<%BANNER%>
Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00430
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 10-11-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00430
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 39th Issue Thursday, October 11, 2012 Three Sections Three Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Green Scene .................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 6B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11BINDEX OBITUARIES John D. McCabe Kathryn Nell Revell Dr. Jolly Herschel Rogers Michael Wayne Shepard Lila Frances Strickland Loey Dillard TumblesonCommission candidates attend bi-partisan forum PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENAll eight candidates for the three seats on the county commission speak at Monday nights forum jointly held by the local Democratic and Republican parties. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe first-ever joint forum held by the Wakulla Democratic and Republican executive committees took place on Monday, Oct. 8 at the Wakulla County Community Center and was for the three county commission races. The forum was proposed by Democratic chair Rachel Pienta and Republican chair Jonathan Kilpatrick after they felt the previous forums that were held by other groups had not been fair to their candidates. They encouraged their candidates not to attend forums held by those groups and decided to hold their own forums instead. About 40 people turned out for the bi-partisan forum and all eight county commissioner candidates were in attendance to answer submitted questions from the community ranging from how to address growth to views on the countys wetlands ordinance, thoughts about the RESTORE Act and opinion of the solid waste assessment. Candidates were given only a minute to formulate a response to each question. Those running for district 1 seat are incumbent Alan Brock, Jenny Brock and Ralph Thomas. When asked what each candidates vision for growth was, Alan Brock said growth has slowed and the commission needs to continue to focus on implementing the Crawfordville Town Plan, pass the one-cent sales tax again to pay for infrastructure improvements and use funds from the RESTORE Act to fund needed infrastructure improvements, as well as continue to support Tallahassee Community Colleges Environmental Institute. Jenny Brock said she would like to see funds from the RESTORE Act used for wastewater upgrades along the coast, as well as the county improving its roads and ease the situation on U.S. Highway 319. She added that she would like to increase the outdoor recreation industry and help small businesses grow and prosper. Thomas said the county needs to find a balance between preserving the natural resources and having responsible growth. The county also needs to focus on needs instead of wants and prioritize the infrastructure problems that the county has, such as overtaxed sewer system, unpaved roads, county facility issues, etc. The same question was also asked to candidates in districts 3 and 5. The candidates running in district 3 are incumbent Mike Stewart and Howard Kessler. Kessler said continuing to tax citizens, such as the new 7-percent Public Services Tax, defeats the purpose of wanting people and businesses to come to the county. He added that with the possibility of more environmental jobs coming to the county, the commission needs to create an atmosphere to allow that to happen. Stewart said the county needs a commission that agrees growth needs to happen and it also needs to help businesses move here and expand, such as the referendum on the November ballot that would allow the commission to give tax exemptions to new and existing businesses. Candidates running in district 5 are John Shuff, Emily Smith and Richard Harden. Current Commissioner Lynn Artz chose not to seek re-election.Continued on Page 3ABarbara Rosen turns natures discards into artBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netBarbara Rosen has been crafting and creating things with her hands since she was a little girl, but her current hobby has only been a love of hers for the last eight years and something she stumbled upon at a yard sale. One day on her way back home to Alligator Point with her husband, David, they passed a yard sale while coming through Crawfordville. He asked her if she would like to stop and check it out. He has never stopped for a garage sale, ever, Rosen says of her husband. But this day, he gave in to his wifes love of yard sales and she happened upon a book from the 1920s that had ideas about what to do with pine needles. I hated these pine needles, Rosen says. Im surrounded by pine needles. Rosen and her husband moved to Alligator Point in 1998. A little ways down the road, she decided to get the book out. It had general directions about how to make pine needle baskets, so Rosen decided to try and gure it out. Eventually, in 7 or 8 hours, she had created a small basket. To me, it was just fabulous, she says. Ive always been a crafter, Rosen says. She has done embroidery, knitting, crocheting, sewing, macrame, etc. You name it, I did it. After making her first pine needle basket, she got into her golf cart and went to show her project to the neighbors. One of her neighbors told Rosen that she needed to nd long pine needles. One day, that neighbor showed up at Rosens house with those long pine needles. She had found them. Her arms were full of pine needles, Rosen says. The long pine needles come from very old pine trees and can be found along the coast in this area and St. Theresa, she says. Continued on Page 15A Pine straw basketsPHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netOctober is Disability Awareness Month and to recognize this, the school districts exceptional student education office hosted a picnic in the park that focused on ability. This is the second year for the event and it has already doubled in amount of students, teachers, staff and residents who participated, said Tanya English, ESE director. Continued on Page 2AFocus on Ability celebrates with picnic at park A member of Spirit Paws. Dying oyster beds crippling a once thriving industry See Page 10A

PAGE 2

Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County is in line to receive a signi cant amount of money from the RESTORE Act, which holds those parties responsible for the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill accountable and ensures that 80 percent of the fines received be invested back into the Gulf region. However, there have been recent reports about a negotiation between BP and the Department of Justice about a possible settlement that may direct some nes elsewhere. Gulf County Commissioner Bill Williams spoke to the Wakulla County Commission at its Oct. 1 meeting and told them there is a possibility that a portion of the nes could be paid under the Natural Resources Damages Act, instead of the Clean Water Act. This is a bad thing, Williams said. Williams is helping counties within Florida set up the framework for the RESTORE Act. If this happens, federal agencies would have more control of the money, instead of it being sent directly to the states and counties affected. Rep. Steve Southerland, along with several other lawmakers sent a letter to the U.S. attorney general urging him to adhere to the RESTORE Act in collecting nes from BP. To withhold justice from the people who live along the Gulf Coast and endured the economic nightmare of this disaster would be a blatant violation of the role of government, Rep. Southerland said. I believe that ne monies should be processed through the Clean Water Act as was approved by Congress and signed into law by the President. Under the RESTORE Act, 80 percent of nes received would go to those areas affected by the oil spill and 35 percent of that would ow directly to the ve states, Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. In Florida, 75 percent of those funds would go to the most impacted counties, Wakulla included. If the settlement is for $15 billion dollars, Wakulla will receive over $25 million dollars from the local fund, and be competitive in two other funds for millions more, said County Commissioner Alan Brock. The Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council will receive 30 percent and 30 percent will be disbursed among the ve states based on miles of oiled shoreline, distance from disaster and population. The remaining 5 percent will be dedicated to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration and Science, Observation, Monitoring and Technology Program administered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and centers of excellence. These pots will be competitive and the county be competing against all the states. Although there have been reports that there is some stalling on BPs end towards a settlement, the county is still moving forward with making preparation for those funds. The county commission approved an interlocal agreement relating to the establishment of the Gulf Consortium and approved County Administrator David Edwards to serve as the countys representative. This consortium will administer the funds that are disbursed to the ve states based on several factors which do not go directly to the counties. This allows us to be an air traffic controller, Edwards said. It allows us to participate. Williams said there will be a lot of multi-county projects that are funded through this pot of money. Its imperative that the counties stick together, he said. The county commission also voted to schedule a public hearing to establish a Restore Act Advisory Committee that will help the county prioritize projects to be funded through the portion allocated directly to the county. The proposed members include a county commissioner; someone selected by the cities of St. Marks and Sopchoppy, Panacea Waterfronts, Chamber, Economic Development Council, Tourist Development Council, School Board and TCC Wakulla Campus; someone representing Shell Point, Oyster Bay and Spring Creek communities; someone representing the shing industry; someone in the natural resources industry; and a citizen at-large. The county commission is accepting applications for the representatives of the communities, shing and natural resources industries and citizen at-large. The county commission will then select those committee members. Those interested should complete and submit an application to the county administration office no later than Oct. 26. Brock said, The RESTORE Act can serve as the catalyst to truly restore our regions economy and environment. Wakulla County, and the whole panhandle, will move forward with economic development and infrastructure improvements that will make our communities some of the best in the nation.COUNTY COMMISSIONCounty could receive millions from RESTORE Act the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringGene MosserAugust 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromI am happy to win the certicate and will take advantage of it & enjoy all of the meals! OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l l a nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlorank You So Much! 000CV38 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta Continued from Page 1A The day was all about celebrating the students who are a part of the ESE program, as well as teachers and staff. Everybodys got an ability, said Superintendent David Miller. Its all about celebrating them. Local businesses who employ students and people with disabilities were also recognized at the event. The students in attendance were also entertained by students of Michelle Snows music therapy class, the Medart Dancers and Wakulla Middle School Bell Dance team, as well as the Riversprings Middle School cheer team and their spirit paws squad, which are students who are in the ESE class at Riversprings. The Pyramid Players from Tallahassee were also there to sing and perform several dances. They are a group of singers, actors and dancers with developmental disabilities. There were also several agencies on hand to provide information to students and parents, including Florida Diagnostic & Learning Resources System who had a booth set up with games for the students to play. There were also representatives from Project 10 Transition Education Network, Refuge House, Special Olympics and others.Focus on Ability celebrates with picnic at park At left, a student plays a tossing game at the Focus on Ability picnic at Hudson Park on Friday, Oct. 5.PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSEN

PAGE 3

Continued from Page 1A Smith said the county needs to build up its ecotourism industry, and also take advantage of the universities that surround the county. But in order to do that, the county must have jobs to support the graduates. She added that the commission needs to continue to support the Crawfordville Town Plan and have more sensible, attractive and unique growth. Shuff said the commission needs to support the TCC Environmental Institute, put more emphasis on the fishing community, x the problem of U.S. Highway 319, support the Crawfordville Town Plan and focus on fixing the infrastructure problems in Wakulla Gardens. Harden said the county needs to continue to support its major industries, such as the school district, government, St. Marks Powder and the prison, as well as back the shermen 100 percent. The county also needs to focus on the county as a whole, not just on infrastructure improvements to Crawfordville. Another question also focused on views of the countys wetlands ordinance. DISTRICT 1 Jenny Brock said people need to understand how wetlands function so they realize how important it is to protect them. She said she was OK with granting a variance to accommodate those people who need to use the land for a home on case by case basis. Thomas felt the commission needs to protect the wetlands, while also protecting property rights. He added that he wanted to keep the provisions that allow for a variance to build within the the 40-foot buffer zone. Alan Brock said the variance proposal allows for people to access their property rights and he felt the wetlands ordinance protects property rights and wetlands. He added that he has learned that the variance process was extremely complicated and proposed the idea of allowing the county planning director to approve variances within the 40-foot buffer zone for lots that were platted before 1995. DISTRICT 3 Kessler said continuing to destroy the countys wetlands is destroying the biggest asset it has. The county needs to protect its jewel and the reason people come to visit and stay in Wakulla County, he said. Stewart pointed out that he was the swing vote on the wetlands ordinance and voted to keep it as stringent as it is currently. He added that he would continue to support protecting the wetlands. DISTRICT 5 Smith felt the wetlands ordinance should be left alone. Wetlands do so much for our county, she said. She added that the allowance for variances is OK, as long as it is reasonable. Shuff felt like the wetlands ordinance infringed on some property rights. The state has toughened up its regulations and maybe the county needs to look at its ordinance again, and meet somewhere in the middle, he said. Im not saying go back to the state, but to look at it. Harden said it is important to protect wetlands, but doesnt agree with people not being able to build on their own property because of wetlands. They still have to pay property tax on the land they cant use. He added that the county needs to revisit the ordinance. The candidates were also asked where the funds from the Restore Act should be used. The Restore Act ensures that nes owed by BP and the other parties responsible for the Gulf oil spill will be invested into the Gulf region. DISTRICT 1 Jenny Brock, who is on the National Wildlife Federation Board of Directors and lobbied its passage in Washington, D.C., said the county should look at doing infrastructure that is allowable under the act, such as sewer along the coast, as well as real restoration for the Gulf Coast. Thomas said the county is forming a citizen advisory committee to help gure out what the countys needs are, which he felt was important. He also felt the county needed to use the funds to help the countys overtaxed sewer system and also provide better access to its waterways. Alan Brock, who represented the county and also lobbied for it, said the idea is to restore the environment, as well as the economy. Some ideas include improving the wastewater system, other economic investments and partnering with TCCs Environmental Institute. Its such an amazing opportunity, he said. DISTRICT 3 Kessler said the county needs to protect the environment, water and estuaries. He added that there needs to be accountability when spending those funds. To really make it count, so all can bene t, Kessler said. Stewart agreed that the money needed to be spent wisely. The No. 1 priority is sewer. That goes back to the environment, he said. DISTRICT 5 Shuff wanted to see the money used to help the oyster industry, improve the sewer system and help Wakulla Gardens. Harden said the money can be a real game changer for the county and can be used on environmental and economic restoration, as well as infrastructure needs. Smith felt the money should be spent on sewer, other infrastructure problems, beautification projects and helping Wakulla Gardens. She added that she didnt want to see the county do the bare minimum on projects. Not just patch up, Smith said. She added that she wanted to see the county come up with innovative ideas. A hot topic question for many residents that was asked focused on the candidates views of the countys decision to contract with Waste Pro for garbage collection and charge a $196 assessment to all property owners. DISTRICT 1 Jenny Brock said many people are upset about having no choice but to pay the assessment. She added that there is nothing to help those homeowners that inherited a home that they do not live in but are still required to pay the assessment. She also felt the 10-year contract was too much. We have to live with that, she said. Thomas said he didnt agree with it from the beginning because it is a government imposed monopoly. But since the county does have it, it needs to make sure it is done properly. And make sure its run ef ciently, he added. Alan Brock, who led the initiative for curbside pickup, said he was proud of taking the lead on this issue. The county was losing $500,000 a year, he said, and needed to do something. The commission looked at charging $112 to every resident, which did not include curbside pickup. If we have to charge people money, we should try and provide a service, he said. He added that he felt it was a great program. DISTRICT 3 Kessler felt the decision to impose solid waste assessment was rushed and done at the 11th hour. He added that people are having to pay far too many taxes. We need to re-prioritize, he said. Stewart felt the commission did the right thing, because citizens were going to be charged a fee regardless, but now they get a service. This only makes good common sense, he said. DISTRICT 5 Smith said she was uncomfortable that the small businesses were put out of business and that the garbage pickup is mandatory. She also wondered how the county got to that point to begin with and said there was a lack of vision and planning in dealing with the countys solid waste problem. She added that the county needs to reevaluate the contract with Waste Pro at the end of the 10 years. Shuff felt the program was a good one. Everyone contributes to the countys waste, he said. He added that the contract had to be long term for Waste Pro to agree to take on the countys solid waste. However, he would have liked to see a sliding fee scale for disadvantaged citizens who have to pay the solid waste assessment. Richard Harden said, People lost their choice, which is the thing that upsets the people he has spoken with the most. He would have tried to find a way to allow the private companies to stay in business and also allow people to have access to the land- ll. The next forum hosted by the Democratic and Republic executive committees will be held on Oct. 22 for the superintendent of schools candidates and those running for state house district 7. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Subscribe to The Wakulla News 877401-6408 Commission candidates attend bi-partisan forum The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 5, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider:A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 9260919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 11, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 5, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider:A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 11, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & ExteriorTogether We Are Providing Employment for Local CraftsmanFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Office detectives investigated a Panacea shooting incident that occurred at 1:27 a.m. Friday, Oct. 5 at 151 Otter Lake Road, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. During the incident inside a bedroom, a .25 caliber handgun discharged and struck Michael Todd Henley, 48, of Panacea in the head. Henley was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital where he died on Saturday, Oct. 6. Detectives determined that David Gordon Griggs, 51, of Panacea, who occupied the 151 Otter Lake Road home with Henley, was a convicted felon who was in possession of a rearm. Griggs was charged with possession of a firearm by a convicted felon and transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. The rearm recovered at the scene was reported stolen from Tallahassee in 1989 by the Tallahassee Police Department. In addition, four other rearms were recovered in the Griggs home. The case investigation is continuing and additional charges are possible. Griggs posted a $10,000 bond on Oct. 5 and was released from the county jail.Man killed in Panacea shooting David Gordon Griggs WILLIAM SNOWDENThe United Way kicked off its campaign with a party at La Parrillada on Sept. 27. Some of those at the party included Sarah Barnett Deeb, United Way vice president for resource development, Courtney Peacock of Capital City Bank, who is this years Wakulla chairperson, Rene Millender of Capital City Bank, and Megan Picht, a campaign associate for United Way. Last year, the United Way distributed more than $130,000 to local Wakulla agencies.Drive time

PAGE 4

Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Candidate responds to allegations about past FBI agent endorses Maurice Langston Only Creel attends sheriffs forum Coast Guard Auxiliary for Oct. 11, 2012 Sheriffs Report for Sept. 27, 2012 Football: Wakulla dominates Jefferson Should city commissioners in Sopchoppy get a salary? Wakulla Springs Lodge celebrates 75 years thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.COMMUNITY DEBATE By JONATHAN KILPATRICKMedicare is a promise made to Americas seniors and that promise must be kept. For current seniors and soon-to-be-seniors it is vital that the current Medicare program be maintained. However, the Medicare trust fund is slipping into insolvency and must be corrected for future generations. Doing nothing about Medicares nancial position is not a viable option. Allowing future seniors to have a choice and a say in their own health insurance decision would be a solution that bene ts both seniors and the taxpayer. Americans lead lifestyles that are varied and a one size ts all program often does not t the needs of each American. Premium supports would allow future seniors the choice of selecting the program that is best for their individual situation. Future seniors could pick a traditional Medicare plan or through a premium support plan use the average annual amount spent per Medicare recipient to purchase private insurance. This idea is nothing new or radical and ironically was recommended by Sen. John Breaux in 1999 when he was the chairman of Bill Clintons Medicare Reform Commission. By utilizing the premium supports, each senior would be able to make an informed decision as to which plan would be best. This approach would add competition to the pricing structure and allow the private market to develop innovative improvements to lower cost and keep the coverage we now enjoy. The current Medicare prescription drug plan is modeled on a premium support structure. Seniors have signed up for the program in greater numbers than expected and yet due to competition and innovation, the Congressional Budget Of ce now says the programs 10-year cost will be 43 percent lower than estimated in 2004. The current administrations policy to cut $716 billion from Medicare at a time when the Social Security and Medicare Trust Fund Boards say that the hospital trust fund will be insolvent by 2024 is an approach that will lead to disaster. The Obama administration would use that $716 billion to shore up his Obamacare scheme. Taking funds that were promised to seniors and funded by seniors to finance a governmental takeover of our healthcare system will expand governments reach into the lives of all Americans at the expense of our nations current seniors who have paid into the Medicare system for their entire working lives. Individual choice and personal freedom is always a good approach. Medicare is no different. By allowing seniors the choice of selecting the current Medicare plan or using the funds to purchase private insurance should be a decision left to each individual and not dictated to all Americans by a bureaucrat in Washington.Jonathan Kilpatrick is the chair of the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee.By RACHEL PIENTA The 2012 election cycle has been dominated by rumors and scare tactics that suggest senior citizens will lose their Medicare bene ts if President Obama wins a second term. A review of the facts shows that the exact opposite is true. Mitt Romneys plan would bankrupt Medicare by 2016, turn the program into a voucher system, and would increase costs for seniors by more than $6,000 a year. The Republican Party and the Romney Campaign cite a real gure $500 billion that is part of the health reform debate. The GOP distorts and spins the gure as $500 billion in Medicare cuts, rather than as decreases in the rate of growth of future spending. And the GOP further piles on the incorrect talking point about government-run health care. On the Truth-Meter, the claim rates as False. [Cleveland Plain Dealer, Politifact, www.politifact.com/ ohio/statements/2011/ jun/23/national-republican-senatorial-committee/ nrsc-claims-sen-sherrodbrown-voted-cut-500-billion 06/09/11] New York Magazine writer Jonathan Chait commented on a speech made by President Obama during a campaign swing through Florida, noting that President Obama talks Medicare in Florida and argues that Mitt Romney will end Medicare as we know it. The claim is undeniably true [Jonathan Chait, New York Magazine, http://nymag.com/daily/ intel/2012/07/obama-romney-ends-medicare-as-weknow-it.html 7/19/12]. Both Reuters and Bloomberg reported that Ryans Budget Bill Also Would End Traditional Medicare By Capping Spending And Offer Vouchers To Buy Private Insurance. [Bloomberg, http://go.bloomberg.com/ political-capital/2012-08-13/ medicare-truth-behind-thecuts 8/13/12; Reuters, http://www.reuters.com/ article/2012/08/12/ususa-campaign-idUSBRE87B0J820120812 8/12/12]. The proposed plan would shift more costs to seniors and increase out of pocket costs by more than $6,000 each year. As early as 2011, the Romney Campaign released Medicare plan details that outlined the voucher concept, Medicare Is Reformed As A Premium Support System, Meaning That Existing Spending Is Repackaged As A Fixed-Amount Bene t To Each Senior That He Or She Can Use To Purchase An Insurance Plan. [Romney Press Release, Spending Plan Cut The Spending, http://mittromney.com/ blogs/mitts-view/2011/11/ romney-presents-plan-turnaround-federal-government 11/4/11] Seniors cannot afford the Romney-Ryan Medicare plan. Rachel Pienta is chair of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee.The issue: Medicare is week e Wakulla News asked the local Democrat ic and Republican party chairs to respond to the question of what should be done with Medicare. Leading up to the Nov. 6 election, e News will submit a question each week for the local parties to answer. Do you have a question youd like asked, or did the question prompt a response from you? Send it to editor@thewakullanews.net.DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: REPUBLICAN RESPONSE: By DAVID EDWARDS Happy fall, yall. We have started the 201213 Fiscal Year and hit the ground running. A high priority for us is the RESTORE Act. On Oct. 1, the Board entered into an Interlocal Agreement for the formation of the Gulf Consortium. The purpose of the consortium is to ensure that funds within the competitive pots of money are evenly allocated between the 23 impacted Gulf Coast counties. Wakulla County will be receiving a allocation of funds that will come directly to us. Also, we are seeking members to serve on the RESTORE Act Advisory Committee. A major responsibility will be to serve as a clearinghouse for the acceptance and tracking of all projects from Wakullas public, private and nonpro t organizations as well as our citizens. In its advisory role, the committee will review all projects received in accordance with criteria established by the RESTORE Act; and provide progress reports and recommendations to the Board on all projects received. If you are a resident of Shell Point, Oyster Bay or Spring Creek communities; a citizen from the shing industry; a citizen from the natural resources industry; or a Wakulla County citizen who has nancial, accounting, and/or budgeting experience, I encourage you to visit our website (www. mywakulla.com) to obtain more information and an application. Get out and vote. On the Nov. 6 General Election ballot you will see a referendum to vote for or against an economic development property tax exemption for new businesses and expansions of existing businesses. The purpose of this property tax exemption program is to encourage the establishment of new businesses in Wakulla and for our existing businesses to expand and create new jobs in the county. Once established, the program authorizes the county to grant qualifying businesses an ad valorem tax exemption on real property improvements and tangible personal property of up to 100 percent for up to 10 years. This program is subject to the approval of a majority vote at the Nov. 6 General Election. To better educate yourself of the program, visit our website (www. mywakulla.com). One-cent sales tax continuing to be put to use on capital infrastructure projects. We are in the process of planning for major improvements at Hudson and Azalea Park. Community involvement will play a big role in this project. Please stay tuned as we will be seeking your input in the near future. If I can be of any assistance to you, please contact me. I think everyone knows that I have an open door policy, feel free to come see me, call me (926-0919 ext. 402), or send me an email at dedwards@mywakulla. com. David Edwards is Wakulla County administrator.Editor, The News: Bravo Wakulla! This town is so imbued with quiet angels that it astounds me. I wish the rest of the world had the opportunity to learn from the people and businesses in our community; this world would be a more genteel place. I would like to draw attention to our local Wal-Mart store. I am a teacher at the high school, and for years Wal-Mart has been extremely helpful towards teachers when it comes to supplies, free tools of the trade, giving us yearly grab bags and gift certi cates. I love seeing former students working in all departments, supporting themselves while attending TCC or Lively. Bravo for helping them with their work vs. school schedules! Recently one of our students was having trouble seeing in class she needed eyeglasses. Although she was having dif culties at home, she was able to make it down to Wal-Marts Optical Department. Once learning about the childs eye problems, David set up an appointment with the optometrist. Immediately Dr. Gardner offered to examine her without charge and Mr. F. Picard of the optical department offered to supply her with a pair of glasses for free. These people are truly quiet angels who aid in making our community an outstanding one. They did not have to step forward and help a child, but they did. She now has her new glasses and is nally able to see her work. She also looks good in them. Thank you Wal-Mart Optical. BRAVO! F. Druda Crawfordville Editor, The News: The rst two weeks of October are designated by Florida Statute for Disability History and Awareness Instruction. A part of this includes an understanding of the history of legislation providing access for persons with disabilities. Many remember the implementation of the Education for of All Handicapped Children Act in the early 1970s, which was the precursor to current IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) which entitles all students to Free and Appropriate Public Education. Also enacted during the same time period was the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) which requires equal access for persons with disabilities. Prior to this legislation, many children as well as adults with disabilities were institutionalized or kept at home. Today, in all Wakulla County Schools we serve students with a wide range of exceptionalities such as autism, emotional/behavior disorders, speci c learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities developmental delays, traumatic brain injuries and physical impairments. These children participate in educational, social and community activities along with their non-disabled peers, receiving accommodations as necessary. Students earning a Special Diploma are encouraged to remain in school until the semester in which they turn 22, to pursue a regular diploma and work on career skills. On Oct. 5, the Wakulla County School Board Exceptional Student Education Of ce hosted the second annual Focus on Ability Picnic in the Park at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. The purpose was to celebrate Disability Awareness Month, and focus on the abilities of our students. During the event, achievements of many students were spotlighted with a PowerPoint presentation of work experiences in the community and entertainment of song and dance and cheers. Many thanks to the people who worked together to make this event a success. Vicki Strickland and Kathy Duncan coordinated the set up and serving with their students, in addition to creating a PowerPoint highlighting work experiences with Florida Wild Mammal Association, CHAT, Goodwill Industries and school lunchrooms. Brian English and Bill Versiga provided hot dogs and manned the grill; FDLRS (Florida Diagnostic Learning Resource Systems), Project 10 Transition and The Refuge House provided information stations; Michelle Snow, Linda Leckinger and Regina Strickland worked with their students to provide entertainment; Catherine Harris and the Riversprings Middle School cheerleaders introduced a new addition to their team, the Spirit Paws, who entertained with cheers and a dance routine. Special Olympic sponsor Patricia Bodiford provided a T-shirt giveaway; and Tallahassee Pyramid Players claimed the stage with song and dance routines to wrap up the day. I also appreciate the parental and community support of our students. Your presence and participation made it a great day! Tanya English Executive Director of Exceptional Student Education/Student Services Wakulla County Schools FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR READERS WRITE:A lot going on in county government ank you to our local quiet angels Support of Focus on Ability appreciated

PAGE 5

Editor, The News: I attended the bi-partisan forum on Monday night at the community center. As you may know, it was hastily arranged and Im afraid it showed. The format was grossly unfair to certain candidates because they were forced to answer before their opponent(s) 7 out of 8 total questions. Being able to hear your opponents reply to a question before you answer the same question is a huge advantage, and thats exactly what was allowed to happen. Yep, you heard that right. Its kind of like forcing a football team to kick off 7 out of 8 halves! Although they rotated the rst question among each candidate, they always went down the line with the same question and not randomly. So in District 1, Jenny Brock had to answer 7 of 8 questions before Ralph Thomas and Ralph had to answer 7 out of 8 questions before Alan Brock. Therefore Alan answered only one time before Jenny and only one time before Ralph. In District 3, Howard Kessler had to answer 7 out of 8 questions before Mike Stewart, so Stewart only answered rst one time before Kessler. In District 5, Emily Smith had to answer 7 out of 8 questions before John Shuff and Shuff had to answer 7 out of 8 before Richard Harden. That meant Richard had to answer only once before Emily and once before John. Its ironic this forum was conceived because of claims that other forums were unfair. I dont think it was intentional, but very clearly the format was seriously awed. Of course, each candidate was only doing what was instructed by the organizers. Alternating answering rst among opponents is the hallmark of a fair forum and is certainly customary. I think asking why alternating among opponents wasnt done here is a fair question. Also, each candidate had only one minute to respond to questions, complex questions. I would have appreciated hearing more than just one minute from each candidate. I would hope any future bi-partisan forums be modi ed to ensure fairness for all candidates. Steve Fults fultsie@aol.com www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 5Areaders speak out More OpinionsEditor, The News: An open letter to citizens of Wakulla County: There was an article in The Wakulla News last week (Only Creel attends sheriffs forum, front page) where I again pledged that I had encouraged my supporters to run a clean campaign just as I have pledged. I even stated that I despise dirty politics and dirty campaigning. This is what has been going on in races for Wakulla County sheriff for years, fear and intimidation. Then Wednesday night citizens began receiving phone calls from a polling agency outside of Wakulla County asking misleading and non-factual questions about my record as a law enforcement of cer. Not only misleading and non-factual, but outright untruths! I have been divorced, but the other questions were asked to imply that I had violated law enforcement policy, completely untrue. I invite anyone to look at my Florida Highway Patrol personnel le. It is exemplary. I think that it is a shame that someone would use character assassinations to win an election. I want to address a few things concerning the race for Wakulla County Sheriff of which I am a candidate. From the very beginning in this race and during the 2008 race against David Harvey, I vowed to run a clean campaign, no mud-slinging, no personal attacks and no negative campaigning. I was and am committed to sticking to the issues who is the better candidate to lead Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. On Sept. 24 my opponent, Maurice Langston, mailed me a letter that he had signed on Sept. 21, with a Clean Campaign Pledge. I saw no need to sign this pledge as I had already signed a Candidates Oath with the Supervisor of Elections, a binding contract to adhere to run a clean campaign and abide by voting laws. These tactics are low and despicable and I am sorry that the citizens of Wakulla County have been subjected to this type of negative campaigning. Charlie Creel Candidate for Sheriff of Wakulla County Editor, The News: Four years ago our county commission was polarized and county revenue was on the decline. The three incumbents who were up for election all decided to walk away. There werent many people who were willing to even discuss running for of ce, let alone actually follow through and put their name on the ballot. Everyone was wondering who would be willing to wade into the mess that was facing our county and try to help our county out of it. Alan Brock saw the problem and decided that he would run and help bring our community together. He saw that together we could move our county beyond the immediate problems and get us back on track to good growth and success. Alan helped end the polarization, he took out the politics and started looking for ways to bring the community together. I have known Alan for a long time, and have always been impressed with the way he puts people at ease, listens to them and nds solutions to problems. I think Wakulla is lucky to have Alan serving on our county commission. Alan is a good face for our community. He speaks and presents himself well and has a strong network of in uence that he isnt afraid to lean on to help Wakulla. Like Apple Computers slogan, Alan Thinks different coming up with solutions that other people never would. Over the last couple of years I have read in The Wakulla News about the money our county was losing with the way we handled trash. I read how the state was preparing to come in and take over, increasing cost and decreasing services for every household. Alan managed to lead the county forward with an affordable alternative curbside garbage and recycling service and my family is actually saving over $100 a year! Who else could have come up with that solution and then get it through our commission? I am proud to call Alan Brock a friend and I am proud to have him as our county commission chair. I can only hope that he gets re-elected and he can continue to serve us for another four years. Thank you Alan for your service, my family is proud to cast our vote for you again. Sincerely, Molly Tucker Clore molly.a.clore@gmail.com Editor, The News: My son Gil attended Medart Elementary School from 2002 to 2007, Bobby Pearce was the schools principal during that time. In 2002, when Gil began rst grade, a group of parents including myself had an idea to start a Cub Scout program. With Principal Pearces encouragement and support, we started Cub Scout Pack 33. When we had ideas to promote the program, Principal Pearce was always available for discussions and willing to help. When we came up with the idea of an annual tree planting, that idea was met with support from Principal Pearce. Over a ve-year period, the Cub Scouts and parents planted over 100 trees around Medart Elementary School. Today, those trees are providing shade in the courtyards between class wings and can be seen lining the entrance drive. Largely as a result of Principal Pearces supportive nature and cando attitude, I was compelled to take over the job of Parent Teacher Organization (PTO) President. During that period Principal Pearce, myself and other parents worked together and accomplished a number of improvements to the school. Flashing caution signals were nally installed along Highway 319 and Highway 98 entrances. Prior to these signals, cars ew by the school at 55 mph as buses and cars dropped kids off before and after school, it was a recipe for disaster. Together, we implemented the Concerts for the Arts, a music concert to help the music and art programs that were struggling due to budget cuts. Local musicians including School Board member Jerry Evans came together to put on an amazing event. Together, we revamped the annual Spring Carnival and bought new playground equipment. The annual tree planting continued to grow in size. More trees were planted, irrigation was installed and even a butter y garden was built. All of these programs succeeded because of Bobby Pearces supportive nature and willingness to try new ideas. As PTO President and Cubmaster of Pack 33, I became a regular visitor to Bobby Pearces of ce. Bobby was always available to listen and had an open door/ open ear policy. If Bobby Pearce is elected as Superintendent of Schools, I would expect new ideas to be thoughtfully weighed for merit and then carefully chosen, just as he did as Principal Pearce. As for Principal Pearce and his genuine concern for kids, I watched Principal Pearce every morning greeting little kids with a smile or high ve. He would ask how a particular class was going or if they were feeling better after being out sick. It seemed at times like he personally knew every student and what was going on in their lives and truly cared. If the halls were full of students, it sometimes took a very long time to get from point A to point B if you were walking with Bobby, the kids loved him! As for the scouting programs, it was over 10 years ago a small g roup of determined parents and scouts, had the idea that a Scout program was needed in our area and received support and encouragement. Today, Cub Scout Pack 33, now Pack 8, has grown to include Boy Scout Troop 8 as well as a Venture Crew 8. As the parent of an Eagle Scout who went through these programs and as the Unit Commissioner working with all three Scout programs, I thank Principal Pearce for his support of scouting, as well as the many other ideas that have bene ted our youth. David Damon davdam8@aol.com Editor, The News: Like most Wakulla County gunnies and hunters, I have been proud of the NRAs past political aim and straight shooting. Today, we are a family of disenchanted NRA Life Members, because the NRA is way off target in our county sheriffs race. My husband and I are so passionate about our Second Amendment freedoms that we gave our children, in-laws and grandkids life memberships in the NRA and my husband has devoted much of his professional life to rearms training and promotion of our Second Amendment Rights. We have known Maurice Langston, a brother NRA Life Member, for over 30 years and can attest to the fact that no one in Wakulla County Government has done more over the years to champion gun rights and hunters rights than Maurice Langston! Maurice has been the direct supervisor over the WCSO Shooting Range since he rst arranged for jailed prisoners to provide free labor for construction of what was to become a model publicly supported shooting range. Maurice helped raise funds and in-kind donations to provide rearms training classrooms, out-buildings and ranges. Maurice grew up hunting quail and deer in the Smith Creek Community and strongly supported NRAs early efforts to pass concealed carry legislation in Florida. He has been an avid supporter of the recent Legislation by NRA/USF to further enhance and protect those important individual freedoms in Florida. The NRA/USF rmly believes that, if Barack Obama is re-elected, he will issue Executive Orders and Policy that severely restrict our current rearms and hunting freedoms. USFs Marion Hammer and the NRA keep close tabs on our National Government, but when it comes to knowing the candidates for sheriff in Wakulla County, Marion Hammer and the NRA completely missed the target by failing to do their homework and to research the facts. The fact is that those people in Wakulla County who support President Obama are the same people who do not support Maurice Langston. Its true. Just look around as you drive through the County. If you see an Obama sign in a yard, you will likely see a sign for the other sheriff candidate. If the NRA had taken the time to research instead of blindly following the Tallahassee mob, they could have put two and two together and would have realized that birds of a feather ock together. Disappointed at Shell Point Kathleen Lamarche secureland@aol.com Editor, The News: As sheriff of Wakulla County I have observed some comments made to the public about the operation of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office. Most of the things that have been said have been incorrect or misleading. I would like to personally offer political candidate Charlie Creel and any other candidate an opportunity to stop by the sheriffs of ce and visit with me. I would enjoy giving Creel or others an opportunity to review the sheriffs of ce budget to get a better understanding of how things really work so that the public does not get erroneous information. Most recently, comments were made in a newspaper advertisement about the Enhanced 911 budget which is approximately $165,000 annually. With two employees working in the division there was a comment made that the employees must be making $80,000 each. They do not. The E-911 budget funds a very technologically advanced communications system that must also be maintained and updated on a regular basis to work properly. This is just one area where we can share more information with the candidate to make him more informed about what we do. The door has always been open to anyone who has questions about how law enforcement funding is being spent. My staff has always been available and happy to discuss any portion of the WCSO budget and our divisions so nobody will have to speculate what is being done here and how money is being spent. We just nished working on the 2012-13 annual WCSO budget that the new sheriff will have to work with until Sept. 30, 2013, and nobody from the community made any comments or asked questions about it. Sincerely, Donnie W. Crum Sheriff, Wakulla County Editor, The News: I have known Ralph Thomas for nearly 20 years and I can personally tell you that he is an honorable and caring individual. Ralph continuously strives to help others, be it through his work at his church or through his efforts in the community. Ralph can be depended on each and every day to help those around him. His scally conservative mindset and his service before self attitude will be great attributes to the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners. Please join me in supporting Ralph Thomas for County Commissioner District 1 on Nov. 6. Sincerely, Valerie Russell, ARNP CrawfordvilleMORE READERS WRITE:Negative campaigning is despicable Sheri is available for budget questions NRA mis res in sheri s endorsement Like Apple, Alan Brock thinks di erent Bobby Pearce is open to new ideas Howard Kessler understands taxation e bi-partisan forum had its problems Amendments are troubling Endorsing Ralph omas for commissionEditor, The News: It is my perception that it is time for a change at every level of government. This is especially true here in Wakulla County. Because of the federal and state forests here in the county, the amount of taxable land is limited. This obviously places restraints on the property taxes that can be collected. However, the current commission has shown great creativity in increasing taxes by adding fees (the garbage fee for the monopoly trash collector) and the taxes on power, water and phones. Budgets seem to be kind of out of control. We are retired. We cant put our hands on other peoples money such as the commission has done to allow us to spend. I believe the commission needs NEW people who understand that we the taxpayers and voters dont have an in nite supply of money. I rmly believe that Howard Kessler is a man who understands this. He is very intelligent, hard working, and, I believe, has the best interests of the county at heart. We need people like Howard back on the commission. Look at what the current commission has done tax levels, special taxes, the mismanagement of the county dump over the many years that forced the commission to impose a collection fee and award a 10 year, monopolistic contract for management of the dump and trash collection, and on and on. Lets elect Howard and some other new folks and get some people who understand taxation, governing, integrity and management and start to get the current mess cleaned up! Ron Wigton, retired Oyster Bay/Shell PointEditor, The News: When you read the amendments on your ballot, be sure to read between the lines so you know what they really are saying. I was amazed (and disappointed) when I did that. Marcia Bjerregaard League of Women Voters member

PAGE 6

Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Churchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Church Briefs Octoberfest to be celebrated at Trinity Lutheran Oktoberfest for Trinity Lutheran Church and Preschool will be held on Saturday, Oct. 13, beginning at 10 a.m. Family fun including German food, silent auction, games for kids and big kids. Bratwurst, Sauerkraut, hot dogs, and German potato salad will be served for $5 per person. Trinity Lutheran Church and Preschool is located on Highway 98 across from Wakulla High School. Pumpkin Patch at Wakulla Springs Baptist Wakulla Springs Baptist Church will have pumpkins for sale beginning Monday, Oct. 15, through Oct. 31. The pumpkin patch will be open on weekdays from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. All proceeds go towards the garden ministry that supports local food pantries. A Harvest of Hope Pumpkin Patch Festival will be held at the church on Saturday, Oct. 20, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. with fun, food and games. The church is located at 1391 Crawfordville Highway. For more information, call 926-5152. Homecoming at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church and Pastor Bill Jenkins invite all to their Homecoming and Covered Dish Fellowship Dinner on Sunday, Oct. 14, beginning at 10:45 a.m. Please bring the whole family to this wonderful time of worship and fellowship. Quilt is being raf ed by Christ Church AnglicanChrist Church Quilters are raf ing a beautiful hand quilted queen-king size quilt. The pattern is Star-spangled Four Patch. Raf e tickets are now available, 6 tickets for $5 or $1 each. The drawing will be held after noon on Dec. 9, at Christ Church Anglican, 3383 Coastal Highway. You may call the church at745-8412 or Mary Lou Martin 210-1203 for more information or for tickets. By ETHEL M. SKIPPER Skipper Temple Church of Christ, 165 Surf Road in Sopchoppy, will be celebrating Pastor Ethel Skippers 24 years of pastoring. The congregation was in Carrabelle for more than 18 years. In 2006, Pastor Skipper relocated the church to Sopchoppy. This week, members of the church and many others will come together with praise and worship. Tawanna Moris from Tallahassee and Bethlehem True Holiness Pastor J. Blake of Woodville, and Blessed Hope Church Pastor Grady Harper of St. Marks appeared on Tuesday, Oct. 9. On Wednesday, Oct. 10, Macedonia Church Pastor Alfred Nelson of Sopchoppy, and New Hope Pentecostal Church Pastor Fred Cromartie of Crawfordville appeared. On Thursday, Oct. 11, St. John Primitive Baptist Church Pastor Raymond Sanders of Medart, and Zion Hill P.B. Church Pastor Ervin Donaldson of Sopchoppy. On Friday night, Oct. 12, the Right Rev. Chris Burney of Greater St. Mark Church of Tallahassee and Shiloh Church of Christ, Quincy, Pastor Mary Holloman. Sunday services will begin at 11 a.m. with True Holiness Church of Christ from Blountstown, Pastor Elder E. Brigham; Woodville Church of Christ Pastor Elder Andrew Morris. Dinner will be served after services. We wish a happy belated birthday to Deacon A.B. Simmon, Mrs. Charlene Green, Oct. 6, Felicia Green, from your family and friends. Skipper Temple celebratesLocal Prayer Walk continues for third weekBuckhorn NewsBy CYNTHIA WEBSTER For the past two weeks I have been a part of the Footsteps for Faith and Freedom Prayer Walk for National Healing. Each day my husband and I go to Azalea Park and join with dozens of others to walk and pray for a spiritual reawakening within our nation. Always there is a member of the Wakulla County clergy walking with us and often two or three are present. At Saturdays prayer walk we were blessed to have David Moss, a Wakulla High School Senior from the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church lead us in prayer. On arriving at the park we found that David had brought a giant wooden cross, made of 4x4 beams, which he placed against a tree. Before prayer we heard several testimonies from walkers including one from a wonderful lady who spoke of a time when she was making her daily call to a friend. The friend had a niece who had lost a child within the previous six months. Somehow (we know how) when she dialed the seven digits of her friends telephone number the connection was made into the home of the niece whose number she did not know. As a result, the caller, who also had experienced the loss of a child, was able to share an intimate and soul healing hour with a mother who was having a very dif cult day. This could not have happened without Gods intervention. Another testimony was made by a woman claiming to have nearly eight decades behind her. She said that as a teen she had turned her life over to God. When she met a person she wanted to marry she questioned whether she could serve God and be a wife and mother. She did marry, had three children, lost her rst husband, found work in the medical eld helping others, raised her children and later married a man also in the medical eld whose faith was as strong as hers. Together they traveled all over the world caring for the sick and bringing the word of God with them wherever they went. And our prayer leader David testi ed that although only 17 he has witnessed the greatness of God. He explained how his faith has sustained him through severe family problems and times of serious illness for his mom. SCHEDULE FOR WEEK THREE: Thursday, Oct. 11, 6:45 p.m., Lay Leader Byron L. Price, Seafarers Chapel. Friday, Oct. 12, 10 a.m., Pastor Glen Hamel of Promiseland Ministries. Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m., Youth Leader, Derricke Gray, River of Life. Monday, Oct. 15, 6:45 p.m., Pastor Samuel Hayes, Mt. Olive Primitive Baptist Church #2. Tuesday, Oct. 16, 6:45 p.m., Assistant Pastor Rick Carter, Harvest Fellowship. Wednesday, Oct. 17, 10 a.m., Pastor Charles Barwick, Panacea Full Gospel Assembly. All are welcome to join in the prayer walks. The morning walks are especially nice for moms with young children there is a playground in the park. Listen to Freedom interview on WAVE Radio, 94.1 each Thursday at 10:50 a.m.Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... The queen-size quilt to be raf ed. Crawfordville United Methodist Church held a Blessing of the Animals last Saturday. A procession of animals, more than 20 dogs, one cat and two stuffed animals were led up to the frront doors of the church where they received a hands-on blessing and prayer from Pastor Mike Shockley. The rite was conducted in remembrance of St. Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of animals and the environment. Donations of pet food were accepted and will be presented to the animal shelter.Crawfordville UMC holds a Blessing of the AnimalsPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMallory Dotson with her dog Zeus as he receives a blessing from Pastor Mike Shockley.

