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Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00427
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 09-20-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00427
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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIn a show of local bipartisanship, the heads of the local Democratic and Republican parties came together last week to announce a plan to hold a series of forums for candidates. Party chairs Jonathan Kilpatrick of the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee and Rachel Pienta of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee jointly announced the forums last week at The Wakulla News. The forums are set for Oct. 8, 22, and 25. The times and locations will be announced. The forums will include races for state House District 7 and it was con rmed that Republican candidate Halsey Beshears and Democrat Robert Hill will appear at the Oct. 22 forum as well as sheriff, school superintendent, property appraiser and the three county commission races. We decided to co-host these forums during this electoral cycle to provide a venue for equal, across-the-aisle, fair representation of the candidates, Pienta said. While we may differ on our perspectives regarding ideologies and policies, Kilpatrick said, the parties can nd common ground in our respect for the democratic election process. Pienta said that an impetus for the joint forums was the concern about the recent League of Women Voters forum. There was so much outcry after that last one at the library, she said, referring to the Aug. 23 forum for school superintendent and property appraiser candidates. Continued on Page 2A By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCounty commissioners and citizens expressed deep concern about new proposed flood maps unveiled last week, complaining about expanded ood zones and the potential nancial impact on residents and businesses. County Planning Director Luis Serna told commissioners at their meeting on Monday, Sept. 17, that the preliminary maps will affect homeowner insurance rates and building in those areas. He encouraged citizens to check the online map to see if the designation of their property had changed. The maps are online at the Northwest Florida Water Management Districts website, www.nwfwmd.state. .us, and click on the ood information portal. Some of the signi cant changes mentioned included the base ood elevation for the City of St. Marks being raised 10 feet, and the ood zone going well upriver. While most of the changes are in the coastal area and along the rivers, there was concern that the map shows expanded flooding areas in places such as Wakulla Gardens and there were concerns that the nancial impact on some residents there could be devastating. You may well get notice from your mortgage company that you need flood insurance, Commissioner Mike Stewart warned residents. Their major concern appeared to be having time to appeal the maps. Rules for adoption of the maps give parties 90 days to appeal. Continued on Page 15A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 36th Issue Thursday, September 20, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Arts & Entertainment ....................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 6B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 10B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11BINDEX OBITUARIES Daniel Lawrence Calhoun Capt. David Sams Gibbs Bernadette Parker Sue Calhoun Preacher James Jimmy Darnell Smith William Bill Boyd Stephens Sr.Parties come together to hold forumsFlood maps criticizedCoastal Cleanup is held PHOTO BY LYNDA KINSEY FOR KEEP WAKULLA COUNTY BEAUTIFUL/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSVolunteer Marc Dickieson removes a sofa and carpet from the marsh on Bottoms Road in Panacea.FEMA MAP/NWFWMD.STATE.FL.US WEBSITEConcern expressed about nancial impacts on citizens, businessesCounty budget of $42M approved with little comment. See story, Page 3A. WILLIAM SNOWDENLocal party chairs Democrat Rachel Pienta and Republican Jonathan Kilpatrick last week. This past Saturday marked the 27th annual Coastal Cleanup, and more than 9 million people in 52 countries worked to clean shorelines. Locally, the event was sponsored by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, and Bruce Ashley reported at the county commission meeting on Monday that 130 volunteers showed up at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday morning, and 440 volunteers were at Woolley Park in Panacea. Among the unusual items found, Ashley said, included a living room suite with a sleeper sofa and carpet, a full bike rack, in addition to lots of glass, metal, textiles and other non-biodegradable items. KWCB Director Jo Anne Palmer will have a full report next week.Complaint about robo-calls that message says is from Wakulla Democrats, but actually from another group. See story, Page 2A. A water pipe of cypress at the Colorado museum &See Page 12A Help shape the future of Tallahassee Community College in Wakulla CountyAnd register for a $500 scholarship drawing! GreatIdeas@TCC.fl.edu (850) 201-8632 We want to hear from you on whats important. Attend TCCs Town Hall Listening Session for a community discussion on how we can better serve area residents and partner with local businesses. Ribbon cutting and reception for our new facility to follow.October 10 | 6 p.m. | 2932 Crawfordville Highway

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThanks to a grant funded by the Environmental Protection Agencys Gulf of Mexico Alliance initiative and a partnership with Florida A&M University, all the elementary schools in Wakulla County and the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center will be getting a visit from the Gulf Specimen Marine Labs Sea Mobile in the near future. COAST Charter School in St. Marks was the rst school to host the mobile lab on Sept. 12. Students from prekindergarten to eighth grade learned about the importance of marine resources and how they are affected by coastal watersheds. Students rst heard a presentation in the auditorium about coastal watersheds and then class by class came outside to learn more about watersheds. They rst visited with Kimberly Davis, environmental education coordinator for FAMUs Center for Water and Air Quality, and her display that showed the students how fertilizers and other things affect watersheds and marine life and end up in the water. The students were then able to see and touch some of this marine life on the Sea Mobile. Tom Harrah, who runs the Sea Mobile, said Gulf Specimen was contacted by FAMU about the partnership after they attended the Riverfront Festival in Carrabelle. We thought our two displays went really well together, Harrah said. Then FAMU came across funding and decided to partner with Gulf Specimen. They will visit six schools in Wakulla County. A lot of schools dont come to the lab, Harrah said. This gives us the chance to offer them a free booking. And the hope is that the children will then also want to visit the lab in the future and learn and see even more marine life. COAST was the rst place they visited together. Its been going really good, Davis said. Along with the schools, they will also be at several different festivals in the area and will visit the senior centers in Leon County and Wakulla. Weve got quite a few bookings, Harrah said. Its kind of exciting for us.Gulf Specimen takes Sea Mobile to COASTContinued from Page 1A Several citizens complained about the perception of bias at the forum. And Pienta, who was a founding member of the local group, led a complaint with the state organization. Pienta said last week that she believed there was a bias for no party candidates shown at the forums. Pienta was discouraging Democratic candidates from attending the next League forum, scheduled for Sept. 27, which is set for county commission candidates. Kilpatrick wouldnt say that Republican candidates were discouraged from attending, but noted that a rally for GOP candidates is set at Wildwood Bistro on the same night as the forum. Its the candidates choice which they want to attend, he said. Kilpatrick said the three forums planned by the two local parties would give our candidates an opportunity to get their message out without making them a target to be twisted. Besides the Democrat and Republican candidates, the NPA candidates will be invited to participate as well. Pienta and Kilpatrick will serve as moderators at the forums. Questions can be submitted by citizens, and what the process is for submitting questions will be announced later. Our questions will be much more about policy, ideology, Kilpatrick said.Parties to hold forums NOTICE OF TALQUIN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. ANNUAL MEETINGSATURDAY, SEPT 29, 2012Registration and Voting: 8:30 10:00 a.m. Business Portion of Meeting: 10:00 a.m.100 VALUABLE PRIZESIncluding: 42 at screen TV, 32 G iPad, Wii game system, iPods, trolling motor, electric energy ef ciency kits & more!Entertainment: 9:00 9:45 a.m. Country Connections at theJames A. Shanks Middle School Gymnasium 1400 W. King Street, Quincy, Florida LindysChicken Since19687locations SPECIALS SPECIALS TENDERS 3 Large Chicken Tenders w/ Fries .......... $4.89 HOT WINGS 5 Piece w/ Fries ....................................... $4.89 2 Whole Wings w/ Fries & Biscuit .................................... $4.89 Includes Side & Small Drink Chicken Fillet combo .................................. $6.99 3 Tenders special ........................................ $6.39 5 Hot Wings ................................................. $6.39 Chicken Salad or BBQ Sandwich ............... $5.99 Pork Chop Sandwich .................................. $6.99 2 Whole Wings ............................................ $6.39 2 PC Dark with only Mashed Potatoes ....... $5.19 COMBO MEALS COMBO MEALS By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThere have been reports of robo-calls being made to local residents, in which the recorded message apparently identi es the call as being made for Wakulla Democrats. Rachel Pienta, chair of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee, said on Tuesday, Sept. 18, she had no knowledge of the calls other than complaints she had received. Robo-calls are expensive, Pienta said. Wakulla Democrats dont have money for that. Pienta said she had a report from a local Democrat who was angry about the call, complaining that it would just turn off voters. She was unfamiliar with what exactly was being said on the calls. Several Democratic staffers received the calls, but hung up. One report sent in an email states: The call starts off by saying Greetings from (Wakool-a) Wakulla Democratic Party. The number on the caller ID shows up as (425) 3908108 and is identi ed VOTE USA from Renton, Va. There was some indication it may be a Republican political organization. It also appears the group has been the subject of a warning of a phone scam in Indiana in which callers reportedly told people that lines were expected to be long on election day and that they could vote over the phone. You cannot vote over the phone.Suspicious phone calls reported SEA LAB: Students at COAST Charter School get hands-on with Gulf Specimens Sea Mobile.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Please RecycleBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe 2012-13 budget for Wakulla County was unanimously approved by the county commission on Sept. 17 with very little comment from the public. Unlike previous years, this years budget of $42.4 million budget did not appear to be controversial. There were no new taxes or tax increases in the approved budget and the millage rate will remain the same at 8.50 mills. That is $8.50 in taxes for each $1,000 of property value. For an average home of $100,000 with a $50,000 homestead exemption, that amounts to $425 in county taxes. That does not include other assessments or taxes. To generate the same tax revenue as the previous year, the millage rate would need to be 8.8354 mills, the roll back rate. The slight increase in the budget, of $438,00, from the rst public hearing is attributed to the commission approving grants for the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council; an increase in cash forward for the re MSBU fund for a tanker truck, brush truck and radios; adjustment to cash forward that decreased the law enforcement education fund; and an increase in cash forward to put in reserve for corrections in the sheriffs ne and forfeiture fund. One of the most significant changes to the countys budget is the creation of the ne and forfeiture fund which is dedicated to capturing all of the sheriffs of ces related costs into one fund. This will help the county move away from relying on the jail bed revenue, said County Administrator David Edwards. Other changes to the budget were caused by the re-organization of the county administration. This includes the elimination of the deputy county administrator position Tim Barden is leaving the county at the end of the year and the Of ce of Management and Budget and transferring budget management back to the clerk of the court. The Public Information Of ce has also been renamed to the Communication and Public Services Office and will include special projects, agenda management, public records requests, recreation services, veteran services and library services. Previously, recreation, veterans services and the library were under the deputy county administrator. The county administrator will also now oversee the airport and probation services, which were under the deputy county administrator as well. The Office of Intergovernmental Affairs has been created and will be responsible for grants administration, contract management, legislative, economic development and the RESTORE Act. The Parks and Recreation Department has been split and renamed the Parks and Facilities Management. This department will be in charge of the maintenance of the parks and county buildings. The county is looking to hire a director for this department and hopes to find someone with building or construction experience. Other changes include having the Building Department be responsible for building inspections and code enforcement. Fire Rescue will include re services, emergency medical services, animal control and the liaison with the emergency management department. Major capital improvements include building the sheriffs annex and a new re and emergency medical services building. There are also plans to make upgrades to Hudson and Azalea parks and renovate the community center.COUNTY COMMISSION CITY OF ST. MARKSCounty approves $42M budget with little commentStreetscaping project should be finished by Stone Crab FestivalBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter heavy rains pushed back the start date for construction of the streetscape in St. Marks, work has begun and the project should be nished before the Stone Crab Festival on Oct. 20, said City Manager Zoe Mans eld. The project in on schedule, even with the rain, Mans eld said. The streetscape will include sidewalks down both sides of Port Leon Drive from Pine Street to Riverside Drive and will connect with the St. Marks Trail. There will also be an imprint of a lighthouse in the center of the road of Riverside Drive, benches, trash cans, period lighting and landscaping improvements. The city was awarded a $600,000 Community Redevelopment Block Grant for downtown revitalization. Hale Contracting was awarded the bid for construction. Their bid was $398,123. Hydra Engineering developed the plans for the project and Fred Fox is administering the grant. Hydra Engineering is really on top of things, Mans eld said. They are doing a great job for us. The contractor has 90 days to complete the project, but Mans eld said they are shooting for 45 days. Our little city will be looking good and have a safe walking path to our downtown area, Mans eld said. CITY OF ST. MARKS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JENNIFER JENSEN New sidewalks are being installed in St. Marks down both sides of Port Leon Drive and will connect with the St. Marks Trail. The work is being paid for with a state grant. The board approves a property tax rate of 8.50 mills, the same as last years tax. Notice of Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment TransmittalCopies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.NO FINAL ACTION ADOPTING THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT WILL BE TAKEN AT THESE MEETINGS.SEPTEMBER 20, 2012 Public HearingThe Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, October 8, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, November 5, 2012, beginning at 5:00 P.M., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. The proposed amendment is included in a proposed ordinance entitled: NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS SEPTEMBER 20, 2012 The Wakulla County Planning Commission and/or Board of County Commissioners propose to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, October 8, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, November 5, 2012 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony.City of Sopchoppy SEPTEMBER 20, 27, 2012 SPECIAL WORKSHOPTHE CITY OF SOPCHOPPY WILL BE HOLDING A SPECIAL WORKSHOP MEETING, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012, 6:30 P.M. THE PURPOSE OF THIS MEETING IS TO GET COMMUNITY INPUT ON A PROPOSAL TO PROVIDE A SALARY OR STIPEND TO MEMBERS OF THE SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION.The Council welcomes any input on this issue and urges you to attend. For further information please call the clerks ofce at 962-4611.

