campaign, as of 2011, there were 136,863 Social Security bene“ ciaries in the district, with 92,479 over 65 years old. Lawson said Tuesday theres nothing more dear to me … not just because of my age … than protecting Social Security and keeping Medicare the way we have it today.Ž It is very, very important that the American people and the people who are in Washington right now recognize the fact that this is the only retirement program that people can depend on,Ž he told Panama City seniors at an earlier event. Many of those baby boomers didnt have a retirement system. Private corporations didnt give it to them, or they were let go before they were quali“ ed to be vested into these programs.Ž Southerland spokesman Matt McCullough told the News Service of Florida last month that Lawsons own legislative record is suspect. He said Lawsons recipe of cuts to Medicare Advantage, hospitals and nursing homes will have a devastating impact on Florida seniors.Ž Lawson supports the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare. Southerland has repeatedly voted against it. Southerland didnt mention his opponent much when he spoke at the NEBA event on Tuesday. But Lawson was represented by an empty chair with his name on it at the head table. NEBA President Mark Trafton said Lawson had been invited in an effort to be bipartisan.Ž Lawson campaign spokeswoman Mara Sloan said her candidate had a scheduling conflict, but will debate Southerland Thursday on WFSU radio and at an Oct. 24 League of Women Voters of Bay County candidate forum in Panama City.ELECTION 2012Southerland vs Lawson becoming a marquee race By HENRY BUDDY WELLSWakulla Election SupervisorOn Tuesday, Nov. 6, polls will open for Wakulla County voters who were registered to vote by Oct. 9. Voting hours are from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Here are some helpful reminders on how to be prepared for Election Day: € Florida law requires voters to present a picture ID with signature. Acceptable forms of ID are Florida Drivers License, Florida ID Card, U.S. Passport, Military or Student ID, Public Assistance ID, Neighborhood association identi“ cation and Debit/Credit Card. Please note: IDs must have current signature. Any combination of picture and signature is accepted. € Early voting starts Oct. 27 and ends Nov. 3. Times are 8 a.m. until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1 p.m. until 7 p.m. on Sunday. A voter can take with them a marked sample ballot or other helpful information into the polling place so that they may remember their choices. € Voters are encouraged to con“ rm their voting polling place by checking their voter information card or by going to our website www.wakullaelection. com and clicking on precinct “ nder. If the voter has moved, they are required to vote in their new home precinct. Absentee ballots should be mailed back or dropped off at the Supervisor of Elections of“ ce no later than 7 on election day. The cost of a stamp for returning absentee ballots is 65 cents. If a voter has requested an absentee ballot and later decides to vote at the polling place instead, they may bring the absentee ballot with them to be cancelled at their polling place and receive a new ballot to vote at the polls. Name and address changes, or signature updates may be made at the Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections of“ ce or by printing a Voter Registration Application online. Address changes within Wakulla County can be done by phone. Please complete these changes before going to the polls. Our website contains a wealth of information. Please go to www.wakullaelection.com. If you have any other election questions or concerns, you may also call the Wakulla Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575.How to be prepared for the Nov. 6 General Election No Acreage Limitations! Financing for Rural Homes www.FarmCredit-Fl.com Charlotte Dodson NMLS #700260850-656-2920 | Tallahassee, FL Oering loans with: Publix Aprons Simple Meals. (They really are!)Craving a delicious home-cooked meal tonight? You can do it! Stop by the Aprons Simple Meals center for inspiration. Pick up a recipe card and all the ingredients right there, and youre ready to cook! Aprons will help you bring your family back to the table. Its just that simple.publix.com/aprons

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By TIM LINAFELTFrom the very “ rst play, it was clear that things were different. Florida States offense started its game against Boston College game with literally the worst “ eld position possible … inside its own 1-yard line … and virtually no margin for error. So, naturally, the Seminoles lined up in the shotgun and “ red a deep pass to Rodney Smith. That one fell incomplete. But four plays later, all of them passes, EJ Manuel went deep again and this time didnt miss, hooking up with a Kenny Shaw for a 77-yard touchdown pass that completed a 99-yard drive. That drive foreshadowed things to come in FSUs eventual 51-7 win over the Eagles. It was followed by a career day from Manuel, who finished with 439 yards, four touchdowns and two interceptions, one of which was bobbled into the hands of a BC defender. And there were also career bests from two receivers … Rodney Smith led the team with nine catches for 108 carries, while Kenny Shaw had an ef“ cient 125 yards on just two receptions. But more importantly, it was a preview for a new … or maybe old … type of FSU offense. One that was clearly missing last week in Raleigh. I think their psyche was they got annoyed that they got a little conservative last week, and they werent about to do that,Ž Eagles coach Frank Spaziani said. They were going to attack, and they were in an attack mode right from the beginning.Ž The Seminoles came out with clear intentions to overwhelm an overmatched Boston College defense. Their “ rst nine plays were passes. As the lead continued to grow, Manuel continued to air it out. Up 41-7 in the fourth quarter, he “ nally tossed his last touchdown pass, a 12-yarder to James Wilder Jr. After the game, FSU coach Jimbo Fisher and a slew of players were asked about this new approach. What led to it? Was it the heavy criticism thrown their way after a conservative game plan cost them a win at N.C. State? Newspaper columnists and fans alike took Fisher to task last week for squandering a 16-0 lead in the second half, and Fisher reversed course multiple times on just where the blame should fall before “ nally settling on himself during his Wednesday call-in show.But the Seminoles swear up and down that they dont read outside in” uences. Im not interested in sending a message,Ž Fisher said. Im interested in winning a football game.Ž Was it disparaging comments made by Boston Colleges defenders during the week? BC linebacker Sean Sylvia said the Seminoles have had everything handed to them over the years,Ž and he didnt think FSU was prepared to bounce back from a tough loss. Linebacker Nick Clancy said he expected the Seminoles to run just three plays … their bread and butterŽ … and think that would be enough. Well, we were real offended by that,Ž FSU linebacker Christian Jones said. And they were well aware of Boston Colleges remarks, but that didnt have anything to do with it either. According to Fisher and Manuel, it was a simple as exploiting the matchup advantages they found during their “ lm study. Ill coach every game the best I think to win it. This game, thats what we wanted to do,Ž Fisher said. We saw what we wanted to do, as far as attacking their defense, during the week,Ž Manuel said, and it was some passing plays, so thats why we came out like that.Ž Whatever it was, it worked. Nine different Seminoles finished with a reception … 10 counting Manuel, who was credited with a catch after recovering a Lonnie Pryor fumble … and eight of them had double-digit receiving yardage. And Manuels career day was enough to move him past some good company in the record books. His 439 yards gave him 6,148 for his career, surpassing both Charlie Ward and Thad Busby on the schools all-time passing yardage list. Not bad for a team that supposedly used only three plays all night. That was the most impressive three plays Ive ever seen Coach Jimbo call,Ž linebacker Vince Williams said. Im just saying.Ž www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 7BBy MARTY COHENIt was somewhat amusing, and more than a bit telling, that after more than 20 minutes of conversation with offensive coordinator Brent Pease on Tuesday, a question “ nally came up regarding Vanderbilts defense. Yeah thanks … thats who were playing, Pease said with a smile. Thats what I thought came here for (today).Ž Nah, nobody really comes to talk about Vanderbilt football. Shoot, most folks in Nashville dont discuss Vanderbilt football. Engaging second-year head coach James Franklin has tried to institute a culture change surrounding his Commodore program, but erasing decades of futility doesnt happen overnight and will only come with consistent success … good luck with that in the SEC. So while coaches and players resolve to maintain their one-game-at-atime resolve, the rest of us cant help but peak toward the upcoming showdowns With South Carolina and Georgia, the two contests that will truly de“ ne the course of the Gator season. Yet some folks will look at the Vanderbilt match and conjure up all sorts of reasons to be concerned, some holding merit, most not. In the end, its your call. You can worry about this game a lot, fret about it a little or none at all. After all, if you believe in such madeup sportswriter/fan stuff, Saturday nights clash is the ultimate trap game,Ž the very de“ nition of a trap gameŽ if you choose to put any credence that such a concept exists. This game, against a lesser foe, on the road, cozy crowd, small buzz, comes smack between two home games with very big buzzes, LSU last Saturday and South Carolina a week from Saturday. So this is indeed, the picture of a trap gameŽ … of course, it only pans out if the trappee not perform well. It would be my advice, take it or leave it, to fall somewhere between worrying about this game a tough and none at all. Obviously the more Florida continues to win, the more is at stake and therefore, the more there is to lose. But the catch to all this is: Vandy stinks. Not the oldŽ version of Vandy stinks, when the Commodores had absolutely no chance to beat Florida. No its the newŽ model of Vandy stinks, a slightly better adaptation than the previous Vandy stinks model. F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102South Carolina State at Florida A&MSaturday, Oct. 20 at 6 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3 or famuathletics.com. #9 South Carolina at #3 FloridaSaturday, Oct. 20 at 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on CBS. #12 Florida State at MiamiSaturday, Oct. 20 at 8 p.m.The game can be seen on ABC. N o R e a s o n No Reason t o S w e a t to Sweat T h i s O n e This One James Wilder Jr. caught two touchdowns. Linebacker MIKE TAYLOR and the rest of the Florida Gators will certainly not look past Vanderbilt.Seminoles get aggressive in win over BCPhoto By COLIN HACKLEYGATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON FloridaDMD.orgCommit to a mentoring or internship experience to reap the rewards. Sarah Goldman, Able Trust Mentor & UCF Student S Sa Sa Sa a h rah rah a Gld Gold Gold old man man, n, man m A Able Able Able Tru Tru T st M st M M e ento o r r &U & U & U CFS C CF S F tude de tude n nt t Sarah Goldman, Able Trust Mentor & UCF Student OPEN THE DOORTO YOUR BEST HIRE YET Give job seekers with disabilities a chance to show you what they can do. Youll be surprised by what you get in return. € Access a pool of dependable, productive and capable workers € Recruit interns, volunteers or long-term employees € Discover how simple it is to accommodate workers with disabilities € Improve company-wide morale € Receive positive feedback from customers

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 12 … Like a black hole sucking the light from the heavens, the general election now less than four weeks away appears to be preventing anything from escaping its grasp as the pace quickens and the money ” ows. While U.S. vice presidential candidates held their table-top battle, voter registration ended this week in Florida, though final numbers wont be known for a bit. While the focus on the coming election has blotted out much of the regular government news, there was some of that this week: of“ cials overseeing the statebacked property insurer let up some in their effort to create a $350 million loan program backers say will reduce the number of policies held by Citizens Property Insurance Corp. Also, incoming House Speaker Will Weatherford named Seth McKeel to become the chambers chief budget builder, tapping the Lakeland Republican to head the powerful House Appropriations Committee when lawmakers return after the Nov. 6 election. CITIZENS BOARD SLOWS DOWN LOAN PROGRAM Prompted by concerns from wary lawmakers and the states consumer advocate, Citizens Property Insurance Corp will hire an outside “ rm to take a second look at a $350 million loan program its governing board approved just last month. The goal of the program was take more than 300,000 policies out of Citizens by offering private companies low interest loans to sweeten the deal. Quickly assembled by a new Citizens president from the private sector, the plan has raised concerns among key lawmakers wary over the idea itself and the speed by which it has come together. On Tuesday, Citizens depopulation committee recommended that the insurer hire Goldman Sachs, or another major investment firm, to review the surplus notes program, which would provide up to $50 million in 20-year, lowinterest loans to individual companies willing to take Citizens policies for at least 10 years. Citizens President and CEO Barry Gilway acknowledged the desire for additional information, but stood “ rm in his belief that the program would work as intended, reducing Citizens maximum loss by $2 billion and saving policyholders an estimated $1.7 billion in assessments during the 10 years in which the take out companies would be required to hold the policies. Instead of trying to depopulate Citizens by coverage elimination, reductions and restrictions, which have not played well in the marketplaceƒ This program, on the other hand, clearly bene“ ts the policyholder,Ž Gilway said. But Robin Westcott, Floridas insurance consumer advocate, applauded the boards decision to take a closer look. Sometimes when we are in the middle of doing that, it helps to have a third party to come in and take a look,Ž she said. BOOK CLOSES ON FLORIDA VOTER REGISTRATION Florida election of“ cials on Tuesday closed the door on new registrations for people wanting to vote in this years general election. The “ nal count of registered voters brings, for now, to a close months of wrangling over new voter registration laws that, for a time, curtailed third-party voter registration. Though book-closing results wont be available for several days, state Democratic Party officials have been on a roll, having registered 18,063 more voters than Republicans, a 16percentage point spread, in September. It was more of the same for Democrats, who have beaten the GOP in signing up new voters in each of the last eight months. Hispanics are a big part of the equation: Democrats now have a roughly 30 percentage point advantage in Hispanics in a state where Latino registration used to be more likely to be Republican. Hispanic Democrats not only outnumber Hispanic Republicans but there are also more Hispanic independents than Hispanic Republicans. As of August, the state had about 4.6 million registered Democrats to 4.1 million registered Republicans. Another 2.4 million are registered with no party af“ liation and about 328,000 are in minor parties. MCKEEL TO BECOME BUDGET CHAIR Weatherford “ lled one of the most powerful positions in the state legislative leadership team this week by tapping McKeel to take over the House Appropriation Committee as the chamber begins drafting its roughly $70 billion budget proposal for next year. McKeel, R-Lakeland, has been in the House since 2006 and served on the Appropriations Committee. He has been chairman of the State Affairs Committee in the most recent two years and was deputy majority leader in 2009-2010. McKeel, 37, is vice president of Lakeland Properties and Management, his familys real estate management company. STORY OF THE WEEK: Citizens Property Insurance Corp. slows down to take another look at $350 million loan program. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Im not going to let people hide behind their of“ ce if they are involved in a case,Ž Circuit Judge Frank Shef“ eld on whether to allow lawyers to depose Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll in a case pending before his court involving the illegal release of an audio recording of an of“ ce conversation.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Being sucked into the election vortexBy JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 12 – After railing for more than two years about “Obamacare,’’ Florida Republicans lost their legal battle this summer against a federal health overhaul that ultimately will require most Americans to have insurance coverage. But when voters cast ballots this fall, they will see the issue again. Lawmakers have proposed a constitutional amendment that, if passed, would say Floridians can’t be forced to buy health coverage. At least in the short term, the measure would appear to have little effect, but House sponsor Scott Plakon, R-Longwood, pointed to what he sees as a “basic right” that Floridians should not be “ ned, taxed or penalized for our health care choices.” “I’m hopeful that we will assert what I think should be a basic right in our constitution,’’ Plakon said Friday. But Democrats have long argued that the proposal, which will appear on the ballot as Amendment 1, is legally toothless and is simply aimed at ring up Republican voters who loathe the 2010 federal health overhaul, known as the Affordable Care Act. The GOP-dominated Legislature voted in 2011 to put the measure on this fall’s ballot. “It was political nonsense then,’’ said Rep. Mark Pafford, D-West Palm Beach. “It’s political nonsense now.” The proposed amendment does not speci cally mention the Affordable Care Act, but it says a “law or rule may not compel, directly or indirectly, any person or employer to purchase, obtain or otherwise provide for health care coverage.” That statement comes under a broader overall aim of preserving the “freedom of all residents of the state to provide for their own health care.” Critics have long said the constitutional amendment would not allow Floridians to opt out of the Affordable Care Act’s requirement that most Americans have health insurance in 2014 or pay a penalty, a requirement dubbed the “individual mandate.” The critics’ position has stemmed from the Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution, which generally leads to federal laws trumping state laws when con icts arise. Republicans also suffered a huge blow in June, when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld most of the Affordable Care Act, including the individual mandate, in a lawsuit spearheaded by Florida. Plakon said the proposed constitutional amendment would prevent any future attempts by Florida lawmakers to put similar health-care requirements on residents. Such a scenario, however, seems highly unlikely under the current Republican leadership. Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island, also said Republican Mitt Romney might win the presidency in November, which could help spur major changes in the health-care system. Romney has called for repealing the Affordable Care Act and giving states more power to make health reforms.Symbolic or not, Florida voters will get say on health mandate Caf THURSDAY DRINK SPECIALS Perfect Weather to head to the Coast Sunday ThursdayALL U CAN EATSpecials Catfish ......$11.95 Shrimp ....,$13.95 Scallops ..$13.95Includes Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies30 SHRIMP10 Fried • 10 Grilled • 10 BlackenedServed with Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies$12.95Winter hours: Tues. Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 • Sunday 4-9984-52431506 Coastal Hwy., Scenic BiWay4P.M. 6P.M.2 for 1 DRINKSTHURSDAY SPECIALSALL U CAN EATShrimp .....$12.95 Scallops....$13.95 Baby Back Ribs $9.95 Dozen Oysters $3.00 Beer $1.50 Well $2.00 Wine $3.00Winter Hours: Thurs. 4-9 Fri. 4-10 • Sat. 11-10 Sunday 11-9 713-001499 Rock Landing Rd. Overlooking Beautiful Dickerson Bay Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  P a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICEƒ EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Gene MosserAugust 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromI am happy to win the certi“cate and will take advantage of it & enjoy all of the meals!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l l a n t n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 9B -Janet By DAVID WHITE From the outside, winemaking seems romantic. Farm workers lovingly tend to their vineyards throughout the spring and summer, and then hand harvest their grapes in the early fall. Those grapes are then gently crushed … by foot, of course … and turn into wine on their own through the magic of fermentation. Were led to believe that winemakers simply monitor this process. Theyre there to make sure the “ nal product winds up on the dinner table, but nature takes care of virtually everything. This narrative is partially true. But it ignores the grueling, backbreaking work that goes into every bottle of wine we open. Last week, I took part in that work during a brief visit to California, where I visited 12 wineries in Napa Valleys Stags Leap District. I came equipped with rubber boots and gloves … and offered to help wherever an extra hand was needed. Im still hurting. Wherever wine is made, harvest is a special time. But the work is exhausting. In the evenings and early mornings, vineyards are packed with laborers collecting fruit, as picking while the weather is cool protects workers from daytime heat and ensures the grapes arrive in pristine condition. The roads are equally busy. In the mornings and evenings, trucks are “ lled with grapes. Throughout the day, those same trucks haul equipment and vineyard supplies. Wineries are abuzz with around-the-clock activity. Forklifts and tractors are in constant use. As grapes come in, theyre sorted, de-stemmed, and sorted again, as no winemaker wants leaves, spiders, or rocks to end up in her wine. With white wines, those grapes are crushed and pressed before fermentation. With reds, most of the grapes are typically left intact before theyre placed in barrels or tanks. At this point, yeast gets to work … gradually converting the sugar into alcohol and imparting a litany of new tastes and aromas. Over about two weeks, what begins as grape juice becomes wine. Throughout this period, winemakers regularly taste the fermenting juice … and bring samples to the laboratory … to make sure the process is progressing as it should. For every winemaking team, the cleaning never ends. From bins, sorting tables, and de-stemming machines to tanks, pipes, and winemaking equipment, scalding hot water is used, over and over again, to hose down virtually everything. Wineries are very wet during harvest season. The work seems endless. Harvest only lasts about six to 10 weeks, depending on the grape variety. But during this period, 12to 14-hour days are normal. Much of the work is messy and physical. Some is mind-numbingly repetitive. Many tough choices have to be made. And at every step, attention to detail is critical … one small error could result in hundreds of gallons of lost wine. Despite all the effort, harvest is magical. The air is “ lled with energy and the smell of fermenting grapes. Winemakers and their teams beam with joy, knowing their work will bring joy and pleasure to countless people. I cant wait to go back.David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet. WHITE’S WINESHarvest is magical, but grueling PHOTO BY D_RAMEY_LOGAN SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for quali“ed applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and ”oor rate of 2.5% LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt Favored Treatment "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser Bonnet Creek Fall Retreat From $179 per night Includes a $50 daily Resort Credit and daily self-parking For reservations call 888-208-7440. Ask for promotion code BCFT. Visit HiltonBonnetCreek.com/fall

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comStone Crab Festival is Saturday in St. MarksThe history of Shields Marina goes back further than the marina itself. It all began in 1928 when O.P. Shields settled in St. Marks. (O.P. was the paternal grandfather of Charles C. Shields, known to most as Chuck.) Although O.P. founded a charter boat service which catered to many of the top state of“ cials, including the Governor and cabinet members, his visions went much further than simply running “ shing trips. Shortly after establishing the charter boat business, he opened a small caf for the purpose of providing breakfast to the men and boys who came down to “ sh in the rich waters of Apalachee Bay. In a short time he expanded his caf into a larger operation that served not only breakfast but lunch and dinner and became known as Shields Caf. The restaurant became famous for its seafood and Greek salads and was run by Nick and Pete, two gentlemen of Greek descent who were from Tarpon Springs. O.P. died in 1959 without a will and the estate sold the restaurant and shortly thereafter, it burned down never to be reopened. The stories go that on any given Sunday, you had to wait in line just to get a seat and be able to eat the seafood that made it famous. Besides the charter boat business and the caf, O.P. had other ventures. In the late 1940s, he dug the only canal in St. Marks which is still used today. He also built the boathouse located at the end of the canal. His vision was for the large building that is currently owned by Theo Proctor to be a clubhouse and to sell lots on each side of the canal for private weekend homes where people could dock their boats. He died before his vision became a reality but not before the canal was “ nished complete with a fresh water spring to keep the water circulating. Because the family was large and there was no will, most of the land that O.P. Shields had purchased was sold to individuals to pay the various taxes and attorney fees associated with his estate. The land on the north and east side of the canal was purchased mainly by the Lynn family who opened up a marina that is still in existence today. The land where the openair boat slips of Shields Marina are now located was owned by the Roberts family but leased to Tenneco for 99 years. Many years later, Chuck bought out the lease, tore down the old sheds, refurbished the old tug boat slip used by Tenneco Oil Company and put in all new open-air slips that are located on the St. Marks River and in use today. In 1953, Myrtle and Curtis Shields, who both previously worked for Curtis father, O.P., opened their own small bait and tackle shop. It was a simple concrete block building approximately 12x20-feet with an icehouse on one end. They catered mostly to the private boats as the commercial boats were all docked downriver where the marina basin is now located. They also had rental boats and guides to take folks out “ shing. The commercial docks went from where Riverside Caf is currently located all the way to where the current marina store is located and were operated by E. W. Roberts. Myrtle and Curtiss small mom-and-pop operation grew and as their sons Chuck and Benny matured and worked in the marina, it became knows as Shields & Sons Marina. In 1968, it was incorporated and became Shields Marina as it is presently named today. In the early 1970s, the marina was purchased by Pamela and Charles Shields. Chuck had visions of what he wanted the marina to become and started working on buying back the land that once was owned by his grandfather. Over the next 10 to 15 years, he was able to buy back most of the land. Chuck and Pam had three sons, Barton, Barry and Brett, all of whom spent many a summer and most weekends helping out at the marina. By the late 1980s, Brett had graduated from college with a degree in building and construction and went to work for Ajax Construction as a project manager. He missed the water and marina life and returned after several years in the construction business. Chuck, although still active and CEO, has taken a back seat and Brett is now president. The new marina store and of“ ces were completed in 2009. The next phase is to refurbish the old boat basin which is suffering from erosion problems and rusty roofs. Call Shields Marina at 925-6158.... Visit Shields Marina... Fish with St. Marks Out“ ttersBy CAPT. MIKE McNAMARAOctober could be the best month of the year for catching “ sh in Apalachee Bay. October also has a long history of awesome weather in our area. Cold fronts bring down the temperatures, but are usually short lived. Find a warm and breezy tide and the trout bite can get super hot. Find a slick morning mid-tide and red“ sh could stack up on any point or rock pile. If youre looking for that breezy tide with the super trout bite, an evening trip could be just the ticket. Shorter days will have the trout feeding all day, but drifting the ” ats as the sun sets can be primetime. Popping a cork and jig combination will catch “ sh, but topwater is still my favorite. I know the ” oating grass can make you want to cut your topwater off, but all you need is just a few clicks. BAM! Another trout attack. If your topwater game is not up to par, stick with the jig and shrimp imitation. There is a very good shrimp run happening and everything eats shrimp. As for red“ sh, if you “ nd one, he will most likely have friends. Sometimes we “ nd the classic schools of reds, but for the most part our “ sh hold in small groups. In October they will start to gather. They might not gather in a tight bunch, but they will gather in one general location. Keep moving until you “ nd your “ sh and enjoy. If you do not beat them up too bad, they will hang in the general location until a weather change pushes them out. A great place to target reds this month will be the creek mouths and adjacent waters. If the inshore action is not enough to get you “ shing this month, keep in mind the close to shore action will also be crazy. Close to shore will be in the 15 feet out to 30 feet in Apalachee Bay. Look for a fall push of pelagics, cobia, mackerel, and jacks. Also beware of giant red“ sh blasting bait. These are big “ sh, in the 30 pound and up class. If you “ nd a calm day, take a ride, and troll bait pods 8 to 12 miles south of St. Marks. Make sure you bring the camera. Capt. Mike McNamara of St Marks Out“ tters can be contacted at red“ sh@ stmarksout“ tters.com or by calling (850) 510-7919. WHILE IN ST. MARKS WHILE IN ST. MARKSSPECIAL To The NEWSA sponge boat unloading at Shields Marina dock recently. Wakulla Christian School, in coordination with the Wakulla County Veterans Services Office, is proud to host the Saturday, November 10, 2012 at Hudson Park Games, Vendors Raffles, a Silent Auction, and Lots of Food !!! Parade Starts @ 10:00a.m. A portion of the proceeds from this grand event will be donated to our local Veterans Services Office. Your family or organization is invited to participate in this very special event dedicated to honoring all Veterans and active duty military. Please consider entering a float or vehicle decorated in honor of your loved ones’. For more information or to register your float, please contact the Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee via fax @ 850-926-5186 or email WCVDay@gmail.com “Honoring All Who Served” Soldier Care Packages 6th Annual Veterans Day Parade and Celebration to Support Our Troops and Honor Our Veterans Wakulla Christian School is collecting public donations of items to send to our troops wish list items include individually wrapped beef jerky, Pringles, individually wrapped sunflower seeds, individually wrapped nuts, individually packaged mix of Propel Fitness Water and Gatorade, individually packaged hard candy and gummy bears, white tube socks, protein bars, granola ba rs, books, soap, razors, sunscreen, nail files, AA batteries and Ziploc bags. For further information, please contact Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee Drop offanyitemsatoneof thefollowing supportivebusinessesinWakulla county: HOME MORTGAGEAMERIFIRST Has Your Mortgage Lender Forced You to Pay For Excessive Amounts of Flood or Hazard Insurance on Your Home?Certain Lenders, including Wells Fargo,GMAC and Chase may have been forcing borrowers to pay for excessive insurance on Condos or Homes. If this has happened to you, you may be entitled to monetary compensation. Call NOW for information regarding your legal rights. ATTENTION Call 813-225-4000 or 800-360-6439 Jason Whittemore601 Bayshore Boulevard, Suite 910 €Tampa, FL 33606 Certain Lenders, including Wells Fargo, Bank of America, and Chase may have been forcing borrowers to pay for excessive insurance on Condos or Homes. If this has happened to you, you may be entitled to monetary compensation. Call NOW for information regarding your legal rights. Certain Lenders, including Citibank may have been forcing borrowers to pay for excessive insurance on Condos or Homes. If this has happened to you, you may be entitled to monetary compensation. Call NOW for information regarding your legal rights. Crawler Tractors, Motor Graders, Farm Tractors, Core Drill, Sweeper, Service & Bucket/Sign Trucks, Flatbed & Dump Trucks, Paving Equipment, Over (250) 2010-2007 Ford F-150 Crew and Ext. Cabs w/40-80k miles, 2010-2006 Chevrolet Pickups, Suburbans and Tahoes w/40-90k miles! MUCH, MUCH MORE! For details, visit: www.jmwood.com Absolute Public AuctionAlabama Dept. of Transportation € October 26, 2012 € 9:00 AM 1409 Coliseum Blvd., Montgomery, Alabama Bryant Wood AL LIC #1137(334) 264-3265 95 95 Happy Birthday!to Edna Wilson Come celebrate with her Sunday, October 21, 2-4 pm at 118 Namon Spears Rd., CrawfordvillePlease bring hugs... no gifts, please!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 11B YOUR AD HERE About Again Ants Articles Atlantic Bait Bells Bets Brilliant Burnt Cabin Cool Credit Desk Doctor Dress Drew Drugs Dusk Duty Dying Eggs Ever Exit Fist Gear High Houses Hurt Index India Iron Land Leap Lent Link Lion Loved Mimes Mind Multiplication Nail Necks Nests This page sponsored in part by: Photographs Pure Road Rude Runs Sense Slap Some Sorted Stuff Suit Team Tight Tilt Topic Tour Used Useful Veto Youre Yo-yo Zero