PAGE 7

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 7AObituaries John D. McCabe Kathryn Nell Revell Dr. Jolly Herschel Rogers Michael Wayne Shepard Lila Frances Strickland Loey Dillard TumblesonJohn D. McCabe, 68, of Crawfordville, passed away on Monday, Oct. 1. He was predeceased by his wife, Peggy McCabe, in 1997. He had been living in the area for the past 30 years and was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Crawfordville. He served in the U.S. Air Force and loved motorcycles and shing. Survivors include five children, Michael McCabe (April) of Boise, Idaho, Bobby McCabe (Sophie) of Encinitas, Calif., Jennifer Rothgeb (Nicholas) of Virginia Beach, Va., Jessi Frost (William) of Crawfordville and Jon Campbell (Adrianna) of Homestead; two sisters; and six grandchildren. The Funeral Service was held at 3 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 5, at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Crawfordville. The committal service will conclude at Whiddon Lake Cemetery. The U.S. Air Force will provide military honors. Memorials may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Bevis Funeral Home in Crawfordville(www.bevisfh. com or 850/926.3333) was in charge of arrangements. Kathryn Nell Revell, 65, of Crawfordville passed away Friday, Oct. 5. She was born in Tallahassee and lived in Crawfordville for most of her adult life. She was retired from the U.S. District Court System where she served as a court room deputy. She was a member of Eastern Star where she held the of ce of Worthy Matron at Crawfordville Chapter 242 and Gainesville Rob Morris Chapter 310. Visitation for family and friends was held Monday, Oct. 8, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville. Services followed the visitation at 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel. Burial will follow at Revell Cemetery in Sopchoppy. Survivors include a son, Kenny Chaganis (Sandy) of Crawfordville; three brothers, Barney Calvin Revell (Marsha) of New Port Richey, James Revell (Patti) of Crawfordville and Ricky Revell and Rose of McIntosh; one sister, Frances Smith (Herman) of Tallahassee; three granddaughters, Ashley, Samantha and Cori Chaganis; and one great-granddaughter, Miranda Philman. She was predeceased by beloved son, Murray Chaganis. In lieu of owers make donations in her name to the Wakulla County Historical Society, P.O. Box 151, Crawfordville FL 32326. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfhcom) Dr. Jolly Herschel Rogers died on Sept. 14. He was a retired veterinarian and commercial shing boat captain, University of Georgia graduate, born in Cuthbert, Ga. Owned veterinary practices in Tampa, Pinellas Park and Crawfordville. Over his lifetime, he enjoyed a variety of hobbies that included racing hydroplanes, go-kart racing, scuba diving, spear shing, hunting, building and ying radio controlled airplanes. He was recently widowed from his wife, June Rogers. He was predeceased by his parents, Herschel Rogers and Dorothy Williams Rogers. Survivors include his children, Pam Rogers Herring of Birmingham, Ala., Bill Rogers of Crawfordville, and Luke Rogers of Tallahassee; his stepchildren, Barbara Taylor of Laurel Hill, Debra Knotts of Birmingham, Ala., Kelly Dykes of Crawfordville and Karol Shepherd of Crawfordville; ve grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held Sunday, Oct. 14, at 1 p.m. in the Dogwood Room at Wakulla Springs State Park. Michael Wayne Shepard, 53, of Crawfordville, died at his home on Sept. 26. Survivors include his mother and stepfather, Bebe and Amos Moore of Crawfordville; his father and stepmother, Larry and Jorene Shepard of Austin, Texas; one brother, Greg Moore of Lima, Ohio; two sisters, Shelley Moore of Crawfordville and Kim Shepard of Houston, Texas; one nephew, Sage Moore and one niece, Belle Paul, both of Crawfordville; aunt, Dee Frye of Tallahassee. He was predeceased by a half-brother, Shannon Shepard; and his paternal grandmother, Jewell Shepard. A Celebration of Life will be held Saturday, Oct. 13, from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at 18 Shepherdwood Drive in Crawfordille. Lila Frances Strickland, 65, of the Ivan community, died on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012. She was born on Oct. 26, 1947 to the late Ralph and Alma Green Strickland. She was a former employee of The Wakulla News, and a military veteran. Survivors include her daughter, Layla Strickland McMillan (Mike); grandsons, Justin, Brian and Jake; two brothers, Durwood Strickland (Betty) of Tallahassee and Larry Strickland (JoAnne) of Crawfordville; a sister, Imogene Whaley of Medart; and sister-in-law, Connie Strickland Cutchin, and brother-in-law, Richard Lynn. She is also survived by numerous nieces, nephews and extended family and friends. She was predeceased by a brother, Roderick Strickland; and sister, Phyllis Lynn. It was her wish to be cremated and a celebration of her life will be held on Friday, Oct. 26, at 11 a.m. at 606 Whiddon Lake Road in Crawfordville. Casual dress is requested. Memorial donations can be made to the Veterans Association. She was always looking out for everyone else rather than being worried about her own well-being. Loey Dillard Tumbleson, 78, died on Sept. 26 in Tallahassee. He was born Jan. 12, 1934, in Keo, Ark., to Loey and Maudie Grif n Tumbleson. He owned and operated several businesses. He was a member of Pioneer Baptist Church. Survivors include his sons, Gene Tumbleson, Rod Tumbleson and Bruce (Carla) Tumbleson; his grandchildren, Heather Tumbleson, Allan Tumbleson, Charity Tumbleson and Stonewall Bryant; and 10 siblings. He was preceded in death by his wife of 54 years, Euvona J. Tumbleson. The funeral was held Oct. 1 at Abbey Funeral Home in Tallahassee, with interment at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. Donations may be made to Pioneer Baptist Church in Crawfordville. Online condolences at www.abbeyfh.com.John D. McCabe Kathryn Nell Revell Dr. Jolly Herschel Rogers Michael Wayne Shepard Lila Frances Strickland Loey Dillard TumblesonEarly to bed, early to rise hasnt worked for meREV. JAMES L. SNYDER My father was not what you would call a literate person. Apart from the Bible, he did not read much of anything else on a regular basis. I can remember as a young person him quoting a great American patriot, Benjamin Franklin. The only quote he knew of this man was, Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise. For a long time I thought he was making it up and then one day, I happened to run across a book in the library about Benjamin Franklin and, there it was. Benjamin actually did say that. I had to give my father that one. It seems that every time it got close to what my father termed as my bedtime, he would remind me of this famous quote. It got so I hated when bedtime came. At the time, I had my doubts about the validity of this quote because if my father followed this quote as he encouraged me to do, why was he not healthy, wealthy and wise? At the time, I was in no position to question his wisdom. I was wise enough to know that the best part of wisdom was not to challenge the wisdom of my father. This has attributed to my length of life to date. Continued on Page 15A OUT TO PASTOR To the people of Wakulla County,On the day the Wakulla News published a story about my opponent asking me to sign a pledge to carry on a clean campaign, ironically the people of Wakulla County started receiving mudslinging calls questioning the character and integrity of my experience in law-enforcement. People who have received these negative calls disguised as a legitimate poll have alerted me, so I want to ensure that the people of Wakulla County know that the derogatory implications of these calls are untrue. I anticipate these types of campaign tactics will go on until Election Day, nevertheless I will continue to carry on the clean campaign I have conducted for the past year and a half. I signed an oath to abide by voting laws as my opponent did when we qualified as candidates, and I have stayed true to it.I ask for your vote Nov. 6, so Wakulla County will have a FRESH START in the sheriffs ofce.Facebook at Charlie Creel for Sheriff charlieforsheriff@gmail.com (850) 926-4712 PO Box 482 Crawfordville, FL 32326www.charliecreel.comPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Afliation, for sheriff.

PAGE 8

Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySopchoppy Lions Club celebrates 60 years SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMembers of the Sopchoppy Lions Club for 2013. By MARJ LAWSpecial to The NewsIn September, the Sopchoppy Lions Club celebrated the completion of 60 years of continuous service to Wakulla County and Lions Clubs internationally. Chartered in 1952, Sopchoppy Lions have helped our residents preserve sight and prevent blindness. Lions also participate in projects to improve our community. Originally, the Club began with 18 charter members. Emory Green was the last surviving charter member. Now, Bernie Kemp, Warren Harden and Robert Roddenberry have served the longest: 53, 49, and 48 years respectively. While sight preservation and conservation are the major focus of the club, their projects have been many and varied. Back when there was the old Sopchoppy school, the Lions were instrumental in assisting the athletic department by helping to fund lights on the eld so they could enjoy night games. Lions acquired the rst uniforms for the Wakulla High School band around 1967. Lions helped erect mail boxes on rural routes. Lions participate in Keep Wakulla County Beautifuls Adopt a Road program, picking up trash every 3 months from several miles of road. Lions hold booths at festivals: they used to attend the Sopchoppy Fourth of July festival for many years; now they have a booth at the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin festival. In addition to the many service projects around Wakulla County, sight conservation and preservation are always in the forefront of our Lions thinking. They purchase eyeglasses for many in need. Lions are involved in assisting with the cost of some eye surgeries. To be able to do this, they collect old eyeglasses which get minor repairs if needed and are sanitized. They are then slipped in plastic bags. Many go to foreign countries. Those in need of glasses locally are sent to speci c eye doctors who give the Lions Club a very generous rate. Then the Lions can help with the glasses themselves. Lions support eye centers around the states. They also provide some funding in the Leader Dog Program. This program helps the hearing and sight impaired train for and obtain a leader dog. Financial support comes from the Lions local programs, such as their sh fry on Saturday, Nov. 3, their birthday calendars, raf es, brooms and donations. 60 years of Lions in Sopchoppy! This is real service to our community. Kristie Walker and Nicholas Soderholm of Carrabelle announce the birth of their son, Tyler Evan Soderholm, on Sept. 11 at 12:40 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 7 pounds, 12 ounces and was 20.75 inches. He has an older sister, Kaylee, who is 23 months. His maternal grandparents are Christine Silvey of Crawfordville and Ivan Walker of Carrabelle. His paternal grandparent is Sharon Soderholm of Carrabelle. His great-grandparents are Dennis Allen of Crawfordville and Judy Stevens of Panacea and Gail Browning of Bridge City, Texas, and Margaret Zuberbeuhler of Carrabelle.Special to The NewsThe Christmas Assistance Program for the Salvation Army is accepting applications for Wakulla, Leon and Gadsden county residents. Applications for Christmas assistance will be taken at the Salvation Armys main of ce, located at 5016 W. Tennessee St. in Tallahassee. Applications are being accepted on Oct. 10-12, 15-19 and 22-26 from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Applicants must bring: A picture ID for all adults in the home. Birth certi cates for all children in the home. Social security cards for everyone in the home. A lease agreement with name and address on it. Proof of all income for the home. This includes cash assistance, food stamps and child support. Proof of all expenses. Any bills that an applicant pays, such as utilities, phone, cable, insurance, daycare, etc. A need for assistance must be proven and those who have received this assistance for the past 3 years will be ineligible this year.Christmas assistance available through Salvation ArmySpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Historical Society is sponsoring a Genealogy Seminar on Saturday, Oct. 20 at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. Registration is at 8:15 a.m., and includes breakfast and lunch. Featured speakers are genealogy experts Jay Collins and Melody Porter. Collins was born and raised in upstate New York. He and his wife have lived and worked in Tallahassee since 1978. He recently retired from the City of Tallahassee, where he worked as a Business Systems Analyst supporting the Document Imaging and Records Management System. While with the City he attained the credentials of Certi ed Document Imaging Architect and Certi ed Public Manager. He became involved in genealogy in the early 90s and is the owner of Bluejay Genealogy Research, tracing the genealogical connections to selected artifacts. He has served on the Board of the Tallahassee Genealogical Society since 2008, and is currently serving his third year as its president. His discussion will include: Your DNA ReportWhat do all those numbers mean, a brief introduction to the basics of DNA and genealogy; and Applying DNA to your genealogy research, practical examples of how to use DNA results to resolve questions or con icts. Porters background is in computer software as business analyst and project manager, but she has researched her genealogy for over 20 years. She specializes in Florida, Georgia and Native American research. She is a Native American and a voting member of the Western Cherokee Tribe in Oklahoma. She has attended The Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research at Sanford and the Volunteer Genealogist Class at the headquarters for the Daughters of the American Revolution. She is a past secretary of the Florida State Genealogical Society (FSGS), former Pioneer Records Administrator and Reviewer for the FSGS Pioneer Certi cation Committee. She was presented the FSGS Distinguished Service Award in 2006. She was the rst vice president for the International Society for Family History Writers and Editors and is a member of the Association for Professional Genealogists, the Genealogical Speakers Guild and the National Genealogical Society. She is a former treasurer and seminar chair for the Tallahassee Genealogical Society. Porters discussion will include: CENSUS FIRST, where to start when looking for an ancestor and tracking an ancestor through history using the census gives a timeline that can help nd additional materials; and BEGINNING GENEALOGY, searching for an ancestor means looking for stories, but how do you know what to look for, where to look, how to make sense of all that documentation, and how to keep track of what you nd. The seminar is open to everyone. For more information contact the WCHS at 926-1110, 524-5334 or email 24research@gmail.com. Genealogy seminar on Oct. 20 Walker and Soderholm welcome a baby boy The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Clubs2012 ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZA Wildwood Country Club Thursday October 11 2012 6:30pm Social 7:00pm Dinner, Auction, & Show please join us for Bealls Maurices Way Out West Carrolls Boot Country Crums Mini MallTICKETS $30.00 eachall proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County students SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for qualied applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and oor rate of 2.5% Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts Color F acial Waxings Specialty Cuts F lat T ops F eather Locks Color P erms Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. c e H a i r S a l o n e H l o H a i a l o i r S a c e c e o n o o n Tues -S at 54 529 05 & t. . . . F STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN Bonnet Creek Fall Retreat From $179 per night Includes a $50 daily Resort Credit and daily self-parking For reservations call 888-208-7440. Ask for promotion code BCFT. Visit HiltonBonnetCreek.com/fall

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSolar electric systems installed at 2 local schools By KATRINA RODDENBERRYSpecial to The NewsTwo of Wakulla Countys elementary schools are now SunSmart E-Shelter schools. Riversink Elementary and Crawfordville Elementary are two of 90 schools in Florida that have been out tted with a solar electric (photovoltaic) system that are directly connected to the utility grid. Each school has a 10,000 watt system that will offset electricity costs to the school during normal operation. In addition, the system powers critical items in the school during a power outage, and the system is able to utilize the energy stored in batteries for 24-hour operation. The system also provides scienti c data that can be analyzed by students. The installation of both systems was completed on Sept. 27. Riversink Elementary and Crawfordville Elementary were selected to receive the systems through the Florida Solar Energy Centers E-Shelter program. The program provides free solar energy systems to public schools and colleges that have been designated by the state as enhanced hurricane protection area (EHPA) shelters. This program was funded by the State of Florida through a grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Each school was competitively selected based on their location, status as an emergency shelter and renewable energy education and outreach plans. Teachers at Riversink Elementary, Julia Parker and Katrina Roddenberry, and teachers at Crawfordville Elementary, Kimberly Bartnick and Kirsten Brazier, attended a professional development workshop in Panama City provided by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) to learn more about the system and how to teach students about solar energy. FSEC provided the teachers with training on a number of curriculum units that focus on a wide variety of topics including conservation, alternative energy technologies and understanding of natural systems. In addition, each school was provided a resource kit that included hands-on solar classroom laboratory materials for implementing the curriculum units. The overall educational goal of this program is to increase the number of educators who teach the science and technology of renewable energy and increase the number of students who are exposed to these concepts. The program will allow students to gain a basic understanding of how solar thermal and photovoltaic systems work and understand the importance of renewable energy, energy ef ciency and energy conservation to their futures. Riversink Elementary has incorporated these ideas into their upcoming Project Learning Tree (PLT) Week. PLT is an award winning, interdisciplinary, environmental educational program designed to increase students critical thinking in making informed decisions on environmental issues. This years week long program, which will begin on Nov. 9, has the theme of Energy and Me and will feature presenters from a variety of public and private organizations to engage students in various activities focused on environmental awareness, including a presentation of the schools new solar electric (photovoltaic) system. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA solar electric system is now installed at Riversink Elementary, above, and Crawfordville Elementary schools. RMS band boosters taking donations for yard saleThe Riversprings Middle School Band Boosters will be receiving donations Friday, Oct. 19 from 3 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Band Room located at the back of Riversprings Middle School for its yard and bake sale. They will not be taking clothes or linens. The yard and bake sale will begin at 7:30 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 20. No early birds, please. Contact Bear Booster President Dodi Shef eld at (850) 510-2293 or Tracy Douglas at (850)926-5457 for details on donations or questions. Proceeds from the yard and bake sale will bene t all RMS Band Students for School Year 2012-2013. Community pep rally will be held on Oct. 23 at WHSWakulla High School will be hosting a community event on Oct. 23, beginning at 6 p.m. The Powder Puff Game between junior and senior girls will kickoff at 6 p.m. The Community Pep Rally will begin at 7 p.m. and is expected to last until 8 p.m. There will be refreshments and food for sale at the concession stand. During the Pep Rally, the 2012 Homecoming Court will be announced and those in attendance will be able to familiarize themselves with the faces that are eligible to win the title of King and Queen for 2012. They will accept a $1 donation entry fee at the gate. Come out to Wakulla High on Oct. 23 to show community spirit. For questions, contact Briana Fordham at Wakulla High School. Keiser University hosts open houseKeiser University (KU) will be hosting a Scare Fair Open House for prospective students, the general public and community partners to have an opportunity to learn more about KU and the programs offered. The event takes place on Oct. 24 from 6:30 8:30 p.m. There will be faculty and staff available to meet with individuals who are seeking doctoral, masters, bachelors and associate degrees in over 70 programs. KU prepares graduates for careers in business, criminal justice, health care, technology, hospitality, education, culinary arts and career-focused general studies. Students take one class at a time, for one month at a time, allowing them to better manage their personal time for parenting, work and study. Small class sizes ensure personalized attention, practical training and accessibility to instructors. The Scare Fair Open House has food, games, prizes and community partner demonstrations along with representatives from the sheriffs of ce, various armed forces, gaming companies all in attendance to make this a fun and informative event for all who attend. Visit www.kuopenhouse.com for more information. Wakulla Christian School, in coordination with the Wakulla County Veterans Services Office, is proud to host the Saturday, November 10, 2012 at Hudson Park Games, Vendors Raffles, a Silent Auction, and Lots of Food !!! Parade Starts @ 10:00a.m. A portion of the proceeds from this grand event will be donated to our local Veterans Services Office. Your family or organization is invited to participate in this very special event dedicated to honoring all Veterans and active duty military. Please consider entering a float or vehicle decorated in honor of your loved ones. For more information or to register your float, please contact the Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee via fax @ 850-926-5186 or email WCVDay@gmail.com Honoring All Who Served Soldier Care Packages 6th Annual Veterans Day Parade and Celebration to Support Our Troops and Honor Our Veterans Wakulla Christian School is collecting public donations of items to send to our troops wish list items include individually wrapped beef jerky, Pringles, individually wrapped sunflower seeds, individually wrapped nuts, individually packaged mix of Propel Fitness Water and Gatorade, individually packaged hard candy and gummy bears, white tube socks, protein bars, granola ba rs, books, soap, razors, sunscreen, nail files, AA batteries and Ziploc bags. For further information, please contact Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee Drop offanyitemsatoneof thefollowing supportivebusinessesinWakulla county: HOME MORTGAGEAMERIFIRST An appraiser for Wakulla's next chapter (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser GET TO A BETTER STATE. CALL ME TODAY.1103208 12/11Get a Free Discount Double Check. I can help you save like a champion, with discounts that could add up to XX%* and be worth hundreds of dollars. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, State Farm Indemnity Company, Bloomington, IL *Discounts may vary by state. Aaron Rodgers got his. How about you? 40% *Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com

PAGE 10

Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsDying oyster beds are crippling a once thriving industryBy A.B. SIDIBECitrus County ChronicleCEDAR KEY It is written large on the faces of the hard-scrabble oystermen and women. Their skins deeply browned and creased from years, days and hours of exposure to the unrelenting and lingering Florida sun. The people, the multigenerational tradition of extracting a gnarly, irregular-shaped mollusk oysters from the sounds and bays that dot the states Big Bend area. From Waccasassa Bay on through the Suwannee Sound past the bend into Apalachicola Bay, their industry and way of life is besieged by the vagaries climate and what some describe as government in- exibility regarding rules. So far, the 2012 oyster season, which began Sept. 1, is widely regarded as poor and perhaps the most extensive failure of the oyster reefs in generations. Ten percent of the nations oyster supplies and 90 percent of the states supplies come from this region. In an industry where a typical harvester can haul in an average of 15 bushels of oysters a day, this year the oystermen struggle to make two to four bushels. Oysters are dead. The oysters are dead, Danny Beckham shouted over the whir of his skiffs motor and as he plowed white foam in his wake heading recently to an estuary on the southern reaches of the Suwannee Sound. The question is, what are we going to do about it? Beckham said. He said the dying oyster beds, and what he considers restrictions placed on the oystermen like him, are conspiring to end a maritime heritage. My family has done this for four generations. I have done it for 55 years. My grandson comes out here after school to do it, too, Beckham said. I feel like we are in the middle of the end for what we do. LITTLE TO SHOW FOR LOTS OF WORK Upon arrival at an estuary near the Gulf of Mexico, three other skiffs were anchored over the oyster reefs in estimated 6 feet deep water. Men wielded 10-foot long scissor-like rakes called tongs to dredge the bivalves from the bottom. The oysters are then heaved over the tiny skiffs gunwale and dumped on the bow for culling. As his boat approached the others, Beckham heard a familiar sound: Oysters crack and rattle as they were being dumped on skiff bows. Did you hear that? They are dead. It sounds like broken glass because the shells are empty, Beckham said. The men continued to plunge the rusty, ironforged tongs into the shellladen bottom and in a shallow arc dump more of it on to their boat bows. The sun hung high with some clouds in the distance as the ritual continued. A lean woman sat donning sunglasses and a well-worn baseball hat and football jersey with a hammer-like culling iron ferreting the good from the bad. Her hands, like the others, are rough hewn. In her holding hand she had on a Kevlar-type glove. Mike Roach, who was working solo, had his bow piled high with oysters. After ve hours of deliberate and muscle-fueled work, he had only two bushels. Hopefully, I can get another bushel from this, Roach said, pointing to his pile. George Stevens had also been there for hours, but only had two bushels. Thats like $50 from working all day, Stevens said. We used to make $150 to $200 a day, he added. Ronald Fred Crum, head of the Wakulla Fishermens Association, which also represents the oystermen, said he has been working overtime to nd solutions for an industry in crisis. Crum said the industry workers need help and soon. We cant and should not shut down the season as some are suggesting. We need some entitlements, help for these people. We should subsidize what they are making right now and allow the industry to recover in about two years, Crum said. Lets reward effort and hard work. These people have families and bills to pay. They need help and we need answers, Crum said. Cedar Key oysterman Beckham has been supplementing his meager harvest with a smoked mullet and dip business, but he said sales from that business are hardly suf cient to offset the loss of revenue from the scant season. Oysters typically take 15 to 18 months to recover, which means next years season also could be affected. Oyster season run through May. Gov. Rick Scott visited Franklin County on Wednesday and said up to 2,500 jobs are at risk in that county alone because of the poor harvest. Scott has declared an emergency from Levy to Franklin counties. The emergency declaration means the counties involved will now be eligible for federal aid. EDITORS NOTE: This story appeared in our sister newspaper, the Citrus County Chronicle, in its Sunday, Oct. 7 edition. PHOTO BY MATTHEW BECK/Citrus County ChronicleMichael Roach utilizes long, wooden tongs to harvest what he can from the bottom of Rattlesnake Point off Cedar Key. The tongs are one of the standard tools incorporated by oystermen. NEED HEARING AIDS?HEARING AIDS AT NO COST TO FEDERAL BCBS WORKERS AND RETIREES!?Thats Rights No Co-Pay! No Exam Fee! No Adjustment Fee! Discover How Much Better Your World Can Sound The Name Youve Come To Trust Serving Your Hearing Needs For Over 60 yearsBlue Cross Blue Shield Federal Insurance pays total cost of 2 Miracle Ear ME2100 series aids. If you have Federal Government Insurance with enrollment code #104, #105, #111, or #112, you are covered for hearing aids with no out of pocket expenses. 3 yr. warranty. If you have a basic plan, we have factory pricing for non-qualifiers Miracle EarHearing Aid Center is NOW Offering CRAWFORDVILLE3295 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY THE LOG CABIN, BARRY BUILDING TALLAHASSEESEARS MIRACLE EAR GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL 1500 Apalachee ParkwayANN HENNESSY, MA, CCC-A CERTIFIED & LICENSED AUDIOLOGISTCall for an appointment 850-942-4007 Toll Free 1-866-942-4007HUNTERS ACT NOW & ORDER HEARING PROTECTIONMIRACLE EAR GUARDIAN*Hearing evaluation and video otoscope inspection are always free. Hearing evaluation is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnosis, nor are they intended to replace a physician's care. If you suspect a medical problem, please seek treatment from your doctor. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle G E T READY FOR HUN T IN G Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-7 Closed Sun. & Wed.

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton This weeks column was written by Duane Treadon, many thanks to him for putting this together. Fall means many things and for the Auxiliary, and the election of leadership is one of those things. Our Flotilla held elections for the positions of Flotilla Commander and vice flotilla commander during our October meeting. Elections of these two positions are held every year around this time so that newly elected leadership has the chance to attend a leadership training if they have not been before. While a vice commander is not term limited, the Flotilla commander can only hold of ce for a maximum of two years. Current Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos has served the past two years as Flotilla commander and now must step down. Bob has been involved with the growth of our detachment in CarrabelleSt. George Island, the reestablishment our Communications trailer, and the expansion of our Area Of Responsibility (AOR) that tripled in size. During our recent meeting the nominating committee reported that they received only two quali ed nomination from the membership, Duane Treadon for Flotilla commander and Norma Hill for vice commander. With no other quali ed members nominated, Treadon and Hill were chosen to serve as the Flotillas elected leadership in 2013. Congratulations, we know you both will do a great job. We were also excited to welcome a guest to our meeting Jarrell Hale, a former Coast guardsman. Jan. 26 may seem like a long time away, but it will be here sooner than you expect it. Why is this date important? It will be the first offering of the Coast Guard Auxiliarys Public Education course About Boating Safely by the Flotilla. Classes tend to ll up as the date gets closer so we will be taking registrations early for the class. This eight-hour class will be held in Tallahassee at the Fish and Wildlife Commissions headquarters. Topics covered include navigation, first aid, trailering, emergencies on the water, Florida boating law, how to have fun and still be safe, and other safe boating topics. To cover expenses, cost for the class is $30 per individual or $50 for a family up to four. For more information or to register email info@ uscgaux.net or stop by our information booth at the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival on Oct. 20. After the Flotilla meeting this past Saturday a few of our members participated in an area familiarization patrol. Veteran members Tim Ashley and Duane Treadon along with transfer member Fran Keating and former active duty Coast Guard member Jarrell Hale conducted the mission from St. Marks to just before the U.S. Highway 98 bridge on the river then out the river to the St. Marks River channel buoy. Though new to our Flotilla, Fran Keating is not new to the Auxiliary. Having joined the Auxiliary in 2003 and brings a wealth of knowledge to our Flotilla. Having boated on the waters of Detroit, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Mississippi, and what we call brown water bodies (lakes) Fran brings a great deal of knowledge on boating in varied conditions. Jarrell Hale from Thomasville, Ga., served active duty Coast Guard mostly on small boats (25-50 feet). Both Fran and Jarrell commented on the extreme care that must be taken in navigating our many oyster beds. With a low tide that afternoon many of these just under the water with higher tides were exposed. A small miscalculation can cause a tremendous amount of damage to a boat and the people onboard. Anyone who was out Saturday can con rm it was an excellent day for boating. We are so fortunate that our boating season can really last year round. While many of our northern friends are starting to pull boats out and winterize before the cold season we are blessed with warm breezes and bright sun well into the so called cold season. Next week, several members of Flotilla 12 will head over to Panama City to participate in the Division Meeting. This is a great time for learning, exchanging ideas, stories and lessons learned as well as fellowship. We get this opportunity three times a year and it is always a good time! Look for the highlights next week. Enjoy these cooler but still enjoyable fall days. And remember, as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Oct 11, 12 Fri Oct 12, 12 Sat Oct 13, 12 Sun Oct 14, 12 Mon Oct 15, 12 Tue Oct 16, 12 Wed Oct 17, 12 Date 3.4 ft. 12:33 AM 3.6 ft. 1:05 AM 3.8 ft. 1:35 AM 3.9 ft. 2:04 AM 4.1 ft. 2:35 AM 4.2 ft. 3:07 AM High 1.4 ft. 5:38 AM 1.0 ft. 6:28 AM 0.5 ft. 7:13 AM 0.0 ft. 7:56 AM -0.3 ft. 8:39 AM -0.5 ft. 9:22 AM -0.6 ft. 10:08 AM Low 3.3 ft. 11:44 AM 3.6 ft. 12:40 PM 3.8 ft. 1:30 PM 4.0 ft. 2:18 PM 4.0 ft. 3:04 PM 4.0 ft. 3:50 PM 3.8 ft. 4:36 PM High 0.8 ft. 6:14 PM 0.8 ft. 6:55 PM 0.9 ft. 7:32 PM 1.0 ft. 8:08 PM 1.1 ft. 8:42 PM 1.3 ft. 9:17 PM 1.5 ft. 9:52 PM Low Thu Oct 11, 12 Fri Oct 12, 12 Sat Oct 13, 12 Sun Oct 14, 12 Mon Oct 15, 12 Tue Oct 16, 12 Wed Oct 17, 12 Date 3.5 ft. 12:30 AM 3.7 ft. 1:02 AM 3.9 ft. 1:32 AM 4.0 ft. 2:01 AM 4.2 ft. 2:32 AM 4.3 ft. 3:04 AM High 1.5 ft. 5:35 AM 1.0 ft. 6:25 AM 0.5 ft. 7:10 AM 0.0 ft. 7:53 AM -0.3 ft. 8:36 AM -0.6 ft. 9:19 AM -0.7 ft. 10:05 AM Low 3.4 ft. 11:41 AM 3.7 ft. 12:37 PM 3.9 ft. 1:27 PM 4.1 ft. 2:15 PM 4.1 ft. 3:01 PM 4.1 ft. 3:47 PM 3.9 ft. 4:33 PM High 0.9 ft. 6:11 PM 0.9 ft. 6:52 PM 0.9 ft. 7:29 PM 1.1 ft. 8:05 PM 1.2 ft. 8:39 PM 1.4 ft. 9:14 PM 1.6 ft. 9:49 PM Low Thu Oct 11, 12 Fri Oct 12, 12 Sat Oct 13, 12 Sun Oct 14, 12 Mon Oct 15, 12 Tue Oct 16, 12 Wed Oct 17, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 12:33 AM 3.2 ft. 1:09 AM 3.4 ft. 1:41 AM 3.5 ft. 2:11 AM 3.7 ft. 2:40 AM 3.8 ft. 3:11 AM 3.9 ft. 3:43 AM High 1.3 ft. 6:42 AM 0.9 ft. 7:32 AM 0.4 ft. 8:17 AM 0.0 ft. 9:00 AM -0.3 ft. 9:43 AM -0.5 ft. 10:26 AM -0.6 ft. 11:12 AM Low 3.1 ft. 12:20 PM 3.4 ft. 1:16 PM 3.6 ft. 2:06 PM 3.7 ft. 2:54 PM 3.8 ft. 3:40 PM 3.7 ft. 4:26 PM 3.5 ft. 5:12 PM High 0.7 ft. 7:18 PM 0.7 ft. 7:59 PM 0.8 ft. 8:36 PM 0.9 ft. 9:12 PM 1.0 ft. 9:46 PM 1.2 ft. 10:21 PM 1.3 ft. 10:56 PM Low Thu Oct 11, 12 Fri Oct 12, 12 Sat Oct 13, 12 Sun Oct 14, 12 Mon Oct 15, 12 Tue Oct 16, 12 Wed Oct 17, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 12:25 AM 2.7 ft. 12:57 AM 2.8 ft. 1:27 AM 3.0 ft. 1:56 AM 3.1 ft. 2:27 AM 3.1 ft. 2:59 AM High 1.0 ft. 5:49 AM 0.7 ft. 6:39 AM 0.4 ft. 7:24 AM 0.0 ft. 8:07 AM -0.2 ft. 8:50 AM -0.4 ft. 9:33 AM -0.4 ft. 10:19 AM Low 2.5 ft. 11:36 AM 2.7 ft. 12:32 PM 2.9 ft. 1:22 PM 3.0 ft. 2:10 PM 3.0 ft. 2:56 PM 3.0 ft. 3:42 PM 2.8 ft. 4:28 PM High 0.6 ft. 6:25 PM 0.6 ft. 7:06 PM 0.6 ft. 7:43 PM 0.7 ft. 8:19 PM 0.8 ft. 8:53 PM 0.9 ft. 9:28 PM 1.1 ft. 10:03 PM Low Thu Oct 11, 12 Fri Oct 12, 12 Sat Oct 13, 12 Sun Oct 14, 12 Mon Oct 15, 12 Tue Oct 16, 12 Wed Oct 17, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 12:17 AM 2.8 ft. 12:49 AM 2.9 ft. 1:19 AM 3.1 ft. 1:48 AM 3.2 ft. 2:19 AM 3.3 ft. 2:51 AM High 1.4 ft. 5:17 AM 0.9 ft. 6:07 AM 0.5 ft. 6:52 AM 0.0 ft. 7:35 AM -0.3 ft. 8:18 AM -0.5 ft. 9:01 AM -0.6 ft. 9:47 AM Low 2.6 ft. 11:28 AM 2.8 ft. 12:24 PM 3.0 ft. 1:14 PM 3.1 ft. 2:02 PM 3.2 ft. 2:48 PM 3.1 ft. 3:34 PM 2.9 ft. 4:20 PM High 0.8 ft. 5:53 PM 0.8 ft. 6:34 PM 0.8 ft. 7:11 PM 1.0 ft. 7:47 PM 1.1 ft. 8:21 PM 1.3 ft. 8:56 PM 1.4 ft. 9:31 PM Low Thu Oct 11, 12 Fri Oct 12, 12 Sat Oct 13, 12 Sun Oct 14, 12 Mon Oct 15, 12 Tue Oct 16, 12 Wed Oct 17, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 12:25 AM 2.9 ft. 12:46 AM 2.9 ft. 1:07 AM 3.1 ft. 1:29 AM 3.2 ft. 1:54 AM 3.3 ft. 2:24 AM High 1.4 ft. 5:07 AM 1.1 ft. 5:54 AM 0.8 ft. 6:36 AM 0.5 ft. 7:16 AM 0.2 ft. 7:57 AM 0.0 ft. 8:41 AM -0.1 ft. 9:28 AM Low 2.7 ft. 11:05 AM 2.8 ft. 12:21 PM 2.9 ft. 1:29 PM 3.0 ft. 2:31 PM 3.0 ft. 3:31 PM 3.0 ft. 4:31 PM 2.9 ft. 5:33 PM High 0.8 ft. 5:30 PM 1.0 ft. 6:12 PM 1.1 ft. 6:51 PM 1.4 ft. 7:27 PM 1.6 ft. 8:00 PM 1.8 ft. 8:33 PM 1.9 ft. 9:05 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacOct. 11 Oct. 17First Oct. 21 Full Oct. 29 Last Nov. 6 New Oct. 15Major Times 10:05 AM 12:05 PM 10:29 PM 12:29 AM Minor Times 3:31 AM 4:31 AM 4:31 PM 5:31 PM Major Times 10:54 AM 12:54 PM 11:18 PM 1:18 AM Minor Times 4:31 AM 5:31 AM 5:08 PM 6:08 PM Major Times --:---:-11:44 AM 1:44 PM Minor Times 5:33 AM 6:33 AM 5:46 PM 6:46 PM Major Times 12:09 AM 2:09 AM 12:36 PM 2:36 PM Minor Times 6:37 AM 7:37 AM 6:26 PM 7:26 PM Major Times 1:03 AM 3:03 AM 1:31 PM 3:31 PM Minor Times 7:44 AM 8:44 AM 7:10 PM 8:10 PM Major Times 1:59 AM 3:59 AM 2:29 PM 4:29 PM Minor Times 8:53 AM 9:53 AM 7:58 PM 8:58 PM Major Times 2:59 AM 4:59 AM 3:29 PM 5:29 PM Minor Times 10:01 AM 11:01 AM 8:52 PM 9:52 PM Average Average Better Better Best Better++ Good7:36 am 7:10 pm 3:32 am 4:32 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:37 am 7:09 pm 4:32 am 5:09 pm 7:38 am 7:07 pm 5:34 am 5:47 pm 7:38 am 7:06 pm 6:39 am 6:27 pm 7:39 am 7:05 pm 7:46 am 7:11 pm 7:40 am 7:04 pm 8:54 am 8:00 pm 7:40 am 7:03 pm 10:02 am 8:53 pm31% 24% 17% 9% 2% 6% 14% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Symbiosis II Animals live together, with intricate relationships, even in the marine environment. Recall animals that eat others are called predators, those that consume their host slowly without killing them are called parasites. But many that work together are called commensals. We see cooperation as either mutual or one sided. The egret that walks near a cow is watching for the cow to stir up bugs or other food, which it opportunistically takes. The Remora sh follows sharks, turtles and rays, even adhering to their host, to detach and feed off the scraps of a feeding frenzy. These are usually one sided relationships. On the patch reefs I studied, I found a community of creatures that lived together. The algae-like anemone Lebrunea (and others), was the host for crabs, shrimps, star sh and small sh, some of which played a role in the health of the reef sh. Several species of shrimp called Periclimenes, are known to clean sh. During dawn and dusk, usually, sh attend these anemone cleaning stations, lining up to have their mouth, gills and body parts picked over by these shrimp. Scientists have argued that the sh just like to be ticked, and as such gain nothing from the relationship. The shrimp clearly get the food, esh or parasites, they pick out of the teeth of the awaiting sh. Do the sh value this service? First, I noticed that non-resident sh lined up to be cleaned by one shrimp species, and the resident sh lined up in front of cleaning stations of another shrimp species. So I set forth to document not only which sh species like which shrimp species, but how each sh partitions the reef. I rst learned how to study territoriality by watch birds (speci cally Mockingbirds) in a cemetery. The birds hop from headstone to headstone singing outwardly from their defended space. By drawing their path and encounters with others, I can de ne their territory. Periodically, they will y back to a nest or feeding area. And periodically, they will y up high and leave the area for water or other social options. My resident sh did exactly the same thing, swimming from one prominence to another, not singing, per se, but interacting with others at their territorial boundary. Periodically they would swim high up over the reef and go to another part of the undefended reef and soon return. Within their territories, I often found a resident cleaning station, nest of eggs or feeding area. I once found an anemone without cleaners outside of any shs territory. I placed a cleaner and within a few minutes, the adjourning defending sh included the station into its territory. Different species with overlapping territories each spent time at shared cleaning stations. A pecking order became apparent based upon sh size, the larger the more dominant. One day well into the study, I saw a butter y sh heading straight into a cleaning station in the heart of the reef. They eat anemones, and began tearing this station apart, shrimp and crabs jumping off, making quite the ruckus. Immediately, several small Bicolor Damsel sh jumped in adding to the ruckus and trying, unsuccessfully, to push the larger Butter y sh away. Soon the Cooco Damsel sh joined in and began pushing the intruder away. The Three Spot Damsel was next, nipping at the now eeing Butter y sh. I thought the show was over when a foot-long Grasby Grouper rose up off the reef and took a bite that disabled the Butter y sh. All were sh I had recorded attending the cleaning station and now defending it from predation. Naturally, I next removed all the defending sh from a cleaning station and watched in amazement, the immediate destruction of the resident cleaning station. Within one hour, all the cleaners were gone. The anemone had either moved or been eaten by the next morning. Fascinating community structure! Can we learn from them? Like us on

PAGE 12

Green Scene Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Please RecycleBy KEN FIELDS In 1999, after 15 years in law enforcement, I went to work for Merck and Co. in Albany, Ga. During the years at Merck I focused on building my photography business and started doing weddings, family, and nature shoots. Soon I realized taking pictures could never be just a business, it was a lifelong passion. Over the years I still had my dream of taking pictures of Alaska and all its natural beauty. On Aug. 24 my dream came true when I ew out of Tallahassee Regional Airport. Making the trip even better was that my mom would join me during my stopover in Atlanta and we would head off on our adventure. From Atlanta we had a short layover in Salt Lake City before heading to Anchorage, Alaska. Our ight arrived at 12:57 a.m. on Saturday. That morning we were up at 8 a.m. and walked from one end of Anchorage to the other, getting some great pictures. On weekends from May to September they have an outdoor market covering two city blocks and you can buy anything you need. What a day of sights, fun, and pleasure. I found Stewarts Photo Shop and of course I had to look and look. Sunday morning it was time to pick up our motorhome and supplies so we could head off to Denali National Park. The drive there should have taken three and a half hours, but we stopped often and took our time. There were pictures to be taken around every curve. Its all so big and beautiful! We were up early Monday morning ready for a tour of Denali National Park. It was raining and would continue for the rest of the day. Our plan to go to Wonder Lake would have to be postponed until Tuesday, the tour bus was full. To Savage River we went, rain or shine, there were pictures waiting to be taken. The drive through Denali was breathtaking. At every turn of the road I saw more beauty through my lens than I had ever imagined. Tuesday 6 a.m. we headed to Wonder Lake, an 85-mile trip that would take 11 hours. Sable Pass was magni cent, the colors were brilliant. We had several stops along the way, one more spectacular than the other. There was a sad moment when we reached the place where a photographer had been killed by a grizzly bear on Aug. 24. At this point we were 1,000 feet up the mountains. We saw a grizzly bear 300 yards away at our next stop, the driver told us to keep our distance. Beauty doesnt describe what I saw around me. We arrived at the base of Mount McKinley which is part of the Alaskan range. The place made me feel so insigni cant, the mountains are huge and you know only God could make something so amazingly beautiful. Soon we were at Wonder Lake and this is the closest point to Mount McKinley you may go without a climbing pass or plane. On our return trip we saw a wolf and beautiful lynx. As we saw the lynx walking down the river bed, it seemed he posed for the camera without concern that we were there. Another glorious day with images so amazing words cant express them. After 11 hours we were ready for food and sleep. Wednesday morning we started our drive to Valdez. The panorama continued to be breathtaking. Our drive took much longer than expected. I took so many pictures of this magni cent place. We nally arrived at Valdez about 10:15 p.m. and I got a picture of the moon rising on one side of the road, and the sun setting on the other. Thursday we walked around Valdez. Through my lens I captured all the grandeur and magic of this old city. The next morning as were leaving we passed by the sh hatchery. I couldnt believe the picture waiting for me: Tens of thousands of seagulls lined the bay, for the next two miles. Next we drove through Thompson Pass. The closer we were to the end of our drive we found ourselves passing Worthington and Nelchina glaciers. Upon arriving to Anchorage we have driven 1,119 miles and seen more than we ever dreamed of. Saturday it was time to return home. All are invited to an exhibit, A Night as Seen Through My Lens, featuring photos from his Majestic Alaska Shoot on Oct. 13 from 2 to 8 p.m. at the Wakulla County Shriners Club.Genetically Modi ed Foods (GM) are making the news with legislators getting involved at our State Capitol recommending that everyone has a right to know what is in their foods and speci cally if any food has been genetically modi- ed. Perhaps you as a consumer would appreciate some insight into this issue. Keith Schneider and Renee Goodrich Schneider are both from the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department at the University of Florida and offer this abbreviated summary. What is a GM Food? A GM food results when the genetic makeup of an organism is modified. This can be done through incorporating genes from other organisms or by rearranging genes already present. These changes can result in attributes that were not found in the original organism. Some examples of traditional foods that have been genetically modified include tomatoes, squash, potatoes, cotton, and soybeans. Why are foods modi- ed? GM is used to assist food manufacturers to improve the storage capacity and/or the nutritional value of foods. The rst GM food was a particular tomato which was modi ed to allow it to remain rm even after extended shipping and storage. Another example is hard cheeses, where the substance to make the rennet was originally derived from the stomachs of calves and is now commercially produced. Approximately 90 percent of the hard cheses are now made using this process. What is the potential help to the consumer? Industry has argued that GM foods reduce production costs by reducing the need for additional chemicals (pesticides and fertilizers) and mechanical inputs. The nutrition implications are also cited as an obvious bene t for the consumer, since the bioengineering could create plants that could produce a more nutritious food. What are the health concerns? The potential for GM foods to cause allergic reactions is the most obvious health concern associated with these products. Speci c protein in milk, eggs, wheat, sh, tree, nuts, peanuts, soybeans, and shell sh cause over 90% of food allergies. If a protein from one of these food types were to be incorporated into a food that normally would not have this protein, people who are allergic to these proteins could unknowingly consume such a food and suffer an allergic reaction. The FDA has required that each producer of a GM food product presents scienti c evidence that they have not incorporated any allergenic substances into their product. If this evidence cannot be produced, the FDA requires a label to be put on the product to alert consumer. How is food safety monitored in all foods? There is no one statute or federal agency devoted to the regulation of GM foods. You and I rely on the Food and Drug Administration for assurance that the foods we buy are safe and wholesome. Under the Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act, the FDA has the authority to ensure the safety of most domestic and imported foods in the U.S. market (except meat and poultry, which is regulated by the USDA). Pesticides used in or on foods are regulated primarily by the Environmental Protection Agency. Continued on Page 13A By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING e concern over food thats been genetically modi ed PHOTOGRAPH BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA view of the Alaskan wilderness in Denali National Park, part of the upcoming exhibit of photos by Ken Fields. Ken Fields, left, shows a photo to kicker Dustin Hopkins during a recent FSU game. Photographer exhibits scenes of recent trip to Alaska 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief Support850-878-5310