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Mr. Sopchoppy Bill Stephens is dead at 72 William Bill Boyd Stephens Sr. obituary The time Paul wrote of has come (Letters) John Wayne Brim obituary High court hears appeal of Hilton death sentence Clerk restores office hours Charlie Creel will be a great sheriff (Letters) Medicaid case put on hold for now thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Editor, The News: Wakulla County will soon experience the most important change in education it has made in two decades. The Nov. 6 election will chart the course of public education for years to come. It is our honor, the principals of the Wakulla County School District, to recommend Bobby Pearce as superintendent of schools. Pearce has distinguished himself as a student, an athlete, a husband and father, a teacher, a coach, a principal and assistant superintendent. Bobby Pearce is a man of integrity who has served the parents and children of Wakulla County for more than 24 years. He has also run his own successful small business which has reinforced his appreciation of a dollars value. Pearce has been both mentor and trusted colleague to all of us over the years. Most importantly, we are con dent that with Pearce as our leader, Wakullas high performing status will not only continue but will reach new heights. The future of Wakullas children is at stake. Mr. Pearce has the strength to move us forward in dif cult times. As the principal of Medart Elementary his school earned 10 consecutive A grades while having the highest percentage of economically disadvantaged students in the district. Bobby Pearce is respected because he can be trusted. He respects all people and treats them with dignity. Bobby Pearce is the clear choice to be the next superintendent of Wakulla County. Please join us, the principals of Wakullas schools, as we enthusiastically support him in that endeavor. Mike Crouch Wakulla High School Mike Barwick Wakulla Middle School Dod Walker Riversprings Middle School Sharon Kemp Medart Elementary Susan Brazier Shadeville Elementary Angie Walker Crawfordville Elementary Jackie High Riversink Elementary Tom Askins Sopchoppy Education Center Kim Dutton Wakulla Education Center Editor, The News: I have learned that the Sopchoppy City Commission is having a workshop on Sept. 27 with the intent to adopt itself a salary for the rst time in its history. This is on top of some of its members adopting a tradition of going on paid conference after paid conference. In this time of economic recession, people loosing jobs, and budget tightening in both the private and public sectors, it is shocking that the commissioners are seeking a taxpayer salary. Having served on the Sopchoppy City Commission for over 20 years, without compensation, out of a sense of a duty to serve my community, I nd it hard to believe that a salary is warranted. After all, the commission sets its meeting times and can set the meeting after the council members day jobs, and they usually do. So no time off work to worry about. And traveling to the meeting in our one-squaremile city cannot be that much of a nancial burden to require a salary to compensate for it. Other than seeking ego aggrandizement and taxpayer money in their pockets, I can think of no justi cation for paying the Sopchoppy City Commission a salary. I hope the citizens of Sopchoppy and the customers of the Sopchoppy water system who live outside the city limits whose hardearned money will be used to pay this proposed salary will let the council members know their thoughts. Eddie Evans SopchoppySchool principals endorse Bobby Pearce Kessler is a champion for taxpayers Charlie Creel is very professional, caring Firearm training at facility is excellent Sopchoppy commissioners paid a salary? Fleetwood family appreciates supportA father is instrumental in a daughters lifeBy RITA HANEY Reviewing books available for parents is a favorite past time. Books allow us to both gain and process information at our own pace and through our own belief system. There is no need for defense or argument. When a book is found at our own public library it is a double bonus. Bringing up Girls by Dr. James Dobson is informative and easy to read. Dr. Dobson states his foundation for living and raising children is Christian and freely states this is his guidepost. This means a rm sense of values which the family knows, understands and all members of the family are responsible for their behavior. Fathers are instrumental in a girls life. A friend of mine, Ward, told me he was taking his niece (father not in the home) on a date. He said he wanted her to learn and appreciate how she was to be treated when she dated. Ward further reported that over the last few years he had ensured that his niece felt valued and loved for who she was. This behavior on Wards part also made her feel protected. Young girls do not necessary say they need protection busy as they are ghting for freedom and their own identity. However, this idea of protection was made clear to me when a blended family was planning an adoption by the husband of his 13-year-old stepdaughter. Why, she asked him, do I need this (adoption)? The stepdad replied: Protection. This word was met with a thoughtful silence. Yes, young girls need to know they deserve respect. They need to know that in their need to discover who they are becoming someone is watching. A relationship with a father is a blessing that is beyond measure. Yes, maybe it works best if the father and mother are in the same household. However, the important thing to remember is quantity is not necessarily quality and a father, be it weekend or joint custody, has a place in his daughters life that is invaluable. Divorce is a painful experience for all members of the family. There may be a discussion on which is better for parents to live together and be miserable and unhappy, or to experience the pain of divorce. Neither is ideal. What is necessary is that fathers as well as mothers have an active role in their childs life. We live in a chaotic world. Most people work at least eight hours a day. Many people live from paycheck to paycheck, causing extraordinary stress on parents, In this setting, having responsibility for housework, laundry, packing lunches, servicing the car, yard work and the list goes on should involve all members of the family, Feeling a part of something is an important quality. Guiding Good Choices, a family seminar geared for parents of 9to 12-year-olds reports that the feeling of belonging is how street gangs operate and entice young people to join. A gang is a strong example. Being part of a group at school for example everyone has a role and a position that all members know. When kids have a feeling of belonging at home, a role to play, some responsibility that all members of the family rely on, they know they are appreciated and a creates a resistance to those unfriendly social behaviors outside the home. Parents are important. Fathers are necessary. Providing a rm foundation of values, learning to accept responsibility for behavior and being loved and appreciated for who they are. Fathers matter. Bringing up Girls by Dr. James Dobson is available at the Wakulla County LibraryRita Haney, MSW, LCSW is a social worker in Crawfordville,. She can be reached at 926-2039.READERS WRITE:Editor, The News: As a champion for the taxpayers, Dr. Howard Kessler has my support. While serving as a past commissioner, he consistently voted against over-spending, and bloated, top-heavy government. Dr. Kessler is a scal conservative who was always careful with the peoples money. He did his homework, and asked the tough questions to staff and other commissioners that no one else would ask. In tough economic times, he worked hard to reduce county expenditures, and under his tutelage, grants were written, and surplus funds were made available. He is for transparency in government. No commissioner devoted himself so tirelessly to the citizens. He was accessible to all citizens and kept regular of ce hours. Today, it is hard to nd a commissioner who is in the of ce. Dr. Kessler was never in a rush to end the board meetings. He wanted to take the time it took to serve the citizens. His commitment was to do good things for all of the people in this county, not just for his friends. He leads by example, and I know him to be a man of integrity. He is respectful of the people. He never yelled at citizens, and I never heard him speak ill of them behind their backs. He is honest and honorable. He is a man of conscience, integrity and convection who is dedicated to service, and helping all who ask of him. And he does not do this for political gain, but it is because that is who is he is. I hope you will take the time to meet, and vote for Howard Kessler for county commission. Sue Damon Shell Point Editor, The News: We apologize for taking so long to do this, but its better late than never, right? We want to thank Bethany Lassiter of Dazzles Studio for the yard sale she held for Austin Fleetwood and his mom, Tammy, on June 9, to help in defraying medical costs for Austins cancer treatment. Of course, it couldnt have been so successful without all the donations and baked goods provided by caring people of this community. It turned out well despite the rain. We also want to thank Shane and Metra Weaver for Austins bene t held on July 7. We are so grateful for those who cooked, served, made or donated items to sell and raf e off, the entertainment, the re truck and volunteers who stayed with it, and the participation of the car show. It was a beautiful day shared with loving people and we had a great time! The day ended with a successful Teen Dance and they had a good time and we thank the DJ for his services. We are blessed to be in a community that pulls together in time of need. Wakulla does love Jesus and not just Wakulla because He is being seen over and over through the love, support and prayers from people people we dont even know. The Fleetwood family Editor, The News: An open letter to Sheriff Donnie Crum: This is to commend you and your WCSO Training Staff for the exceptionally ne rearms training you provide to the citizens of Wakulla County and to the Law Enforcement/Private Security Community at the Firearms Training Facility. As you know, I served as range master at the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy for 17 years and retired in 1997. I have assisted WCSO as a volunteer instructor and attended your Firearms Training Facility as a student, and I know a good Firearms Training Program when I see one. The WCSO Training Staff is second to none, and your staff is far more courteous and accommodating than most. Lt. Fred Nichols and Sgt. Ed Tyre are two of the most professional rearms instructors I have had the pleasure of being associated with in my 40-plus years as a certi ed rearms instructor. As the president of Plantation Security Inc., a resident of Wakulla County, and a retired range master, it is a pleasure for me volunteer my services and to contribute to the nancial support of this ne facility. Thanks for a job well done! Major Alan Lamarche Shell Point Editor, The News: The purpose for this message is to show my support for Charlie Creel as the next sheriff of Wakulla County. I worked with Charlie when he was head of security for the Lt. Governor of Florida and found him to be a very professional and caring law enforcement of cer and person. I personally observed him working on state law enforcement issues and was impressed with his management skills. Not only is Charlie a great person, he is also very capable of ef ciently running the of ce of the sheriff and will have the best interest of the citizens of Wakulla County on his mind daily. I feel that I am very quali ed to make this statement being a retired (36 year) law enforcement of cer myself. I started with f our years at the Panama City Police Department, eight years with the Pensacola Police Department and 23 years with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement where I was chief of Executive Protection for three governors and eventually rose to the rank of assistant commissioner. I was colonel of the DOTs Motor Carrier Compliance of ce, and ultimately retiring from the Florida Highway Patrol as a lieutenant colonel. The experience I have in law enforcement has taught me much about the behavior of people and through this I can say Charlie is a step above the rest! Good luck, Charlie. Scotty Sanderson

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 Page 5AEditor, The News: This letter is my response to Ron Huddlestons letter last week (Mike Stewart wants the best for Wakulla) regarding his defense of the exorbitant taxes thrust upon the citizens of Wakulla County by the current commission. All citizens are important whether or not they rent or own their home. Lets not re-invent history or distort facts! The 7 percent taxes placed on all utilities in the county are, by de nition, clearly a tax! If the county collects money from the citizens and puts it in the general fund and uses it to pay their bills, its a tax on the citizens. Dont tell us that it is not. The commission voted on these taxes because they are spending more than they have budgeted. I am fed up with hearing that the commission is languishing over dif cult decisions. The truth is the commission is not giving their job of managing the budget the effort it deserves. The citizens are tired of paying for their inability to manage. Mr. Huddleston, I dont know what your expertise in budgeting is that would cause a member of the commission to consult you, but I can tell you that I spent a great deal of my career monitoring budgets and dealing with nancial issues. Overspending, taxing the people, and then writing a big letter trying to justify it, is an effort in futility! I am voting for Howard Kessler because he consistently voted NO to tax increases. Your candidate consistently voted YES. Dr. Kessler is the candidate of my choice. He has always been there for the citizen. Chuck Hickman An overtaxed citizen Crawfordvillereaders speak out More OpinionsTaxes are taxes, whatever you call them John Shu is choice for strong future Alan Brock has proven leadership Maurice Langston is right for sheri Emily Smith will be good for Wakulla omas says hes taking the high road More speci cs needed from candidateEditor, The News: It was the late 1980s when my father brought his family back home to Wakulla County. My favorite memories were made right here in this county. I took my rst job as a carpenter working for Curleys Construction. This led to a good career working as a custom carpenter right here in Wakulla County. In 2003, my wife Leilania and I decided to build our rst house and could think of no place in the world we would rather be than in Wakulla. It was this decision that led to my meeting John Shuff. John watched me as I worked tirelessly night after night and every available minute on the weekends to make our dream a reality. Shortly after the completion of our home, John approached me about adding a small addition and garage to his home, which is coincidentally across the street from mine, and we struck an agreement. This agreement was the start of a friendship that I have been very thankful for and proud to be a part of. It turned out to be bene cial to me in my career as well when John asked me to be the carpenter that helped him and many others rebuild our beloved Old Courthouse. You cant imagine how proud I was to be a part of such an important part of preserving this countys heritage. It was during this project that I rst got a good up-close look at Johns love for, and commitment to, this wonderful community. Since that time I have worked on several projects with John, the most recent of which was a $9.5 million rebuild of the Eastside Psychiatric Hospital in Tallahassee. Believe me this was a major project for anyone to take on. Never once did it take away from his focus and dedication to the commitments he made in helping to better our county. Mr. Shuff has worked closely with members of our local government on many issues over the years. He recognizes the need for continued, responsible growth in our community. To have and maintain responsible growth is essential to securing a future in this community for our children. In order to do this we must have accountable, responsible government. As a father of three wonderful, beautiful daughters, all of whom I pray will have the chance to live and raise families in Wakulla, I believe I have a vested interest in our countys future. John Shuff is our choice to help shape that future. Thank you, Paul Nichols Crawfordville Editor, The News: Im proud to show my support for Emily Smiths campaign for county commissioner. Emily is involved with many community services and projects and will listen to the needs of all the people. She is knowledgeable and thoughtful about the countys history and challenges. As county commissioner, Emily will weigh all issues with the best interests of Wakulla County citizens at heart. You may know Emily from her work with the renewable fuels presentations as part of FAMUs Small Farms Program. Several years ago she worked with Crescent Moon Farms and Purple Martin Nurseries. More recently, she commuted to Tallahassee as a graduate student and instructor of freshman research and writing. Ive seen Emily speaking at our Board of County Commission meetings and know that she has reviewed most of the online commission meetings of the past as well. She has attended and sponsored many meetings and citizen help-sessions over the past few months as she strives to assist Wakulla County folks with their everyday problems and concerns. Everyone who knows Emily