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SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements Todays New Ads WAKULACOUNTYWant to Rent 2 bedroom. 1 bath. House Dec -May...prefer Panacea/Sopchoppy area. Call 231-256-7648 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Child Care Personnel BABY SITTER NEEDEDIn my home, in Sopchoppy, alternate weekends, some weekdays, 12 year old well behaved boy. Call Nanci (850) 363-1650 Trades/ Skills Tire Technician /Mechanic NeededB & B Dugger, Inc. is looking for a part or full-time tire mounting technician that has experience with tire changers. tire balancers and mounting truck & small tractor tires. Additional experience in roadside asssistanceŽ and working in the field is also prefererred. A Florida driver license with a clear MVR is a position requirement. Pay negotiable. Call the business office at (850) 926-2929 or email to office@band bdugger.com to receive an application Farm Services BUSH HOGGING ROADS GRADED GARDENS TILLED Have tractor will bush hog finish cut large acerage grade roads driveways till gardens. dbdouge@aol.com or 850-643-6283 Pets Happy Jack LiquivicRecognize safe & effecitive against hook & roundworms by US Center for Ventinary Medicine.PET STOP(850) 926-7949 www.happy jackinc.com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Bath $650 month, $600 dep. Includes gargage and water, shed and deck. No Pets, Firm (850) 926-6212 Leave Message CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 SOPCHOPPY2/1.5 Singlewide $575.REVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Mobile Homes For Sale 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, Chefs Kitchen. Beautiful Master Suite, Built in Wet Bar. Call Today (850) 576-2106 4 BR Mobile Home on 3 Acres Ready to Move IN EZ Payments. Call Me (850) 576-2105 100 Families Needed for Govt Loan Program. Call Today (850) 576-2104 3BR, 2BA-Used Mobile Home. Great Condition Amazing Deal!!! Call Me ASAP (850) 576-2687 CRAWFORDVILLE3 BD\2BA SW on 3 Acres in AŽ rated schools, No smoking, $500 per pet Avail. Nov. firs /last/dep $750. ea 850-926-6766 Use YOUR Land or Your Trade As your DOWN Payment Call Now (850) 576 2687 Apartments Unfurnished PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall Mary (850) 984-4811Equal Housing Opportunity TDD 1 800 955 2771 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $700/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1937 CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Bedroom / 2 Bath, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 CRAWFORDVILLENice 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Home in Wakulla Gardens, Lots of extra features, $895. month (850) 926-8948 N. Crawfordville2/1 Mobile Home $575 monthREVELL REALTY 850-962-2212 SOPCHOPPY2/1For Rent, $600 month On CanalREVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Rentals Wanted WAKULACOUNTYWant to Rent 2 bedroom. 1 bath. House Dec -May...prefer Panacea/Sopchoppy area. Call 231-256-7648 Lots For Sale 3 LOTS 50 x 100Side by Side REDUCED PRICE (850) 926-7966 (850) 933-1051 One Acre Lot w/ Well, Septic & Utility Pole off Wakulla Spring Rd HWY61 $19,500 (850) 421-2205 Home/Office Cleaning Need your house or office cleaned? Call Renee at 850-590-6720 for information about my cleaning services, experience and pricing. References available. Siding Cypress Lumber Pecky T&G v Joint Timbers and beams (850) 643-6283 Rent: Houses Unfurnished 5408-1018 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Steven Wisecup and Arthur Wisecup Doing business as: Winitstick Fictitious Name Notices at 30 John David Dr., Crawfordville, Florida 32327 with a mailing address of 30 John David Dr., Crawfordville, Florida 32327desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of Fictitious Name Notices State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 12th day of October, 2012 /s/Steven Wisecup /s/Arthur Wisecup October 18, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices 5401-1018 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 328.17 F.S., NON-JUDICAIL SALE OF VESSEL Notice is hereby given that unless sooner paid or redeemed, Rock Landing Marina, LLC, Inc. intends a public sale of the following vessels by brief description and apparent owners: 1.Vessel: 21 ft. Shamrock Cleveland Engine 351, VIN # SHA 015290483, Reg. # FL5221DN Owner: Estate of James E. Torgerson, II 2.Vessel: 27 ft. 1976 Columbia, VIN # 7043, Reg. # FL3499PA Owner: Scott Synar 3.Vessel: 25 ft. Hunter Marine Outboard, VIN # HUN51432 M79C25, Reg. # FL9947CV Owner Josh Davis Said sale will take place October 27, 2012 beginning at 9:00 a.m. and shall be held 5407-1018 TWN 11/01 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Affordable Title & Lien, Inc. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78 of the Florida Statutes on Lien Notices November 1, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. *AUCTION WILL OCCUR WHERE EACH VEHICLE IS LOCATED* 2003 PONTIAC VIN # 1G2JB12F837270406 Located at: 2235 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Wakulla Any person(s) claiming Lien Notices Lien Notices any interest(s) in the above vehicles contact: Affordable Title & Lien, Inc, (954) 416-1779 *ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE* Some of the vehicles may have been released prior to auction LIC #AB-0003126 October 18, 2012 at the location of Rock Landing Marina, 99 Rock Landing Road, Panacea, Florida 32346. The mailing address and contact number of said Marina is P.O. Box 653, Panacea, Florida 32346; Telephone # (850) 984-5844 October 11 & 18, 2012 Lien Notices Lien Notices Lien Notices 5357-0830 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: Ernest Kilpatrick Last known address of 86-B Allen Harvey St. Crawfordville, FL32327 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 October 18, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5400-1018 TWN Vs. Fields, Judith. 2010-CA-037 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-CA-037 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-MLMI, Plaintiff, vs. JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 AND #2, AND ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, et al. Defendant(s). RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 28, 2010 and an Order Rescheduling the Foreclosure Sale dated September 25, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 2010-CA-037 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-MLMI Plaintiff, and JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, is the Defendant. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash in the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32326 at 11:00 AM, on the 29th day of November, 2012, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOTS 6 AND 7, BLOCK 1, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you 5406-1018 TWN Estate of Bullock, Reginald File No. 12000374CPANotice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GADSDEN COUNTY, FLORIDA FILE NO. 12000374CPA IN RE: ESTATE OF REGINALD BULLOCK Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Reginald Bullock, deceased, whose date of death was August 19, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gadsden County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 10 E. Jefferson St. Quincy, FL32351. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 11, 2012. Personal Representative: By:/s/ Nellie Ruth Shaw 1181 Joe Adams Road Quincy, florida 32351 Attorney for Personal Representative: Kimberly L. King, Attorney for Nellie Ruth Shaw Florida Bar Number 0593011 KING & WOOD P.A., 1701 Hermitage Blvd. Suite 104, Tallahassee, FL323308 Telephone: (850)580-7711 Fax: (850)205-4501 October 11 & 18, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 OFFICE SPACE LEASEFOR THE BARRY BUILDING ATTHE LOG CABINCrawfordville 850-508-5471$25000/MO Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $625mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. Visit me on the web www.WakullaInfo.com Dawn Reed -Realtor GRICell (850) 294-3468 141 Elizabeth St.3BR/2BA mobile home on 1 acre with over 2,000 sq. ft. fenced, garage/workshop, to porches, replace, and much more. Directions: north Hwy 319, right at light at Walmart, right on Harry Morrison to Elizabeth. “OPEN HOUSE Sunday Oct. 21 1-3 pm”

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will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on September 26, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Attorney for the Plaintiff: Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, Popkin & Rosaler, P.A., 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442. Telephone: (954)360-9030 Facsimile: (954)420-5187. October 11 & 18, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5395-1018 TWN vs. Lacher, Walter J., Case No. 652010CA000269 Foreclosure IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA000269 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NASUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. WALTER J. LACHER A/K/AWALTER LACHER et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 19, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000269 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NASUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC. is the Plaintiff and WALTER J. LACHER A/K/AWALTER LACHER; TAMARALACHER; AIS SERVICES, LLC AS SUCCESSOR IN INTERESTTO AMERITECH GOLD; WAKULLA BANK; CAPITALONE BANK (USA), NATIONALASSOCIATION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; STATE OF FLORIDA-DEPARTMENTOF REVENUE; TENANT#1 N/K/AJACQUELYNE MCLENDON are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 1st day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES, 45 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 14 AND ALONG THE NORTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF EMMETT WHALEYROAD 760.70 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE NORTH 88 DEGREES, 45 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SECTION LINE AND ALONG SAID NORTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY300.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREE, 10 MINUTES, 58 SECONDS EAST 145.29 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES, 45, MINUTES, 46 SECONDS EAST 299.64 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREE, 02 MINUTES, 31 SECONDS WEST 145.29 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A188 EMMETT WHALEYROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on September 19, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By:Desireee D. Willis: Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. October 11 & 18, 2012 5396-1018 TWN vs. Kirkland, Stacie Case No.: 65-2010-CA-000425 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000425 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. STACIE RENEE KIRKLAND A/K/ASTACIE R. KIRKLAND; ANTROYLEMORE KIRKLAND A/K/AANTROYL. KIRKLAND; DIANE DELORES ROBERTS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DIANE DELORES ROBERTS; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTS(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWNHEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on JSeptember 19, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on November 1, 2012 at 11:00 A.M. (EST) at the Wakulla County Courthouse, located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FLthe following described property: From the southwest corner of the Northeast Quarter (NE1/4) of Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida; run East 711.12 feet along the south boundary line of said Northeast Quarter to a concrete monument and the Point of Beginning; from said concrete monument, run due North 1,296.43 feet to a point on a traverse line in the approximate center of the Bethel to Wakulla public road; thence run North 87 degrees 05 minutes 20 seconds East along said traverse line 127.22 feet to an angle point; then run South 74 degrees 16 minutes East along said traverse line 98.32 feet; thence run due South 1,276.23 feet to the south boundary line of the Northeast quarter of said Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 1 West; thence run West along the south boundary line of said Northeast Quarter 221.78 feet to the Point of Beginning. Less the southerly part of the Bethel to Wakulla public road, lying and being in the South Half of the Northeast Quarter of Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 1 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices West, Wakulla County, Florida. Said land being otherwise described as lot No. 4 of an unrecorded plat of a survey of lands of the Estate of Stacey Roberts, deceased. TOGETHER WITH that certain 2006 Nobility RMS Model 66x 28Manufactured Home, Serial No.s N1-10006Aand N1-10006B Property address: 154 Robert Williams Drive, Crawfordville, FL32327. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERSTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated September 19, 2012 (seal) Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk Wakulla County Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk October 11 & 18, 2012 5404-1018 TWN vs. Hill, Kathy File No. 2012-CP-84 Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTFOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, File No. 2012-CP-84 IN RE: ESTATE OF KATHYDOWNING HILL Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Kathy Downing Hill., deceased, whose date of death was April 9, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLACounty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 11, 2012. Personal Representative: Jessie A. Hill, Jr. 2671 Crawfordville Hwy., Box 6 Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: Deirdre A. Farrington, Attorney for Jessie a. Hill., Jr. Florida Bar Number: 488690, PO Box 392, Crawfordville, FL32326Telephone: (850)926-2700, Fax: (850)926-2741 E-Mail: deirdre@farrington-law.com 5405-1018 TWN vs. Scott, Allen File No. 12-91-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, File No. 12-91-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ALLEN JAMES SCOTT, a/k/a ALLEN J. SCOTT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ALLEN JAMES SCOTT, a/k/a ALLEN J. SCOTT deceased, whose date of death was JUNE 23, 2012 and whose Social Security Numberis 102-36-3329 is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 11, 2012. Personal Representative: By: /s/ PATRICIA P. STRICKLAND P.O. Box 125 ,Brooksville, FL 34605-0125 Attorney for Personal Representative: R. SETH MANN, R. SETH MANN, P.A. Florida Bar Number 0990434 38109 Pasco Avenue, Dade City, FL 33525 Telephone (352) 567-5010, Facsimile: (352) 567-1877 October 11, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5388-1018TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 009 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that GENE OPHEIM the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1613 Year of Issuance 2005 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-085-121-11580-012 CASORAESTATES UI TRACT 12 OR 253 P619 OR 253 P624 Name in which assessed RONALD D & TINARENEE THOMAS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. 5389-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 010 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1096 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 08-6S-01W-283-04862-E01 MARINAVILLAGE OF PANACEAUNIT 2 BLK E LOT 1 & BOAT SLIPF OR 372 P888 OR 496 P637 Name in which assessed H. CLAYHARRIS & LINDAW HARRIS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18,2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Be sure to come see this home of excellent quality design, construction and condition. These are just a few words to describe this beautiful home. Wonderful family home on a very large corner lot. 1738 Sq. Ft. heated and over 2,500 total including 3 bedrooms, two baths, deck, porch and garage. The entire home is brick construction with a red brick curb mailbox. The private Master Bedroom features a bath with a separate garden tub and shower. Both bathrooms are tiled. Ceiling fans are in all bedroom and living room. The large beautiful brick “replace has never been lit. There are gorgeous hardwood ”oors throughout the home, with Berber carpeting in all the bedrooms. You must see the beautiful, versatile kitchen. The separate Dining Room has French doors, which lead to a wonderful screened-in porch and on to an open deck further leading to the large shady, fenced, back yard. Ready to move in, just need the right person or family! Priced right at $169,900. Come see us this Sunday! Take Taff Drive or Trice Lane off Hwy 319 and each will take you to Mulberry Circle. Look for Coastal Gems Real Estate Sign in among all the political signs on the corner of Trice Lane and Mulberry Cir. Trice Lane runs between Hwy. 319 and Hwy. 61 in Crawfordville. OPEN HOUSESUNDAY October 21 2:00 5:00 P. M. Corner of Mulberry Circle and Trice Lane. Crawfordville, FL 32327 h h f ll Carrol Ann Williams, Lic. Real Estate Broker/Owner 850926-2811 850566-9293 ulberry Circle ea l Est. 2000 / www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 13B Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities • 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $900 Security Deposit • 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA home $800 mo. • 31 Chehaw 3BR/2BA DWMH $650mo. Lynn Cole-Eddinger David Hoover “Open House”SATURDAY & SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20TH & 21ST, 1-3PM615 OAKWOOD TRAIL/BROOK FOREST Words cannot describe this upscale 3 bedroom 2 bath home located on an incredible 5 acre tract in Brook Forest. Elegant hardwood oors throughout, custom built kitchen with granite countertops, stainless steel appliance and loads of windows looking out over huge back patio and beautiful back yard. Large harmonius family room, formal living room with replace. Split bedroom plan with all closets professionally shelved. Both bathrooms redone and GORGEOUS. 2 car detached garage with workout room and shop area. Property backs up to St. Joe land. Basketball/tennis court, plus 2 playhouses. Asking $289,900. “OWNER’S ANXIOUS!” Dir: From Crawfordville, Hwy 319, take left on Martin Luther King, right on Rehwinkle Road, left on Oakwood Trail. Coastwise Realty,Inc. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!55 Allison Dr. Panacea 3BR/2BA Nice Dock and Boardwalk, Furnished or Unfurnished. GREAT FISHING on Dickerson Bay! $950 mo. No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2837 Coastal Hwy. Commercial Building $800 mo. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Commercial building 4,300 square foot heated and cooled building on 1 acre of land Rents out for $1,800.00. Building is in excellent condition. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets

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Page 14B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5385-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 006 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that NU TAX 1 GPthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2525 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-121-351-11968-A05 THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELLPOINT UNIT 2 BLOCK ALOT 5 OR 752 P576 Name in which assessed JOHN BOCCHINO said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk 5386-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 007 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that DONALD J SHEMWELLthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number 5387-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 008 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that DONALD J SHEMWELLthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1414 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-024-000-06581-001 P-8-1-M-6 COMM AT THE NW COR OF THE E1/2 OF THE NW 1/4 OF LOT 24 RUN S 17%E 660 FT TO THE P.O.B OR 163 P719 Name in which assessed ERVIN ADONALDSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18, 2012 5376-1018 TWN IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-320-DR St acey Kimble Jefferson Petitioner, and Benjamin Alexander Jefferson Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: Benjamin Alexander Jefferson l/k/a 75 Northwood Lane, Crawfordville, FL32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on STACEYKIMBLE JEFFERSON whose address is 75 NORTHWOOD LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 on or before October 26, 2012 and file with the orignal with the clerk of the Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.September 27 and October 4, 11, & 18, 2012 Dissolution of Marriage Notices Dissolution of Marriage Notices Dissolution of Marriage Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1687 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-034-009-08538-000 WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT 2 BLOCK 8 LOT 26 OR 20 P682 OR 634 P327 Name in which assessed KURTD & SAMUELLELLIOTTJR AS JTRS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11, & 18, 2012 By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18, 2012 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 32 38 43 48 58 63 66 69 2 33 59 3 34 52 18 27 44 4 15 28 39 49 5 24 40 45 6 25 35 60 64 67 70 7 21 36 53 8 29 50 65 22 26 51 61 9 16 19 41 46 62 10 37 47 54 11 42 55 68 71 12 30 56 13 31 57 ACROSS 1. Bouncers' requests 4. "R.U.R." playwright 9. "Rabbit food" 14. Teachers' org. 15. Beyond's partner 16. Two-dimensional 17. If actress Tyne married Chicago politico Richard, she'd be Tyne __ 19. Upper crust 20. "Don't fire __ fired upon" 21. Orthodontist's device 23. Caught in the act 24. Guinness suffix 26. Gaelic tongue 27. 1/2 fl. oz. 29. Dr. Scholl's products 32. Felix's roommate 35. Director Preminger 37. Pew area 38. Scuff up 39. If artist Yoko married skater Apolo, she'd be Yoko __ 42. Palindromic Bobbsey 43. Jillions 45. Mo ffo or Pavlova 46. Politico Lott 48. Wanted-poster figures 50. Mason's job 52. Native Canadian 53. KLM rival 54. In the proverbial cellar 58. City south of Elizabeth, NJ 61. Grosse __, MI 63. Siouan tribesmen 64. If skater Sasha married director Ethan, she'd be Sasha __ 66. Look for water 67. Getting chilled 68. __ Plaines, IL 69. Aids in wrongdoing 70. Arboreal abodes 71. Bard's beforeDOWN1. Pakistan's chief river 2. Colonial diplomat Silas 3. Explorer Sieur de La __ 4. Ill-bred sorts 5. Puts down 6. Capitol Hill figure 7. Navratilova rival 8. Chan films regular __ Luke 9. Gear for some fishermen 10. Jazzman Mose or puppeteer Fran 11. If singer Cleo married actor Nathan, she'd be Cleo __ 12. Kitty starter 13. Word before XING 18. Gossipy sort 22. Mortise mate 25. Impromptu percussion 28. A sib 29. Cornell's city 30. Hunter or Bayh 31. Shipped off 32. Actor Epps 33. Mall event 34. If singer Sheryl married actor Russell, she'd be Sheryl __ 36. Won __ soup 40. Quadrennial candidate Ralph 41. 4th-qtr. followers, sometimes 44. Most tangy 47. Dig find 49. Cand y brand 51. Facet 53. Brit's weight 55. Battery terminal 56. Beef on the hoof 57. On tenterhooks 58. Closing passage 59. Get from __ (progress a bit) 60. MBA subj. 62. Till stack 65. "__ Master's Voice" American Prole Hometown Content 10/14/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 12 3 4561 7248 3 86 4697 125 86 29 4716 583 200 9 HometownContent 182 9436 5 7 435876912 769251438 397 185264 254639781 618427395 876 312549 543798126 921564873 I N D U S O M A R C O D A D E A N E S A L E A T O B S A L L E C R O W C R O W E Y E N T A T A R T E S T C A D S B R O R E E S E S A B A S E S N A D E R P O L S P O O N S E C O N E V E R T T O N S T O N E K E Y E I T H A C A H I S T E N O N A S P E C T S P E A R S O T S O N E S A L L I S O N R E L I C L A I N E L A N E A N O D E A N T E E V A N S T E E R D E E R S E N T T E N S E F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 – Page 15B 1. AD SLOGANS: What candy bars were sold with the slogan, Sometimes you feel like a nut. Sometimes you dontŽ? 2. GEOGRAPHY: Where are the Maltese Islands located? 3. FAMOUS QUOTES: What American writer once said, Analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies of itŽ? 4. SCIENCE: What is a less-than-average tide occurring at the first and third quarters of the moon? 5. PHOBIAS: Hemophobia is an irrational fear of what? 6. GAMES: What kind of game has variations that include CincinnatiŽ and OmahaŽ? 7. HUMAN ANATOMY: What are the crescent-shaped white spots on fingernails called? 8. MYTHOLOGY: According to Greek mythology, what was the name of the prophetic god who could change his form at will? 9. LANGUAGE: What is the Gaelic equivalent of James? 10. MATH: What is the lowest whole number (in English) that includes the letter aŽ when it is spelled out? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1 1. Mounds and Almond Joy 2. Mediterranean Sea 3. E.B. White 4. Neap tide 5. Blood 6. Poker 7. Lunula 8. Proteus 9. Seamus or Shamus 10. 1,000 (thousand) YOUR AD HERE

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By ROB BUDA For those of us who love saltwater and seafood, there is nothing better than spending time with family and friends on the water during a good scalloping season. It is a time when you see boats loaded up with all manner of life leaving the boat ramps from St. Marks. Men, women, children and, of course, the family dog all piled up in a boat heading out to the flats. Only on rare occasion does one see a whole family piled up like this in one boat for a “ shing trip and it can be quite the sight. Scalloping does not require specialized equipment. All thats needed is a mask, snorkel, dive “ ns, and a dive ” ag. There are some who prefer not to use any equipment except maybe a mask. I call this method scallop noodlingŽ because this manner of collecting scallops slightly resembles how they catch catfish in Alabama and Georgia. There are two basic requirements all participants must have before entering the water to collect whole bay scallops; (1) know how to swim, and (2) not be afraid of sea grass. Most of us who were born in Florida were introduced to water before we could walk. Typically, those who came late to swimming are the ones who are afraid of sea grass. They scream out in terror when sea grass touches their legs. Ive never known sea grass to harm anyone but for some reason, there is a primal fear of the stuff coming in contact with their legs. Sea grass scaredy-cats are very important members of the team, however … we call them shuckers.Ž They remain on the boat and wait for the snorkelers and noodlers to bring back scallops. Once the scallops are handed up to the boat, they get tossed in the cooler to let them chill out. Here again, specialized equipment is not needed for shucking. A good metal spoon will work just “ ne. After collecting the days limit of St. Marks scallops, it is our custom to motor off from the scalloping grounds and shuck our catch in deeper water. Shucking scallops is a social event. It is a time when family and friends can tell stories and make jokes and is a good time for all. That is, if you are all getting along in close quarters. They say if you can get along with your wife while on a boat offshore, then you were meant to be together. If you add the kids, your friends and the family dog, well then, thats all the better. Page 16B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 2012October 20, 2012 10 a.m. to 6 P.m.Parking $2.00 per carFUN, FOOD, LIVE MUSIC, PARADE ARTS, CRAFTS, EXHIBITS Special to The NewsOn Saturday, Oct. 20, the Hobbs-Bevis family will mark their 50th anniversary as owners of Shell Island Fish Camp and Marina located on the Wakulla River in St. Marks. The camp is a full service “ sh camp and the largest one in the Southeast. Most “ sh camps have either closed or been turned into full-time marinas. The camp sells more three-day “ shing licenses than anywhere in Florida. Alex and Gazzie Hobbs purchased Shell Island Fish Camp and Marina in 1962 and moved with their children, Allen and Gail, to St. Marks from Thomson, Ga. They had farmed and operated their grocery stores in McDuf“ e County for many years. They retained their property in Georgia and the family still returns often to visit family and friends. Alex and Gazzie retired in 1988 and Allen and Ruthie Hobbs took over the family business. Over time, Allen and Ruthie added their in” uence in the operation. Seven old small cabins were eliminated and replaced by a 24-room motel, improved the four two-bedroom existing cabins with kitchens, added “ ve Park Models, four pontoon boats and 14 center console “ berglass rental boats replaced the original high-maintenance wood skiffs. Alex passed away in June 2010 after he had witnessed his dream that the business would stay in the family. His wife, Gazzie, 89, still lives at the camp as well as his daughter, Gail Field, and her husband, David. Allen and Ruthie retired in August 2010 and Alexs grandson, Jimmy Bevis and his wife Sherie, took over the operation. Jimmy is the son of Gail Hobbs Field so this will be the third generation to run the marina. Jimmy worked at the camp while going to school, worked at other jobs until 2003 when he came back to his “ rst love, the “ sh camp, and worked for Allen and Ruthie until they retired. Jimmy and Sherie have a 13-year-old daughter, Emily, who loves to be at the dock and assist wherever she can. We hope to have a fourth generation to take over. She already has her license for operating a boat on the open water. One consistent trait that has been evident through the years is the frequent upgrades incorporated to improve the general facility. First was the addition of enclosed and covered dry storage with forklift service for our customer boats. Wooden skiffs were replaced with “ berglass boats. Asphalt paving was added. Higher capacity and taller lifts replaced the lone lift. Small cabins were replaced with motel units. Sea walls were improved and ” oating piers with boat docks were added. Covered dry storage buildings were increased again The store opens at 6:30 a.m. seven days a week. Jimmy and Sherie also live at the camp so they are never far away from work. They have moved into the 21st Century and can be reached at www.shellisland“ shcamp.com. The “ sh camp has been a blessing to the Hobbs family for 50 years and we look forward to many more wonderful years at the best place on earth.Ž Shell Island celebrates 59 years business WHILE IN ST. MARKS:Scalloping in St. Marks: A family adventure ON THE RIVER, INC. 15th ANNUAL STONE CRAB FEAST 15th ANNUAL STONE CRAB FEAST Saturday, October 20 Come Celebrate the Opening of the Season with us!Stone Crabs are in starting October 15 Stone Crabs are in starting October 15 at the Stone Crab FestivalFRESH Stone Crab Right off the Boat! Follow the Music Live Bands All Day… Rain or Shine for the festival at Riverside 10am 10pm Featuring “Public Address” and “Bill Rigsby Band” All the Fun & Music You Can Stand Bring the Whole Family 850-925-5668 Any further south and you’re all wet! All the Fun & Music You Can Stand Bring the Whole Family850-925-5668 Any further south and you’re all wet! Head To Riverside Cafe in St. Marks for Head To Riverside Cafe in St. Marks for !!" 2012 Go to www.bigbendhospice.org to Sign-up Today! 11:30am Registration and Lunch 12:30pm Tee-o October 26, 2012Wildwood Country ClubSAVE THE DATE!For more information, call Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308Wakulla County Big Bend Hospice Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief Support850-878-5310 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org



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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCounty commissioners and county staff expressed deep frustration with FEMA this week over ood maps and the agencys failure to cover expenses the county incurred with Tropical Storm Debby. It is incredibly hard getting money back from FEMA, County Administrator David Edwards told commissioners at their meeting on Monday, Oct. 15. Edwards went so far as to warn of the agency: Its very obvious we cannot rely on FEMA at all. Edwards was frustrated by FEMAs apparent unwillingness to cover some $500,000 in Debbyrelated expenses. He said every time he met with FEMA and a response about what the county needed to do to get payment, he would get it done and FEMA would change the rules the next day, he said. Theres no ifs, ands and buts about it were going to wind up with about a half-million dollars they arent going to fund, Edwards said. He advised the board to begin building up reserves in order to have some ability to fund storm events. County Commissioner Mike Stewart was adamant in his response: I think we should ght the knuckleheads. Commissioners directed Stewart to attend the meeting set for Wednesday with FEMA of cials along with County Attorney Heather Encinosa. There was a report on a meeting with FEMA and county staff and of cials with the cities of St. Marks and Sopchoppy. County Commissioner Randy Merritt, who is an engineer, noted at that meeting some apparent irregularities in the ood zone especially as mapped in St. Marks. He noted that while most of the city is in the ood zone, the City of Tallahassees Purdom Power Plant is somehow excluded. Comparing how Panacea and St. Marks were mapped by FEMA, Merritt said the methodologies were different with more extrapolation in St. Marks. There was very little change in Panaceas ood map, Merritt said, while St. Marks changes were signi cant. During citizens to be heard, resident Pierce Withers of Ochlockonee Bay complained that he had just been noti ed that his ood insurance had gone up to $5,000 a year. Withers asked the board to at least consider what would the ramifications be if the county withdrew from the ood insurance program. County Commissioner Jerry Moore, while agreeing to direct the county attorney to look at it, said he was concerned that lenders would pull out of the county. Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 40th Issue Thursday, October 18, 2012 Three Sections Three Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Arts & Entertainment ....................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 7B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 8B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 7B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 12B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 12B Comics ...........................................................................Page 15BINDEX OBITUARIES Martha GriffinSee Page 15ABy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net County of cials have asked FEMA for more time to challenge the accuracy of the agencys new ood maps. It appears, for now, the ticking clock for an appeal has stopped ticking. County of cials have warned the new maps would cause signi cant nancial impact to residents and businesses in the county. After the new maps were unveiled last month, the Wakulla County Commission sent a letter to FEMA asking for more time to appeal the maps. The maps have already been put on the federal register, but County Administrator David Edwards was told by representatives from Northwest Florida Water Management District that they have been told by FEMA to hold up. NFWMD is required to advertise the new maps twice in a local paper. Once that is done, the 90-day clock starts, Edwards said. The county has 90 days to appeal the maps for an error and they were seeking an extra 90 days on top of that. The concerns with the new maps were the base ood elevation for the City of St. Marks being raised 10 feet and the ood zone going well upriver. Most of the changes are in the coastal area and along the rivers, but also shows expanded ooding areas in places such as Wakulla Gardens. I believe it went too far, Edwards said. There is some concern that the process FEMA was supposed to follow was not done. FEMA has been developing the maps for the last 6 years, and Edwards said FEMA staff met with the county three or four years ago and then nothing until this September. Edwards said the county has made a records request for the case le dealing with the ood maps. County Commissioner Mike Stewart said, We want them to prove to us that they did those steps, Stewart said. The maps are online at Northwest Florida Water Management Districts website, www.nwfwmd.state. .us, and click on the ood information portal.County frustrated with FEMA FEMA MAP/NWFWMD.STATE.FL.US WEBSITEFEMA appears to grant more time for challenge to maps Dolphins frolic in Shell Point Dolphins frolic in Shell Point Dolphins frolic in Shell Point Dolphins frolic in Shell PointPHOTO BY SUE DAMON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net The 4-H National Youth Science Day was held on Oct. 10 and students at schools in Wakulla County joined with other schools from around the country to become scientists for the day and participate in this years experiment. Students created an EcoBot out of a toothbrush, battery and tape. Once the Eco-Bot was completed the students used it to perform a simulated environmental clean-up project and then measured the effectiveness of their Eco-Bot. Its been great, said 4-H Extension Agent Sherri Kraeft. The kids are super excited. Kraeft led the demonstration in the Wakulla County schools and to Margaret Callaghans fourth-grade class at Riversink Elementary School. It gets the kids excited about 4-H and science, Kraeft said. The students broke into groups of three or four and took the head off their toothbrush and then attached a battery to the top of it, turning it into an Eco-Bot. Once they were completed, they were ready for the experiment. The students learned about the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and were given a sheet with bird seed on it that simulated the oil. They were then asked to create a barrier to keep the Eco-Bot in the designated area to clean up the spill. The Eco-Bots had 30 seconds to clean up as much as possible. This year is pertinent because of the oil spill and we talked about how it relates to our county, Kraeft said. Callaghan has been involved in the science day for the last several years and said the students really enjoy it. And its neat to think that all across America kids are doing the exact same thing, she said. Fourth-grader Madison Hooker said she learned experiments can be done with anything. I learned that it was fun too, she said. Another fourth-grader Shane Smith said, You can make small robots that can do big things. Callaghan said the students will continue to do experiments with the EcoBot and coordinate it with math. The 4-H National Youth Science Day is part of 4-Hs One Million New Scientists, One Million New Ideas campaign, which is intended to engage 1 million additional young people in science, engineering and technology programming by 2013.Students build Eco-Bots for 4-H Youth Science Day PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENRiversink Elementary students build Eco-Bots out of toothbrushes and batteries. Event is held to increase awareness of domestic violence