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 13AContinued from Page 12AThe FDA monitors foods to enforce the tolerances for pesticides set by the EPA. Finally it is the USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services that controls the eld trials of any GM crop that falls under permitting requirements. What does the future hold? With all of the controversy surrounding GM foods, researchers have been searching for new methods to enhance crop production. One technique combines the selection of genes that control traits of interest, such as color, meat quality or disease resistance. Because this process uses existing DNA, not transgenic DNA to choose desired traits, this methodology stands to be less controversial than other GM techniques. Want to know more? Visit www.solutionsforyourlife. com and request publication number FSHN02-2 or give me a call and I will see that you receive a copy. Swenson: Genetically modi ed foodsBy GENA DAVIS October is the month to think pink! Breast Cancer has finally gotten the attention it has deserved for so long. It is still, however, a devastating disease for the victims and families that face it each and every day. Many patients find that exercise and eating right can help them maintain their strength during treatment, and helps them have a more positive outlook on their situation. There are many women at the gym who have dealt with, or are currently dealing with breast cancer. They have kept their workouts and exercise routines intact before, during and after their treatment program. They feel it helps them mentally and physically. So many cancer patients have as many mental rami cations as physical ones. Having some type of physical outlet such as weightlifting or an exercise class helps them cope and helps them stay healthy. Body-Tek 24 Fitness Center and Zumba Wakulla are donating the proceeds from the Zumba classes to breast cancer Research, so girls and guys, come on out and get your Zumba on! Dear EarthTalk: Given that the presidential election is just around the corner, what can you tell me about each candidates environmental track record and positions? Jane Miller Chicago Just because the environment is getting short shrift this election season due to our nations lingering economic woes doesnt mean that candidates Obama and Romney can ignore the issue. Environmentalists have cheered several of President Obamas moves during his first term, including: passage of the Recovery Act and its funding for environmental and habitat restoration and water quality improvements; passage of the rst comprehensive National Policy for the Stewardship of the Ocean, the Coasts and the Great Lakes; and the signing of the Omnibus Public Lands Management Act of 2009, which expanded land protections and water conservation across two million acres of federal wilderness. Obama also formed the Partnership for Sustainable Communities to bring together federal agencies to help communities nationwide improve access to affordable housing and increase low cost transportation options while protecting the environment. He also established new rules to reduce the negative impacts of mountain-top removal coal mining, set historic standards limiting greenhouse gas emissions from cars and trucks, made substantial investments in clean energy, proposed the rst-ever carbon pollution limits for new fossil-fuel- red power plants, and reduced carbon emissions within the federal government. On the downside, green leaders dismay Obamas lack of follow-through on a 2008 campaign promise to label genetically modi ed foods so that consumers know what they are getting when they buy corn, sugar or breakfast cereal. Also, a 2011 Obama decision to deregulate the planting of genetically modi ed alfalfa and sugar beets incensed organic farmers and environmental leaders. Greens also worry about Obamas enthusiasm for an all-of-the-above energy policy that includes the practice of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) to access natural gas in shale beds under wide swaths of the northeast and western U.S. If re-elected, Obama would no doubt work to expand U.S. leadership on setting emissions limits in unison with other nations, and has pledged to continue to reduce our dependence on oil so as to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Conservationists are also hopeful that Obama will set aside threatened lands for protection from development as both Bill Clinton and George W. Bush did soon before leaving the White House. While Mitt Romney doesnt have much of an environmental track record from his days as Massachusetts governor, he did get kudos for being open minded to both regulatory and market-based policy ideas. He also supported a 2003 northeastern states agreement to reduce carbon emissions from power plants via a regional capand-trade emissions reduction plan. But in 2005 Romney abruptly pulled Massachusetts out of the plan, telling reporters that it didnt protect businesses and consumers from increased energy costs. Romney is now pitching an energy plan that embraces all the options, including fossil fuels, nuclear energy and renewables. But he recently told ScienceDebate.org that he opposes any kind of carbon tax or cap-and-trade system that would handicap the American economy and drive manufacturing jobs away, adding that economic growth and technological innovation, not economysuppressing regulation, are key to protecting the environment in the long run. Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). What are candidates positions on the environment? Environmentalists have cheered several of President Obamas moves during his rst term, but dismay his lack of follow-through on a 2008 campaign promise to label genetically modi ed foods. Mitt Romney doesnt have much of an environmental track record, but has been open minded to both regulatory and market-based policy ideas. Zumba to support breast cancer research GET FIT $14,214,813 1-866-742-1373 Get your business noticed One Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Dont make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.AdNetworksFlorida.com all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor Favored Treatment "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser

PAGE 14

Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportA 35-year-old Quincy manager reported an armed robbery at Hardees. The victim stated that a suspect requested an undisclosed amount of cash from him after closing time. The masked suspect was brandishing a handgun while demanding the cash. Evidence was collected at the scene. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce: SEPTEMBER 27 Loss Prevention staff at Wal-Mart reported a retail theft after a 16-year-old male was reportedly observed taking headphones and concealing them on his person. The juvenile allegedly did not make any attempt to pay for the item before leaving the last point of sale. The item, valued at $31, was recovered. The juvenile did not qualify for transportation to the juvenile detention center. The suspects mother is a jail inmate and she requested the juvenile be turned over to a friend who picked him up. Sarah Sanders of Panacea reported a fraud. The victim reported that someone cashed an insurance check intended for her family. SEPTEMBER 28 Ashley Bragg of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported losing her debit card and discovering three purchases on her account that she did not make. The victim had $16 worth of fast food purchases on her account from Tallahassee. Delano Taylor of Panacea reported nding a set of car keys through Panacea Post Office officials. The keys were originally found at Wal-Mart in Crawfordville. The keys were turned over to the Evidence Division. Rona Bowen of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash at her home. A vehicle ran into her mailbox and knocked it over. Witnesses at the scene assisted deputies in locating the suspect who admitting hitting a Waste Pro garbage bin, but did not realize she struck the mailbox as well. Marlyan Virginia Gray, 72, of Carrabelle was issued a traf c ticket for leaving the scene of an accident. Damage to the mailbox was estimated at $50. Ronald Price of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at Maria Del Carmen Lane. The entrance sign to the development was damaged. Damage to balls and lights on the sign was estimated at $200. Richard Strickland of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported that a suspect conducted a yard sale and some of the items sold belonged to him. The value of the stolen items is $670. Other items were burned by the suspect. Those items were valued at $34. The stolen items were recovered and Amanda Renee Glover, 32, of Panacea was arrested for grand theft and criminal mischief. Thomas Galvan of Tallahassee reported a grand theft in Crawfordville. An air conditioning unit, valued at $2,000, was reported missing from a foreclosed home in Crawfordville. Robert Blankenship of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Jewelry and a television, valued at $215, were reported missing. Individuals of interest have been identi ed. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated an abandoned vehicle on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road and Cajer Posey Road in Crawfordville. The vehicle had an Alabama tag and posed a traf c hazard. A wrecker was called to the scene after Sgt. Harrell was unable to locate any ownership information. Jimmy Young of Crawfordville reported the theft of a canine from his home. The Pekinese was valued at $400. Dianna Rosenbaum of Crawfordville reported a theft at her home. Jewelry, a television and miscellaneous items, valued at $360, were reported missing. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated a 10-speed bicycle that was recovered in the Wakulla Gardens area. A juvenile was observed riding the bicycle but when Deputy Gibson returned to check on the welfare of the juvenile he found the bike on a vacant lot. The bike was turned in to the Property Division as found property. SEPTEMBER 29 Verbon Scott of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims mailbox and trash bin were disturbed. Damage to the mailbox was estimated at $25. Suspects were observed in the area. SEPTEMBER 30 Jessica Lanette Fruggiero, 28, of Crawfordville was charged with battery after getting into an altercation with another inmate at the Wakulla County Jail. Corrections staff determined that a verbal altercation escalated into a physical dispute. Timothy Stephens of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim noticed that his vehicle was tampered with overnight and $535 worth of property was stolen from inside. The items included sunglasses, a phone charger and an umbrella. The vehicle was not locked at the time of the theft. Amanda Glover of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Clothing, movies, books, a table and string trimmer, valued at $700, were reported missing. A suspect has been identi- ed. Penny Whitehead of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Damage was reported to the victims vehicle. Damage was estimated at $150. Kimberly Sharkey of Tallahassee reported a structure re in Crawfordville. Brandon Loudner of Crawfordville reported a grease fire on the stove. Wakulla firefighters responded and extinguished the re. Loudner and two juveniles escaped from the home unharmed. Damage was reported to the stove area of the kitchen. Lorna Conner of Panacea reported a traf c crash at Coastal Highway and Walker Farm. The victim struck a deer and created $2,500 worth of damage to her vehicle. OCTOBER 1 Deputies Gibby Gibson and Vicki Mitchell were called out to investigate a disturbance when they discovered their suspect had ed the scene. Deputy Mitchell conducted a traf c stop in the Old Shell Point Road area. Derrik Ray Stallings, 18, of Crawfordville was stopped and it was determined that the driver did not possess a valid driver license. Stallings was also arrested for DUI and operating a motor vehicle while license was suspended or revoked with knowledge. Deputy Ward Kromer searched Stallings prior to transporting him to the Wakulla County Jail and discovered marijuana and drug paraphernalia on the suspect. He was charged with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Stallings was also charged with aggravated battery, criminal mischief and burglary with assault or battery in connection with the disturbance case that led to the DUI arrest. Damage to the victims home and property was estimated at $1,220. James Travis of Crawfordville recovered property owned by a Tallahassee man at Azalea Park. Deputy Mike Crum contacted the owner and made arrangements for him to pick up the missing property. Earl Peckham of Crawfordville reported the theft of a handicapped permit from his vehicle. The vehicle was not locked and tissues were also removed from the vehicle. Wrenn Green of Panacea reported a traf c crash. A boat trailer driven by Coy Shiver of Eastpoint struck Greens vehicle with a trailer guide. The trailer guide damaged Greens window and vehicle door while also injuring his hand. Damage was estimated at $300. Howard Wynns Crabtree, 42, of St. Marks was charged with smuggling contraband into the Wakulla County Jail. Crabtree was observed concealing items in the front of his jail issued clothing while on trash detail at Newport Park. Two packs of cigarettes were recovered. Betty Money of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone spray painted the victims vehicle. Damage to the vehicle is estimated at $500. OCTOBER 2 Marvin Libby Jr. of Premier Motor Cars reported a vehicle theft. A boat and trailer were taken from the lot. The boat is valued at $7,000 and it was entered in the FCIC/NCIC data base. Louise Fedorak of Panacea reported a vehicle theft from a Panacea residence. A Lincoln Continent al, valued at $2,000, was removed from the yard. A suspect has been identi ed. Barbara Wallace of Crawfordville reported an animal incident where she lost her parrot. The parrot was in its cage outside the front door when the victim left home. But she returned to discover that the parrot was gone. A suspect cat was observed on the property, paw prints were observed inside the cage and loose feathers were discovered by Deputy Randy Phillips. Christen Odham of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim lost her purse from inside an unlocked vehicle at her home. The purse and contents were valued at $504. Evidence was collected at the scene and a suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Ian Dohme and Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. OCTOBER 3 Areyouna Brooks of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft. Shoes and purses, valued at $3,120, were removed from her vehicle. A suspect has been identi ed. Martin Causseaux of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A suspect, who has been identi ed, stole $562 worth of business equipment from the victims business vehicle. Detective Nick Boutwell interviewed Jeremy E. McCranie, 35, of Crawfordville who admitting taking the property and selling it. He was charged with grand theft and was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 825 calls for service during the past week. V V ote Ralph Thomas for COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 I will Serve you, and be accessible to discuss issues that are important to you Make sound decisions that reflect the standards set by the community, only after gathering and weighing all of the facts Work to ensure that every tax dollar is spent efficiently on items that promote the services desired by our citizens Strive to reduce taxes Refrain from incurring additional debt and will seek every opportunity to reduce the current debt load Insist that we build an Emergency Fund that will not be used to pay for non-emergencies between budgets Remember that Freedom belongs to the people and should not be infringed upon by the Government www.ralphthomas2012.com Poli cal adversement, paid for and approved by Ralph Thomas, Republican, for County Commission District 1 LWVVote Wakulla 2012 CANDIDATE FORUMSPresented by The League of Women Voters#The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization encouraging the informed and active participation of all citizens in the political process. CLIP AND SAVE THESE FORUM DATES! All forums will take place at theSeating is limited Doors open at 6:15For more information call: Membership in the Wakulla League is open to all interested citizens. VOTE AGAINST ALAN BROCK He Does NOT PAY any PROPERTY TAXES!No School Tax, County Tax, Water Tax, Fire Tax and No Trash Fee, but he Decides how to Tax You & Spend Your Tax Dollars while being Paid by the Taxpayers!PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT BY DONNA SANFORD. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

PAGE 15

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 15AContinued from Page 7A Incidentally, I have carried this over into my married life. According to my father, if I simply obeyed Franklins advice I would have a life filled with health, wealth and wisdom. The three things absolutely needed in life to make a person happy. Or, so Franklin would lead us to believe. After what seems to be a lifetime of living, and living in as much harmony of these two aspects of life, I must say that there is very little truth to be said concerning good old Franklins saying. No matter how early I go to bed or how early I get up, I do not seem to be any wealthier or healthier. Perhaps, and this is only a guess on my part because I am not as wise as old Benjamin Franklin, you had to do something when you got up that contributed or created your wealth. Just a suggestion from me. That is the way it is with most sayings. They sound good, you sound wise in quoting them, but after every saying is quoted, nothing seems to change. They just do not cover the whole spectrum. It is not that I have not given it the good old college try; it just does not work for me. This past week I had an occasion to think about this quote. I have tried keeping the early to bed and early to rise objective in full focus throughout my life. I am not up partying until the wee hours of the morning. At my age, my party time is early afternoon. I have made a concerted effort to get enough rest and just to make sure I have enough rest I indulge in an afternoon nap. I am not sure where this comes in Benjamin Franklins quote. Recently, I had cause to re ect upon the validity of Benjamin Franklins sage advice. My quarterly taxes were due, and you know what good old Uncle Sam thinks about being late on his payments. If confession is good for the soul (another famous quote), I need to confess that while I was writing this check to Uncle Sam I had some rather harsh thoughts about him in the process. There, I said it. During the same week, some other bills were due and none of them would take no for an answer. Again, I must confess, while writing these checks I was sputtering to myself quite a bit. As I looked at my checkbook, I knew that the wealthy component of Benjamin Franklins quote did not come in my direction. I was simply out of wealth. Not only that, but I recently spent about four weeks sick with bronchitis and pneumonia and spent about three weeks in bed. Not only was I early to bed, but I was glued to my bed. How does that t into Franklins saying? The healthy aspect of that quote has not fallen in my direction either. If you want to know about the wise element, simply query the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Another old phrase says, three strikes and youre out. Well, according to the Franklin saying, I must concede that I am out. I am not wealthy, in many regards Im not healthy and for sure, Im not wise. It is my opinion that there is a lot more to life than wise old sayings from some old man from the past. Benjamin Franklin, for example, no doubt practiced early to bed and early to rise but in the end, he died. That does not sound too healthy to me. Of course, the best place for wisdom is the Bible. I like what the wisest man in the world said, Trust in the LORD with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths (Proverbs 3:5-6 KJV). I am not too sure about the healthy and the wealthy components, that is up for grabs, but I am convinced the wise part comes from the Lord. After all, the Bible teaches us that God is Omniscient. If God knows everything and I know God, I am in a good position.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Pastor: Early to bed, early to rise hasnt worked for me PLEASE RE-ELECT OUR PAP Donnie Sparkman WAKULLA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERHe Is: Knowledgeable Honest Dedicated to the people of Wakulla County with 42 years of experience Certi ed Florida Appraiser Experienced Land Surveyor (and He Loves US! Brigs, Walker & Reese)Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, for Property Appraiser Continued from Page 1A Typically, she and her husband will get in the car and drive where the long pine needles are and spend all day racking them up. She then wraps them up and stores them. After that rst day, she fell in love and continued to try and make more baskets. When I rst started, I had no idea what I was doing, Rosen says. It has been a learning process through trial and error. She has never taken a class to make what she calls an embryo basket. She says she doesnt want to be in uenced by someone elses style. Instead, she continues to come up with new and creative ideas. Its like Im challenging myself to see what I can come up with, Rosen says. First, she boils the pine needles to soften them and then wraps a bunch of them in a dish towel. When she is ready to begin making a basket, she takes a small amount of needles and wraps a thread around the ends to secure them. She then starts one pine needle at a time. She uses a coiling method, as opposed to basket weaving. Her basket making is constantly evolving and she is always trying new ideas. She incorporates sea grass, sweet grass and other grasses into her baskets. She also dyes the pine needles to give the baskets a different look. At one time, she was using wooden pieces for the center of the baskets to speed up the process. The center part of the basket take the longest amount of time, around 4 hours. She had her son, Michael, cut out slices of wood from live oak, heart of pine and cedar tress to make the centers. She has also used coasters and other items. Anything that can have holes drilled in it can be used, she says. I look at the world in a different way, Rosen says. I see if its something I can turn into a basket. She also started making tops for the baskets, which she didnt do in the beginning. Other ideas have included breaking apart a wine box and using part of it as the base. She has also used gourds as the base and then adds the pine needles to the top of it. She has also traded with local artists and used their ceramic pieces for the center of the basket, combining the different forms of art. They are constantly evolving and I am constantly evolving, Rosen says. When Rosen started making her baskets, she would bring them in to the of ce where she works in Tallahassee. One day, she was approached by one of the doctors who needed Christmas gifts for his family. He asked her for ve baskets and from that moment she stared selling them. Youre so honored, Rosen says when people are willing to pay for something she made. She then went to the Blue Crab Festival in Panacea and sold seven of 14 baskets she brought. From that point on, she started attending more festivals and shows to sell her baskets. I call myself an accidental artist, Rosen says. She loves making baskets and says it is just a part of who she is now. Im a happy basket maker, Rosen says. The baskets are portable so she is able to take them with her where ever she goes. And she only works two days a week, so her lifestyle allows her to indulge in her passion for basket making. Many people who visit her booth at festivals end up coming back several times to see the same basket. She believes those people are getting some sort of message from the basket. Theres a mysterious connection between people and my baskets, Rosen says. No two of her baskets are alike. She doesnt take pictures of her baskets because she doesnt want to have to try and recreate it. When she starts on a basket, she typically doesnt know how it will turn out. This was natures discards, she says of the pine needles. But she is able to turn them into something people can enjoy. I like to see how it evolves, she says. And no matter what age someone is, they can start something new, she adds. Theres lots to do. She was 62 when she started making handcrafted baskets. Rosen will be at the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival on Oct. 20 with her Basketry by Barbara.Barbara Rosen turns natures discards into art JENNIFER JENSENBaskets Barbara Rosen made by coiling pine needles.

PAGE 16

Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LES HARRISON Walk into any retailer and the evidence is in plain sight. Christmas is less than three months away. Decorations, gifts, cards, and wrapping paper are prominently displayed for the buyers convenience. Among the ubiquitous decorations are the red and green pillar candles with holiday fragrances. One, the Bayberry candle, has a distinctly North Florida connection. The bayberry and wax myrtle trees are both member of the Myrica plant genus. The term Myrica is a Greek word for fragrance. A member of this plant is found in a majority of the inhabited world. The bayberry, with its larger berries, is collected commercially to produce the popular candle scent. Before the advent of mass-market candles, wax myrtles had the same use in many North Florida homes. The wax myrtle is a native Florida plant. It is a small tree or large shrub which can be grown anywhere in the state. Wax myrtle does well in a moist environment. It is excellent for use in poorly drained soils, but grows well in drier soils. This durable plant can serve many uses in the landscape. Wax myrtles have male and female flowers produced on separate plants. Female owers grow in close bunches producing light green round fruits about an eighth of an inch in diameter. The fruits are coated with a thick, bluish wax useful in making candles. Wax myrtles can reach a height of 25 feet. Their leaves are evergreen narrow at the base and broader toward the upper end of the leaves. About midway up the leaf toward the tip, coarse teeth appear on the leaf edges. Wax myrtles produce suckers, small plants that sprout from the roots. The suckers grow into large clumps, or clusters, and eventually grow into a very large, dense plant. Suckers can be removed from around the main trunk to produce an attractive, small tree. The trunk of the wax myrtle is grayish white in color similar to northern birch. These trees are used extensively in patio planting and as landscape screens. Wax myrtles can be grown from seeds, cuttings, and simple layering techniques. Seeds can be started in a mixture of equal parts sand and peat moss. Another method for propagating wax myrtle is to dig established plants during the winter months. Cut the plants back to within a few inches of the ground. Dig out the root clumps and set them in containers. In a few months, the plant will regrow. A small tree 10 to 12 feet in height will take a few years to grow using this method. Being a native plant, wax myrtle is well suited to Wakulla Countys soils and climate. The plant is cold hardy, salt tolerant, and relatively free of diseases and insects. The only one serious pest of wax myrtle is a caterpillar which chews leaves and ties terminal leaves together. To learn more about wax myrtles, contact your UF/ IFAS Wakulla Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@ufl.edu or at (850) 926-3931.Wax myrtles are a hardy native species PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWax myrtle berries have a thick, bluish wax useful in making candles.Special to The NewsThe Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society meets Tuesday, Oct. 16, at 6:30 p.m. at Wakulla Public Library. The feature in this season of raging wildflowers on the roadsides is Road Rage: Wildflowers and Public Right-of-Ways, an illustrated presentation by Sarracenias guest, IFAS Wakulla Extension Agent Les Harrison. The public is cordially invited. Social time, with refreshments for all, will precede the 6:30 meeting.Les Harrison to speak on wildflowers Come to visit us at our brand-new TLFCU branch: 2655-C Crawfordville Highway and go home with cash!Refinance any vehicle through TLFCU and receive two-percent cash back of the original loan value, up to $500! TLFCU.org | 866.876.4638 bank smallTHINK BIG Federally Insured by NCUA. *Bonus is 2% of the new principal loan balance with TLFCU, subject to a maximum bonus of $500. Bonus is only available for vehicles currently financed with another lender. The member is responsible for paying all fees associated with the loan, including doc stamps, title, and lien fees. Loan approval is subject to credit verification, income level, debt ratio, collateral approval and TLFCU's underwriting guidelines. Some restrictions may apply. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. Ask one of our Loan Specialists for all details, fees, and current rates. Membership eligibility limited to those who live, work, o r worship in Leon, Gadsden, Jefferson, or Wakulla county. At HealthSouth, we understand that recovering from a stroke can be challenging. But no matter where a patient is in his/her recovery process, or how long ago the stroke occurred, our Second Chance Stroke Program could help maximize functional ability, increase independence and improve quality of life. This includes areas of mobility, speech or written communication, swallowing, cognitive functions and activities of daily living. Our program oers: Physical/occupational/speech therapy Certied rehabilitation nurses Therapist trained in neuro developmental treatment Patient/family education Support groups Admission is by referral for a free in-home evaluation. For more information contact us.YOU DESERVE A SECOND CHANCE:HealthSouth Corporation:551344

PAGE 17

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netWakulla looked unstoppable in the first half of last weeks game against Rickards. We played our best half of the year, War Eagle Head Coach Scott Klees said after the game. Everything was clicking, offensively and defensively. Wakulla stayed undefeated, improving to 6-0, and basically guaranteed a spot in the district playoffs with the win. Im proud of our guys for coming out with focus, Klees said. Early in the game, the Rickards defense was obviously confused with Wakullas offense. On the rst two offensive series, running back Demetrius Lindsey broke long runs to set up Dillon Norman for scores. The War Eagles were up 14-0 with not even half of the rst quarter played. Then came the only Wakulla error special teams giving up a long return for a touchdown on the subsequent kickoff. Wakulla kept the ball on the ground, with Lindsey tearing off more long runs and Norman scoring another rushing touchdown to go up 21-7 with just over a minute left in the rst. In the second quarter, Lindsey scored on a 14-yard run and the War Eagles tacked on the extra point to go up 28-7 with 8:55 remaining. Just before halftime, Dillon Norman broke a long run to the Rickards 22-yard line and quarterback Caleb Stephens connected with receiver Mikal Cromartie on a 23-yard touchdown pass. With the extra point, it put Wakulla up 35-7 with a minute left in the half. (Cromartie was named Defensive Player of the Week for his work on the other side of the ball, which included an interception, a fumble recover and ve tackles.) It was remarkable in that Wakulla threw the ball only three times in the whole game. There would be no more scoring in the game. The second half saw lots of replacements come in for the War Eagles, and a Rickards offense that struggled against Wakullas defense. Norman, who was named offensive player of the week, scored three touchdowns in the game, and Lindsey scored once. Klees praised the offensive line: They played extremely well, he said. And the defense didnt budge the ball. Of the few number of passes, Klees said: I wanted to establish the run and be physical up front. You run to open up the passing game. But, the coach said, the ground game was working so well, he didnt want to get away from it. On defense, the only time Rickards seemed to get any offensive momentum and appear to be driving the ball was on Wakulla penalties. Klees sighed when asked about it. I guess were just gonna be the most-penalized team. Klees also praised the play of quarterback Caleb Stephens, who is somewhat hobbled with a knee injury and will have surgery after the season. He played well. Im pleased with his performance. THIS WEEK: Open. NEXT WEEK: The War Eagles travel to play Suwannee High School in Live Oak on Friday, Oct. 19, at 7:30 p.m. Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 sports news and team views SportsCross Country: Good showing at FSU Invitational Volleyball: Lady War Eagles chalk up two wins Sports, Page 4B Hear ye, hear ye the Florida Supreme Court is now in session W eekly Roundup, Page 6BWar Eagles look great in win over RickardsWakulla o ense shows speed in dominating rst half over district foe; defense doesnt give up points KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRickards defense was unable to solve Wakullas offense in the rst half as speedsters Demetrius Lindsey and Dillon Norman tore off runs for scores to put the War Eagles up 35-7 over the Raiders. Above, Lindsey breaks into the open eld.MORE GAME PHOTOS, Page 3B. Some things get better with age. Capital Health Plan is one of them. Plan to attend a SEMINAR during the Medicare Annual Election Period, October 15 through December 7, 2012, to LEARN MORE about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) and Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-8708943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Paid Endorsement. Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 to RSVP or for more information. (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p .m., seven days a week or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/MedicareH5938_DP 358 Accepted 08122012Anna Johnson says....Join me and become a member of a Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO) plan. Seminars will be held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd., Tallahassee Friday, October 12 Monday, October 15 Tuesday, October 16 Tuesday, October 23 Friday, October 26 Monday, October 29 Thursday, November 1 Wednesday, November 7 Friday, November 9 Monday, November 12 Tuesday, November 13 Wednesday, November 21 Friday, November 23 Thursday, November 29 Friday, November 30 Wednesday, December 5 Thursday, December 6 Over 250 community-minded Wakulla County residents gather to eat tasty seafood, have a good time, and net funding for a growing Big Brothers Big Sisters Wakulla County Mentoring Program.We are trying to raise $7,000 to support the ongoing efforts of the Big Brothers Big Sisters Wakulla County Mentoring Program. With such funding, Big Brothers Big Sisters will help more Wakulla County youth facing adversity overcome HUGE obstacles to develop: $10 per plate. Tickets are available online at www.bbbs.org/BIGcatch, at Poseys Steam Room, or at Poseys Dockside Caf.To Sponsor or for More Info: Contact Katie Williams at katie.williams@bigbendmentoring.org or 850.386.6002 Law Oce Est. 1998Fore closures Creditor /Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Sq uare Crawfordville, F lorida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator

PAGE 18

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Oct. 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Oct. 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Oct. 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 9621010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Oct. 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Oct. 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Oct. 16 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. SARRACENIA CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. The feature is Road Rage: Wild owers and Public Right-of-Ways, an illustrated presentation by Sarracenias guest, Wakulla Extension Of ce Director Les Harrison. The public is invited. Social time, with refreshments, will precede the meeting. Wednesday, Oct. 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Oct. 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsThursday, Oct. 11 ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZA AND AUCTION will be held by the Wakulla Coastal Optimist Club at 6:30 p.m. at Wildwood Country Club. Money earned goes to fund the scholarships they give out to Wakulla High seniors. They will be modeling clothing for men and women. Entertainer of the Year, Kevin Story, will be the guest performer. For tickets, visit Centennial Bank, see Noah or Sherrie Posey Miller at Poseys Steam Room or at Dentistry By The Sea. CAPITAL AREA HEALTHY START COALITION will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. at the library. Wakulla County providers, care coordinators, local professionals and consumers are invited to begin the CAHSC service delivery planning process. This is the organizational meeting for developing the 2015-2020 plan. RELAY FOR LIFE KICKOFF PARTY will be held at 7 p.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Church for the Carnival of Hope. Register a team (please bring your rst $100 of fundraising money), register as a survivor and learn about Relay. For more information or to RSVP email wakullarelay@ gmail.com or call (850) 926-8854. Saturday, Oct. 13 WAKULLA GREENWING DAY will be held at the Sheriffs Of ce Range, located at 65 Qualify Lane, off Lawhon Mill Road. Registration is at 9 a.m. and the event is 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. It is open to children 6 to 18 years old, parental supervision is required. Cost is $15 per child, which includes a T-shirt and Greenwing Magazine subscription. Lunch is provided. There will be educational stations targeting rearm safety, bench shooting, shotgun shooting, archery, turkey shoot for $2 per shot and a chicken shoot for $1 per shot. There will be giveaways and door prizes. For more information, call Holly Porter at 519-0416 or email WAKULLAGREENWING@ EMBARQMAIL.COM. COUNCIL FAMILY REUNION will be held starting at 5 p.m. at the Council family reunion picnic grounds in Crawfordville with a sh fry. There will also be a covered dish lunch at 11 a.m. on Sunday. Descendants of John Cecil Council, an early pioneer of Wakulla County, are invited. For questions, call Beverly Council at 926-3759. CHINESE AUCTION will be held by the VFW Ladies Auxiliary Post No. 4538 at 475 Arran Road. Doors open at 6 p.m. and auction starts at 7 p.m. Purchase a sheet of 25 tickets for $5. A drawing for each auction item will be held. OKTOBERFEST will be held at 10 a.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church and Preschool. There will be German food, silent auction, games for kids. There will be bratwurst, sauerkraut, hotdogs and German potato salad. Cost is $5 per person. The church is located on U.S. Highway 98 across from the high school. Sunday, Oct. 14 COUNCIL FAMILY REUNION will be held at 11 a.m. with a covered dish lunch at the Council family reunion picnic grounds in Crawfordville. For questions, call Beverly Council at 926-3759. Wednesday, Oct. 17 INFORMATION SERVICE DAY on pre-Medicare annual open enrollment will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center, 33 Michael Drive. The Area Agency on Aging will be providing information on how to proceed in making changes to Medicare. There also will be a SHINE volunteer counselor available to assist with Medicare and Medicaid needs. For more information, contact the Senior Center at 926-7145.Upcoming EventsFriday, Oct. 19 FORE THE BUILD GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held to bene t Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County at Wildwood Golf Course. This tournament will help fund the 2012 Habitat Home Build. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Cost is $50 per person or $200 per team. To enter, contact Doris Crosby at 545-7425. Saturday, Oct. 20 STONE CRAB FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in downtown St. Marks. There will be food, music, parade, childrens activities, educational displays and dozens of vendors. A parade will be held at 11 a.m. The theme is super hero. Dress up or decorate a golf cart or antique car. Call 925-6224 or email cityofst.marks@comcast.net for additional details on the parade. ANNUAL HORSE-O-WEEN will be held at noon the Wakulla County Equestrian Center, Lawhon Mill Road in Sopchoppy, by the Wakulla County Horsemans Association. There will be fun games with prizes for everyone. WATERS JOURNEY: Following the Water to Wakulla Springs will be held from 8 a.m. to noon. Springs expert, Jim Stevenson, will lead people on a tour by caravan. Advance registration is recommended. Tour departs from TCC in Tallahassee at 8 a.m. and ends at the tower overlooking the spring at noon. Cost is $18 and includes the entrance fee to Wakulla Springs State Park. For more information, call 926-3376. GENEALOGY SEMINAR will be held by the Wakulla County Historical Society at the Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. Registration is at 8:15 a.m., and includes breakfast and lunch. Speakers are genealogy experts Jay Collins and Melody Porter. For more information, call 926-1110. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Government Meetings Thursday, Oct. 11 TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea. The public is invited. WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 6 p.m. at the Parks and Recreation Administration Of ce. ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, Oct. 15 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for its regular meeting in the commission chambers. SCHOOL BOARD will meet at 5:45 p.m. for its monthly meeting in the school administration building. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorJust to keep everyone in the loop on our upcoming e-book checkout service, we have placed our rst order and will be undergoing staff training in the next couple of weeks so that we can go live as quickly as possible. A few things you should know about this service is that there will be a limit of two e-books that can be checked out at a time for two weeks at a time. We are only ordering e-books which are compatible with all of the major readers (Kindle, Nook, Ipad, etc) so that the greatest number of our patrons can have access. For those who dont have readers, there are apps which you can put on your mobile device or home computer which can give you access as well. More details will be forthcoming along with our go live date and the dates for public workshops so that we can show you how the system will work. It is very user friendly but we will of course be available to answer any questions. Please contact us for any suggestions youd like to see in our e-book collection as well. Change in Grace Period Due to a change in our new operating system we are currently unable to give our patrons a grace period on their checkouts. This means that overdue nes begin accruing the day after your items are due. This is only an issue if your items are returned late. If they are on time our patrons will never have to worry about this. We will announce when/if we will be able to provide a grace period again. Remember that if you need to renew items you can do so via our website or by giving us a call at 926-7415. Book Extravaganza Another Success Huge thanks to all who attended our Book Extravaganza last Saturday. Your generous donations raised more than $500 for the Friends of the Library. Combined with our Silent Auction in mid-September you have helped raise more than $3,500 for the library! Thank you once again for your generous support and keep an eye on us as we put this funding to good use. Friday Night Movie Our Friday night movie this week tells the story of a team of explorers who discover a clue to the origins of mankind on Earth, leading them on a journey to the darkest corners of the universe. There, they must ght a terrifying battle to save the future of the human race. Though our Public Showing License doesnt allow me to name it here, I can say that the lm is directed by Ridley Scott, and is hinted at being a prequel to his blockbuster Aliens saga. This critically acclaimed R-rated lm (for sci- violence and brief language) stars Noomi Rapace, Michael Fassbender, Charlize Theron and Idris Elba, and is guaranteed to keep the audience guessing and on the edge of their seat. Due to the rating all minors must be accompanied by an adult. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing. Political EventsThursday, Oct. 18 POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for sheriff will be held at 7 p.m. at the library by the League of Women Voters of Wakulla County. Saturday, Oct. 20 MEET PETE WILLIAMS, candidate for State Attorney, from noon to 2:30 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant, Crawfordville. This is a free event and lunch and drinks will be served. Monday, Oct. 22 POLITICAL FORUM for candidates in the state house district 7 and county school superintendent races will be held starting at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. The superintendent forum will follow at 7:45 p.m. This forum is held by the Wakulla Republican and Wakulla Democratic executive committees. Library News... Optimist Club Fashion Extravaganza at Wildwood at 6:30 p.m. Relay for Life kickoff party at 7 p.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Chinese auction for VFW Ladies Auxiliary at 475 Arran Road at 6 p.m. Wakulla Greenwing Day at Sheriffs Of ce Range from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.ThursdayThursdaySaturdaySaturday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 3Bsports news and team views SportsPlayers of the WeekDILLON NORMAN 12 carries for 157 yards and 3 touchdowns BRANDON NICHOLS Played great on Special Teams, says Klees. MIKAL CROMARTIE 1 interception, a fumble recovery, 5 tackles plus offensive catch for TDO ense Defense Special Teams War Eagles look great in win over RickardsBy BRIANA FORDHAMSpecial to The NewsWakulla High School will be hosting a community event on Oct. 23, beginning at 6 p.m. The Powder Puff Game between junior and senior girls will kickoff at 6 p.m. The community pep rally will begin at 7 p.m. and is expected to last until 8 p.m. There will be refreshments and food for sale at the concession stand. During the pep rally, the 2012 Homecoming Court will be announced and youll be able to familiarize yourself with the faces that are eligible to win the title of king and queen for 2012. We are accepting a $1 donation entry fee at the gate. Please come out to the event and show your community spirit. If you have any questions, you may contact Briana Fordham at Wakulla High School. Community pep rally set Oct. 23 WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCoach Scott Klees tells the play to quarterback Caleb Stephens. Wakulla students celebrate the win after the game by singing the alma mater. War Eagle linebacker Dequon Simmons sticks a hit on a Raiders running back. Wakulla safety Mikal Cromartie picks off a pass and gets into the open eld. Cheerleaders and the War Eagle Marching Band keep the Wakulla fans revved up for the game.More photos online at thewakullanews.com 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org www.Ken FieldsPhotography.photoshelter.com THE RACE FOR U.S. SENATEFlorida voters have key decisions to make in the race for U.S. Senate. Read continuing coverage in this newspaper and tune-in to the statewide debates to learn more about the candidates and where they stand on the issues that matter the most to you. For a list of tv stations carrying the live debates visit BeforeYouVote.orgWed., Oct.17, 2012 7:00 8:00 pm ET Broadcast live from Nova Southeastern University Mack (R ) Nelson (D ) DEBATE Sponsors: Florida Blue, Credit Unions of Florida, AARP and The Claude Pepper FoundationDebate Partners Host

PAGE 20

Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsCLASSIFIEDS $12 Per Week!By ELIZABETH ANDREWSAssistant CoachThe Wakulla Lady War Eagles played two games and a tournament last week, improving their record to 8-6 and 4-0 in districts. The first game was against Franklin, at home on Wednesday, Oct. 3, and resulted in three straight match wins with scores of 25-16, 25-14 and 25-14. Marina Petrandis served up eight aces and eight kills while Breighly Bolton added to the score with four aces and eight kills. Shannan Wood was the leader in kills with nine. The second game was yet another win for the Lady War Eagles at Suwannee High on Thursday, Oct. 4. The Eagles had three straight match wins with scores of 25-8, 25-12, and 25-16 thanks to Haley Browns 15 kills, seven digs and three aces. Chelsea Carroll had an amazing game with ve aces and 20 assists. Breighly Bolton contributed 11 kills and Shannan Wood added 10. The tournament was held at Florida High School on Saturday, Oct. 6, and included three other teams, John Paul II, Florida High and North Florida Christian. Wakulla placed third in the tournament, losing to John Paul II in three matches in the rst game 25-21, 25-17 and 27-25. Florida High was Wakullas second loss and lasted four matches with scores of 16-25, 20-25, 25-22 and 23-25. The day ended on a good note with Wakulla defeating NFC in three matches with scores of 2512, 25-20 and 25-19. Freshman setter Caylee Cox stepped in for Capt. Chelsea Carroll, who was not able to make the tournament and had 77 assists and six aces throughout the day. Haley Brown had 33 kills, Shannan Wood had 31, Marina Petrandis had 17, and Breighly Bolton had 12. Defense was lead by Jordan Pryor with 37 digs and Haley Brown with 25. The Lady War Eagles will play next week against John Paul II on Oct. 15 and on Oct. 18 against Maclay finishing up the season with districts on Oct. 25.Special to The News The Crawfordville International Gold Gymnastics competitive level 3 team has won gold in back-to-back weekend competitions. The rst meet was held Sept. 29 at the U.S. Gold Gymnastics facility in Destin. Last weekend, the gymnasts participated in the Canopy Roads Classic 2012 at the Trousdell Gymnastics Center in Tallahassee facing ve other competitive teams. The gymnasts were scored on their performance on beam, oor, vault and bars. Level 3 gymnasts, ages 7 to 9, are coached by Yasmin Belhaj and Katie Bell. International Gold Gymnastics will be hosting the next competition, 2012 Going for Gold Invite in Tallahassee on Oct. 20. In the photo, from left to right are top: Annika Matlock; middle row: Hailey Quick, Hannah Francis, Lillie Steinle, Jewell Fondo and Coach Yasmin; bottom row: MaKenna Schissler, Aubree Bushee, Caroline Barwick and Riley Davis. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach On Saturday, Oct. 6, the local cross country teams joined 2,500 runners from more than 100 Florida High Schools as they competed in the huge FSU Invitational held on the Apalachee Regional Park cross country course. The newly expanded and updated course is a joint venture between FSU, Gulf Winds Track Club and Leon County and is now truly a national class venue. This invitational has always been a major meet, but this year it was even bigger because it will be the site of the 2012 State Finals Meet which made this meet the of- cial Pre-State Meet. Entries were limited to the rst 100 teams to register, even though other teams were interested in attending. There were eight separate races held on Saturday, including Elite and Invitational sections. Both of the WHS teams competed in the small school division. Because of the way the meet was scheduled, the local teams races didnt start until after 10:30 a.m., which meant that the runners faced extremely warm and humid conditions which somewhat negatively affected their race times. As expected, the races were extremely competitive and the runners had to ght for every place and every place was important in the nal standings. Twenty- ve schools entered girls in this section and the WHS girls had another excellent outing, placing 4th out of the 19 schools that elded complete teams. The WHS varsity girls team consisted of Marty Wiedeman, Raychel Gray, Kasey James, Lydia Wiedeman, Kayla Webbe, Lilianna Broadway and Connie Lewis Webbe was the 5th scoring runner for WHS team, running a new personal record (PR) time of 23:19 and also moving into the top 15 female runners of all time at the high school. Lewis also set a new PR of 25:52, which was a 1:43 improvement for her. In the attendant JV race, Emily Westmark also ran a PR. The WHS boys also had a good outing. Thirty schools entered runners in this section, with 21 schools elding full teams. The local boys nished in 8th place. The varsity boys team was composed of Aaron Smith, Travis Parks, Lane Williams, Albert Smythe, Ryan Dodson, Mitchell Atkinson, Gabe Hutchins, Jimmy French and Justin Milhon. Smith, Smythe, Dodson, Milhon and French all recorded PRs in the race. Smiths time of 18:18, was good enough to move him into 9th place on the All-Time Top 15 list at the high school. WHS also had a number of runners in the boys JV race who ran good times and set new PRs. These runners included Riley Carrier, Mark Veerapen, Tyler Westcott, Toby Jordon, Riley Welch and Evan Guarino. Right after the races, I wasnt sure exactly how we had run, said Coach Paul Hoover. Because of the conditions, the times for most of our top runners were a little slow, but after having a chance to analyze the results and looking at how we placed, it became clear that our kids, both the boys and girls, had really raced well. And in cross country, the real test is how you do in the head-to-head battle with the competition rather than the time you ran and we did about as well as I could have hoped for, Hoover said. Im pretty proud of our teams, especially the work ethic theyve shown and how they work together and pull for each other. The teams are back in action this Saturday, Oct. 13, at the Dolphin Dash, hosted by Mosley High School in Lynn Haven.CROSS COUNTRYWar Eagles have good showing at FSU Invitational IGGs gymnastics team wins gold twiceSPECIAL TO THE NEWS Lady War Eagles chalk up wins against Franklin, Suwannee BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPlay at the net in a recent game between Wakulla and Florida High. !!" 2012 Go to www.bigbendhospice.org to Sign-up Today! 11:30am Registration and Lunch 12:30pm Tee-o October 26, 2012Wildwood Country ClubSAVE THE DATE!For more information, call Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308Wakulla County Big Bend Hospice REGISTRATION DATES: SATURDAY 10/20/12 & SATURDAY 10/27/12 REGISTRATION TIMES: 8:00 A.M. TO 12:00 P.M. OR DURING OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY 10/15/12 TO FRIDAY 10/26/12 8-5PMREGISTRATION DEADLINE: SATURDAY 10/27/12, 12:00 PM REGISTRATION PLACE: MEDART RECREATION PARK 79 Recreation Dr.AGE DETERMINING DATE: SEPTEMBER 1st, 2012COST IS $40.00 PER CHILDAGES: 04 & UNDER DIVISION: 06 & UNDER DIVISION: 08 & UNDER DIVISION: 10 & UNDER DIVISION: 12 & UNDER DIVISION: COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD8 & 9 DIVISION: 10, 11, & 12 DIVISION: All players (basketball & soccer) must provide proof of health insurance or purchase a policy for an additional $10.00. All leagues are coed. If interested in coaching the above sports, please contact the Wakulla County Recreation Department. All volunteers must complete a criminal history background check. www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926685 or 510Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH

PAGE 21

By MARTY COHENWe wait for events like this, the games that are the reason you come to Florida. Even us sports writers, a cynical, critical bunch if there ever was one, get juiced for matchup of this magnitude. They used to be an annual occurrence around here, sometimes more than once in a season, but its been a while since there was a big-game feel surrounding Florida football. Welcome back. Saturdays contest with No. 4 LSU will deliver the seasons de ning moment for undefeated Florida. It should be great theater on Saturday afternoon in The Swamp, which hopefully will become a full-throated factor like it was in the two decades before Muschamp arrived. For a while this is a big game, its simultaneously not a critical game for Florida in fact, you could make a case (and I will) that the LSU showdown is the least important game Florida will play for the rest of the season, or at the very least, the conference season. Now before your blood pressure starts spiking and you begin to wonder exactly what I was ingesting during the bye weekend, hear me out. Florida could lose this game on Saturday and not have a single goal it set for itself this season including winning the national championship, however farfetched it once seemed dashed in the process. Losing a game to a team from the SEC West is simply not a deterrent to winning an SEC or even a national championship. Floridas championship teams in 2006 and 2008 both lost close games to SEC West teams, and turned out OK. Floridas next four games are more vital to Floridas chances to return to Atlanta after a two-year absence. The Gators next home game against South Carolina on Oct. 20, is in nitely more critical than the LSU matchup.Florida is undefeated, and has put itself in early position to have a special season and LSU is the next stone on the path. A win would be great, a cause to celebrate, at least for a bit. But again, a loss would not cause irreparable damage to the season. Sure it is any loss becomes magni ed as the stakes continue to rise. But Floridas far more important games will come on Oct. 20 and Oct. 27, the tough backto-back South CarolinaGeorgia doubleheader which will ultimately determine the course of the season. Lose one of those games, and Floridas dream of making it back to Atlanta takes a severe hit. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 5BFLORIDA FLORIDA gators gatorsBy TIM LINAFELT RALEIGH, N.C. As Jimbo Fisher confessed painful truth after painful truth in the wake of Florida States disappointing 17-16 loss at North Carolina State, he came across one point that wasnt quite accurate. We still control our own destiny in the ACC, Fisher said, holding on to a shred of optimism after yet another season of high hopes and high expectations fell by the wayside. Fisher wasnt being dishonest. It just slipped his mind that if N.C. State wins out, it will be the Wolfpack and not the Seminoles making the trip to Charlotte to represent the Atlantic Division in the ACC Championship Game. But forget that dashed optimism and hang on to this new silver lining: Florida State can still win its rst Atlantic Coast Conference title since 2005. Now before you go rolling your eyes, remember that this is still a talented and veteranheavy team that, if its as mature as it constantly said it was throughout the preseason and September, will be able to bounce back and refocus itself for the nal six games of the regular season. Also remember that the Wolfpack, which came into the FSU game having dropped contests to seemingly mediocre teams from Tennessee and Miami, still has dates with North Carolina and Clemson left on the schedule. So, yes, the Seminoles are still very much in the hunt to win the conference and make their rst BCS appearance since the 2006 Orange Bowl. There wont be enough excuses in the world if this team, this coaching staff, fails to win the ACC in year three of the Fisher Era. Stalwarts Virginia Tech have gone 0-for-The Big East, losing rst to putrid Pittsburgh and then Cincinnati. The Hokies followed that up by getting run off the eld by a UNC team with a new head coach and nothing to play for thanks to NCAA sanctions. The Miami Hurricanes have been blown out by Kansas State and Notre Dame. Georgia Tech lost by three touchdowns to Middle Tennessee State and won just two of its rst six. Virginia, a program supposedly on the rise in coach Mike Londons third season, was blushing after falling at home to Louisiana Tech and, instead of bouncing back, was routed at Duke. Perhaps its only tting that, through six games, Maryland picked to finish dead last leads the Atlantic Division and the Blue Devils are only a half-game back of Miami in the Coastal. This is not a sign of great parity within the league. Its a sign that the ACC might be as bad as its ever been since expansion. Which makes it that much more frustrating for FSU fans that the Seminoles have once again let a chance to get a stranglehold on the conference fall through their grips. The Seminoles in 2013 will have to replace their veteran quarterback, star running back, most experienced receiver and do-everything fullback. The defense will have questions, too. Everett Dawkins, Anthony McCloud and Cornellius Carradine will be gone and its uncertain thatBrandon Jenkins or Bjoern Werner will return. When they arrived in 2008 and 2009, it was hard to imagine that players like EJ Manuel, Chris Thompson, Rodney Smith and Lonnie Pryor could make it through their entire FSU careers without winning a single championship. Competing for ACC titles ought to be the standard, not the goal. In any given year, FSU has enough talent to win the league, and that will be true in 2013. But next year wont present near the opportunity that 2012 did. Which makes it imperative for the Seminoles to bounce back from yet another CarterFinley nightmare theyve lost four of their last six in the 57,583-seat stadium and win this conference. Coming up short in 2010 and 2011 were tough enough pills to swallow. By December 1, 2012, FSU will have reached its expiration date. In the meantime, the Seminoles will have to cross their ngers for another N.C. State loss which is hardly an outlandish hope and not stub theirs toes in any remaining contests. The upcoming visit to Miami and FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Savannah State at Florida A&M atSaturday, Oct. 13 at 6 p.m.The game can be seen on famuathletics.com. #4 Florida at VanderbiltSaturday, Oct. 13 at 6 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPNU. Boston College at #12 Florida StateSaturday, Oct. 13 at 5:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN2.LSU game LSU game big, not big, not critical critical Jimbo Fisher and EJ Manuel have a lot at stake over the second half of FSUs season.Wide receiver Quinton Dunbar is slowly emerging as a threat in Floridas evolving passing attack.ACC now a must-win for FSUPhoto By TRAVIS REGISTERGATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here!

PAGE 22

Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 5 As the nation tuned in for the rst of three presidential debates this week, Tallahassees attention focused heavily on the state Supreme Court. The court heard arguments in a range of controversial cases that included a parental-rights ght between former lesbian partners; an undocumented immigrants attempt to become a lawyer; a long-running debate about nuclearpower costs; and a dispute about university tuition. Meanwhile, three justices fought back in a political battle with Republican leaders and conservatives who want them replaced. Outside the court, regulators approved new rates for Citizens Property Insurance Corp. customers for 2013, while business groups and the states consumer advocate traded salvos about an effort to reduce the number of policies in the statebacked insurance pool. JUDGES ON THE HOT SEAT The Supreme Court typically hears oral arguments one week each month. And this week was a doozy. The court heard arguments about whether the Florida Board of Governors has the power to determine tuition and fees for public universities, a power that if granted would take that authority away from the Legislature. A skeptical court listened as an attorney for a group led by former U.S. Sen. Bob Graham argued that a 2002 constitutional amendment establishing the Board of Governors implicitly gave it the authority to set tuition and fees. Justices also said they may be powerless to let an undocumented immigrant practice law in the state, despite recent federal moves to create a pathway to permanent status for immigrants brought to the country as children. In a case that has drawn national attention, the Florida Board of Bar Examiners asked justices to weigh in on whether it should waive rules, set up in 2008, and allow Jose Godinez-Samperio to be accepted as a Bar member despite the fact he is currently illegally residing in the country. In another case, the court raised doubts about a challenge to a 2006 law that has led to customers of two utilities paying for future nuclear reactors that might not be built. The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy led the legal challenge after the PSC late last year approved allowing Florida Power & Light and Progress Energy Florida to pass along about $282 million in nuclearproject costs to customers in 2012. From nuclear power to nuclear family, the court also heard arguments in a legal battle that raises new questions about parental rights after the break-up of same-sex relationships. A Brevard County case pits two women who were lesbian partners when they decided to have a child. It is unique because one of the women provided an egg that was fertilized and implanted in the other woman, who later gave birth. After the relationship ended, the woman who gave birth blocked her former partner from having parental rights. Florida law gives egg or sperm donors limited rights, but some justices wondered if the laws were written with anonymous donors in mind and did not re ect other situations. At one point, Justice Barbara Pariente raised the scenario of a man who impregnates a woman in a one-night stand and receives parental rights. She questioned whether two women who decide to raise a child should have lesser rights and said that could create issues of equal protection. In most years, merit retention votes dont draw much attention, as sitting appellate judges and Supreme Court justices quietly return to of ce. This year, some conservative groups and the Republican Party of Florida are attempting to unseat three veteran justices who have repeatedly come under re from conservatives for rulings going back more than a decade. On Friday, Justices R. Fred Lewis, Barbara Pariente and Peggy Quince attended a forum at the Florida State University College of Law to talk about merit retention as the trio tries to counter the push to send them packing. Collectively, they have raised more than $1 million to keep their jobs. Last month, the RPOF voted to of cially oppose the justices for a series of rulings that have not gone Republicans way. Among others joining the ght is Americans for Prosperity, a group funded by conservative billionaires Charles and David Koch. The justices have been joined by a group, Defend Justice from Politics, which supports their retention efforts. CITIZENS IN THE NEWS The state-backed insurer was in the news this week as the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation approved rates for 2013 that will boost premiums by 10.8 percent for Citizens Property Insurance Corp. customers. Following more than a month of review and multiple hearings by Citizens board members and the agency, OIR approved new rates that will affect most of the companys 1.4 million customers on policies renewed after Jan. 1. State lawmakers and OIR of cials have been trying to boost Citizens rates in recent years to make them more comparable to rates that would be charged by the private market in some of the riskiest areas of the state. Lawmakers, however, limited annual increases to 10 percent, a cap that critics say has hindered efforts to depopulate the state-run pool that has become the largest property insurer in the state. The cap, however, does not include higher costs for hurricane catastrophe insurance, resulting in rates climbing higher than 10 percent. The rate hikes come amid growing efforts by Citizens to reduce its ranks. This week, a plan to use $350 million in surplus to coax private companies into taking policies out of Citizens drew concern from Floridas insurance consumer advocate, who called on the insurer to provide much more data surrounding the proposed loan program. In a letter to Citizens Chairman Carlos Lacasa, consumer advocate Robin Westcott put forth a lengthy list of questions surrounding a deal approved in September by Citizens board of governors to provide 20year, low interest loans to private carriers to partially offset the risks associated with Citizens policies. Business groups, led by Associated Industries of Florida, jumped to Citizens defense, saying the loan program is needed to help re-invigorate the states private insurance market. ELECTION UPDATE Floridas effort to remove non-citizens from the ranks of voters took another step forward this week. A federal judge ruled that theres no time limit for the state to push for the removal of voters who were never supposed to be registered, and an effort to clean the rolls of non-citizens can continue until the November election. Judge William Zloch ruled that Secretary of State Ken Detzner is within the law in seeking the removal of voters from the rolls who were never supposed to be there. Opponents contended federal law prevented such purges within 90 days of the election. Certainly, the National Voter Registration Act does not require the State to idle on the sidelines until a non-citizen violates the law before the State can act, Zloch wrote. STORY OF THE WEEK: The Florida Supreme Court took up a series of high-pro- le cases, which dealt with issues such as university tuition, nuclear power costs and the admission of an undocumented immigrant to the Florida Bar. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: So if you have sex the good old-fashioned way its constitutional, but anything else doesnt get the same status? Florida Supreme Court Justice Barbara Pariente during arguments in parental-rights case involving two women who were in a same-sex relationship. WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Hear ye, hear ye the Supreme Court is now in sessionBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 5 Three justices of the Florida Supreme Court used a forum Friday at Florida State University to hit back at their critics, while campaign lings showed the trio had raised more than $1 million for their electoral defense. Speaking to an audience at the FSU College of Law comprised mostly of students, Justices R. Fred Lewis, Barbara Pariente and Peggy Quince pushed back against a campaign to push them off the bench that has spread from a conservative grass-roots uprising to a denouncing of the three by the Republican Party of Florida. The justices said that the effort to throw them off the court in this Novembers merit retention elections, in which the justices dont face opposition but have to get the approval of a majority of voters, was a challenge to the states judicial branch itself. We do not want and we should not want to go back to a system where judges are beholden to anyone no political party, no group, no individual, Quince said. Pariente stressed the same theme: That the bid by the group Restore Justice 2012 and other opponents to push the justices off the court would help to dismantle some of the reforms passed after a series of scandals shook the high court in the 1970s. What we see is that it is not about just the three of us, but it is about our system of a fair and impartial judiciary, she said. Lewis, who at times choked back tears when talking about his respect for the court and his role as a judge, recalled working for then-Circuit Court Judge Shelby Highsmiths unsuccessful campaign for the Supreme Court. Lewis said he and Highsmith were shocked at the corruption in the race. Floridians deserve better, Lewis said. We ought not allow it to go back to those days. Opponents have sought to cast the three, who often serve as the backbone of the courts left-of-center majority, as activist judges who are out of touch with the states voters. Supporters have insisted that the justices have simply followed the law and that the new effort is an attempt to mold a court less likely to thwart Gov. Rick Scott and the Republican-dominated Legislature. Recently, the Republican Party of Floridas executive board got into the ght, upbraiding the justices for their votes in a 2003 appeal by Joe Nixon, who was convicted in the 1984 murder of Jeanne Bickner in Leon County. In that ruling, the court found that Nixons lawyer erred in essentially conceding his guilt during the trial without getting a statement of approval from Nixon. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned that decision. These three justices voted to set aside the death penalty for a man convicted of tying a woman to a tree with jumper cables and setting her on re, party spokeswoman Kristen McDonald said when the state GOP announced it was backing the effort to remove the justices. But Lewis told reporters after the event that he ruled against one of Nixons earlier appeals in 2000. So I guess I should take it that their attack is actually a compliment, he said. Lewis did concur in the majority opinion in the 2003 appeal, but wrote in a separate concurring opinion that he felt bound by the courts earlier ruling even though he thought the result was legally and logically incorrect. Lewis criticized the RPOF for jumping into the fray. Im disappointed, he said. And I would have been disappointed if the Democratic Party had come out one way or another. I would have been disappointed if the Green Party [had gotten involved]. Im disappointed that we are in an era where partisan politics, theres an attempt to inject that into nonpartisan matters.Justices hit back at critics No Acreage Limitations! Financing for Rural Homes www.FarmCredit-Fl.com Charlotte Dodson NMLS #700260850-656-2920 | Tallahassee, FL Oering loans with: Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 7B YOUR AD HERE Acid Aged April Asia Asked Asks Bite Cane Choice Construction Cost Daisy Decay Descriptions Drink Eats Ends Erases Extend Eyed Food Gets Happen Hens Hint Holster Hotel Idle Illustrated Laid Lamb Leak Lies Link Lion Lips Mark Mixes Noticed Only Parentheses Part Peas Peels This page sponsored in part by: Plan Pretty Rail Related Rest Rock Seem Sees Self Sets Simply Skied Slim Super Taxes Term Text Unity Wash X-ray

PAGE 24

Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEmploymentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements Todays New Ads Need your house or office cleaned? Call Renee at 850-590-6720 for information about my cleaning services, experience and pricing. References available. Good Things to Eat RAKER FARMSBlanched & Frozen Peas. Fresh Cut Okra. Green Peanut. And we process Beef, Hogs & Deer850-926-7561 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements Turn your art into cash! FREE ARTAPPRAISALS FOR POSSIBLE CONSIGNMENT* Oct 13 & 14. Noon to 10pm at Baterbys Art Gallery. 9101 International Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, FL32819. Call (866)537-1013 or visit www.Baterbys.com for more information. *Verbal appraisals & consignments taken based on consideration. Child Care Personnel BABY SITTER NEEDEDIn my home, in Sopchoppy, alternate weekends, some weekdays, 12 year old well behaved boy. Call Nanci (850) 363-1650 Medical Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Professional AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 Trades/ Skills DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 DRIVERS100% Owner Operator Co. Pay increase / Home weekly, Regional & Dedicated Class A-CDL1yr. Exp. In last 3 Call (800)695-9643 or www .driveforwatkins.com DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Freight Up = More $Need CDLClass ADriving Exp (877)258-8782 www.drive4melton.com TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Trades/ Skills Tire Technician /Mechanic NeededB & B Dugger, Inc. is looking for a part or full-time tire mounting technician that has experience with tire changers. tire balancers and mounting truck & small tractor tires. Additional experience in roadside asssistance and working in the field is also prefererred. A Florida driver license with a clear MVR is a position requirement. Pay negotiable. Call the business office at (850) 926-2929 or email to office@band bdugger.com to receive an application General Help AIRLINE CAREERSBecome an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 DRIVERS:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money DownCALL: 888-880-5911 Schools/ Instruction MEDICALBILLINGTRAINING!Train forMedical Billing Careers at SCT rain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placement assistance aftertraining! HS/GED/PC Needed (888)872-4677 Furniture CHERRYBEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used, brand new in factory boxes. Original cost $4500. Sell for $795. Can deliver. Call Tom (407)574-3067 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET. In original plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice $975. Can deliver. Call Bill (813)298-0221 Farm Services BUSH HOGGING ROADS GRADED GARDENS TILLED Have tractor will bush hog finish cut large acerage grade roads driveways till gardens. dbdouge@aol.com or 850-643-6283 Pets Happy Jack LiquivicRecognize safe & effecitive against hook & roundworms by US Center for Ventinary Medicine.PET STOP(850) 926-7949 www.happy jackinc.com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Bath $650 month, $600 dep. Includes gargage and water, shed and deck. No Pets, Firm (850) 926-6212 Leave Message CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 NEAR WOODVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Rural, Mobile Home $650 mo. + sec. Available Immediately (850) 745-8526. Mobile Homes For Sale 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, Chefs Kitchen. Beautiful Master Suite, Built in Wet Bar. Call Today (850) 576-2106 4 BR Mobile Home on 3 Acres Ready to Move IN EZ Payments. Call Me (850) 576-2105 100 Families Needed for Govt Loan Program. Call Today (850) 576-2104 3BR, 2BA-Used Mobile Home. Great Condition Amazing Deal!!! Call Me ASAP (850) 576-2687 Use YOUR Land or Your Trade As your DOWN Payment Call Now (850) 576 2687 Apartments Unfurnished PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall Mary (850) 984-4811Equal Housing Opportunity TDD 1 800 955 2771 Rental Houses PANACEACottage, for Rent 2/1, Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Rennovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, covered front proch & open back deck, Small pets acceptable Excellent fishing! $585/month 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $750/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1937 CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Bedroom / 2 Bath, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 Real Estate For Sale One Acre Lot w/ Well, Septic & Utility Pole off Wakulla Spring Rd HWY61 $19,500 (850) 421-2205 Home/Office Cleaning Need your house or office cleaned? Call Renee at 850-590-6720 for information about my cleaning services, experience and pricing. References available. Siding Cypress Lumber Pecky T&G v Joint Timbers and beams (850) 643-6283 5403-1011 TWN THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE : Monday, October 15, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850-926-0065 October 11, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5401-1018 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 328.17 F.S., NON-JUDICAIL SALE OF VESSEL Notice is hereby given that unless sooner paid or redeemed, Rock Landing Marina, LLC, Inc. intends a public sale of the following vessels by brief description and apparent owners: 1.Vessel: 21 ft. Shamrock Cleveland Engine 351, VIN # SHA 015290483, Reg. # FL5221DN Owner: Estate of James E. Torgerson, II 2.Vessel: 27 ft. 1976 Columbia, VIN # 7043, Reg. # FL3499PA Owner: Scott Synar 3.Vessel: 25 ft. Hunter Marine Outboard, VIN # HUN51432 M79C25, Reg. # FL9947CV Owner Josh Davis Said sale will take place October 27, 2012 beginning at 9:00 a.m. and shall be held at the location of Rock Landing Marina, 99 Rock Landing Road, Panacea, Florida 32346. The mailing address and contact number of said Marina is P.O. Box 653, Panacea, Florida 32346; Telephone # (850) 984-5844 October 11 & 18, 2012 Lien Notices Lien Notices Lien Notices 5400-1018 TWN Vs. Fields, Judith. 2010-CA-037 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-CA-037 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-MLMI, Plaintiff, vs. JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 AND #2, AND ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, et al. Defendant(s). RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 28, 2010 and an Order Rescheduling the Foreclosure Sale dated September 25, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 2010-CA-037 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-MLMI Plaintiff, and JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, is the Defendant. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash in the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32326 at 11:00 AM, on the 29th day of November, 2012, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOTS 6 AND 7, BLOCK 1, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you 5405-1018 TWN Estate of Bullock, Reginald File No. 12000374CPANotice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GADSDEN COUNTY, FLORIDA FILE NO. 12000374CPA IN RE: ESTATE OF REGINALD BULLOCK Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Reginald Bullock, deceased, whose date of death was August 19, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gadsden County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 10 E. Jefferson St. Quincy, FL32351. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 11, 2012. Personal Representative: By:/s/ Nellie Ruth Shaw 1181 Joe Adams Road Quincy, florida 32351 Attorney for Personal Representative: Kimberly L. King, Attorney for Nellie Ruth Shaw Florida Bar Number 0593011 KING & WOOD P.A., 1701 Hermitage Blvd. Suite 104, Tallahassee, FL323308 Telephone: (850)580-7711 Fax: (850)205-4501 October 11 & 18, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices THE WAKULLA AREA TIMES 4Br 2Ba House $1150mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $625mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432we sell and service most makes and models Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 OFFICE SPACE LEASEFORTHE BARRY BUILDING ATTHE LOG CABINCrawfordville 850-508-5471$25000/MO Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Be ds, Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r S yst ems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT

PAGE 25

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 9B will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on September 26, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Attorney for the Plaintiff: Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, Popkin & Rosaler, P.A., 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442. Telephone: (954)360-9030 Facsimile: (954)420-5187. October 11 & 18, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5391-1011 TWN Vs.Davis, Joyce Case No. 2012-112-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-112-CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 2628 Crawfordville Hwy P.O. Box 1240 Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Plaintiff, v. JOYCE L. DAVIS, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOTS 64 AND 65 OF BLOCK 25, OF WAKULLAGARDENS, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the W akulla County Courthouse, 5392-1011 TWN Vs. Thomas, Tanesia Case No. 2010CA-000111 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTYCIVILACTION CASE NO. 2010CA-000111 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, acting through the United States Department of Agriculture, Rural Development, f/k/a Farmers Home Administration, a/k/a Rural Housing Service, Plaintiff, vs. TANESIANICOLE THOMAS, a single woman, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on September 20, 2012 by the above entitled Court in the above styled cause, the undersigned Clerk of Court or any of his duly authorized deputies, will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: Aportion of Lots 4&5, Block 4, of Greiners Addition to Crawfordville and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a concrete monument (marked #2919) marking the Northeast corner of Lot 1, Block 4 of Greiners Addition to Crawfordville, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point also lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Nelson Road, thence run South 72 degrees 15 minutes 37 seconds West along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 169.88 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #6475) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 72 degrees 11 minutes 30 seconds West along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 60.01 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #6475), thence leaving said Southerly right-of-way boundary run South 17 degrees 40 minutes 24 seconds East 99.95 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #6475) thence run North 72 degrees 16 minutes 09 seconds East 60.01 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #6475), thence run North 17 degrees 40 minutes 41 seconds West 100.03 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 0.14 acres, more or less at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash on November 15, 2012, in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, beginning at 11:00 A.M. Central Time, subject to all ad valorem taxes and assessments for the real property described above. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN SIXTY(60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. REQUESTS FOR ACCOMMODA TIONS BY PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, (850)577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED on September 20, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court 3056 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk October 4 & 11, 2012. 5393-1011 TWN vs. King, Beulah Case No. 652012CA000292 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTYCIVILDIVISION Case No.65-2012-CA-000292 Division WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. BEULAH V. KING, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:BEULAH V. KING CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN LASTKNOWN ADDRESS 111 SHAR MELRE LN CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOTS NUMBERED ONE-HUNDRED FIFTY-FOUR AND ONE-HUNDRED FIFTY-FIVE (154 & 155), BLOCK A OF MAGNOLIAGARDENS, AS PER PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA commonly known as 84 TAFFLINGER RD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Michael L. Tebbi of Kass Shuler, P.A., plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813) 229-0900, on or before November 2, 2012, (or 30 days from the first date of publication, whichever is later) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated: September 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Honorable J. H. Thurmond 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301: (850) 577-4401 within 7 working days of your receipt of this notice: if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. October 4 & 11, 2012 5394-1011 TWN Vs. Clardy, Ronald Case No. 65-2010-CA000352 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000352 U.S. BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. RONALD CLARDY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RONALD CLARDY; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on July 18, 2012, and the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on September 19, 2012, in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: LOTS 40 AND 41, BLOCK 1 OF WAKULLAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDEDINN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA a/k/a 115 SIOUX TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at eleven oclock a.m. on October 25, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 19th day of September, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk October 4 & 11, 2012 665101223 5395-1018 TWN vs. Lacher, Walter J., Case No. 652010CA000269 Foreclosure IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA000269 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NASUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. WALTER J. LACHER A/K/AWALTER LACHER et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 19, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000269 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NASUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC. is the Plaintiff and WALTER J. LACHER A/K/AWALTER LACHER; TAMARALACHER; AIS SERVICES, LLC AS SUCCESSOR IN INTERESTTO AMERITECH GOLD; WAKULLA BANK; CAPITALONE BANK (USA), NATIONALASSOCIATION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; STATE OF FLORIDA-DEPARTMENTOF REVENUE; TENANT#1 N/K/AJACQUELYNE MCLENDON are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 1st day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES, 45 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 14 AND ALONG THE NORTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF EMMETT WHALEYROAD 760.70 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE NORTH 88 DEGREES, 45 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SECTION LINE AND ALONG SAID NORTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY300.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREE, 10 MINUTES, 58 SECONDS EAST 145.29 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES, 45, MINUTES, 46 SECONDS EAST 299.64 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREE, 02 MINUTES, 31 SECONDS WEST 145.29 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A188 EMMETT WHALEYROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on September 19, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By:Desireee D. Willis: Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. October 11 & 18, 2012 5396-1018 TWN vs. Kirkland, Stacie Case No.: 65-2010-CA-000425 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000425 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. STACIE RENEE KIRKLAND A/K/ASTACIE R. KIRKLAND; ANTROYLEMORE KIRKLAND A/K/AANTROYL. KIRKLAND; DIANE DELORES ROBERTS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DIANE DELORES ROBERTS; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTS(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWNHEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, 5397-1011 TWN vs. Wheeler, Wanda 65-2010-CA-000344Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000344 CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. WANDAWHEELER A/K/AELWANDA WHEELER RODGERS, et. al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 19, 2012, and entered in 65-2010-CA-000344 of the Circuit Court of the second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC., is the Plaintiff and ELWANDAWHEELER RODGERS A/K/AWANDAWHEELER; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Lobby, Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. on November 1, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 19th day of September, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN EAST 1560.62; THENCE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 58 EAST ALONG THE MAINTAINED RIGHT OF WAYOF FORESTRYROAD #356 640.30TO THE P.O.B. FROM SAID P.O.B. CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYSOUTH 09 DEGREES 5829 EAST 210.00; THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 01 WEST 210.00; THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 58 WEST 210.00; THENCE NORTH 80 DEGREES 01 EAST 210.00TO THE P.O.B. CONTAINING 1.01 ACRES MORE OR LESS. October 4 & 11, 2012 11-07553 UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on JSeptember 19, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on November 1, 2012 at 11:00 A.M. (EST) at the Wakulla County Courthouse, located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FLthe following described property: From the southwest corner of the Northeast Quarter (NE1/4) of Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida; run East 711.12 feet along the south boundary line of said Northeast Quarter to a concrete monument and the Point of Beginning; from said concrete monument, run due North 1,296.43 feet to a point on a traverse line in the approximate center of the Bethel to Wakulla public road; thence run North 87 degrees 05 minutes 20 seconds East along said traverse line 127.22 feet to an angle point; then run South 74 degrees 16 minutes East along said traverse line 98.32 feet; thence run due South 1,276.23 feet to the south boundary line of the Northeast quarter of said Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 1 West; thence run West along the south boundary line of said Northeast Quarter 221.78 feet to the Point of Beginning. Less the southerly part of the Bethel to Wakulla public road, lying and being in the South Half of the Northeast Quarter of Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida. Said land being otherwise described as lot No. 4 of an unrecorded plat of a survey of lands of the Estate of Stacey Roberts, deceased. TOGETHER WITH that certain 2006 Nobility RMS Model 66x 28Manufactured Home, Serial No.s N1-10006Aand N1-10006B Property address: 154 Robert Williams Drive, Crawfordville, FL32327. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERSTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated September 19, 2012 (seal) Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk Wakulla County Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk October 11 & 18, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Thomas. Superintendent Miller, Becky Cook, Ray Gray, Mike Scott and Greg Thomas were in attendance. Jerry Evans was absent. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the agenda as amended.Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve a Letter of Retirement on Martha A. Folsom/effective May 31, 2012.Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the following Letters of Resignation: 1. Jerry Ducksworth/effective Oct. 1, 2012 2. Josh Cerwin/effective Sept. 13, 2012 3. Lisa Dunn/effective Sept. 25, 2012 Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve an Employee Suspension. (See Supplemental File #22) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve Out of Field teachers. (See Supplemental File #22) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the Pre-K Non-Certicated Personnel. (See Supplemental File #22) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. An Executive Session was held to discuss the release of V.A.M. scores and the impact on teacher evaluations and how it will affect our district. Staff in attendance: Superintendent Miller, Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott, Mr. Thomas, Assistant Superintendents ODonnell & Pearce, Randy Beach, CFO and Karen Wells, Executive Director of Human Resources.MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON OCTOBER 1, 2012OCTOBER 11, 2012 Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!55 Allison Dr. Panacea 3BR/2BA Nice Dock and Boardwalk, Furnished or Unfurnished. GREAT FISHING on Dickerson Bay! $950 mo. No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2837 Coastal Hwy. Commercial Building $800 mo. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Commercial building 4,300 square foot heated and cooled building on 1 acre of land Rents out for $1,800.00. Building is in excellent condition. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate52 Evans 3 BR/2BA with Garage. $975. mo, $975. Security. 66 Homan Point 3BR/2BA with 2 Car Garagee. $97. mo., $975. Security. 26B old Courthouse Square 2 BR/2BA Townhouse. Avalable 11/1, $750 mo. $750 Security. 31 Chehaw Panacea, 3BR/2BA DWMH, $650/mo, %650 Security. 22 Coral Way 3BR./2BA with 1 car garage and fenced in yard on 1/2 acre. Pets okay with $250. fee, $950.mo/$950 Deposit. 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available, all utilities included. 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./$900 Deposit 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of ofce space, fenced 82 Mimosa 3BR/1.5BA $650Mo./$650 Deposit 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA Available Sept. 1, $900Mo./$900 Deposit 14 Cutchin Ct. 3BR/2BA $650 mo/$650 Deposit. 140 Duane St: 3BR/2BA $875 mo and $875 Security deposit. No smoking pets ok with owner approval and $250 pet fee. Available Oct. 1.

PAGE 26

Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 3056 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 11:00 AM (EST), on the 25th day of October, 2012. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (seal) Timothy D. Padgett, ESQ.,Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Counsel for Plaintiff October 4 & 11, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5404-1018 TWN vs. Hill, Kathy File No. 2012-CP-84 Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTFOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, File No. 2012-CP-84 IN RE: ESTATE OF KATHYDOWNING HILL Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Kathy Downing Hill., deceased, whose date of death was April 9, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLACounty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. 5405-1018 TWN vs. Scott, Allen File No. 12-91-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, File No. 12-91-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ALLEN JAMES SCOTT, a/k/a ALLEN J. SCOTT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ALLEN JAMES SCOTT, a/k/a ALLEN J. SCOTT deceased, whose date of death was JUNE 23, 2012 and whose Social Security Numberis 102-36-3329 is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 11, 2012. Personal Representative: By: /s/ PATRICIA P. STRICKLAND P.O. Box 125 ,Brooksville, FL 34605-0125 Attorney for Personal Representative: R. SETH MANN, R. SETH MANN, P.A. Florida Bar Number 0990434 38109 Pasco Avenue, Dade City, FL 33525 Telephone (352) 567-5010, Facsimile: (352) 567-1877 October 11, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5376-1018 TWN IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-320-DR Stacey Kimble Jefferson Petitioner, and Benjamin Alexander Jefferson Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: Benjamin Alexander Jefferson l/k/a 75 Northwood Lane, Crawfordville, FL32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on STACEYKIMBLE JEFFERSON whose address is 75 NORTHWOOD LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 on or before October 26, 2012 and file with the orignal with the clerk of the Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.September 27 and October 4, 11, & 18, 2012 5385-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 006 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that NU TAX 1 GPthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2525 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-121-351-11968-A05 THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELLPOINT UNIT 2 BLOCK ALOT 5 OR 752 P576 Name in which assessed JOHN BOCCHINO said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18, 2012 5386-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 007 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that DONALD J SHEMWELLthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1687 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-034-009-08538-000 WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT 2 BLOCK 8 LOT 26 OR 20 P682 OR 634 P327 Name in which assessed KURTD & SAMUELLELLIOTTJR AS JTRS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11, & 18, 2012 5387-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 008 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that DONALD J SHEMWELLthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1414 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-024-000-06581-001 P-8-1-M-6 COMM AT THE NW COR OF THE E1/2 OF THE NW 1/4 OF LOT 24 RUN S 17%E 660 FT TO THE P.O.B OR 163 P719 Name in which assessed ERVIN ADONALDSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18, 2012 5388-1018TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 009 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that GENE OPHEIM the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1613 Year of Issuance 2005 5389-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 010 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1096 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 08-6S-01W-283-04862-E01 MARINAVILLAGE OF PANACEAUNIT 2 BLK E LOT 1 & BOAT SLIPF OR 372 P888 OR 496 P637 Name in which assessed H. CLAYHARRIS & LINDAW HARRIS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18,2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-085-121-11580-012 CASORAESTATES UI TRACT 12 OR 253 P619 OR 253 P624 Name in which assessed RONALD D & TINARENEE THOMAS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 11, 2012. Personal Representative: Jessie A. Hill, Jr. 2671 Crawfordville Hwy., Box 6 Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: Deirdre A. Farrington, Attorney for Jessie a. Hill., Jr. Florida Bar Number: 488690, PO Box 392, Crawfordville, FL32326Telephone: (850)926-2700, Fax: (850)926-2741 E-Mail: deirdre@farrington-law.com The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 27 32 40 43 51 56 63 67 70 2 28 52 3 24 53 4 33 46 64 21 29 47 57 5 15 18 41 44 6 30 34 58 65 68 71 7 35 59 8 31 48 60 22 25 49 54 9 16 19 42 45 10 26 36 55 66 69 72 11 23 37 50 12 38 61 13 39 62 ACROSS 1. Easy marks 5. Diamond defect 9. Dwelt 14. It may thicken 15. Cohort of Kent and Olsen 16. Ring great Griffith 17. "__ boy!" 18. See 24-Across 19. Big name in bridge 20. Venus at sunrise, sometimes 23. Singer DiFranco 24. When paired with 18-Across, miscellany 25. Utter chaos 27. Thick __ brick 29. Beirut is its cap. 31. Crystal ball consultant 32. Tend to the turkey 34. "Just for the heck __ ..." 36. Leather piercers 40. Tea, e.g. 43. Top-shelf 44. Pound or Cornell 45. "Nancy" rich kid 46. Go ballistic 48. Lyrical Gersh win 50. Brylcreem amount 51. Lead from the dugout 54. Pull at the earth's surface, briefly 56. Corrida shout 57. Formal attire 63. "Zelig" director 65. Brie covering 66. Al, "inventor" of the Internet 67. Apartment sign 68. "The Raven" opener 69. Jacob's twin 70. Eyelid problems 71. Bewhiskered barker 72. HUD, for one: Abbr.DOWN1. Cyber-trash 2. Choir voice 3. Sauerbraten, et al. 4. Mike holder 5. Defat, whaler-style 6. Singer k.d. 7. Added stipulations 8. Shrine Game side 9. Ogrish Simon 10. "Editorially spea king," in chatroom shorthand 11. Like the flu 12. Actress Verdugo 13. Strauss material 21. Do-nothing 22. Assists, criminally 26. Harsh Athenian lawgiver 27. Quatrain scheme 28. Ahead of the tag 30. Flask filler 31. Commandments mount 33. Half of octa35. On behalf of 37. Part of a Vformation, perhaps 38. In __ land (spacy) 39. Grubby guy 41. Israeli desert region 42. Arboreal ape 47. Scully and Smart 49. Short poem on two rhymes 51. Zoo barriers 52. Dole out 53. Literature Nobelist Sachs 55. Urged, with "on" 58. Lustful god 59. Mudville co mplement 60. Andean of old 61. End of a shooting 62. Not masc. or fem. 64. Shoebox lettersAmerican Prole Hometown Content 10/7/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 12 345 6 372 584 8 97 42 735 2 61 948 651349 00 9 HometownContent 128 3495 6 7 439765821 657821493 583 492176 914657238 276138954 742 986315 391574682 865213749 S P A M A B A B M O A T S A L T O S A F E A L L O T P O T R O A S T S N E L L Y S T A N D T E T R A E E E I D L E R A G E N T S F L E N S E N E G E V L A N G B O O Z E E R O S A N D S F O R N I N E W E S T S I N A I I N C A A B E T S R O N D E L L E G R E E O R A N G I M O D R A C O E G G E D V I R A L W I L D G O O S E E L E N A L A L A W R A P D E N I M S L O B N E U T

PAGE 27

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 11B 1. ART: Where is the world-famous Prado museum located? 2. ANATOMY: Where are muscles known as triceps found in the body? 3. ADVERTISEMENTS: What breakfast cereal did Sonny the Cuckoo Bird promote? 4. NATURAL WORLD: Where would stalagmites be found in a natural cave formation? 5. GEOGRAPHY: Where was the ancient city of Persepolis located? 6. SCIENCE: What was the first elementary particle to be discovered? 7. MUSIC: What is the national anthem of Canada? 8. COMPUTERS: What does the acronym DOS stand for? 9. FAMOUS QUOTES: Who once said, I worked my way up from nothing to a state of extreme poverty. 10. LANGUAGE: What is an atelier? 2012 King Feaures Synd., Inc. Answers 1. John Travolta 2. Philippines 3. 1890 4. Taxi 5. Thomas Merton 6. Hungarian 7. Minnesota 8. Oliver! 9. The lek 10. John F. Kennedy YOUR AD HERE

PAGE 28

Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy DAVID WHITE On Saturday morning, a friend called to seek my advice on that evenings dinner. My boyfriend and I are making poached salmon with truf es and shrimp in a cream sauce, she said. What type of wine should we drink? I could see her conundrum. Salmon and shrimp suggest a dry, refreshing white. But a cream sauce could bludgeon a delicate wine. And anything red even something soft and light, like a Pinot Noir probably wouldnt complement the dish. Thats why the answer was simple. Just go with Champagne, I answered. Itll work perfectly. Later that evening, my friend con rmed that the wine was an ideal match. Plus, she said, It was fun to drink Champagne with dinner, just like real wine. Year after year, Frances big Champagne houses spend millions trying to convince us that Champagne is best enjoyed when celebrating. That might be true after all, wine shops see a huge spike in sales around New Years and Valentines Day, and it is fun to drink Champagne on a special occasion. But Champagne and other sparkling wines deserve a spot at the dinner table all year long. Most sparklers are characterized by vibrant acidity and freshness, which help them cut through spicy meals, complement savory food, and elevate even the simplest of dishes. Real Champagne is quite pricey, obviously. Under European Union trade laws, wine can only be sold as Champagne if it comes from the Champagne region of France and is made in accordance with a number of regulations. Most notably, Champagne must be made in the traditional method an expensive, multi-step process and produced, generally, from Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier. Consequently, even budget options cost about $40 per bottle. Fortunately, there are plenty of affordable sparkling wines from regions outside Champagne. Within France, sparkling wines labeled as Cremant are produced using the traditional method and winemakers must follow a number of strict rules. Sparkling wines from Burgundy called Cremant de Bourgogne have long offered exceptional value. Because the region grows the same grape varieties as Champagne, top examples can often pass for the real thing. And theyre typically just a fraction of the cost many can be found for less than $20. In the United States, wines labeled as Methode Champenoise are also produced in the traditional method using the same grape varieties as Champagne. For about $25, its hard to beat the entry level bottlings from Domaine Carneros, Roederer Estate, and Argyle. For less than $15, Cava a sparkling wine from Spain thats produced like Champagne but using native Spanish grapes is the best option. Of course, nothing beats the real thing. And fortunately for American consumers, theres never been a better time to explore Champagne. For years, the American market has been dominated by large producers like Moet & Chandon, Piper Heidsieck, and Veuve Clicquot. These companies purchase their grapes from growers across Champagne and blend their wines to deliver a consistent, high quality product year after year. In recent years, however, wine enthusiasts have gone gaga over Grower Champagne, or wines made by the farmers who grow the grapes. Just as we understand why an apple grown in Virginia tastes different from an apple grown in Massachusetts, we understand why a Chardonnay produced in Sonoma tastes different from a Chardonnay produced in Napa. Champagne is no different. And Grower Champagne conveys a sense of place something that large producers simply cant offer. Today, Grower Champagne accounts for only about 4 percent of Americas Champagne market. But that percentage has been rising quickly, thanks to a few key wine importers and Americas growing obsession with knowing the source of our food. Indeed, wine enthusiasts call grower Champagne farmers zz. Grower Champagnes are still quite expensive. Basic offerings from some of my favorites ChartogneTaillet, Egly-Ouriet, Pierre Peters, and Vilmart still cost upwards of $50. So next time you feel like splurging, pick up a bottle of Grower Champagne. And next time you sit down for dinner especially if youve prepared something with a cream sauce go for something that sparkles. David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet. -Janet Bubbles for any occasion WHITES WINES Expert physicians.Quality medical care.Ofce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comFamily Practice Accepting new patients X-Ray Services Pediatric patients 2 yrs. & older Offering specialty care: Capital Regional Cardiology Associates 850-877-0216 Capital Regional Medical Group Podiatry Services 850-878-8235 Capital Regional Surgical Associates 850-219-2306 Robert Frable, DO Aida Torres, ARNPCRAWFORDVILLE