admires her strength of character and her love for Wakulla County. If you dont know Emily, I hope that you will visit her website (www. EmilyForWakulla.com), or will attend some of the planned public forums. Please join me in voting for Emily Smith on election day, Tuesday, Nov. 6. Sandy Tedder Sopchoppy Editor, The News: I read Howard Kesslers announcement that he was running in the paper last week, and read what he feels he could do better than our current board, and wasnt surprised to see the vague mention of government cuts and ef- ciency improvements that he often alludes to without speci cs. Howards last two years on the county commission were the best chance for him to implement any major changes that he had spoken about in the years prior. With six years of experience under his belt, he understood the system, the rules and the process. I have little doubt that if he presented a reasonable argument that he could have passed almost anything with the votes of Commissioner George Green and Commissioner Lynn Artz, and if it was a good idea I am sure that Commissioner Alan Brock and Commissioner Mike Stewart would have joined also. He was the chairman, their chosen leader. But what does he have to show for those two years? What major tax breaks, staf ng or program changes did he try to implement? From what I can tell his main focus was on removing the county administrator. He was successful, but he could have done so much more. I read with interest where he wants to see the PST, or Public Services Tax, removed. This is a tax that is paid by every citizen who pays a water, electric or gas bill for their home. It allowed the county to reduce the revenue from the property tax by almost 2 million dollars. Everyone pays in, based on how much they use giving people real control over their taxes. He suggested removing this tax and deciding what programs to cut the funding for through discussion of the Board of County Commissioners. He then listed many programs that he wouldnt want to see altered or cut because of this reduction not leaving much room for budget cuts. After his eight years of service, I ask that Howard present to us the areas where he thinks Wakulla County should be looking for budget cuts. It is true, that if re-elected he would be one of five commissioners, so it would not be his decision alone. But I think it is important that we have a understanding of where he thinks there is waste in our county government, what sections would he look to cut to offset the loss of revenue. I want to know what service Howard Kessler believes we are able to go without. It is easy to speak of hypothetical government cuts it isnt easy to actual decide what should go. It is my understanding that Wakulla County is doing financially well with our current system, if Howard wants to cut services to cut taxes he should be clear about what he thinks should be cut, and with his years of experience it should be easy for him to do so. I look forward to Howards next Letter to the Editor explaining where the cuts should be made to offset his proposed tax decreases or a letter explaining his change in position. Bob Danzey CrawfordvilleMORE READERS WRITE:Editor, The News: I have paid attention to politics for my entire adult life and I have seen enough to know that political campaigns often becomes ugly and mean-spirited. As citizens, we have come to expect this as normal behavior in the political arena, even though it disgusts us when we see politicians stoop to this level. I am not a typical politician, nor do I want to be one. I certainly do not want to win a political of ce so bad that I am willing to compromise my morals and values. If the only way to victory is by attacking my opponents and impugning their integrity, I would prefer to lose with my own integrity intact. I am running to serve the citizens of Wakulla County as a Commissioner for District one. I CHOOSE to make my campaign about the strengths and experience that I will bring to the position. My strengths are not increased by trampling on the integrity of my opponents. I have come to know Commissioner Alan Brock since he was elected in 2008. It is my sincere belief that he is a man of honor. He is trustworthy and sincere in his desire to do his very best to make Wakulla County a better place. He and I have different ideas of what is best for our county and I would have made some decisions differently than he did. Nonetheless, I have nothing but respect for him as a person. My knowledge of my other opponent, Jenny Brock, is very limited. I have exchanged greetings with her in passing, but have never worked with her on local issues, nor have I ever had an in-depth conversation with her. From my limited exposure to her, I have nothing but respect for her as a person. As we enter the nal few weeks of this campaign, I am committed to staying on the high road. I will continue to focus my conversations on my abilities and how I intend to tackle the tough issues that affect Wakulla County. You will not see me resort to character assassinations of either of my opponents. You will not see me participate in a last-minute smear campaign, designed to create doubt about my opponents. Politicians often utilize this tactic when they want to create confusion, but they dont want to give ample time for the whole truth to be revealed and discussed. You will not see attacks on my opponents that come from my supporters or from an unknown Political Action Committee. I will not allow any person or group to do so called dirty work on my behalf. The citizens of Wakulla County are tired of underhanded politics. We need strong leaders with a strong work ethic who will model the behaviors our parents, pastors and teachers instilled into us. I am that person, and I promise to always put my entire heart and soul into serving the best interests of the good people of Wakulla County. If you have questions about who I am, or what I stand for, I invite you to give me a call at 559-0608. Together, we will ensure that our government is a reflection of the same strong values that bind our families together. May Gods blessings be upon your family and our community! Ralph Thomas Candidate for commission District 1 Editor, The News: I met Alan Brock when he ran for commissioner four years ago in 2008. Over the last four years Alan has a proven track record of success when it comes to issues involving our community. Alan championed the BP Restore Act and because of his continued vigilance and stewardship our community will receive millions in much-needed dollars. With passage of the federal Restore Act, Wakulla County and seven other Northwest Florida counties affected by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill are assured of receiving millions of dollars when nes are assessed against BP for the spill. The funding will potentially change the course of environmental restoration and economic development within our community. At a time when Wakulla County is faced with reduced nancial resources due to a troubled economy, these funds will be critical in assisting our community efforts to help our citizens, local businesses and local economy recover from this devastating recession. Alan championed the solid waste services. In 2005, when the existing land ll facility was closed and the county chose not to build a new transfer station, the state was threatening to ne the county for non-compliance. Alans promotion of this county-wide solid waste collection service provides the citizens of Wakulla County a valuable service, has increased recycling, decreased illegal dumping and lowered the overall annual cost per household for trash collection. At a time when everyone should be concerned about the condition we leave the environment for our children and future citizens, this service is something everyone can participate in and be proud of. It is meaningful decisive actions like these that make the difference in the responsible stewardship of this community. Alan led the effort to hire David Edwards as our new county administrator. One only needs to read page 4A of The Wakulla News, Sept. 13 issue (A view of whats happening in county government by David Edwards) to see that the hiring of this skilled management professional has encouraged the reorganization of and the ef cient streamlining of the local government structure saving the citizens of Wakulla County tax dollars and increasing the ef ciency of our county government. I have watched Alans determination to see this community take positive steps toward acquisition of alternative funding, responsible growth and ef cient government. Many of the decisions made have not been easy or popular with everyone. However, that is why we elect our leaders to do the county business. A commissioner who thoughtfully listens to alternative viewpoints, studies the problem and carefully considers the various issues prior to making his decisions is exactly what we ask of our elected of cials. Alan is a moderate voice willing to seek out compromise with his fellow commissioners and craft scal budgets, promote responsible growth and encourage ef cient government that works and serves the interests and people of Wakulla County. This cooperation provides meaningful outcomes and illustrates maturity as a commissioner and citizen. Join me in voicing your support at the polls for a proven leader who cares deeply for Wakulla County and its citizens. Vote for Alan Brock for four more years of proven leadership. It is time for Alans proven leadership! Bret D. Hammond Wakulla StationYou can count on Richard Harden Editor, The News: I would like to endorse Richard Harden for county commission. I have known Richard for close to 33 years. He is always a person that you could count on to be very honest and trustworthy. He has always cared about his community and has shown that in his dedication to Sopchoppy. He is a very hardworking individual who listens to his supporters and is not afraid to do the right thing. He is very fiscally conservative and tries his very best to make the right decisions for the community. If you call Richard you can believe he listens to your concerns. He would be a valuable asset to the Wakulla County Commission. Hard work, dedication, loyalty, professionalism and honesty those are characteristics not usually found in a candidate, but Richard has all of them. Patricia Ratliff Owner, Serendipty Salon St. Marks Editor, The News: We are writing today to support and rally for Maurice Langston running for Wakulla County sheriff. Our community deserves sound, knowledgeable, and ethically responsible leadership. Wakulla needs to continue to move forward, and Maurice is the person who can facilitate this movement and support the needs of our citizens. Maurice understands the strengths of our community but also has the ability to access the needs and implement changes or programs to support Wakulla County. He has proven leadership and knows how to talk the talk and walk the walk. Maurice is also known as a devout family man. He and his family have overcome stressors that had the potential to devastate the most strong. However, Maurice has led his family to overcome with grace and dignity characteristics he would bring to the elected of ce of sheriff for Wakulla County. Integrity, compassion, and knowledge values your parents tried to instill in you. Maurice has made his parents proud and he will do the same for the citizens of Wakulla County as our Sheriff. Vote Right. Vote Langston. Ray and Patricia Hubbird Crawfordville

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Churchreligious views and events Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Church BriefsThe umpire (gasp) wore shortsREV. JAMES L. SNYDER Okay, right up front I want to confess that I am an old fogey. In my defense, as if I needed one, I was born an old fogey. I have what may be called old-fogeyitis, a rare psychological disorder only affecting people born of woman. For many years, I beat myself over the head because I did not understand old fogeyitis syndrome. Years ago, I have learned to accept it, whether others accept it or not is not my problem. It was a wonderful day when I realized I could have a lot of other things much worse than oldfogeyitis. Just this week I saw an article in the picture of supposedly the ugliest woman in the world. As I looked at her picture, it reminded me of one of my old aunts. I know Im not the prettiest face in town but I wasnt born this way. My face is the result of the stress through the years from the old-fogeyitis syndrome. One of the amazing traits of this syndrome is the marvelous selective memory. My memory is so good I can remember things that never happened. Some people look at me when I recall one of these pseudo-memories as if I was senile. Oh no. It is not senility it is old-fogeyitis. I really did not know how bad it was until this past week. My oldest granddaughter was playing softball and invited me to come and watch her rst game. She made me one of those offers that I couldnt refuse. It has been a longtime since I seen a slow pitch softball game much less played in one. I remembered those glorious days of yesteryear when I played slow pitch softball. According to my memory, I was the star pitcher on my team. What memories they were. Since they are my memories, I feel I have the right to make them what I want them to be. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage, our youngest daughter and her daughter joined me as we watched my granddaughters rst game. We brought our own chairs so we were able to set up our seating arrangements where we could watch our granddaughter play her rst game. I am not prejudiced, but from where we were sitting, she was the star player on her team. I am not sure how her team could ever get along without her. It is my humble opinion that greatness like this is inherited. You do not learn that kind of thing on your own, it is something that is passed down to you thr ough your genes. I must have passed it on to her because I do not have it anymore. Continued on Page 15A Yard sale set at Little Salem P.B. Church The pastors aide at Little Salem Primitive Baptist Church will be having a yard sale on Saturday, Sept. 22, beginning at 8 a.m. Fish and chicken dinners will also be on sale. The church is located at 1998 Wakulla Arran Road. Call for vocalists to perform in Handels Messiah The Community Choir is calling for vocalists and singers for the holiday musical program Handels Messiah, to be performed on Sunday, Dec. 9, at the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church in Sopchoppy at 3 p.m. The opportunity to be a part of this production is available to anyone in the Wakulla County area so new participants are encouraged to participate. Please join us at practice beginning Oct. 28 at 2:30 p.m. at the church. Reba Mason will be directing. Light refreshments will be served. Mark your calendars. Please call Reba Mason at (850) 9623804 for additional information. Big Bend Hospice to host Bereavement Conference Big Bend Hospice will hold its eighth annual Bereavement Conference on Friday, Sept. 28, at Tallahassee Community College. The event is billed as Tapestries: Stories of Love, Loss and Hope. To register, go to bigbendhospice,org and click on the link. For more information, contact Lisa Baggett at (850) 878-5310 or email lisa@ bigbendhospice.org. OUT TO PASTOR By CYNTHIA WEBSTERSpecial to the News The world is in a mess. There is not one person in all of Wakulla County who fails to realize this. Yet this has not happened overnight. For decades we have allowed so many wrongs to continue even when we knew them to be wrong. Promises have been falsely made to the people that can not be kept, television and movies use language that should be unacceptable, and children are being given false hope about their future. Our culture is more crass, our values less evident and our prayers less frequent. No one denies this and few claim that this is the way it should be. And yet we continue to look to the government and accept what they tell us. We expect all that is wrong to be xed without bothering to understand the issues. And worst of all we do know that by doing this we are placing our trust in the wrong hands. The answer lies in the fervent prayers of righteous men. Christians, lifting their voices in prayerful unison asking for national healing, for wisdom and that His will be done, shall be heard. And that is the good news people from across Wakulla County, from all denominations are deciding to stand up and stand out on faith by being a part of the Footsteps for Faith and Freedom prayer walk from Sept. 27 to Nov. 5. And we want you to be a part of it too. Here is how it works. Monday through Saturday people will meet up for about an hour. We will be lifted up in prayer by one of our clergy and then walk in fellowship. This is not a procession, a parade, nor even a group walk. Rather it is simply a walk. You might choose to walk alone, walk with a friend, walk with a family member, walk with your dog, or perhaps push your baby in the stroller. It does not matter even that you walk. You might want only to bring a chair or sit on the bench, enjoy the fall air and pray. This is not an invitation to a 40-day commitment but rather an opportunity to join with others who believe that our countrys survival depends on Gods presence in the decisions that we as a nation make and in the life choices that we as His children choose. Through prayerful petition we can seek together both Gods blessing and his mercy on America and on our homes. Day One of Footsteps for Faith and Freedom is Thursday, Sept. 27, at Azalea Park at 7 p.m. Future prayer walks will take place at 7 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday and at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. Put the date on your calendar, tuck a bottle of water in your belt, and get ready to experience a wonderful hour with other Christians who know that now is the time to stand up and step out in our Faith. For additional information or for a ride contact your home church or footstepsforfaithnfreedom@ gmail.com.Footsteps for faith and freedomBy ETHEL SKIPPER Thought for the week: In the First Book of John it teaches us how to know God through Love. It reads, Beloved, let us love one another, for love is of God, and everyone that loveth is born of God, and knoweth God. He that loveth not knoweth not God, for God is love. In this was manifested the love of God toward us, because God sent his only begotten son into the world, that we might live through him. Herein is love, not that we loved God but that he loved us and sent his son to be propitiation for our sins. If God so loved us, we ought to love one another. No man has seen God at any time. If we love one another, God dwelleth in us, his love is perfected in us. Jesus commanded his disciples to love one another just as he had loved them. Their love for one another would be the trademark characteristic that would identify them as his disciples. As children of God who is love, all believers naturally bear the characteristic of their Father. He is light-walking, practicing righteousness and abiding in Christ. If love is absent, there is no knowledge of God. Let us love one another and pray for our world that we live in. Our prayers are for those that are not saved, the sick and shut-in, the homeless, those in the nursing homes, hospitals, prisons. Let us pray for peace. We wish a happy birthday to Crystal Green, Mother Doris Mackey and Eddie Brannen Sr., from Mother Eva M. Johnson. The fth Sunday Union meeting of the Church of Christ Written in Heaven will be held in Panama City from Sept. 28 to Sept. 30 at Trinity Temple Church of Christ W.I.H. Union Director Andrew Morris. Beginning Oct. 9 and through Oct. 14, there will be a church celebration for Pastor Ethel M. Skipper to recognize 24 years of pastoring. There will be church each night, featuring choir singing, preaching and praising the Lord. You dont want to miss this occasion. Mount Olive No. 1 Church will be in service Friday night, Sept. 21, at 7 p.m. Guest will be Skipper Temple Church. Everyone is welcome. Host pastor Elder Donald Jefferson.Ethel Skipper is a longtime columnist for The Wakulla News.Love, for love is of GodWalks in support of faith begins on ursday, Sept. 27, at Azalea Park at 7 p.m.