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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net Things are heating up in two local races this election, the sheriffs race and county commission district 3. Residents are receiving calls and mailers targeting speci c candidates rather than endorsing or supporting one. From a push poll to ads and mailers, voters are getting information about the candidates, some of whom say the information is factual while others say it is not. SHERIFFS RACE Several residents have received a polling call from a caller identified as representing CCG Research who asks questions about voters opinions of candidates and then proceeds to focus on the sheriffs race. Many are identifying this call as a push poll, which is intended to turn a voter against a candidate by stating negative qualities about him. According to emails received by The News, the questions in the CCG poll asked if they would vote for a candidate who had been divorced, and who had some disciplinary action while serving with the highway patrol. These questions were clearly about candidate Charlie Creel, who is running under no party af liation. Both Creel and his opponent Maurice Langston, Republican, say they had nothing to do with the poll. I dont condone that type of strategy, I condemn it, Langston said. Langston said he knew nothing about it until someone told him they had received the call. He did not authorize it and doesnt endorse it, he said. I had nothing to do with any polling and to say I did is misleading, non-factual and an outright untruth, Langston said. The chief law enforcement of cer in the county or any law enforcement of cer is expected to tell the truth and I respect that Mr. Creel is doing that and I hope he will respect that I am also. Creel found the whole thing despicable. Theyre asking questions about my record that are totally off-base, he said. He continued to say that the only truth was that he had in fact been divorced. The rest is outright lies, he said, and he encouraged anyone who is interested to look at his record. Id like to know where it did come from and who is behind it, Creel said. A phone message was left at the of ces of CCG for comment, but a return call had not been received by deadline. CCG is a private company called Conquest Communications Group out of Richmond, Va. CCG provides consulting services, marketing research and public opinion polling. CCG was founded by Vic Gresham and Dave Johnson. Johnson has served previously as the executive director for the Republican Party of Virginia and he has also been with the National Republican Congressional Committee. KESSLER VS. STEWART RACE The other race that has brought out groups who have had ads and mailers not endorsed speci cally by a candidate is county commission district 3, with candidates Howard Kessler, who is running under no party affiliation, and Mike Stewart, Republican. A mailer, as well as several ads have been placed labeling Stewart as the tax man and discusses the implementation of new and increased taxes while Stewart has been a commissioner. These have been paid for by the Florida Quality of Life Council in Sarasota. Kessler has said previously that he was not behind the group. State nancial records for FQOL show a contribution of $25,000 from Anne Van Meter, Kesslers wife, back in July. When asked about this connection, Kessler said he did not know his wife had done this until she told him on Friday. Neither his campaign money nor his funds were used, he said. Van Meter also con rmed that her husband did not know. She added that she did nothing to hide it and has no reservations about it. Kessler said, I may not have chosen that route for me personally, but I understand her frustration and why she did what she did. Van Meter said she did it in response to what happened in the 2010 election when Kessler ran for county commissioner. She said she knows there will be negative ads and mailers that will come out right before the election with false information about her husband and she wanted to be able to make sure the correct information got out. I will not be at-footed, she said. She added that nothing in the mailer or ads is untrue or false. It is informational, she said. Kessler said he supports his wife and understand why she chose to do this. And added that from what he has seen, the materials were not negative or personal, but factual. Stewart felt differently. He said the mailer and ads distort the facts. Theyre distorting the numbers, he said. Im just frustrated with all that. He added that he didnt understand why someone would spend that large amount of money for a job that pays $30,000 a year and comes with so many headaches. That bothers me, Stewart said. There have also been ads against Kessler funded by an outside group from Coconut Creek called Floridians for Accountability. Stewart said he has no personal connection to the group and he did not know about the ads prior to them coming out. He said he knows of the group and has informed them that he did not want to be a part of it and not to include his photo. I dont want to be connected to them, Stewart said. Floridians for Accountability has not received a financial contribution since October 2010. However, Floridians for Accountability has purchased ads since then and there is belief by some, such as Van Meter, that mailers are planned in the next couple weeks. WA-KOOLA CALLS There have been recent automated calls with a recorded message that indicated it was being made on behalf of the Wakulla Democratic Party that encourages voters to get absentee ballots. There has been some skepticism expressed about the call since Wakulla is pronounced incorrectly in the recording as Wa-koola. Democratic Chair Rachel Pienta has said the local committee had nothing to do with the calls. Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comIn a Sept. 27 article, Candidate responds to allegations about past, The News reported that Hugh Taylor spoke before the county commission and in other venues to complain that allegations against a candidate for superintendent were racially motivated. Taylor did not make those statements at the meeting or in other venues. We apologize for the errors.CorrectionQuestions about outside groups in local campaigns Concerns about outside groups being involved in local races have come up in the Wakulla sheriffs race between Charlie Creel and Maurice Langston, above, and in the county commission district 3 race between Howard Kessler and Mike Stewart, below.FILE PHOTOS Over 250 community-minded Wakulla County residents gather to eat tasty seafood, have a good time, and net funding for a growing Big Brothers Big Sisters Wakulla County Mentoring Program.We are trying to raise $7,000 to support the ongoing efforts of the Big Brothers Big Sisters Wakulla County Mentoring Program. With such funding, Big Brothers Big Sisters will help more Wakulla County youth facing adversity overcome HUGE obstacles to develop: $10 per plate. Tickets are available online at www.bbbs.org/BIGcatch, at Poseys Steam Room, or at Poseys Dockside Caf.To Sponsor or for More Info: Contact Katie Williams at katie.williams@bigbendmentoring.org or 850.386.6002 5:30PM 8:30PM The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bareld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. TAX IMPACT OF VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARDNOTICE The Wakulla County Canvassing Board will meet in the Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections Ofce at 3115-B Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida on the following dates. All candidates, citizens and press are invited to attend.LOGIC AND ACCURACY TEST NOTICE OPENING OF ABSENTEE BALLOTS Logic and Accuracy : Wednesday-October 24, 2012 @ 9 a.m. Opening of Absentee: Friday-November 2, 2012 @ 9a.m. 2nd Opening of absentee: Tuesday-November 6, 2012 @ 5p.mOCTOBER 18, 2012 The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 5, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider:A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 18, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE OF REFERENDUM NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A REFERENDUM ELECTION has been called by the Board of County Commissioners of Wakulla County, Florida and will be held from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. on November 6,2012, in Wakulla County, Florida, at which time there shall be submitted to the duly qualied electors of Wakulla County, as more specically described and provided for in Ordinance No. 2012-17 of the Board of County Commissioners of Wakulla County, Florida, adopted August 6, 2012, the following question published below: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTIONS FOR NEW BUSINESSES AND EXPANSIONS OF EXISTING BUSINESSES Shall the Board of County Commissioners of Wakulla County, Florida, be authorized to grant, pursuant to s. 3, Art. VII of the Florida Constitution, property tax exemptions to new businesses and expansions of existing businesses that are expected to create new, full-time jobs in the County? __ BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA By -sE. Alan Brock, ChairmanOCTOBER 4, 18, 2012 By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net A town hall meeting combined with a ribbon cutting was held at the new location of Talllahassee Community Colleges Wakulla Center on Oct. 10. TCC recently moved into the building that also houses Centennial Bank and celebrated this new spot with a ribbon cutting and reception, but rst the night started with a town hall meeting to gather community input about the future of the campus. We were thrilled to combine the two, said TCC President Jim Murdaugh. TCC is in the beginning stages of its strategic planning process and the rst step is inviting input from the community, Murdaugh said. They were looking for feedback about what they are currently providing, as well as what people would like to see offered. Some of the similar wants heard from those in attendance included more core classes offered, as well as dual enrollment program for high school students, vocational and technical classes, a testing location, exam preparation classes and partnering with local businesses. Superintendent David Miller said TCC needs to be an expansion of the programs currently offered at the high school. He added that TCC has a great relationship with the school district and he wants it to continue. People were also in agreement that there was a need for better communication among TCC and its students, as well as those in the community. Several ideas that were mentioned have also been brought up at TCC board meeting and TCC is on its way toward implementing some of them. This is just the beginning, Murdaugh said. Where ever we start is not the end. They plan to continue to expand on what is offered at the TCC Wakulla Center. One of the ideas of having the facility serve as a testing site has been scheduled, as well as days when an advisor will be on site, Murdaugh said. I want people to know how much we appreciate the number of people who came and the enthusiasm they have, he said. It takes that for us to be successful. As for TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute planned to open in Wakulla County, Murdaugh said they are still identifying a location and are waiting on accreditation and approval of the courses and degrees that will be offered at the facility. They have also identi ed the faculty who will teach at the institute. Some classes offered through the institute will start prior to it being built in January. These classes will be online with online lectures and some eld or laboratory experiences.TCC holds town hall meeting WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDENThe Coastal Optimists held their annual fashion show fundraiser on Thursday, Oct. 11, at Wildwood. The models show off some of the out ts they wore at the event. Optimist fashionsRelay for Life kicko Mitch Boone, a 16-year-old cancer survivor, shared his story at the kickoff for Relay for Life on Thursday, Oct. 11, at Crawfordville United Methodist Church. In an emotional speech, Boone recounted going through surgery as a 4th grader, questioning why little children should have to endure such pain. Boone is this years honorary chairman for the Relay, which will be held on Saturday, April 27, beginning at 2 p.m. and lasting until Sunday, April 28. The event raises money for cancer research. TCC Wakulla tells of programs offered, and asks the community what they want.

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Pine Straw Baskets: Barbara Rosen turns natures discards into art Man killed in Panacea shooting Sheriff is available for budget questions Riverside Cafe hosts Chamber luncheon What the three no-party candidates said at the league forum From the Dock for Oct. 18 Drive time Dying oyster beds are crippling a once thriving industry thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.COMMUNITY DEBATE By JONATHAN KILPATRICKFor the last four years the United States Federal government has spent over $1 trillion dollars per year more than it has received in tax revenues. If spending money is the role of the federal government, the Obama administration can say mission accomplished. Clearly, this approach has not worked in creating jobs or stimulating the economy. Our nation has borrowed and spent funds that future generations will be forced to repay and our unemployment rate still remains high. The most appropriate action our government can do to create jobs and get the economy moving again is to create a tax policy that lets Americans keep more of the money they have earned and eliminate unnecessary regulations and burdens on small business. Most small businesses in America are taxed at the personal tax rate, currently at 35 percent, and in January 2013 will be as high as 39.6 percent. Reducing that tax burden would allow the small business owners in this nation the freedom to expand and hire additional staff. Sending tax money to Washington, then having a federal agency spend that money will not affect the economy nearly as quickly as allowing businesses and individuals to keep and spend their earnings in the local economy. The federal government has a role in issuing regulations; however, burdensome and unnecessary regulation have the effect of sti ing job creation. Each year the federal government creates approximately 80,000 pages of new regulations. One example: The Federal Food and Drug administration estimates that the food service industry will spend an additional 14 million hours to comply with a federal regulation that all vending machine and chain restaurants display calorie content for all foods. Consumers will have to pay for those 14 million hours and higher prices will lead to less economic activity and fewer jobs created. Our government could see the greatest impact in job creation and economic development by creating a path to energy independence. Simply speeding the permitting process for private sector exploration and drilling would create thousands of jobs in this country. Approving the Keystone pipeline for oil delivery to re neries would create hundreds of thousands more. The federal, state and local governments cannot ef ciently create jobs. However, by proposing the right tax policy and the right balance of regulations, governments can create the environment where businesses and individuals create jobs and stimulate the economy.Jonathan Kilpatrick is the chair of the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee.By RACHEL PIENTAThe debate over governments role in economic stimulation and job creation has been a key ideological difference in this years presidential election. One particular sound bite, You didnt build that or the inverse we built this trope dominated the airwaves and became a pivot point for the economic argument. As Democrats, we believe the government plays a critical role in economic stimulation and job creation. From key healthcare policies which ensure a healthy workforce to support for critical infrastructure elements including roads and sewers, government provides the foundation on which a thriving, successful economy is built. The governments role in educating a quali ed 21st Century workforce to meet business demands in the global economy cannot be understated. Efforts to ensure competitive fair lending practices for small business growth and new mortgage creation drive the economic engine with corporate and residential development. The key to economic growth rests within a healthy public-private partnership that encourages entrepreneurship and ingenuity. When the founding fathers envisioned the nation that would become the United States of America we know and love today, the edgling republic was the equivalent of a Silicon Valley start-up hatched up in someones garage. From such humble beginnings great nations and successful business ventures grow. Our nations founding fathers were not antigovernment nor were they even anti-tax. They sought fair representation and fair taxation not the end of government. President Lincoln would later refer to the Union as government of the people, by the people, and for the people. Such a vision of government and our nation embodies a quintessential we and represents the American bond that unites us as citizens working together to keep the grand vision of the Founding Fathers viable in perpetuity. Im a proud American and, as a Democrat, I say we built this.Rachel Pienta is the chair of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee.The issue: Role of government is week e Wakulla News asked the local Democrat ic and Republican party chairs to respond to the question what is the proper role of government. Leading up to the Nov. 6 election, e News will submit a question each week for the local parties to answer Do you have a question youd like asked, or did the question prompt a response from you? Send it to editor@thewakullanews.net.DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: REPUBLICAN RESPONSE: READERS WRITE:The benefits of improved economy ank you for support of senior Luau Remember postage when mailing ballot Fish fry set to fund Historical Society needs By GOV. RICK SCOTT Every day, we are seeing more and more jobs being created and Floridians getting back to work. In August, more than 28,000 Floridians found work in the private sector. Thats 28,000 Floridians who can now better ful ll their dreams right here in the Sunshine State. We are hearing stories like Sandra Cimbaros of Boca Raton, who was laid off from her last job in March and, like many Floridians, took advantage of the services at Workforce Alliance in Palm Beach County to help her get back to work. She attended a rsum and interview workshop and began work assessments that the workforce board offered. With hard work and a little help, Sandra was hired by the Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce in August as a communications coordinator. I think its important for all Floridians who are looking for a job to visit their local workforce center to find out more information about how they assist in nding a meaningful career. Businesses are choosing Florida to grow and expand. I announced last week that Univision/ABC are opening their new 24hour news network in Miami, creating 342 jobs. The week before that, I helped announce more than 2,000 jobs coming to Central Florida. These new jobs for Floridians are being created by Nemours Childrens Hospital and Prime Therapeutics in Orlando, as well as Accuform Signs in Brooksville. Companies like Nemours, Prime Therapeutics and Accuform Signs have realized that we are doing the right things in Florida to help businesses succeed. Weve lowered taxes and reduced burdensome regulation. Floridas business tax climate is ranked fth in the nation according to the Tax Foundations Tax Climate Index. Floridas private-sector is creating jobs and Floridians are seeing the bene ts directly. Our state has seen increases in median home prices and housing starts. In the second quarter of this year, Floridas income growth outpaced the nation. In addition, Floridas consumer con dence is at a ve-year high, according to the University of Florida. A recent economic estimating conference says that Florida is on pace to create 900,000 new jobs by 2018. Of course, we still have a lot of work left to do, but I am working every day to ensure Floridas privatesector continues to grow. In August, our state was second only to Texas in job creation. I am working to make us No. 1. Rick Scott is Governor of Florida.Editor, The News: People might not be aware that sending in the absentee ballot requires 65cents for postage. The envelope weight is over the limit for one regular stamp. Not enough postage? Your vote does not get counted. Madeleine Carr Crawfordville Editor, The News: Eden Springs Third Annual Senior Prom Luau was a huge success, thanks to the staff and residents of Eden Springs Rehab, and our many community supporters, their hours of hard work and untiring efforts made this event the best ever for our residents and families. Without them this would have been impossible. Planning for this event took months, our residents and especially our resident Council President Joseph Smith were excited and worked hard on fundraising events, menu planning, music and decorations. The staff worked with the residents on not only the Prom itself but also on the many fund raisers we had in order to fund our prom some of the events included a live auction conducted by our very own auctioneer Gloria Monk, our rst fundraiser in the park, along with many small raf es, bake sales, hot dog sales and the sale of many TVs that were donated by Amns Sumners. The list of those who contributed includes Clyde Hamilton and Richard Carraway for their creation and construction of our special Tiki Bar which will become a permanent part of our activities, Donna Humeniak for her hand made quilt, Crawfordville Goodwill for the use of their Luau garments, Denise Folh at The Wakulla News for assistance with advertising with all our events, Little Caesars pizza, Maurice, Pizza Hut, Skybox Liquors, Ace Hardware, Medart Assembly of God including Pat Vice and her girls, Mrs. Piggott and the womans club of Lake Ellen Baptist Church, Donut Hole, Panhandle Pizza, Stone Creek Pizza, Evolution Spa, Kutz-n-Kurlz, and Beef O Bradys, a very special thank you to Louise Sloan and Misty Weeks you are the best Thank you all again. Marjorie Hamilton, LPN III /CLTC Activity CoordinatorEden Springs Nursing and Rehab. CenterEditor, The News: This is to thank The Wakulla News for covering the news and events of the Wakulla County Historical Society. Much has been accomplished since the Historical Society was founded in October 1991 to collect, preserve, exhibit, and interpret history of the Wakulla County area. We are particularly thankful for the generous support of the community to make the dream of a Heritage Village Park become reality. Murray McLaughlin, who is vice president for the Heritage Village, said recently the plan will be a footprint for administration, parking, houses, farm, hiking trails, amphitheater, and other ancillary exhibits. Private funding for the plan and county approval is needed before structures can be moved onto the property. The goal is to move each structure to its permanent location and save the cost of a second move. Two buildings need immediate placement on the property, including the TullyMcLaughlin House (c. 1892) which has been parked in Medart for several years. As an initiative to raise funds for the site plan, the Historical Society is having a Fish Fry at Hudson Park in Crawfordville on Friday, Oct. 26 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. The cost is $8 per plate or 2 for $15. All proceeds will bene t the Heritage Village Park. We invite everyone to follow our progress by visiting the Museum at 24 High Drive in Crawfordville (open Thursday, Friday, and Saturday) or call us at 850926-1110. Sincerely, Cathy Frank President WCHSAlan Brock has served the county wellEditor, The News: For some one who is not excited over the elections this year, I do have one exception and a certain local candidate that both my husband and I will be voting for Alan Brock. Alan doesnt come from big money, Alan doesnt have an over abundance of political signs every where you look. The best thing about Alan to me is that Alan is still Alan the same great guy he was before he took of ce and the same great guy that has served the county well with out any drama or name calling. That is class. So yes that is why Alan has our support he is down home, he is real, he has served us well and he can relate to each one of us better than any one else sitting on that board. Simply put, Alan Brock has morals and class. If you are fed up with all the negative campaigning, fed up with all of the mud slinging and are more confused than ever on who to vote for, Id like to encourage you to consider Alan Brock, District 1 County Commissioner. And for the record, this message has not been approved by, paid for or endorsed in any way by Alan Brock. It is my opinion and likely the only opinion I will feel strongly enough about during this election to have it published. Nancy Posey Parker Wakulla Station

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 5Areaders speak out More OpinionsMORE READERS WRITE:David Miller endorses Bobby Pearce Langston denies negative campaigning Charlie Creel has the credentials for sheri Re-evaluating NRA after endorsement Made up mind for John Shu Howard Kessler is a man of great integrity Jim Parham is a good choice A change in county politicsEditor, The News: As voters in Wakulla County, we face a crucial choice in deciding the direction of local law enforcement. The issue basically boils down to this: do we want change or do we want a continuation of the decades-old status quo? As a longtime Wakulla County resident, I choose change and wholeheartedly support Charlie Creel for sheriff. As for Charlie Creel, his credentials, capabilities and fair minded demeanor speak for themselves. The best evidence is that which comes from his peers. As a retired deputy sheriff and recently retired Executive Director of the Florida Police Benevolent Association and its 30,000 plus law enforcement members in the state, I have had a chance to talk with many members over the past four plus years about Charlie Creel. Out of curiosity, I have asked many state and local of cers who have worked with Charlie just what they think about him. Without prompting and without exception, they tell me what a conscientious, hard working, honest, decent and capable person he is. That says it all and says what we need here. Also related and for what it is worth, the letter from Mrs. Lamarche in last weeks Wakulla News (NRA mis res in sheriffs endorsement, Oct. 11) was very interesting. She made an awkward, amusing attempt to tie, somehow, the national presidential race, Charlie, and Charlies endorsement by the NRA into some hard-to-fathom plot. Nice try, but as they say in this neck of the woods, that dog wont hunt. I cant speak for Charlie or figure out what national politics has to do with our local sheriffs race, but I do know Marion Hammer of the NRA/Unified Sportsmen of Florida very well. We have worked together at the Capitol, shoulder-toshoulder, on such things as the Concealed Weapons Law (1987) and most recently on the Stand Your Ground Law. Marion and the NRA do not do things on a whim. My educated hunch is that the NRA endorsement of Charlie Creel was well-researched and thought out. In the next several weeks, there will no doubt be more negative attacks against Charlie Creel. The cowardly push poll telephone calls trashing Charlie are probably just a warm up. If you want change, ignore these devious tactics and stand up for what is right. Vote for Charlie Creel. Sincerely, David Murrell dkmurrell1@hotmail.com Editor, The News: I read with interest,a letter sent in by Mrs. Kathleen Lamarche in regards to the NRAs endorsement of Mr. Creel for Sheriff. As a lifetime patron member, Golden Eagle, and recipient of the NRAs National Patriots Medal, I also was curious as to how Mr. Creel was selected by Mrs. Hammer and the NRA for endorsement when only Mr. Langston had produced and published his membership certi cate as proof of his alliance with the NRA. Mr. Creel had produced nothing of the sort,except a letter on a letterhead issued by a past president of the NRA with whom he apparently had a professional or passing acquaintance with. I contacted the NRA to enquire of this and was basically told that I was to mind my own business and not to show disrespect for Mrs. Hammer, that the double letterhead (Uni ed Sportsmen of Florida, which Mrs Hammer also heads, and the NRA) are of cial NRA letterhead, that the NRA had graded both candidates and selected the one even though both are said to be NRA members. It became apparent to me that the ONLY thing the NRA is interested in is my monetary donations and an inner circle within the NRA forms its leadership who decides who the national membership endorses, without asking the membership of course. I, for one, will be re-evaluating my association with a such an organization. Rev. Dr. Randall Sanders ronHorsesNLthr@aol.com Editor, The News: I would like to share some of what I know about Dr. Howard Kessler, candidate for a Wakulla County Commission seat. Kessler, a man of great integrity, really cares about the welfare of our people. Kessler has great compassion for the less fortunate. This is obvious from the time he has spent as a volunteer doctor with our Childrens Medical Society and Neighborhood Health Services. He served as a volunteer doctor in Haiti treating victims in the aftermath of a disastrous earthquake. When Kessler was a Wakulla County commissioner he had the courage to face unfair criticism and continue to ght for programs that were bene cial to all our citizens, not just to special interests. He voted against wasteful county budgets that exceeded our citizens capacity to pay for. Likewise, he fought against a bloated top-heavy county government; he favored an administration with more working Indians and less unnecessary expensive chiefs. Kessler is in the forefront ghting for open, transparent and accountable government; he insists on letting the sun shine on what our county government is doing. He is very approachable, always ready to listen to what a citizen has to say. He listens to the little guy, no matter how little in uence they have. The underpinning of Dr. Kesslers philosophy is his concern for protecting our natural resources and way of life. He was the driving force behind enactment of our countys wetlands protection ordinance, so vital to our economy and way of life and a model for other political identities. I will vote for Dr. Kessler in November and strongly urge others to do likewise. Wakulla will be better with Kessler as a Commissioner. Lorraine G. Lambou Crawfordville Editor, The News: I believe Bobby Pearce is the best candidate for Superintendent of Wakulla County Schools for many reasons. He has the leadership skills, scal responsibility, integrity, and a true love for the students of Wakulla County. Bobby Pearces leadership skills are tried and true. His experience as principal of an A rated school for 11 consecutive years shows he has the ability to focus on student success by making all aspects of running a school work toward that most important goal. This includes not just educating our children well, but making sure everything from their bus ride to their breakfast, lunch, and after school tutoring experiences are positive. He knows how to work well with parents, teachers, and staff to keep the question of How will this help our students succeed? in the forefront. Now in his role as Assistant Superintendent for Administration, Bobby Pearce has expanded his leadership skills by serving the entire school district. He has a realworld view of how much work it takes to keep a Florida Department of Education designated Academically High Performing District on top, and he has his own vision for taking our school district to even greater heights. Bobby Pearce has also shown that he is a good steward of taxpayer dollars. As a principal, he always managed his school budget soundly and had positive audits. In his current role as Assistant Superintendent for Administration, he now works with the entire school district budget, which also has sound nancial audits from the state. He constantly looks for ways to use our limited nancial resources wisely, such as costs saved with a new energy ef ciency program. He is scally responsible with the understanding that students and teachers must be provided with what they need in the classrooms to be successful. In addition, Bobby Pearce has the integrity to lead this school district well. He has 24 years of continuous service as a teacher, coach, principal, and assistant superintendent. In all those years, he has done nothing but positively in uence students, teachers, and staff to do their best. He is a graduate of Wakulla High School, where his daughter just graduated from the WHS Medical Academy and his son now attends. He has a vested interest in the success of Wakulla County Schools for all of our children. Bobby Pearce has also been married to his wife, a kindergarten teacher, for 22 years. His ethics, integrity, and loyalty are to be commended. Finally, Bobby Pearce is the best candidate for Superintendent of Wakulla County Schools because he truly loves the children of Wakulla County. As principal, he knew every child in his school, and had the philosophy of know you by name and treat you like family. What he will ensure for the children of Wakulla County is a world class education t hat will prepare them for successful careers and citizenship. David Miller Superintendent Wakulla County Schools Editor, The News: Wakulla County would be fortunate to have Jim Parham as its property appraiser. I have known Jim since he was a boy; he and I are rst cousins by marriage. While he was in business school at FSU, I encouraged him to consider real estate appraisal; it just seemed a right t for his personality and intelligence. After training with FDOT, he worked for me at Investors Realty of Tallahassee and though I didnt know it at the time, he was picking my brain continually and storing away what I had learned in real estate. I was impressed when he left his hometown and moved to the Tampa Bay area to work around some of the pioneers of the appraisal profession without knowing anyone beforehand. He did well; he soughtout mentors, earned the respect of the older generation of appraisers and was awarded the letters behind his name. He broadened his exposure in both urban and rural markets throughout central Florida; from shopping malls to citrus groves. After 20-plus years, Jim returned home to the Big Bend area. I was representing a landowner on a tract the state wanted to buy and became frustrated with the process. I called Jim and we went to look at the property. Within minutes Jim described the unique features of the tract and told me how to deal with the state to get my property owner the money he was due, which I did. I had been brokering and dealing in real estate for 50plus years and the student had come home to teach his former teacher something about real estate! It is with my most sincere conviction that I recommend Jim Parham to you, the citizens of Wakulla County, as being highly quali ed and experienced for the of ce of property appraiser. He has the integrity to get the job done right for Wakullas future. George K. Walker Tallahassee It has been my observation during this campaign season that there is a difference in reality and perceived reality. Reality is what is really happening and Perceived Reality is what is said over and over and over again to make you, the citizen, believe it is happening. I am here to state that I have NO involvement in any negative campaigning or polling. You can be assured that I am bold enough to stand behind anything I do and will mark it with my approval as required on that oath I took, both at the Supervisor of Elections Office and the Campaign Pledge sent to Mr. Creel. However, I will continue to point our difference on issues we obviously disagree on, such as: The Budget: Mr. Creel said twice during the last forum he does not understand, I do. The Crime Rate: I do not believe Wakulla County is a dangerous place to live, he does. Management Styles: he wants to bring in out of county consultants to tell him where your money is being spent and how to organize the sheriffs of- ce. I have the experience to do that. Community Involvement: he wants an advisory committee and citizens to come to him and I am involved in the community and go to you. Our Law Enforcement Experience: his is in traf c enforcement, mine is in solving burglaries, murders, child abuse and serving you, not citing you. There is one thing he and I can agree on we have no control on outside sources who chose to exercise their constitutional right to free speech even when their free speech may or may not be right! T.W. Maurice LangstonCandidate for Wakulla County Sheriff Editor, The News: This has been the longest campaign season I can ever remember, and I will be happy when the results are in on Nov. 6. I made up my mind months ago and have not wavered in my choice of John Shuff since his decision to run. John is running an honest, straightforward campaign on positions he takes on important ideas. Being retired, he will dedicate as many hours as needed to resolve problems that arise, and will have an open door policy for our citizens. John has worked hard in and for this community and of the candidates in the District 5 race, has the only real business experience that is critically needed to help manage our taxpayer dollars, set priorities and resolve issues on a county level. John is also the only candidate in the District 5 race who has worked on county-wide issues with diverse groups, and who best understands the importance of positive interaction between our government, our businesses, our citizens, and the vital role they each play in our community. The job of commissioner requires knowledge and experience in dealing with constitutional of cers, the county administration, and citizens, as well as the ability to give and take on issues you support and on those you may not support. John has the life experiences that are imperative to lead this county. This years election outcome will potentially be a game changer in the direction of our county. We must elect and re-elect commissioners who have lived here long enough to have a history in our county, and who understand from long term, rst-hand experience how unique we are. We must elect a commissioner with a proven economic background who has worked with and around our government and will be prepared on day one. A vote for John Shuff will insure that our board of county commissioners will be a united group supporting sustainable job growth here in Wakulla. John will work to ensure the board does not reverse the positive direction this county has begun under our current leadership. Please help us strengthen Wakulla for the future. Vote Shuff. Charlie Palmer Crawfordville Editor, The News: My name is Cynthia Thomas. I am the wife of Ralph Thomas, who is currently seeking the County Commission seat in District 1. When Ralph approached me about running for of ce, there were only three things that I said to him: 1. Remember you are a father. 2. Remember you are a husband. And 3. only get into the race if you can continue to walk the path the Lord has set before you, and remain the man that our Lord has molded you to be. I recently had the pleasure of attending the bi-partisan political forum and the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Political Forum. I would like to say thank you to both of these groups for their time and efforts to deliver a platform for local candidates to allow citizens to learn more about them and their stands on multiple issues affecting our county. Through these forums I realized that there has been a change in what I was hearing and seeing in our candidates. I would speci cally like to give a special acknowledgement to the candidates running for District 1. In my opinion, Alan Brock, Jenny Brock, and Ralph Thomas are truly shaping the future of Wakulla politics. These three have truly demonstrated what running a Clean Campaign is all about. They have managed their campaign in such a way that even their supporters re ect their positive attitudes and are displaying the candidates beliefs. They have kept their platforms to what they believe they can do for our county in the future. I know that they all have the best intentions in their hearts for this county and I am proud that they are standing behind their beliefs and practicing some of the lessons our parents taught us when we were children: Be respectful, be courteous, treat others as you want to be treated, and if you cant say something nice, dont say anything at all. We have become so complacent about negative campaigning that we know its going to happen and just accept it. Well, we shouldnt accept it. We can change the perception about politics if we just get back to the basics. These three candidates continue to demonstrate that they learned these basics growing up and are ready for a change in the politics for Wakulla County. It is clear that the tone of Wakulla politics is changing. Citizens want to hear about the vision a candidate has for our county. Change can occur in politics one race at a time if candidates are strong enough to stay out of the mud. We elect them to be leaders. Lets expect them to show leadership on the campaign trail. Thank you to all the candidates for their willingness to serve and may each of you be blessed for your service. Cynthia Thomas Crawfordville