PAGE 1

Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 39th Issue Thursday, October 11, 2012 T h r e e S e c t i o n s Three Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Green Scene .................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 6B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B INDEX OBITUARIES John D. McCabe Kathryn Nell Revell Dr. Jolly Herschel Rogers Michael Wayne Shepard Lila Frances Strickland Loey Dillard TumblesonCommission candidates attend bi-partisan forum PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENAll eight candidates for the three seats on the county commission speak at Monday nights forum jointly held by the local Democ ratic and Republican parties. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe first-ever joint forum held by the Wakulla Democratic and Republican executive committees took place on Monday, Oct. 8 at the Wakulla County Community Center and was for the three county commission races. The forum was proposed by Democratic chair Rachel Pienta and Republican chair Jonathan Kilpatrick after they felt the previous forums that were held by other groups had not been fair to their candidates. They encouraged their candidates not to attend forums held by those groups and decided to hold their own forums instead. About 40 people turned out for the bi-partisan forum and all eight county commissioner candidates were in attendance to answer submitted questions from the community ranging from how to address growth to views on the countys wetlands ordinance, thoughts about the RESTORE Act and opinion of the solid waste assessment. Candidates were given only a minute to formulate a response to each question. Those running for district 1 seat are incumbent Alan Brock, Jenny Brock and Ralph Thomas. When asked what each candidates vision for growth was, Alan Brock said growth has slowed and the commission needs to continue to focus on implementing the Crawfordville Town Plan, pass the one-cent sales tax again to pay for infrastructure improvements and use funds from the RESTORE Act to fund needed infrastructure improvements, as well as continue to support Tallahassee Community Colleges Environmental Institute. Jenny Brock said she would like to see funds from the RESTORE Act used for wastewater upgrades along the coast, as well as the county improving its roads and ease the situation on U.S. Highway 319. She added that she would like to increase the outdoor recreation industry and help small businesses grow and prosper. Thomas said the county needs to find a balance between preserving the natural resources and having responsible growth. The county also needs to focus on needs instead of wants and prioritize the infrastructure problems that the county has, such as overtaxed sewer system, unpaved roads, county facility issues, etc. The same question was also asked to candidates in districts 3 and 5. The candidates running in district 3 are incumbent Mike Stewart and Howard Kessler. Kessler said continuing to tax citizens, such as the new 7-percent Public Services Tax, defeats the purpose of wanting people and businesses to come to the county. He added that with the possibility of more environmental jobs coming to the county, the commission needs to create an atmosphere to allow that to happen. Stewart said the county needs a commission that agrees growth needs to happen and it also needs to help businesses move here and expand, such as the referendum on the November ballot that would allow the commission to give tax exemptions to new and existing businesses. Candidates running in district 5 are John Shuff, Emily Smith and Richard Harden. Current Commissioner Lynn Artz chose not to seek re-election.Continued on Page 3ABarbara Rosen turns nature's discards' into artBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netBarbara Rosen has been crafting and creating things with her hands since she was a little girl, but her current hobby has only been a love of hers for the last eight years and something she stumbled upon at a yard sale. One day on her way back home to Alligator Point with her husband, David, they passed a yard sale while coming through Crawfordville. He asked her if she would like to stop and check it out. He has never stopped for a garage sale, ever,Ž Rosen says of her husband. But this day, he gave in to his wifes love of yard sales and she happened upon a book from the 1920s that had ideas about what to do with pine needles. I hated these pine needles,Ž Rosen says. Im surrounded by pine needles.Ž Rosen and her husband moved to Alligator Point in 1998. A little ways down the road, she decided to get the book out. It had general directions about how to make pine needle baskets, so Rosen decided to try and “ gure it out. Eventually, in 7 or 8 hours, she had created a small basket. To me, it was just fabulous,Ž she says. Ive always been a crafter,Ž Rosen says. She has done embroidery, knitting, crocheting, sewing, macrame, etc. You name it, I did it.Ž After making her first pine needle basket, she got into her golf cart and went to show her project to the neighbors. One of her neighbors told Rosen that she needed to “ nd long pine needles. One day, that neighbor showed up at Rosens house with those long pine needles. She had found them. Her arms were full of pine needles,Ž Rosen says. The long pine needles come from very old pine trees and can be found along the coast in this area and St. Theresa, she says. Continued on Page 15A Pine straw basketsPHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netOctober is Disability Awareness Month and to recognize this, the school districts exceptional student education office hosted a picnic in the park that focused on ability. This is the second year for the event and it has already doubled in amount of students, teachers, staff and residents who participated, said Tanya English, ESE director. Continued on Page 2AFocus on Ability celebrates with picnic at park A member of Spirit Paws. Dying oyster beds crippling a once thriving industry See Page 10A

PAGE 2

Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County is in line to receive a signi“ cant amount of money from the RESTORE Act, which holds those parties responsible for the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill accountable and ensures that 80 percent of the fines received be invested back into the Gulf region. However, there have been recent reports about a negotiation between BP and the Department of Justice about a possible settlement that may direct some “ nes elsewhere. Gulf County Commissioner Bill Williams spoke to the Wakulla County Commission at its Oct. 1 meeting and told them there is a possibility that a portion of the “ nes could be paid under the Natural Resources Damages Act, instead of the Clean Water Act. This is a bad thing,Ž Williams said. Williams is helping counties within Florida set up the framework for the RESTORE Act. If this happens, federal agencies would have more control of the money, instead of it being sent directly to the states and counties affected. Rep. Steve Southerland, along with several other lawmakers sent a letter to the U.S. attorney general urging him to adhere to the RESTORE Act in collecting “ nes from BP. To withhold justice from the people who live along the Gulf Coast and endured the economic nightmare of this disaster would be a blatant violation of the role of government,Ž Rep. Southerland said. I believe that “ ne monies should be processed through the Clean Water Act as was approved by Congress and signed into law by the President.Ž Under the RESTORE Act, 80 percent of “ nes received would go to those areas affected by the oil spill and 35 percent of that would ” ow directly to the “ ve states, Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. In Florida, 75 percent of those funds would go to the most impacted counties, Wakulla included. If the settlement is for $15 billion dollars, Wakulla will receive over $25 million dollars from the local fund, and be competitive in two other funds for millions more,Ž said County Commissioner Alan Brock. The Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council will receive 30 percent and 30 percent will be disbursed among the “ ve states based on miles of oiled shoreline, distance from disaster and population. The remaining 5 percent will be dedicated to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration and Science, Observation, Monitoring and Technology Program administered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and centers of excellence. These pots will be competitive and the county be competing against all the states. Although there have been reports that there is some stalling on BPs end towards a settlement, the county is still moving forward with making preparation for those funds. The county commission approved an interlocal agreement relating to the establishment of the Gulf Consortium and approved County Administrator David Edwards to serve as the countys representative. This consortium will administer the funds that are disbursed to the “ ve states based on several factors which do not go directly to the counties. This allows us to be an air traffic controller,Ž Edwards said. It allows us to participate.Ž Williams said there will be a lot of multi-county projects that are funded through this pot of money. Its imperative that the counties stick together,Ž he said. The county commission also voted to schedule a public hearing to establish a Restore Act Advisory Committee that will help the county prioritize projects to be funded through the portion allocated directly to the county. The proposed members include a county commissioner; someone selected by the cities of St. Marks and Sopchoppy, Panacea Waterfronts, Chamber, Economic Development Council, Tourist Development Council, School Board and TCC Wakulla Campus; someone representing Shell Point, Oyster Bay and Spring Creek communities; someone representing the “ shing industry; someone in the natural resources industry; and a citizen at-large. The county commission is accepting applications for the representatives of the communities, “ shing and natural resources industries and citizen at-large. The county commission will then select those committee members. Those interested should complete and submit an application to the county administration office no later than Oct. 26. Brock said, The RESTORE Act can serve as the catalyst to truly restore our regions economy and environment. Wakulla County, and the whole panhandle, will move forward with economic development and infrastructure improvements that will make our communities some of the best in the nation.ŽCOUNTY COMMISSIONCounty could receive millions from RESTORE Act the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Gene MosserAugust 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromI am happy to win the certi“cate and will take advantage of it & enjoy all of the meals!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l l a nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! 000CV38 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta Continued from Page 1A The day was all about celebrating the students who are a part of the ESE program, as well as teachers and staff. Everybodys got an ability,Ž said Superintendent David Miller. Its all about celebrating them.Ž Local businesses who employ students and people with disabilities were also recognized at the event. The students in attendance were also entertained by students of Michelle Snows music therapy class, the Medart Dancers and Wakulla Middle School Bell Dance team, as well as the Riversprings Middle School cheer team and their spirit paws squad, which are students who are in the ESE class at Riversprings. The Pyramid Players from Tallahassee were also there to sing and perform several dances. They are a group of singers, actors and dancers with developmental disabilities. There were also several agencies on hand to provide information to students and parents, including Florida Diagnostic & Learning Resources System who had a booth set up with games for the students to play. There were also representatives from Project 10 Transition Education Network, Refuge House, Special Olympics and others.Focus on Ability celebrates with picnic at park At left, a student plays a tossing game at the Focus on Ability picnic at Hudson Park on Friday, Oct. 5.PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSEN

PAGE 3

Continued from Page 1A Smith said the county needs to build up its ecotourism industry, and also take advantage of the universities that surround the county. But in order to do that, the county must have jobs to support the graduates. She added that the commission needs to continue to support the Crawfordville Town Plan and have more sensible, attractive and unique growth. Shuff said the commission needs to support the TCC Environmental Institute, put more emphasis on the fishing community, “ x the problem of U.S. Highway 319, support the Crawfordville Town Plan and focus on fixing the infrastructure problems in Wakulla Gardens. Harden said the county needs to continue to support its major industries, such as the school district, government, St. Marks Powder and the prison, as well as back the “ shermen 100 percent. The county also needs to focus on the county as a whole, not just on infrastructure improvements to Crawfordville. Another question also focused on views of the countys wetlands ordinance. DISTRICT 1 Jenny Brock said people need to understand how wetlands function so they realize how important it is to protect them. She said she was OK with granting a variance to accommodate those people who need to use the land for a home on case by case basis. Thomas felt the commission needs to protect the wetlands, while also protecting property rights. He added that he wanted to keep the provisions that allow for a variance to build within the the 40-foot buffer zone. Alan Brock said the variance proposal allows for people to access their property rights and he felt the wetlands ordinance protects property rights and wetlands. He added that he has learned that the variance process was extremely complicated and proposed the idea of allowing the county planning director to approve variances within the 40-foot buffer zone for lots that were platted before 1995. DISTRICT 3 Kessler said continuing to destroy the countys wetlands is destroying the biggest asset it has. The county needs to protect its jewel and the reason people come to visit and stay in Wakulla County, he said. Stewart pointed out that he was the swing vote on the wetlands ordinance and voted to keep it as stringent as it is currently. He added that he would continue to support protecting the wetlands. DISTRICT 5 Smith felt the wetlands ordinance should be left alone. Wetlands do so much for our county,Ž she said. She added that the allowance for variances is OK, as long as it is reasonable. Shuff felt like the wetlands ordinance infringed on some property rights. The state has toughened up its regulations and maybe the county needs to look at its ordinance again, and meet somewhere in the middle, he said. Im not saying go back to the state, but to look at it.Ž Harden said it is important to protect wetlands, but doesnt agree with people not being able to build on their own property because of wetlands. They still have to pay property tax on the land they cant use.Ž He added that the county needs to revisit the ordinance. The candidates were also asked where the funds from the Restore Act should be used. The Restore Act ensures that “ nes owed by BP and the other parties responsible for the Gulf oil spill will be invested into the Gulf region. DISTRICT 1 Jenny Brock, who is on the National Wildlife Federation Board of Directors and lobbied its passage in Washington, D.C., said the county should look at doing infrastructure that is allowable under the act, such as sewer along the coast, as well as real restoration for the Gulf Coast. Thomas said the county is forming a citizen advisory committee to help “ gure out what the countys needs are, which he felt was important. He also felt the county needed to use the funds to help the countys overtaxed sewer system and also provide better access to its waterways. Alan Brock, who represented the county and also lobbied for it, said the idea is to restore the environment, as well as the economy. Some ideas include improving the wastewater system, other economic investments and partnering with TCCs Environmental Institute. Its such an amazing opportunity,Ž he said. DISTRICT 3 Kessler said the county needs to protect the environment, water and estuaries. He added that there needs to be accountability when spending those funds. To really make it count, so all can bene“ t,Ž Kessler said. Stewart agreed that the money needed to be spent wisely. The No. 1 priority is sewer. That goes back to the environment,Ž he said. DISTRICT 5 Shuff wanted to see the money used to help the oyster industry, improve the sewer system and help Wakulla Gardens. Harden said the money can be a real game changer for the county and can be used on environmental and economic restoration, as well as infrastructure needs. Smith felt the money should be spent on sewer, other infrastructure problems, beautification projects and helping Wakulla Gardens. She added that she didnt want to see the county do the bare minimum on projects. Not just patch up,Ž Smith said. She added that she wanted to see the county come up with innovative ideas. A hot topic question for many residents that was asked focused on the candidates views of the countys decision to contract with Waste Pro for garbage collection and charge a $196 assessment to all property owners. DISTRICT 1 Jenny Brock said many people are upset about having no choice but to pay the assessment. She added that there is nothing to help those homeowners that inherited a home that they do not live in but are still required to pay the assessment. She also felt the 10-year contract was too much. We have to live with that,Ž she said. Thomas said he didnt agree with it from the beginning because it is a government imposed monopoly. But since the county does have it, it needs to make sure it is done properly. And make sure its run ef“ ciently,Ž he added. Alan Brock, who led the initiative for curbside pickup, said he was proud of taking the lead on this issue. The county was losing $500,000 a year, he said, and needed to do something. The commission looked at charging $112 to every resident, which did not include curbside pickup. If we have to charge people money, we should try and provide a service,Ž he said. He added that he felt it was a great program. DISTRICT 3 Kessler felt the decision to impose solid waste assessment was rushed and done at the 11th hour. He added that people are having to pay far too many taxes. We need to re-prioritize,Ž he said. Stewart felt the commission did the right thing, because citizens were going to be charged a fee regardless, but now they get a service. This only makes good common sense,Ž he said. DISTRICT 5 Smith said she was uncomfortable that the small businesses were put out of business and that the garbage pickup is mandatory. She also wondered how the county got to that point to begin with and said there was a lack of vision and planning in dealing with the countys solid waste problem. She added that the county needs to reevaluate the contract with Waste Pro at the end of the 10 years. Shuff felt the program was a good one. Everyone contributes to the countys waste,Ž he said. He added that the contract had to be long term for Waste Pro to agree to take on the countys solid waste. However, he would have liked to see a sliding fee scale for disadvantaged citizens who have to pay the solid waste assessment. Richard Harden said, People lost their choice,Ž which is the thing that upsets the people he has spoken with the most. He would have tried to find a way to allow the private companies to stay in business and also allow people to have access to the land“ ll. The next forum hosted by the Democratic and Republic executive committees will be held on Oct. 22 for the superintendent of schools candidates and those running for state house district 7. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Subscribe to The Wakulla News 877401-6408 Commission candidates attend bi-partisan forum The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 5, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider:A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 9260919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 11, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 5, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider:A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.OCTOBER 11, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & Exterior Together We Are Providing Employment for Local Craftsman FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Office detectives investigated a Panacea shooting incident that occurred at 1:27 a.m. Friday, Oct. 5 at 151 Otter Lake Road, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. During the incident inside a bedroom, a .25 caliber handgun discharged and struck Michael Todd Henley, 48, of Panacea in the head. Henley was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital where he died on Saturday, Oct. 6. Detectives determined that David Gordon Griggs, 51, of Panacea, who occupied the 151 Otter Lake Road home with Henley, was a convicted felon who was in possession of a “ rearm. Griggs was charged with possession of a firearm by a convicted felon and transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. The “ rearm recovered at the scene was reported stolen from Tallahassee in 1989 by the Tallahassee Police Department. In addition, four other “ rearms were recovered in the Griggs home. The case investigation is continuing and additional charges are possible. Griggs posted a $10,000 bond on Oct. 5 and was released from the county jail.Man killed in Panacea shooting David Gordon Griggs WILLIAM SNOWDENThe United Way kicked off its campaign with a party at La Parrillada on Sept. 27. Some of those at the party included Sarah Barnett Deeb, United Way vice president for resource development, Courtney Peacock of Capital City Bank, who is this years Wakulla chairperson, Rene Millender of Capital City Bank, and Megan Picht, a campaign associate for United Way. Last year, the United Way distributed more than $130,000 to local Wakulla agencies.Drive time

PAGE 4

Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Candidate responds to allegations about past • FBI agent endorses Maurice Langston • Only Creel attends sheriff’s forum • Coast Guard Auxiliary for Oct. 11, 2012 • Sheriff’s Report for Sept. 27, 2012 • Football: Wakulla dominates Jefferson • Should city commissioners in Sopchoppy get a salary? • Wakulla Springs Lodge celebrates 75 years thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.COMMUNITY DEBATE By JONATHAN KILPATRICKMedicare is a promise made to Americas seniors and that promise must be kept. For current seniors and soon-to-be-seniors it is vital that the current Medicare program be maintained. However, the Medicare trust fund is slipping into insolvency and must be corrected for future generations. Doing nothing about Medicares “ nancial position is not a viable option. Allowing future seniors to have a choice and a say in their own health insurance decision would be a solution that bene“ ts both seniors and the taxpayer. Americans lead lifestyles that are varied and a one size “ ts allŽ program often does not “ t the needs of each American. Premium supports would allow future seniors the choice of selecting the program that is best for their individual situation. Future seniors could pick a traditional Medicare plan or through a premium support plan use the average annual amount spent per Medicare recipient to purchase private insurance. This idea is nothing new or radical and ironically was recommended by Sen. John Breaux in 1999 when he was the chairman of Bill Clintons Medicare Reform Commission. By utilizing the premium supports, each senior would be able to make an informed decision as to which plan would be best. This approach would add competition to the pricing structure and allow the private market to develop innovative improvements to lower cost and keep the coverage we now enjoy. The current Medicare prescription drug plan is modeled on a premium support structure. Seniors have signed up for the program in greater numbers than expected and yet due to competition and innovation, the Congressional Budget Of“ ce now says the programs 10-year cost will be 43 percent lower than estimated in 2004. The current administrations policy to cut $716 billion from Medicare at a time when the Social Security and Medicare Trust Fund Boards say that the hospital trust fund will be insolvent by 2024 is an approach that will lead to disaster. The Obama administration would use that $716 billion to shore up his Obamacare scheme. Taking funds that were promised to seniors and funded by seniors to finance a governmental takeover of our healthcare system will expand governments reach into the lives of all Americans at the expense of our nations current seniors who have paid into the Medicare system for their entire working lives. Individual choice and personal freedom is always a good approach. Medicare is no different. By allowing seniors the choice of selecting the current Medicare plan or using the funds to purchase private insurance should be a decision left to each individual and not dictated to all Americans by a bureaucrat in Washington.Jonathan Kilpatrick is the chair of the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee.By RACHEL PIENTA The 2012 election cycle has been dominated by rumors and scare tactics that suggest senior citizens will lose their Medicare bene“ ts if President Obama wins a second term. A review of the facts shows that the exact opposite is true. Mitt Romneys plan would bankrupt Medicare by 2016, turn the program into a voucher system, and would increase costs for seniors by more than $6,000 a year. The Republican Party and the Romney Campaign cite a real “ gure … $500 billion … that is part of the health reform debate. The GOP distorts and spins the “ gure as $500 billion in Medicare cuts, rather than as decreases in the rate of growth of future spending. And the GOP further piles on the incorrect talking point about government-run health care. On the Truth-Meter, the claim rates as False.Ž [Cleveland Plain Dealer, Politifact, www.politifact.com/ ohio/statements/2011/ jun/23/national-republican-senatorial-committee/ nrsc-claims-sen-sherrodbrown-voted-cut-500-billion … 06/09/11] New York Magazine writer Jonathan Chait commented on a speech made by President Obama during a campaign swing through Florida, noting that President Obama talks Medicare in Florida and argues that Mitt Romney will end Medicare as we know it. The claim is undeniably trueŽ [Jonathan Chait, New York Magazine, http://nymag.com/daily/ intel/2012/07/obama-romney-ends-medicare-as-weknow-it.html … 7/19/12]. Both Reuters and Bloomberg reported that Ryans Budget Bill Also Would End Traditional Medicare By Capping Spending And Offer Vouchers To Buy Private Insurance.Ž [Bloomberg, http://go.bloomberg.com/ political-capital/2012-08-13/ medicare-truth-behind-thecuts … 8/13/12; Reuters, http://www.reuters.com/ article/2012/08/12/ususa-campaign-idUSBRE87B0J820120812 … 8/12/12]. The proposed plan would shift more costs to seniors and increase out of pocket costs by more than $6,000 each year. As early as 2011, the Romney Campaign released Medicare plan details that outlined the voucher concept, Medicare Is Reformed As A Premium Support System, Meaning That Existing Spending Is Repackaged As A Fixed-Amount Bene“ t To Each Senior That He Or She Can Use To Purchase An Insurance Plan.Ž [Romney Press Release, Spending Plan … Cut The Spending,Ž http://mittromney.com/ blogs/mitts-view/2011/11/ romney-presents-plan-turnaround-federal-government … 11/4/11] Seniors cannot afford the Romney-Ryan Medicare plan. Rachel Pienta is chair of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee.The issue: Medicare is week e Wakulla News asked the local Democrat ic and Republican party chairs to respond to the question of what should be done with Medicare. Leading up to the Nov. 6 election, e News will submit a question each week for the local parties to answer. Do you have a question youd like asked, or did the question prompt a response from you? Send it to editor@thewakullanews.net.DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: REPUBLICAN RESPONSE: By DAVID EDWARDS Happy fall, yall. We have started the 201213 Fiscal Year and hit the ground running. A high priority for us is the RESTORE Act. On Oct. 1, the Board entered into an Interlocal Agreement for the formation of the Gulf Consortium. The purpose of the consortium is to ensure that funds within the competitive pots of money are evenly allocated between the 23 impacted Gulf Coast counties. Wakulla County will be receiving a allocation of funds that will come directly to us. Also, we are seeking members to serve on the RESTORE Act Advisory Committee. A major responsibility will be to serve as a clearinghouse for the acceptance and tracking of all projects from Wakullas public, private and nonpro“ t organizations as well as our citizens. In its advisory role, the committee will review all projects received in accordance with criteria established by the RESTORE Act; and provide progress reports and recommendations to the Board on all projects received. If you are a resident of Shell Point, Oyster Bay or Spring Creek communities; a citizen from the “ shing industry; a citizen from the natural resources industry; or a Wakulla County citizen who has “ nancial, accounting, and/or budgeting experience, I encourage you to visit our website (www. mywakulla.com) to obtain more information and an application. Get out and vote. On the Nov. 6 General Election ballot you will see a referendum to vote for or against an economic development property tax exemption for new businesses and expansions of existing businesses. The purpose of this property tax exemption program is to encourage the establishment of new businesses in Wakulla and for our existing businesses to expand and create new jobs in the county. Once established, the program authorizes the county to grant qualifying businesses an ad valorem tax exemption on real property improvements and tangible personal property of up to 100 percent for up to 10 years. This program is subject to the approval of a majority vote at the Nov. 6 General Election. To better educate yourself of the program, visit our website (www. mywakulla.com). One-cent sales tax … continuing to be put to use on capital infrastructure projects. We are in the process of planning for major improvements at Hudson and Azalea Park. Community involvement will play a big role in this project. Please stay tuned as we will be seeking your input in the near future. If I can be of any assistance to you, please contact me. I think everyone knows that I have an open door policy, feel free to come see me, call me (926-0919 ext. 402), or send me an email at dedwards@mywakulla. com. David Edwards is Wakulla County administrator.Editor, The News: Bravo Wakulla! This town is so imbued with quiet angels that it astounds me. I wish the rest of the world had the opportunity to learn from the people and businesses in our community; this world would be a more genteel place. I would like to draw attention to our local Wal-Mart store. I am a teacher at the high school, and for years Wal-Mart has been extremely helpful towards teachers when it comes to supplies, free tools of the trade,Ž giving us yearly grab bags and gift certi“ cates. I love seeing former students working in all departments, supporting themselves while attending TCC or Lively. Bravo for helping them with their work vs. school schedules! Recently one of our students was having trouble seeing in class … she needed eyeglasses. Although she was having dif“ culties at home, she was able to make it down to Wal-Marts Optical Department. Once learning about the childs eye problems, David set up an appointment with the optometrist. Immediately Dr. Gardner offered to examine her without charge and Mr. F. Picard of the optical department offered to supply her with a pair of glasses for free. These people are truly quiet angels who aid in making our community an outstanding one. They did not have to step forward and help a child, but they did. She now has her new glasses and is “ nally able to see her work. She also looks good in them. Thank you Wal-Mart Optical. BRAVO! F. Druda Crawfordville Editor, The News: The “ rst two weeks of October are designated by Florida Statute for Disability History and Awareness Instruction. A part of this includes an understanding of the history of legislation providing access for persons with disabilities. Many remember the implementation of the Education for of All Handicapped Children Act in the early 1970s, which was the precursor to current IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) which entitles all students to Free and Appropriate Public Education. Also enacted during the same time period was the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) which requires equal access for persons with disabilities. Prior to this legislation, many children as well as adults with disabilities were institutionalized or kept at home. Today, in all Wakulla County Schools we serve students with a wide range of exceptionalities such as autism, emotional/behavior disorders, speci“ c learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities developmental delays, traumatic brain injuries and physical impairments. These children participate in educational, social and community activities along with their non-disabled peers, receiving accommodations as necessary. Students earning a Special Diploma are encouraged to remain in school until the semester in which they turn 22, to pursue a regular diploma and work on career skills. On Oct. 5, the Wakulla County School Board Exceptional Student Education Of“ ce hosted the second annual Focus on Ability Picnic in the Park at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. The purpose was to celebrate Disability Awareness Month, and focus on the abilities of our students. During the event, achievements of many students were spotlighted with a PowerPoint presentation of work experiences in the community and entertainment of song and dance and cheers. Many thanks to the people who worked together to make this event a success. Vicki Strickland and Kathy Duncan coordinated the set up and serving with their students, in addition to creating a PowerPoint highlighting work experiences with Florida Wild Mammal Association, CHAT, Goodwill Industries and school lunchrooms. Brian English and Bill Versiga provided hot dogs and manned the grill; FDLRS (Florida Diagnostic Learning Resource Systems), Project 10 Transition and The Refuge House provided information stations; Michelle Snow, Linda Leckinger and Regina Strickland worked with their students to provide entertainment; Catherine Harris and the Riversprings Middle School cheerleaders introduced a new addition to their team, the Spirit Paws, who entertained with cheers and a dance routine. Special Olympic sponsor Patricia Bodiford provided a T-shirt giveaway; and Tallahassee Pyramid Players claimed the stage with song and dance routines to wrap up the day. I also appreciate the parental and community support of our students. Your presence and participation made it a great day! Tanya English Executive Director of Exceptional Student Education/Student Services Wakulla County Schools FROM THE ADMINISTRATORREADERS WRITE:A lot going on in county government ank you to our local quiet angels Support of Focus on Ability appreciated

PAGE 5

Editor, The News: I attended the bi-partisan forum on Monday night at the community center. As you may know, it was hastily arranged and Im afraid it showed. The format was grossly unfair to certain candidates because they were forced to answer before their opponent(s) 7 out of 8 total questions. Being able to hear your opponents reply to a question before you answer the same question is a huge advantage, and thats exactly what was allowed to happen. Yep, you heard that right. Its kind of like forcing a football team to kick off 7 out of 8 halves! Although they rotated the “ rst question among each candidate, they always went down the lineŽ with the same question and not randomly. So in District 1, Jenny Brock had to answer 7 of 8 questions before Ralph Thomas and Ralph had to answer 7 out of 8 questions before Alan Brock. Therefore Alan answered only one time before Jenny and only one time before Ralph. In District 3, Howard Kessler had to answer 7 out of 8 questions before Mike Stewart, so Stewart only answered “ rst one time before Kessler. In District 5, Emily Smith had to answer 7 out of 8 questions before John Shuff and Shuff had to answer 7 out of 8 before Richard Harden. That meant Richard had to answer only once before Emily and once before John. Its ironic this forum was conceived because of claims that other forums were unfair. I dont think it was intentional, but very clearly the format was seriously ” awed. Of course, each candidate was only doing what was instructed by the organizers. Alternating answering “ rst among opponents is the hallmark of a fair forum and is certainly customary. I think asking why alternating among opponents wasnt done here is a fair question. Also, each candidate had only one minute to respond to questions, complex questions. I would have appreciated hearing more than just one minute from each candidate. I would hope any future bi-partisan forums be modi“ ed to ensure fairness for all candidates. Steve Fults fultsie@aol.com www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 – Page 5Areaders speak out More OpinionsEditor, The News: An open letter to citizens of Wakulla County: There was an article in The Wakulla News last week (Only Creel attends sheriffs forum,Ž front page) where I again pledged that I had encouraged my supporters to run a clean campaign just as I have pledged. I even stated that I despise dirty politics and dirty campaigning. This is what has been going on in races for Wakulla County sheriff for years, fear and intimidation. Then Wednesday night citizens began receiving phone calls from a polling agency outside of Wakulla County asking misleading and non-factual questions about my record as a law enforcement of“ cer. Not only misleading and non-factual, but outright untruths! I have been divorced, but the other questions were asked to imply that I had violated law enforcement policy, completely untrue. I invite anyone to look at my Florida Highway Patrol personnel “ le. It is exemplary. I think that it is a shame that someone would use character assassinations to win an election. I want to address a few things concerning the race for Wakulla County Sheriff of which I am a candidate. From the very beginning in this race and during the 2008 race against David Harvey, I vowed to run a clean campaign, no mud-slinging, no personal attacks and no negative campaigning. I was and am committed to sticking to the issues … who is the better candidate to lead Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. On Sept. 24 my opponent, Maurice Langston, mailed me a letter that he had signed on Sept. 21, with a Clean Campaign Pledge. I saw no need to sign this pledge as I had already signed a Candidates Oath with the Supervisor of Elections, a binding contract to adhere to run a clean campaign and abide by voting laws. These tactics are low and despicable and I am sorry that the citizens of Wakulla County have been subjected to this type of negative campaigning. Charlie Creel Candidate for Sheriff of Wakulla County Editor, The News: Four years ago our county commission was polarized and county revenue was on the decline. The three incumbents who were up for election all decided to walk away. There werent many people who were willing to even discuss running for of“ ce, let alone actually follow through and put their name on the ballot. Everyone was wondering who would be willing to wade into the mess that was facing our county and try to help our county out of it. Alan Brock saw the problem and decided that he would run and help bring our community together. He saw that together we could move our county beyond the immediate problems and get us back on track to good growth and success. Alan helped end the polarization, he took out the politics and started looking for ways to bring the community together. I have known Alan for a long time, and have always been impressed with the way he puts people at ease, listens to them and “ nds solutions to problems. I think Wakulla is lucky to have Alan serving on our county commission. Alan is a good face for our community. He speaks and presents himself well and has a strong network of in” uence that he isnt afraid to lean on to help Wakulla. Like Apple Computers slogan, Alan Thinks differentŽ … coming up with solutions that other people never would. Over the last couple of years I have read in The Wakulla News about the money our county was losing with the way we handled trash. I read how the state was preparing to come in and take over, increasing cost and decreasing services for every household. Alan managed to lead the county forward with an affordable alternative … curbside garbage and recycling service … and my family is actually saving over $100 a year! Who else could have come up with that solution … and then get it through our commission? I am proud to call Alan Brock a friend and I am proud to have him as our county commission chair. I can only hope that he gets re-elected and he can continue to serve us for another four years. Thank you Alan for your service, my family is proud to cast our vote for you again. Sincerely, Molly Tucker Clore molly.a.clore@gmail.com Editor, The News: My son Gil attended Medart Elementary School from 2002 to 2007, Bobby Pearce was the schools principal during that time. In 2002, when Gil began “ rst grade, a group of parents including myself had an idea to start a Cub Scout program. With Principal Pearces encouragement and support, we started Cub Scout Pack 33. When we had ideas to promote the program, Principal Pearce was always available for discussions and willing to help. When we came up with the idea of an annual tree planting, that idea was met with support from Principal Pearce. Over a “ ve-year period, the Cub Scouts and parents planted over 100 trees around Medart Elementary School. Today, those trees are providing shade in the courtyards between class wings and can be seen lining the entrance drive. Largely as a result of Principal Pearces supportive nature and cando attitude, I was compelled to take over the job of Parent Teacher Organization (PTO) President. During that period Principal Pearce, myself and other parents worked together and accomplished a number of improvements to the school. Flashing caution signals were “ nally installed along Highway 319 and Highway 98 entrances. Prior to these signals, cars ” ew by the school at 55 mph as buses and cars dropped kids off before and after school, it was a recipe for disaster. Together, we implemented the Concerts for the Arts, a music concert to help the music and art programs that were struggling due to budget cuts. Local musicians including School Board member Jerry Evans came together to put on an amazing event. Together, we revamped the annual Spring Carnival and bought new playground equipment. The annual tree planting continued to grow in size. More trees were planted, irrigation was installed and even a butter” y garden was built. All of these programs succeeded because of Bobby Pearces supportive nature and willingness to try new ideas. As PTO President and Cubmaster of Pack 33, I became a regular visitor to Bobby Pearces of“ ce. Bobby was always available to listen and had an open door/ open ear policy. If Bobby Pearce is elected as Superintendent of Schools, I would expect new ideas to be thoughtfully weighed for merit and then carefully chosen, just as he did as Principal Pearce. As for Principal Pearce and his genuine concern for kids, I watched Principal Pearce every morning greeting little kids with a smile or high “ ve. He would ask how a particular class was going or if they were feeling better after being out sick. It seemed at times like he personally knew every student and what was going on in their lives and truly cared. If the halls were full of students, it sometimes took a very long time to get from point A to point B if you were walking with Bobby, the kids loved him! As for the scouting pro-grams, it was over 10 years ago a small group of determined parents and scouts, had the idea that a Scout program was needed in our area and received support and encouragement. Today, Cub Scout Pack 33, now Pack 8, has grown to include Boy Scout Troop 8 as well as a Venture Crew 8. As the parent of an Eagle Scout who went through these programs and as the Unit Commissioner working with all three Scout programs, I thank Principal Pearce for his support of scouting, as well as the many other ideas that have bene“ ted our youth. David Damon davdam8@aol.com Editor, The News: Like most Wakulla County gunniesŽ and hunters, I have been proud of the NRAs past political aim and straight shooting. Today, we are a family of disenchanted NRA Life Members, because the NRA is way off target in our county sheriffs race. My husband and I are so passionate about our Second Amendment freedoms that we gave our children, in-laws and grandkids life memberships in the NRA and my husband has devoted much of his professional life to “ rearms training and promotion of our Second Amendment Rights. We have known Maurice Langston, a brother NRA Life Member, for over 30 years and can attest to the fact that no one in Wakulla County Government has done more over the years to champion gun rights and hunters rightsŽ than Maurice Langston! Maurice has been the direct supervisor over the WCSO Shooting Range since he “ rst arranged for jailed prisoners to provide free labor for construction of what was to become a model publicly supportedŽ shooting range. Maurice helped raise funds and in-kind donations to provide “ rearms training classrooms, out-buildings and ranges. Maurice grew up hunting quail and deer in the Smith Creek Community and strongly supported NRAs early efforts to pass concealed carry legislation in Florida. He has been an avid supporter of the recent Legislation by NRA/USF to further enhance and protect those important individual freedoms in Florida. The NRA/USF “ rmly believes that, if Barack Obama is re-elected, he will issue Executive Orders and Policy that severely restrict our current “ rearms and hunting freedoms. USFs Marion Hammer and the NRA keep close tabs on our National Government, but when it comes to knowing the candidates for sheriff in Wakulla County, Marion Hammer and the NRA completely missed the target by failing to do their homework and to research the facts. The fact is that those people in Wakulla County who support President Obama are the same people who do not support Maurice Langston. Its true. Just look around as you drive through the County. If you see an Obama sign in a yard, you will likely see a sign for the other sheriff candidate. If the NRA had taken the time to research instead of blindly following the Tallahassee mob,Ž they could have put two and two together and would have realized that birds of a feather ” ock together.Ž Disappointed at Shell PointŽ Kathleen Lamarche secureland@aol.com Editor, The News: As sheriff of Wakulla County I have observed some comments made to the public about the operation of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office. Most of the things that have been said have been incorrect or misleading. I would like to personally offer political candidate Charlie Creel and any other candidate an opportunity to stop by the sheriffs of“ ce and visit with me. I would enjoy giving Creel or others an opportunity to review the sheriffs of“ ce budget to get a better understanding of how things really work so that the public does not get erroneous information. Most recently, comments were made in a newspaper advertisement about the Enhanced 911 budget which is approximately $165,000 annually. With two employees working in the division there was a comment made that the employees must be making $80,000 each. They do not. The E-911 budget funds a very technologically advanced communications system that must also be maintained and updated on a regular basis to work properly. This is just one area where we can share more information with the candidate to make him more informed about what we do. The door has always been open to anyone who has questions about how law enforcement funding is being spent. My staff has always been available and happy to discuss any portion of the WCSO budget and our divisions so nobody will have to speculate what is being done here and how money is being spent. We just “ nished working on the 2012-13 annual WCSO budget that the new sheriff will have to work with until Sept. 30, 2013, and nobody from the community made any comments or asked questions about it. Sincerely, Donnie W. Crum Sheriff, Wakulla County Editor, The News: I have known Ralph Thomas for nearly 20 years and I can personally tell you that he is an honorable and caring individual. Ralph continuously strives to help others, be it through his work at his church or through his efforts in the community. Ralph can be depended on each and every day to help those around him. His “ scally conservative mindset and his service before selfŽ attitude will be great attributes to the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners. Please join me in supporting Ralph Thomas for County Commissioner District 1 on Nov. 6. Sincerely, Valerie Russell, ARNP CrawfordvilleMORE READERS WRITE:Negative campaigning is despicable Sheri is available for budget questions NRA mis“ res in sheri s endorsement Like Apple, Alan Brock thinks di erent Bobby Pearce is open to new ideas Howard Kessler understands taxation e bi-partisan forum had its problems Amendments are troubling Endorsing Ralph omas for commissionEditor, The News: It is my perception that it is time for a change at every level of government. This is especially true here in Wakulla County. Because of the federal and state forests here in the county, the amount of taxable land is limited. This obviously places restraints on the property taxes that can be collected. However, the current commission has shown great creativity in increasing taxes by adding fees (the garbage feeŽ for the monopoly trash collector) and the taxes on power, water and phones. Budgets seem to be kind of out of control. We are retired. We cant put our hands on other peoples moneyŽ such as the commission has done to allow us to spend. I believe the commission needs NEW people who understand that we the taxpayers and voters dont have an in“ nite supply of money. I “ rmly believe that Howard Kessler is a man who understands this. He is very intelligent, hard working, and, I believe, has the best interests of the county at heart. We need people like Howard back on the commission. Look at what the current commission has done … tax levels, specialŽ taxes, the mismanagement of the county dump over the many years that forcedŽ the commission to impose a collection fee and award a 10 year, monopolistic contract for management of the dump and trash collection, and on and on. Lets elect Howard and some other new folks and get some people who understand taxation, governing, integrity and management and start to get the current mess cleaned up! Ron Wigton, retired Oyster Bay/Shell PointEditor, The News: When you read the amendments on your ballot, be sure to read between the lines so you know what they really are saying. I was amazed (and disappointed) when I did that. Marcia Bjerregaard League of Women Voters member

PAGE 6

Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Churchreligious views and events Wakulla Worship Centers Church Briefs Octoberfest to be celebrated at Trinity Lutheran Oktoberfest for Trinity Lutheran Church and Preschool will be held on Saturday, Oct. 13, beginning at 10 a.m. Family fun including German food, silent auction, games for kids and big kids. Bratwurst, Sauerkraut, hot dogs, and German potato salad will be served for $5 per person. Trinity Lutheran Church and Preschool is located on Highway 98 across from Wakulla High School. Pumpkin Patch at Wakulla Springs Baptist Wakulla Springs Baptist Church will have pumpkins for sale beginning Monday, Oct. 15, through Oct. 31. The pumpkin patch will be open on weekdays from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. All proceeds go towards the garden ministry that supports local food pantries. A Harvest of Hope Pumpkin Patch Festival will be held at the church on Saturday, Oct. 20, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. with fun, food and games. The church is located at 1391 Crawfordville Highway. For more information, call 926-5152. Homecoming at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church and Pastor Bill Jenkins invite all to their “Homecoming and Covered Dish Fellowship Dinner” on Sunday, Oct. 14, beginning at 10:45 a.m. Please bring the whole family to this wonderful time of worship and fellowship.  Quilt is being raf ed by Christ Church AnglicanChrist Church Quilters are raf ing a beautiful hand quilted queen-king size quilt. The pattern is Star-spangled Four Patch. Raf e tickets are now available, 6 tickets for $5 or $1 each. The drawing will be held after noon on Dec. 9, at Christ Church Anglican, 3383 Coastal Highway. You may call the church at745-8412 or Mary Lou Martin 210-1203 for more information or for tickets. By ETHEL M. SKIPPER Skipper Temple Church of Christ, 165 Surf Road in Sopchoppy, will be celebrating Pastor Ethel Skippers 24 years of pastoring. The congregation was in Carrabelle for more than 18 years. In 2006, Pastor Skipper relocated the church to Sopchoppy. This week, members of the church and many others will come together with praise and worship. Tawanna Moris from Tallahassee and Bethlehem True Holiness Pastor J. Blake of Woodville, and Blessed Hope Church Pastor Grady Harper of St. Marks appeared on Tuesday, Oct. 9. On Wednesday, Oct. 10, Macedonia Church Pastor Alfred Nelson of Sopchoppy, and New Hope Pentecostal Church Pastor Fred Cromartie of Crawfordville appeared. On Thursday, Oct. 11, St. John Primitive Baptist Church Pastor Raymond Sanders of Medart, and Zion Hill P.B. Church Pastor Ervin Donaldson of Sopchoppy. On Friday night, Oct. 12, the Right Rev. Chris Burney of Greater St. Mark Church of Tallahassee and Shiloh Church of Christ, Quincy, Pastor Mary Holloman. Sunday services will begin at 11 a.m. with True Holiness Church of Christ from Blountstown, Pastor Elder E. Brigham; Woodville Church of Christ Pastor Elder Andrew Morris. Dinner will be served after services. We wish a happy belated birthday to Deacon A.B. Simmon, Mrs. Charlene Green, Oct. 6, Felicia Green, from your family and friends. Skipper Temple celebratesLocal Prayer Walk continues for third week Buckhorn News By CYNTHIA WEBSTER For the past two weeks I have been a part of the Footsteps for Faith and Freedom Prayer Walk for National Healing. Each day my husband and I go to Azalea Park and join with dozens of others to walk and pray for a spiritual reawakening within our nation. Always there is a member of the Wakulla County clergy walking with us and often two or three are present. At Saturdays prayer walk we were blessed to have David Moss, a Wakulla High School Senior from the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church lead us in prayer. On arriving at the park we found that David had brought a giant wooden cross, made of 4x4 beams, which he placed against a tree. Before prayer we heard several testimonies from walkers including one from a wonderful lady who spoke of a time when she was making her daily call to a friend. The friend had a niece who had lost a child within the previous six months. Somehow (we know how) when she dialed the seven digits of her friends telephone number the connection was made into the home of the niece whose number she did not know. As a result, the caller, who also had experienced the loss of a child, was able to share an intimate and soul healing hour with a mother who was having a very dif“ cult day. This could not have happened without Gods intervention. Another testimony was made by a woman claiming to have nearly eight decades behind her. She said that as a teen she had turned her life over to God. When she met a person she wanted to marry she questioned whether she could serve God and be a wife and mother. She did marry, had three children, lost her “ rst husband, found work in the medical “ eld helping others, raised her children and later married a man also in the medical “ eld whose faith was as strong as hers. Together they traveled all over the world caring for the sick and bringing the word of God with them wherever they went. And our prayer leader David testi“ ed that although only 17 he has witnessed the greatness of God. He explained how his faith has sustained him through severe family problems and times of serious illness for his mom. SCHEDULE FOR WEEK THREE: € Thursday, Oct. 11, 6:45 p.m., Lay Leader Byron L. Price, Seafarers Chapel. € Friday, Oct. 12, 10 a.m., Pastor Glen Hamel of Promiseland Ministries. € Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m., Youth Leader, Derricke Gray, River of Life. € Monday, Oct. 15, 6:45 p.m., Pastor Samuel Hayes, Mt. Olive Primitive Baptist Church #2. € Tuesday, Oct. 16, 6:45 p.m., Assistant Pastor Rick Carter, Harvest Fellowship. € Wednesday, Oct. 17, 10 a.m., Pastor Charles Barwick, Panacea Full Gospel Assembly. All are welcome to join in the prayer walks. The morning walks are especially nice for moms with young children … there is a playground in the park. Listen to Freedom interview on WAVE Radio, 94.1 each Thursday at 10:50 a.m.Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... The queen-size quilt to be raf” ed. Crawfordville United Methodist Church held a Blessing of the Animals last Saturday. A procession of animals, more than 20 dogs, one cat and two stuffed animals were led up to the frront doors of the church where they received a hands-on blessing and prayer from Pastor Mike Shockley. The rite was conducted in remembrance of St. Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of animals and the environment. Donations of pet food were accepted and will be presented to the animal shelter.Crawfordville UMC holds a Blessing of the AnimalsPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMallory Dotson with her dog Zeus as he receives a blessing from Pastor Mike Shockley.