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 Page 7AObituaries Daniel Lawrence Calhoun Capt. David Sams Gibbs Bernadette Parker Sue Calhoun Preacher James Jimmy Darnell Smith William Bill Boyd Stephens Sr.William Bill Boyd Stephens Sr., of Sopchoppy, passed away Monday, Sept. 10. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Bobbie Stephens. He was born in Thomas County, Ga., and had lived in Wakulla County since 1973 coming from Lakeland. He was retired from the City of Sopchoppy as a public water systems operator. He attended Lake Ellen Baptist Church. He was Past Master of Ashmore Masonic Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32308. Visitation for family and friends was held Wednesday, Sept. 12, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. Services were held Thursday, Sept. 13, at 3 p.m. at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. Burial followed at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. Survivors include four children, Brenda Villiard (Kevin) of Sopchoppy, Pamela Smith (Ronnie) of Joplin, Mo., William Bill B. Stephens Jr. (Sheila) of Crawfordville, and Michael D. Stephens (Deanna) of Jacksonville; two sisters, Betty Ann Smith of Medart and Faye Andrews (J.C.) of Tallahassee; a brother, Andy Jack Stephens (Sandy) of Coolidge, Ga.; 12 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville, is assisting with arrangements (850-926-3333) or www.bevisfh.com. Sue Calhoun Preacher, 73, passed away on Tuesday, Sept. 11, in Crawfordville. She was born Madrena Sue Calhoun in Campbell County, Va., on June 24, 1939 and had lived in Tallahassee since 1982. She was self-employed at Abacomp Accounting and Tax, with her daughter and business partner, since 1982. She retired from the State of Florida (Pharmacy Services) after 26 years. She had been an active member of Crawfordville United Methodist Church since 2009 and was a member of Eastern Star. She won awards for her paintings in Jacksonville. She wrote a column Lloyd Notes for the Monticello News under the name Sue Gramling in the 1970s. Memorial services will be held on Saturday, Sept. 22, at 11 a.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Church in Crawfordville. The family requests no owers or plants. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to Crawfordville United Methodist Church Outreach Ministries, 176 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville FL 32327. Survivors include her daughter, Rebecca M. Gramling of Tallahassee; sister-in-law, Lynette Calhoun of Tallahassee; nieces, Kimberly Bingham of Spokane, Wash., Wendy Calhoun of Tallahassee and Teresa Herrin of North Ft. Myers; and 10 great-nieces and six great-nephews. She was predeceased by her parents and her siblings. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville, is assisting with arrangements (850-926-3333) or www.bevisfh.com. Daniel Lawrence Calhoun, 69, died on Tuesday, Sept.11, in Crawfordville. He was born in Moccasin Gap, Va. He was a retired truck driver. Memorial services will be held on Saturday, Sept. 22, at 11 a.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Church in Crawfordville, FL. Survivors include his wife of 42 years, Lynnette Calhoun of Tallahassee; two daughters, Kim Bigham of Spokane, Wash., and Wendy Calhoun of Tallahassee; eight grandchildren and eight greatgrandchildren; and a niece, Rebecca Gramling of Tallahassee. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville, is assisting with arrangements (850926-3333) or www.bevisfh. com. Bernadette Helen Darling Parker, 80, of Sopchoppy, formerly of Charles City, Iowa, died Aug. 31 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital in Tallahassee. She was born May 9, 1932, in Greenwood, Wis., the daughter of Merrill and Helen (Johnson) Darling. Funeral services were held on Sept. 8 at Hauser Funeral Home in Charles City with burial at Riverside Cemetery in Charles City. Survivors include five children, Mavis (Cary) LaBounty of Sopchoppy, Fritz Parker of Charles City, Altha Morgan of Fort Worth, Texas, Clifford Parker Jr. of Charles City, and Dea Neve of Charles City; 16 grandchildren; 24 great-grandchildren; six great-great-grandchildren; and a sister, Marilyn (Gene) Putney of Barnum, Minn. She was predeceased by her parents; her husband, Clifford; a great granddaughter, Morgan Swartwood; special friend, Herman Putney Jr.; and son-in-law, Kevin Neve. James Jimmy Darnell Smith died on Wednesday, Sept. 12, in Eastpoint. He lived most of his life on St. George Island where he will be remembered for his artistic and musical talents. His marquetry (wood inlay) artwork is featured in many of the homes on the island. Survivors include one son, Shawn Christopher Smith of Eastpoint; a brother, Michael Smith of Crawfordville; three sisters, Patricia Davis of Crawfordville, Sharlene Posey of Kansas City, and Tina Langston (Daryl) of Sopchoppy; and numerous nephews and nieces. He was predeceased by his parents, Alsey May and Mary Ellen Smith of Crawfordville. The family would like to extend a special thanks to all his dedicated friends in Franklin and Wakulla counties for their support during his illness over the last nine years and for their calls concerning donations. They can be made to The Jimmy Smith Fund, C/O Centennial Bank, P.O. Box 610, Crawfordville FL 32326.William Bill Boyd Stephens Sr. Sue Calhoun Preacher Daniel Lawrence Calhoun Bernadette Helen Darling Parker James Jimmy Darnell SmithCapt. David Sams Gibbs, 69, of Panacea, died on July 29 at his home with family members and caregivers by his side. He was born July 6, 1943, to James Frank and Sara Sams Gibbs of Tifton, Ga. He spent his last years out as a boat captain shing the waters along Panaceas coast and inland rivers. Memorial Services will be held in Tifton at the First Baptist Church Chapel at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 22, and at Bayside Marina in Panacea on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 2 p.m. followed by a gathering of friends and family at the Panacea Moose Lodge. Memorials donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308, or www.bigbendhospice.org. Survivors include his sister Jane Sinclair (Jim) of Tifton; several nieces and nephews; special thanks to friends and caregivers, Sonny Lemire of Panacea and Marko Mills of Crawfordville; and Big Bend Hospice. He was predeceased by a brother, James Jim Gibbs.Capt. David Sams Gibbs Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for qualied applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and oor rate of 2.5% Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor Bobby PEARCE Electfor Superintendent of SchoolsPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Bobby Pearce, Democrat, Superintendent of SchoolsJoin me at pearce4kids on facebook

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsPamper your Pooch, an event held by CHAT of Wakulla, Inc., will be Saturday, Sept. 29 at Hudson Park. This year is a little different, as local candidates have been invited to help out at the event. Alan Brock, Jenny, Brock, Bobby Pearce, Charlie Creel, Donnie Sparkman, Emily Smith, Howard Kessler, Jim Parham, John Shuff, Kimball Thomas, Maurice Langston and Ralph Thomas have agreed to do the dirty work for CHAT. Two candidates will be scheduled each hour between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. CHAT volunteers will towel dry, apply all natural ea/tick treatment and take care of pawdicures. Also offered will be anal gland extraction and microchipping by Dr. Faith Hughes, of VCA Wakulla Animal Hospital; photo shoot and all natural baked doggy treats by Purrs and Waggs.CHAT event gets help from candidates Williams marries Amesha Brannen Rotary program will feature Ed Ball Special to The NewsWho was Ed Ball is the title of the program to be presented by historian Madeleine Carr at the Rotary Club of Wakulla County on Thursday, Sept. 21. The meeting will be held at noon at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center, 33 Michael Drive. Non-members can attend the program and enjoy lunch for $7. Learn about how pre-war and post-war Florida provided Ball an adventurous life. The program coincides with the 75th Anniversary of the Historic Wakulla Springs Lodge built by nancier Ball. Completed on September 25, 1937. For more information, contact Doug Jones at 9261177. happenings in our community Community Amesha Brannen of Sopchoppy and Reginald Williams of Crawfordville were married on Aug. 31 at 3 p.m. at Faith Healing & Anointing Temple by Pastor Bettye Lovett. The bride is the daughter of Eddie and Ethel Brannen. The groom is the son of Evelyn and Phillip House and Ben Williams. The couple had their honeymoon in Panama City Beach. The couple will live in Crawfordville. Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Williams, at right Special to The NewsIn spite of persistent downpours, more than 50 people attended the Blue Ribbon Reunion event on Sept. 8 at the Wakulla Democratic Party Headquarters. The event brought together many individuals who actively worked for the election of Barack Obama in 2008 and volunteers working on the presidents re-election campaign. A special memorial tribute was made to Ralph Lewis, one of the key organizers of the successful 2008 campaign, who passed away shortly after the election. David Roddenberry presented a plaque in his honor to members of his family and Ralphs grandson, Alexander Lewis spoke on behalf of the family. On Saturday, volunteers signed up to help at the headquarters and they also enjoyed a delicious meal of barbecue chicken, hot dogs, salad and dessert. The Wakulla Democratic Party Headquarters located in the North Pointe Center, 1626 Crawfordville Highway, Unit B, is open Monday through Friday from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. and on Saturday from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Call 745-6169 or come by for more information.Blue Ribbon event was well attended SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPeople in the attendance at the Blue Ribbon Reunion held by the Wakulla Democratic Party listen to a presentation honoring organizer Ralph Lewis. 100th birthday party for Eloise The family of Eloise Kemp Strickland would like to invite all her family and friends to her 100th Birthday Celebration on Saturday, Sept. 29 at the Historic Sopchoppy High School Gymnasium. The drop-in time is 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. No gifts please. Eloise Kemp Strickland, at left Email your community news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space is available. Jones and Fisher to wed this weekend Annie Bell Jones and Keith Fisher, both of Tallahassee, announce their upcoming wedding. She is the daughter of Maddie Parks and Kalvin Young of Tallahassee. He is the son of John and Christine Johnson of Crawfordville. The wedding will be Sept. 22 at 3 p.m. at the Retreat at Bradleys Pond. Annie Jones and Keith Fisher, at left I LIKEMIKEREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 C WAKULLA COUNTY VOTERS HAVE TWO CHOICES: 1. VOTE FOR MIKE STEWART, A MAN OF ACTION AND PROVEN PERFORMANCE, WHO STANDS UP FOR YOUR RIGHTS AND LOOKS FOR SOLUTIONS. 2. VOTE FOR HOWARD KESSLER, A PERSON WHO I BELIEVE HAS A RECORD OF HIDING BEHIND THE NO VOTE, INACTION AND OF BRINGING NOTHING TO THE TABLE AS A WORKABLE SOLUTION. ITS YOUR CHOICE... BUT I LIKE MIKE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3www.mikestewart2012.comPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MIKE STEWART, REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3facebook.com/ mike.stewart.3363 FREEto the PublicAny questions please contact our oce at 850-926-1033Featured Guest & Speaker:MR. BOBWILLIAMSONAuthor of Miracle on Luckie StreetRemarkable personal story From H omeless to Millionnaire...NAMI WAKULLA(NATIONALALLIANCEONMENTALILLNESS)Cordially Invites You to Attend Date: Place: Time: Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief Support850-878-5310

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 Page 9A2012 General Election Local Candidates SHERIFF Maurice Langston REP Charlie Creel NPA PROPERTY APPRAISER Donnie Sparkman DEM Jim Parham NPA SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Robert Bobby Pearce DEM Kimball Kim Thomas NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 Alan Brock DEM Ralph Thomas REP Jenny Brock NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 Mike Stewart REP Howard Kessler NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 5 Richard Harden REP John Shuff DEM Emily T. Smith NPA2012 Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Political Forum Questions Form Questions will be screened and approved by the forum committee based on the following guidelines: 1. The question must be directed to all candidates for the speci c race. 2. The question must be concise and relevant to the current issues. Ask The Candidates Please complete the form below to submit your question to the candidates for their respective races. Deadline for submitting questions is Oct. 2. First Name ________________________________________________ Where do you live in Wakulla? ____________________________ Local race to which your question applies: (see list at left) ____________________________________________________________ What is your question for the candidates? ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Mail this form to: Wakulla Chamber Political Forum P. O. Box 148 Crawfordville FL 32326 education news SchoolSpecial to The NewsAs a part of its strategic planning process, Tallahassee Community College is organizing three listening session town halls to receive feedback from the community and shape its next strategic plan. A drawing for a $500 TCC scholarship will also take place at each town hall. The events are hosted by President Jim Murdaugh and will be held in each of the three counties in TCCs service district. In Wakulla County, it will be held on Oct. 10 from 6 to 7 p.m. at TCCs Wakulla Center, 2932 Crawfordville Highway At these events, TCC hopes to learn more about community members priorities, goals and hopes when it comes to higher education, workforce development and TCCs role in the community. The feedback from these events will be used to inform TCCs strategic plan, said Dr. Murdaugh. We pride ourselves as an institution on listening to the community and aligning our priorities with those that we serve. Participation in these events by the Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla communities will help ensure that our strategic plan is not only relevant, but student-focused and forward-thinking. Questions to be discussed at the town hall events include how TCC can better serve residents and partner with local businesses, what TCC can do to prepare students for the future and what TCC should prioritize to help achieve the greatest potential for the Big Bend region. For more information on the town hall events, or to provide comments on TCCs strategic planning process, contact the College at GreatIdeas@tcc. .edu or (850) 2018632, or visit www.tcc. .edu/ GreatIdeas. By DAVID ROYSE THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 14...Gov. Rick Scott will push lawmakers to avoid cutting the education budget this year, the governor said following a dinner with union of- cials late Friday. And if theres enough money, hell again push for an increase. Scott, who championed the restoration of $1 billion to this years education budget after signing a 2011 budget that cut the same amount, told reporters that he promised union of cials with the Florida Education Association that he will call on lawmakers to at least hold the line on spending for schools. In our dinner tonight, I told the FEA that as we continue to develop our education agenda we are going to, at a minimum, sustain current state funding for education in the next budget and depending on the states economic outlook, aim to increase education funding where we can improve student outcomes. Scott had dinner at the Governors Mansion Friday night with representatives of the union as the culmination of a week focused on education, during which the governor visited several schools. Our goal is to better prepare students for college and careers and our policies in the next budget and the next legislative session will be designed around that, Scott said. The dinner was noteworthy because the teachers union and most state Republican leaders have not been very friendly over the last few years. In fact Scott signed legislation last year that put in place a merit pay system that the union opposed in a high pro le battle between the FEA and the GOP. Scotts promise to try to increase, or at least maintain current education spending, may put him at odds with his own party in the Legislature. Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville and the incoming Senate president, said earlier this week that he didnt see enough money in the outlook for incoming taxes to be thinking about boosting education spending. The $1 billion increase has proven popular, even if it was a restoration of earlier cuts. School districts have seen their overall budgets decreased signi cantly in the last several years. Scott will release his proposed budget in January and lawmakers will convene in the regular session in March.Scott will push to avoid education cutsTCC will hold a town hall meetingSpecial to The NewsFor orthopedic surgeon Sean Adelman a father of three, including Dev, a highschool age daughter with Down syndrome life lessons are not the exclusive province of the young. Adelman is the author of Sams Top Secret Journal (www.raiseexpectations.com), a Nancy Drew-style childrens book series featuring a protagonist with Down syndrome. School and other social functions provide many rst worldly experiences that are important to developing students. And diversity is so important. Studies have shown that those with learning challenges bene t from inclusive education a movement that integrates special-ed students with non-special-ed students and so does the rest of the student body. Empathic development: The best way to a better society is to have empathy for our fellow human beings. During the 1990s, inclusion of specialed students jumped from 48 percent to 70 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Diversity and the real world: Children who attend inclusive schools are better able to navigate the complexities of our diverse adult society. Students with and without special needs bene t from exposure to classmates who face different life circumstances. The meaning of friendship: Children need to develop social skills and to know how to create and sustain meaningful friendships for a healthy adult life. Bene ts of inclusion with special ed students 5:30 pm Social Time 6:00 pm Forum Wakuula County Senior Citizens Center 33 Michael Dr., Crawfordville Wakulla County Chamber of Commercepresents 2012 Candidates ForumTuesday, October 9th, 2012At the SHERIFF Maurice Langston REP Charlie Creel NP A PROPERTY APPRAISER Donnie Sparkman DEM Jim P arham NPA SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Robert Bobby Pearce DEM Kimball Kim Thomas NP A COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 Alan Brock DEM Ralph Thomas REP J enny Brock NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 Mike Stewart REP Ho ward Kessler NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 5 Richard Harden REP J ohn Shuff DEM Emily T. Smith NPARefreshments provided by Wakulla County Rotary Club Seating is limited SHERIFF Maurice Langston REP Charlie Creel NP A PROPERTY APPRAISER Donnie Sparkman DEM Jim P arham NPA SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Robert Bobby Pearce DEM Kimball Kim Thomas NP A COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 Alan Brock DEM Ralph Thomas REP J enny Brock NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 Mike Stewart REP Ho ward Kessler NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 5 Richard Harden REP J ohn Shuff DEM Emily T. Smith NPA The following candidates from local races have been invited to participate: The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Clubs2012 ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZAWildwood Country Club Thursday October 11 2012 6:30pm Social 7:00pm Dinner, Auction, & Show please join us forBealls Maurices Way Out West Carrolls Boot Country Crums Mini MallTICKETS $30.00 eachall proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County students

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsHere it is the middle of September and were getting ready to get into the fall shing pattern. The water will start cooling off on the flats and sh will start heading to the oyster bars and up the creeks and rivers. Hopefully the rains will stop before cold weather gets here because the trout just do not like fresh water. Anytime you nd them in the creeks and rivers the water has a high salinity level. Let it rain a lot and dump a lot of freshwater into the creeks and rivers and you can kiss the trout goodbye until early spring. I cant count the times Ive been catching trout in the rivers and creeks and go back after a heavy rain and nothing. JR at the Aucilla River said if trout are in the river and you get a fairly heavy rain, the tell-tale sign that the fish will be gone is leaves floating down the river. I was talking with JR today and he said shing wasnt real good though some sh are being caught. The water around the Aucilla and Econfina are still very black and he said the clearest water he has seen is over around Gray Mare Rock. One of these days hes probably gonna be on a reality TV show. He has started taking people bow hunting for alligators if they have a permit to harvest one. He has rigged his airboat with four big lights and going out at night it looks like daylight. If anybody knows the waters down there, he does. He said he knows most of the alligators down there by name. So far they have taken seven with a bow and ve were over 10 feet. The latest trip he had was this past weekend and a 14-year-old girl shot a 10foot 2-inch gator. JR said that gator would not be eating any more of his red sh. If you have a permit to harvest an alligator in Jefferson, Wakulla or Taylor counties, give JR a call at his store. The number there is (850) 584-4595. If hes not there hes out shing, hunting or looking for alligators. I talked with Capt. Randy Peart today and he said charters have been slow but he went to the Econ na last Saturday. He said despite the east wind that they managed to catch seven trout and two reds. He said he had to nd rockgrass to nd the trout. Capt. David Fife has been catching quite a few reds in the Spring Creek Oyster Bay area and also catching lots of big silver trout. Jeff May from Carrolton, Ga., was down this weekend and said they went out southeast of Shell Point in search of grouper and came back with seven nice grouper and lots of rock bass and pink mouth grunts. They had planned to sh on Monday but 5 to 7 foot seas kept them at the dock. I fished with Jeff and Doddie Dickman from Evansville, Ind., a week ago and we caught lots of trout and ounder the two days we shed. We managed a couple of nice reds and Jeff Landed a 6-pound trout, which was his largest ever. Everything was either caught on live shrimp or a Gulp. On Saturday I fished with Bryant Collin from Camilla, Ga., and his son and a friend. We ended the day with seven reds, 11 trout and three flounder. We probably caught 30 trout that were about 14.75-inches long. Everything was caught around the oyster bars around Shell Point and we couldnt nd anything on the ats. The Gulp and live shrimp caught everything. I take a lot of kids shing and have had them on my boat as young as 4, though I sure tried to talk her mother into leaving her at home because it was so cold. She was the only adult and there was no father involved. This was years ago and it was so cold and windy that I tried to talk her out of going at all. I could hear the three older kids when I was talking with her on the phone and they sounded like they were almost in tears when she told them we might not go. I told them to dress warm and I would give it my best, but dont be surprised if we dont catch anything. All of the kids caught fish and even the 4-year-old reeled in a big trout with the help of her mother. On Saturday the young man I took out shing was 10 and he caught his rst red sh. In fact he caught three and you would not believe how excited he got. The point of all of this is if you have a son or daughter take them shing. With all the electronic games that kids are hooked on, if we dont get the younger generation interested, years from now the boat ramps are gonna be empty. Remember to know your limits, be careful out there and take a kid shing. If you dont have a kid, take one of your friends kids shing. Good luck and good shing!Shifting into a fall shing pattern From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle G E T READY FOR HUN T IN G Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts Color F acial Waxings Specialty Cuts F lat T ops F eather Locks Color P erms Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. c e H a i r S a l o n e H l o H a i a l o i r S a c e c e o n o o n Tues -S at 54 529 05 & t. . . . F STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO If Wakulla is to become greater it would be good to hire a property appraiser who has worked in and understands the dynamics of greater markets (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bareld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of From FWC NewsThe 2012 recreational season for bay scallops, which was extended two weeks earlier this year, will close Tuesday, Sept. 25. The nal day of harvesting is Sept. 24. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) extended the season temporarily in 2010 and 2011 to help alleviate economic hardships caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The season was extended permanently in June 2012. This extension will help increase business opportunities during a time of the year when other sheries are closed and tourism has decreased. The 2012 season began July 1. Before the change, the season was set to end Sept. 11. Surveys will be conducted after the season closes to assess the scallop population. Bay scallops can be recreationally harvested in Gulf of Mexico state waters (shore to nine nautical miles) from the Pasco-Hernando County line northward to the west bank of the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County. The recreational bag limit is two gallons of whole bay scallops or one pint of meat per person, per day, with a vessel limit of 10 gallons of whole bay scallops or a half-gallon of meat. There is no commercial harvest for bay scallops in Florida state waters. Scallop harvesters can assist the FWCs scallop researchers by completing an online survey at http://svy. mk/bayscallops, indicating where they harvest scallops, how many they collect and how long it takes to harvest them. FWC staff and some vendors in harvest areas also distribute postage-paid survey cards that collect similar data. Participants can email BayScallops@MyFWC.com to ask questions or send additional information. Harvesters are asked to submit all information for the 2012 season by Oct. 31. Visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Bay Scallops to learn more.Scallop season closes Sept. 25

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As most of you have read before, Flotilla 12 is part of a larger Division running from the Econ na River all the way to Pensacola. Division 1 is part of the eighth Coastal Region District. This runs from New Mexico to parts of Florida and Georgia. Within our Flotilla, we have members who have served on both division and district staff as well as elected of ces. Last week the eighth Coastal Region held its SEPTRAIN fall training and meeting in Dallas. Two of our members, Chuck Hickman and Duane Treadon, attended the meeting. Duane sent in this report. As the Districts Program Visitor (PV) Staff Officer Chuck Hickman is responsible for overseeing the Auxiliarys PV program from New Mexico to St. Marks. Members involved in PV provide yers and brochures about safe boating to the public at various retail and government locations throughout their areas. This free material promotes one of the key components of the Auxiliarys mission, Recreational Boating Safety or RBS. You may have seen displays from Flotilla 12 in locations around our area. If you are interested in setting up your location as a PV site contact our local PV staff of cer Mike Harrison at FSO-PV@uscgaux.net As division Communication Service (CS) Of cer Duane Treadon was asked to attend a special offering of the Coast Guards AUX-4 class. CS of cers have many duties but one of their larger duties is website and social media development for their otillas. AUX-4 is a class dedicated to teaching students how to utilize the Auxiliarys WOW II website development platform. This training is such an important tool for otillas since all of the CS of- cers are volunteers and may not have the skills to build and maintain a website. As part of a National effort within the Auxiliary to make all webpages look similar, be on the look out for changes in our page (www.uscgaux.net). During the business meeting of the District Board and Staff, our Division Commander Mo Davis was elected as the new District Captain East. Bravo Zulu Mo! What an honor to have one of our own represent us again in such a prestigious position. We have also had Jeff Brooks from our division and Rich Rasmussen from our otilla in that position. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident Challenge yourself to learn something new about boating safety so that you are ready when the challenges arise. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMo Davis and Jeff Brooks.FWC Law Enforcement operations Winter Storage. The winter brings cooler and rougher ocean water that often lessens diver enthusiasm. If you want to continue diving during the winter, the caverns of North Florida from Morrison Springs and Jackson Blue to our west, Orange Grove, Peacock, Troy and Ginnie to our east and Divers Den and Blue Grotto to our south make for wonderful dives (as long as you are Cavern quali- ed). Their waters are usually clear and constant temperature year around. The drive time is between one and two hours. Those who can, travel to warm dive destinations in the winter. When winter interest step up such as hunting, school and football, our diving equipment is forgotten. How should we store it and where? Proper storage now can save money and needless delays next spring. So gather up your dive equipment and lets get started. Many folks take their regulator in for its annual inspection before storage, others in the spring before use. Cylinders need to be stored full of breathing gas, or completely empty and open. A partially lled aluminum cylinder stored in a closet becomes a bomb when your house burns down. Recall you basic physics: you can expect a 5 psi increase in pressure for every 1 degree increase in ambient temperature. A full cylinder at 3000 psi will pop its safety burst disc before the cylinder melts down and relieve the pressure of the cylinder. A half- lled cylinder will not, resulting in a failure to contain the gas and a sudden explosive rupture. Shrapnel from the cylinder wall will cause further damage and possible injury. Now is the time to inspect the dates for testing and schedule any tests before you need to use your cylinders. We are often asked to ll out of hydro or VIP cylinders in the spring, causing further unwanted delays. Store your cylinders standing up with some type of restraint to keep them from falling over. Cylinders may be tied to a wall or closet using an eye bolt and some 1/4 inch line from the bolt and around the valve. Steel round bottom cylinders need a boot to be more stable standing up. I am certain you rinse your equipment after each dive. But now you should soak all of it. Fill your BC with fresh water and submerge it in a tub of fresh water overnight. Be sure to seal the rst stage of your regulator (dust cap) before submerging the entire regulator in with the BC. Yes, toss in your ns, mask, snorkel, gloves, speargun, dive gear bag and wet suit as well. You need to soak out the salts before a long storage. The next day, remove the equipment from the tub and drain the BC, hang everything out to dry in the shade, and in ate the BC with dry air from your tank. Once dry, your rubber parts can be lightly powdered with talcum, a natural preservative. I do not recommend dumping talcum into the snorkel or the second stage of the regulator however. If you forget to clean it out next spring, breathing