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Churchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Church BriefsMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... By SHERYL GRIMES On Oct. 7, the Wakulla United Methodist Church, established in the 19th century, hosted its annual Homecoming event with almost 200 attending. Food and fellowship highlighted the day with current members and returning members celebrating the church rst pastored by Methodist circuit rider, John Slade, in 1852. Lorrie Gallamore, Hospitality Committee, said, Everyone visited, worshiped and remembered the churchs heritage and former members. Immediately following the service, guests and members enjoyed a covered dish luncheon. Though members built the current log sanctuary in 1998, the small pre-Civil War church still stands beside the sanctuary at 1584 Old Woodville Road. At one time, the small building was located directly across the street and served as a schoolhouse. Local family names, too many to list, dot the churchs history compiled by Bruce Nesmith Alford. Pastor Susie Horner, who came to pastor the church in July, was the featured speaker for the combined church service. We were excited to have all our returning members and guests hear our dynamic new minister, Pastor Horner, said Pastor Parish Relations Committee Chair Don Grimes. On Oct. 7, Marie Ladd and Jeanette Garrison were honored by the Wakulla United Methodist Women, with many family members attending. Clem Bunker, Wakulla UMW President, said These women, though now deceased, are remembered this year for their commitment and service, both to the church and the community. Both ladies have family members who continue to attend and support the church. Being able to come together to remember those saints who were instrumental in the founding of Wakulla United Methodist Church and to celebrate with those who today continue to contribute to the life and well being of our church, congregation and community is a time of great joy. This is a wonderful way of drawing the body of believers closer to God, to one another and to the church, said Pastor Horner. For more information, please call 850 421-5741.Wakulla United Methodist holds HomecomingBy CYNTHIA WEBSTER There is something about making a commitment! It can be exciting, challenging, tiring and often requires endurance. In the case of those who have made a commitment to participate as often as possible in the Footsteps for Faith and Freedom Forty Day Prayer Walk, it has been nothing short of joyful. The national clergy has called for 40 days of prayer before the election because of the deep concern that exists for the spiritual condition of our nation. We are honoring this 40-day call for prayer in a style unique to Wakulla. There may well be other towns that are walking and praying together but it would be hard to imagine any of them being in a setting so uniquely beautiful as what we have right here in our own county. God has blessed us with a rich environment a spectacular coastline, stunning marshland, natural springs, rich forest land, cattle, pig and horse farms, sh in the waters, a wide variety of wildlife and, perhaps most important, good and generous people who honor the Creator for all they have been given. The Church however is being sidelined in todays world, many children are not being exposed to the Word of God and adults often shun His Word as it is the easier path to take. So the 40-day walk is just one way of restoring honor to its rightful place. All the political leaders, all the good intentions, all the money invested wisely or unwisely is only a thimble full of aid and comfort compared to the greatness of God. We encourage all people of Wakulla County to come out and test the waters at Azalea Park for an hour of prayer and walk. Pick a day, call a friend or come alone, but make a decision to take part. Each walk starts with a short message and prayer given by a member of our Wakulla County clergy. For those who cannot walk there are benches and picnic tables there is an entire group who sit together and do the rosary during walk time. Few have been able to be there every day so no one needs to worry that they will be the only one present for the rst time. We are there because, as believers, we know our prayers must be for the spiritual condition of our land, not its politics. CLERGY SCHEDULE FOR WEEK FOUR Thursday, Oct. 18, 6:45 p.m. Rev. Dr. Renita Allen-Dixon, Ecclesia Outreach Ministries. Friday, Oct. 19, 10 a.m. Bishop Bill Payne, Friendship Primitive Baptist Church. Saturday, Oct. 20, 10 a.m. Elder Renson Thompson, Little Salem Primitive Baptist Church. Monday, Oct. 22, 6:45 p.m. President Brent R. Tucker, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Tuesday, Oct. 23, 6:45 p.m. Citizen Stewart Scott, Miracle Deliverance Center #2. Wednesday, Oct. 24, 10 a.m. Pastor Gordon L. Beal, Mt. Elon Church.40 day prayer walk continues Wakulla High senior Danny Moss carried a cross on a recent prayer walk. Marie Ladd Jeanette Garrison Pastor Appreciation set at New HopePastor Appreciation for Pastor Fred Cromartie, marking ve years with the church, will be celebrated at New Hope Pentecostal Church of Crawfordville with nightly events Oct. 16 through Sunday, Oct. 21. The nightly events begin at 7:30 p.m. The Sunday event will be held at 3 p.m. with a dinner at the Crawfordville Womens Club Ivan Assembly to hold Fall FestivalIvan Assembly of God will be hosting a Fall Festival on the evening of Oct. 31 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the church. Everything is free of charge! Trunk or Treat with games, giveaways, bouncers, hay-ride, cake walk, lots of candy, soup and chili, fried oreos and funnel cakes. Come out and bring the family. The church is located at 202 Ivan Church Road in Crawfordville. Phone number is (850) 926-4826. Pumpkin Patch at Wakulla Springs Baptist Wakulla Springs Baptist Church will have pumpkins for sale through Oct. 31. The pumpkin patch will be open on weekdays from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. All proceeds go towards the garden ministry that supports local food pantries. A Harvest of Hope Pumpkin Patch Festival will be held at the church on Saturday, Oct. 20, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. with fun, food and games. The church is located at 1391 Crawfordville Highway. For more information, call 926-5152. Grace Baptist will hold a fall festivalCome enjoy an afternoon of free food, fun, games, a cake walk and fellowship for all ages at Grace Baptist Church on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. In addition, on every hour the short drama The Letter From Hell will be performed by the Live Out Loud Youth and Drama Ministry, Chosen Generation Youth ministries, and Friends in Christ Youth Ministry. Grace Baptist is located at 803 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 926-3217.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 7AObituaries Martha Griffin, 78, of Crawfordville, passed away Oct. 11 at her Crawfordville residence. Services were held previously in Crawfordville. Survivors include her husband of 34 years, James F. Grif n; sons, Dany Langley and James E. Grif n; daughters, Bonnie Stuckey and Wendy Shepard; sister-in-law, Deanna Grif n; and four grandchildren, Amanda Fulton, Justin Drasher, Kyle Stuckey, and Ryan Stuckey. Fair eld Funeral Home in Tallahassee was in charge of the arrangements.Martha Grif nCashing in on a cashless societyREV. JAMES L. SNYDER I am the kind of person that likes to do business with cash on the barrelhead. I do not like credit because it has a way of biting you in the end. When you have a credit card, there are fees to beat the band. I do have a credit card but I have it hidden so well that I have not been able to nd it for seven weeks. I just do not like using it. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage always warns me about the possibility that someone can steal my credit card. Ha ha, I say in de ance to her warning. I am never worried about that. If anybody can get money out of my account with my credit card, I would like to work with them and go 50-50 on it. Every time I need money, my credit card is empty. I think there is a conspiracy in this whole thing. Nothing is more embarrassing than going to a checkout counter to pay for goods that I intend to purchase and my credit card is denied. The reason I was using the credit card at the time was I did not have any cash in my pocket. Now, I have no cash in my pocket and my credit card is just grinning at me refusing to cough up the money needed for purchasing these goods. I hate my credit card. And it is reciprocal. My credit card hates me and tries its level best to embarrass me every chance it gets. When I do business, I want to know that I have done business. Nothing is more satisfying than completing a financial transaction with cash. I have noticed a dangerous trend in the area of business in our country. There is a tendency away from cash. I do not understand it. I think the simplest thing to do would be to pay cash for something. But no, some people think that is so old fashion that they have to come up with something new. Now they have this newfangled thing that you can pay your bills online. What is that all about? I like to see the person I am paying and hear from them their gratuitous Thank you, for the transaction. I was just getting used to writing checks and now I do not have to use my checkbook anymore. My creditors want me to pay online. When will all this craziness stop? If cash was good enough for Benjamin Franklin, it certainly is good enough for me. Then the inevitable happened. You know how it is. Well, it happened to me. I went to do a little bit of shopping while I was out of town on a trip recently. I made sure I had cash in my wallet so I stopped at a restaurant in the shopping mall. Normally I do not like shopping malls. I get nervous every time I go into one of these malls wondering if I will ever exit alive. There are just too many people in these malls for my comfort. But the necessity of my trip brought me to this mall and I decided I would treat myself to lunch. One of the great things about treating myself to lunch when my wife is not with me is I can order what I want for my lunch. After all, it is my lunch. I had a great time selecting things from the menu that had nothing whatsoever to do with vegetables. Vegetables are all right in their place, but their place is not on my lunch plate, especially when my wife is not present. I had a scrumptious lunch and then top it off with a nice slice of apple pie la mode. Life does not get any better than this. I sat back in my chair, rubbed my stomach and felt good about the world around me. I was even beginning to think that there might not be so much wrong with malls after all. Finally, it was time to take my ticket up to the cashier and pay for my lunch. I was in for a very rude awakening. I presented my ticket to the cashier and pulled out of my wallet enough cash to cover the ticket. Im sorry, sir, the woman behind the cashier said. We dont accept cash in this restaurant. I was in a good mood and laughed as though I was the vice President of the United States. Thats a good one, I complimented her. Sir, we dont take cash here, she insisted. We are not set up for cash; all we take are credit cards. About this time, I realized she was not joking. I found myself in the proverbial pickle with only cash on my person and no credit card. But all I have is cash. Finally, the manager of the restaurant was called to the front, I was able to settle my ticket with him, giving him cash and he used his credit card to pay the ticket. What is this world coming to when you cannot use cash anymore? What is better than cash in my thinking is Gods gift. For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord (Romans 6:23 KJV). Unlike cash, Gods gift to me will never go out of style.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com. OUT TO PASTORSpecial to The News Big Bend Hospice invites everyone to the annual Services of Remembrance, which are held in each of the counties Big Bend Hospice serves. Big Bend Hospices Service of Remembrance is a non-denominational service that brings together those in the community to honor the memories of loved ones at this very special time of the year. Many times people become overwhelmed with emotions during the holiday season, said Cathy Adkison, Big Bend Hospices President and CEO. Big Bend Hospices Service of Remembrance provides a wonderful opportunity to pause to remember, pay honor and find support, Adkison said. This is a time for remembrance open to everyone in the community, The service is open to the public. The Wakulla County service will be held on Sunday, Dec. 2 at 4 p.m. at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. The services in each county includes music by Music Therapists and words of encouragement from chaplains, all are part of the Big Bend Hospice staff. Big Bend Hospice Grief and Loss Counselors will also be available to talk. The Services conclude with a special candle-lighting ceremony and passing of the candlelight in memory of loved ones. A reception follows, hosted by members from each countys Advisory Council. Other county services are set for: Franklin County Saturday, Nov. 10, at 10:30 a.m. at Three Servicemen Statue, 230 Market Street, Apalachicola. Gadsden County Thursday, Dec. 13, at 6 p.m. at Magnolia House Assisted Living Facility, 1125 Strong Road, Quincy. Jefferson County Monday, Dec. 3, at 6 p.m. at First Church of the Nazarene, 1590 North Jefferson Street, Monticello. Madison County Thursday, Dec. 6, at 6 p.m. at St. Marys Episcopal Church, 140 NE Horry Avenue, Madison. Taylor County Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 6 p.m., at Perry Garden Club, 206 Forest Park Drive, Perry. Everyone who attends shares a common purpose to honor and to remember a loved one who has died, to be surrounded by others who are on a similar journey and to connect with loved ones. The service is proof that death ends a life and not a relationship, that the holidays can still be a time of hope and of family, of love and of connection to all the things and all the people who have ever been important to us. If you would like additional information about Big Bend Hospices bereavement services, please contact Pam Mezzina at (850) 878-5310, x799 or pam@bigbendhospice.org. Registration information is also available at www.bigbendhospice.org. Big Bend Hospice will hold Service to RememberService of Remembrance o ers a wonderful opportunity to honor our loved ones as the holiday season begins.Teens who have experienced the death of a parent, grandparent sibling, friend or other signi cant person in their life can enjoy a fun, relaxing, and uplifting day at Bradleys Pond in the company of their peers. The event is set for Thursday, Nov. 1, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Retreat at Bradleys Pond in northern Leon County. This retreat will include group activities, music, creative arts, and a special remembrance ceremony. The loss does not have to be recent for a teen to bene t from this retreat. Some local school districts consider this an excused absence so please check with your teens school. Light breakfast, lunch, and a complimentary t-shirt or hoodie will be provided. Space is limited, so please contact Caitlin at 878-5310 extension 706 or email at Caitlin@bigbendhospice.org for more information or to register. This retreat is a free service of Big Bend Hospice but donations are graciously accepted.Teen Woe-Be-Gone is for grieving teens YARD SALESFRI & SAT OCT 19 & 20 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS!TWO BIG (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & ExteriorTogether We Are Providing Employment for Local CraftsmanFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings CommunityEvent is held in honor of Austin Fleetwood Special to The NewsOn Wednesday, Sept. 19, community members gathered in memory of Austin Fleetwood. Under the direction of the newly formed 4-H Education Enrichment Council, Wakulla citizens of all ages came together at Beef OBradys to support a local family at a Team Fleetwood Fundraiser. Students from Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School advertised the event, greeted and seated customers, cleared tables and assisted the servers throughout the four-hour event, while maintaining a steady stream of Team Fleetwood T-shirt and bracelet sales. Even when the crowd size created a 30-minute wait for available tables, the customers were cheerful about the delay. WHS junior Makayla Payne said, It was amazing! Our community members do not mind giving to a family in need. We all come together to help. So many young people were there, and it was exciting to be a part of the event. Forever Team Fleetwood. Fleetwood, a popular local high school student, recently lost his battle with cancer, and the event gave community members one more opportunity to honor his family. More than $900 was raised between the spirit night donation from Beefs, community member donations and shirt and bracelet sales. 4-H volunteers for the event were Andrew Bracci, Jillian Richardson, Richard Walker, Danielle Gray, Alexander Lewis, Ciara Harris, Montana Burns and Shalia Godbolt. Leaders were Kelli Bracci and Nancy Floyd Richardson. 4-H Agent Sherri Kraeft and volunteer Jo Ann Palmer were present to support the event as well. For more information on any 4-H Club or event, visit their website at wakulla.ifas. u .edu or like them on Facebook at Wakulla County 4-H. The 4-H Agent can be reached in the of ce at 9263931 or via email at sjkraeft@ u .edu.Photos by Nancy Floyd Richardson/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents and volunteers sport Team Fleetwood T-shirts, above left, at the recent fundraiser held in honor of Austin Fleetwood, while other students support the cause. Big Catch Charity Fish Fry is planned for Oct. 23Special to The NewsWakulla Countys Big Brothers Big Sisters Mentoring Program will host its third annual BIG Catch Charity Fish Fry on Oct. 23 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Presented by Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend, the dinner event will take place at Poseys Dockside Caf located at 99 Rock Landing Road in Panacea. The events purpose is to raise awareness about Big Brothers Big Sisters in Wakulla County, to raise funds for the growing youth mentoring program and to bring the community together for dinner and good time on a Tuesday night. Host to approximately 250 community-minded Wakulla County residents, the BIG Catch Charity Fish Fry will feature shrimp plates, sides and iced tea catered by Poseys, cash bar, and live music in a relaxing family friendly environment. Commissioner Alan Brock, a dedicated youth mentoring advocate, said, The Big Brothers Big Sisters Mentoring Program in Wakulla County has really gained momentum over the last year. New partnerships are forming with groups throughout the county, and I am even serving as a member of the Big Brothers Big Sisters Wakulla County Advisory Panel. The organization is now focusing on recruiting both volunteers and children to the Wakulla County Program. We hope the BIG Catch Charity Fish Fry will create greater awareness and raise donations to help with recruitment and ongoing Big/ Little case management. With increased funding from the United Way and the addition of a second part-time employee, the Big Brothers Big Sisters Mentoring Program in Wakulla County said Louis Garcia, Big Brothers Big Sisters chief executive of cer. Our goal is to strengthen the community by setting more atrisk youth on a path toward success. With the guidance of safe, compatible mentors, the youth we serve have a better shot of reaching their full potential. Its not rocket science, said long-time Wakulla County resident and program coordinator, Stacy Harvey. Children need positive adult role models in their lives. Our volunteer mentors spend time with their Little at least twice a month for a minimum of a year. After a year, these children experience improved self con dence, improved relationships with guardians, teachers and peers, avoidance of risky behaviors, and improved academic outcomes. It works, and we have many real life success stories. Tickets are available to purchase at Poseys Steam Room (1506 Coastal Highway), Poseys Dockside Caf (99 Rock Landing Road,) or online at www.bbbs.org/BIGCatch for $10 per plate. For ticket information or to learn more about how to enroll a child or about how to become a mentor, contact Stacy Harvey at wakulla@ bbbsbigbend.org or 366-3865. To sponsor the event, contact Director of Philanthropy Katie Williams at katie.williams@bigbendmentoring. org or at 386-3863. Local student crowned Miss Teen Florida International Special to The NewsRhiannon Dressel-Beattie of Crawfordville was recently crowned Miss Teen Florida International 2013. She will compete for the title of Miss Teen International in July at the Northshore Performing Arts Center in Chicago, Ill. Contestants of the Miss Teen International pageant will compete in the areas of evening gown, aerobic wear, fun fashion wear and personal interview. Dressel-Beattie, a home schooled student, will promote her platform of Helping Hearts during her reign as Miss Teen Florida International and if she should capture the International crown. She chose this platform after her father passed away last July of a heart attack. My platform, Helping Hearts, was inspired by him and his death, said DresselBeattie as well as the experience of helping a loved one with heart disease. Dressel-Beattie is the daughter of Roxann Dressel and the late Dan Stockwell. Although she enjoys competing in pageants this busy teen loves giving back to her community. I was recently a volunteer at the Eden Springs Nursing Home Fundraising event, which raised money for the resident prom, she said. They asked me to be volunteer manager of their country store which is open to serve the residents. Giving her mother credit for raising her to help others before helping herself, Dressel-Beattie has won numerous awards for her community involvement including International Leadership Networks Young Achiever 2012, Relay for Life Star Supporter 2011, Presidential Volunteer Service Award Gold Level 2010 and World Youth Federations Humanitarian Award 2007. The Miss Teen Florida Pageant is the preliminary to the Miss Teen International Pageant. The Miss International system was developed to promote todays young women, their accomplishments and commitment to family and community. For more information or appearances contact Lauri Rottmayer, New Media Marketing, at foxxytrotmedia@gmail.com or (918) 350-0190. Happy birthday, MadisonHappy rst birthday to Madison Manelli Gebhart on Oct. 18. She is the daughter of Heath and Angie Shivers Gebhart of Woodville. Her maternal grandparents are Gary and Rita deMontmollin Shivers of Woodville. Her paternal grandparents are Gary and Nancy Gebhart of Waukeena. Her maternal greatgrandparents are Floyd deMontmollin, Sr. of Woodville and the late Margarita Manelli deMontmollin and Betty Shivers of Crawfordville and the late John Bob Shivers. Her paternal greatgrandparents are the late Ellsworth Sponseller, Jr. formerly of Waukeenah, Betty Sponseller, New Oxford, Penn., and the late Leo and Jane Gebhart formerly of Bonneauville, Penn. She has a big brother Wyatt who will be turning 5 years old on Nov. 1. Rhiannon Dressel-Beattie Madison Gebhart Poli cal adversement, paid for and approved by Ralph Thomas, Republican, for County Commission District 1 Who is Thomas and Why is it time? My name is Ralph Thomas and I would like to be your next County Commissioner for District 1. At election time, we see candidates step forward and ask us for our vote. Most are very good at telling us what they will do for us, if elected. If you do not already know me, the most important thing I want you to know, is that I have been very involved in Wakulla politics for many years, as a concerned citizen. Im not just telling you what I think I can do, I want you know what I have already done. On 09/06/2011, our County Commissioners imposed a new garbage tax. They also adopted a hardship exemption for those who could not afford the new tax. While this seemed like a noble gesture, they neglected to accurately calculate the cost of the exemption. This is hard to believe considering they spent a year on this project. Realizing their oversight, I did the analysis and I did the math. After understanding the real cost, and sharing it with our Commissioners, they changed the exemption threshold and avoided a very costly mistake. My efforts, saved our tax payers more money than I will earn as a Commissioner over the next four years. Im sure you have noticed that our current Board of County Commissioners has imposed new taxes for you to pay and also increased others that you were already paying. Most folks understand that taxes are a necessary part of living in a desirable community. I think we also understand that times are hard and we are all operating on less than we did in the past, including county government. Most folks also agree that efficient spending must be achieved before new taxes are imposed on our citizens. I have been working hard to encourage our Commissioners to get their spending under control before asking you to pay additional taxes. We currently pay a 4 cent local option fuel tax, which funds the road department. It has existed since 1993. Since then, the tax has been extended in five year increments, as needed. Earlier this year, our Commissioners were prepared to extend the tax for 30 years. I saw no good reason for this lengthy extension. I spoke to the board with a desire to let citizens know that a 30 year extension would allow our Commissioners to borrow against this revenue stream. I didnt think it was a good idea to take taxpayers deeper into debt. After raising this issue, all five Commissioners agreed, and changed the extension from 30 to 5 years. After Commissioners approved the purchase of a new truck for the EMS Department, I reviewed the State Purchasing Contract and discovered a truck with more features that was better suited for its intended purpose, and for slightly less money. All five Commissioners agreed with my recommendation and changed the purchase order. You can count on me to keep an eye on the bottom line. Its your money. You need a Commissioner who will guard it for you and spend it wisely. I humbly ask for your vote and I look forward to the opportunity to serve you! I welcome your call at 559-0608. See for yourself @ h p://youtu.be/0-L5ExMjNDw See for yourself @ h p://youtu.be/24JubiM_EVs See for yourself @ h p://youtu.be/AQRyjsewBT4 See for yourself @ h p://youtu.be/elcaZiIuU8Y An appraiser for Wakulla's next chapter (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser I LIKEMIKE STEWARTREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mike Stewart, Republican candidate for county commissioner, district 3 PLEASE RECYCLE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 9Aeducation news SchoolRMS students express themselves through tie-dye Special to The NewsRiversprings Middle School held two School Pride Tie-Dye days on Friday, Sept. 14 and Friday, Oct. 5. The event was the brain child of RMS Principal Dod Walker. Walker said that he wanted, Students to be able to express individuality and uniqueness, while understanding the value of being part of a group. School Tshirts were made available for the students, faculty and staff. Participants met in the Riversprings courtyard to tie-dye their shirts. The result was a shirt that had a unique ngerprint, but also possessed similarity to each other. The coordinator for the event was sixth grade teacher Louis Hernandez. Students had the opportunity to Show school pride through scienti c inquiry, according to Hernandez. Hernandez ground troops were Mina Sutton, Amber Allen and Steve Walker. Judging from the number of tie-dyed shirts on campus, the event was an enormous success. So whenever you see a student around the county wearing a RMS tie-dyed shirt, you will know that they are expressing their bear pride. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents prepare to tie-dye their school shirts with the help of teacher, Louis Hernandez, left, and a nished product, right. Data shows improvement in subgroups achievementBy BETH ODONNELLAssistant SuperintendentEvery fall after the initial state test data results are released for entire districts and schools in the summer, the Florida Department of Education digs deeper into the data to look at how subgroups performed. This is done so that school districts can see how they are doing with each population in their schools. For example, if the district as a whole does better each year but it does not advance each subgroup, then it needs to look at what it can do to better serve students in that subgroup. Several subgroups in Wakulla showed reading and math scores above the 2012 state averages and also showed an increase in achievement levels over the same 2011 subgroup in Wakulla. In reading, the black student population in Wakulla scored 7 percent higher than the 2012 state average for the same subgroup. Hispanic students in Wakulla scored 15 percent higher than the same 2012 subgroup state average. Economically disadvantaged students in Wakulla scored 10 percent higher than the 2012 state average for economically disadvantaged students. The Asian student population in Wakulla scored 3 percent higher than the same 2012 state subgroup average. All four Wakulla subgroups also increased their achievement levels from the same 2011 Wakulla subgroups. In math, the black student population in Wakulla scored 4 percent over the 2012 state average for the same subgroup. Hispanic students in Wakulla scored 8 percent over the state Hispanic population. Economically disadvantaged students scored 7 percent higher than the state average. Asian students scored 10 percent higher than their state counterparts. The Indian student population scored 13 percent higher than the state average. All ve Wakulla subgroups also increased their achievement levels over the previous years same Wakulla subgroups. Every fall we disaggregate this data to see how we can serve all of our students better, said Superintendent David Miller. But we dont just wait until these numbers come out. We have a pretty good idea throughout the year using different assessments so our teachers can help every student get the most out of each school year.First Lady Ann Scotts Summer Literary Program endsSpecial to The NewsThroughout the summer, First Lady Ann Scott visited Florida state parks and challenged students to read as many books as possible during the summer break. Now that summer is over, the results of the First Ladys 2012 Summer Literacy Adventure have been tallied and show that students at Wellington Elementary School in Palm Beach County pledged to read 6,248 books more than any other school in the state. Statewide, nearly 29,000 students pledged to read a total of 102,733 books. I am delighted to congratulate the students of Wellington Elementary for their incredible participation in this years Summer Literacy Adventure, said First Lady Scott. Literacy and reading are the foundation for all learning and these students are well on their way to success. First Lady Scott made the announcement Wednesday during a visit to the school to congratulate the students on their victory. In honor of their accomplishment, Wellington Elementary students and staff will get a free oneday pass good at any state park in Florida from the Department of Environmental Protection. I want to thank Mrs. Scott for her commitment to reading and helping students boost their literacy skills, said Commissioner of Education Pam Stewart. The Summer Reading Adventure is an exciting way for students to discover nature and have fun reading at the same time. I also want to thank our partners who made this years adventure a great success. The 2012 Summer Literacy Adventure is a partnership between First Lady Ann Scott, the Department of Educations Just Read, Florida! office, the Department of Environmental Protection, Scholastic, and MetaMetrics, and is geared toward helping children stay engaged in reading and literacy during the summer break. Children participating in the Summer Literacy Adventure were also encouraged to use a free online tool to search for books based on their reading ability and interests. A unique resource from MetaMetrics called Find a Book, Florida uses Lexile measures to guide readers to the most appropriate level books for them. To learn about literacy resources available through the Department of Education, visit Just Read, Florida! Local public libraries are also an excellent literacy resource throughout the school year and Florida State Parks enhance learning experiences through exploration and discovery all year long. To view photos of the event, please visit www.facebook.com/FLAnnScott. To learn more about First Lady Ann Scott, follow her on twitter at @FLANNSCOTT. Grant awarded to TCC will help Wakulla studentsSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Department of Education (FDOE) has awarded $670,110 to Tallahassee Community College (TCC) to support a 21st Century Community Learning Center (CCLC) Program that will serve Wakulla County students. The grant project will be a collaborative effort between TCC, Wakulla Christian School (WCS), Wakulla County Schools, Communities in Schools of Florida and local organizations. The program will be based at Wakulla Christian School and will serve students enrolled at eight elementary and middle schools throughout Wakulla County Crawfordville Elementary, Medart Elementary, Riversink Elementary, Shadeville Elementary, Wakulla Coast Charter, Riversprings Middle, Wakulla Middle and Wakulla Christian School. The 21st CCLC program will play a critically important role in changing the lives of at-risk students by preparing students to succeed at their schools and beyond, said TCC President Jim Murdaugh. TCC is pleased to collaborate on this project with Wakulla Christian School, the Wakulla County Schools and other valued partners. The Florida Department of Educations generous award will enable our partnership to provide academic services of the highest quality to improve student achievement. The new project will build on TCCs extensive experience in providing after-school academic enrichment activities through 21st CCLC programs in Gadsden and Jefferson counties. Like its predecessors, the Wakulla County project will aim to increase students academic performance, increase awareness of healthy behaviors and increase family involvement of adult caregivers. The Wakulla Christian School site will deliver services for 140 students in pre-k through eighth grade during afterschool, weekends, holidays and summer. The project will be led by Bonnie Holub, Director of the TCC Wakulla Center. Although TCC will receive $670,110 for the 2012-13 academic year, the FDOE award is renewable annually for a ve-project performance period with maximum total funding of $2,948,484. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFirst Lady Ann Scott reads to children at an elementary school in Florida. TCCs WAKULLA CENTERWe want you to succeed professionally through education and training. We are here to help.FALL 2012 INFORMATION SESSIONS:OCTOBER 23 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about the Testing Center, Enrollment Services and Student SuccessOCTOBER 30 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about Financial Aid & Scholarship and the Career CenterNOVEMBER 6 | 3 5 P.M.Learn more Financial Aid & Scholarships, Enrollment Services and Student SuccessNOVEMBER 13 | 3 6 P.M.Learn more about the Testing Center and the Career CenterTesting is available by appointment every Friday. For more information call (850) 922-6290 GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWell, here it is the middle of October and Sunday felt like summertime when the wind quit out on the ats. Its supposed to cool down starting Tuesday and I can tell you I am looking forward to some cooler weather. According to Alan Lamarche, grouper shing is outstanding and you dont have to go very deep to nd sh. On Friday, Alan took Plantation Security officers Joe Martelli and Grady Phelps. They started by checking a pin sh rap out on the Ochlockonee Shoals and noticed a lot of activity in 3 to 4 feet of water. It turned out to be big bull reds. They used pin sh to catch a release several of them before heading on out in search of grouper. They got their limit of grouper using LYs and live pin sh. Grouper season closes the end of October. Jeff May, a U.S. Marshal from the Atlanta area brought several other marshals down last weekend and spent the first day shing a shallow reef where they caught some ounder and one legal cobia and lost a bigger one. On Saturday, they headed offshore and came in with four nice grouper and 25 big seabass. While making an arrest in Atlanta, Jeff slipped and broke his leg, which kept him from shing the entire weekend, but he was able to drive the boat. Capt. David Fife of Spring Creek shed three half-days with some friends from Destin. They shed mostly with live bull minnows and cut bait. They caught 15 reds, 20 speckled trout and 30 big silver trout during those days. Mike Falk Jr. said he shed Sunday before last with his 5 year old son and they caught a lot of sh. Using a white Gulp with a chartreuse tail, under the Cajun Thunder, they caught about 30 trout off the Shell Point Reef. They went back Sunday but the winds kept them from shing that area so they shed the ats until the winds died. They then ran to the Ochlockonee Shoals. Carson caught a 24-inch trout shing a Gulp very slowly on the bottom. Mike said he made the cast, set the hook and brought the trout to the boat and all he had to do was net it. He said they went through a bunch of Gulps because of the large number of black seabass, Spanish and ladyfish out there. Mike said when they go to Wal-Mart his son immediately goes to the shing department. Bill Birdwell of Shell Point had his 8-year-old grandson Wyatt Goode from Chattanooga down while on a fall break and they fished several days. Wyatt caught a 20-inch trout using a Gulp under a Cajun Thunder and Bill said he had another one on that big that a shark bit half into. They were shing the ats east of Live Oak Island. Capt. Luke Frazier at Angies Marine in Medart said they fished last week at the mouth of the Ochlockonee River. He said they fished the Clam Bar and other places where they have generally done real well and couldnt catch a sh. They moved into the oyster bars at the mouth of the river where quite a few boats were getting oysters. They anchored about 40 feet from them and started casting jigs and ended up with eight big trout. Luke has started guiding again. What he is doing is guiding people who have their own boats but just cant seem to catch sh or dont know where to go. If you t into this category, drop by AMS in Medart and look Luke up. Hell put you on the sh. Week before last I took out Jim Jaynes from Conyers, Ga. Jim works for Bass Pro in Atlanta and was down with his wife for two weeks. We fished Oyster Bay and caught a lot of sh. The rst spot we shed we caught a lot of silver trout but they werent real big. We went to another spot and everyone there was over 15 inches long they were very hungry. We probably caught and released about 30 of them and then went to a spot for trout. The trout were stacked up like cordwood but most were 14 inches long though we did manage to catch several big enough to keep. When the tide got up good we went to the flats and using the Gulp under the Cajun Thunder we caught more nice speckled trout. Yesterday I shed with Kevin Walsh, his son Matthew and Matthews friend Caleen. The wind was out of the east and I shed the same spots I had shed with Jim but they just werent there. We shed hard for trout most of the day and ended up with three trout, one Spanish and a ounder. Fortunately the reds cooperated and we ended up with seven nice reds and threw back about 10 or 12. Everything was caught on live shrimp. The weather is going to cool down this weekend and should push more sh around the oyster bars and into the creeks. Hopefully it will bunch up the reds a little more. Right now there are plenty of sh out on the Ochlockonee Shoals as well and at the mouth of the Ochlockonee River. I dont know that I have ever seen as many mullet on the ats as I have this past week and also a lot of bait. Remember to know y our limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Weather should cool, moving sh to oyster bars, creeksWyatt Goode with a 20 1/2 inch trout caught while shing with grandfather Bill Birdwell of Shell Point.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Special to The News The U.S. Forest Service will soon begin their prescribed re season for 2013. Approximately 100,000 acres in the Apalachicola National Forest are planned for prescribed re to help prevent wild res and promote a healthy forest. Plants and animals native to the longleaf pine habitats in the Apalachicola National Forest depend on natural re cycles, which are mimicked through the use of prescribed res to balance habitat and food sources. Prescribed burning is also one of the most effective land management tools used in preventing the outbreak and spread of wild res. Prescribed re is a safe way to apply a natural process, ensure ecosystem health and reduce wild re risk. Land managers and ecologists understand the natural process; res have been part of the system since the beginning of time and are as natural and important as wind and rain, said Steve Parrish, U.S. Forest Service re management of- cer for the Apalachicola National Forest. Drivers and residents are reminded of the possibility of unexpected shifting winds that could increase the risk of smoke on the road during prescribed burns. If you have questions regarding the prescribed re burning season, contact the Apalachicola National Forest Wakulla Ranger District Of ce at (850) 926-3561.Prescribed burning to begin in national forest 926-6040WWW.SAFEWAYWATERBYSLMCO.COM SafewayWater by SLMCOWhole house ltration systems Water softeners & conditioners NO-SALT water conditioners Iron & Sulfur removal systems Drinking water systems Expert well water treatment ~ WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT CENTER ~ Better taste ... Better health ... Better on your budget ~ WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT CENTER ~ Better taste... Better health... Better on your budget! WATER QUALITY REPO RT Call today for a free water report For your community!Or call today for a free water test and Analysis. We will test for: TDS, IRON, IRON BACTERIA, CHLORINE LEVELS and HARDINESS And give you the results right on the spot!NO OBLIGATION NO PRESSURE NO NONSENSE FACTORY DIRECT PRICING!!!$11700 OFFWITH THIS ADEXPIRES: 10/31/12WHOLE HOUSE SYSTEM!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton I must start this week with a thank you to a valued reader. Two weeks ago the column covered Rule 13 discusses the overtaking, or passing, of one boat by another. It was brought to my attention that there was an error in my description of the rule. It should have read: To be overtaking, or passing another boat the rule states that you must be more than 22.5 degrees abaft (behind) the beam (mid-line of the boat). In this position, the passing boat will only be able to see the white sternlight of the boat being passed. I had stated the white anchor light. This past week Division 1 held our fall conference and business meeting. Saturday offered conference attendees a choice of six trainings to attend. Some lasted a half-day while others were scheduled for the entire day. Our Staff Officer for Member Training Anne DelBello worked hard with the conference organizer Ellena Rolland to make sure everything went well. Flotilla 12 member Duane Treadon was asked to be an instructor for WOW, a website design/ maintenance program. Other training included rules of the road, operations, aids to navigation, paddleboard sports, the Coast Guard noti cation system Everbridge and others. Saturday ended with an awards banquet. Sunday morning was the business meeting. This is a time for all the Flotilla Commanders and Division Staff Of cers to come together with representatives from Sector Mobile, DIRAUX, Station Destin and Station Panama City. At this meeting we were fortunate to welcome Commander Muller from Sector Mobile; Lt. John Autherment, MSD from Station Panama City; Jeff Brooks District Captain East and Jeff Davis aviation liaison to Sector Mobile. Throughout the meeting, the importance of increasing awareness and educating commercial shing vessels on the need for inspections was discussed. As of Oct. 15, 2012, all U.S. commercial fishing vessels operating beyond three nautical miles offshore will be required to have a U.S. Coast Guard dockside safety examination. The mandatory dockside examination requirement, called for in legislation enacted in 2010, affects commercial fishing vessels nationwide, and includes all commercial fishing, fish tender and sh processing vessels. Although commercial shing vessels operating beyond three nautical miles from the coast must have a safety examination, all U.S. commercial shing vessels, regardless of where they operate, can request an exam and are encouraged to do so (http:// www.uscgnews.com/go/ doc/4007/1556011/Safetyexaminations-requiredfor-commercial-fishingvessels-). Both Commander Muller and Lieutenant Autherment stressed the bene t the Auxiliary can provide with increasing education for commercial shing vessels and captains in the future. In addition to the typical business, The fall conference is also the time elections are held for the upcoming year. Current Division Commander Mo Davis has completed his two year term and was recently elected to the position of District Captain East. It is with great pride that I announce to you the newly elected and already installed Division Commander and Division vice Commander Gordon Schmidt and Eric DeVuyst. Following the election, the former elected leadership passed down their shoulder boards to the new elected leadership, a tradition started several years ago. Shoulder boards designate the highest office held by a member of the auxiliary, either elected or appointed. Staff Of cer for communications Dallas Cochran discussed the completion of a mobile communications station that will be available to otillas across the division as well as the active duty if needed. With the potential for bad weather that may limit access or take of ine our communications throughout the Division, this is a great asset. Bravo Zulu to all who helped make this a reality! All in all it was a very successful meeting! It is always great to see other auxiliarists and reconnect. We will not have another Division meeting until February 2013. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident, neither is safe shing. Schedule your vessel exam today! Mo Davis, Eric DeVyst, Gordon Schmidt, Jeff Brooks District Captain East Jeff Brooks administers the oath to newly elected division leadership.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Dive Education Now that the summer is over, the weather is cooling down and the number of requests for basic diver training has gone up. Folks are preparing for the adventures of next spring now that school is back in session and the family shifts into a different routine. I have been training people to breathe compressed gases underwater for 45 years. The answer to a request for diver training is seldom the same. I ask what the anticipated outcome from this requested training might be? Parents want their kids to dive with them. Spouses want to accompany each other underwater. Fishermen want to spear sh in their native habitat. Scientists want to collect data below the surface. Police want to collect evidence or a body that has been dumped in a sinkhole. Clam shermen want to harvest their catch. People want to dive for good health. Photographers want to capture images of the silent world. People want to build arti cial reefs. Mostly, people want to see beautiful reef sh. I am always pleased at the variety of things we want to do or see underwater. I begin by encouraging them, regardless of age, to get a mask, snorkel and ns and learn how to breathhold dive. Just about any age can do this activity called snorkel diving. We usually collect scallops by holding our breath and brie y sliding below the surface to search for the blueeyed swimmers. And kids can practice in their supervised family pool, strengthening swimming skills until they are old enough to move to the next step. As a family, I took my kids into surface supplied diving rst. I placed a compressor on the boat and supervised them breathing from a regulated gas supply while watching from the surface until they were con dent and informed enough to join me at very shallow depths. This approach works for adults also. There is no heavy cylinder on your back and you are on a leash! Freedom from any connection to the surface is the ultimate objective however, and a Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus is what most folks want. A traditional quality scuba class will take ve days, include lectures to learn details about the physics and physiology of the environment, local residents and the technology. Pool training to master skin and scuba skills takes the same amount of time. The last two days of the class are dedicated to checkout dives, hopefully in clear and somewhat warm water. How this class is bundled together is up to the instructor and students to arrange, either as weeknight lectures with weekend water work, or morning lecture with afternoon pool sessions. In the end, the certi cation earned is a learners permit to depths no deeper than 60 feet. Classes with couples are taught differently from those with kids and different again from training police of cers. They each have their charm and challenges. I understand that Wakulla High School has a new Engineering Program. I wonder if they might be interested in our Dive Engineer curriculum taught along these same lines? Safety through education! Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Oct 18, 12 Fri Oct 19, 12 Sat Oct 20, 12 Sun Oct 21, 12 Mon Oct 22, 12 Tue Oct 23, 12 Wed Oct 24, 12 D ate 4.2 ft. 3:43 AM 4.1 ft. 4:21 AM 3.9 ft. 5:05 AM Hi g h -0.5 ft. 10:55 AM -0.3 ft. 11:47 AM 0.1 ft. 12:46 PM 1.8 ft. 12:04 AM 1.9 ft. 1:18 AM 1.8 ft. 3:02 AM 1.5 ft. 4:42 AM L ow 3.5 ft. 5:25 PM 3.2 ft. 6:17 PM 2.9 ft. 7:16 PM 3.6 ft. 6:00 AM 3.2 ft. 7:23 AM 3.0 ft. 9:32 AM 3.1 ft. 11:14 AM Hi g h 1.6 ft. 10:30 PM 1.7 ft. 11:11 PM 0.5 ft. 1:54 PM 0.8 ft. 3:10 PM 1.0 ft. 4:25 PM 1.1 ft. 5:27 PM L ow 2.8 ft. 8:27 PM 2.8 ft. 9:43 PM 2.9 ft. 10:47 PM 3.1 ft. 11:36 PM Hi g h Thu Oct 18, 12 Fri Oct 19, 12 Sat Oct 20, 12 Sun Oct 21, 12 Mon Oct 22, 12 Tue Oct 23, 12 Wed Oct 24, 12 D ate 3.2 ft. 3:35 AM 3.1 ft. 4:13 AM 2.9 ft. 4:57 AM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 11:06 AM -0.2 ft. 11:58 AM 0.1 ft. 12:57 PM 1.3 ft. 12:15 AM 1.4 ft. 1:29 AM 1.3 ft. 3:13 AM 1.1 ft. 4:53 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 5:17 PM 2.4 ft. 6:09 PM 2.2 ft. 7:08 PM 2.7 ft. 5:52 AM 2.4 ft. 7:15 AM 2.2 ft. 9:24 AM 2.3 ft. 11:06 AM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 10:41 PM 1.3 ft. 11:22 PM 0.3 ft. 2:05 PM 0.6 ft. 3:21 PM 0.7 ft. 4:36 PM 0.8 ft. 5:38 PM L ow 2.1 ft. 8:19 PM 2.1 ft. 9:35 PM 2.2 ft. 10:39 PM 2.3 ft. 11:28 PM Hi g h Thu Oct 18, 12 Fri Oct 19, 12 Sat Oct 20, 12 Sun Oct 21, 12 Mon Oct 22, 12 Tue Oct 23, 12 Wed Oct 24, 12 D ate 3.9 ft. 4:19 AM 3.8 ft. 4:57 AM Hi g h -0.5 ft. 11:59 AM -0.2 ft. 12:51 PM 1.6 ft. 12:15 AM 1.7 ft. 1:08 AM 1.7 ft. 2:22 AM 1.6 ft. 4:06 AM 1.3 ft. 5:46 AM L ow 3.3 ft. 6:01 PM 3.0 ft. 6:53 PM 3.6 ft. 5:41 AM 3.3 ft. 6:36 AM 3.0 ft. 7:59 AM 2.8 ft. 10:08 AM 2.9 ft. 11:50 AM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 11:34 PM 0.1 ft. 1:50 PM 0.4 ft. 2:58 PM 0.7 ft. 4:14 PM 0.9 ft. 5:29 PM 1.0 ft. 6:31 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 7:52 PM 2.6 ft. 9:03 PM 2.6 ft. 10:19 PM 2.7 ft. 11:23 PM Hi g h Thu Oct 18, 12 Fri Oct 19, 12 Sat Oct 20, 12 Sun Oct 21, 12 Mon Oct 22, 12 Tue Oct 23, 12 Wed Oct 24, 12 D ate 3.3 ft. 3:27 AM 3.2 ft. 4:05 AM 3.0 ft. 4:49 AM 2.8 ft. 5:44 AM Hi g h -0.5 ft. 10:34 AM -0.3 ft. 11:26 AM 0.1 ft. 12:25 PM 0.5 ft. 1:33 PM 1.9 ft. 12:57 AM 1.8 ft. 2:41 AM 1.4 ft. 4:21 AM L ow 2.7 ft. 5:09 PM 2.5 ft. 6:01 PM 2.3 ft. 7:00 PM 2.2 ft. 8:11 PM 2.5 ft. 7:07 AM 2.3 ft. 9:16 AM 2.4 ft. 10:58 AM Hi g h 1.6 ft. 10:09 PM 1.7 ft. 10:50 PM 1.8 ft. 11:43 PM 0.7 ft. 2:49 PM 0.9 ft. 4:04 PM 1.0 ft. 5:06 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 9:27 PM 2.3 ft. 10:31 PM 2.4 ft. 11:20 PM Hi g h Thu Oct 18, 12 Fri Oct 19, 12 Sat Oct 20, 12 Sun Oct 21, 12 Mon Oct 22, 12 Tue Oct 23, 12 Wed Oct 24, 12 D ate 4.3 ft. 3:40 AM 4.2 ft. 4:18 AM 4.0 ft. 5:02 AM Hi g h -0.6 ft. 10:52 AM -0.3 ft. 11:44 AM 0.1 ft. 12:43 PM 2.0 ft. 12:01 AM 2.1 ft. 1:15 AM 1.9 ft. 2:59 AM 1.6 ft. 4:39 AM L ow 3.6 ft. 5:22 PM 3.3 ft. 6:14 PM 3.0 ft. 7:13 PM 3.6 ft. 5:57 AM 3.2 ft. 7:20 AM 3.0 ft. 9:29 AM 3.1 ft. 11:11 AM Hi g h 1.7 ft. 10:27 PM 1.9 ft. 11:08 PM 0.5 ft. 1:51 PM 0.8 ft. 3:07 PM 1.0 ft. 4:22 PM 1.2 ft. 5:24 PM L ow 2.8 ft. 8:24 PM 2.8 ft. 9:40 PM 3.0 ft. 10:44 PM 3.2 ft. 11:33 PM Hi g h Thu Oct 18, 12 Fri Oct 19, 12 Sat Oct 20, 12 Sun Oct 21, 12 Mon Oct 22, 12 Tue Oct 23, 12 Wed Oct 24, 12 D ate 3.4 ft. 3:00 AM 3.4 ft. 3:42 AM 3.3 ft. 4:31 AM 3.1 ft. 5:31 AM Hi g h -0.1 ft. 10:21 AM 0.0 ft. 11:21 AM 0.2 ft. 12:30 PM 0.3 ft. 1:45 PM 1.8 ft. 1:17 AM 1.6 ft. 3:01 AM 1.3 ft. 4:20 AM L ow 2.8 ft. 6:37 PM 2.7 ft. 7:46 PM 2.6 ft. 8:56 PM 2.5 ft. 9:55 PM 2.8 ft. 6:49 AM 2.6 ft. 8:32 AM 2.5 ft. 10:32 AM Hi g h 2.0 ft. 9:41 PM 2.0 ft. 10:25 PM 2.0 ft. 11:34 PM 0.5 ft. 2:56 PM 0.7 ft. 4:00 PM 0.9 ft. 4:54 PM L ow 2.5 ft. 10:39 PM 2.6 ft. 11:12 PM 2.6 ft. 11:40 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacOct. 18 Oct. 24First Oct. 21 Full Oct. 29 Last Nov. 6 New Nov. 13Major Times 4:00 AM 6:00 AM 4:31 PM 6:31 PM Minor Times 11:08 AM 12:08 PM 9:51 PM 10:51 PM Major Times 5:01 AM 7:01 AM 5:32 PM 7:32 PM Minor Times 12:09 PM 1:09 PM 10:53 PM 11:53 PM Major Times 6:01 AM 8:01 AM 6:30 PM 8:30 PM Minor Times 1:05 PM 2:05 PM 11:56 PM 12:56 AM Major Times 6:59 AM 8:59 AM 7:26 PM 9:26 PM Minor Times --:---:-1:55 PM 2:55 PM Major Times 7:52 AM 9:52 AM 8:18 PM 10:18 PM Minor Times 12:59 AM 1:59 AM 2:38 PM 3:38 PM Major Times 8:43 AM 10:43 AM 9:07 PM 11:07 PM Minor Times 2:00 AM 3:00 AM 3:17 PM 4:17 PM Major Times 9:30 AM 11:30 AM 9:53 PM 11:53 PM Minor Times 2:59 AM 3:59 AM 3:53 PM 4:53 PM Average Average Average Average Average Average+ Average7:41 am 7:02 pm 11:09 am 9:52 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:42 am 7:01 pm 12:10 pm 10:54 pm 7:42 am 7:00 pm 1:06 pm 11:57 pm 7:43 am 6:59 pm 1:55 pm --:-7:44 am 6:58 pm 2:39 pm 1:00 am 7:44 am 6:57 pm 3:18 pm 2:01 am 7:45 am 6:56 pm 3:54 pm 3:00 am21% 29% 37% 44% 51% 58% 65% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Vote Against Alan BrockAs of September, he raised $24,125 For his campaign. $20,000 came from OUTSIDE our County & State .Do we want OUTSIDE People & MONEY INFLUENCING a Commissioner? NO Alan Does Not Pay Property Taxes!Poli cal adver sement paid for and approved by Donna Sanford.