PAGE 7

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 – Page 7AObituaries John D. McCabe Kathryn Nell Revell Dr. Jolly Herschel Rogers Michael Wayne Shepard Lila Frances Strickland Loey Dillard TumblesonJohn D. McCabe, 68, of Crawfordville, passed away on Monday, Oct. 1. He was predeceased by his wife, Peggy McCabe, in 1997. He had been living in the area for the past 30 years and was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Crawfordville. He served in the U.S. Air Force and loved motorcycles and “ shing. Survivors include five children, Michael McCabe (April) of Boise, Idaho, Bobby McCabe (Sophie) of Encinitas, Calif., Jennifer Rothgeb (Nicholas) of Virginia Beach, Va., Jessi Frost (William) of Crawfordville and Jon Campbell (Adrianna) of Homestead; two sisters; and six grandchildren. The Funeral Service was held at 3 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 5, at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Crawfordville. The committal service will conclude at Whiddon Lake Cemetery. The U.S. Air Force will provide military honors. Memorials may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Bevis Funeral Home in Crawfordville(www.bevisfh. com or 850/926.3333) was in charge of arrangements. Kathryn Nell Revell, 65, of Crawfordville passed away Friday, Oct. 5. She was born in Tallahassee and lived in Crawfordville for most of her adult life. She was retired from the U.S. District Court System where she served as a court room deputy. She was a member of Eastern Star where she held the of“ ce of Worthy Matron at Crawfordville Chapter 242 and Gainesville Rob Morris Chapter 310. Visitation for family and friends was held Monday, Oct. 8, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville. Services followed the visitation at 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel. Burial will follow at Revell Cemetery in Sopchoppy. Survivors include a son, Kenny Chaganis (Sandy) of Crawfordville; three brothers, Barney Calvin Revell (Marsha) of New Port Richey, James Revell (Patti) of Crawfordville and Ricky Revell and Rose of McIntosh; one sister, Frances Smith (Herman) of Tallahassee; three granddaughters, Ashley, Samantha and Cori Chaganis; and one great-granddaughter, Miranda Philman. She was predeceased by beloved son, Murray Chaganis. In lieu of ” owers make donations in her name to the Wakulla County Historical Society, P.O. Box 151, Crawfordville FL 32326. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfhcom) Dr. Jolly Herschel Rogers died on Sept. 14. He was a retired veterinarian and commercial “ shing boat captain, University of Georgia graduate, born in Cuthbert, Ga. Owned veterinary practices in Tampa, Pinellas Park and Crawfordville. Over his lifetime, he enjoyed a variety of hobbies that included racing hydroplanes, go-kart racing, scuba diving, spear “ shing, hunting, building and ” ying radio controlled airplanes. He was recently widowed from his wife, June Rogers. He was predeceased by his parents, Herschel Rogers and Dorothy Williams Rogers. Survivors include his children, Pam Rogers Herring of Birmingham, Ala., Bill Rogers of Crawfordville, and Luke Rogers of Tallahassee; his stepchildren, Barbara Taylor of Laurel Hill, Debra Knotts of Birmingham, Ala., Kelly Dykes of Crawfordville and Karol Shepherd of Crawfordville; “ ve grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held Sunday, Oct. 14, at 1 p.m. in the Dogwood Room at Wakulla Springs State Park. Michael Wayne Shepard, 53, of Crawfordville, died at his home on Sept. 26. Survivors include his mother and stepfather, Bebe and Amos Moore of Crawfordville; his father and stepmother, Larry and Jorene Shepard of Austin, Texas; one brother, Greg Moore of Lima, Ohio; two sisters, Shelley Moore of Crawfordville and Kim Shepard of Houston, Texas; one nephew, Sage Moore and one niece, Belle Paul, both of Crawfordville; aunt, Dee Frye of Tallahassee. He was predeceased by a half-brother, Shannon Shepard; and his paternal grandmother, Jewell Shepard. A Celebration of Life will be held Saturday, Oct. 13, from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at 18 Shepherdwood Drive in Crawfordille. Lila Frances Strickland, 65, of the Ivan community, died on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012. She was born on Oct. 26, 1947 to the late Ralph and Alma Green Strickland. She was a former employee of The Wakulla News, and a military veteran. Survivors include her daughter, Layla Strickland McMillan (Mike); grandsons, Justin, Brian and Jake; two brothers, Durwood Strickland (Betty) of Tallahassee and Larry Strickland (JoAnne) of Crawfordville; a sister, Imogene Whaley of Medart; and sister-in-law, Connie Strickland Cutchin, and brother-in-law, Richard Lynn. She is also survived by numerous nieces, nephews and extended family and friends. She was predeceased by a brother, Roderick Strickland; and sister, Phyllis Lynn. It was her wish to be cremated and a celebration of her life will be held on Friday, Oct. 26, at 11 a.m. at 606 Whiddon Lake Road in Crawfordville. Casual dress is requested. Memorial donations can be made to the Veterans Association. She was always looking out for everyone else rather than being worried about her own well-being. Loey Dillard Tumbleson, 78, died on Sept. 26 in Tallahassee. He was born Jan. 12, 1934, in Keo, Ark., to Loey and Maudie Grif“ n Tumbleson. He owned and operated several businesses. He was a member of Pioneer Baptist Church. Survivors include his sons, Gene Tumbleson, Rod Tumbleson and Bruce (Carla) Tumbleson; his grandchildren, Heather Tumbleson, Allan Tumbleson, Charity Tumbleson and Stonewall Bryant; and 10 siblings. He was preceded in death by his wife of 54 years, Euvona J. Tumbleson. The funeral was held Oct. 1 at Abbey Funeral Home in Tallahassee, with interment at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. Donations may be made to Pioneer Baptist Church in Crawfordville. Online condolences at www.abbeyfh.com.John D. McCabe Kathryn Nell Revell Dr. Jolly Herschel Rogers Michael Wayne Shepard Lila Frances Strickland Loey Dillard TumblesonEarly to bed, early to rise hasnt worked for meREV. JAMES L. SNYDER My father was not what you would call a literate person. Apart from the Bible, he did not read much of anything else on a regular basis. I can remember as a young person him quoting a great American patriot, Benjamin Franklin. The only quote he knew of this man was, Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.Ž For a long time I thought he was making it up and then one day, I happened to run across a book in the library about Benjamin Franklin and, there it was. Benjamin actually did say that. I had to give my father that one. It seems that every time it got close to what my father termed as my bedtime,Ž he would remind me of this famous quote. It got so I hated when bedtime came. At the time, I had my doubts about the validity of this quote because if my father followed this quote as he encouraged me to do, why was he not healthy, wealthy and wise? At the time, I was in no position to question his wisdom. I was wise enough to know that the best part of wisdom was not to challenge the wisdom of my father. This has attributed to my length of life to date. Continued on Page 15A OUT TO PASTOR To the people of Wakulla County,On the day the Wakulla News published a story about my opponent asking me to sign a pledge to carry on a clean campaign, ironically the people of Wakulla County started receiving mudslinging calls questioning the character and integrity of my experience in law-enforcement. People who have received these negative calls disguised as a ‘legitimate’ poll have alerted me, so I want to ensure that the people of Wakulla County know that the derogatory implications of these calls are untrue I anticipate these types of campaign tactics will go on until Election Day, nevertheless I will continue to carry on the clean campaign I have conducted for the past year and a half. I signed an oath to abide by voting laws – as my opponent did – when we qualified as candidates, and I have stayed true to it.I ask for your vote Nov. 6, so Wakulla County will have a FRESH START in the sheriffs of“ce.Facebook at Charlie Creel for Sheriff charlieforsheriff@gmail.com (850) 926-4712 PO Box 482 Crawfordville, FL 32326www.charliecreel.comPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Af“liation, for sheriff.

PAGE 8

Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySopchoppy Lions Club celebrates 60 years SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMembers of the Sopchoppy Lions Club for 2013. By MARJ LAWSpecial to The NewsIn September, the Sopchoppy Lions Club celebrated the completion of 60 years of continuous service to Wakulla County and Lions Clubs internationally. Chartered in 1952, Sopchoppy Lions have helped our residents preserve sight and prevent blindness. Lions also participate in projects to improve our community. Originally, the Club began with 18 charter members. Emory Green was the last surviving charter member. Now, Bernie Kemp, Warren Harden and Robert Roddenberry have served the longest: 53, 49, and 48 years respectively. While sight preservation and conservation are the major focus of the club, their projects have been many and varied. Back when there was the old Sopchoppy school, the Lions were instrumental in assisting the athletic department by helping to fund lights on the “ eld so they could enjoy night games. Lions acquired the “ rst uniforms for the Wakulla High School band around 1967. Lions helped erect mail boxes on rural routes. Lions participate in Keep Wakulla County Beautifuls Adopt a Road program, picking up trash every 3 months from several miles of road. Lions hold booths at festivals: they used to attend the Sopchoppy Fourth of July festival for many years; now they have a booth at the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin festival. In addition to the many service projects around Wakulla County, sight conservation and preservation are always in the forefront of our Lions thinking. They purchase eyeglasses for many in need. Lions are involved in assisting with the cost of some eye surgeries. To be able to do this, they collect old eyeglasses which get minor repairs if needed and are sanitized. They are then slipped in plastic bags. Many go to foreign countries. Those in need of glasses locally are sent to speci“ c eye doctors who give the Lions Club a very generous rate. Then the Lions can help with the glasses themselves. Lions support eye centers around the states. They also provide some funding in the Leader Dog Program. This program helps the hearing and sight impaired train for and obtain a leader dog. Financial support comes from the Lions local programs, such as their “ sh fry on Saturday, Nov. 3, their birthday calendars, raf” es, brooms and donations. 60 years of Lions in Sopchoppy! This is real service to our community. Kristie Walker and Nicholas Soderholm of Carrabelle announce the birth of their son, Tyler Evan Soderholm, on Sept. 11 at 12:40 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 7 pounds, 12 ounces and was 20.75 inches. He has an older sister, Kaylee, who is 23 months. His maternal grandparents are Christine Silvey of Crawfordville and Ivan Walker of Carrabelle. His paternal grandparent is Sharon Soderholm of Carrabelle. His great-grandparents are Dennis Allen of Crawfordville and Judy Stevens of Panacea and Gail Browning of Bridge City, Texas, and Margaret Zuberbeuhler of Carrabelle.Special to The NewsThe Christmas Assistance Program for the Salvation Army is accepting applications for Wakulla, Leon and Gadsden county residents. Applications for Christmas assistance will be taken at the Salvation Armys main of“ ce, located at 5016 W. Tennessee St. in Tallahassee. Applications are being accepted on Oct. 10-12, 15-19 and 22-26 from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Applicants must bring: € A picture ID for all adults in the home. € Birth certi“ cates for all children in the home. € Social security cards for everyone in the home. € A lease agreement with name and address on it. € Proof of all income for the home. This includes cash assistance, food stamps and child support. € Proof of all expenses. Any bills that an applicant pays, such as utilities, phone, cable, insurance, daycare, etc. A need for assistance must be proven and those who have received this assistance for the past 3 years will be ineligible this year.Christmas assistance available through Salvation ArmySpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Historical Society is sponsoring a Genealogy Seminar on Saturday, Oct. 20 at the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. Registration is at 8:15 a.m., and includes breakfast and lunch. Featured speakers are genealogy experts Jay Collins and Melody Porter. Collins was born and raised in upstate New York. He and his wife have lived and worked in Tallahassee since 1978. He recently retired from the City of Tallahassee, where he worked as a Business Systems Analyst supporting the Document Imaging and Records Management System. While with the City he attained the credentials of Certi“ ed Document Imaging Architect and Certi“ ed Public Manager. He became involved in genealogy in the early 90s and is the owner of Bluejay Genealogy Research, tracing the genealogical connections to selected artifacts. He has served on the Board of the Tallahassee Genealogical Society since 2008, and is currently serving his third year as its president. His discussion will include: Your DNA Report„What do all those numbers mean,Ž a brief introduction to the basics of DNA and genealogy; and Applying DNA to your genealogy research,Ž practical examples of how to use DNA results to resolve questions or con” icts. Porters background is in computer software as business analyst and project manager, but she has researched her genealogy for over 20 years. She specializes in Florida, Georgia and Native American research. She is a Native American and a voting member of the Western Cherokee Tribe in Oklahoma. She has attended The Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research at Sanford and the Volunteer Genealogist Class at the headquarters for the Daughters of the American Revolution. She is a past secretary of the Florida State Genealogical Society (FSGS), former Pioneer Records Administrator and Reviewer for the FSGS Pioneer Certi“ cation Committee. She was presented the FSGS Distinguished Service Award in 2006. She was the “ rst vice president for the International Society for Family History Writers and Editors and is a member of the Association for Professional Genealogists, the Genealogical Speakers Guild and the National Genealogical Society. She is a former treasurer and seminar chair for the Tallahassee Genealogical Society. Porters discussion will include: CENSUS FIRST,Ž where to start when looking for an ancestor and tracking an ancestor through history using the census gives a timeline that can help “ nd additional materials; and BEGINNING GENEALOGY,Ž searching for an ancestor means looking for stories, but how do you know what to look for, where to look, how to make sense of all that documentation, and how to keep track of what you “ nd. The seminar is open to everyone. For more information contact the WCHS at 926-1110, 524-5334 or email 24research@gmail.com. Genealogy seminar on Oct. 20 Walker and Soderholm welcome a baby boy The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Club’s2012 ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZA Wildwood Country Club Thursday • October 11 • 2012 6:30pm Social 7:00pm Dinner, Auction, & Show please join us for Beall’s Maurice’s Way Out West Carroll’s Boot Country Crum’s Mini MallTICKETS $30.00 eachall proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County students SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for quali“ed applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and ”oor rate of 2.5% Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts • Color • F acial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • F lat T ops F eather Locks • Color • P erms • Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. c e H a i r S a l o n e H l o H a i a l o i r S a c e c e o n o o n Tues -S at 54 529 05 & t. . . . F STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN Bonnet Creek Fall Retreat From $179 per night Includes a $50 daily Resort Credit and daily self-parking For reservations call 888-208-7440. Ask for promotion code BCFT. Visit HiltonBonnetCreek.com/fall

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSolar electric systems installed at 2 local schools By KATRINA RODDENBERRYSpecial to The NewsTwo of Wakulla Countys elementary schools are now SunSmart E-Shelter schools. Riversink Elementary and Crawfordville Elementary are two of 90 schools in Florida that have been out“ tted with a solar electric (photovoltaic) system that are directly connected to the utility grid. Each school has a 10,000 watt system that will offset electricity costs to the school during normal operation. In addition, the system powers critical items in the school during a power outage, and the system is able to utilize the energy stored in batteries for 24-hour operation. The system also provides scienti“ c data that can be analyzed by students. The installation of both systems was completed on Sept. 27. Riversink Elementary and Crawfordville Elementary were selected to receive the systems through the Florida Solar Energy Centers E-Shelter program. The program provides free solar energy systems to public schools and colleges that have been designated by the state as enhanced hurricane protection area (EHPA) shelters. This program was funded by the State of Florida through a grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Each school was competitively selected based on their location, status as an emergency shelter and renewable energy education and outreach plans. Teachers at Riversink Elementary, Julia Parker and Katrina Roddenberry, and teachers at Crawfordville Elementary, Kimberly Bartnick and Kirsten Brazier, attended a professional development workshop in Panama City provided by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) to learn more about the system and how to teach students about solar energy. FSEC provided the teachers with training on a number of curriculum units that focus on a wide variety of topics including conservation, alternative energy technologies and understanding of natural systems. In addition, each school was provided a resource kit that included hands-on solar classroom laboratory materials for implementing the curriculum units. The overall educational goal of this program is to increase the number of educators who teach the science and technology of renewable energy and increase the number of students who are exposed to these concepts. The program will allow students to gain a basic understanding of how solar thermal and photovoltaic systems work and understand the importance of renewable energy, energy ef“ ciency and energy conservation to their futures. Riversink Elementary has incorporated these ideas into their upcoming Project Learning Tree (PLT) Week. PLT is an award winning, interdisciplinary, environmental educational program designed to increase students critical thinking in making informed decisions on environmental issues. This years week long program, which will begin on Nov. 9, has the theme of Energy and MeŽ and will feature presenters from a variety of public and private organizations to engage students in various activities focused on environmental awareness, including a presentation of the schools new solar electric (photovoltaic) system. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA solar electric system is now installed at Riversink Elementary, above, and Crawfordville Elementary schools. RMS band boosters taking donations for yard saleThe Riversprings Middle School Band Boosters will be receiving donations Friday, Oct. 19 from 3 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Band Room located at the back of Riversprings Middle School for its yard and bake sale. They will not be taking clothes or linens. The yard and bake sale will begin at 7:30 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 20. No early birds, please. Contact Bear Booster President Dodi Shef“ eld at (850) 510-2293 or Tracy Douglas at (850)926-5457 for details on donations or questions. Proceeds from the yard and bake sale will bene“ t all RMS Band Students for School Year 2012-2013. Community pep rally will be held on Oct. 23 at WHSWakulla High School will be hosting a community event on Oct. 23, beginning at 6 p.m. The Powder Puff Game between junior and senior girls will kickoff at 6 p.m. The Community Pep Rally will begin at 7 p.m. and is expected to last until 8 p.m. There will be refreshments and food for sale at the concession stand. During the Pep Rally, the 2012 Homecoming Court will be announced and those in attendance will be able to familiarize themselves with the faces that are eligible to win the title of King and Queen for 2012. They will accept a $1 donation entry fee at the gate. Come out to Wakulla High on Oct. 23 to show community spirit. For questions, contact Briana Fordham at Wakulla High School. Keiser University hosts open houseKeiser University (KU) will be hosting a Scare Fair Open House for prospective students, the general public and community partners to have an opportunity to learn more about KU and the programs offered. The event takes place on Oct. 24 from 6:30 … 8:30 p.m. There will be faculty and staff available to meet with individuals who are seeking doctoral, masters, bachelors and associate degrees in over 70 programs. KU prepares graduates for careers in business, criminal justice, health care, technology, hospitality, education, culinary arts and career-focused general studies. Students take one class at a time, for one month at a time, allowing them to better manage their personal time for parenting, work and study. Small class sizes ensure personalized attention, practical training and accessibility to instructors. The Scare Fair Open House has food, games, prizes and community partner demonstrations along with representatives from the sheriffs of“ ce, various armed forces, gaming companies … all in attendance to make this a fun and informative event for all who attend. Visit www.kuopenhouse.com for more information. Wakulla Christian School, in coordination with the Wakulla County Veterans Services Office, is proud to host the Saturday, November 10, 2012 at Hudson Park Games, Vendors Raffles, a Silent Auction, and Lots of Food !!! Parade Starts @ 10:00a.m. A portion of the proceeds from this grand event will be donated to our local Veterans Services Office. Your family or organization is invited to participate in this very special event dedicated to honoring all Veterans and active duty military. Please consider entering a float or vehicle decorated in honor of your loved ones’. For more information or to register your float, please contact the Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee via fax @ 850-926-5186 or email WCVDay@gmail.com “Honoring All Who Served” Soldier Care Packages 6th Annual Veterans Day Parade and Celebration to Support Our Troops and Honor Our Veterans Wakulla Christian School is collecting public donations of items to send to our troops wish list items include individually wrapped beef jerky, Pringles, individually wrapped sunflower seeds, individually wrapped nuts, individually packaged mix of Propel Fitness Water and Gatorade, individually packaged hard candy and gummy bears, white tube socks, protein bars, granola ba rs, books, soap, razors, sunscreen, nail files, AA batteries and Ziploc bags. For further information, please contact Wakulla County Veterans Day Committee Drop offanyitemsatoneof thefollowing supportivebusinessesinWakulla county: HOME MORTGAGEAMERIFIRST An appraiser for Wakulla's next chapter (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser GET TO A BETTER STATE.’ CALL ME TODAY. 1103208 12/11Get a Free Discount Double Check.’ I can help you save like a champion, with discounts that could add up to XX%* and be worth hundreds of dollars. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, State Farm Indemnity Company, Bloomington, IL *Discounts may vary by state. Aaron Rodgers got his. How about you? 40% *Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com

PAGE 10

Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsDying oyster beds are crippling a once thriving industryBy A.B. SIDIBECitrus County ChronicleCEDAR KEY „ It is written large on the faces of the hard-scrabble oystermen and women. Their skins deeply browned and creased from years, days and hours of exposure to the unrelenting and lingering Florida sun. The people, the multigenerational tradition of extracting a gnarly, irregular-shaped mollusk „ oysters „ from the sounds and bays that dot the states Big Bend area. From Waccasassa Bay on through the Suwannee Sound past the bend into Apalachicola Bay, their industry and way of life is besieged by the vagaries climate and what some describe as government in” exibility regarding rules. So far, the 2012 oyster season, which began Sept. 1, is widely regarded as poor and perhaps the most extensive failure of the oyster reefs in generations. Ten percent of the nations oyster supplies and 90 percent of the states supplies come from this region. In an industry where a typical harvester can haul in an average of 15 bushels of oysters a day, this year the oystermen struggle to make two to four bushels. Oysters are dead. The oysters are dead,Ž Danny Beckham shouted over the whir of his skiffs motor and as he plowed white foam in his wake heading recently to an estuary on the southern reaches of the Suwannee Sound. The question is, what are we going to do about it?Ž Beckham said. He said the dying oyster beds, and what he considers restrictions placed on the oystermen like him, are conspiring to end a maritime heritage. My family has done this for four generations. I have done it for 55 years. My grandson comes out here after school to do it, too,Ž Beckham said. I feel like we are in the middle of the end for what we do.Ž LITTLE TO SHOW FOR LOTS OF WORK Upon arrival at an estuary near the Gulf of Mexico, three other skiffs were anchored over the oyster reefs in estimated 6 feet deep water. Men wielded 10-foot long scissor-like rakes called tongs to dredge the bivalves from the bottom. The oysters are then heaved over the tiny skiffs gunwale and dumped on the bow for culling. As his boat approached the others, Beckham heard a familiar sound: Oysters crack and rattle as they were being dumped on skiff bows. Did you hear that? They are dead. It sounds like broken glass because the shells are empty,Ž Beckham said. The men continued to plunge the rusty, ironforged tongs into the shellladen bottom and in a shallow arc dump more of it on to their boat bows. The sun hung high with some clouds in the distance as the ritual continued. A lean woman sat donning sunglasses and a well-worn baseball hat and football jersey with a hammer-like culling iron ferreting the good from the bad. Her hands, like the others, are rough hewn. In her holding hand she had on a Kevlar-type glove. Mike Roach, who was working solo, had his bow piled high with oysters. After “ ve hours of deliberate and muscle-fueled work, he had only two bushels. Hopefully, I can get another bushel from this,Ž Roach said, pointing to his pile. George Stevens had also been there for hours, but only had two bushels. Thats like $50 from working all day,Ž Stevens said. We used to make $150 to $200 a day,Ž he added. Ronald Fred Crum, head of the Wakulla Fishermens Association, which also represents the oystermen, said he has been working overtime to “ nd solutions for an industry in crisis. Crum said the industry workers need help and soon. We cant and should not shut down the season as some are suggesting. We need some entitlements, help for these people. We should subsidize what they are making right now and allow the industry to recover in about two years,Ž Crum said. Lets reward effort and hard work. These people have families and bills to pay. They need help and we need answers,Ž Crum said. Cedar Key oysterman Beckham has been supplementing his meager harvest with a smoked mullet and dip business, but he said sales from that business are hardly suf“ cient to offset the loss of revenue from the scant season. Oysters typically take 15 to 18 months to recover, which means next years season also could be affected. Oyster season run through May. Gov. Rick Scott visited Franklin County on Wednesday and said up to 2,500 jobs are at risk in that county alone because of the poor harvest. Scott has declared an emergency from Levy to Franklin counties. The emergency declaration means the counties involved will now be eligible for federal aid. EDITORS NOTE: This story appeared in our sister newspaper, the Citrus County Chronicle, in its Sunday, Oct. 7 edition. PHOTO BY MATTHEW BECK/Citrus County ChronicleMichael Roach utilizes long, wooden tongs to harvest what he can from the bottom of Rattlesnake Point off Cedar Key. The tongs are one of the standard tools incorporated by oystermen. NEED HEARING AIDS?HEARING AIDS AT NO COST TO FEDERAL BCBS WORKERS AND RETIREES!?That’s Rights… No Co-Pay! No Exam Fee! No Adjustment Fee! Discover How Much Better Your World Can Sound… The Name You’ve Come To Trust Serving Your Hearing Needs For Over 60 yearsBlue Cross Blue Shield Federal Insurance pays total cost of 2 Miracle Ear ME2100 series aids. If you have Federal Government Insurance with enrollment code #104, #105, #111, or #112, you are covered for hearing aids with no out of pocket expenses. 3 yr. warranty. If you have a basic plan, we have factory pricing for non-qualifiers Miracle EarHearing Aid Center is NOW Offering CRAWFORDVILLE3295 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY THE LOG CABIN, BARRY BUILDING TALLAHASSEESEARS MIRACLE EAR GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL 1500 Apalachee ParkwayANN HENNESSY, MA, CCC-A CERTIFIED & LICENSED AUDIOLOGISTCall for an appointment 850-942-4007 Toll Free 1-866-942-4007HUNTERS… ACT NOW & ORDER HEARING PROTECTIONMIRACLE EAR GUARDIAN*Hearing evaluation and video otoscope inspection are always free. Hearing evaluation is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnosis, nor are they intended to replace a physician's care. If you suspect a medical problem, please seek treatment from your doctor. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle G E T READY FOR HUN T IN G Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-7 Closed Sun. & Wed.

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton This weeks column was written by Duane Treadon, many thanks to him for putting this together. Fall means many things and for the Auxiliary, and the election of leadership is one of those things. Our Flotilla held elections for the positions of Flotilla Commander and vice flotilla commander during our October meeting. Elections of these two positions are held every year around this time so that newly elected leadership has the chance to attend a leadership training if they have not been before. While a vice commander is not term limited, the Flotilla commander can only hold of“ ce for a maximum of two years. Current Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos has served the past two years as Flotilla commander and now must step down. Bob has been involved with the growth of our detachment in CarrabelleSt. George Island, the reestablishment our Communications trailer, and the expansion of our Area Of Responsibility (AOR) that tripled in size. During our recent meeting the nominating committee reported that they received only two quali“ ed nomination from the membership, Duane Treadon for Flotilla commander and Norma Hill for vice commander. With no other quali“ ed members nominated, Treadon and Hill were chosen to serve as the Flotillas elected leadership in 2013. Congratulations, we know you both will do a great job. We were also excited to welcome a guest to our meeting … Jarrell Hale, a former Coast guardsman. Jan. 26 may seem like a long time away, but it will be here sooner than you expect it. Why is this date important? It will be the first offering of the Coast Guard Auxiliarys Public Education course About Boating Safely by the Flotilla. Classes tend to “ ll up as the date gets closer so we will be taking registrations early for the class. This eight-hour class will be held in Tallahassee at the Fish and Wildlife Commissions headquarters. Topics covered include navigation, first aid, trailering, emergencies on the water, Florida boating law, how to have fun and still be safe, and other safe boating topics. To cover expenses, cost for the class is $30 per individual or $50 for a family up to four. For more information or to register email info@ uscgaux.net or stop by our information booth at the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival on Oct. 20. After the Flotilla meeting this past Saturday a few of our members participated in an area familiarization patrol. Veteran members Tim Ashley and Duane Treadon along with transfer member Fran Keating and former active duty Coast Guard member Jarrell Hale conducted the mission from St. Marks to just before the U.S. Highway 98 bridge on the river then out the river to the St. Marks River channel buoy. Though new to our Flotilla, Fran Keating is not new to the Auxiliary. Having joined the Auxiliary in 2003 and brings a wealth of knowledge to our Flotilla. Having boated on the waters of Detroit, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Mississippi, and what we call brown water bodies (lakes) Fran brings a great deal of knowledge on boating in varied conditions. Jarrell Hale from Thomasville, Ga., served active duty Coast Guard mostly on small boats (25-50 feet). Both Fran and Jarrell commented on the extreme care that must be taken in navigating our many oyster beds. With a low tide that afternoon many of these just under the water with higher tides were exposed. A small miscalculation can cause a tremendous amount of damage to a boat and the people onboard. Anyone who was out Saturday can con“ rm it was an excellent day for boating. We are so fortunate that our boating season can really last year round. While many of our northern friends are starting to pull boats out and winterize before the cold season we are blessed with warm breezes and bright sun well into the so called cold season. Next week, several members of Flotilla 12 will head over to Panama City to participate in the Division Meeting. This is a great time for learning, exchanging ideas, stories and lessons learned as well as fellowship. We get this opportunity three times a year and it is always a good time! Look for the highlights next week. Enjoy these cooler but still enjoyable fall days. And remember, as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Oct 11, 12 Fri Oct 12, 12 Sat Oct 13, 12 Sun Oct 14, 12 Mon Oct 15, 12 Tue Oct 16, 12 Wed Oct 17, 12 Date 3.4 ft. 12:33 AM 3.6 ft. 1:05 AM 3.8 ft. 1:35 AM 3.9 ft. 2:04 AM 4.1 ft. 2:35 AM 4.2 ft. 3:07 AM High 1.4 ft. 5:38 AM 1.0 ft. 6:28 AM 0.5 ft. 7:13 AM 0.0 ft. 7:56 AM -0.3 ft. 8:39 AM -0.5 ft. 9:22 AM -0.6 ft. 10:08 AM Low 3.3 ft. 11:44 AM 3.6 ft. 12:40 PM 3.8 ft. 1:30 PM 4.0 ft. 2:18 PM 4.0 ft. 3:04 PM 4.0 ft. 3:50 PM 3.8 ft. 4:36 PM High 0.8 ft. 6:14 PM 0.8 ft. 6:55 PM 0.9 ft. 7:32 PM 1.0 ft. 8:08 PM 1.1 ft. 8:42 PM 1.3 ft. 9:17 PM 1.5 ft. 9:52 PM Low Thu Oct 11, 12 Fri Oct 12, 12 Sat Oct 13, 12 Sun Oct 14, 12 Mon Oct 15, 12 Tue Oct 16, 12 Wed Oct 17, 12 Date 3.5 ft. 12:30 AM 3.7 ft. 1:02 AM 3.9 ft. 1:32 AM 4.0 ft. 2:01 AM 4.2 ft. 2:32 AM 4.3 ft. 3:04 AM High 1.5 ft. 5:35 AM 1.0 ft. 6:25 AM 0.5 ft. 7:10 AM 0.0 ft. 7:53 AM -0.3 ft. 8:36 AM -0.6 ft. 9:19 AM -0.7 ft. 10:05 AM Low 3.4 ft. 11:41 AM 3.7 ft. 12:37 PM 3.9 ft. 1:27 PM 4.1 ft. 2:15 PM 4.1 ft. 3:01 PM 4.1 ft. 3:47 PM 3.9 ft. 4:33 PM High 0.9 ft. 6:11 PM 0.9 ft. 6:52 PM 0.9 ft. 7:29 PM 1.1 ft. 8:05 PM 1.2 ft. 8:39 PM 1.4 ft. 9:14 PM 1.6 ft. 9:49 PM Low Thu Oct 11, 12 Fri Oct 12, 12 Sat Oct 13, 12 Sun Oct 14, 12 Mon Oct 15, 12 Tue Oct 16, 12 Wed Oct 17, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 12:33 AM 3.2 ft. 1:09 AM 3.4 ft. 1:41 AM 3.5 ft. 2:11 AM 3.7 ft. 2:40 AM 3.8 ft. 3:11 AM 3.9 ft. 3:43 AM High 1.3 ft. 6:42 AM 0.9 ft. 7:32 AM 0.4 ft. 8:17 AM 0.0 ft. 9:00 AM -0.3 ft. 9:43 AM -0.5 ft. 10:26 AM -0.6 ft. 11:12 AM Low 3.1 ft. 12:20 PM 3.4 ft. 1:16 PM 3.6 ft. 2:06 PM 3.7 ft. 2:54 PM 3.8 ft. 3:40 PM 3.7 ft. 4:26 PM 3.5 ft. 5:12 PM High 0.7 ft. 7:18 PM 0.7 ft. 7:59 PM 0.8 ft. 8:36 PM 0.9 ft. 9:12 PM 1.0 ft. 9:46 PM 1.2 ft. 10:21 PM 1.3 ft. 10:56 PM Low Thu Oct 11, 12 Fri Oct 12, 12 Sat Oct 13, 12 Sun Oct 14, 12 Mon Oct 15, 12 Tue Oct 16, 12 Wed Oct 17, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 12:25 AM 2.7 ft. 12:57 AM 2.8 ft. 1:27 AM 3.0 ft. 1:56 AM 3.1 ft. 2:27 AM 3.1 ft. 2:59 AM High 1.0 ft. 5:49 AM 0.7 ft. 6:39 AM 0.4 ft. 7:24 AM 0.0 ft. 8:07 AM -0.2 ft. 8:50 AM -0.4 ft. 9:33 AM -0.4 ft. 10:19 AM Low 2.5 ft. 11:36 AM 2.7 ft. 12:32 PM 2.9 ft. 1:22 PM 3.0 ft. 2:10 PM 3.0 ft. 2:56 PM 3.0 ft. 3:42 PM 2.8 ft. 4:28 PM High 0.6 ft. 6:25 PM 0.6 ft. 7:06 PM 0.6 ft. 7:43 PM 0.7 ft. 8:19 PM 0.8 ft. 8:53 PM 0.9 ft. 9:28 PM 1.1 ft. 10:03 PM Low Thu Oct 11, 12 Fri Oct 12, 12 Sat Oct 13, 12 Sun Oct 14, 12 Mon Oct 15, 12 Tue Oct 16, 12 Wed Oct 17, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 12:17 AM 2.8 ft. 12:49 AM 2.9 ft. 1:19 AM 3.1 ft. 1:48 AM 3.2 ft. 2:19 AM 3.3 ft. 2:51 AM High 1.4 ft. 5:17 AM 0.9 ft. 6:07 AM 0.5 ft. 6:52 AM 0.0 ft. 7:35 AM -0.3 ft. 8:18 AM -0.5 ft. 9:01 AM -0.6 ft. 9:47 AM Low 2.6 ft. 11:28 AM 2.8 ft. 12:24 PM 3.0 ft. 1:14 PM 3.1 ft. 2:02 PM 3.2 ft. 2:48 PM 3.1 ft. 3:34 PM 2.9 ft. 4:20 PM High 0.8 ft. 5:53 PM 0.8 ft. 6:34 PM 0.8 ft. 7:11 PM 1.0 ft. 7:47 PM 1.1 ft. 8:21 PM 1.3 ft. 8:56 PM 1.4 ft. 9:31 PM Low Thu Oct 11, 12 Fri Oct 12, 12 Sat Oct 13, 12 Sun Oct 14, 12 Mon Oct 15, 12 Tue Oct 16, 12 Wed Oct 17, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 12:25 AM 2.9 ft. 12:46 AM 2.9 ft. 1:07 AM 3.1 ft. 1:29 AM 3.2 ft. 1:54 AM 3.3 ft. 2:24 AM High 1.4 ft. 5:07 AM 1.1 ft. 5:54 AM 0.8 ft. 6:36 AM 0.5 ft. 7:16 AM 0.2 ft. 7:57 AM 0.0 ft. 8:41 AM -0.1 ft. 9:28 AM Low 2.7 ft. 11:05 AM 2.8 ft. 12:21 PM 2.9 ft. 1:29 PM 3.0 ft. 2:31 PM 3.0 ft. 3:31 PM 3.0 ft. 4:31 PM 2.9 ft. 5:33 PM High 0.8 ft. 5:30 PM 1.0 ft. 6:12 PM 1.1 ft. 6:51 PM 1.4 ft. 7:27 PM 1.6 ft. 8:00 PM 1.8 ft. 8:33 PM 1.9 ft. 9:05 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacOct. 11 Oct. 17First Oct. 21 Full Oct. 29 Last Nov. 6 New Oct. 15Major Times 10:05 AM 12:05 PM 10:29 PM 12:29 AM Minor Times 3:31 AM 4:31 AM 4:31 PM 5:31 PM Major Times 10:54 AM 12:54 PM 11:18 PM 1:18 AM Minor Times 4:31 AM 5:31 AM 5:08 PM 6:08 PM Major Times --:---:-11:44 AM 1:44 PM Minor Times 5:33 AM 6:33 AM 5:46 PM 6:46 PM Major Times 12:09 AM 2:09 AM 12:36 PM 2:36 PM Minor Times 6:37 AM 7:37 AM 6:26 PM 7:26 PM Major Times 1:03 AM 3:03 AM 1:31 PM 3:31 PM Minor Times 7:44 AM 8:44 AM 7:10 PM 8:10 PM Major Times 1:59 AM 3:59 AM 2:29 PM 4:29 PM Minor Times 8:53 AM 9:53 AM 7:58 PM 8:58 PM Major Times 2:59 AM 4:59 AM 3:29 PM 5:29 PM Minor Times 10:01 AM 11:01 AM 8:52 PM 9:52 PM Average Average Better Better Best Better++ Good7:36 am 7:10 pm 3:32 am 4:32 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:37 am 7:09 pm 4:32 am 5:09 pm 7:38 am 7:07 pm 5:34 am 5:47 pm 7:38 am 7:06 pm 6:39 am 6:27 pm 7:39 am 7:05 pm 7:46 am 7:11 pm 7:40 am 7:04 pm 8:54 am 8:00 pm 7:40 am 7:03 pm 10:02 am 8:53 pm31% 24% 17% 9% 2% 6% 14% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Symbiosis II Animals live together, with intricate relationships, even in the marine environment. Recall animals that eat others are called predators, those that consume their host slowly without killing them are called parasites. But many that work together are called commensals. We see cooperation as either mutual or one sided. The egret that walks near a cow is watching for the cow to stir up bugs or other food, which it opportunistically takes. The Remora “ sh follows sharks, turtles and rays, even adhering to their host, to detach and feed off the scraps of a feeding frenzy. These are usually one sided relationships. On the patch reefs I studied, I found a community of creatures that lived together. The algae-like anemone Lebrunea (and others), was the host for crabs, shrimps, star “ sh and small “ sh, some of which played a role in the health of the reef “ sh. Several species of shrimp called Periclimenes, are known to clean “ sh. During dawn and dusk, usually, “ sh attend these anemone cleaning stations, lining up to have their mouth, gills and body parts picked over by these shrimp. Scientists have argued that the “ sh just like to be ticked, and as such gain nothing from the relationship. The shrimp clearly get the food, ” esh or parasites, they pick out of the teeth of the awaiting “ sh. Do the “ sh value this service? First, I noticed that non-resident “ sh lined up to be cleaned by one shrimp species, and the resident “ sh lined up in front of cleaning stations of another shrimp species. So I set forth to document not only which “ sh species like which shrimp species, but how each “ sh partitions the reef. I “ rst learned how to study territoriality by watch birds (speci“ cally Mockingbirds) in a cemetery. The birds hop from headstone to headstone singing outwardly from their defended space. By drawing their path and encounters with others, I can de“ ne their territory. Periodically, they will ” y back to a nest or feeding area. And periodically, they will ” y up high and leave the area for water or other social options. My resident “ sh did exactly the same thing, swimming from one prominence to another, not singing, per se, but interacting with others at their territorial boundary. Periodically they would swim high up over the reef and go to another part of the undefended reef and soon return. Within their territories, I often found a resident cleaning station, nest of eggs or feeding area. I once found an anemone without cleaners outside of any “ shs territory. I placed a cleaner and within a few minutes, the adjourning defending “ sh included the station into its territory. Different species with overlapping territories each spent time at shared cleaning stations. A pecking order became apparent based upon “ sh size, the larger the more dominant. One day well into the study, I saw a butter” y “ sh heading straight into a cleaning station in the heart of the reef. They eat anemones, and began tearing this station apart, shrimp and crabs jumping off, making quite the ruckus. Immediately, several small Bicolor Damsel “ sh jumped in adding to the ruckus and trying, unsuccessfully, to push the larger Butter” y “ sh away. Soon the Cooco Damsel “ sh joined in and began pushing the intruder away. The Three Spot Damsel was next, nipping at the now ” eeing Butter” y “ sh. I thought the show was over when a foot-long Grasby Grouper rose up off the reef and took a bite that disabled the Butter” y “ sh. All were “ sh I had recorded attending the cleaning station and now defending it from predation. Naturally, I next removed all the defending “ sh from a cleaning station and watched in amazement, the immediate destruction of the resident cleaning station. Within one hour, all the cleaners were gone. The anemone had either moved or been eaten by the next morning. Fascinating community structure! Can we learn from them? Like us on

PAGE 12

Green Scene Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Please RecycleBy KEN FIELDS In 1999, after 15 years in law enforcement, I went to work for Merck and Co. in Albany, Ga. During the years at Merck I focused on building my photography business and started doing weddings, family, and nature shoots. Soon I realized taking pictures could never be just a business, it was a lifelong passion. Over the years I still had my dream of taking pictures of Alaska and all its natural beauty. On Aug. 24 my dream came true when I ” ew out of Tallahassee Regional Airport. Making the trip even better was that my mom would join me during my stopover in Atlanta and we would head off on our adventure. From Atlanta we had a short layover in Salt Lake City before heading to Anchorage, Alaska. Our ” ight arrived at 12:57 a.m. on Saturday. That morning we were up at 8 a.m. and walked from one end of Anchorage to the other, getting some great pictures. On weekends from May to September they have an outdoor market covering two city blocks and you can buy anything you need. What a day of sights, fun, and pleasure. I found Stewarts Photo Shop and of course I had to look and look. Sunday morning it was time to pick up our motorhome and supplies so we could head off to Denali National Park. The drive there should have taken three and a half hours, but we stopped often and took our time. There were pictures to be taken around every curve. Its all so big and beautiful! We were up early Monday morning ready for a tour of Denali National Park. It was raining and would continue for the rest of the day. Our plan to go to Wonder Lake would have to be postponed until Tuesday, the tour bus was full. To Savage River we went, rain or shine, there were pictures waiting to be taken. The drive through Denali was breathtaking. At every turn of the road I saw more beauty through my lens than I had ever imagined. Tuesday 6 a.m. we headed to Wonder Lake, an 85-mile trip that would take 11 hours. Sable Pass was magni“ cent, the colors were brilliant. We had several stops along the way, one more spectacular than the other. There was a sad moment when we reached the place where a photographer had been killed by a grizzly bear on Aug. 24. At this point we were 1,000 feet up the mountains. We saw a grizzly bear 300 yards away at our next stop, the driver told us to keep our distance. Beauty doesnt describe what I saw around me. We arrived at the base of Mount McKinley which is part of the Alaskan range. The place made me feel so insigni“ cant, the mountains are huge and you know only God could make something so amazingly beautiful. Soon we were at Wonder Lake and this is the closest point to Mount McKinley you may go without a climbing pass or plane. On our return trip we saw a wolf and beautiful lynx. As we saw the lynx walking down the river bed, it seemed he posed for the camera without concern that we were there. Another glorious day with images so amazing words cant express them. After 11 hours we were ready for food and sleep. Wednesday morning we started our drive to Valdez. The panorama continued to be breathtaking. Our drive took much longer than expected. I took so many pictures of this magni“ cent place. We “ nally arrived at Valdez about 10:15 p.m. and I got a picture of the moon rising on one side of the road, and the sun setting on the other. Thursday we walked around Valdez. Through my lens I captured all the grandeur and magic of this old city. The next morning as were leaving we passed by the “ sh hatchery. I couldnt believe the picture waiting for me: Tens of thousands of seagulls lined the bay, for the next two miles. Next we drove through Thompson Pass. The closer we were to the end of our drive we found ourselves passing Worthington and Nelchina glaciers. Upon arriving to Anchorage we have driven 1,119 miles and seen more than we ever dreamed of. Saturday it was time to return home. All are invited to an exhibit, A Night as Seen Through My Lens,Ž featuring photos from his Majestic Alaska ShootŽ on Oct. 13 from 2 to 8 p.m. at the Wakulla County Shriners Club.Genetically Modi“ ed Foods (GM) are making the news with legislators getting involved at our State Capitol recommending that everyone has a right to know what is in their foods and speci“ cally if any food has been genetically modi“ ed. Perhaps you as a consumer would appreciate some insight into this issue. Keith Schneider and Renee Goodrich Schneider are both from the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department at the University of Florida and offer this abbreviated summary. What is a GM Food? A GM food results when the genetic makeup of an organism is modified. This can be done through incorporating genes from other organisms or by rearranging genes already present. These changes can result in attributes that were not found in the original organism. Some examples of traditional foods that have been genetically modified include tomatoes, squash, potatoes, cotton, and soybeans. Why are foods modi“ ed? GM is used to assist food manufacturers to improve the storage capacity and/or the nutritional value of foods. The “ rst GM food was a particular tomato which was modi“ ed to allow it to remain “ rm even after extended shipping and storage. Another example is hard cheeses, where the substance to make the rennet was originally derived from the stomachs of calves and is now commercially produced. Approximately 90 percent of the hard cheses are now made using this process. What is the potential help to the consumer ? Industry has argued that GM foods reduce production costs by reducing the need for additional chemicals (pesticides and fertilizers) and mechanical inputs. The nutrition implications are also cited as an obvious bene“ t for the consumer, since the bioengineering could create plants that could produce a more nutritious food. What are the health concerns? The potential for GM foods to cause allergic reactions is the most obvious health concern associated with these products. Speci“ c protein in milk, eggs, wheat, “ sh, tree, nuts, peanuts, soybeans, and shell“ sh cause over 90% of food allergies. If a protein from one of these food types were to be incorporated into a food that normally would not have this protein, people who are allergic to these proteins could unknowingly consume such a food and suffer an allergic reaction. The FDA has required that each producer of a GM food product presents scienti“ c evidence that they have not incorporated any allergenic substances into their product. If this evidence cannot be produced, the FDA requires a label to be put on the product to alert consumer. How is food safety monitored in all foods? There is no one statute or federal agency devoted to the regulation of GM foods. You and I rely on the Food and Drug Administration for assurance that the foods we buy are safe and wholesome. Under the Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act, the FDA has the authority to ensure the safety of most domestic and imported foods in the U.S. market (except meat and poultry, which is regulated by the USDA). Pesticides used in or on foods are regulated primarily by the Environmental Protection Agency. Continued on Page 13A By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING e concern over food thats been genetically modi“ ed PHOTOGRAPH BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA view of the Alaskan wilderness in Denali National Park, part of the upcoming exhibit of photos by Ken Fields. Ken Fields, left, shows a photo to kicker Dustin Hopkins during a recent FSU game. Photographer exhibits scenes of recent trip to Alaska 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief Support850-878-5310