talcum is unpleasant. Roll or fold up your wet suit (do not hang it on a wire hanger!) and store it on a shelf away from any motors or gas furnace as ozone generated by these devices will destroy the rubber. Hang your BC in the same closet on a strong hanger or one that is designed for dive equipment. Your regulator can be coiled up on a shelf or attached to the special BC hanger that has clips for the regulator. Much of the rest of your equipment can go back into your gear bag, now that it has dried, and stored on yet another shelf. When the soft spring breeze beckons you to dive again, you will nd your dive equipment ready to reliably serve your underwater needs once again. This report represents some events the FWC handled over Aug. 31 to Sept. 7, but does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. ESCAMBIA COUNTY: Officer Matt Cushing checked individuals shing from a vessel near the Pensacola Pass. While speaking to them, Of cer Cushing learned a third subject was scuba diving but observed there was no divers down ag displayed. Of cer Cushing waited in the area for the diver to surface. When the diver surfaced, Of cer Cushing found the subject to be in possession of an undersized gag grouper. Citations were issued for the two violations. WALTON COUNTY: Of- cers Randall Brooks and Ken White responded to Santa Rosa Beach to assist a dolphin rescue team with a beached whale. The rescue team transported the whale to Gulf World in Panama City for treatment. BAY COUNTY: Officer Mike Nobles was checking shermen when he found one to be nervous and very evasive during conversation. Of cer Nobles determined that the sherman had outstanding warrants as a felony traf c offender. The subject was arrested and transported to the Bay County Jail. Lt. Jay Chesser, and Officers Neal Goss and Mike Nobles responded to a boating accident on Deer Point Lake involving two personal watercrafts (PWCs) that collided head on. Both operators were transported to local trauma centers. Of cers assisted in transporting the injured to shore, securing and recovering the damaged vessels, and working the crime scene gathering statements and other information. The investigation is ongoing. P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday p Thu Sep 20, 12 Fri Sep 21, 12 Sat Sep 22, 12 Sun Sep 23, 12 Mon Sep 24, 12 Tue Sep 25, 12 Wed Sep 26, 12 Date 4.2 ft. 4:45 AM 4.0 ft. 5:24 AM 3.2 ft. 12:20 AM High -0.0 ft. 11:57 AM 0.2 ft. 12:58 PM 1.9 ft. 12:12 AM 2.1 ft. 1:15 AM 2.1 ft. 2:53 AM 1.9 ft. 4:42 AM 1.5 ft. 6:00 AM Low 3.3 ft. 6:21 PM 3.0 ft. 7:25 PM 3.8 ft. 6:13 AM 3.5 ft. 7:26 AM 3.3 ft. 9:27 AM 3.4 ft. 11:15 AM 3.6 ft. 12:25 PM High 1.6 ft. 11:27 PM 0.5 ft. 2:14 PM 0.6 ft. 3:41 PM 0.7 ft. 5:01 PM 0.7 ft. 6:04 PM 0.7 ft. 6:53 PM Low 2.8 ft. 8:48 PM 2.8 ft. 10:20 PM 2.9 ft. 11:31 PM High Thu Sep 20, 12 Fri Sep 21, 12 Sat Sep 22, 12 Sun Sep 23, 12 Mon Sep 24, 12 Tue Sep 25, 12 Wed Sep 26, 12 Date 4.3 ft. 4:42 AM 4.1 ft. 5:21 AM 3.2 ft. 12:17 AM High -0.0 ft. 11:54 AM 0.2 ft. 12:55 PM 2.0 ft. 12:09 AM 2.2 ft. 1:12 AM 2.3 ft. 2:50 AM 2.0 ft. 4:39 AM 1.6 ft. 5:57 AM Low 3.4 ft. 6:18 PM 3.1 ft. 7:22 PM 3.9 ft. 6:10 AM 3.6 ft. 7:23 AM 3.4 ft. 9:24 AM 3.5 ft. 11:12 AM 3.7 ft. 12:22 PM High 1.8 ft. 11:24 PM 0.5 ft. 2:11 PM 0.7 ft. 3:38 PM 0.7 ft. 4:58 PM 0.7 ft. 6:01 PM 0.7 ft. 6:50 PM Low 2.8 ft. 8:45 PM 2.8 ft. 10:17 PM 3.0 ft. 11:28 PM High Thu Sep 20, 12 Fri Sep 21, 12 Sat Sep 22, 12 Sun Sep 23, 12 Mon Sep 24, 12 Tue Sep 25, 12 Wed Se p 26, 12 Date 3.9 ft. 5:21 AM 2.7 ft. 12:07 AM 2.9 ft. 12:56 AM High -0.0 ft. 1:01 PM 1.5 ft. 12:31 AM 1.7 ft. 1:16 AM 1.9 ft. 2:19 AM 1.9 ft. 3:57 AM 1.7 ft. 5:46 AM 1.4 ft. 7:04 AM Low 3.1 ft. 6:57 PM 3.8 ft. 6:00 AM 3.5 ft. 6:49 AM 3.3 ft. 8:02 AM 3.1 ft. 10:03 AM 3.2 ft. 11:51 AM 3.4 ft. 1:01 PM High 0.2 ft. 2:02 PM 0.4 ft. 3:18 PM 0.6 ft. 4:45 PM 0.6 ft. 6:05 PM 0.6 ft. 7:08 PM 0.6 ft. 7:57 PM Low 2.8 ft. 8:01 PM 2.6 ft. 9:24 PM 2.6 ft. 10:56 PM High Thu Sep 20, 12 Fri Sep 21, 12 Sat Sep 22, 12 Sun Sep 23, 12 Mon Sep 24, 12 Tue Sep 25, 12 Wed Sep 26, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 4:37 AM 3.0 ft. 5:16 AM 2.4 ft. 12:12 AM High -0.0 ft. 12:08 PM 0.2 ft. 1:09 PM 1.4 ft. 12:23 AM 1.5 ft. 1:26 AM 1.5 ft. 3:04 AM 1.4 ft. 4:53 AM 1.1 ft. 6:11 AM Low 2.5 ft. 6:13 PM 2.3 ft. 7:17 PM 2.9 ft. 6:05 AM 2.6 ft. 7:18 AM 2.5 ft. 9:19 AM 2.6 ft. 11:07 AM 2.7 ft. 12:17 PM High 1.2 ft. 11:38 PM 0.4 ft. 2:25 PM 0.5 ft. 3:52 PM 0.5 ft. 5:12 PM 0.5 ft. 6:15 PM 0.5 ft. 7:04 PM Low 2.1 ft. 8:40 PM 2.1 ft. 10:12 PM 2.2 ft. 11:23 PM High Thu Sep 20, 12 Fri Sep 21, 12 Sat Sep 22, 12 Sun Sep 23, 12 Mon Sep 24, 12 Tue Sep 25, 12 Wed Sep 26, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 4:29 AM 3.2 ft. 5:08 AM 3.0 ft. 5:57 AM 2.5 ft. 12:04 AM High -0.0 ft. 11:36 AM 0.2 ft. 12:37 PM 0.5 ft. 1:53 PM 2.0 ft. 12:54 AM 2.1 ft. 2:32 AM 1.9 ft. 4:21 AM 1.5 ft. 5:39 AM Low 2.6 ft. 6:05 PM 2.3 ft. 7:09 PM 2.2 ft. 8:32 PM 2.7 ft. 7:10 AM 2.6 ft. 9:11 AM 2.7 ft. 10:59 AM 2.8 ft. 12:09 PM High 1.6 ft. 11:06 PM 1.8 ft. 11:51 PM 0.6 ft. 3:20 PM 0.7 ft. 4:40 PM 0.7 ft. 5:43 PM 0.7 ft. 6:32 PM Low 2.2 ft. 10:04 PM 2.3 ft. 11:15 PM High Thu Sep 20, 12 Fri Sep 21, 12 Sat Sep 22, 12 Sun Sep 23, 12 Mon Sep 24, 12 Tue Sep 25, 12 Wed Sep 26, 12 Date 3.5 ft. 4:17 AM 3.5 ft. 4:57 AM 3.4 ft. 5:48 AM 2.6 ft. 12:05 AM 2.7 ft. 12:36 AM 2.7 ft. 1:01 AM High 0.4 ft. 11:28 AM 0.4 ft. 12:46 PM 0.5 ft. 2:16 PM 2.1 ft. 12:21 AM 2.0 ft. 2:42 AM 1.8 ft. 4:20 AM 1.5 ft. 5:28 AM Low 2.7 ft. 7:36 PM 2.6 ft. 9:18 PM 2.6 ft. 11:11 PM 3.2 ft. 6:54 AM 3.0 ft. 8:24 AM 3.0 ft. 10:11 AM 3.0 ft. 11:47 AM High 2.0 ft. 10:28 PM 2.0 ft. 11:04 PM 0.5 ft. 3:39 PM 0.5 ft. 4:47 PM 0.6 ft. 5:42 PM 0.7 ft. 6:28 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 20 Sept. 26First Sept. 22 Full Sept. 29 Last Oct. 7 New Oct. 15Major Times 5:12 AM 7:12 AM 5:41 PM 7:41 PM Minor Times 12:16 PM 1:16 PM 11:02 PM 12:02 AM Major Times 6:11 AM 8:11 AM 6:41 PM 8:41 PM Minor Times --:---:-1:20 PM 2:20 PM Major Times 7:10 AM 9:10 AM 7:39 PM 9:39 PM Minor Times 12:00 AM 1:00 AM 2:17 PM 3:17 PM Major Times 8:08 AM 10:08 AM 8:36 PM 10:36 PM Minor Times 1:01 AM 2:01 AM 3:10 PM 4:10 PM Major Times 9:03 AM 11:03 AM 9:29 PM 11:29 PM Minor Times 2:03 AM 3:03 AM 3:56 PM 4:56 PM Major Times 9:55 AM 11:55 AM 10:20 PM 12:20 AM Minor Times 3:05 AM 4:05 AM 4:38 PM 5:38 PM Major Times 10:45 AM 12:45 PM 11:08 PM 1:08 AM Minor Times 4:05 AM 5:05 AM 5:16 PM 6:16 PM Average Average Average Average+ Average Average Average7:24 am 7:35 pm 12:17 pm 11:03 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:25 am 7:34 pm 1:20 pm --:-7:25 am 7:33 pm 2:18 pm 12:01 am 7:26 am 7:31 pm 3:10 pm 1:02 am 7:26 am 7:30 pm 3:57 pm 2:04 am 7:27 am 7:29 pm 4:39 pm 3:06 am 7:28 am 7:28 pm 5:17 pm 4:06 am31% 39% 46% 54% 61% 68% 75% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com & Red Clay Footprints By John RobertsA morsel of genuine history is a thing so rare as to be always valuable Thomas Jefferson In my spare time I try to help out at the Wakulla County Historical Society Museum by volunteering, as needed, to work at the Museum located at 24 High Street (the old jail), in Crawfordville. Now and then, something kind of unusual happens there, and such was the case on July 27, when a gentleman, Clint Stalcup, dropped by with a piece of wood in his hand which he said he would like to donate to the museum. He said the piece of wood was from Cripple Creek, Colo. Cal Jamison, the museum director, was visiting at the time and we both silently wondered what on earth we may do with a piece of wood from Colorado. Stalcup explained right away that the hollowed out cylindrical shaped artifact had connections to North Florida. He explained that Cripple Creek was a mining town in the late 1800s and the artifact was a portion of water pipe which had been laid down underground in about 1894. He added that he was with the crew that dug up the wooden pipe, and was thereby able to cut off a small section of it. He said the pipe was in sections, 8 feet in length and secured together by non-metallic straps. The wood showed no sign of decay after having been in the ground until it was dug up in 2006 (112 years). Stalcup said a ledger at Cripple Creek disclosed the wood was cypress and originated from a company in North Florida and was shipped to Colorado in 1894. We were happy to accept this artifact and Jamison took measurements of it which were 7.5 inches high, outside diameter, 7 inches, and inside diameter, 4 inches. Photographs were taken and one is included here. Note that the center of the pipe was hollowed out perfectly and a shallow groove was observed at the bottom where the water had flowed for so many years. Who would guess that our wonderful cypress wood could serve as a water pipe for all those years without having to be repaired or replaced? No wonder cypress is often called The wood eternal. Aboard the USS Fremont at the 1968 Republican Convention in Miami Beach, Aug. 5, 1968 I know most of you folks have been saturated with non-stop politics, I certainly am, but if you will stay with me here, I want to tell you something you all probably never knew about the Republican Convention of 1968. I want to tell you about my experiences at that convention, and in particular the role the USS Fremont (AKA-44) had in it. Now, before I go into detail, a little about the Fremont. She was a special ship, a real veteran of World War II. The ship was an Attack Transport, launched at Pascagoula, Miss., on March 31, 1943, 492 feet long, 69 feet beam, with a crew of 369 enlisted and 25 of cers. The Fremont had berthing spaces for 1,200 U.S. Marines and, during the war, took them to combat on the Paci c beaches at Saipan, Peleliu, Leyte, Linguyan Gulf and Iwo Jima. The Fremont placed her 21 assault boats in the water in as little time as 19 minutes, and earned the coveted Amphibious Assault Award for 13 consecutive years the only ship in the Navy to accomplish that feat. A ne classic movie starring Jeff Chandler, Away All Boats, portrayed the wartime exploits of an Attack Transport ship such as the Fremont. The ship was decommissioned in 1969. During the planning stages for the 1968 Republican Convention, the U.S. Navy stepped up to assist the U.S. Secret Service with a plan to solve the berthing and feeding of their personnel and other support agencies who would provide security for the Convention to be held at Miami Beach from Aug. 5 through Aug. 8. I dont know if the gures are correct, but my research disclosed security personnel, to include Army explosives specialists, numbered about 200. With accommodations at local hotels at Miami Beach and vicinity very dif cult to obtain, the assistance offered by the Navy seemed to be a real blessing, and the plan was put into effect. The USS Fremont was tasked to provide that assistance. Because of the large task at hand, the Secret Service reached out to other agencies to provide assistance, including the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS). I was then an NCIS Special Agent assigned to the local of ce in Key West. I was detailed to report to Miami Beach on July 28, 1968, and report to the Secret Service for duty. I was told lodging would be provided by the USS Fremont which would be berthed at Miami Beach. Fortunately, I still have a copy of my personal log which I kept during my duties there with which to refresh my memory. I recall how fortunate I thought I was to have my accommodations aboard ship at Miami Beach. I was to be in for a very big surprise. From my personal log: Departed Key West, Fla., 1500 (3 p.m.), 28 July, arrived aboard USS FREMONT, 1900 (7 p.m.), 28 July 1968. Now for my big surprise: No one had told me the Fremont was to be a oating hotel for the Secret Service and others in support. As I checked aboard on the quarterdeck of the Fremont, I properly identi ed myself with credentials and told the of cer of the deck that I understood I had a berthing space on board (I was thinking an officers stateroom). The messenger of the watch told me to accompany him and we began walking forward on the ship. I told the young man there must be some mistake as we were going in the direction of the Troop Spaces on the Fremont. He said there was no mistake. You folks are berthing down there. As a former enlisted tin can (destroyer) sailor, I am not too proud to sleep anywhere on a ship, but keep in mind, I was armed with a .357 magnum pistol, carrying ammunition, my credentials, handcuffs and badge. We were required to wear proper attire at all times, which meant starched shirts and clean, pressed suits and ties. Maybe some of you who served in the old Army or Marine Corps went to war on those transports and can visualize the predicament all of us were in. To top it off, for the rst couple of days and nights, the air conditioning was inoperative in the berthing compartment. Imagine the heat below decks at Miami Beach in the summertime. I am not exaggerating when I tell you there was fog down there and I could swear it even rained on us a few times! The humidity was so high that all our clothes were damp when we put them on. It was very dif cult, but by showering several times a day and sleeping with our firearms, credentials, wallets, etc., under our very thin mattresses, we made it. Early on, nearly all of the Secret Service agents and others began to abandon ship and found accommodations elsewhere. There were several NCIS agents aboard and we had t he same idea in mind, but understandably were ordered to remain on board since it would have been an insult to the Navy if we, too, left the ship. After all, the captain and crew were doing the best they could, and they did very well under the circumstances. From my log, I can tell you my duties with the Secret Service were good ones. I initially worked general surveillance at the Fontainebleau Hotel for three days for Harold Stassen and Ronald Reagan. I worked from Aug 4 through the Aug. 8 at a remote television monitor from the Secret Service Command Trailer with which I could scan the crowd on the oor of the convention for any suspicious or unusual activity. It was a nice sit down job and the trailer was air conditioned and comfortable. I remember that Richard Nixon was nominated for president and Spiro Agnew for vice president. From my log, August 1968 Secured. Departed Miami, Fla. At 1130 (11:30 a.m.), arrived Key West, Fla. at 1500 (3pm). All in all, I enjoyed my work at Miami and would not have wanted to miss it for anything. I even look back fondly on my short stint aboard a very ne and famous ship, the USS Fremont, and am proud of our Navy for doing its best to support the American people and their Republican Convention.A water pipe of cypress at the museum from Colorado SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe section of wooden water pipe that arrived at the historical museum that had been used underground in Colorado for more than 100 years. The wood is North Florida cypress. The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews. comFor local For local news news and and photos photos visit us visit us online onlinewww.TheWakullaNews.com www.TheWakullaNews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 Page 13AThe Sopchoppy Opry and Southbound Band welcomes Swiftwater with members Mary Catherine Smith-Jacobs, Larry Strickland, Sharlyn Marie Smith and Wretha and Al Webb. The group will appear on Saturday, Sept. 29 at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium for an evening of classic country, bluegrass and gospel music. Swiftwater, known for beautiful voices and tight harmony, fuse classic country with bluegrass for a unique traditional-plus sound. Call 962-3711 for tickets. ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSwiftwater at the OprySpecial to The NewsPosh Java will be hosting a concert by Belmont & Jones (Charlie Engstrom and Carrie Hamby), on Saturday, Sept. 29, at 8 p.m. Original music and blues from the well of deep country. This is not urbanized or electrified blues, but traditional music that has virtually slipped into oblivion. In uenced by 1920s and 30s style blues artists Ma Rainey, Memphis Minney, Charlie Patton, Son House and Skip James, Belmont & Jones keeps it pure and simple: usually two guitars and one vocalist. Nationally touring blues artist Bill Shef- eld recently said about Belmont & Jones, I could listen to these guys all night. Carrie Hamby resides in Tallahassee and Charlie Engstrom in New Orleans, but spends quite a bit of time in Tallahassee. Both are seasoned musicians and songwriters in many styles of music, and this show will take us back in time to when the blues were pure and simple, and soulfully true. Listen to Belmont & Jones on Youtube to hear this duo perform. Cover is $10. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Posh is located on the corner of Rose Street and Winthrop Avenue in downtown Sopchoppy. UPCOMING SHOWS Lis and Lon Williams will return to Posh Java on Saturday, Oct. 6, at 8 p.m. Lis plays rhythm guitar and banjo as well as sings lead and harmony vocals. Her guitar style adds a percussive quality to some of the tunes. Lons smooth style on the upright bass provides a grounding force, and his honest vocal style adds to their original music. Janet Goodman, Music News Nashville, describes the Williamsons music as resonating vintage charm, somewhere between 1930s movie musicals and folk/bluegrass fare, where melodies are everything. Check out reviews and listen to the Williamsons by visiting www.elisabethwilliamson.com, www.gatorbonerecords.com or by going to youtube. Tickets are $10. Local singer/ songwriter Rick Ott will perform on Saturday, Oct. 13, at 8 p.m. Original music and popular covers. Rock n roll, Americana, country, folk and gospel influences. Visit www.reverbnation.com/ rickott. Tickets are $10. David Olney, internationally acclaimed singer/songwriter, with Nashville-based guitarist Sergio Webb are back by popular demand on Friday, Oct. 19, at 8 p.m. Sold out in the past, these two performers are truly memorable. Olneys intelligent compositions radiate the intensity that has earned him a place as one of the most respected singer-songwriters in the world today. His style encompasses bluesy rock n roll, honkey tonk, beautiful love songs, and Americana Music at its best. Visit www. davidolney.us. Reservations for this concert are $15 per person. Nikki Talley will perform at Posh Java on Saturday, October 20, at 8 p.m. Talley is an energetic mountain girl with a big voice. She is one half of a full-time touring husband and wife duo based out of Asheville, N.C., contributing acoustic guitar, claw hammer banjo and trademark stunning vocals. Husband, Jason Sharp, will accompany her on nger style and at picking guitar, as well as bass. Talley offers a ery stage performance, hauntingly seductive and raw gritty lyrics, lifted by a voice that harkens back to her Appalachian roots, and shores up on the edges of contemporary country, folk and old time. www.nikkitalley.com. Tickets are $10. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com. Blues duo Belmont & Jones slated to appear at Posh Java TCC to hold open house for Dali exhibitTallahassee Community College is hosting an open house event at its main Tallahassee campus on Thursday, Sept. 20 from 4 to 7 p.m. to celebrate the arrival of the Dal on Tour exhibition. Dal on Tour is a collection of photographic reproductions of Spanish surrealist Salvador Dals work. The open house and exhibition will take place on the rst oor of the library on TCCs main campus. This is a great opportunity to experience the work of one of the 20th centurys most famous and in uential artists, said Deborah Robinson, director of Library Services. Were thrilled that we could work with the Dal Museum to share this collection with our students and the community. Dal on Tour features reproductions of some of Dals most famous paintings, including The Discovery of America by Christopher Columbus, The Ghost of Vermeer of Delft Which Can Be Used as a Table and Geopoliticus Child Watching the Birth of the New Man. The open house will include remarks by TCC faculty member Jen Robinson. The collection will be on display in the library until Nov. 15. It was brought to TCC by Library Services, Rosalinda Wright and the Global Gateway program. For more information on cultural events happening at TCCs Library, contact Karen Doster at 850-201-6194 or dosterk@tcc. .edu. Gadsden Arts to host local authorsMeet area authors at the Gadsden Arts Centers rst Local Authors Showcase on Thursday, Sept. 27 beginning at 3:30 p.m. Its free. Authors will read excerpts from their work and sign books. The featured local authors include Rhett DeVane, Felicia Thomas, Terry Lewis, Regina N. Lewis, Doug Alderson, Carol Hair Moore, Elton Patterson and Margena B. Myrick. While youre at Gadsden Arts, see the four newest exhibitions: Inside/Out: Beth Appleton assemblages and Deborah LaGrasse sculpture; Bound and Unfettered: works by Ben Bivins; Tallahassee Watercolor Society Brush Strokes Exhibit, and Gadsden Arts Center Artists Guild. These exhibitions run until Nov. 3. The Gadsden Arts Center is located on Quincys historic Courthouse Square at 13 N. Madison St. For more information, call (850) 875-4866 or www.gadsdenarts.orgon. Arts briefs SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBelmont & Jones are scheduled to appear at Posh. 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 $14,214,813 $42,901,664 Friday f September 28 6:30pm 9:30pm 4679 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FLwww.EdenSpringsRehab.comEden Springs Nursing and Rehab( 850 ) 926-7181u Private Rehab Suites tu Physical Therapy t u Stroke Specialist tCome by for a tour and see our facility and services!REHABRECOVERENJOY LIFE! Everyone is invited to attend theThird Annual Senior PromLuau! A Well-Kept Secret Where Youll Experience The Personal Touch. For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & ExteriorTogether We Are Providing Employment for Local CraftsmanFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn Sept. 9, an employee at Hardees in Crawfordville reported a disorderly conduct involving a customer. The customer became upset with the employee and threw sausage gravy on the drive-through window. Lt. Jimmy Sessor collected the tag number from the suspect vehicle and went to the suspects home. Warren Roth, 47, of Crawfordville was issued a notice to appear in court for disorderly conduct. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: SEPTEMBER 6 Beth Paternita of Panacea reported a traf c crash on Surf Road. The victim was visiting a friend when she discovered damage to her vehicle. Damage was estimated at $2,000. A person of interest was identi ed. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated some illegal dumping on Ridgeway Court in Crawfordville. A concerned citizen contacted the sheriffs office about an area littered with debris that was 100 feet long and 30 feet wide. The debris in the area included a mattress, television, shelves and other miscellaneous items. The citizen told the deputy that the home was in foreclosure and items were recently removed from the home and left outside. The litter control unit was noti ed to be prepared to remove the debris if necessary. Erica Bunch of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Two unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank account. The transactions totaled $60 with additional charges pending. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. Keri Copeland of Panacea reported a grand theft in St. Marks. A cast iron wood burning stove, valued at $500, was removed from the victims property. The suspect vehicle used to transport the stove was discovered at an area convenience store and two suspects were identi ed. Deputy Nick Gray interviewed the suspects who returned the stove to the victim. Due to the stove being returned, the victim decided not to press charges. SEPTEMBER 7 Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a grand theft. Three black females left the store with a shopping cart full of merchandise and failed to pay for the items. The three women got into a vehicle in the parking lot and left the area at a high rate of speed northbound on U.S. Highway 319. The value of the stolen property was estimated at $1,500. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Travoris McWhite of Crawfordville reported the fraudulent use of a credit card. Two transactions were observed for $171 in Mission and Pharr, Texas. Contact will be made with law enforcement in the Texas communities to pursue an investigation there. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. Ruby Gilyard of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Suspects picked up medications that did not belong to them. Deputy Cole Wells and Reserve Deputy Roy Gunnarsson investigated and identi ed the suspects. The victim decided not to pursue criminal charges when the medications were returned. Nathaniel Rawls of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of $480 worth of household items including a mattress, sheets and electronics. A suspect has been identi ed. Damage to the residence was estimated at $70. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. William Middleton of Tallahassee reported the theft of a marine battery from St. Marks. The battery is valued at $50. The battery was stolen while the victim was at the Lighthouse Road boat ramp. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. SEPTEMBER 8 William Benton of Metcalf, Ga., reported a vehicle theft from Shell Point. The vehicle and contents are valued at $25,000 and a suspect was identi ed. The Thomas County Sheriffs Of ce in Georgia reported recovering the abandoned vehicle in their jurisdiction. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Kaitlien Salem of Crawfordville reported the theft of jewelry from her mailbox. Contents of her mail were missing from her mailbox. The value of the stolen property was $20 and a suspect has been identi- ed. The victim planned to share the information with the U.S. Postal Service as well. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. SEPTEMBER 9 Howard Dale Britt, 55, of Crawfordville was stopped by Detective Matt Helms for an inoperable headlight. Britt did not have a valid driver license due to it being suspended in 2009. Britt was arrested for operating a motor vehicle while license is suspended or revoked with knowledge. SEPTEMBER 10 Tamara Ingram of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone shattered her vehicle window at her home. Damage was estimated at $100. A person of interest has been identi ed. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. SEPTEMBER 11 Linda Fruggiero of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported the unauthorized removal of funds from her bank account. The victim reported the loss of $826. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. Alan Dale Brown, 48, of Crawfordville was arrested and charged with battery by a person detained in a jail facility following an altercation with a 21-year-old inmate in one of the jail dorm pods. The altercation began over the noise level in the dorm pod. Brown was observed striking the victim in the ear with a closed st creating a minor injury to the victim. The victim was treated by the jail medical staff. Detention Deputy Richard Moon investigated along with Deputy Alan Middlebrooks, Deputy Chris Grif n and Deputy Jeff Carroll. Emily Winston of The Inn at Wildwood reported a grand theft. A suspect left the hotel without paying for a four-night stay. The suspect has been identi ed. She owes the Inn $306. Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Rachel Capps of Crawfordville reported a fraudulent use of a Social Security number. The victim discovered that a suspect in western Florida had used her Social Security number to open a bank account. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Two juveniles were involved in a traf c crash at Wakulla High School. The vehicles were traveling toward the sports complex parking spaces when the rst vehicle made a wide right turn to pull into a parking space. The second vehicle was behind the rst and attempted to pass on the right side of the rst vehicle and was struck. One driver made an improper turn without using a turn signal and the other driver improperly passed on the right. Both vehicles were towed due to their damage. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. SEPTEMBER 12 The Wal-Mart Asset Protection Team reported a retail theft. Curtiss Lesvan Diggs, 50, of T allahassee was allegedly observed taking items from the hardware section and concealing them inside his clothing. Asset Protection stopped the suspect after he passed the last point of sale. The items were recovered and valued at $35. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. Margaret Jones of Crawfordville reported a suspect, who has been identified, running into her mailbox with a motor vehicle. The victim requested the suspect pay for the mailbox damage and Lt. Jimmy Sessor issued the suspect a trespass warning for the property. Deputy Will Hudson also investigated. Matthew Goodheart of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of an electronic game system from his home. The stolen property is valued at $325. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Crystal McKeown of Crawfordville reported a fraud and credit card offense. The victim was contacted by a knife company regarding an order that she had never made. The shipping order was for $348. The company cancelled the shipping and charges. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. Justin Carroll of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to a vehicle. A piece of metal was thrown through the victims truck window while it was parked. Damage was estimated at less than $200. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,067 calls for service during the past week including: 13 residential and business alarms; 74 citizen contacts; 11 disturbances; 21 E-911 emergency calls; 45 investigations; 48 medical emergencies; 290 business and residential security checks; 27 special details; 12 suspicious vehicles; 66 traf c enforcements; 192 traf c stops; 16 disabled vehicles; and 11 reckless vehicles.Sheri s Report Charlie Creel:GOOD LAW ENFORCEMENT MANAGEMENT BUILDS RESPECTADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENTOne of the frequent complaints I hear from people as I go door-to-door in Wakulla County is a lack of respect for the Wakulla County Sheriffs Ofce, especially the way our tax dollars are spent to enforce the law. I believe respect for the law and those who enforce it is imperative and must be restored. The WCSO takes 53% of our property taxes, yet the crime rate in our county is one of the worst in Florida. According to FDLE, the crime rate in Wakulla County for 2011 from 2010 was up 15.4%, the seventh highest of any county in the state. Even more disturbing is the number of people who say they never hear back from the WCSO on the status of their case after they report burglaries on their homes or vehicles. Is this failure the result of a lack of money or bad management? As your sheriff, I want to make a 180-degree change to bring back respect for the WCSO. To do that, my rst step would be to have a comprehensive, credible audit by the Florida Auditor Generals Ofce. A thorough audit makes common business sense. No one should follow a 30+ year administration without having a full review of how money has been spent and is being spent. Unfortunately, as things stand, no one outside the WCSO seems to know where our money goes. For example, look at this months sheriffs report in the Wakulla Area Times. The report is lled with budget gures, but no explanation for what those gures represent. Without details, I consider those gures nothing but numbers. For instance, the report says the WCSO is requesting $165, 314 for E-911, and then states E-911 has two employees. Are we to assume that each E-911 employee is making more than $80,000 per year? The report also states that the average salary at the WCSO is $35,000 per year. It is a fact that most employees at the sheriffs ofce make less than this. Does this mean that the top-heavy administration and their sizeable salaries cause the average salary to be $35,000? It is true the WCSO has reduced deputys ranks to not appear so topheavy with administrators but what the citizens do not realize is their salaries were not reduced along with the reduction in rank. Lists of gures, such as the ones in the sheriffs report, make it clear that, if this county is going to be serious about bringing down its shameful crime rate, an audit has to be performed to manage and spend your tax dollars more effectively. A credible audit rst would show the inventory of all the county-owned WCSO property, as well as all contracts, grants, invoices and salaries. Then, using this audit, the WCSO could go back to a zero-based budget. That means throw away all past budgets and start over with a new budget based on evaluating and assessing the true needs of the department. I would take this independent audit to craft a budget that is lean, efcient, and transparent to the citizens, while providing the services we all deserve and CAN afford. For a genuine FRESH START with a sheriff who will work FULL-TIME on law-enforcement, I ask for your vote and support on Nov. 6.Please contact me at ( 850 ) 926-4712 Post Ofce Box 482, Crawfordville, FL 32326 charlieforsheriff@gmail.com www.charliecreel.comPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Afliation, for sheriff. No one should follow a 30+ year administration without having a full review of how money has been spent and is being spent. 000BK7Z HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 Page 15AContinued from Page 6A It was then that I saw it, which kicked in the oldfogeyitis syndrome. What I saw shocked me and it takes a lot to shock me. Up to this point, I was primarily focused on my granddaughter and her pristine playing on the eld, so I did not see right away what I eventually saw. It happened when my granddaughter stepped up to bat for the first time. After that, the whole game went blank for me. Behind my lovely granddaughter was the catcher all dressed in the catchers out t. That did not startle me. Behind the catcher was the umpire, or so he was pretending to be, and that is what startled me. It was a girls slow pitch softball team and every one of them was dressed in their softball players out t. I believe in dressing for the occasion. The occasion was a softball game and those involved in the softball game were wearing attire consistent with the game at hand. Then I saw the umpire. And the umpire was wearing shorts! Shorts! It is not that I object to a man wearing shorts as long as he does not wear them out in public. The last time I wore shorts I was 3 years old and it was only because my mother made me wear them. When I had control of my wardrobe, I put away those shorts and began wearing pants like a man. I think if the good Lord wanted us to wear shorts, in public that is, He would have made our legs more visually appealing. A mans legs are not appealing, unless they have been in the sun too long and the skin begins to peel. A man, especially an old man, has knobby knees, hairy legs and varicose veins none of which should be part of public domain. This is not something I want to see when I am out in public. I can dutifully attest to the fact that my legs have not seen direct sunlight in over 50 years. I attribute this to the fact that I wear pants every day of my life. Not short pants, but pants that go all the way down to my ankles. Short pants look like you cannot afford to buy the whole thing. For some reason I could not watch the game with the same enthusiasm. When I got home that night I settled down a little bit and thought of a verse of Scripture, something Jesus said. Judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous judgment (John 7:24 KJV). In spite of my severe old-fogeyitis condition, I must remember not to judge people according to their appearance. It is not what a man looks like but rather, what he does that makes him the man he is.