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comFifty-two years ago the beautiful St. Marks Lighthouse went automatic. For me, and probably many others in Wakulla County, it marked the end of an era, and a sad one at that. No longer would keepers or as they were called after the Coast Guard took charge, Of cers-in-Charge, be on duty there to properly maintain the structure, respond to emergencies in their area of responsibility, give courtesies to minor requests from mariners, and provide constant attention to aids to navigation. Since 1960, the lighthouse would simply become a large beacon to mark the entrance to the St. Marks River. But my friends, there was a time that I can remember when there were people, often entire families at our lighthouse. One such family was that of my mother, who lived there with her parents and two brothers and ve sisters. That house was not very large, only two bedrooms, living room, and dining room. But somehow they managed to make it a home and a very happy one. My grandfather, John Y. Gresham, left his position as Assistant Keeper at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse in Gulf County in 1918 to take a promotion as Keeper at our St. Marks Lighthouse. He ended up staying there longer than any other Keeper, 31 years, until his retirement in 1949. Mother lived there until she got married in 1936. She passed away in 1999, but many years before that, she wrote a narrative, Life at the Lighthouse, and here it is: LIFE AT THE LIGHTHOUSE My family moved to Cape San Blas Lighthouse in the winter of 1916 when I was 3 years old. My father was the Assistant Keeper there for a year and from there was transferred to St. Marks Lighthouse as Keeper, a promotion. Both these lighthouses are on the Gulf of Mexico on the northwest coast of Florida. Our family consisted of only four children when we moved to the lighthouse but grew to eight of us, six girls and two boys. The nearest town was eight miles away, a small shing village, St. Marks. My father would go to St. Marks on Saturday, an hours run in his small, 20-foot launch. He would get the mail and a weeks supply of groceries and always brought candy for us children. Our main problem was school. My father had been reared in a very poor environment and had little schooling so was determined that we should have as much training as he could afford. He taught us himself when he had time. He subscribed to several magazines and we had to read them and tell him what he had learned. Every night of my life that I lived with my father I had to listen to Lowell Thomas give the news. Keeping a lighthouse is not a dif cult occupation, but rearing eight children at once is. In order to supplement the small salary paid by the government my father fished with a net at night. The lighthouse had to be kept immaculately clean, like a ship, at all times. With all the chores to be done there was little time left to teach the children so we advertised in several northern papers for a teacher who wished to spend the three summer months in Florida at a lighthouse and teach. We were swamped with mail! It was hard to choose someone from all the letters. When my father decided on a particular one he would write them the details. The teacher had to live in the house with the family and was paid a small salary, part by the government and part by my father. The teacher would arrive by train in St. Marks and we would meet them in the small launch. That was always an exciting day for us, meeting the teacher who would be our constant companion for three months. We always had a new teacher each summer except for one who came three consecutive summers. We had a room, the living room, made into a classroom with school desks and blackboard. We went to class promptly at eight in the morning, and my mother would have our lunch prepared at noon. We returned to the class room at 1 p.m. and stayed until 3:30 in the afternoon. There were always four or ve pupils, the smaller children being too young and the older ones going away to school or work as they grew up. We were, of course, each in a different grade and would make a grade in three months. We all went through the eighth grade this way. I stayed home longer than the others and just to have something to do went over the 8th grade three times. Our teacher, usually a lady, became a dear friend. She not only taught us our books but all about the way other people lived. She would tell us about going to movies, to parties, about neighbors and things that we read about but never did. She taught us girls how to x our hair pretty and discussed clothes, and, if she were young, boys. We, in turn, would take her rowing or sailing, shing and in swimming. Our way of life was as fascinating to her as hers was to us. We often corresponded for years after they returned home. My mother had a sister who lived in St. Marks who we visited at least once a month. We would go to St. Marks in the launch on Sunday and attend the small church and eat at my aunts house. We always looked forward to these visits. Often we would plan to go and the wind would blow hard from the south and cause the water to be rough and our trip had to be postponed until another Sunday. I remember how unhappy this would make me. We often went as long as three months in the winter without seeing anyone outside the family. Now that I live in a city I look back and remember that I was never lonely at all. With our large family we were always busy and thoroughly entertained. We didnt know what it was like to have friends and neighbors so didnt miss it. When the weather was bad sponge fishermen would come in near the lighthouse and anchor about a mile offshore, and there were always other shing boats anchored near or passing. My two brothers knew a lot of the shermen and on days that both our parents were away the boys would run the American ag up the pole as a signal that we were alone and this was an invitation to come up to see us. On these occasions we would play the piano and sing, play the phonograph and fry sh for dinner. When I was 13 years old we had a young man, 21 years old, to come teach us one summer. He had taught a term of school in St. Marks and my father knew him and asked him to teach us the following summer. He liked it so much at the lighthouse he stayed on longer and helped with the painting and cleaning. This young man was very serious minded and strict with us and I didnt care for him at all. Some 10 years later when I was attending business school in Tallahassee, he wrote me a letter and asked to visit me. Two years later we were married in the same room at the lighthouse where he had taught me. Years have gone by both my husband and father have passed away. The lighthouse is not used as a home anymore. The windows and doors are shuttered and the light is automatic, but nothing can change my happy memories of my life at the lighthouse. Vera Gresham Roberts Tallahassee. & LIfe at the St. Marks Lighthouse SPECIAL TO THE NEWSST. MARKS LIGHTHOUSE, 1918: The Greshams, Alton, Lela (mother), Vera (author of this account), Ella, and John Y. (Keeper, father) Red Clay Footprints By John Roberts e Wakulla Historical Society will hold a genealogy seminar on Saturday, Oct. 20, at Wakulla County Extension Facility. Join us and start your family tree. Registration will be held beginning at 8:15 a.m., breakfast and lunch included and two guest speakers. For more information call (850) 926-1110 or (850) 524-5334. I LIKEMIKEREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 C WAKULLA COUNTY VOTERS HAVE TWO CHOICES: 1. VOTE FOR MIKE STEWART WHO IN CONCERT WITH FELLOW BOARD MEMBERS TOOK ON THE TOUCH TASK OF DOWNSIZING OUR LOCAL GOVERNMENT, WHILE STILL PROVIDING ESSENTIAL SERVICES, AS WELL AS BUILDING BACK OUR DEPLETED RESERVES. 2. VOTE FOR HOWARD KESSLER WHO DURING HIS LAST TERM IN OFFICE ALLOWED LOCAL GOVERNMENT TO BECOME BLOATED AND INEFFICIENT, DEPLETING OUR RESERVES AND EARNING THE COUNTY A VERY POOR AUDIT REPORT. ITS YOUR CHOICE... BUT I LIKE MIKE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3www.mikestewart2012.comPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MIKE STEWART, REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3facebook.com/ mike.stewart.3363 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts Color F acial Waxings Specialty Cuts F lat T ops F eather Locks Color P erms Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. c e H a i r S a l o n e H l o H a i a l o i r S a c e c e o n o o n Tu es -S at 54 529 05 & t. . . . . F STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 13ABy BILL RUSSELLVolunteer Fire ghterFall is upon us and in the South that means three things: politics, college football, and festivals. On Oct. 27 at Hudson Park, the third annual Smoke and Fire Fire ghters Barbecue Contest and Charity Fundraiser will be held and we have found a way to incorporate all three of our favorite fall pasttimes: a barbecue contest, dunking booths with political candidates in them, and this event starts early enough for you to grab several to-go plates to take to FSUs homecoming game against Duke. The money raised goes to support the Childrens Burn Camp (Camp Amigo) and to assist local Emergency workers in furthering their education and advancing their skills. No one re department makes money from this event it strictly bene ts the children that have suffered severe burns and it helps the entire county have better trained emergency workers. The day will kick off with registration for a 5K family run/walk at 8 a.m., with the run starting at 9 a.m. You may pre-register for this event at Anytime Fitness in Crawfordville or register the morning of the event at the Rainbow International location on the north end of Hudson Park. The serving of food should begin at 11 a.m. and the barbecue judging will begin at 11:45 a.m. The judges will have their work cut out for them as 16 teams are in the contest this year. The contest was opened to law enforcement last year and there are now two teams from the Wakulla Sheriffs Of ce and one from Leon County Sheriffs Of ce. Fire department teams are from Tallahassee Fire, Perry Fire, Blountstown Fire, St. Marks Powder, Gadsden County EMS and several of our own county departments. While barbecue plates are being sold, and the judging is going on, political candidates will be called who have volunteered to be in the dunking booth. Since all of the proceeds go to great causes and we want to raise as much as possible, and in keeping with the spirit of politics, we have provided a loophole for these candidates any candidate who has volunteered to be in the booth can escape by providing a $100 donation to the charities. Most candidates are a part of this fundraiser, so give a little to your favorite candidates, earmarked for this event. For kids (and those still kids at heart) there will be re equipment on display, Air Methods will have a helicopter on display, and there will also be a bounce house. The menu will include lunch plate tickets at $6 for chicken, $7 for two meats and $8 for chicken, pulled pork and ribs. Since early voting starts that day, we will give you $1 off of any plate if you go to the Supervisor of Elections Of ce and vote early. Just wear your I Voted sticker to receive the discount. Bill Russell is a Wakulla County Volunteer Fire ghter.The Sopchoppy Opry, located in historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium, 164 Yellow Jacket Avenue, cordially invites all to the second annual Gospel Concert on Saturday, Oct. 27, at 7 p.m. featuring Fortress, one of the areas premier Gospel groups! Tickets are $10 and may be reserved by calling (850) 962-3711. Fortress is comprised of lead vocalist and keyboard player Ken Hosford; alto vocalist Georgia Anne Hosford; tenor vocalist Orville Eddy and bass vocalist Russell Hosford. The vocal ensemble is accompanied by rhythm guitarist Earnie Sumner, bass guitarist Will Hosford, and percussionist Jim Johnson. The Sopchoppy Opry, now in its 13th year, is a fundraising activity of the Wakulla County School Board and Sopchoppy High School Alumni Association. All concert proceeds are used for the restoration of historic Sopchoppy High School. The ticket office and caf open at 5:30 p.m. on before the concert. For more information about Fortress and the Opry, go to www.sopchoppyopry.com. By DEBBIE DIXSpecial to The NewsNashville based songwriters David Olney and Sergio Webb will return for their third Posh Java performance, to entertain the audience with intelligent and original rockabilly/ Americana music, on Friday, Oct. 19, at 8 p.m. Olney stands out like a jalapeno in a bowl of vanilla pudding, one reviewer wrote. His music is deep and thoughtful, intellectually rich and socially true. Olney has written music performed by Emmylou Harris, Linda Ronstadt and Del McCoury. Tony Laiolo wrote, Olney doesnt defy categorization so much as he rises above it. There is simply no one else like him. Sergio, Olneys sidekick on guitar and ukulele and whatever else he can pick up (a megaphone?) is amazing. A humble, gentle character, in real life, he is right there on any instrument that he plays. Both men are stellar musicians. Visit DavidOlney.com or you tube to listen to the music. The show for these two performers has been sold out in the past. For reservations contact Posh Java at poshjava@gmail.com or phone: (850) 962-1010. Cover is $15. Performing on Saturday, Oct. 20, at 8 p.m. is Nikki Talley. Talley has been described as a hardworking, energetic, mountain girl with a big voice. Touring with her husband, Jason Sharp, this duo is from Asheville, N.C. and has been performing a lot in Florida. Between the two of them, they play acoustic guitar, clawhammer banjo, nger style and at picking guitar, bass, and of course, vocals. Critics and reviewers have compared Talley to Patty Loveless and Gillian Welch, but comparisons do a disservice to her ery stage performances, her hauntingly seductive and raw gritty lyrics, and by a voice lifted up that harkens back to her Appalachian roots, and shores up on the edges of contemporary country, folk, and old time. Listen to Talley at www. nikkitalley.com, www.facebook.com/nikkitalleysongs, or on youtube. For reservations contact Posh Java at poshjava@ gmail.com or phone: (850) 962-1010. Cover for the Talley show is $10. Dinner before the show will be served by reservation only. BYOB. Sopchoppy Opry Gospel Concert to feature FortressSmoke and Fire fundraiser setTwo concerts at Posh Java this weekend David Olney and Sergio Webb. PLEASE RE-ELECT OUR PAP Donnie Sparkman WAKULLA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERHe Is: Knowledgeable Honest Dedicated to the people of Wakulla County with 42 years of experience Certi ed Florida Appraiser Experienced Land Surveyor (and He Loves US! Brigs, Walker & Reese)Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, for Property Appraiser I LIKEMIKE STEWARTREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mike Stewart, Republican candidate for county commissioner, district 3 FELLOW RESIDENTSThis is YOUR opportunity to VOTE for YOUR VERY OWN $250 TRAFFIC TICKET!State of Florida Troopers are Charged with Enforcement of TRAFFIC LAWS.Their whole career is TRAFFIC Enforcement. They are not a State Police in Florida as in Many States.Play safer and VOTE for MAURICE LANGSTON for SHERIFFPolitical advertisement paid for by Jack Collins, 16 Fonigan Rd., Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 Independently of any Candidate This Advertisement was not Approved by any Candidate. Taxpayers Beware!Vote NO on the Wakulla County Referendum, theLast item on the Ballot!Poli cal adver sement paid for and approved by Donna Sanford. 000CV38 HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926685 or 510Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Oct. 6, three victims from Crawfordville and Tallahassee reported suspicious activity as a motorist drove into their travel lane on Commerce Boulevard and pointed a weapon at them. The victims were riding motorcycles at the time of the incident. A total of ve motorcycle drivers were able to escape the motorist without injury. Deputy Randy Phillips and Sgt. Andy Curles investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week:OCTOBER 3 Kalie Galasso of Crawfordville was involved in a traffic crash when she was westbound on Highway 267. She lost control of her vehicle and struck a power pole. Damage to her vehicle was estimated at $7,000. She was not injured. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated.OCTOBER 4 Hannah Louise Williams, 27, of Crawfordville was charged with retail theft at Wal-Mart. Asset Protection staff observed the suspect placing items in a shopping cart but she allegedly failed to stop and pay at the last point of sale. She was detained and $122 worth of merchandise was recovered from the cart. Andrew Carter of Crawfordville reported the theft of a tree stand from his hunting property. The tree stand was removed by juveniles and was returned to the owner. The victim decided not to pursue any charges. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated an animal complaint in Sopchoppy. An animal control of cer witnessed a dog at a residence that was emaciated and suffering from a skin condition. The animal was transported to a veterinarian for treatment. Conditions of additional dogs at the residence are also being investigated.OCTOBER 5 A 17-year-old male from Crawfordville was involved in a single vehicle crash on U.S. Highway 319 north of Highway 267. The vehicle left the highway, ipped and ended up in a wooded area. The juvenile reported that he swerved to miss a deer and lost control of his truck. The victim declined medical treatment and was turned over to a friend due to his mother being out of town. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. James Bevis of Shell Island Fish Camp in St. Marks reported the theft of a boat gas tank. The tank was removed from a boat in the boatyard and is valued at $35. The perpetrator was in the process of removing the outboard motor when he was interrupted and he left the scene with the motor barely attached to the boat. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. Leonard Tartt of the City of Sopchoppy reported a criminal mischief to a city vehicle. Someone cut the gas ll tube that connects to the gas tank. Damage is estimated at $150. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. David Arnett of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported five unauthorized withdrawals from his bank account for a total of $600. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. Geneva Prince of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to a swimming pool. A bullet hole was observed in the above ground pool. Damage was estimated at $250. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. Misty Lynn Attewell, 25, of Crawfordville was charged with felony retail theft at Wal-Mart. Loss Prevention of cials observed the suspect placing merchandise into recyclable shopping bags in her cart. Attewell walked to the last point of sale and purchased only a movie. The stolen items included fabric, related sewing items and other items reportedly valued at $467. Maranda Sherrod of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief at the County Line Bar. The victim was leaving the bar when she observed her vehicle window shattered. A beer bottle was used to break the glass. Damage was estimated at $250. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated.OCTOBER 6 John Davidson of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victim awoke in the morning and his vehicle was gone. The vehicle was not locked and the keys were inside. Climbing gear for the victims work was also reported missing. The climbing gear is valued at approximately $2,500 and the vehicle is valued at $2,000. The vehicle was entered in the FCIC/NCIC data base. Later, the vehicle was reported recovered on property owned by John Conley of Crawfordville a few miles away. The climbing property was also recovered. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. Tommy Joe Nazworth of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A suspect, who has been identi ed, removed two nail guns from the victims property. The property is valued at $750. Sgt. Andy Curles investigated. On Oct. 6, off duty Sgt. Ronald Mitchell and Deputy Vicki Mitchell were traveling behind Dana H. Crum, 28, of Crawfordville when Crum crashed her vehicle into a tree on Horseshoe Trail in Crawfordville. Sgt. Andy Curles and Deputy Stephen Simmons assisted at the accident scene until EMS arrived on scene and transported her to the hospital for multiple lacerations. Charles W. Montford of Crawfordville reported an animal incident. The victim was bitten by a dog while he was riding a motorcycle at Summerwind Circle North and Old Woodville Highway. The dog bite tore the victims pants and broke the skin. He declined medical attention. Deputy Randy Phillips and Animal Control Of cer Bonnie Brinson investigated but were unable to locate the animal. Henry Carter of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary at his home. A window was broken out. Damage to the home was estimated at $500. Nothing appeared to have been taken from inside. Lt. Jimmy Sessor and Deputy Will Hudson investigated. Oneida Hollett of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim reported the loss of her credit card and quickly contacted her bank. The bank noted that an unauthorized charge was made on the card for $129. Deputy Will Hudson investigated.OCTOBER 7 Richard Armstrong of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim was in the process of moving out of his residence when he discovered that someone broke into his home, camper and vehicle. Damage to the victims property was estimated at $450. A re extinguisher was taken from the camper and discharged inside the victims vehicle. Damage to the Mercedes was estimated at $200. One of the perpetrators cut his hand on the broken glass and blood soaked napkins were collected as evidence. While investigating the Armstrong case, deputies were called to investigate another burglary nearby on property owned by Ashley Duane Gowdy. The investigation determined that $1,100 worth of damage was created at the unoccupied home. Bags of rye grass seed were also torn open inside a barn on the property. Damage to the seed bags was estimated at $300. As deputies investigated a report of paint cans on Happy Time Drive, three juveniles were observed hiding behind a residence. Deputy Sean Wheeler and Deputy Will Hudson spoke to the juveniles who had paint on their hands. With their guardians present, the juveniles, ages 10, 13 and 14, admitted to entering the two residences and creating the damage. One of the juveniles suffered a deep cut on his hand after punching out a window. The juveniles were charged with three counts each of burglary of a conveyance and three counts each of criminal mischief in the Armstrong case and two counts each of burglary and two counts each of criminal mischief in the Gowdy case. The juveniles did not score high enough to be taken to the juvenile detention center and were released to their parents. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston also investigated. WCSO Jail inmate Garrett Mizell Revell, 26, of Crawfordville was charged with battery by a person detained in a jail facility after correctional staff observed Revell striking a 25-year-old victim with a closed st. Deputies Reed Brown, Lisa Hummel and Lt. Cliff Carroll investigated.OCTOBER 8 Tabitha Mathers of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The vehicle was on property owned by a relative and was removed without her permission. A suspect has been identi ed. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated. Linda Cyr of Crawfordville reported a structure re. Deputy Ian Dohme entered the home while the re was still active and used his agency issued re extinguisher to knock down small res within the kitchen. Wakulla re ghters also came to the scene and put out the blaze which included burning blankets used by the victim to attempt to put out the re. The re originated on the stove as the victim attempted to fry food. Damage was estimated at $500 and the re was ruled accidental. Wayne Morgan of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A computer and jewelry, valued at $1,200, was reported missing from the victims home. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Deputy Gibby Gibson and Reserve Deputy David Pienta investigated a report of an infant possibly in distress inside a vehicle in the WalMart parking lot. An infant was crying inside the vehicle with no ventilation. Due to the childs appearance, EMS was called to the scene to check the child. EMS provided the child with an ice pack to cool him down and determined the child was healthy. No charges were led, however contact was made with the Department of Children and Families regarding the incident. Deputy Katie Deal reported nding property while working with the Litter Control Unit near Sopchoppy. A wallet and make-up bag was recovered and contact was made with the owner, Sara Weaver. The victim reported that her vehicle was broken into in Franklin County and her wallet was stolen on Oct. 7. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated.OCTOBER 9 Sara Weaver of Crawfordville also led a fraud complaint over the unauthorized use of her credit card. The victim discovered eight unauthorized charges on her account for $842. The transactions were completed in Wakulla County and evidence was collected at multiple scenes. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Wal-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft involving Robyn Lynn Scott, 50, of Crawfordville. The suspect gathered items as she went through the store and was observed placing items in her purse. The suspect failed to pay for the items before leaving the last point of sale. The stolen items included toothbrushes, DVDs and meat, valued at $93. Scott was arrested for retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. She was also issued a trespass warning for the store. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated.OCTOBER 10 Deputy Sean Wheeler conducted a traf c stop of a vehicle with only one working headlight. The driver, Cristepher Joe Smith, 21, of Crawfordville, did not possess a driver license. It was determined that Smith was driving while his license was suspended or revoked habitual. Deputy Wheeler issued Smith a traf c warning for faulty equipment and arrested Smith for DWLSR habitual. Danny Sellers of St. Marks reported a vehicle theft. The victim launched his boat in St. Marks to go shing. When he returned his trailer was missing. The trailer was entered into the FCIC/NCIC data base and is valued at $1,500. The victims truck was not tampered with. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. Androphojus Jemica Inge, 25, of Tallahassee was arrested and charged with leaving the scene of an accident involving property damage, reckless driving, high speed eeing and eluding with lights and sirens activated, falsely identifying himself to law enforcement and driving while driver license is suspended or revoked third or subsequent conviction. Deputy Stephen Simmons responded to a reckless vehicle call at the 3600 block of Crawfordville Highway. Deputy Simmons observed the motorist pass vehicles on the right and left sides and pass a school bus in a no passing zone. Motorists had to get off the road to avoid a crash with the vehicle which was traveling at a high rate of speed. Deputy Simmons attempted to stop the vehicle as it passed a second school bus. Due to the heavy traf- c and extreme speeds of 70 miles per hour in a 55 mile per hour zone, the law enforcement pursuit was discontinued. However, Deputy Simmons observed the motorist crash into a dirt embankment and fence line on the east side of the road near Donaldson-Williams Road. The vehicle was unoccupied but driver was observed coming out of a eld with no shoes or pants on. Pants were observed caught on a wire fence nearby. The driver eventually admitted to Major Shepard Bruner that he was the driver and only occupant of the vehicle. The vehicle struck a large electrical wire near a power line before crashing. Jack Tedder of Smith Creek and Perry reported the theft of 14 50-pound bags of corn on the cob from his shed in Smith Creek. The missing corn is valued at $112. It is used to feed deer. Sgt. Mike Helms investigated. Mishele Eaton of Sopchoppy reported the theft of a piece of furniture from her home. A suspect has been identi ed. The couch is valued at $1,000. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. Julie Edmondson of Panacea reported the theft of household goods and a GPS, valued at $280, from her home. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. Frank Payne of Panacea reported a fraud. The victim reported that individuals have attempted to open credit card accounts in his name. The card requests came from Malaysia and Missouri. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 943 calls for service during the past week. 000BK81 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 15A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and to bring attention to this cause, to those who are struggling to free themselves from it, the ones who help ght it and remember those who have been lost at the hand of domestic violence, the Domestic Violence Task Force held a program on Oct. 10. Those in attendance heard from Judge Jackie Fulford about her experiences dealing with domestic violence cases while she was a prosecutor. Fulford said her rst experiences with domestic violence were not good ones and many times, the victim would eventually recant her story and try and drop the charges against the person who was abusing her. If the state attorneys of ce pursued charges against the abuser, Fulford said the victim would ght them the entire time. I couldnt understand why they fought us, Fulford said. Then she attended a seminar on domestic violence and began to understand the cycle of violence and became moved to ght for people who couldnt ght for themselves. After this, one of her rst cases in Wakulla County involved a woman from Mississippi who was picked up with her significant other for boating under the in uence. Of cers noticed the woman was bruised and found out that the man constantly beat and raped her. It was part of their relationship, Judge Fulford said. Fulford got the woman to agree to press charges against the man. She also told her about Refuge House. However, Fulford was gone for a few days and when she came back she was informed the woman had dropped the charges and recanted her statement. The man was then let out on bail and took her back to Mississippi. She ended up going missing and Fulford was convinced the man had harmed her. The woman was found dead at the bottom of a river and her death was ruled an accidental drowning. Eventually, with Fulfords persistence, the man was charged with her death and sent to prison. Kathy Asbell, of the task force and Refuge House, said she remembered this case and it was one that was extremely dif cult. This woman, even in her death, received justice, Asbell said. Fulford told the crowd that she wished she could say this was her only tragic case. Its a very real problem, she said. There are no boundaries for domestic and sexual violence. People in these very real situations need to be taught that they can live in a relationship where they are lived, Fulford said. To the victims I say, get out, she said. There are people to help you. Following Fulfords presentation, a candle was lit by Barbara Strickland, Leslie Drews mother, for the three women who have died at the hands of domestic violence. Drew was killed in 2009 by her boyfriend. Domestic violence affects everyone, said Strickland, who has been an advocate for the cause of raising awareness of domestic violence. Its been almost three years, but its still fresh, she said of her daughters death. Meg Baldwin, director of Refuge House, called Strickland one of her personal heroes. She added that the role of those involved in Refuge House and other places and people who help those dealing with domestic violence must confront the cruelty head on and continue the ght and to be there for those who need help. They also must continue to have faith in human beings, she said. And to know there are people who are capable of rising to the occasion to see through one persons lies to see the truth.Event is held to increase awareness of domestic violence PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENCircuit Judge Jackie Fulford speaks to the crowd. Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce detectives arrested a 30-year-old Tallahassee woman Oct. 15 in connection with the theft and fraudulent use of credit cards stolen from a Crawfordville victim on Oct. 7 in Franklin County. Elizabeth Lauren Watts faces 10 counts of fraudulent use of a credit card, four counts of forgery and one count of grand theft. She is incarcerated in the Wakulla County Jail under an $11,500 bond. The Crawfordville victim reported a vehicle burglary in the Alligator Point area of Franklin County where her purse, identi cation and credit cards were stolen. Detectives determined that the victims credit cards were used fraudulently for $922 in purchases. Watts was arrested in Panacea without incident.Woman arrested in fraud case