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 – Page 13AContinued from Page 12AThe FDA monitors foods to enforce the tolerances for pesticides set by the EPA. Finally it is the USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services that controls the “ eld trials of any GM crop that falls under permitting requirements. What does the future hold? With all of the controversy surrounding GM foods, researchers have been searching for new methods to enhance crop production. One technique combines the selection of genes that control traits of interest, such as color, meat quality or disease resistance. Because this process uses existing DNA, not transgenic DNA to choose desired traits, this methodology stands to be less controversial than other GM techniques. Want to know more? Visit www.solutionsforyourlife. com and request publication number FSHN02-2 or give me a call and I will see that you receive a copy. Swenson: Genetically modi“ ed foodsBy GENA DAVIS October is the month to think pink!Ž Breast Cancer has finally gotten the attention it has deserved for so long. It is still, however, a devastating disease for the victims and families that face it each and every day. Many patients find that exercise and eating right can help them maintain their strength during treatment, and helps them have a more positive outlook on their situation. There are many women at the gym who have dealt with, or are currently dealing with breast cancer. They have kept their workouts and exercise routines intact before, during and after their treatment program. They feel it helps them mentally and physically. So many cancer patients have as many mental rami“ cations as physical ones. Having some type of physical outlet such as weightlifting or an exercise class helps them cope and helps them stay healthy. Body-Tek 24 Fitness Center and Zumba Wakulla are donating the proceeds from the Zumba classes to breast cancer Research, so girls and guys, come on out and get your Zumba on! Dear EarthTalk: Given that the presidential election is just around the corner, what can you tell me about each candidates environmental track record and positions? Jane Miller Chicago Just because the environment is getting short shrift this election season due to our nations lingering economic woes doesnt mean that candidates Obama and Romney can ignore the issue. Environmentalists have cheered several of President Obamas moves during his first term, including: passage of the Recovery Act and its funding for environmental and habitat restoration and water quality improvements; passage of the “ rst comprehensive National Policy for the Stewardship of the Ocean, the Coasts and the Great Lakes; and the signing of the Omnibus Public Lands Management Act of 2009, which expanded land protections and water conservation across two million acres of federal wilderness. Obama also formed the Partnership for Sustainable Communities to bring together federal agencies to help communities nationwide improve access to affordable housing and increase low cost transportation options while protecting the environment. He also established new rules to reduce the negative impacts of mountain-top removal coal mining, set historic standards limiting greenhouse gas emissions from cars and trucks, made substantial investments in clean energy, proposed the “ rst-ever carbon pollution limits for new fossil-fuel“ red power plants, and reduced carbon emissions within the federal government. On the downside, green leaders dismay Obamas lack of follow-through on a 2008 campaign promise to label genetically modi“ ed foods so that consumers know what they are getting when they buy corn, sugar or breakfast cereal. Also, a 2011 Obama decision to deregulate the planting of genetically modi“ ed alfalfa and sugar beets incensed organic farmers and environmental leaders. Greens also worry about Obamas enthusiasm for an all-of-the-aboveŽ energy policy that includes the practice of hydraulic fracturing (frackingŽ) to access natural gas in shale beds under wide swaths of the northeast and western U.S. If re-elected, Obama would no doubt work to expand U.S. leadership on setting emissions limits in unison with other nations, and has pledged to continue to reduce our dependence on oil so as to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Conservationists are also hopeful that Obama will set aside threatened lands for protection from development as both Bill Clinton and George W. Bush did soon before leaving the White House. While Mitt Romney doesnt have much of an environmental track record from his days as Massachusetts governor, he did get kudos for being open minded to both regulatory and market-based policy ideas. He also supported a 2003 northeastern states agreement to reduce carbon emissions from power plants via a regional capand-trade emissions reduction plan. But in 2005 Romney abruptly pulled Massachusetts out of the plan, telling reporters that it didnt protect businesses and consumers from increased energy costs. Romney is now pitching an energy plan that embraces all the options, including fossil fuels, nuclear energy and renewables. But he recently told ScienceDebate.org that he opposes any kind of carbon tax or cap-and-trade system that would handicap the American economy and drive manufacturing jobs away,Ž adding that economic growth and technological innovation, not economysuppressing regulation,Ž are key to protecting the environment in the long run. Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). What are candidates positions on the environment? Environmentalists have cheered several of President Obamas moves during his “ rst term, but dismay his lack of follow-through on a 2008 campaign promise to label genetically modi“ ed foods. Mitt Romney doesnt have much of an environmental track record, but has been open minded to both regulatory and market-based policy ideas. Zumba to support breast cancer research GET FIT $14,214,813 1-866-742-1373 Get your business noticed One Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Don’t make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.AdNetworksFlorida.com all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ Favored Treatment "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser

PAGE 14

Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportA 35-year-old Quincy manager reported an armed robbery at Hardees. The victim stated that a suspect requested an undisclosed amount of cash from him after closing time. The masked suspect was brandishing a handgun while demanding the cash. Evidence was collected at the scene. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce: SEPTEMBER 27 € Loss Prevention staff at Wal-Mart reported a retail theft after a 16-year-old male was reportedly observed taking headphones and concealing them on his person. The juvenile allegedly did not make any attempt to pay for the item before leaving the last point of sale. The item, valued at $31, was recovered. The juvenile did not qualify for transportation to the juvenile detention center. The suspects mother is a jail inmate and she requested the juvenile be turned over to a friend who picked him up. € Sarah Sanders of Panacea reported a fraud. The victim reported that someone cashed an insurance check intended for her family. SEPTEMBER 28 € Ashley Bragg of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported losing her debit card and discovering three purchases on her account that she did not make. The victim had $16 worth of fast food purchases on her account from Tallahassee. € Delano Taylor of Panacea reported “ nding a set of car keys through Panacea Post Office officials. The keys were originally found at Wal-Mart in Crawfordville. The keys were turned over to the Evidence Division. € Rona Bowen of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash at her home. A vehicle ran into her mailbox and knocked it over. Witnesses at the scene assisted deputies in locating the suspect who admitting hitting a Waste Pro garbage bin, but did not realize she struck the mailbox as well. Marlyan Virginia Gray, 72, of Carrabelle was issued a traf“ c ticket for leaving the scene of an accident. Damage to the mailbox was estimated at $50. € Ronald Price of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at Maria Del Carmen Lane. The entrance sign to the development was damaged. Damage to balls and lights on the sign was estimated at $200. € Richard Strickland of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported that a suspect conducted a yard sale and some of the items sold belonged to him. The value of the stolen items is $670. Other items were burned by the suspect. Those items were valued at $34. The stolen items were recovered and Amanda Renee Glover, 32, of Panacea was arrested for grand theft and criminal mischief. € Thomas Galvan of Tallahassee reported a grand theft in Crawfordville. An air conditioning unit, valued at $2,000, was reported missing from a foreclosed home in Crawfordville. € Robert Blankenship of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Jewelry and a television, valued at $215, were reported missing. Individuals of interest have been identi“ ed. € Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated an abandoned vehicle on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road and Cajer Posey Road in Crawfordville. The vehicle had an Alabama tag and posed a traf“ c hazard. A wrecker was called to the scene after Sgt. Harrell was unable to locate any ownership information. € Jimmy Young of Crawfordville reported the theft of a canine from his home. The Pekinese was valued at $400. € Dianna Rosenbaum of Crawfordville reported a theft at her home. Jewelry, a television and miscellaneous items, valued at $360, were reported missing. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated a 10-speed bicycle that was recovered in the Wakulla Gardens area. A juvenile was observed riding the bicycle but when Deputy Gibson returned to check on the welfare of the juvenile he found the bike on a vacant lot. The bike was turned in to the Property Division as found property. SEPTEMBER 29 € Verbon Scott of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims mailbox and trash bin were disturbed. Damage to the mailbox was estimated at $25. Suspects were observed in the area. SEPTEMBER 30 € Jessica Lanette Fruggiero, 28, of Crawfordville was charged with battery after getting into an altercation with another inmate at the Wakulla County Jail. Corrections staff determined that a verbal altercation escalated into a physical dispute. € Timothy Stephens of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim noticed that his vehicle was tampered with overnight and $535 worth of property was stolen from inside. The items included sunglasses, a phone charger and an umbrella. The vehicle was not locked at the time of the theft. € Amanda Glover of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Clothing, movies, books, a table and string trimmer, valued at $700, were reported missing. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € Penny Whitehead of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Damage was reported to the victims vehicle. Damage was estimated at $150. € Kimberly Sharkey of Tallahassee reported a structure “ re in Crawfordville. Brandon Loudner of Crawfordville reported a grease fire on the stove. Wakulla firefighters responded and extinguished the “ re. Loudner and two juveniles escaped from the home unharmed. Damage was reported to the stove area of the kitchen. € Lorna Conner of Panacea reported a traf“ c crash at Coastal Highway and Walker Farm. The victim struck a deer and created $2,500 worth of damage to her vehicle. OCTOBER 1 € Deputies Gibby Gibson and Vicki Mitchell were called out to investigate a disturbance when they discovered their suspect had ” ed the scene. Deputy Mitchell conducted a traf“ c stop in the Old Shell Point Road area. Derrik Ray Stallings, 18, of Crawfordville was stopped and it was determined that the driver did not possess a valid driver license. Stallings was also arrested for DUI and operating a motor vehicle while license was suspended or revoked with knowledge. Deputy Ward Kromer searched Stallings prior to transporting him to the Wakulla County Jail and discovered marijuana and drug paraphernalia on the suspect. He was charged with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Stallings was also charged with aggravated battery, criminal mischief and burglary with assault or battery in connection with the disturbance case that led to the DUI arrest. Damage to the victims home and property was estimated at $1,220. € James Travis of Crawfordville recovered property owned by a Tallahassee man at Azalea Park. Deputy Mike Crum contacted the owner and made arrangements for him to pick up the missing property. € Earl Peckham of Crawfordville reported the theft of a handicapped permit from his vehicle. The vehicle was not locked and tissues were also removed from the vehicle. € Wrenn Green of Panacea reported a traf“ c crash. A boat trailer driven by Coy Shiver of Eastpoint struck Greens vehicle with a trailer guide. The trailer guide damaged Greens window and vehicle door while also injuring his hand. Damage was estimated at $300. € Howard Wynns Crabtree, 42, of St. Marks was charged with smuggling contraband into the Wakulla County Jail. Crabtree was observed concealing items in the front of his jail issued clothing while on trash detail at Newport Park. Two packs of cigarettes were recovered. € Betty Money of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone spray painted the victims vehicle. Damage to the vehicle is estimated at $500. OCTOBER 2 € Marvin Libby Jr. of Premier Motor Cars reported a vehicle theft. A boat and trailer were taken from the lot. The boat is valued at $7,000 and it was entered in the FCIC/NCIC data base. € Louise Fedorak of Panacea reported a vehicle theft from a Panacea residence. A Lincoln Continental, valued at $2,000, was removed from the yard. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € Barbara Wallace of Crawfordville reported an animal incident where she lost her parrot. The parrot was in its cage outside the front door when the victim left home. But she returned to discover that the parrot was gone. A suspect cat was observed on the property, paw prints were observed inside the cage and loose feathers were discovered by Deputy Randy Phillips. € Christen Odham of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim lost her purse from inside an unlocked vehicle at her home. The purse and contents were valued at $504. Evidence was collected at the scene and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Ian Dohme and Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. OCTOBER 3 € Areyouna Brooks of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft. Shoes and purses, valued at $3,120, were removed from her vehicle. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € Martin Causseaux of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A suspect, who has been identi“ ed, stole $562 worth of business equipment from the victims business vehicle. Detective Nick Boutwell interviewed Jeremy E. McCranie, 35, of Crawfordville who admitting taking the property and selling it. He was charged with grand theft and was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 825 calls for service during the past week. V V o t e Ralph Thomas for COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 I will Serve you, and be accessible to discuss issues that are important to you Make sound decisions that reflect the standards set by the community, only after gathering and weighing all of the facts Work to ensure that every tax dollar is spent efficiently on items that promote the services desired by our citizens Strive to reduce taxes Refrain from incurring additional debt and will seek every opportunity to reduce the current debt load Insist that we build an Emergency Fund that will not be used to pay for non-emergencies between budgets Remember that Freedom belongs to the people and should not be infringed upon by the Government www.ralphthomas2012.com Poli cal adver sement, paid for and approved by Ralph Thomas, Republican, for County Commission District 1 LWV Vote Wakulla 2012Ž CANDIDATE FORUMSPresented by The League of Women Voters#The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization encouraging the informed and active participation of all citizens in the political process. CLIP AND SAVE THESE FORUM DATES! All forums will take place at theSeating is limited Doors open at 6:15For more information call: Membership in the Wakulla League is open to all interested citizens. VOTE AGAINST ALAN BROCK He Does NOT PAY any PROPERTY TAXES!No School Tax, County Tax, Water Tax, Fire Tax and No Trash Fee, but he Decides how to Tax You & Spend Your Tax Dollars while being Paid by the Taxpayers!PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT BY DONNA SANFORD. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

PAGE 15

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 – Page 15AContinued from Page 7A Incidentally, I have carried this over into my married life. According to my father, if I simply obeyed Franklins advice I would have a life filled with health, wealth and wisdom. The three things absolutely needed in life to make a person happy. Or, so Franklin would lead us to believe. After what seems to be a lifetime of living, and living in as much harmony of these two aspects of life, I must say that there is very little truth to be said concerning good old Franklins saying. No matter how early I go to bed or how early I get up, I do not seem to be any wealthier or healthier. Perhaps, and this is only a guess on my part because I am not as wise as old Benjamin Franklin, you had to do something when you got up that contributed or created your wealth. Just a suggestion from me. That is the way it is with most sayings. They sound good, you sound wise in quoting them, but after every saying is quoted, nothing seems to change. They just do not cover the whole spectrum. It is not that I have not given it the good old college try; it just does not work for me. This past week I had an occasion to think about this quote. I have tried keeping the early to bed and early to rise objective in full focus throughout my life. I am not up partying until the wee hours of the morning. At my age, my party time is early afternoon. I have made a concerted effort to get enough rest and just to make sure I have enough rest I indulge in an afternoon nap. I am not sure where this comes in Benjamin Franklins quote. Recently, I had cause to re” ect upon the validity of Benjamin Franklins sage advice. My quarterly taxes were due, and you know what good old Uncle Sam thinks about being late on his payments. If confession is good for the soul (another famous quote), I need to confess that while I was writing this check to Uncle Sam I had some rather harsh thoughts about him in the process. There, I said it. During the same week, some other bills were due and none of them would take no for an answer. Again, I must confess, while writing these checks I was sputtering to myself quite a bit. As I looked at my checkbook, I knew that the wealthyŽ component of Benjamin Franklins quote did not come in my direction. I was simply out of wealth. Not only that, but I recently spent about four weeks sick with bronchitis and pneumonia and spent about three weeks in bed. Not only was I early to bed, but I was glued to my bed. How does that “ t into Franklins saying? The healthyŽ aspect of that quote has not fallen in my direction either. If you want to know about the wise element, simply query the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Another old phrase says, three strikes and youre out. Well, according to the Franklin saying, I must concede that I am out. I am not wealthy, in many regards Im not healthy and for sure, Im not wise. It is my opinion that there is a lot more to life than wise old sayings from some old man from the past. Benjamin Franklin, for example, no doubt practiced early to bed and early to rise but in the end, he died. That does not sound too healthy to me. Of course, the best place for wisdom is the Bible. I like what the wisest man in the world said, Trust in the LORD with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy pathsŽ (Proverbs 3:5-6 KJV). I am not too sure about the healthy and the wealthy components, that is up for grabs, but I am convinced the wise part comes from the Lord. After all, the Bible teaches us that God is Omniscient. If God knows everything and I know God, I am in a good position.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Pastor: Early to bed, early to rise hasnt worked for me PLEASE RE-ELECT OUR “PAP” Donnie Sparkman WAKULLA COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERHe Is: Knowledgeable Honest Dedicated to the people of Wakulla County with 42 years of experience Certi ed Florida Appraiser Experienced Land Surveyor (and He Loves US! Brigs, Walker & Reese) Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Donnie R. Sparkman, Democrat, for Property Appraiser Continued from Page 1A Typically, she and her husband will get in the car and drive where the long pine needles are and spend all day racking them up. She then wraps them up and stores them. After that “ rst day, she fell in love and continued to try and make more baskets. When I “ rst started, I had no idea what I was doing,Ž Rosen says. It has been a learning process through trial and error. She has never taken a class to make what she calls an embryo basket.Ž She says she doesnt want to be in” uenced by someone elses style. Instead, she continues to come up with new and creative ideas. Its like Im challenging myself to see what I can come up with,Ž Rosen says. First, she boils the pine needles to soften them and then wraps a bunch of them in a dish towel. When she is ready to begin making a basket, she takes a small amount of needles and wraps a thread around the ends to secure them. She then starts one pine needle at a time. She uses a coiling method, as opposed to basket weaving. Her basket making is constantly evolving and she is always trying new ideas. She incorporates sea grass, sweet grass and other grasses into her baskets. She also dyes the pine needles to give the baskets a different look. At one time, she was using wooden pieces for the center of the baskets to speed up the process. The center part of the basket take the longest amount of time, around 4 hours. She had her son, Michael, cut out slices of wood from live oak, heart of pine and cedar tress to make the centers. She has also used coasters and other items. Anything that can have holes drilled in it can be used, she says. I look at the world in a different way,Ž Rosen says. I see if its something I can turn into a basket.Ž She also started making tops for the baskets, which she didnt do in the beginning. Other ideas have included breaking apart a wine box and using part of it as the base. She has also used gourds as the base and then adds the pine needles to the top of it. She has also traded with local artists and used their ceramic pieces for the center of the basket, combining the different forms of art. They are constantly evolving and I am constantly evolving,Ž Rosen says. When Rosen started making her baskets, she would bring them in to the of“ ce where she works in Tallahassee. One day, she was approached by one of the doctors who needed Christmas gifts for his family. He asked her for “ ve baskets and from that moment she stared selling them. Youre so honored,Ž Rosen says when people are willing to pay for something she made. She then went to the Blue Crab Festival in Panacea and sold seven of 14 baskets she brought. From that point on, she started attending more festivals and shows to sell her baskets. I call myself an accidental artist,Ž Rosen says. She loves making baskets and says it is just a part of who she is now. Im a happy basket maker,Ž Rosen says. The baskets are portable so she is able to take them with her where ever she goes. And she only works two days a week, so her lifestyle allows her to indulge in her passion for basket making. Many people who visit her booth at festivals end up coming back several times to see the same basket. She believes those people are getting some sort of message from the basket. Theres a mysterious connection between people and my baskets,Ž Rosen says. No two of her baskets are alike. She doesnt take pictures of her baskets because she doesnt want to have to try and recreate it. When she starts on a basket, she typically doesnt know how it will turn out. This was natures discards,Ž she says of the pine needles. But she is able to turn them into something people can enjoy. I like to see how it evolves,Ž she says. And no matter what age someone is, they can start something new, she adds. Theres lots to do.Ž She was 62 when she started making handcrafted baskets. Rosen will be at the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival on Oct. 20 with her Basketry by Barbara.Barbara Rosen turns natures discards into art JENNIFER JENSENBaskets Barbara Rosen made by coiling pine needles.

PAGE 16

Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LES HARRISON Walk into any retailer and the evidence is in plain sight. Christmas is less than three months away. Decorations, gifts, cards, and wrapping paper are prominently displayed for the buyers convenience. Among the ubiquitous decorations are the red and green pillar candles with holiday fragrances. One, the Bayberry candle, has a distinctly North Florida connection. The bayberry and wax myrtle trees are both member of the Myrica plant genus. The term Myrica is a Greek word for fragrance. A member of this plant is found in a majority of the inhabited world. The bayberry, with its larger berries, is collected commercially to produce the popular candle scent. Before the advent of mass-market candles, wax myrtles had the same use in many North Florida homes. The wax myrtle is a native Florida plant. It is a small tree or large shrub which can be grown anywhere in the state. Wax myrtle does well in a moist environment. It is excellent for use in poorly drained soils, but grows well in drier soils. This durable plant can serve many uses in the landscape. Wax myrtles have male and female flowers produced on separate plants. Female ” owers grow in close bunches producing light green round fruits about an eighth of an inch in diameter. The fruits are coated with a thick, bluish wax useful in making candles. Wax myrtles can reach a height of 25 feet. Their leaves are evergreen narrow at the base and broader toward the upper end of the leaves. About midway up the leaf toward the tip, coarse teeth appear on the leaf edges. Wax myrtles produce suckers, small plants that sprout from the roots. The suckers grow into large clumps, or clusters, and eventually grow into a very large, dense plant. Suckers can be removed from around the main trunk to produce an attractive, small tree. The trunk of the wax myrtle is grayish white in color similar to northern birch. These trees are used extensively in patio planting and as landscape screens. Wax myrtles can be grown from seeds, cuttings, and simple layering techniques. Seeds can be started in a mixture of equal parts sand and peat moss. Another method for propagating wax myrtle is to dig established plants during the winter months. Cut the plants back to within a few inches of the ground. Dig out the root clumps and set them in containers. In a few months, the plant will regrow. A small tree 10 to 12 feet in height will take a few years to grow using this method. Being a native plant, wax myrtle is well suited to Wakulla Countys soils and climate. The plant is cold hardy, salt tolerant, and relatively free of diseases and insects. The only one serious pest of wax myrtle is a caterpillar which chews leaves and ties terminal leaves together. To learn more about wax myrtles, contact your UF/ IFAS Wakulla Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u” .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@ufl.edu or at (850) 926-3931.Wax myrtles are a hardy native species PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWax myrtle berries have a thick, bluish wax useful in making candles.Special to The NewsThe Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society meets Tuesday, Oct. 16, at 6:30 p.m. at Wakulla Public Library. The feature in this season of raging wildflowers on the roadsides is Road Rage: Wildflowers and Public Right-of-Ways,Ž an illustrated presentation by Sarracenias guest, IFAS Wakulla Extension Agent Les Harrison. The public is cordially invited. Social time, with refreshments for all, will precede the 6:30 meeting.Les Harrison to speak on wildflowers Come to visit us at our brand-new TLFCU branch: 2655-C Crawfordville Highway and go home with cash!Refinance any vehicle through TLFCU and receive two-percent cash back of the original loan value, up to $500! TLFCU.org | 866.876.4638 bank smallTHINK BIG Federally Insured by NCUA. *Bonus is 2% of the new principal loan balance with TLFCU, subject to a maximum bonus of $500. Bonus is only available for vehicles currently financed with another lender. The member is responsible for paying all fees associated with the loan, including doc stamps, title, and lien f ees. Loan approval is subject to credit verification, income level, debt ratio, collateral approval and TLFCU's underwriting guidelines. Some restrictions may apply. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. Ask one of our Loan Specialists for all details, fees, and current rates. Membership eligibility limited to those who live, work, o r worship in Leon, Gadsden, Jefferson, or Wakulla county. At HealthSouth, we understand that recovering from a stroke can be challenging. But no matter where a patient is in his/her recovery process, or how long ago the stroke occurred, our Second Chance Stroke Program could help maximize functional ability, increase independence and improve quality of life. This includes areas of mobility, speech or written communication, swallowing, cognitive functions and activities of daily living. Our program oers: € Physical/occupational/speech therapy € Certi“ed rehabilitation nurses € Therapist trained in neuro developmental treatment € Patient/family education € Support groups Admission is by referral for a free in-home evaluation. For more information contact us. YOU DESERVE A SECOND CHANCE 2012:HealthSouth Corporation:551344

PAGE 17

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netWakulla looked unstoppable in the first half of last weeks game against Rickards. We played our best half of the year,Ž War Eagle Head Coach Scott Klees said after the game. Everything was clicking, offensively and defensively.Ž Wakulla stayed undefeated, improving to 6-0, and basically guaranteed a spot in the district playoffs with the win. Im proud of our guys for coming out with focus,Ž Klees said. Early in the game, the Rickards defense was obviously confused with Wakullas offense. On the “ rst two offensive series, running back Demetrius Lindsey broke long runs to set up Dillon Norman for scores. The War Eagles were up 14-0 with not even half of the “ rst quarter played. Then came the only Wakulla error … special teams giving up a long return for a touchdown on the subsequent kickoff. Wakulla kept the ball on the ground, with Lindsey tearing off more long runs and Norman scoring another rushing touchdown to go up 21-7 with just over a minute left in the “ rst. In the second quarter, Lindsey scored on a 14-yard run and the War Eagles tacked on the extra point to go up 28-7 with 8:55 remaining. Just before halftime, Dillon Norman broke a long run to the Rickards 22-yard line and quarterback Caleb Stephens connected with receiver Mikal Cromartie on a 23-yard touchdown pass. With the extra point, it put Wakulla up 35-7 with a minute left in the half. (Cromartie was named Defensive Player of the Week for his work on the other side of the ball, which included an interception, a fumble recover and “ ve tackles.) It was remarkable in that Wakulla threw the ball only three times in the whole game. There would be no more scoring in the game. The second half saw lots of replacements come in for the War Eagles, and a Rickards offense that struggled against Wakullas defense. Norman, who was named offensive player of the week, scored three touchdowns in the game, and Lindsey scored once. Klees praised the offensive line: They played extremely well,Ž he said. And the defense didnt budge the ball.Ž Of the few number of passes, Klees said: I wanted to establish the run and be physical up front. You run to open up the passing game.Ž But, the coach said, the ground game was working so well, he didnt want to get away from it. On defense, the only time Rickards seemed to get any offensive momentum and appear to be driving the ball was on Wakulla penalties. Klees sighed when asked about it. I guess were just gonna be the most-penalized team.Ž Klees also praised the play of quarterback Caleb Stephens, who is somewhat hobbled with a knee injury and will have surgery after the season. He played well. Im pleased with his performance. THIS WEEK: Open. NEXT WEEK: The War Eagles travel to play Suwannee High School in Live Oak on Friday, Oct. 19, at 7:30 p.m. Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 sports news and team views Sports Cross Country: Good showing at FSU Invitational Volleyball: Lady War Eagles chalk up two wins Sports, Page 4B Hear ye, hear ye – the Florida Supreme Court is now in session Weekly Roundup, Page 6B War Eagles look great in win over RickardsWakulla o ense shows speed in dominating “ rst half over district foe; defense doesnt give up points KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRickards defense was unable to solve Wakullas offense in the “ rst half as speedsters Demetrius Lindsey and Dillon Norman tore off runs for scores to put the War Eagles up 35-7 over the Raiders. Above, Lindsey breaks into the open “ eld. MORE GAME PHOTOS, Page 3B. Some things get better with age. Capital Health Plan is one of them. Plan to attend a SEMINAR during the Medicare Annual Election Period, October 15 through December 7, 2012, to LEARN MORE about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) and Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-8708943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Paid Endorsement. Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 to RSVP or for more information. (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/Medicare H5938_DP 358 Accepted 08122012 Anna Johnson says.... Join me and become a member of a Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO) plan.Ž Seminars will be held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd., Tallahassee Friday, October 12 Monday, October 15 Tuesday, October 16 Tuesday, October 23 Friday, October 26 Monday, October 29 Thursday, November 1 Wednesday, November 7 Friday, November 9 Monday, November 12 Tuesday, November 13 Wednesday, November 21 Friday, November 23 Thursday, November 29 Friday, November 30 Wednesday, December 5 Thursday, December 6 Over 250 community-minded Wakulla County residents gather to eat tasty seafood, have a good time, and netŽ funding for a growing Big Brothers Big Sisters Wakulla County Mentoring Program. We are trying to raise $7,000 to support the ongoing efforts of the Big Brothers Big Sisters Wakulla County Mentoring Program. With such funding, Big Brothers Big Sisters will help more Wakulla County youth facing adversity overcome HUGE obstacles to dev elop: $10 per plate. Tickets are available online at www.bbbs.org/BIGcatch, at Poseys Steam Room, or at Poseys Dockside Caf.To Sponsor or for More Info: Contact Katie Williams at katie.williams@bigbendmentoring.org or 850.386.6002 Law Oce Est. 1998Fore cl osures Creditor / Debtor B usiness L aw1 7 High Drive, S uite C Courthouse Sq uare Crawfordvi ll e, F l orida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator

PAGE 18

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Oct. 11  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Oct. 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Oct. 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 9621010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Oct. 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Oct. 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Oct. 16  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  SARRACENIA CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. The feature is “Road Rage: Wild owers and Public Right-of-Ways,” an illustrated presentation by Sarracenia’s guest, Wakulla Extension Of ce Director Les Harrison. The public is invited. Social time, with refreshments, will precede the meeting. Wednesday, Oct. 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Oct. 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsThursday, Oct. 11  ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZA AND AUCTION will be held by the Wakulla Coastal Optimist Club at 6:30 p.m. at Wildwood Country Club. Money earned goes to fund the scholarships they give out to Wakulla High seniors. They will be modeling clothing for men and women. Entertainer of the Year, Kevin Story, will be the guest performer. For tickets, visit Centennial Bank, see Noah or Sherrie Posey Miller at Posey’s Steam Room or at Dentistry By The Sea.  CAPITAL AREA HEALTHY START COALITION will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. at the library. Wakulla County providers, care coordinators, local professionals and consumers are invited to begin the CAHSC service delivery planning process. This is the organizational meeting for developing the 2015-2020 plan.  RELAY FOR LIFE KICKOFF PARTY will be held at 7 p.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Church for the Carnival of Hope. Register a team (please bring your rst $100 of fundraising money), register as a survivor and learn about Relay. For more information or to RSVP email wakullarelay@ gmail.com or call (850) 926-8854. Saturday, Oct. 13  WAKULLA GREENWING DAY will be held at the Sheriff’s Of ce Range, located at 65 Qualify Lane, off Lawhon Mill Road. Registration is at 9 a.m. and the event is 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. It is open to children 6 to 18 years old, parental supervision is required. Cost is $15 per child, which includes a T-shirt and Greenwing Magazine subscription. Lunch is provided. There will be educational stations targeting rearm safety, bench shooting, shotgun shooting, archery, turkey shoot for $2 per shot and a chicken shoot for $1 per shot. There will be giveaways and door prizes. For more information, call Holly Porter at 519-0416 or email WAKULLAGREENWING@ EMBARQMAIL.COM.  COUNCIL FAMILY REUNION will be held starting at 5 p.m. at the Council family reunion picnic grounds in Crawfordville with a sh fry. There will also be a covered dish lunch at 11 a.m. on Sunday. Descendants of John Cecil Council, an early pioneer of Wakulla County, are invited. For questions, call Beverly Council at 926-3759.  CHINESE AUCTION will be held by the VFW Ladies Auxiliary Post No. 4538 at 475 Arran Road. Doors open at 6 p.m. and auction starts at 7 p.m. Purchase a sheet of 25 tickets for $5. A drawing for each auction item will be held.  OKTOBERFEST will be held at 10 a.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church and Preschool. There will be German food, silent auction, games for kids. There will be bratwurst, sauerkraut, hotdogs and German potato salad. Cost is $5 per person. The church is located on U.S. Highway 98 across from the high school. Sunday, Oct. 14  COUNCIL FAMILY REUNION will be held at 11 a.m. with a covered dish lunch at the Council family reunion picnic grounds in Crawfordville. For questions, call Beverly Council at 926-3759. Wednesday, Oct. 17  INFORMATION SERVICE DAY on pre-Medicare annual open enrollment will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center, 33 Michael Drive. The Area Agency on Aging will be providing information on how to proceed in making changes to Medicare. There also will be a SHINE volunteer counselor available to assist with Medicare and Medicaid needs. For more information, contact the Senior Center at 926-7145.Upcoming EventsFriday, Oct. 19 FORE THE BUILD GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held to bene t Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County at Wildwood Golf Course. This tournament will help fund the 2012 Habitat Home Build. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Cost is $50 per person or $200 per team. To enter, contact Doris Crosby at 545-7425. Saturday, Oct. 20  STONE CRAB FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in downtown St. Marks. There will be food, music, parade, children’s activities, educational displays and dozens of vendors. A parade will be held at 11 a.m. The theme is super hero. Dress up or decorate a golf cart or antique car. Call 925-6224 or email cityofst.marks@comcast.net for additional details on the parade.  ANNUAL HORSE-O-WEEN will be held at noon the Wakulla County Equestrian Center, Lawhon Mill Road in Sopchoppy, by the Wakulla County Horseman’s Association. There will be fun games with prizes for everyone.  WATERS JOURNEY: Following the Water to Wakulla Springs will be held from 8 a.m. to noon. Springs expert, Jim Stevenson, will lead people on a tour by caravan. Advance registration is recommended. Tour departs from TCC in Tallahassee at 8 a.m. and ends at the tower overlooking the spring at noon. Cost is $18 and includes the entrance fee to Wakulla Springs State Park. For more information, call 926-3376.  GENEALOGY SEMINAR will be held by the Wakulla County Historical Society at the Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. Registration is at 8:15 a.m., and includes breakfast and lunch. Speakers are genealogy experts Jay Collins and Melody Porter. For more information, call 926-1110. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Government Meetings Thursday, Oct. 11  TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea. The public is invited.  WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 6 p.m. at the Parks and Recreation Administration Of ce.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, Oct. 15  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for its regular meeting in the commission chambers.  SCHOOL BOARD will meet at 5:45 p.m. for its monthly meeting in the school administration building. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorJust to keep everyone in the loop on our upcoming e-book checkout service, we have placed our “ rst order and will be undergoing staff training in the next couple of weeks so that we can go liveŽ as quickly as possible. A few things you should know about this service is that there will be a limit of two e-books that can be checked out at a time for two weeks at a time. We are only ordering e-books which are compatible with all of the major readers (Kindle, Nook, Ipad, etc) so that the greatest number of our patrons can have access. For those who dont have readers, there are apps which you can put on your mobile device or home computer which can give you access as well. More details will be forthcoming along with our go live date and the dates for public workshops so that we can show you how the system will work. It is very user friendly but we will of course be available to answer any questions. Please contact us for any suggestions youd like to see in our e-book collection as well. Change in Grace Period Due to a change in our new operating system we are currently unable to give our patrons a grace period on their checkouts. This means that overdue “ nes begin accruing the day after your items are due. This is only an issue if your items are returned late. If they are on time our patrons will never have to worry about this. We will announce when/if we will be able to provide a grace period again. Remember that if you need to renew items you can do so via our website or by giving us a call at 926-7415. Book Extravaganza Another Success Huge thanks to all who attended our Book Extravaganza last Saturday. Your generous donations raised more than $500 for the Friends of the Library. Combined with our Silent Auction in mid-September you have helped raise more than $3,500 for the library! Thank you once again for your generous support and keep an eye on us as we put this funding to good use. Friday Night Movie Our Friday night movie this week tells the story of a team of explorers who discover a clue to the origins of mankind on Earth, leading them on a journey to the darkest corners of the universe. There, they must “ ght a terrifying battle to save the future of the human race. Though our Public Showing License doesnt allow me to name it here, I can say that the “ lm is directed by Ridley Scott, and is hinted at being a prequel to his blockbuster Aliens saga. This critically acclaimed R-rated “ lm (for sci-“ violence and brief language) stars Noomi Rapace, Michael Fassbender, Charlize Theron and Idris Elba, and is guaranteed to keep the audience guessing and on the edge of their seat. Due to the rating all minors must be accompanied by an adult. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing. Political EventsThursday, Oct. 18  POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for sheriff will be held at 7 p.m. at the library by the League of Women Voters of Wakulla County. Saturday, Oct. 20  MEET PETE WILLIAMS, candidate for State Attorney, from noon to 2:30 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant, Crawfordville. This is a free event and lunch and drinks will be served. Monday, Oct. 22  POLITICAL FORUM for candidates in the state house district 7 and county school superintendent races will be held starting at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. The superintendent forum will follow at 7:45 p.m. This forum is held by the Wakulla Republican and Wakulla Democratic executive committees. Library News... Optimist Club Fashion Extravaganza at Wildwood at 6:30 p.m. Relay for Life kickoff party at 7 p.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Chinese auction for VFW Ladies Auxiliary at 475 Arran Road at 6 p.m. Wakulla Greenwing Day at Sheriff’s Of ce Range from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.ThursdayThursdaySaturdaySaturday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 – Page 3Bsports news and team views SportsPlayers of the WeekDILLON NORMAN 12 carries for 157 yards and 3 touchdowns BRANDON NICHOLS Played great on Special Teams, says Klees. MIKAL CROMARTIE 1 interception, a fumble recovery, 5 tackles … plus offensive catch for TDO ense Defense Special Teams War Eagles look great in win over RickardsBy BRIANA FORDHAMSpecial to The NewsWakulla High School will be hosting a community event on Oct. 23, beginning at 6 p.m. The Powder Puff Game between junior and senior girls will kickoff at 6 p.m. The community pep rally will begin at 7 p.m. and is expected to last until 8 p.m. There will be refreshments and food for sale at the concession stand. During the pep rally, the 2012 Homecoming Court will be announced and youll be able to familiarize yourself with the faces that are eligible to win the title of king and queen for 2012. We are accepting a $1 donation entry fee at the gate. Please come out to the event and show your community spirit. If you have any questions, you may contact Briana Fordham at Wakulla High School. Community pep rally set Oct. 23 WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCoach Scott Klees tells the play to quarterback Caleb Stephens. Wakulla students celebrate the win after the game by singing the alma mater. War Eagle linebacker Dequon Simmons sticks a hit on a Raiders running back. Wakulla safety Mikal Cromartie picks off a pass and gets into the open “ eld. Cheerleaders and the War Eagle Marching Band keep the Wakulla fans revved up for the game. More photos online at thewakullanews.com 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org www.Ken FieldsPhotography.photoshelter.com THE RACE FOR U.S. SENATE Florida voters have key decisions to make in the race for U.S. Senate. Read continuing coverage in this newspaper and tune-in to the statewide debates to learn more about the candidates and where they stand on the issues that matter the most to you. For a list of tv stations carrying the live debates visit BeforeYouVote.org Wed., Oct.17, 2012 7:00 8:00 pm ET Broadcast live from Nova Southeastern University Mack ( R ) Nelson ( D ) DEBATE Sponsors : Florida Blue, Credit Unions of Florida, AARP and The Claude Pepper Foundation Debate Partners Host

PAGE 20

Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsCLASSIFIEDS $12 Per Week!By ELIZABETH ANDREWSAssistant CoachThe Wakulla Lady War Eagles played two games and a tournament last week, improving their record to 8-6 and 4-0 in districts. The first game was against Franklin, at home on Wednesday, Oct. 3, and resulted in three straight match wins with scores of 25-16, 25-14 and 25-14. Marina Petrandis served up eight aces and eight kills while Breighly Bolton added to the score with four aces and eight kills. Shannan Wood was the leader in kills with nine. The second game was yet another win for the Lady War Eagles at Suwannee High on Thursday, Oct. 4. The Eagles had three straight match wins with scores of 25-8, 25-12, and 25-16 thanks to Haley Browns 15 kills, seven digs and three aces. Chelsea Carroll had an amazing game with “ ve aces and 20 assists. Breighly Bolton contributed 11 kills and Shannan Wood added 10. The tournament was held at Florida High School on Saturday, Oct. 6, and included three other teams, John Paul II, Florida High and North Florida Christian. Wakulla placed third in the tournament, losing to John Paul II in three matches in the “ rst game 25-21, 25-17 and 27-25. Florida High was Wakullas second loss and lasted four matches with scores of 16-25, 20-25, 25-22 and 23-25. The day ended on a good note with Wakulla defeating NFC in three matches with scores of 2512, 25-20 and 25-19. Freshman setter Caylee Cox stepped in for Capt. Chelsea Carroll, who was not able to make the tournament and had 77 assists and six aces throughout the day. Haley Brown had 33 kills, Shannan Wood had 31, Marina Petrandis had 17, and Breighly Bolton had 12. Defense was lead by Jordan Pryor with 37 digs and Haley Brown with 25. The Lady War Eagles will play next week against John Paul II on Oct. 15 and on Oct. 18 against Maclay finishing up the season with districts on Oct. 25.Special to The News The Crawfordville International Gold Gymnastics competitive level 3 team has won gold in back-to-back weekend competitions. The “ rst meet was held Sept. 29 at the U.S. Gold Gymnastics facility in Destin. Last weekend, the gymnasts participated in the Canopy Roads Classic 2012 at the Trousdell Gymnastics Center in Tallahassee facing “ ve other competitive teams. The gymnasts were scored on their performance on beam, ” oor, vault and bars. Level 3 gymnasts, ages 7 to 9, are coached by Yasmin Belhaj and Katie Bell. International Gold Gymnastics will be hosting the next competition, 2012 Going for Gold Invite in Tallahassee on Oct. 20. In the photo, from left to right are top: Annika Matlock; middle row: Hailey Quick, Hannah Francis, Lillie Steinle, Jewell Fondo and Coach Yasmin; bottom row: MaKenna Schissler, Aubree Bushee, Caroline Barwick and Riley Davis. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach On Saturday, Oct. 6, the local cross country teams joined 2,500 runners from more than 100 Florida High Schools as they competed in the huge FSU Invitational held on the Apalachee Regional Park cross country course. The newly expanded and updated course is a joint venture between FSU, Gulf Winds Track Club and Leon County and is now truly a national class venue. This invitational has always been a major meet, but this year it was even bigger because it will be the site of the 2012 State Finals Meet which made this meet the of“ cial Pre-State Meet. Entries were limited to the “ rst 100 teams to register, even though other teams were interested in attending. There were eight separate races held on Saturday, including Elite and Invitational sections. Both of the WHS teams competed in the small school division. Because of the way the meet was scheduled, the local teams races didnt start until after 10:30 a.m., which meant that the runners faced extremely warm and humid conditions which somewhat negatively affected their race times. As expected, the races were extremely competitive and the runners had to “ ght for every place and every place was important in the “ nal standings. Twenty-“ ve schools entered girls in this section and the WHS girls had another excellent outing, placing 4th out of the 19 schools that “ elded complete teams. The WHS varsity girls team consisted of Marty Wiedeman, Raychel Gray, Kasey James, Lydia Wiedeman, Kayla Webbe, Lilianna Broadway and Connie Lewis Webbe was the 5th scoring runner for WHS team, running a new personal record (PR) time of 23:19 and also moving into the top 15 female runners of all time at the high school. Lewis also set a new PR of 25:52, which was a 1:43 improvement for her. In the attendant JV race, Emily Westmark also ran a PR. The WHS boys also had a good outing. Thirty schools entered runners in this section, with 21 schools “ elding full teams. The local boys “ nished in 8th place. The varsity boys team was composed of Aaron Smith, Travis Parks, Lane Williams, Albert Smythe, Ryan Dodson, Mitchell Atkinson, Gabe Hutchins, Jimmy French and Justin Milhon Smith, Smythe, Dodson, Milhon and French all recorded PRs in the race. Smiths time of 18:18, was good enough to move him into 9th place on the All-Time Top 15 list at the high school. WHS also had a number of runners in the boys JV race who ran good times and set new PRs. These runners included Riley Carrier, Mark Veerapen, Tyler Westcott, Toby Jordon, Riley Welch and Evan Guarino Right after the races, I wasnt sure exactly how we had run, said Coach Paul Hoover. Because of the conditions, the times for most of our top runners were a little slow, but after having a chance to analyze the results and looking at how we placed, it became clear that our kids, both the boys and girls, had really raced well. And in cross country, the real test is how you do in the head-to-head battle with the competition rather than the time you ran and we did about as well as I could have hoped for,Ž Hoover said. Im pretty proud of our teams, especially the work ethic theyve shown and how they work together and pull for each other.Ž The teams are back in action this Saturday, Oct. 13, at the Dolphin Dash, hosted by Mosley High School in Lynn Haven.CROSS COUNTRYWar Eagles have good showing at FSU Invitational IGGs gymnastics team wins gold twiceSPECIAL TO THE NEWS Lady War Eagles chalk up wins against Franklin, Suwannee BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPlay at the net in a recent game between Wakulla and Florida High. !!" 2012 Go to www.bigbendhospice.org to Sign-up Today! 11:30am Registration and Lunch 12:30pm Tee-o October 26, 2012Wildwood Country ClubSAVE THE DATE!For more information, call Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308Wakulla County Big Bend Hospice REGISTRATION DATES: SATURDAY 10/20/12 & SATURDAY 10/27/12 REGISTRATION TIMES: 8:00 A.M. TO 12:00 P.M. OR DURING OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY 10/15/12 TO FRIDAY 10/26/12 8-5PMREGISTRATION DEADLINE: SATURDAY 10/27/12, 12:00 PM REGISTRATION PLACE: MEDART RECREATION PARK 79 Recreation Dr.AGE DETERMINING DATE: SEPTEMBER 1st, 2012COST IS $40.00 PER CHILDAGES: 04 & UNDER DIVISION: 06 & UNDER DIVISION: 08 & UNDER DIVISION: 10 & UNDER DIVISION: 12 & UNDER DIVISION: COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD8 & 9 DIVISION: 10, 11, & 12 DIVISION: All players (basketball & soccer) must provide proof of health insurance or purchase a policy for an additional $10.00. All leagues are coed. If interested in coaching the above sports, please contact the Wakulla County Recreation Department. All volunteers must complete a criminal history background check. www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH