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LES HARRISONExtension Director The western part of Wakulla County hides a eeting treasure available to only those with a curious mind and a will to witness the ageless autumn display. Fall wildflowers have marshaled a colorful shout against the muted and inevitable silence of a coming winter. A leisurely ride out Smith Creek Road into the Apalachicola National Forest provides the opportunity to observe vibrant displays in and under the pines, palmettos and other permanent residents of the area. In the current cul-desac lifestyle of two-income homes and crammed schedules, even for the children, the autumn forest provides a stark contrast. A GPS is recommended for the novice observers venturing off Smith Creek Road, or at least a compass for basic headings. The forest roads can be confusing and remember the sun sets in the west. The aptly named Golden rods are common in clumps and individuals. This native plant has the unjust reputation for causing hay fever. Research has shown its pollen is too heavy to be windblown. The culprit causing the red eyes and sneezing is ragweed, which blooms nondescriptly at the same time. Golden rods were once considered a strategic resource critical to national security. Thomas Edison used amboyant perennials to produce a natural rubber when offshore sources were threatened by world politics. A ball of golden rod rubber currently resides at Edisons winter home in Fort Myers. On the other end of the color spectrum is the Blazing Star. This plant produces lavender blooms on an eight to 12 inch spike. The clusters are frequently seen on roadsides because the plant has a need for exposure to sunlight. The Pitcher Plant, while not a wild ower, is a colorful local inhabitant of wetter terrain. Sometimes located in a roadside ditch, sometimes found on the edge of swampy areas, the plant is frequently found in a group. The Pitcher Plant is a carnivorous plant whose unique prey-trapping mechanism features a deep cavity lled with a liquid. Unsuspecting insects are attracted by lures into the cavity formed by the cupped leaf. The interior sides of the pitcher are slippery and leave nothing for a fatigued insect to rest upon. Soon the prey is drowned and its body is gradually dissolved providing the plant with needed nutrients. Ladies Hatpins are commonly found with pitcher plants in wet areas. The diminutive button-like bloom clusters are located on the end of a ramrod straight stalk. These perennials bloom throughout the warm seasons of the year. Blue Mist owers are aggressive colonizers that spread by underground runners. The dense deep blue and purple blooms appear as autumn progresses. Like the blazing stars, they are frequently seen on roadside habitats because of their requirement for sunlight. And there are so many more not mentioned here: Asters, False Foxgloves, Sunflowers, Deer Tongue and the list goes on. However, as the days get shorter, so does the treasure of autumn 2012. To learn more about local wild ower, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@ufl.edu or at (850) 926-3931.Fall wild owers give us color before the coming winter PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCarnivorous Pitcher Plants capture insects to get needed nutrients. Blazing Star features lavender owers on a spike. A leisurely ride out Smith Creek Road into the Apalachicola National Forest provides the opportunity to observe vibrant displays of wild owers. Firefighters BBQ Competition and Charity Fundraiser. Fire Equipment on display, Air Methods will have a helicop ter on display! Bouncy House for the kids! SMOKE AND FIRE We Support the Childrens Burn Camp Camp Amigo www.campamigo.com& Firefighter Scholarship FundsSERVING FOOD AT 11AM JUDGING STARTS AT 11:45AM 5K REGISTRATION FOR FAMILY RUN/WALK AT 8AM. RUN STARTS AT 9AM. You may pre-register at Anytime Fitness in Crawfordville or register the morning of the event at the Rainbow International booth located on the North end of Hudson Park. NEW!! DU N KI N G BOOTH!Candidates that have volunteered to be in our dunking booth will be called. Any candidate that has volunteered to be in the booth can escape that by giving a $100 donation to our charities. We really dont want wet candidates, what we really want is money for our charities. Saturday, Oct 27 11am 4pm Hudson Park, Crawfordville Chicken $6, Choice of two meats $7, Chicken, Pulled Pork & Ribs $8 (Served with Slaw, baked beans and roll)Lunch Plate prices:Third AnnualThank you to our Sponsors! Call Us for Your Free In-Home Estimate!FLOORING Bevis Funeral Home & CrematoryHarvey-Young Chapel MAURICE LANGSTON HALSEYBESHEARS

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 sports news and team views SportsCross Country: Runner up nish at Mosley Dolphin Dash Sports, Page 3BVarsity prepares for game against Suwannee CountySports, Page 4B Being sucked into the election v ortex Weekly Roundup, Page 8BBy CONNOR HARRISONof wakullasports.comThe Wakulla War Eagle JV football team continued their dominance with a win over the Taylor County Bulldogs winning 52-26. The Bulldogs were the ones to strike rst with a quick drive that ended up in the end zone. Wakulla answered that score with one of their own and then the two teams traded off another pair of touchdowns. These scores made the game appear that it would be a tight game. Thats when the War Eagles decided to start to pull away. Wakulla had several explosive plays and then they had the smaller ones, but they all add up in the end. These explosions earned the team some fast scoring drives, leading Wakulla to have a comfortable lead going into the half. To open the second half, Wakulla was set to receive the ball and they made to most of the kick return, taking it past the Taylor County Bulldogs on their way to the end zone. Later in the game, after a third down stop, the Bulldogs were forced to punt the ball away but things did not go according to plan as the War Eagles rushed in and blocked the punt. The ball was recovered by Wakulla and on the very next play they managed to get a rushing touchdown. As the second half progressed and the game kept playing out in Wakullas favor, the coaches decided to put the back-up players in. Even with these players in, they stood their ground and didnt allow any long runs or passes. Occasionally the War Eagles would let an opposing player get behind them, leading to a Taylor County touchdown on a long pass. If they learn from these mistakes and get better over the week at practice, they should keep their winning ways at their next game up at Rickards. The coaches called the right plays at the right time and just coached better than Taylor County did. Even though Wakulla had a few plays that didnt quite work out, a lot of the plays were either for positive yardage on offense or, on defense, solid tackles that kept the Bulldogs away from the end zone. Coaching wasnt the only factor either, there was also the crowd. The crowd was very into the game, applauding when their War Eagles broke a big run, or returned a kickoff from one end of the eld to the other. With the crowd getting loud with each deep pass and huge run, there was a lot of noise since there were a lot of these kinds of plays. All in all, the players showed great sportsmanship with congratulating the other players on a good and hard fought game. Now theyre just one game away from having a perfect season.Connor Harrison covers local sports for www. wakullasports.com. He can be reached at wakulla40@ gmail.com.FOOTBALLWar Eagle JV one win from perfect season PHOTO BY CONNOR HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY CONNOR HARRISON SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakullas Antonio Morris ghts through a tackle to take the ball inside the 15 yard line. War Eagle Cody Ochat dives in to block the punt. More game photos on Page 4B and online at thewakullanews.com Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the t op-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011. Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943 ) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 SMChoose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Tuesday, October 23 F riday, October 26 Monday, October 29 Thursday, November 1 Wednesday, November 7 Friday, November 9 Monday, November 12 Tuesday, November 13 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA In-Home Assessments and Referrals Offered for Comfort and Convenience If falls, weakness or inability to participate in activities become a concern for your loved one, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Tallahassee is here to help. We oer free inhome assessments with no physician orders needed. Once an evaluation is approved, HealthSouths team of professionals develop comprehensive, individualized treatment plans for a safe return home. If you have any questions or need more information contact us.IS YOUR LOVED ONE SAFE AT HOME?:HealthSouth Corporation:551345 IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle G E T READY FOR HUN T IN G

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Oct. 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. WAKULLA COUNTY EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea at 7 p.m. Those who would like, please join us at 6 p.m. for conversation and a meal. All Republican candidates will be given time to update the committee on their campaign. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Oct. 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Oct. 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Oct. 21 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Oct. 22 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Oct. 23 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Wednesday, Oct. 24 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Oct. 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsFriday, Oct. 19 BABYSITTING WORKSHOP for ages 12 to 18 years old will be held at the county extension of ce from 7:30 a.m. to 5 :30 p.m. $25 fee includes snacks and CPR certi cation. Limited to 20 openings.Please contact Sherri Kraeft at 926-3931 or sjkraeft@u .edu FORE THE BUILD GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held to bene t Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County at Wildwood Golf Course. This tournament will help fund the 2012 Habitat Home Build. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Cost is $50 per person or $200 per team. To enter contact Doris Crosby at 545-7425. Saturday, Oct. 20 STONE CRAB FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in downtown St. Marks. There will be food, music, parade, childrens activities, educational displays and dozens of vendors. The parade will be held at 11 a.m. Walking, golf carts and antique cars are allowed. The theme is super hero, so dress up or decorate a golf cart or antique car as a super hero. Call 925-6224 or email cityofst.marks@ comcast.net for additional details on the parade. ANNUAL HORSE-O-WEEN will be held at noon the Wakulla County Equestrian Center, Lawhon Mill Road in Sopchoppy, by the Wakulla County Horsemans Association. Horse and rider costume class, monthly horse show and fun classes between regular show classes. There will be fun games with prizes for everyone, even if you dont have a horse. Concessions are on site. WATERS JOURNEY: Following the Water to Wakulla Springs will be held from 8 a.m. to noon. Florida Springs expert, Jim Stevenson, will lead attendees on an overland tour by car caravan which traces the fascinating journey of our water south from Tallahassee to the World Famous Wakulla Springs. Advance registration is recommended. Tour departs from the TCC campus parking lot closest to the intersection of Pensacola Street and Appleyard Drive at 8 a.m. and ends at the tower overlooking the spring at noon. Cost is $18 and includes the entrance fee to Wakulla Springs State Park. A portion of the fee will be contributed to the Wakulla Springs Alliance and the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park. For more information, call 926-3376. Monday, Oct. 22 SCHOOL ADVISORY COUNCIL meeting will be held for Wakulla High School at the WHS library from 3 to 5 p.m. Anyone interested in attending the meeting is invited. Tuesday, Oct. 23 BIG CATCH CHARITY FISH FRY will be held from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Poseys Dockside in Panacea to bene t Wakulla County Big Brothers Big Sisters. Tickets are $10. DRIVER SAFETY CLASS will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the library offered by AARP to seniors which will give a discount on auto insurance for 3 years. Contact Ernie Conte at 926-4605 for details. Wednesday, Oct. 24 CHILDRENS FLU SHOT CLINIC will be held at the Wakulla County Health Department for children age 6 months to 18 years old from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. The focus of this shot clinic will be for those children who are on Medicaid or uninsured children; shots for others will be provided for a fee of $25.For additional information please contact us at (850)926-0400. NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held at TCC Wakulla Center in Crawfordville, catered by Coastal Restaurant, from noon to 1:15 p.m. RSVP to the Chamber of ce at 926-1848. Thursday, Oct. 25 CANDLELIGHT VIGIL will be held by the Narcotics Overdose, Prevention and Education Task Force beginning at 6 p.m. at Hudson Park with a reception. The vigil will begin at 6:30 p.m. Contact Sylvia Hubbard at sylviahubbard@hotmail.com for more information. CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for ReNu U Rejuvenation Spa will be held at 4 p.m. at the Chamber of ce, 23 High Drive, Crawfordville. Upcoming EventsSaturday, Oct. 27 THIRD ANNUAL SMOKE AND FIRE BARBECUE COOK-OFF CONTEST will be held at Hudson Park in downtown Crawfordville from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. This event will include re department and law enforcement teams from around the Big Bend area; live music, games for the kids, live demonstrations, assorted re and safety equipment display. The proceeds from this contest will be used to support Camp Amigo, a week long camp for children that have suffered crippling or dis guring burns, the Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund, and to furnish scholarships to local men and women pursuing Fire ghter and Emergency Medical careers. For sponsorships, call Bill Russell at 984-0148, or Dan Hinchee at 850-545-2154. MONARCH BUTTERFLY FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Events will include Monarch tagging demonstrations, a live butter y garden, talks, people tagging, crafts, exhibits and gifts for purchase. Tours will be held behind the gates all day. No advance reservations will be taken; tours will be given on a rst comerst served basis. The St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center and Natures Classroom/Exhibits and Nature Store is located at 1255 Lighthouse Rd. in St. Marks. Call 850-925-6121 for visit www.fws.gov/saintmarks for more information. Saturday, Nov. 3 SECOND ANNUAL WAKULLA FRIENDS OF SCOUTING FUN SHOOT will be held at the WCSO Shooting Range from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost is $5 per person. There will be a sporting clays competition, a competitive plate shooting event, shooting demonstrations, prizes and gun safety instruction. This event is open to everyone. Attendees under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Firearms and ammunition will be provided. All proceeds will bene t the Boy Scouts of America. The shooting range is located at 65 Qualify Lane, Crawfordville. Contact Mike Scibelli at (850) 251-1497 for details. EMPTY BOWL FUNDRAISER will be held at Hudson park from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tickets are $15 for a soup lunch and hand painted bowl. There will also be live entertainment, including music and Stone Soup play by children. The money raised is used to buy food for the areas food pantries. For more information, contact Haydee Jackley at ribitsceramic@yahoo.com or (850) 567-4212. NAMIBIKES EVENT will be held at Tom Brown Park, 1125 Easterwood Drive, in Tallahassee. Check-in and a continental breakfast open at 6 a.m. The bike riding event will raise awareness about mental illness, treatment and recovery. For rigorous cyclists, there will be a 100mile Century ride to Monticello and back and a 64-mile Metric Century ride to Capps, Fla. and back. There will also be a 30-mile off-road ride, a 6-mile family-ride around the park and a bike rodeo, a safety course where kids can learn safety skills like navigating cones, stopping and proper helmet t. For more information about NAMIBikes, how to donate, or how to ride or volunteer, please visit www. FightStigmaAndRide.org, or contact Carol Weber at cweber@nami orida.org or (850) 671-4445. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Government Meetings Monday, Oct. 22 WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 7 p.m. at the library. Political EventsThursday, Oct. 18 POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for sheriff will be held at 7 p.m. at the library by the League of Women Voters of Wakulla County. Saturday, Oct. 20 MEET PETE WILLIAMS, candidate for State Attorney, from noon to 2:30 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant, Crawfordville. This is a free event and lunch and drinks will be served. Monday, Oct. 22 POLITICAL FORUM for candidates in the state house district 7 and county school superintendent races will be held starting at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. The superintendent forum will follow at 7:45 p.m. This forum is held by the Wakulla Republican and Wakulla Democratic executive committees. Thursday, Oct. 25 POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for property appraiser will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the Community Center, followed by a forum for the sheriff candidates at 7:45 p.m. by the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee and the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee. Fore the Build golf tournament at 8:30 a.m. at Wildwood Golf Course. St. Marks Stone Crab Festival from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in St. Marks. Political forum at 6:30 p.m. at the Community Center. BIg Catch Charity Fish Fry from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Poseys Dockside. FridaySaturdayMondayTuesday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Nikki Talley performs at Posh Java on Saturday, Oct. 20. See story in Arts & Entertainment, Page 13A.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 3Bsports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERTrack CoachOn Saturday, Oct. 13, 16 boys and 14 girls teams toed the starting line at the Fifth Annual Mosley Dolphin Dash cross country 5K run in Lynn Haven. After the dust had settled and the scores were tabulated, the WHS boys and girls teams both claimed runner-up titles. Only perennial state powerhouse Ft. Walton Beach High School bested the local harriers. The course was an accurate, at two-loop course that circled the Lynn Haven Recreation Center and allowed for frequent views of the runners as they battled for their places. Junior captain Aaron Smith led the charge for the WHS boys in the excellent time of 17:33, a new personal record (PR) and a State Elite time. He was followed by J.P. Piotrowski (18:07, PR), Travis Parks (18:24, PR), Mitchell Atkinson (18:45, PR), Alan Pearson (19:06, PR), Lane Williams (19:09), Albert Smythe (19:18, PR), Ryan Dodson (19:35, PR) and Gabe Hutchins (19:53). In the attendant Open/ JV race, Riversinks Middle School runner Bryce Cole also ran an outstanding race, clocking a State Elite time of 19:14. Numerous other Wakulla runners also had an excellent day and recorded new PRs, including: Nathan Green, Jimmy French, Justin Milhon, Riley Carrier, Justin Goates, Toby Jordon, Jake Herr, Evan Guarino, Mark Veerapan, Riley Welch and Tyler Westcott. The girls race had a little extra drama associated with it, as two of the top seven runners were unable to compete, which meant that the five remaining varsity runners all had to perform extremely well and that there was no margin for error on their part. The ve girls all ran outstanding races and handled the extra pressure like true, seasoned veterans. Captains Marty Wiedeman (21:10State Elite Time) and Raychel Gray (21:40, PR) led the way with Lydia Wiedeman (22:08), Kasey James (22:23) and Lilianna Broadway (23:42) in tow. Wiedman and Gray were also recognized for placing in the Top 10 overall, with Wiedeman placing 6th and Gray 10th. In the Open/JV race, Logan Kelley, Ava Shaw, Emily Westmark and Shelby Shiver also set new PRs. This was the race weve been waiting for, said Assistant Coach Greg James. The course and conditions were the best so far this year and the kids took advantage of it and ran some really outstanding times. We had 23 runners who set new PRs and we know the course was accurately measured, so they ran great! The teams will compete next on Saturday, Oct. 20, at the large and extremely competitive Panhandle Championships hosted by Marianna High School. CROSS COUNTRYTeams nab runner-up nishes at Dolphin Dash PHOTO BY KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAaron Smith crosses the nish line at the Dolphin Dash with a State Elite time and Personal Record of 17:33.Margaret Wiedeman and Raychel Gray both placed in the Top 10 Girls at the Mosley Dolphin Dash. REGISTRATION DATES: SATURDAY 10/20/12 & SATURDAY 10/27/12 REGISTRATION TIMES: 8:00 A.M. TO 12:00 P.M. OR DURING OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY 10/15/12 TO FRIDAY 10/26/12 8-5PMREGISTRATION DEADLINE: SATURDAY 10/27/12, 12:00 PM REGISTRATION PLACE: MEDART RECREATION PARK 79 Recreation Dr.AGE DETERMINING DATE: SEPTEMBER 1st, 2012COST IS $40.00 PER CHILDAGES: 04 & UNDER DIVISION: 06 & UNDER DIVISION: 08 & UNDER DIVISION: 10 & UNDER DIVISION: 12 & UNDER DIVISION: COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD8 & 9 DIVISION: 10, 11, & 12 DIVISION: All players (basketball & soccer) must provide proof of health insurance or purchase a policy for an additional $10.00. All leagues are coed. If interested in coaching the above sports, please contact the Wakulla County Recreation Department. All volunteers must complete a criminal history background check. Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 NEED HEARING AIDS?HEARING AIDS AT NO COST TO FEDERAL BCBS WORKERS AND RETIREES!?Thats Rights No Co-Pay! No Exam Fee! No Adjustment Fee! 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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netAfter watching the lm of upcoming opponent Suwannee, Head Football Coach Scott Klees said he anticipates a tough game. From an historical standpoint, last year was the rst time ever that the War Eagles have beat Suwannee and Klees said hes hoping to start a streak. Suwannee has a very talented quarterback, very fast, Klees said. And a couple of good linemen. Its a game that, if were ready to play and do what we should, we should win, the coach said. But Klees warned that Suwannee (3-3, 0-1 in the district) lost a district foe Godby, and that could make them dangerous. With another district loss to Wakulla, Suwannee would be effectively eliminated from the playoffs. As a team, their backs are against the wall they have to win, Klees said. Facing a desparate opponent and traveling to Live Oak creates a dangerous spot for the War Eagles. We have to make sure to keep our focus, Klees said. In the open week, the War Eagles are trying to heal up from their injuries. Running back Demetrius Lindsey hasnt practiced this week because of turf toe. Brandon Nichols has a sprained ankle and only recently returned to practice. His brother Bryan Nichols has been out with a sore shoulder. Everybody else has been practicing, Klees said. Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comWar Eagle JV one win from perfect seasonBy BRIANA FORDHAMSpecial to The NewsWakulla High School will be hosting a community event on Oct. 23, beginning at 6 p.m. The Powder Puff Game between junior and senior girls will kickoff at 6 p.m. The community pep rally will begin at 7 p.m. and is expected to last until 8 p.m. There will be refreshments and food for sale at the concession stand. During the pep rally, the 2012 Homecoming Court will be announced and youll be able to familiarize yourself with the faces that are eligible to win the title of king and queen for 2012. We are accepting a $1 donation entry fee at the gate. Please come out to the event and show your community spirit. If you have any questions, you may contact Briana Fordham at Wakulla High School. Community pep rally set Oct. 23 Sebastian Garner gets tackled around the ankles. Michael Duhart ghts for every yard. Isiah Youmas pushes past a defender.PHOTO BY CONNOR HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY CONNOR HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY CONNOR HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS THIS WEEK: The War Eagles travel to play Suwannee High School in Live Oak on Friday, Oct. 19, at 7:30 p.m. JV close to win recordThe Wakulla High School record for straight wins is 22, set by the JV girls volleyball team several years ago. With the most recent win, the JV football team is at 20 wins in a row with a win next week against Rickards move to 21. They wont be able to try to tie the all-time school win streak until next year. The varsity win record is 21 in a row, set by the 1979-80 baseball team, which was coached by now-Superintendent of Schools David Miller. The closest game the JV War Eagles have had this year was Madison County, who they beat 20-12. William SnowdenVARSITY FOOTBALL Big game coming up against Suwannee FALL CONTRACTORS AUCTION Saturday, Oct. 20 10 AM MARTIN & MARTIN AUCTIONEERS, INC. For More Info: Call 601-450-6200 or Visit WWW.MMAOFMS.COMJeff Martin MSAL #1255Featuring: Trucks, Trailers, Construction Equipment, Farm Equipment, Related Items, Plus MUCH, MUCH MORE. Many Items From Ingalls Shipyard Will Be Sold ABSOLUTE!2236 Hwy. 49, Brooklyn (Hattiesburg), MS 39425 Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. THG-12901Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Joint pain Arthritis pain Muscle pain Back pain Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 5B Our Retail SEAFOOD MARKET Carries FRESH SEAFOOD STRAIGHT from OUR FLEET of BOATSBUY ANYTHING IN OUR SEAFOOD MARKET AND WE WILL PREPARE IT FOR $5. per Meal. The Same is Offered when BRINGING IN YOUR OWN CATCH!!!Thursday Night is Come Check Out Our Great Lobster Prices 984FISH(3474)Open Mon. Thur. 11-9 Fri. 11-10 Sat. 7-10 Sun. 7-9 EVERY NIGHT!!Thurs. Sun.Come Visit O-We-Go Lounge 1/2 OFF Appetizers & Drinks4:30 6:00LUNCH & DINNER MenuFRESH LOCAL OYSTERS or SUN RAY CLAMS Doz. Raw Oysters on 1/2 Shell... $8 Dozen Steamed Oyster on 1/2 Shell Served with Lemon Butter... $8 Dozen Garlic & Parmesan Oysters on 1/2 Shell... $9 Dozen Bacon & Cheddar... $9 Greek Oysters... $9 P.K. Oysters includes Curry, Butter & Parm Cheese... $9 Sit at the Bar and have your Oysters Shucked in Front of You!BASKETSFried Mullet... $9 All You Can Eat Mullet... $10 Beer Battered Fish... $9 Fresh Fried Alligator... $13 Fried Popcorn Shrimp... $10 BLKN $11 Pound of Snow Crab... $12 Fried Shrimp... $14 All Baskets Come with a Choice of FF, Coleslaw or Cheese Grits Substitute a cup of Soup or Salad... $2 or Greek Trim for Salad... $3 Add Cheese on FF... $2SPECIALTIES Fried Pork Chops... $12 grilled... $13Steak & Shrimp10 oz. Steak and 7 Lightly Beer Battered Fresh Local Shrimp... $16 Broiled add... $1Hamburger Steak... $9 add onion gravy... $2, add Cheese & Tomatoes... $3Shrimp & Grits Sauteed Shrimp in a Green Chili Sauce over a bed of Cheese Grits topped with Bacon, Cheddar Cheese, and Parmesan Cheese Comes with one side... $9Fried or Broiled Grouper Fingers... $16 All Specialties served with Choice of 2 Sides Salad, Veggie of the Day, Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw, Soups, Steamed New Potatoes, or French Fries. Greek Trim for Salad... $2SANDWICHESHamburger... $7 Cheeseburger... $8Fish Sandwich Fried... $7, Blackened... $8Philly Cheese Streak Thinly Sliced Steak, Mushrooms, Onions, and Green Peppers... $8#1 Cuban Slow Roasted Pork, Cooked Ham (Hand Sliced No Deli Meat Here), Mustard, Mayo, Pickle on Toasted Cuban Roll... Half... $5, Whole... $8Prime Rib Sandwich Thick Cut of Slow Roasted Prime Rib, Melted Swiss, Sun Dried Tomato & Bacon Mayonnaise & Horseradish Sauce on Toasted French Bread... Half... $6, Whole... $10Bacon Jumbo Slaw Dog Premium Hot Dog Wrapped in Bacon on a Hoagie Roll topped with Asiar Slaw and a Slightly Spicy Sauce... $5Gyro Sliced Lamb, Tomato, Lettuce, Tzatziki Sauce in a Pita... $7Gobble the Gook Smoked Turkey, Bacon, Swiss Cheese, Guacamole, lettuce, on a Ciabatta Roll with Sun Dried Tomato and Bacon Mayonnaise... $9Home Style Reuben Smoked Corn Beef, Swiss Cheese, Sauerkraut, Thousand Island on Marble Rye Bread... $9The Ultimate Soft Shell Sandwich Fried Soft Shell Crab topped with Cole Slaw and Fried Onion Rings with Spicy Tarter Sauce... $11Shrimp Po Boy Fried Shrimp, Lettuce, Tomatoes, Homemade Spicy Tarter Sauce on Cuban Roll... $11 All Sandwiches Served with Choice of FF, Coleslaw or Cheese Grits Substitute a cup of Soup or Salad... $2 Greek Trim for Salad... $3 Add Cheese on FF... $2SALADS & SOUPSSoups of the Day Always Fresh and Always Homemade Cup... $3, Bowl... $5Dinner Salad... $5 Greek Salad... $6 add Shrimp... $4 Blue Cheese Wedge Salad 1/4 Wedge Iceberg Lettuce with Crispy Bacon, Tomatoes, Bleu Cheese Crumbles and Homemade Bleu Cheese Dressing... $7Breakfast MenuSATURDAY & SUNDAY 7a.m. 11a.m. Creole Eggs -2 Eggs Poached in our Spicy Homemade Creole Sauce Served with Cheese Grits & Choice of Toast or Sambos Homemade Biscuits... $6Shrimp & Grits Cheese Grits & 2 Fried Eggs Topped with Homemade Green Chili Sauce and Popcorn Shrimp... $65 oz. Grilled Ham Steak, 2 Eggs with Home Fries and Cheese Grits... $8Homemade Pancakes... $42 Eggs, Cheese Grits, Choice of Patty Sausage or Bacon... $4.50Biscuits & GravySambos 2 Homemade Biscuits Topped with Sausage Gravy... $5Steak & Eggs... $13Over the Top OMELETS... and so much more!OMELETES Comes with Choice of American, Swiss, Cheddar, or Pepper Jack Cheese and Served with Grits or Home Fries & ToastSimply Cheesy Choose any Cheese or mix em... $6 only .50 per extra kind of CheeseMeat and Cheese Country Ham, Bacon, Sausage, and Cheese... $7Everything but the Kitchen Sink Ham, Bacon, Onions, Peppers, Mushrooms, Tomatoes, Greek Peppers, Choise of Cheese, and Topped with Green Chili Pepper Sauce... $8Philly Cheese Shredded Steak, Green Peppers, Onions, Mushrooms, and Choice of Cheese... $8Western Omelete Ham, Green Peppers, Onion, Tomatoes, and Choice of Cheese... $7THE GREEK Feta Cheese, Tomatoesm Onions, and Tzatziki Sauce...$7ADD Your Favorite Ingredient to Any OmeleteSUCH AS Shrimp Dinner with 2 sides ... $17.95 Flounder Dinner with 2 Sides ... $16.95 SEAFOOD PLATTER #1Shrimp, Deviled Crab, Oysters, Scallop, Grouper Fingers with 2 Sides ... $17.95 SEAFOOD PLATTER #2Head on Shrimp, Shrimp, Oysters, Deviled Crab with 2 Sides ... $22.95 14 oz. New York Strip Dinner ... $13.95Be Sure to ask about the Greek Trim for your SaladFULLY STOCKED BARBIG SCREEN TVs to Watch your Favorite Team!!!Great Weather for Dining on the Deck Overlooking the Bay and Watching the Sun Go Down!Everyday Great Seafood Prices PANACEA, at the Bridge; FLORIDASEAFOOD RESTAURANT 850-984-5168 Oyster Bar~Restaurant Seafood Market91 Coastal Highway, Ochlockonee Bay3 BIG SCREEN TVS TO WATCH YOUR FAVORITE TEAM Huge Selection of AppetizersWings~Smoked Fish Dip~ U-Peel Shrimp & so much more!BEER and WINE $2 Drafts Friday is Greek Day SOFT SHELL CRABS RIB EYESCUT TO ORDER $8 LB.FRESH SHRIMP & GROUPERFLORIDA LOBSTERLIVE CRABS-$6 DOZ.LOCAL CLAMS Mushrooms .65 Cheese (each slice) .55 Tomatoes .50 Ham .80 Green Peppers .55 Onions 40 Sausage Gravy $1All Items subject to availabilityMimosas $4.50

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 10 As the race for the White House tightens, Republicans and Democrats are battling for every congressional seat they have a chance of winning. And in a north Florida district, Democrats are targeting rst-term U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland in an increasingly competitive clash with former state Senate Democratic Leader Al Lawson. The race had not been widely considered up for grabs. Southerland, a tea party favorite from Panama City, has a money advantage over Lawson and upset seven-term Congressman Allen Boyd, D-Monticello, to take the seat in 2010. But last week Politico listed the race among its five potential House upsets, noting a growing consensus among strategists from both parties that Southerland is suddenly in a dog ght for re-election. Also last week, the National Republican Congressional Committee made its rst ad buy in the district, spending nearly $150,000 for television ads in the Panama City and Tallahassee markets. Lawson voted to raise his pay 50 percent, with automatic increases every year, intones the announcer in an NRCC ad for Southerland, just like a sneaky politician. Al Lawson: pay raise for him, higher taxes for you. Lawson denied the charge at a campaign event Tuesday, telling the Progressive Democrats of Tallahassee that legislative salaries had been tied to state workers pay. I started off in the Legislature in 1982, and they paid me $12,000 a year, he said. It took 20 years for me to make as much money as my opponent made in two years in Washington. As of July 25, the last date for which gures are available, Southerland had raised $1,212,911 in contributions, with 35 percent from political action committees, and had $716,650 on hand. Lawson had raised $187,376, with 7 percent from PACs, and had $101,733 on hand. Lawson represented most of the district in the state Senate for years. He ran against Boyd in the 2010 Democratic primary for Congress, but lost 51 to 49 percent. That set the scene for newcomer Southerland to beat Boyd by 53 to 41 percent, with independent voters playing a large role. Although Democrats have outnumbered Republicans in the district for years, 2008 GOP presidential candidate John McCain beat Democrat Barack Obama in the area by a 52 to 47 percent margin. In 2010, however, Republican gubernatorial candidate Rick Scott lost to Democrat Alex Sink by 51.6 to 44.8 percent. The district is nearly 40 percent rural, stretching from the eastern part of the Florida Panhandle into the Big Bend and north-central Florida. It includes Tallahassee, where Lawson has been an insurance agent for 35 years, and Panama City, where Southerlands family has run a funeral home for nearly 60 years. While there are more registered Democrats than Republicans in the district, Southerland said many will vote for him instead of Lawson. I get the reports every month from the supervisors of elections, and theres a lot of people in our neck of the woods that are leaving the Democratic Party, he said at a Florida delegation event in late August. A huge issue in the race is Medicare, the federal program that provides health care for seniors. Lawsons campaign charged in a statement that Southerland has voted to end Medicare as we know it and turn it into a voucher system. In 2011, Southerland voted against a measure that would have protected Social Security benefits from privatization. Southerland has made a point of saying in a radio ad that he wont cut Medicare. On Tuesday, however, when he spoke at a Network of Entrepreneurs and Business Advocates luncheon in Tallahassee, he said, You dont hear many people telling you that Medicare is insolvent and [will be] broke in nine yearsa program that seniors have saved for, that seniors have worked for, that seniors depend upon. So weve got to make some changes. Southerland said the changes he supports wont affect anyone 55 years and older. He said those 54 and younger will have a program that would mirror the health care plan that members of Congress and federal employees already enjoy. Guess what? If youre wealthy, you may pay more, Southerland said. But if youre hurting, and you dont have the meansyou wont pay a dime more. Democrats have charged that Southerland voted to raise health care costs for Floridas seniors while also supporting tax breaks for the wealthy. According to Lawsons campaign, as of 2011, there were 136,863 Social Security bene ciaries in the district, with 92,479 over 65 years old. Lawson said Tuesday theres nothing more dear to me not just because of my age than protecting Social Security and keeping Medicare the way we have it today. It is very, very important that the American people and the people who are in Washington right now recognize the fact that this is the only retirement program that people can depend on, he told Panama City seniors at an earlier event. Many of those baby boomers didnt have a retirement system. Private corporations didnt give it to them, or they were let go before they were quali ed to be vested into these programs. Southerland spokesman Matt McCullough told the News Service of Florida last month that Lawsons own legislative record is suspect. He said Lawsons recipe of cuts to Medicare Advantage, hospitals and nursing homes will have a devastating impact on Florida seniors. Lawson supports the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare. Southerland has repeatedly voted against it. Southerland didnt mention his opponent much when he spoke at the NEBA event on Tuesday. But Lawson was represented by an empty chair with his name on it at the head table. NEBA President Mark Trafton said Lawson had been invited in an effort to be bipartisan. Lawson campaign spokeswoman Mara Sloan said her candidate had a scheduling conflict, but will debate Southerland Thursday on WFSU radio and at an Oct. 24 League of Women Voters of Bay County candidate forum in Panama City.ELECTION 2012Southerland vs Lawson becoming a marquee race By HENRY BUDDY WELLSWakulla Election SupervisorOn Tuesday, Nov. 6, polls will open for Wakulla County voters who were registered to vote by Oct. 9. Voting hours are from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Here are some helpful reminders on how to be prepared for Election Day: Florida law requires voters to present a picture ID with signature. Acceptable forms of ID are Florida Drivers License, Florida ID Card, U.S. Passport, Military or Student ID, Public Assistance ID, Neighborhood association identi cation and Debit/Credit Card. Please note: IDs must have current signature. Any combination of picture and signature is accepted. Early voting starts Oct. 27 and ends Nov. 3. Times are 8 a.m. until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1 p.m. until 7 p.m. on Sunday. A voter can take with them a marked sample ballot or other helpful information into the polling place so that they may remember their choices. Voters are encouraged to con rm their voting polling place by checking their voter information card or by going to our website www.wakullaelection. com and clicking on precinct nder. If the voter has moved, they are required to vote in their new home precinct. Absentee ballots should be mailed back or dropped off at the Supervisor of Elections of ce no later than 7 on election day. The cost of a stamp for returning absentee ballots is 65 cents. If a voter has requested an absentee ballot and later decides to vote at the polling place instead, they may bring the absentee ballot with them to be cancelled at their polling place and receive a new ballot to vote at the polls. Name and address changes, or signature updates may be made at the Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections of ce or by printing a Voter Registration Application online. Address changes within Wakulla County can be done by phone. Please complete these changes before going to the polls. Our website contains a wealth of information. Please go to www.wakullaelection.com. If you have any other election questions or concerns, you may also call the Wakulla Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575.How to be prepared for the Nov. 6 General Election No Acreage Limitations! Financing for Rural Homes www.FarmCredit-Fl.com Charlotte Dodson NMLS #700260850-656-2920 | Tallahassee, FL Oering loans with: Publix Aprons Simple Meals. (They really are!)Craving a delicious home-cooked meal tonight? You can do it! Stop by the Aprons Simple Meals center for inspiration. Pick up a recipe card and all the ingredients right there, and youre ready to cook! Aprons will help you bring your family back to the table. Its just that simple.publix.com/aprons

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By TIM LINAFELTFrom the very rst play, it was clear that things were different. Florida States offense started its game against Boston College game with literally the worst eld position possible inside its own 1-yard line and virtually no margin for error. So, naturally, the Seminoles lined up in the shotgun and red a deep pass to Rodney Smith. That one fell incomplete. But four plays later, all of them passes, EJ Manuel went deep again and this time didnt miss, hooking up with a Kenny Shaw for a 77-yard touchdown pass that completed a 99-yard drive. That drive foreshadowed things to come in FSUs eventual 51-7 win over the Eagles. It was followed by a career day from Manuel, who finished with 439 yards, four touchdowns and two interceptions, one of which was bobbled into the hands of a BC defender. And there were also career bests from two receivers Rodney Smith led the team with nine catches for 108 carries, while Kenny Shaw had an ef- cient 125 yards on just two receptions. But more importantly, it was a preview for a new or maybe old type of FSU offense. One that was clearly missing last week in Raleigh. I think their psyche was they got annoyed that they got a little conservative last week, and they werent about to do that, Eagles coach Frank Spaziani said. They were going to attack, and they were in an attack mode right from the beginning. The Seminoles came out with clear intentions to overwhelm an overmatched Boston College defense. Their rst nine plays were passes. As the lead continued to grow, Manuel continued to air it out. Up 41-7 in the fourth quarter, he nally tossed his last touchdown pass, a 12-yarder to James Wilder Jr. After the game, FSU coach Jimbo Fisher and a slew of players were asked about this new approach. What led to it? Was it the heavy criticism thrown their way after a conservative game plan cost them a win at N.C. State? Newspaper columnists and fans alike took Fisher to task last week for squandering a 16-0 lead in the second half, and Fisher reversed course multiple times on just where the blame should fall before nally settling on himself during his Wednesday call-in show.But the Seminoles swear up and down that they dont read outside in uences. Im not interested in sending a message, Fisher said. Im interested in winning a football game. Was it disparaging comments made by Boston Colleges defenders during the week? BC linebacker Sean Sylvia said the Seminoles have had everything handed to them over the years, and he didnt think FSU was prepared to bounce back from a tough loss. Linebacker Nick Clancy said he expected the Seminoles to run just three plays their bread and butter and think that would be enough. Well, we were real offended by that, FSU linebacker Christian Jones said. And they were well aware of Boston Colleges remarks, but that didnt have anything to do with it either. According to Fisher and Manuel, it was a simple as exploiting the matchup advantages they found during their lm study. Ill coach every game the best I think to win it. This game, thats what we wanted to do, Fisher said. We saw what we wanted to do, as far as attacking their defense, during the week, Manuel said, and it was some passing plays, so thats why we came out like that. Whatever it was, it worked. Nine different Seminoles finished with a reception 10 counting Manuel, who was credited with a catch after recovering a Lonnie Pryor fumble and eight of them had double-digit receiving yardage. And Manuels career day was enough to move him past some good company in the record books. His 439 yards gave him 6,148 for his career, surpassing both Charlie Ward and Thad Busby on the schools all-time passing yardage list. Not bad for a team that supposedly used only three plays all night. That was the most impressive three plays Ive ever seen Coach Jimbo call, linebacker Vince Williams said. Im just saying. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 7BBy MARTY COHENIt was somewhat amusing, and more than a bit telling, that after more than 20 minutes of conversation with offensive coordinator Brent Pease on Tuesday, a question nally came up regarding Vanderbilts defense. Yeah thanks thats who were playing, Pease said with a smile. Thats what I thought came here for (today). Nah, nobody really comes to talk about Vanderbilt football. Shoot, most folks in Nashville dont discuss Vanderbilt football. Engaging second-year head coach James Franklin has tried to institute a culture change surrounding his Commodore program, but erasing decades of futility doesnt happen overnight and will only come with consistent success good luck with that in the SEC. So while coaches and players resolve to maintain their one-game-at-atime resolve, the rest of us cant help but peak toward the upcoming showdowns With South Carolina and Georgia, the two contests that will truly de ne the course of the Gator season. Yet some folks will look at the Vanderbilt match and conjure up all sorts of reasons to be concerned, some holding merit, most not. In the end, its your call. You can worry about this game a lot, fret about it a little or none at all. After all, if you believe in such madeup sportswriter/fan stuff, Saturday nights clash is the ultimate trap game, the very de nition of a trap game if you choose to put any credence that such a concept exists. This game, against a lesser foe, on the road, cozy crowd, small buzz, comes smack between two home games with very big buzzes, LSU last Saturday and South Carolina a week from Saturday. So this is indeed, the picture of a trap game of course, it only pans out if the trappee not perform well. It would be my advice, take it or leave it, to fall somewhere between worrying about this game a tough and none at all. Obviously the more Florida continues to win, the more is at stake and therefore, the more there is to lose. But the catch to all this is: Vandy stinks. Not the old version of Vandy stinks, when the Commodores had absolutely no chance to beat Florida. No its the new model of Vandy stinks, a slightly better adaptation than the previous Vandy stinks model.FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102South Carolina State at Florida A&MSaturday, Oct. 20 at 6 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3 or famuathletics.com. #9 South Carolina at #3 FloridaSaturday, Oct. 20 at 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on CBS. #12 Florida State at MiamiSaturday, Oct. 20 at 8 p.m.The game can be seen on ABC.No Reason No Reason to Sweat to Sweat This One This One James Wilder Jr. caught two touchdowns. Linebacker MIKE TAYLOR and the rest of the Florida Gators will certainly not look past Vanderbilt.Seminoles get aggressive in win over BCPhoto By COLIN HACKLEYGATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON FloridaDMD.orgCommit to a mentoring or internship experience to reap the rewards. Sarah Goldman, Able Trust Mentor & UCF Student S Sa Sa Sa a h rah rah a Gld Gold Gold old man man, n, man m A Able Able Able Tru Tru T st M st M M e ento o r r &U & U & U CFS C CF S F tude de tude n nt t Sarah Goldman, Able Trust Mentor & UCF Student OPEN THE DOORTO YOUR BEST HIRE YETGive job seekers with disabilities a chance to show you what they can do. Youll be surprised by what you get in return. Access a pool of dependable, productive and capable workers Recruit interns, volunteers or long-term employees Discover how simple it is to accommodate workers with disabilities Improve company-wide morale Receive positive feedback from customers

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 12 Like a black hole sucking the light from the heavens, the general election now less than four weeks away appears to be preventing anything from escaping its grasp as the pace quickens and the money ows. While U.S. vice presidential candidates held their table-top battle, voter registration ended this week in Florida, though final numbers wont be known for a bit. While the focus on the coming election has blotted out much of the regular government news, there was some of that this week: of- cials overseeing the statebacked property insurer let up some in their effort to create a $350 million loan program backers say will reduce the number of policies held by Citizens Property Insurance Corp. Also, incoming House Speaker Will Weatherford named Seth McKeel to become the chambers chief budget builder, tapping the Lakeland Republican to head the powerful House Appropriations Committee when lawmakers return after the Nov. 6 election. CITIZENS BOARD SLOWS DOWN LOAN PROGRAM Prompted by concerns from wary lawmakers and the states consumer advocate, Citizens Property Insurance Corp will hire an outside rm to take a second look at a $350 million loan program its governing board approved just last month. The goal of the program was take more than 300,000 policies out of Citizens by offering private companies low interest loans to sweeten the deal. Quickly assembled by a new Citizens president from the private sector, the plan has raised concerns among key lawmakers wary over the idea itself and the speed by which it has come together. On Tuesday, Citizens depopulation committee recommended that the insurer hire Goldman Sachs, or another major investment firm, to review the surplus notes program, which would provide up to $50 million in 20-year, lowinterest loans to individual companies willing to take Citizens policies for at least 10 years. Citizens President and CEO Barry Gilway acknowledged the desire for additional information, but stood rm in his belief that the program would work as intended, reducing Citizens maximum loss by $2 billion and saving policyholders an estimated $1.7 billion in assessments during the 10 years in which the take out companies would be required to hold the policies. Instead of trying to depopulate Citizens by coverage elimination, reductions and restrictions, which have not played well in the marketplace This program, on the other hand, clearly bene ts the policyholder, Gilway said. But Robin Westcott, Floridas insurance consumer advocate, applauded the boards decision to take a closer look. Sometimes when we are in the middle of doing that, it helps to have a third party to come in and take a look, she said. BOOK CLOSES ON FLORIDA VOTER REGISTRATION Florida election of cials on Tuesday closed the door on new registrations for people wanting to vote in this years general election. The nal count of registered voters brings, for now, to a close months of wrangling over new voter registration laws that, for a time, curtailed third-party voter registration. Though book-closing results wont be available for several days, state Democratic Party officials have been on a roll, having registered 18,063 more voters than Republicans, a 16percentage point spread, in September. It was more of the same for Democrats, who have beaten the GOP in signing up new voters in each of the last eight months. Hispanics are a big part of the equation: Democrats now have a roughly 30 percentage point advantage in Hispanics in a state where Latino registration used to be more likely to be Republican. Hispanic Democrats not only outnumber Hispanic Republicans but there are also more Hispanic independents than Hispanic Republicans. As of August, the state had about 4.6 million registered Democrats to 4.1 million registered Republicans. Another 2.4 million are registered with no party af- liation and about 328,000 are in minor parties. MCKEEL TO BECOME BUDGET CHAIR Weatherford lled one of the most powerful positions in the state legislative leadership team this week by tapping McKeel to take over the House Appropriation Committee as the chamber begins drafting its roughly $70 billion budget proposal for next year. McKeel, R-Lakeland, has been in the House since 2006 and served on the Appropriations Committee. He has been chairman of the State Affairs Committee in the most recent two years and was deputy majority leader in 2009-2010. McKeel, 37, is vice president of Lakeland Properties and Management, his familys real estate management company. STORY OF THE WEEK: Citizens Property Insurance Corp. slows down to take another look at $350 million loan program. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Im not going to let people hide behind their of ce if they are involved in a case, Circuit Judge Frank Shef- eld on whether to allow lawyers to depose Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll in a case pending before his court involving the illegal release of an audio recording of an of ce conversation.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Being sucked into the election vortexBy JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 12 After railing for more than two years about Obamacare, Florida Republicans lost their legal battle this summer against a federal health overhaul that ultimately will require most Americans to have insurance coverage. But when voters cast ballots this fall, they will see the issue again. Lawmakers have proposed a constitutional amendment that, if passed, would say Floridians cant be forced to buy health coverage. At least in the short term, the measure would appear to have little effect, but House sponsor Scott Plakon, R-Longwood, pointed to what he sees as a basic right that Floridians should not be ned, taxed or penalized for our health care choices. Im hopeful that we will assert what I think should be a basic right in our constitution, Plakon said Friday. But Democrats have long argued that the proposal, which will appear on the ballot as Amendment 1, is legally toothless and is simply aimed at ring up Republican voters who loathe the 2010 federal health overhaul, known as the Affordable Care Act. The GOP-dominated Legislature voted in 2011 to put the measure on this falls ballot. It was political nonsense then, said Rep. Mark Pafford, D-West Palm Beach. Its political nonsense now. The proposed amendment does not speci cally mention the Affordable Care Act, but it says a law or rule may not compel, directly or indirectly, any person or employer to purchase, obtain or otherwise provide for health care coverage. That statement comes under a broader overall aim of preserving the freedom of all residents of the state to provide for their own health care. Critics have long said the constitutional amendment would not allow Floridians to opt out of the Affordable Care Acts requirement that most Americans have health insurance in 2014 or pay a penalty, a requirement dubbed the individual mandate. The critics position has stemmed from the Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution, which generally leads to federal laws trumping state laws when con icts arise. Republicans also suffered a huge blow in June, when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld most of the Affordable Care Act, including the individual mandate, in a lawsuit spearheaded by Florida. Plakon said the proposed constitutional amendment would prevent any future attempts by Florida lawmakers to put similar health-care requirements on residents. Such a scenario, however, seems highly unlikely under the current Republican leadership. Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island, also said Republican Mitt Romney might win the presidency in November, which could help spur major changes in the health-care system. Romney has called for repealing the Affordable Care Act and giving states more power to make health reforms.Symbolic or not, Florida voters will get say on health mandate Caf THURSDAY DRINK SPECIALS Perfect Weather to head to the CoastSunday ThursdayALL U CAN EATSpecials Catfish ......$11.95 Shrimp ....,$13.95 Scallops ..$13.95Includes Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies30 SHRIMP10 Fried 10 Grilled 10 BlackenedServed with Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw & Hushpuppies$12.95Winter hours: Tues. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 9B -Janet By DAVID WHITE From the outside, winemaking seems romantic. Farm workers lovingly tend to their vineyards throughout the spring and summer, and then hand harvest their grapes in the early fall. Those grapes are then gently crushed by foot, of course and turn into wine on their own through the magic of fermentation. Were led to believe that winemakers simply monitor this process. Theyre there to make sure the nal product winds up on the dinner table, but nature takes care of virtually everything. This narrative is partially true. But it ignores the grueling, backbreaking work that goes into every bottle of wine we open. Last week, I took part in that work during a brief visit to California, where I visited 12 wineries in Napa Valleys Stags Leap District. I came equipped with rubber boots and gloves and offered to help wherever an extra hand was needed. Im still hurting. Wherever wine is made, harvest is a special time. But the work is exhausting. In the evenings and early mornings, vineyards are packed with laborers collecting fruit, as picking while the weather is cool protects workers from daytime heat and ensures the grapes arrive in pristine condition. The roads are equally busy. In the mornings and evenings, trucks are lled with grapes. Throughout the day, those same trucks haul equipment and vineyard supplies. Wineries are abuzz with around-the-clock activity. Forklifts and tractors are in constant use. As grapes come in, theyre sorted, de-stemmed, and sorted again, as no winemaker wants leaves, spiders, or rocks to end up in her wine. With white wines, those grapes are crushed and pressed before fermentation. With reds, most of the grapes are typically left intact before theyre placed in barrels or tanks. At this point, yeast gets to work gradually converting the sugar into alcohol and imparting a litany of new tastes and aromas. Over about two weeks, what begins as grape juice becomes wine. Throughout this period, winemakers regularly taste the fermenting juice and bring samples to the laboratory to make sure the process is progressing as it should. For every winemaking team, the cleaning never ends. From bins, sorting tables, and de-stemming machines to tanks, pipes, and winemaking equipment, scalding hot water is used, over and over again, to hose down virtually everything. Wineries are very wet during harvest season. The work seems endless. Harvest only lasts about six to 10 weeks, depending on the grape variety. But during this period, 12to 14-hour days are normal. Much of the work is messy and physical. Some is mind-numbingly repetitive. Many tough choices have to be made. And at every step, attention to detail is critical one small error could result in hundreds of gallons of lost wine. Despite all the effort, harvest is magical. The air is lled with energy and the smell of fermenting grapes. Winemakers and their teams beam with joy, knowing their work will bring joy and pleasure to countless people. I cant wait to go back.David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet. WHITES WINESHarvest is magical, but grueling PHOTO BY D_RAMEY_LOGAN SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for qualied applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and oor rate of 2.5% LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt Favored Treatment "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser Bonnet Creek Fall Retreat From $179 per night Includes a $50 daily Resort Credit and daily self-parking For reservations call 888-208-7440. Ask for promotion code BCFT. Visit HiltonBonnetCreek.com/fall