PAGE 21

By MARTY COHENWe wait for events like this, the games that are the reason you come to Florida.Ž Even us sports writers, a cynical, critical bunch if there ever was one, get juiced for matchup of this magnitude. They used to be an annual occurrence around here, sometimes more than once in a season, but its been a while since there was a big-game feelŽ surrounding Florida football. Welcome back. Saturdays contest with No. 4 LSU will deliver the seasons de“ ning momentŽ for undefeated Florida. It should be great theater on Saturday afternoon in The Swamp, which hopefully will become a full-throated factor like it was in the two decades before Muschamp arrived. For a while this is a big game, its simultaneously not a critical game for Florida … in fact, you could make a case (and I will) that the LSU showdown is the least important game Florida will play for the rest of the season, or at the very least, the conference season. Now before your blood pressure starts spiking and you begin to wonder exactly what I was ingesting during the bye weekend, hear me out. Florida could lose this game on Saturday and not have a single goal it set for itself this season … including winning the national championship, however farfetched it once seemed … dashed in the process. Losing a game to a team from the SEC West is simply not a deterrent to winning an SEC or even a national championship. Floridas championship teams in 2006 and 2008 both lost close games to SEC West teams, and turned out OK. Floridas next four games are more vital to Floridas chances to return to Atlanta after a two-year absence. The Gators next home game against South Carolina on Oct. 20, is in“ nitely more critical than the LSU matchup.Florida is undefeated, and has put itself in early position to have a special season and LSU is the next stone on the path. A win would be great, a cause to celebrate, at least for a bit. But again, a loss would not cause irreparable damage to the season. Sure it is … any loss becomes magni“ ed as the stakes continue to rise. But Floridas far more important games will come on Oct. 20 and Oct. 27, the tough backto-back South CarolinaGeorgia doubleheader which will ultimately determine the course of the season. Lose one of those games, and Floridas dream of making it back to Atlanta takes a severe hit. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 – Page 5B F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators By TIM LINAFELT RALEIGH, N.C … As Jimbo Fisher confessed painful truth after painful truth in the wake of Florida States disappointing 17-16 loss at North Carolina State, he came across one point that wasnt quite accurate. We still control our own destiny in the ACC,Ž Fisher said, holding on to a shred of optimism after yet another season of high hopes and high expectations fell by the wayside. Fisher wasnt being dishonest. It just slipped his mind that if N.C. State wins out, it will be the Wolfpack … and not the Seminoles … making the trip to Charlotte to represent the Atlantic Division in the ACC Championship Game. But forget that dashed optimism and hang on to this new silver lining: Florida State can still win its “ rst Atlantic Coast Conference title since 2005. Now before you go rolling your eyes, remember that this is still a talented and veteranheavy team that, if its as mature as it constantly said it was throughout the preseason and September, will be able to bounce back and refocus itself for the “ nal six games of the regular season. Also remember that the Wolfpack, which came into the FSU game having dropped contests to seemingly mediocre teams from Tennessee and Miami, still has dates with North Carolina and Clemson left on the schedule. So, yes, the Seminoles are still very much in the hunt to win the conference and make their “ rst BCS appearance since the 2006 Orange Bowl. There wont be enough excuses in the world if this team, this coaching staff, fails to win the ACC in year three of the Fisher Era. Stalwarts Virginia Tech have gone 0-for-The Big East, losing “ rst to putrid Pittsburgh and then Cincinnati. The Hokies followed that up by getting run off the “ eld by a UNC team with a new head coach and nothing to play for thanks to NCAA sanctions. The Miami Hurricanes have been blown out by Kansas State and Notre Dame. Georgia Tech lost by three touchdowns to Middle Tennessee State and won just two of its “ rst six. Virginia, a program supposedly on the rise in coach Mike Londons third season, was blushing after falling at home to Louisiana Tech and, instead of bouncing back, was routed at Duke. Perhaps its only “ tting that, through six games, Maryland … picked to finish dead last … leads the Atlantic Division and the Blue Devils are only a half-game back of Miami in the Coastal. This is not a sign of great parity within the league. Its a sign that the ACC might be as bad as its ever been since expansion. Which makes it that much more frustrating for FSU fans that the Seminoles have once again let a chance to get a stranglehold on the conference fall through their grips. The Seminoles in 2013 will have to replace their veteran quarterback, star running back, most experienced receiver and do-everything fullback. The defense will have questions, too. Everett Dawkins, Anthony McCloud and Cornellius Carradine will be gone and its uncertain thatBrandon Jenkins or Bjoern Werner will return. When they arrived in 2008 and 2009, it was hard to imagine that players like EJ Manuel, Chris Thompson, Rodney Smith and Lonnie Pryor could make it through their entire FSU careers without winning a single championship. Competing for ACC titles ought to be the standard, not the goal. In any given year, FSU has enough talent to win the league, and that will be true in 2013. But next year wont present near the opportunity that 2012 did. Which makes it imperative for the Seminoles to bounce back from yet another CarterFinley nightmare … theyve lost four of their last six in the 57,583-seat stadium … and win this conference. Coming up short in 2010 and 2011 were tough enough pills to swallow. By December 1, 2012, FSU will have reached its expiration date. In the meantime, the Seminoles will have to cross their “ ngers for another N.C. State loss … which is hardly an outlandish hope … and not stub theirs toes in any remaining contests. The upcoming visit to Miami and F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Savannah State at Florida A&M atSaturday, Oct. 13 at 6 p.m.The game can be seen on famuathletics.com. #4 Florida at VanderbiltSaturday, Oct. 13 at 6 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPNU. Boston College at #12 Florida StateSaturday, Oct. 13 at 5:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN2. L S U g a m e LSU game b i g n o t big, not c r i t i c a l critical Jimbo Fisher and EJ Manuel have a lot at stake over the second half of FSUs season.Wide receiver Quinton Dunbar is slowly emerging as a threat in Floridas evolving passing attack.ACC now a must-win for FSUPhoto By TRAVIS REGISTERGATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here!

PAGE 22

Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 5 … As the nation tuned in for the “ rst of three presidential debates this week, Tallahassees attention focused heavily on the state Supreme Court. The court heard arguments in a range of controversial cases that included a parental-rights “ ght between former lesbian partners; an undocumented immigrants attempt to become a lawyer; a long-running debate about nuclearpower costs; and a dispute about university tuition. Meanwhile, three justices fought back in a political battle with Republican leaders and conservatives who want them replaced. Outside the court, regulators approved new rates for Citizens Property Insurance Corp. customers for 2013, while business groups and the states consumer advocate traded salvos about an effort to reduce the number of policies in the statebacked insurance pool. JUDGES ON THE HOT SEAT The Supreme Court typically hears oral arguments one week each month. And this week was a doozy. The court heard arguments about whether the Florida Board of Governors has the power to determine tuition and fees for public universities, a power that if granted would take that authority away from the Legislature. A skeptical court listened as an attorney for a group led by former U.S. Sen. Bob Graham argued that a 2002 constitutional amendment establishing the Board of Governors implicitly gave it the authority to set tuition and fees. Justices also said they may be powerless to let an undocumented immigrant practice law in the state, despite recent federal moves to create a pathway to permanent status for immigrants brought to the country as children. In a case that has drawn national attention, the Florida Board of Bar Examiners asked justices to weigh in on whether it should waive rules, set up in 2008, and allow Jose Godinez-Samperio to be accepted as a Bar member despite the fact he is currently illegally residing in the country. In another case, the court raised doubts about a challenge to a 2006 law that has led to customers of two utilities paying for future nuclear reactors that might not be built. The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy “ led the legal challenge after the PSC late last year approved allowing Florida Power & Light and Progress Energy Florida to pass along about $282 million in nuclearproject costs to customers in 2012. From nuclear power to nuclear family, the court also heard arguments in a legal battle that raises new questions about parental rights after the break-up of same-sex relationships. A Brevard County case pits two women who were lesbian partners when they decided to have a child. It is unique because one of the women provided an egg that was fertilized and implanted in the other woman, who later gave birth. After the relationship ended, the woman who gave birth blocked her former partner from having parental rights. Florida law gives egg or sperm donors limited rights, but some justices wondered if the laws were written with anonymous donors in mind and did not re” ect other situations. At one point, Justice Barbara Pariente raised the scenario of a man who impregnates a woman in a one-night standŽ and receives parental rights. She questioned whether two women who decide to raise a child should have lesser rights and said that could create issues of equal protection. In most years, merit retention votes dont draw much attention, as sitting appellate judges and Supreme Court justices quietly return to of“ ce. This year, some conservative groups and the Republican Party of Florida are attempting to unseat three veteran justices who have repeatedly come under “ re from conservatives for rulings going back more than a decade. On Friday, Justices R. Fred Lewis, Barbara Pariente and Peggy Quince attended a forum at the Florida State University College of Law to talk about merit retention as the trio tries to counter the push to send them packing. Collectively, they have raised more than $1 million to keep their jobs. Last month, the RPOF voted to of“ cially oppose the justices for a series of rulings that have not gone Republicans way. Among others joining the “ ght is Americans for Prosperity, a group funded by conservative billionaires Charles and David Koch. The justices have been joined by a group, Defend Justice from Politics, which supports their retention efforts. CITIZENS IN THE NEWS The state-backed insurer was in the news this week as the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation approved rates for 2013 that will boost premiums by 10.8 percent for Citizens Property Insurance Corp. customers. Following more than a month of review and multiple hearings by Citizens board members and the agency, OIR approved new rates that will affect most of the companys 1.4 million customers on policies renewed after Jan. 1. State lawmakers and OIR of“ cials have been trying to boost Citizens rates in recent years to make them more comparable to rates that would be charged by the private market in some of the riskiest areas of the state. Lawmakers, however, limited annual increases to 10 percent, a cap that critics say has hindered efforts to depopulate the state-run pool that has become the largest property insurer in the state. The cap, however, does not include higher costs for hurricane catastrophe insurance, resulting in rates climbing higher than 10 percent. The rate hikes come amid growing efforts by Citizens to reduce its ranks. This week, a plan to use $350 million in surplus to coax private companies into taking policies out of Citizens drew concern from Floridas insurance consumer advocate, who called on the insurer to provide much more data surrounding the proposed loan program. In a letter to Citizens Chairman Carlos Lacasa, consumer advocate Robin Westcott put forth a lengthy list of questions surrounding a deal approved in September by Citizens board of governors to provide 20year, low interest loans to private carriers to partially offset the risks associated with Citizens policies. Business groups, led by Associated Industries of Florida, jumped to Citizens defense, saying the loan program is needed to help re-invigorate the states private insurance market. ELECTION UPDATE Floridas effort to remove non-citizens from the ranks of voters took another step forward this week. A federal judge ruled that theres no time limit for the state to push for the removal of voters who were never supposed to be registered, and an effort to clean the rolls of non-citizens can continue until the November election. Judge William Zloch ruled that Secretary of State Ken Detzner is within the law in seeking the removal of voters from the rolls who were never supposed to be there. Opponents contended federal law prevented such purges within 90 days of the election. Certainly, the National Voter Registration ActŽ does not require the State to idle on the sidelines until a non-citizen violates the law before the State can act,Ž Zloch wrote.Ž STORY OF THE WEEK: The Florida Supreme Court took up a series of high-pro“ le cases, which dealt with issues such as university tuition, nuclear power costs and the admission of an undocumented immigrant to the Florida Bar. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: So if you have sex the good old-fashioned way ƒ its constitutional, but anything elseŽ doesnt get the same status? … Florida Supreme Court Justice Barbara Pariente during arguments in parental-rights case involving two women who were in a same-sex relationship. WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Hear ye, hear ye – the Supreme Court is now in sessionBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 5 – Three justices of the Florida Supreme Court used a forum Friday at Florida State University to hit back at their critics, while campaign lings showed the trio had raised more than $1 million for their electoral defense. Speaking to an audience at the FSU College of Law comprised mostly of students, Justices R. Fred Lewis, Barbara Pariente and Peggy Quince pushed back against a campaign to push them off the bench that has spread from a conservative grass-roots uprising to a denouncing of the three by the Republican Party of Florida. The justices said that the effort to throw them off the court in this November’s merit retention elections, in which the justices don’t face opposition but have to get the approval of a majority of voters, was a challenge to the state’s judicial branch itself. “We do not want and we should not want to go back to a system where judges are beholden to anyone – no political party, no group, no individual,” Quince said. Pariente stressed the same theme: That the bid by the group Restore Justice 2012 and other opponents to push the justices off the court would help to dismantle some of the reforms passed after a series of scandals shook the high court in the 1970s. “What we see is that it is not about just the three of us, but it is about our system of a fair and impartial judiciary,” she said. Lewis, who at times choked back tears when talking about his respect for the court and his role as a judge, recalled working for then-Circuit Court Judge Shelby Highsmith’s unsuccessful campaign for the Supreme Court. Lewis said he and Highsmith were shocked at the corruption in the race. “Floridians deserve better,” Lewis said. “We ought not allow it to go back to those days.” Opponents have sought to cast the three, who often serve as the backbone of the court’s left-of-center majority, as activist judges who are out of touch with the state’s voters. Supporters have insisted that the justices have simply followed the law and that the new effort is an attempt to mold a court less likely to thwart Gov. Rick Scott and the Republican-dominated Legislature. Recently, the Republican Party of Florida’s executive board got into the ght, upbraiding the justices for their votes in a 2003 appeal by Joe Nixon, who was convicted in the 1984 murder of Jeanne Bickner in Leon County. In that ruling, the court found that Nixon’s lawyer erred in essentially conceding his guilt during the trial without getting a statement of approval from Nixon. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned that decision. “These three justices voted to set aside the death penalty for a man convicted of tying a woman to a tree with jumper cables and setting her on re,” party spokeswoman Kristen McDonald said when the state GOP announced it was backing the effort to remove the justices. But Lewis told reporters after the event that he ruled against one of Nixon’s earlier appeals in 2000. “So I guess I should take it that their attack is actually a compliment,” he said. Lewis did concur in the majority opinion in the 2003 appeal, but wrote in a separate concurring opinion that he felt bound by the court’s earlier ruling even though he thought the result was “legally and logically incorrect.” Lewis criticized the RPOF for jumping into the fray. “I’m disappointed,” he said. “And I would have been disappointed if the Democratic Party had come out one way or another. I would have been disappointed if the Green Party [had gotten involved]. I’m disappointed that we are in an era where partisan politics, there’s an attempt to inject that into nonpartisan matters.”Justices hit back at critics No Acreage Limitations! Financing for Rural Homes www.FarmCredit-Fl.com Charlotte Dodson NMLS #700260850-656-2920 | Tallahassee, FL Oering loans with: Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 – Page 7B YOUR AD HERE Acid Aged April Asia Asked Asks Bite Cane Choice Construction Cost Daisy Decay Descriptions Drink Eats Ends Erases Extend Eyed Food Gets Happen Hens Hint Holster Hotel Idle Illustrated Laid Lamb Leak Lies Link Lion Lips Mark Mixes Noticed Only Parentheses Part Peas Peels This page sponsored in part by: Plan Pretty Rail Related Rest Rock Seem Sees Self Sets Simply Skied Slim Super Taxes Term Text Unity Wash X-ray

PAGE 24

Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements Todays New Ads Need your house or office cleaned? Call Renee at 850-590-6720 for information about my cleaning services, experience and pricing. References available. Good Things to Eat RAKER FARMSBlanched & Frozen Peas. Fresh Cut Okra. Green Peanut. And we process Beef, Hogs & Deer850-926-7561 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements Turn your art into cash! FREE ARTAPPRAISALS FOR POSSIBLE CONSIGNMENT* Oct 13 & 14. Noon to 10pm at Baterbys Art Gallery. 9101 International Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, FL32819. Call (866)537-1013 or visit www.Baterbys.com for more information. *Verbal appraisals & consignments taken based on consideration. Child Care Personnel BABY SITTER NEEDEDIn my home, in Sopchoppy, alternate weekends, some weekdays, 12 year old well behaved boy. Call Nanci (850) 363-1650 Medical Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Professional AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 Trades/ Skills DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 DRIVERS100% Owner Operator Co. Pay increase / Home weekly, Regional & Dedicated Class A-CDL1yr. Exp. In last 3 Call (800)695-9643 or www .driveforwatkins.com DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Freight Up = More $Need CDLClass ADriving Exp (877)258-8782 www.drive4melton.com TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 20 12 Trades/ Skills Tire Technician /Mechanic NeededB & B Dugger, Inc. is looking for a part or full-time tire mounting technician that has experience with tire changers. tire balancers and mounting truck & small tractor tires. Additional experience in roadside asssistanceŽ and working in the field is also prefererred. A Florida driver license with a clear MVR is a position requirement. Pay negotiable. Call the business office at (850) 926-2929 or email to office@band bdugger.com to receive an application General Help AIRLINE CAREERSBecome an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 DRIVERS:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money DownCALL: 888-880-5911 Schools/ Instruction MEDICALBILLINGTRAINING!Train forMedical Billing Careers at SCT rain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placement assistance aftertraining! HS/GED/PC Needed (888)872-4677 Furniture CHERRYBEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used, brand new in factory boxes. Original cost $4500. Sell for $795. Can deliver. Call Tom (407)574-3067 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET. In original plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice $975. Can deliver. Call Bill (813)298-0221 Farm Services BUSH HOGGING ROADS GRADED GARDENS TILLED Have tractor will bush hog finish cut large acerage grade roads driveways till gardens. dbdouge@aol.com or 850-643-6283 Pets Happy Jack LiquivicRecognize safe & effecitive against hook & roundworms by US Center for Ventinary Medicine.PET STOP(850) 926-7949 www.happy jackinc.com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Bath $650 month, $600 dep. Includes gargage and water, shed and deck. No Pets, Firm (850) 926-6212 Leave Message CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 NEAR WOODVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Rural, Mobile Home $650 mo. + sec. Available Immediately (850) 745-8526. Mobile Homes For Sale 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, Chefs Kitchen. Beautiful Master Suite, Built in Wet Bar. Call Today (850) 576-2106 4 BR Mobile Home on 3 Acres Ready to Move IN EZ Payments. Call Me (850) 576-2105 100 Families Needed for Govt Loan Program. Call Today (850) 576-2104 3BR, 2BA-Used Mobile Home. Great Condition Amazing Deal!!! Call Me ASAP (850) 576-2687 Use YOUR Land or Your Trade As your DOWN Payment Call Now (850) 576 2687 Apartments Unfurnished PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall Mary (850) 984-4811Equal Housing Opportunity TDD 1 800 955 2771 Rental Houses PANACEACottage, for Rent 2/1 Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Rennovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, covered front proch & open back deck, Small pets acceptable Excellent fishing! $585/month 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $750/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1937 CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Bedroom / 2 Bath, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 Real Estate For Sale One Acre Lot w/ Well, Septic & Utility Pole off Wakulla Spring Rd HWY61 $19,500 (850) 421-2205 Home/Office Cleaning Need your house or office cleaned? Call Renee at 850-590-6720 for information about my cleaning services, experience and pricing. References available. Siding Cypress Lumber Pecky T&G v Joint Timbers and beams (850) 643-6283 5403-1011 TWN THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE : Monday, October 15, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE : Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850-926-0065 October 11, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5401-1018 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 328.17 F.S., NON-JUDICAIL SALE OF VESSEL Notice is hereby given that unless sooner paid or redeemed, Rock Landing Marina, LLC, Inc. intends a public sale of the following vessels by brief description and apparent owners: 1.Vessel: 21 ft. Shamrock Cleveland Engine 351, VIN # SHA 015290483, Reg. # FL5221DN Owner: Estate of James E. Torgerson, II 2.Vessel: 27 ft. 1976 Columbia, VIN # 7043, Reg. # FL3499PA Owner: Scott Synar 3.Vessel: 25 ft. Hunter Marine Outboard, VIN # HUN51432 M79C25, Reg. # FL9947CV Owner Josh Davis Said sale will take place October 27, 2012 beginning at 9:00 a.m. and shall be held at the location of Rock Landing Marina, 99 Rock Landing Road, Panacea, Florida 32346. The mailing address and contact number of said Marina is P.O. Box 653, Panacea, Florida 32346; Telephone # (850) 984-5844 October 11 & 18, 2012 Lien Notices Lien Notices Lien Notices 5400-1018 TWN Vs. Fields, Judith. 2010-CA-037 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-CA-037 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-MLMI, Plaintiff, vs. JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 AND #2, AND ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, et al. Defendant(s). RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 28, 2010 and an Order Rescheduling the Foreclosure Sale dated September 25, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 2010-CA-037 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-MLMI Plaintiff, and JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, is the Defendant. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash in the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32326 at 11:00 AM, on the 29th day of November, 2012, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOTS 6 AND 7, BLOCK 1, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you 5405-1018 TWN Estate of Bullock, Reginald File No. 12000374CPANotice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GADSDEN COUNTY, FLORIDA FILE NO. 12000374CPA IN RE: ESTATE OF REGINALD BULLOCK Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Reginald Bullock, deceased, whose date of death was August 19, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gadsden County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 10 E. Jefferson St. Quincy, FL32351. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 11, 2012. Personal Representative: By:/s/ Nellie Ruth Shaw 1181 Joe Adams Road Quincy, florida 32351 Attorney for Personal Representative: Kimberly L. King, Attorney for Nellie Ruth Shaw Florida Bar Number 0593011 KING & WOOD P.A., 1701 Hermitage Blvd. Suite 104, Tallahassee, FL323308 Telephone: (850)580-7711 Fax: (850)205-4501 October 11 & 18, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices THE WAKULLA AREA TIMES 4Br 2Ba House $1150mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $625mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432“we sell and service most makes and models” Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 OFFICE SPACE LEASEFOR THE BARRY BUILDING ATTHE LOG CABINCrawfordville 850-508-5471$25000/MO Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Be ds, Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r S yst ems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT

PAGE 25

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 – Page 9B will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on September 26, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Attorney for the Plaintiff: Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, Popkin & Rosaler, P.A., 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442. Telephone: (954)360-9030 Facsimile: (954)420-5187. October 11 & 18, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5391-1011 TWN Vs.Davis, Joyce Case No. 2012-112-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-112-CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 2628 Crawfordville Hwy P.O. Box 1240 Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Plaintiff, v. JOYCE L. DAVIS, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOTS 64 AND 65 OF BLOCK 25, OF WAKULLAGARDENS, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the W akulla County Courthouse, 5392-1011 TWN Vs. Thomas, Tanesia Case No. 2010CA-000111 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTYCIVILACTION CASE NO. 2010CA-000111 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, acting through the United States Department of Agriculture, Rural Development, f/k/a Farmers Home Administration, a/k/a Rural Housing Service, Plaintiff, vs. TANESIANICOLE THOMAS, a single woman, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on September 20, 2012 by the above entitled Court in the above styled cause, the undersigned Clerk of Court or any of his duly authorized deputies, will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: Aportion of Lots 4&5, Block 4, of Greiners Addition to Crawfordville and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a concrete monument (marked #2919) marking the Northeast corner of Lot 1, Block 4 of Greiners Addition to Crawfordville, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point also lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Nelson Road, thence run South 72 degrees 15 minutes 37 seconds West along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 169.88 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #6475) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 72 degrees 11 minutes 30 seconds West along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 60.01 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #6475), thence leaving said Southerly right-of-way boundary run South 17 degrees 40 minutes 24 seconds East 99.95 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #6475) thence run North 72 degrees 16 minutes 09 seconds East 60.01 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #6475), thence run North 17 degrees 40 minutes 41 seconds West 100.03 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 0.14 acres, more or less at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash on November 15, 2012, in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, beginning at 11:00 A.M. Central Time, subject to all ad valorem taxes and assessments for the real property described above. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN SIXTY(60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. REQUESTS FOR ACCOMMODA TIONS BY PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, (850)577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED on September 20, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court 3056 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk October 4 & 11, 2012. 5393-1011 TWN vs. King, Beulah Case No. 652012CA000292 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTYCIVILDIVISION Case No.65-2012-CA-000292 Division WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. BEULAH V. KING, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:BEULAH V. KING CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN LASTKNOWN ADDRESS 111 SHAR MELRE LN CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOTS NUMBERED ONE-HUNDRED FIFTY-FOUR AND ONE-HUNDRED FIFTY-FIVE (154 & 155), BLOCK AŽ OF MAGNOLIAGARDENS, AS PER PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA commonly known as 84 TAFFLINGER RD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Michael L. Tebbi of Kass Shuler, P.A., plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813) 229-0900, on or before November 2, 2012, (or 30 days from the first date of publication, whichever is later) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated: September 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Honorable J. H. Thurmond 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301: (850) 577-4401 within 7 working days of your receipt of this notice: if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. October 4 & 11, 2012 5394-1011 TWN Vs. Clardy, Ronald Case No. 65-2010-CA000352 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000352 U.S. BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. RONALD CLARDY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RONALD CLARDY; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on July 18, 2012, and the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on September 19, 2012, in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: LOTS 40 AND 41, BLOCK 1 OF WAKULLAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDEDINN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA a/k/a 115 SIOUX TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at eleven oclock a.m. on October 25, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 19th day of September, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk October 4 & 11, 2012 665101223 5395-1018 TWN vs. Lacher, Walter J., Case No. 652010CA000269 Foreclosure IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA000269 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NASUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. WALTER J. LACHER A/K/AWALTER LACHER et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 19, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000269 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NASUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC. is the Plaintiff and WALTER J. LACHER A/K/AWALTER LACHER; TAMARALACHER; AIS SERVICES, LLC AS SUCCESSOR IN INTERESTTO AMERITECH GOLD; WAKULLA BANK; CAPITALONE BANK (USA), NATIONALASSOCIATION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; STATE OF FLORIDA-DEPARTMENTOF REVENUE; TENANT#1 N/K/AJACQUELYNE MCLENDON are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 1st day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES, 45 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 14 AND ALONG THE NORTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF EMMETT WHALEYROAD 760.70 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE NORTH 88 DEGREES, 45 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SECTION LINE AND ALONG SAID NORTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY300.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREE, 10 MINUTES, 58 SECONDS EAST 145.29 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES, 45, MINUTES, 46 SECONDS EAST 299.64 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREE, 02 MINUTES, 31 SECONDS WEST 145.29 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A188 EMMETT WHALEYROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on September 19, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By:Desireee D. Willis: Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. October 11 & 18, 2012 5396-1018 TWN vs. Kirkland, Stacie Case No.: 65-2010-CA-000425 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000425 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. STACIE RENEE KIRKLAND A/K/ASTACIE R. KIRKLAND; ANTROYLEMORE KIRKLAND A/K/AANTROYL. KIRKLAND; DIANE DELORES ROBERTS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DIANE DELORES ROBERTS; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTS(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWNHEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, 5397-1011 TWN vs. Wheeler, Wanda 65-2010-CA-000344Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000344 CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. WANDAWHEELER A/K/AELWANDA WHEELER RODGERS, et. al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 19, 2012, and entered in 65-2010-CA-000344 of the Circuit Court of the second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC., is the Plaintiff and ELWANDAWHEELER RODGERS A/K/AWANDAWHEELER; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Lobby, Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. on November 1, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT AŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 19th day of September, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. EXHIBIT AŽ COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN EAST 1560.62; THENCE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 5829Ž EAST ALONG THE MAINTAINED RIGHT OF WAYOF FORESTRYROAD #356 640.30TO THE P.O.B. FROM SAID P.O.B. CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYSOUTH 09 DEGREES 5829Ž EAST 210.00; THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 0131Ž WEST 210.00; THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 5829Ž WEST 210.00; THENCE NORTH 80 DEGREES 0131Ž EAST 210.00TO THE P.O.B. CONTAINING 1.01 ACRES MORE OR LESS. October 4 & 11, 2012 11-07553 UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on JSeptember 19, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on November 1, 2012 at 11:00 A.M. (EST) at the Wakulla County Courthouse, located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FLthe following described property: From the southwest corner of the Northeast Quarter (NE1/4) of Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida; run East 711.12 feet along the south boundary line of said Northeast Quarter to a concrete monument and the Point of Beginning; from said concrete monument, run due North 1,296.43 feet to a point on a traverse line in the approximate center of the Bethel to Wakulla public road; thence run North 87 degrees 05 minutes 20 seconds East along said traverse line 127.22 feet to an angle point; then run South 74 degrees 16 minutes East along said traverse line 98.32 feet; thence run due South 1,276.23 feet to the south boundary line of the Northeast quarter of said Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 1 West; thence run West along the south boundary line of said Northeast Quarter 221.78 feet to the Point of Beginning. Less the southerly part of the Bethel to Wakulla public road, lying and being in the South Half of the Northeast Quarter of Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida. Said land being otherwise described as lot No. 4 of an unrecorded plat of a survey of lands of the Estate of Stacey Roberts, deceased. TOGETHER WITH that certain 2006 Nobility RMS Model 66x 28Manufactured Home, Serial No.s N1-10006Aand N1-10006B Property address: 154 Robert Williams Drive, Crawfordville, FL32327. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERSTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated September 19, 2012 (seal) Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk Wakulla County Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk October 11 & 18, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Thomas. Superintendent Miller, Becky Cook, Ray Gray, Mike Scott and Greg Thomas were in attendance. Jerry Evans was absent. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the agenda as amended.Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve a Letter of Retirement on Martha A. Folsom/effective May 31, 2012.Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the following Letters of Resignation: 1. Jerry Ducksworth/effective Oct. 1, 2012 2. Josh Cerwin/effective Sept. 13, 2012 3. Lisa Dunn/effective Sept. 25, 2012 Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve an Employee Suspension. (See Supplemental File #22) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve Out of Field teachers. (See Supplemental File #22) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the Pre-K Non-Certi“cated Personnel. (See Supplemental File #22) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. An Executive Session was held to discuss the release of V.A.M. scores and the impact on teacher evaluations and how it will affect our district. Staff in attendance: Superintendent Miller, Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott, Mr. Thomas, Assistant Superintendents ODonnell & Pearce, Randy Beach, CFO and Karen Wells, Executive Director of Human Resources.MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON OCTOBER 1, 2012OCTOBER 11, 2012 Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!55 Allison Dr. Panacea 3BR/2BA Nice Dock and Boardwalk, Furnished or Unfurnished. GREAT FISHING on Dickerson Bay! $950 mo. No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2837 Coastal Hwy. Commercial Building $800 mo. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Commercial building 4,300 square foot heated and cooled building on 1 acre of land Rents out for $1,800.00. Building is in excellent condition. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate52 Evans 3 BR/2BA with Garage. $975. mo, $975. Security. • 66 Homan Point 3BR/2BA with 2 Car Garagee. $97. mo., $975. • Security. 26B old Courthouse Square 2 BR/2BA Townhouse. Avalable 11/1, $750 • mo. $750 Security. 31 Chehaw Panacea, 3BR/2BA DWMH, $650/mo, %650 Security. • • 22 Coral Way 3BR./2BA with 1 car garage and fenced in yard on 1/2 acre. Pets okay with $250. fee, $950.mo/$950 Deposit. • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available, all utilities included. • 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./$900 Deposit • 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok • 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced • 82 Mimosa 3BR/1.5BA $650Mo./$650 Deposit • 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA Available Sept. 1, $900Mo./$900 Deposit • 14 Cutchin Ct. 3BR/2BA $650 mo/$650 Deposit. • 140 Duane St: 3BR/2BA $875 mo and $875 Security deposit. No smoking pets ok with owner approval and $250 pet fee. Available Oct. 1.

PAGE 26

Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 3056 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 11:00 AM (EST), on the 25th day of October, 2012. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (seal) Timothy D. Padgett, ESQ.,Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Counsel for Plaintiff October 4 & 11, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5404-1018 TWN vs. Hill, Kathy File No. 2012-CP-84 Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTFOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, File No. 2012-CP-84 IN RE: ESTATE OF KATHYDOWNING HILL Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Kathy Downing Hill., deceased, whose date of death was April 9, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLACounty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. 5405-1018 TWN vs. Scott, Allen File No. 12-91-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, File No. 12-91-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ALLEN JAMES SCOTT, a/k/a ALLEN J. SCOTT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ALLEN JAMES SCOTT, a/k/a ALLEN J. SCOTT deceased, whose date of death was JUNE 23, 2012 and whose Social Security Numberis 102-36-3329 is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 11, 2012. Personal Representative: By: /s/ PATRICIA P. STRICKLAND P.O. Box 125 ,Brooksville, FL 34605-0125 Attorney for Personal Representative: R. SETH MANN, R. SETH MANN, P.A. Florida Bar Number 0990434 38109 Pasco Avenue, Dade City, FL 33525 Telephone (352) 567-5010, Facsimile: (352) 567-1877 October 11, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5376-1018 TWN IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-320-DR Stacey Kimble Jefferson Petitioner, and Benjamin Alexander Jefferson Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: Benjamin Alexander Jefferson l/k/a 75 Northwood Lane, Crawfordville, FL32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on STACEYKIMBLE JEFFERSON whose address is 75 NORTHWOOD LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 on or before October 26, 2012 and file with the orignal with the clerk of the Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.September 27 and October 4, 11, & 18, 2012 5385-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 006 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that NU TAX 1 GPthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2525 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-121-351-11968-A05 THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELLPOINT UNIT 2 BLOCK ALOT 5 OR 752 P576 Name in which assessed JOHN BOCCHINO said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18, 2012 5386-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 007 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that DONALD J SHEMWELLthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1687 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-034-009-08538-000 WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT 2 BLOCK 8 LOT 26 OR 20 P682 OR 634 P327 Name in which assessed KURTD & SAMUELLELLIOTTJR AS JTRS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11, & 18, 2012 5387-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 008 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that DONALD J SHEMWELLthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1414 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-024-000-06581-001 P-8-1-M-6 COMM AT THE NW COR OF THE E1/2 OF THE NW 1/4 OF LOT 24 RUN S 17%E 660 FT TO THE P.O.B OR 163 P719 Name in which assessed ERVIN ADONALDSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18, 2012 5388-1018TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 009 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that GENE OPHEIM the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1613 Year of Issuance 2005 5389-1018 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 010 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1096 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel # 08-6S-01W-283-04862-E01 MARINAVILLAGE OF PANACEAUNIT 2 BLK E LOT 1 & BOAT SLIPF OR 372 P888 OR 496 P637 Name in which assessed H. CLAYHARRIS & LINDAW HARRIS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18,2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-085-121-11580-012 CASORAESTATES UI TRACT 12 OR 253 P619 OR 253 P624 Name in which assessed RONALD D & TINARENEE THOMAS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of NOVEMBER, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 14TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida September 27 and October 4, 11 & 18, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 11, 2012. Personal Representative: Jessie A. Hill, Jr. 2671 Crawfordville Hwy., Box 6 Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: Deirdre A. Farrington, Attorney for Jessie a. Hill., Jr. Florida Bar Number: 488690, PO Box 392, Crawfordville, FL32326Telephone: (850)926-2700, Fax: (850)926-2741 E-Mail: deirdre@farrington-law.com The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 27 32 40 43 51 56 63 67 70 2 28 52 3 24 53 4 33 46 64 21 29 47 57 5 15 18 41 44 6 30 34 58 65 68 71 7 35 59 8 31 48 60 22 25 49 54 9 16 19 42 45 10 26 36 55 66 69 72 11 23 37 50 12 38 61 13 39 62 ACROSS 1. Easy marks 5. Diamond defect 9. Dwelt 14. It may thicken 15. Cohort of Kent and Olsen 16. Ring great Griffith 17. "__ boy!" 18. See 24-Across 19. Big name in bridge 20. Venus at sunrise, sometimes 23. Singer DiFranco 24. When paired with 18-Across, miscellany 25. Utter chaos 27. Thick __ brick 29. Beirut is its cap. 31. Crystal ball consultant 32. Tend to the turkey 34. "Just for the heck __ ..." 36. Leather piercers 40. Tea, e.g. 43. Top-shelf 44. Pound or Cornell 45. "Nancy" rich kid 46. Go ballistic 48. Lyrical Gersh win 50. Brylcreem amount 51. Lead from the dugout 54. Pull at the earth's surface, briefly 56. Corrida shout 57. Formal attire 63. "Zelig" director 65. Brie covering 66. Al, "inventor" of the Internet 67. Apartment sign 68. "The Raven" opener 69. Jacob's twin 70. Eyelid problems 71. Bewhiskered barker 72. HUD, for one: Abbr.DOWN1. Cyber-trash 2. Choir voice 3. Sauerbraten, et al. 4. Mike holder 5. Defat, whaler-style 6. Singer k.d. 7. Added stipulations 8. Shrine Game side 9. Ogrish Simon 10. "Editorially spea king," in chatroom shorthand 11. Like the flu 12. Actress Verdugo 13. Strauss material 21. Do-nothing 22. Assists, criminally 26. Harsh Athenian lawgiver 27. Quatrain scheme 28. Ahead of the tag 30. Flask filler 31. Commandments mount 33. Half of octa35. On behalf of 37. Part of a Vformation, perhaps 38. In __ land (spacy) 39. Grubby guy 41. Israeli desert region 42. Arboreal ape 47. Scully and Smart 49. Short poem on two rhymes 51. Zoo barriers 52. Dole out 53. Literature Nobelist Sachs 55. Urged, with "on" 58. Lustful god 59. Mudville co mplement 60. Andean of old 61. End of a shooting 62. Not masc. or fem. 64. Shoebox letters American Prole Hometown Content 10/7/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 12 345 6 372 584 8 97 42 735 2 61 948 651349 200 9 HometownContent 128 3495 6 7 439765821 657821493 583 492176 914657238 276138954 742 986315 391574682 865213749 S P A M A B A B M O A T S A L T O S A F E A L L O T P O T R O A S T S N E L L Y S T A N D T E T R A E E E I D L E R A G E N T S F L E N S E N E G E V L A N G B O O Z E E R O S A N D S F O R N I N E W E S T S I N A I I N C A A B E T S R O N D E L L E G R E E O R A N G I M O D R A C O E G G E D V I R A L W I L D G O O S E E L E N A L A L A W R A P D E N I M S L O B N E U T

PAGE 27

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 – Page 11B 1. ART: Where is the world-famous Prado museum located? 2. ANATOMY: Where are muscles known as triceps found in the body? 3. ADVERTISEMENTS: What breakfast cereal did Sonny the Cuckoo Bird promote? 4. NATURAL WORLD: Where would stalagmites be found in a natural cave formation? 5. GEOGRAPHY: Where was the ancient city of Persepolis located? 6. SCIENCE: What was the first elementary particle to be discovered? 7. MUSIC: What is the national anthem of Canada? 8. COMPUTERS: What does the acronym DOS stand for? 9. FAMOUS QUOTES: Who once said, I worked my way up from nothing to a state of extreme poverty.Ž 10. LANGUAGE: What is an atelier? 2012 King Feaures Synd., Inc. Answers 1. John Travolta 2. Philippines 3. 1890 4. TaxiŽ 5. Thomas Merton 6. Hungarian 7. Minnesota 8. Oliver!Ž 9. The lek 10. John F. Kennedy YOUR AD HERE

PAGE 28

Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy DAVID WHITE On Saturday morning, a friend called to seek my advice on that evenings dinner. My boyfriend and I are making poached salmon with truf” es and shrimp in a cream sauce,Ž she said. What type of wine should we drink?Ž I could see her conundrum. Salmon and shrimp suggest a dry, refreshing white. But a cream sauce could bludgeon a delicate wine. And anything red … even something soft and light, like a Pinot Noir … probably wouldnt complement the dish. Thats why the answer was simple. Just go with Champagne,Ž I answered. Itll work perfectly.Ž Later that evening, my friend con“ rmed that the wine was an ideal match. Plus,Ž she said, It was fun to drink Champagne with dinner, just like real wine.Ž Year after year, Frances big Champagne houses spend millions trying to convince us that Champagne is best enjoyed when celebrating. That might be true … after all, wine shops see a huge spike in sales around New Years and Valentines Day, and it is fun to drink Champagne on a special occasion. But Champagne and other sparkling wines deserve a spot at the dinner table all year long. Most sparklers are characterized by vibrant acidity and freshness, which help them cut through spicy meals, complement savory food, and elevate even the simplest of dishes. Real Champagne is quite pricey, obviously. Under European Union trade laws, wine can only be sold as ChampagneŽ if it comes from the Champagne region of France and is made in accordance with a number of regulations. Most notably, Champagne must be made in the traditional methodŽ … an expensive, multi-step process … and produced, generally, from Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier. Consequently, even budgetŽ options cost about $40 per bottle. Fortunately, there are plenty of affordable sparkling wines from regions outside Champagne. Within France, sparkling wines labeled as CremantŽ are produced using the traditional method and winemakers must follow a number of strict rules. Sparkling wines from Burgundy … called Cremant de Bourgogne … have long offered exceptional value. Because the region grows the same grape varieties as Champagne, top examples can often pass for the real thing. And theyre typically just a fraction of the cost … many can be found for less than $20. In the United States, wines labeled as Methode ChampenoiseŽ are also produced in the traditional method using the same grape varieties as Champagne. For about $25, its hard to beat the entry level bottlings from Domaine Carneros, Roederer Estate, and Argyle. For less than $15, Cava … a sparkling wine from Spain thats produced like Champagne but using native Spanish grapes … is the best option. Of course, nothing beats the real thing. And fortunately for American consumers, theres never been a better time to explore Champagne. For years, the American market has been dominated by large producers like Moet & Chandon, Piper Heidsieck, and Veuve Clicquot. These companies purchase their grapes from growers across Champagne and blend their wines to deliver a consistent, high quality product year after year. In recent years, however, wine enthusiasts have gone gaga over Grower Champagne,Ž or wines made by the farmers who grow the grapes. Just as we understand why an apple grown in Virginia tastes different from an apple grown in Massachusetts, we understand why a Chardonnay produced in Sonoma tastes different from a Chardonnay produced in Napa. Champagne is no different. And Grower Champagne conveys a sense of place … something that large producers simply cant offer. Today, Grower Champagne accounts for only about 4 percent of Americas Champagne market. But that percentage has been rising quickly, thanks to a few key wine importers and Americas growing obsession with knowing the source of our food. Indeed, wine enthusiasts call grower Champagne farmers “ zz.Ž Grower Champagnes are still quite expensive. Basic offerings from some of my favorites … ChartogneTaillet, Egly-Ouriet, Pierre Peters, and Vilmart … still cost upwards of $50. So next time you feel like splurging, pick up a bottle of Grower Champagne. And next time you sit down for dinner … especially if youve prepared something with a cream sauce … go for something that sparkles. David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet. -Janet Bubbles for any occasion WHITES WINES Expert physicians.Quality medical care.Of“ce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. … 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comFamily Practice Accepting new patients X-Ray Services Pediatric patients 2 yrs. & older Offering specialty care: Capital Regional Cardiology Associates 850-877-0216 Capital Regional Medical Group Podiatry Services 850-878-8235 Capital Regional Surgical Associates 850-219-2306 Robert Frable, DO Aida Torres, ARNPCRAWFORDVILLE