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comStone Crab Festival is Saturday in St. MarksThe history of Shields Marina goes back further than the marina itself. It all began in 1928 when O.P. Shields settled in St. Marks. (O.P. was the paternal grandfather of Charles C. Shields, known to most as Chuck.) Although O.P. founded a charter boat service which catered to many of the top state of cials, including the Governor and cabinet members, his visions went much further than simply running shing trips. Shortly after establishing the charter boat business, he opened a small caf for the purpose of providing breakfast to the men and boys who came down to sh in the rich waters of Apalachee Bay. In a short time he expanded his caf into a larger operation that served not only breakfast but lunch and dinner and became known as Shields Caf. The restaurant became famous for its seafood and Greek salads and was run by Nick and Pete, two gentlemen of Greek descent who were from Tarpon Springs. O.P. died in 1959 without a will and the estate sold the restaurant and shortly thereafter, it burned down never to be reopened. The stories go that on any given Sunday, you had to wait in line just to get a seat and be able to eat the seafood that made it famous. Besides the charter boat business and the caf, O.P. had other ventures. In the late 1940s, he dug the only canal in St. Marks which is still used today. He also built the boathouse located at the end of the canal. His vision was for the large building that is currently owned by Theo Proctor to be a clubhouse and to sell lots on each side of the canal for private weekend homes where people could dock their boats. He died before his vision became a reality but not before the canal was nished complete with a fresh water spring to keep the water circulating. Because the family was large and there was no will, most of the land that O.P. Shields had purchased was sold to individuals to pay the various taxes and attorney fees associated with his estate. The land on the north and east side of the canal was purchased mainly by the Lynn family who opened up a marina that is still in existence today. The land where the openair boat slips of Shields Marina are now located was owned by the Roberts family but leased to Tenneco for 99 years. Many years later, Chuck bought out the lease, tore down the old sheds, refurbished the old tug boat slip used by Tenneco Oil Company and put in all new open-air slips that are located on the St. Marks River and in use today. In 1953, Myrtle and Curtis Shields, who both previously worked for Curtis father, O.P., opened their own small bait and tackle shop. It was a simple concrete block building approximately 12x20-feet with an icehouse on one end. They catered mostly to the private boats as the commercial boats were all docked downriver where the marina basin is now located. They also had rental boats and guides to take folks out shing. The commercial docks went from where Riverside Caf is currently located all the way to where the current marina store is located and were operated by E. W. Roberts. Myrtle and Curtiss small mom-and-pop operation grew and as their sons Chuck and Benny matured and worked in the marina, it became knows as Shields & Sons Marina. In 1968, it was incorporated and became Shields Marina as it is presently named today. In the early 1970s, the marina was purchased by Pamela and Charles Shields. Chuck had visions of what he wanted the marina to become and started working on buying back the land that once was owned by his grandfather. Over the next 10 to 15 years, he was able to buy back most of the land. Chuck and Pam had three sons, Barton, Barry and Brett, all of whom spent many a summer and most weekends helping out at the marina. By the late 1980s, Brett had graduated from college with a degree in building and construction and went to work for Ajax Construction as a project manager. He missed the water and marina life and returned after several years in the construction business. Chuck, although still active and CEO, has taken a back seat and Brett is now president. The new marina store and of ces were completed in 2009. The next phase is to refurbish the old boat basin which is suffering from erosion problems and rusty roofs. Call Shields Marina at 925-6158.... Visit Shields Marina... Fish with St. Marks Out ttersBy CAPT. MIKE McNAMARAOctober could be the best month of the year for catching sh in Apalachee Bay. October also has a long history of awesome weather in our area. Cold fronts bring down the temperatures, but are usually short lived. Find a warm and breezy tide and the trout bite can get super hot. Find a slick morning mid-tide and red sh could stack up on any point or rock pile. If youre looking for that breezy tide with the super trout bite, an evening trip could be just the ticket. Shorter days will have the trout feeding all day, but drifting the ats as the sun sets can be primetime. Popping a cork and jig combination will catch sh, but topwater is still my favorite. I know the oating grass can make you want to cut your topwater off, but all you need is just a few clicks. BAM! Another trout attack. If your topwater game is not up to par, stick with the jig and shrimp imitation. There is a very good shrimp run happening and everything eats shrimp. As for red sh, if you nd one, he will most likely have friends. Sometimes we nd the classic schools of reds, but for the most part our sh hold in small groups. In October they will start to gather. They might not gather in a tight bunch, but they will gather in one general location. Keep moving until you nd your sh and enjoy. If you do not beat them up too bad, they will hang in the general location until a weather change pushes them out. A great place to target reds this month will be the creek mouths and adjacent waters. If the inshore action is not enough to get you shing this month, keep in mind the close to shore action will also be crazy. Close to shore will be in the 15 feet out to 30 feet in Apalachee Bay. Look for a fall push of pelagics, cobia, mackerel, and jacks. Also beware of giant red- sh blasting bait. These are big sh, in the 30 pound and up class. If you nd a calm day, take a ride, and troll bait pods 8 to 12 miles south of St. Marks. Make sure you bring the camera. Capt. Mike McNamara of St Marks Out tters can be contacted at red sh@ stmarksout tters.com or by calling (850) 510-7919. WHILE IN ST. MARKS WHILE IN ST. MARKSSPECIAL To The NEWSA sponge boat unloading at Shields Marina dock recently. Wakulla Christian School, in coordination with the Wakulla County Veterans Services Office, is proud to host the Saturday, November 10, 2012 at Hudson Park Games, Vendors Raffles, a Silent Auction, and Lots of Food !!! Parade Starts @ 10:00a.m. A portion of the proceeds from this grand event will be donated to our local Veterans Services Office. Your family or organization is invited to participate in this very special event dedicated to honoring all Veterans and active duty military. Please consider entering a float or vehicle decorated in honor of your loved ones. For more information or to register your float, please contact the Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee via fax @ 850-926-5186 or email WCVDay@gmail.com Honoring All Who Served Soldier Care Packages 6th Annual Veterans Day Parade and Celebration to Support Our Troops and Honor Our Veterans Wakulla Christian School is collecting public donations of items to send to our troops wish list items include individually wrapped beef jerky, Pringles, individually wrapped sunflower seeds, individually wrapped nuts, individually packaged mix of Propel Fitness Water and Gatorade, individually packaged hard candy and gummy bears, white tube socks, protein bars, granola ba rs, books, soap, razors, sunscreen, nail files, AA batteries and Ziploc bags. For further information, please contact Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee Drop offanyitemsatoneof thefollowing supportivebusinessesinWakulla county: HOME MORTGAGEAMERIFIRST Has Your Mortgage Lender Forced You to Pay For Excessive Amounts of Flood or Hazard Insurance on Your Home?Certain Lenders, including Wells Fargo,GMAC and Chase may have been forcing borrowers to pay for excessive insurance on Condos or Homes. If this has happened to you, you may be entitled to monetary compensation. Call NOW for information regarding your legal rights. ATTENTIONCall 813-225-4000 or 800-360-6439 Jason Whittemore601 Bayshore Boulevard, Suite 910 Tampa, FL 33606 Certain Lenders, including Wells Fargo, Bank of America, and Chase may have been forcing borrowers to pay for excessive insurance on Condos or Homes. If this has happened to you, you may be entitled to monetary compensation. Call NOW for information regarding your legal rights. Certain Lenders, including Citibank, may have been forcing borrowers to pay for excessive insurance on Condos or Homes. If this has happened to you, you may be entitled to monetary compensation. Call NOW for information regarding your legal rights. Crawler Tractors, Motor Graders, Farm Tractors, Core Drill, Sweeper, Service & Bucket/Sign Trucks, Flatbed & Dump Trucks, Paving Equipment, Over (250) 2010-2007 Ford F-150 Crew and Ext. Cabs w/40-80k miles, 2010-2006 Chevrolet Pickups, Suburbans and Tahoes w/40-90k miles! MUCH, MUCH MORE! For details, visit: www.jmwood.com Absolute Public AuctionAlabama Dept. of Transportation October 26, 2012 9:00 AM 1409 Coliseum Blvd., Montgomery, AlabamaBryant Wood AL LIC #1137(334) 264-3265 95 95 Happy Birthday!to Edna Wilson Come celebrate with her Sunday, October 21, 2-4 pm at 118 Namon Spears Rd., CrawfordvillePlease bring hugs... no gifts, please!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 11B YOUR AD HERE About Again Ants Articles Atlantic Bait Bells Bets Brilliant Burnt Cabin Cool Credit Desk Doctor Dress Drew Drugs Dusk Duty Dying Eggs Ever Exit Fist Gear High Houses Hurt Index India Iron Land Leap Lent Link Lion Loved Mimes Mind Multiplication Nail Necks Nests This page sponsored in part by: Photographs Pure Road Rude Runs Sense Slap Some Sorted Stuff Suit Team Tight Tilt Topic Tour Used Useful Veto Youre Yo-yo Zero

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SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEmploymentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements Todays New Ads WAKULACOUNTYWant to Rent 2 bedroom. 1 bath. House Dec -May...prefer Panacea/Sopchoppy area. Call 231-256-7648 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Child Care Personnel BABY SITTER NEEDEDIn my home, in Sopchoppy, alternate weekends, some weekdays, 12 year old well behaved boy. Call Nanci (850) 363-1650 Trades/ Skills Tire Technician /Mechanic NeededB & B Dugger, Inc. is looking for a part or full-time tire mounting technician that has experience with tire changers. tire balancers and mounting truck & small tractor tires. Additional experience in roadside asssistance and working in the field is also prefererred. A Florida driver license with a clear MVR is a position requirement. Pay negotiable. Call the business office at (850) 926-2929 or email to office@band bdugger.com to receive an application Farm Services BUSH HOGGING ROADS GRADED GARDENS TILLED Have tractor will bush hog finish cut large acerage grade roads driveways till gardens. dbdouge@aol.com or 850-643-6283 Pets Happy Jack LiquivicRecognize safe & effecitive against hook & roundworms by US Center for Ventinary Medicine.PET STOP(850) 926-7949 www.happy jackinc.com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Bath $650 month, $600 dep. Includes gargage and water, shed and deck. No Pets, Firm (850) 926-6212 Leave Message CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 SOPCHOPPY2/1.5 Singlewide $575.REVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Mobile Homes For Sale 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, Chefs Kitchen. Beautiful Master Suite, Built in Wet Bar. Call Today (850) 576-2106 4 BR Mobile Home on 3 Acres Ready to Move IN EZ Payments. Call Me (850) 576-2105 100 Families Needed for Govt Loan Program. Call Today (850) 576-2104 3BR, 2BA-Used Mobile Home. Great Condition Amazing Deal!!! Call Me ASAP (850) 576-2687 CRAWFORDVILLE3 BD\2BA SW on 3 Acres in A rated schools, No smoking, $500 per pet Avail. Nov. firs /last/dep $750. ea 850-926-6766 Use YOUR Land or Your Trade As your DOWN Payment Call Now (850) 576 2687 Apartments Unfurnished PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall Mary (850) 984-4811Equal Housing Opportunity TDD 1 800 955 2771 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $700/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1937 CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Bedroom / 2 Bath, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 CRAWFORDVILLENice 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Home in Wakulla Gardens, Lots of extra features, $895. month (850) 926-8948 N. Crawfordville2/1 Mobile Home $575 monthREVELL REALTY 850-962-2212 SOPCHOPPY2/1For Rent, $600 month On CanalREVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 Rentals Wanted WAKULACOUNTYWant to Rent 2 bedroom. 1 bath. House Dec -May...prefer Panacea/Sopchoppy area. Call 231-256-7648 Lots For Sale 3 LOTS 50 x 100Side by Side REDUCED PRICE (850) 926-7966 (850) 933-1051 One Acre Lot w/ Well, Septic & Utility Pole off Wakulla Spring Rd HWY61 $19,500 (850) 421-2205 Home/Office Cleaning Need your house or office cleaned? Call Renee at 850-590-6720 for information about my cleaning services, experience and pricing. References available. Siding Cypress Lumber Pecky T&G v Joint Timbers and beams (850) 643-6283 Rent: Houses Unfurnished 5408-1018 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Steven Wisecup and Arthur Wisecup Doing business as: Winitstick Fictitious Name Notices at 30 John David Dr., Crawfordville, Florida 32327 with a mailing address of 30 John David Dr., Crawfordville, Florida 32327desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of Fictitious Name Notices State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 12th day of October, 2012 /s/Steven Wisecup /s/Arthur Wisecup October 18, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices 5401-1018 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 328.17 F.S., NON-JUDICAIL SALE OF VESSEL Notice is hereby given that unless sooner paid or redeemed, Rock Landing Marina, LLC, Inc. intends a public sale of the following vessels by brief description and apparent owners: 1.Vessel: 21 ft. Shamrock Cleveland Engine 351, VIN # SHA 015290483, Reg. # FL5221DN Owner: Estate of James E. Torgerson, II 2.Vessel: 27 ft. 1976 Columbia, VIN # 7043, Reg. # FL3499PA Owner: Scott Synar 3.Vessel: 25 ft. Hunter Marine Outboard, VIN # HUN51432 M79C25, Reg. # FL9947CV Owner Josh Davis Said sale will take place October 27, 2012 beginning at 9:00 a.m. and shall be held 5407-1018 TWN 11/01 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Affordable Title & Lien, Inc. will sell at Public Sale at Auction the following vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78 of the Florida Statutes on Lien Notices November 1, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. *AUCTION WILL OCCUR WHERE EACH VEHICLE IS LOCATED* 2003 PONTIAC VIN # 1G2JB12F837270406 Located at: 2235 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Wakulla Any person(s) claiming Lien Notices Lien Notices any interest(s) in the above vehicles contact: Affordable Title & Lien, Inc, (954) 416-1779 *ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD WITH RESERVE* Some of the vehicles may have been released prior to auction LIC #AB-0003126 October 18, 2012 at the location of Rock Landing Marina, 99 Rock Landing Road, Panacea, Florida 32346. The mailing address and contact number of said Marina is P.O. Box 653, Panacea, Florida 32346; Telephone # (850) 984-5844 October 11 & 18, 2012 Lien Notices Lien Notices Lien Notices 5357-0830 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: Ernest Kilpatrick Last known address of 86-B Allen Harvey St. Crawfordville, FL32327 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 October 18, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5400-1018 TWN Vs. Fields, Judith. 2010-CA-037 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-CA-037 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-MLMI, Plaintiff, vs. JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 AND #2, AND ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, et al. Defendant(s). RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 28, 2010 and an Order Rescheduling the Foreclosure Sale dated September 25, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 2010-CA-037 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-MLMI Plaintiff, and JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, is the Defendant. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash in the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32326 at 11:00 AM, on the 29th day of November, 2012, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOTS 6 AND 7, BLOCK 1, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you 5406-1018 TWN Estate of Bullock, Reginald File No. 12000374CPANotice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GADSDEN COUNTY, FLORIDA FILE NO. 12000374CPA IN RE: ESTATE OF REGINALD BULLOCK Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Reginald Bullock, deceased, whose date of death was August 19, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gadsden County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 10 E. Jefferson St. Quincy, FL32351. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 11, 2012. Personal Representative: By:/s/ Nellie Ruth Shaw 1181 Joe Adams Road Quincy, florida 32351 Attorney for Personal Representative: Kimberly L. King, Attorney for Nellie Ruth Shaw Florida Bar Number 0593011 KING & WOOD P.A., 1701 Hermitage Blvd. Suite 104, Tallahassee, FL323308 Telephone: (850)580-7711 Fax: (850)205-4501 October 11 & 18, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 OFFICE SPACE LEASEFORTHE BARRY BUILDING ATTHE LOG CABINCrawfordville 850-508-5471$25000/MO Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $625mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. Visit me on the web www.WakullaInfo.com Dawn Reed -Realtor GRICell (850) 294-3468 141 Elizabeth St.3BR/2BA mobile home on 1 acre with over 2,000 sq. ft. fenced, garage/workshop, to porches, replace, and much more. Directions: north Hwy 319, right at light at Walmart, right on Harry Morrison to Elizabeth. OPEN HOUSE Sunday Oct. 21 1-3 pm

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will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on September 26, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Attorney for the Plaintiff: Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, Popkin & Rosaler, P.A., 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442. Telephone: (954)360-9030 Facsimile: (954)420-5187. October 11 & 18, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5395-1018 TWN vs. Lacher, Walter J., Case No. 652010CA000269 Foreclosure IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA000269 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NASUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. WALTER J. LACHER A/K/AWALTER LACHER et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 19, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000269 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NASUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC. is the Plaintiff and WALTER J. LACHER A/K/AWALTER LACHER; TAMARALACHER; AIS SERVICES, LLC AS SUCCESSOR IN INTERESTTO AMERITECH GOLD; WAKULLA BANK; CAPITALONE BANK (USA), NATIONALASSOCIATION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; STATE OF FLORIDA-DEPARTMENTOF REVENUE; TENANT#1 N/K/AJACQUELYNE MCLENDON are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 1st day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES, 45 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 14 AND ALONG THE NORTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF EMMETT WHALEYROAD 760.70 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE NORTH 88 DEGREES, 45 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SECTION LINE AND ALONG SAID NORTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY300.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREE, 10 MINUTES, 58 SECONDS EAST 145.29 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES, 45, MINUTES, 46 SECONDS EAST 299.64 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREE, 02 MINUTES, 31 SECONDS WEST 145.29 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A188 EMMETT WHALEYROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on September 19, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By:Desireee D. Willis: Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. October 11 & 18, 2012 5396-1018 TWN vs. Kirkland, Stacie Case No.: 65-2010-CA-000425 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000425 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. STACIE RENEE KIRKLAND A/K/ASTACIE R. KIRKLAND; ANTROYLEMORE KIRKLAND A/K/AANTROYL. KIRKLAND; DIANE DELORES ROBERTS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DIANE DELORES ROBERTS; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTS(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWNHEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on JSeptember 19, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on November 1, 2012 at 11:00 A.M. (EST) at the Wakulla County Courthouse, located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FLthe following described property: From the southwest corner of the Northeast Quarter (NE1/4) of Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida; run East 711.12 feet along the south boundary line of said Northeast Quarter to a concrete monument and the Point of Beginning; from said concrete monument, run due North 1,296.43 feet to a point on a traverse line in the approximate center of the Bethel to Wakulla public road; thence run North 87 degrees 05 minutes 20 seconds East along said traverse line 127.22 feet to an angle point; then run South 74 degrees 16 minutes East along said traverse line 98.32 feet; thence run due South 1,276.23 feet to the south boundary line of the Northeast quarter of said Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 1 West; thence run West along the south boundary line of said Northeast Quarter 221.78 feet to the Point of Beginning. Less the southerly part of the Bethel to Wakulla public road, lying and being in the South Half of the Northeast Quarter of Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 1 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices West, Wakulla County, Florida. Said land being otherwise described as lot No. 4 of an unrecorded plat of a survey of lands of the Estate of Stacey Roberts, deceased. TOGETHER WITH that certain 2006 Nobility RMS Model 66x 28Manufactured Home, Serial No.s N1-10006Aand N1-10006B Property address: 154 Robert Williams Drive, Crawfordville, FL32327. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERSTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated September 19, 2012 (seal) Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk Wakulla County Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk October 11 & 18, 2012 5404-1018 TWN vs. Hill, Kathy File No. 2012-CP-84 Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTFOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, File No. 2012-CP-84 IN RE: ESTATE OF KATHYDOWNING HILL Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Kathy Downing Hill., deceased, whose date of death was April 9, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLACounty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 11, 2012. Personal Representative: Jessie A. Hill, Jr. 2671 Crawfordville Hwy., Box 6 Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: Deirdre A. Farrington, Attorney for Jessie a. Hill., Jr. Florida Bar Number: 488690, PO Box 392, Crawfordville, FL32326Telephone: (850)926-2700, Fax: (850)926-2741 E-Mail: deirdre@farrington-law.com 5405-1018 TWN vs. Scott, Allen File No. 12-91-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, File No. 12-91-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ALLEN JAMES SCOTT, a/k/a ALLEN J. SCOTT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ALLEN JAMES SCOTT, a/k/a ALLEN J. SCOTT deceased, whose date of death was JUNE 23, 2012 and whose Social Security Numberis 102-36-3329 is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 11, 2012. Personal Representative: By: /s/ PATRICIA P. STRICKLAND P.O. Box 125 ,Brooksville, FL 34605-0125 Attorney for Personal Representative: R. SETH MANN, R. SETH MANN, P.A. Florida Bar Number 0990434 38109 Pasco Avenue, Dade City, FL 33525 Telephone (352) 567-5010, Facsimile: (352) 567-1877 October 11, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5388-1018TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 009 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that GENE OPHEIM the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1613 Year of Issuance 2005 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-085-121-11580-012 CASORAESTATES UI TRACT 12 OR 253 P619 OR 253 P624 Name in which assessed RONALD D & TINARENEE THOMAS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. 5389-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 010 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1096 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 08-6S-01W-283-04862-E01 MARINAVILLAGE OF PANACEAUNIT 2 BLK E LOT 1 & BOAT SLIPF OR 372 P888 OR 496 P637 Name in which assessed H. CLAYHARRIS & LINDAW HARRIS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18,2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Be sure to come see this home of excellent quality design, construction and condition. These are just a few words to describe this beautiful home. Wonderful family home on a very large corner lot. 1738 Sq. Ft. heated and over 2,500 total including 3 bedrooms, two baths, deck, porch and garage. The entire home is brick construction with a red brick curb mailbox. The private Master Bedroom features a bath with a separate garden tub and shower. Both bathrooms are tiled. Ceiling fans are in all bedroom and living room. The large beautiful brick replace has never been lit. There are gorgeous hardwood oors throughout the home, with Berber carpeting in all the bedrooms. You must see the beautiful, versatile kitchen. The separate Dining Room has French doors, which lead to a wonderful screened-in porch and on to an open deck further leading to the large shady, fenced, back yard. Ready to move in, just need the right person or family! Priced right at $169,900. Come see us this Sunday! Take Taff Drive or Trice Lane off Hwy 319 and each will take you to Mulberry Circle. Look for Coastal Gems Real Estate Sign in among all the political signs on the corner of Trice Lane and Mulberry Cir. Trice Lane runs between Hwy. 319 and Hwy. 61 in Crawfordville. OPEN HOUSESUNDAY October 21 2:00 5:00 P. M. Corner of Mulberry Circle and Trice Lane. Crawfordville, FL 32327 hhf ll Carrol Ann Williams, Lic. Real Estate Broker/Owner 850926-2811 850566-9293 ulberry Circle ea l Est. 2000 / www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 13B Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 26B Old Courthouse Square 2BR/2BA townhouse, $750 mo. Available 11/1 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1500 mo, includes all utilities 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $900 Security Deposit 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA home $800 mo. 31 Chehaw 3BR/2BA DWMH $650mo. Lynn Cole-Eddinger David Hoover Open HouseSATURDAY & SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20TH & 21ST, 1-3PM615 OAKWOOD TRAIL/BROOK FOREST Words cannot describe this upscale 3 bedroom 2 bath home located on an incredible 5 acre tract in Brook Forest. Elegant hardwood oors throughout, custom built kitchen with granite countertops, stainless steel appliance and loads of windows looking out over huge back patio and beautiful back yard. Large harmonius family room, formal living room with replace. Split bedroom plan with all closets professionally shelved. Both bathrooms redone and GORGEOUS. 2 car detached garage with workout room and shop area. Property backs up to St. Joe land. Basketball/tennis court, plus 2 playhouses. Asking $289,900. OWNERS ANXIOUS! Dir: From Crawfordville, Hwy 319, take left on Martin Luther King, right on Rehwinkle Road, left on Oakwood Trail. Coastwise Realty,Inc. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!55 Allison Dr. Panacea 3BR/2BA Nice Dock and Boardwalk, Furnished or Unfurnished. GREAT FISHING on Dickerson Bay! $950 mo. No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2837 Coastal Hwy. Commercial Building $800 mo. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Commercial building 4,300 square foot heated and cooled building on 1 acre of land Rents out for $1,800.00. Building is in excellent condition. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets

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Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5385-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 006 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that NU TAX 1 GPthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2525 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-121-351-11968-A05 THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELLPOINT UNIT 2 BLOCK ALOT 5 OR 752 P576 Name in which assessed JOHN BOCCHINO said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk 5386-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 007 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that DONALD J SHEMWELLthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number 5387-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 008 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that DONALD J SHEMWELLthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1414 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-024-000-06581-001 P-8-1-M-6 COMM AT THE NW COR OF THE E1/2 OF THE NW 1/4 OF LOT 24 RUN S 17%E 660 FT TO THE P.O.B OR 163 P719 Name in which assessed ERVIN ADONALDSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18, 2012 5376-1018 TWN IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-320-DR St acey Kimble Jefferson Petitioner, and Benjamin Alexander Jefferson Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: Benjamin Alexander Jefferson l/k/a 75 Northwood Lane, Crawfordville, FL32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on STACEYKIMBLE JEFFERSON whose address is 75 NORTHWOOD LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 on or before October 26, 2012 and file with the orignal with the clerk of the Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.September 27 and October 4, 11, & 18, 2012 Dissolution of Marriage Notices Dissolution of Marriage Notices Dissolution of Marriage Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1687 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-034-009-08538-000 WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT 2 BLOCK 8 LOT 26 OR 20 P682 OR 634 P327 Name in which assessed KURTD & SAMUELLELLIOTTJR AS JTRS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11, & 18, 2012 By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18, 2012 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 32 38 43 48 58 63 66 69 2 33 59 3 34 52 18 27 44 4 15 28 39 49 5 24 40 45 6 25 35 60 64 67 70 7 21 36 53 8 29 50 65 22 26 51 61 9 16 19 41 46 62 10 37 47 54 11 42 55 68 71 12 30 56 13 31 57 ACROSS 1. Bouncers' requests 4. "R.U.R." playwright 9. "Rabbit food" 14. Teachers' org. 15. Beyond's partner 16. Two-dimensional 17. If actress Tyne married Chicago politico Richard, she'd be Tyne __ 19. Upper crust 20. "Don't fire __ fired upon" 21. Orthodontist's device 23. Caught in the act 24. Guinness suffix 26. Gaelic tongue 27. 1/2 fl. oz. 29. Dr. Scholl's products 32. Felix's roommate 35. Director Preminger 37. Pew area 38. Scuff up 39. If artist Yoko married skater Apolo, she'd be Yoko __ 42. Palindromic Bobbsey 43. Jillions 45. Mo ffo or Pavlova 46. Politico Lott 48. Wanted-poster figures 50. Mason's job 52. Native Canadian 53. KLM rival 54. In the proverbial cellar 58. City south of Elizabeth, NJ 61. Grosse __, MI 63. Siouan tribesmen 64. If skater Sasha married director Ethan, she'd be Sasha __ 66. Look for water 67. Getting chilled 68. __ Plaines, IL 69. Aids in wrongdoing 70. Arboreal abodes 71. Bard's beforeDOWN1. Pakistan's chief river 2. Colonial diplomat Silas 3. Explorer Sieur de La __ 4. Ill-bred sorts 5. Puts down 6. Capitol Hill figure 7. Navratilova rival 8. Chan films regular __ Luke 9. Gear for some fishermen 10. Jazzman Mose or puppeteer Fran 11. If singer Cleo married actor Nathan, she'd be Cleo __ 12. Kitty starter 13. Word before XING 18. Gossipy sort 22. Mortise mate 25. Impromptu percussion 28. A sib 29. Cornell's city 30. Hunter or Bayh 31. Shipped off 32. Actor Epps 33. Mall event 34. If singer Sheryl married actor Russell, she'd be Sheryl __ 36. Won __ soup 40. Quadrennial candidate Ralph 41. 4th-qtr. followers, sometimes 44. Most tangy 47. Dig find 49. Cand y brand 51. Facet 53. Brit's weight 55. Battery terminal 56. Beef on the hoof 57. On tenterhooks 58. Closing passage 59. Get from __ (progress a bit) 60. MBA subj. 62. Till stack 65. "__ Master's Voice"American Prole Hometown Content 10/14/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 12 3 4561 7248 3 86 4697 125 86 29 4716 583 200 9 HometownContent 182 9436 5 7 435876912 769251438 397 185264 254639781 618427395 876 312549 543798126 921564873 I N D U S O M A R C O D A D E A N E S A L E A T O B S A L L E C R O W C R O W E Y E N T A T A R T E S T C A D S B R O R E E S E S A B A S E S N A D E R P O L S P O O N S E C O N E V E R T T O N S T O N E K E Y E I T H A C A H I S T E N O N A S P E C T S P E A R S O T S O N E S A L L I S O N R E L I C L A I N E L A N E A N O D E A N T E E V A N S T E E R D E E R S E N T T E N S E For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page 15B 1. AD SLOGANS: What candy bars were sold with the slogan, Sometimes you feel like a nut. Sometimes you dont? 2. GEOGRAPHY: Where are the Maltese Islands located? 3. FAMOUS QUOTES: What American writer once said, Analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies of it? 4. SCIENCE: What is a less-than-average tide occurring at the first and third quarters of the moon? 5. PHOBIAS: Hemophobia is an irrational fear of what? 6. GAMES: What kind of game has variations that include Cincinnati and Omaha? 7. HUMAN ANATOMY: What are the crescent-shaped white spots on fingernails called? 8. MYTHOLOGY: According to Greek mythology, what was the name of the prophetic god who could change his form at will? 9. LANGUAGE: What is the Gaelic equivalent of James? 10. MATH: What is the lowest whole number (in English) that includes the letter a when it is spelled out? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 11. Mounds and Almond Joy 2. Mediterranean Sea 3. E.B. White 4. Neap tide 5. Blood 6. Poker 7. Lunula 8. Proteus 9. Seamus or Shamus 10. 1,000 (thousand) YOUR AD HERE

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By ROB BUDA For those of us who love saltwater and seafood, there is nothing better than spending time with family and friends on the water during a good scalloping season. It is a time when you see boats loaded up with all manner of life leaving the boat ramps from St. Marks. Men, women, children and, of course, the family dog all piled up in a boat heading out to the flats. Only on rare occasion does one see a whole family piled up like this in one boat for a shing trip and it can be quite the sight. Scalloping does not require specialized equipment. All thats needed is a mask, snorkel, dive ns, and a dive ag. There are some who prefer not to use any equipment except maybe a mask. I call this method scallop noodling because this manner of collecting scallops slightly resembles how they catch catfish in Alabama and Georgia. There are two basic requirements all participants must have before entering the water to collect whole bay scallops; (1) know how to swim, and (2) not be afraid of sea grass. Most of us who were born in Florida were introduced to water before we could walk. Typically, those who came late to swimming are the ones who are afraid of sea grass. They scream out in terror when sea grass touches their legs. Ive never known sea grass to harm anyone but for some reason, there is a primal fear of the stuff coming in contact with their legs. Sea grass scaredy-cats are very important members of the team, however we call them shuckers. They remain on the boat and wait for the snorkelers and noodlers to bring back scallops. Once the scallops are handed up to the boat, they get tossed in the cooler to let them chill out. Here again, specialized equipment is not needed for shucking. A good metal spoon will work just ne. After collecting the days limit of St. Marks scallops, it is our custom to motor off from the scalloping grounds and shuck our catch in deeper water. Shucking scallops is a social event. It is a time when family and friends can tell stories and make jokes and is a good time for all. That is, if you are all getting along in close quarters. They say if you can get along with your wife while on a boat offshore, then you were meant to be together. If you add the kids, your friends and the family dog, well then, thats all the better. Page 16B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 2012October 20, 2012 10 a.m. to 6 P.m.Parking $2.00 per carFUN, FOOD, LIVE MUSIC, PARADE ARTS, CRAFTS, EXHIBITS Special to The NewsOn Saturday, Oct. 20, the Hobbs-Bevis family will mark their 50th anniversary as owners of Shell Island Fish Camp and Marina located on the Wakulla River in St. Marks. The camp is a full service sh camp and the largest one in the Southeast. Most sh camps have either closed or been turned into full-time marinas. The camp sells more three-day shing licenses than anywhere in Florida. Alex and Gazzie Hobbs purchased Shell Island Fish Camp and Marina in 1962 and moved with their children, Allen and Gail, to St. Marks from Thomson, Ga. They had farmed and operated their grocery stores in McDuf e County for many years. They retained their property in Georgia and the family still returns often to visit family and friends. Alex and Gazzie retired in 1988 and Allen and Ruthie Hobbs took over the family business. Over time, Allen and Ruthie added their in uence in the operation. Seven old small cabins were eliminated and replaced by a 24-room motel, improved the four two-bedroom existing cabins with kitchens, added ve Park Models, four pontoon boats and 14 center console berglass rental boats replaced the original high-maintenance wood skiffs. Alex passed away in June 2010 after he had witnessed his dream that the business would stay in the family. His wife, Gazzie, 89, still lives at the camp as well as his daughter, Gail Field, and her husband, David. Allen and Ruthie retired in August 2010 and Alexs grandson, Jimmy Bevis and his wife Sherie, took over the operation. Jimmy is the son of Gail Hobbs Field so this will be the third generation to run the marina. Jimmy worked at the camp while going to school, worked at other jobs until 2003 when he came back to his rst love, the sh camp, and worked for Allen and Ruthie until they retired. Jimmy and Sherie have a 13-year-old daughter, Emily, who loves to be at the dock and assist wherever she can. We hope to have a fourth generation to take over. She already has her license for operating a boat on the open water. One consistent trait that has been evident through the years is the frequent upgrades incorporated to improve the general facility. First was the addition of enclosed and covered dry storage with forklift service for our customer boats. Wooden skiffs were replaced with berglass boats. Asphalt paving was added. Higher capacity and taller lifts replaced the lone lift. Small cabins were replaced with motel units. Sea walls were improved and oating piers with boat docks were added. Covered dry storage buildings were increased again The store opens at 6:30 a.m. seven days a week. Jimmy and Sherie also live at the camp so they are never far away from work. They have moved into the 21st Century and can be reached at www.shellisland shcamp.com. The sh camp has been a blessing to the Hobbs family for 50 years and we look forward to many more wonderful years at the best place on earth. Shell Island celebrates 59 years business WHILE IN ST. MARKS:Scalloping in St. Marks: A family adventure ON THE RIVER, INC. 15th ANNUAL STONE CRAB FEAST 15th ANNUAL STONE CRAB FEAST Saturday, October 20 Come Celebrate the Opening of the Season with us!Stone Crabs are in starting October 15 Stone Crabs are in starting October 15at the Stone Crab FestivalFRESH Stone Crab Right off the Boat! Follow the Music Live Bands All Day Rain or Shine for the festival at Riverside 10am 10pm Featuring Public Address and Bill Rigsby Band All the Fun & Music You Can Stand Bring the Whole Family 850-925-5668 Any further south and youre all wet!All the Fun & Music You Can Stand Bring the Whole Family850-925-5668 Any further south and youre all wet! Head To Riverside Cafe in St. Marks for Head To Riverside Cafe in St. Marks for !!" 2012 Go to www.bigbendhospice.org to Sign-up Today! 11:30am Registration and Lunch 12:30pm Tee-o October 26, 2012Wildwood Country ClubSAVE THE DATE!For more information, call Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308Wakulla County Big Bend Hospice Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief Support850-878-5310 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org