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@ att.net. Snyder: e umpire (gasp) wore shorts LWVVote Wakulla 2012 CANDIDATE FORUMSPresented by The League of Women Voters#The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization encouraging the informed and active participation of all citizens in the political process. CLIP AND SAVE THESE FORUM DATES! All forums will take place at theSeating is limited Doors open at 6:15For more information call: Membership in the Wakulla League is open to all interested citizens. New jobs in Wakulla depend upon a reputation of fair t reatment for all "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926685 or 510Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE CANDIDATE FORUMSHERIFF, WAKULLA COUNTY OPEN SEATCharles Charlie Creel T. W. Maurice Langston(Both candidates invited to appear)SPONSORED BY: WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION & CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA TUESDAY, Sept. 25th, 2012 7:00 pm NEW BRIDGE HOPE CHURCH CAFETERIA 1282 SPRING CREEK HIGHWAY(ACROSS FROM MACKS MEATS)Doug Jones, moderatorMEET THE CANDIDATES HEAR THE CANDIDATES ON THE ISSUESPREPARED QUESTIONS AND QUESTIONS FROM THE FLOORWe reserve the right to refuse any questions we deem inappropriate.Advertisement paid for by Concerned Citizens of Wakulla, Inc. and the WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION Continued from Page 1A Commissioners indicated they would seek a six month extension to make their case about errors on the map. The board directed Chairman Alan Brock to sign and send a letter asking for the additional time, and to also make contact with Congressman Steve Southerland and other coastal counties about the situation. The new Flood Insurance Rate Maps were originally unveiled in May, and a workshop meeting to discuss the maps was held on Thursday, Sept. 13, with Wakulla County staff and personnel from FEMA and Northwest Water Management District. (An earlier meeting set for June had to been postponed because of the impacts of Tropical Storm Debby). One part of the process that seemed to stick in the craw of commissioners was the six years spent on the study, but the lack of time for local residents to have input or appeal the ndings. It generated quite a few complaints on the board and among citizens about this as another example of big government forcing things on the citizens. Planning & Zoning appointee Chris Russell complained to commissioners that there are a lot of problems with the data bad information used in the study and basic errors. This thing really needs to be stopped. In an email to Congressman Southerland that he made available to The News, Russell wrote of the study that, Instead of fully incorporating the geographical sets, elevation data, etc. that can be found in the several Letter of Map Amendments (LOMA) previously completed in Wakulla County, FEMA moved forward with utilizing approximate methods to delineate Zone A in Wakulla County. It is reasonable to believe that had the data points generated from the previous LOMAs been included in the FIRMs, the boundaries of Zone A, and possibly other zones, would be different. Russell also noted that recent hydrological events such as Tropical Storm Debby were not included in the Flood Insurance Study. Thus, he wrote, the factual completeness of the FIS is in question. County Administrator David Edwards indicated that the St. Marks ood zone was impacted by consideration of the 1843 hurricane that wiped out the town of Port Leon a storm for which there is very little real data. County Commissioner Jerry Moore warned repeatedly that the impact on property values in these ood areas and the impact overall on business in the county would be great. County Commissioner Randy Merritt voted along with the other board members, but he expressed wariness about the county spending money on what he called a very, very uphill battle. I want to do whatever we can, Merritt said. I just dont want there to be false hope that we can change the federal government. Brock indicated he was extremely concerned about the impact on St. Marks and further upriver. Citizen Ralph Thomas of Crawfordville told commissioners he pays $300 for ood insurance and isnt in a ood zone. He put the cost at $4,500 for ood insurance in a ood zone. He added his opinion that the expanded ood zone would decimate our economy. Clay Kuerksteiner of Ochlockonee Bay commented that when property values on the coast go down, taxes will go up in other areas.Flood maps criticizedSpecial to The NewsA 32-year-old Crawfordville man was arrested Wednesday, Sept. 12 following a multi-agency investigation involving child pornography, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. Joshua Paul Cerwin was arrested by Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) and Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce deputies following the execution of a search warrant at Cerwins home. He is charged with promoting the sexual performance of a child. Cerwin is accused of intentionally downloading videos containing child pornography during the month of July. The suspect admitted to setting up a lesharing program so that any child pornography les he downloaded could be available to others worldwide. During the execution of the search warrant, law enforcement of cials seized computer equipment and other related computer items for forensic analysis. Cerwin remains at the Wakulla County Jail pending his rst appearance on Thursday, Sept. 13.Man arrested on child pornography charge Joshua Paul Cerwin Jeff True is new manager at Wakulla SpringsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter the departure of Wakulla Springs Lodge Manager Derek Adams, assistant manager Jeff True stepped in. True took the of cial title of manager about two weeks ago. There are lots of different changes around here, True said. There has been quite a bit of turnover since Cape Leisure took over the 27-room lodge, restaurant and gift shop at Wakulla Springs State Park from the state in July 2011. True is the third manager Wakulla Springs Lodge has had in that short amount of time. We want it to be a real quick transition, True said. True was hired in February as the assistant manager. He has been in Wakulla County for seven years and said he has always loved Wakulla Springs and also liked the fact that it was a green hotel. He worked at the Inn at Wildwood, which was also a green hotel, but chose to step away from that situation after the bank took it over. When he saw Cape Leisure had positions available, he decided to apply. One thing True wants to focus heavily on is getting Wakulla Springs back involved with the community and remind people the lodge is still open. We need to get the word back out, True said. Prior to Cape Leisure taking over the lodge and restaurant, there was talk of the state closing it because of the huge costs associated with keeping it open. Although that was more than a year ago, people still think Wakulla Springs Lodge is closed, True said, Wakulla Springs isnt going away, True said. There are several events planned for the future. One upcoming event is the lodges 75th anniversary on Sept. 25. An invitation-only rededication ceremony will be held at the lodge. True said the ribbon will be cut again and the Wakulla County Commission has issued a proclamation declaring Sept. 25, 2012, as Wakulla Springs Lodge Day. They have also brought back the popular all-you-can eat fried shrimp at the restaurant on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, he said. They have also hired a sales manager who starts soon. True said he is looking forward to having her out in the county and working with the community. True said he and his staff plan to work hard to get Wakulla Springs back on the map. Cape Leisure entered into a 5-year agreement with the state, which still owns the property. The lodge was built in 1937 by entrepreneur Edward Ball and has been kept mostly in its original condition, with some improvements. The State of Florida purchased the site in 1986 and operated the lodge until July 1, 2011. As a cost-saving measure, the state sought out a private vendor to run the concessions and Cape Leisure was chosen. Cape Leisures other clients include the National Historic Landmark Ribault Club at Fort George Island in Jacksonville, Anastasia State Park in St. Augustine, Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, Jetty Park in Cape Canaveral and Natural Bridge of Virginia. For more information, call 421 or visit www.wakullaspringslodge.com. Manager Jeff True

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LES HARRISONWakulla Extension DirectorThe first indication of a problem is the mysterious white blob about the diameter of a quarter in the grass. The frothy material hides a potential menace to the funds and hours of labor committed to the groomed and manicured lawn. This globule is usually the rst sign a spittlebug is attempting to colonize the yard. These insects occur throughout much of Florida, but are more common in north and northwestern counties. The telltale white blob or spittle hides the immature form of this pest from the view of predators and parasites. It also insulates the spittlebug nymphs against heat and cold, and acts as a moisture control mechanism. The insect would quickly dry up without the layer of froth. While they prefer centipede-grass, these invaders will attack all turf grass species and other plants. Their eggs are laid at the base of the grass in the thatch, in hollow grass stems, or behind the leaf sheaths. One generation may last two to two-and-a-half months, and there are two generations per year. Eggs laid by the second generation overwinter and hatch the following spring, from late March to late April. The first generation adults are abundant in June. The adult population peaks again in early August to early September. A secret to their success is most spittle masses are not obvious because they are located near the soil surface or in the thatch. Adults are likely to be seen in the early morning hours when they are most active. Spittlebugs seek protection and camou age near the soil surface during the heat of the day. They will jump from the leaf surfaces when the turf is disturbed. Nymphs and adult spittlebugs suck plant juices through their piercing-sucking mouthparts. Damage is primarily caused by adults when they inject a phytotoxic into the plants while feeding. Much of the excess ltered uids go into the production of the froth, which has an acrid taste, deterring predators from attacking the next generation. The infested turf wilts and the leaf tips turn yellow. Eventually the grass changes to brown and then curls. Spittlebugs are rarely a problem on well-managed turf. Allowing for an excess thatch accumulation provides for excellent reproductive habitat. The surplus rain of 2012 has added to the likelihood of an infestation. Follow approved practices regarding mowing, fertilization and irrigation to reduce thatch buildup, and dethatch if necessary. If greater control is needed, purchase an insecticide speci cally labeled for spittlebugs. To learn more about spittlebugs, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u edu or at (850) 926-3931.That globule of froth in the grass means spittlebugs PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSPITTLEBUGS: The blob of spittle, above, hides the immature form of the pest in the thatch of grass. The adult insect, left. American Red Cross hurricane and rst-aid apps exceed 1 million downloadsSpecial to The NewsThe American Red Cross announced recently that over the past three months, more than 1 million smart phone users have downloaded the First Aid and Hurricane apps. These free apps are part of a series created by the American Red Cross for both iPhone and Android platforms. The apps provide users with real time information on what to do before, during and after emergencies. The advances in smart phone technology have allowed the Red Cross to revolutionize how the public gets its safety and preparedness information, said Dan Samborn, CEO Capital Area Chapter. Early evidence suggests it is making a difference in emergency situations. In reviews of the app, people have reported using it to respond to everything from cuts and sprains, to choking, seizures and strokes. As Hurricane Isaac approached the Gulf Coast, our Hurricane App was put to the test. Hundreds of thousands of people downloaded the app and spent an average of 30 minutes using the app demonstrating its value to consumers. Nearly 2 million weather alerts were issued and usage of the Shelter Finder feature doubled during and after Isaac. People also used the app to send Im Safe messages to their loved ones. National Red Cross experts in health, safety and preparedness have thoroughly reviewed and eld tested the information and advice provided in Red Cross apps. Apps can help prepare people for emergencies, but they are not a substitute for training. Red Cross First Aid and CPR/AED training empowers people to know how to respond to emergencies in case advanced medical help is delayed. People can go toredcross.org/takeaclass for course information and to register. The Red Cross locally responds to 3-5 disasters each week and we help people get ready to respond to emergencies by providing these apps for free. The Red Cross needs the help of the public to continue this effort. People can make a donation to the Red Cross by mail: 1115 Easterwood Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32311 by calling 878-6080, going to redcross.org or texting REDCROSS to 90999. Ofce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m. (850) 877-55892770 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 110, Tallahassee, FL 32308 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.com Stephanie Lee, MDDr. Lee is joining Dr. Michael Douso and Dr. Kathrine Lupo at Capital Regional Womens Health. As an FSU School of Medicine graduate, she is happy to return to Tallahassee.Capital Regional Womens Health accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers.Next Day Appointments AvailableCapital Regional Medical Center Welcomes Dr. Stephanie Lee Specializing in Gynecology & Obstetrics Expert physicians.Quality obstetrical & gynecological care. GIANT YARD SALE Dedicated to the rescue & rehabliltation of injured and orphaned wild mammals and birds Thurs. Sept. 20 8am 3pm Fri. Sept. 21 8am 3pm Sat. Sept. 22 8am 1pmAt Townsend s Nads Mini Storage, 59 Shadeville Rd., CrawfordvilleDonations can be dropped at Unit 34 during the yard sale For more information about FWMA visit our website: www.wakullawildlife.org 100% of contributors are retained by FWMA for use in pursing our mission. ALL DONATIONS GREATLY APPRECIATED ALL DONATIONS GREATLY APPRECIATED GIANT YARD SALE(setup) !!" 2012 Go to www.bigbendhospice.org to Sign-up Today! 11:30am Registration and Lunch 12:30pm Tee-o October 26, 2012Wildwood Country ClubSAVE THE DATE!For more information, call Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308Wakulla County Big Bend Hospice

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 sports news and team views SportsFSU makes statement in win over Wake ForestIn The Huddle, Page 4BWakulla cheerleaders sweep competitionPage 3BWakulla-NFC game photosPage 5BBy ELIZABETH ANDREWS Special to The NewsThe Lady War Eagles put another district win under their belt defeating Suwannee on Thursday, Sept. 13, in three straight matches at home. The scores were 25-14, 25-15 and 2516. Their current record is 3-3 with a 2-0 district record, putting them in a perfect position for a district championship. Shannan Wood was the star of the game with an astonishing 12 kills and 3 blocks. Haley Brown contributed eight kills and ve digs and Breighly Bolton had three aces, five kills and two blocks. Chelsea Carroll had a great game with two aces, three digs, eight assists and one block. Tamia Potter also helped the Eagles add to the scoreboard with an outstanding ve aces. The next game is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 20, at FAMU High at 6:30 p.m. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach This past Saturday the WHS cross country teams traveled to Tom Brown Park in Tallahassee to compete in the annual Lincoln Invitational Meet. Teams or representatives from about 20 high schools from Georgia and Florida were in attendance. After the dust had cleared, the WHS girls ended up in second place, only 10 points behind perennial powerhouse Maclay High School. The local boys team also had a good outing, nishing in 5th place. In the girls race, junior Margaret Wiedeman went out with the leaders and maintained that contact to nish in 4th place out of the 114 runners in the good time of 21:32 for the 5K distance. She was followed closely by senior Raychel Gray (8th, 22:19), sophomore Kasey James (11th, 22:59), sophomore Lydia Wiedeman (13th, 23:00) and junior Kayla Webbe (19th, 23:29). Sophomore Lilanna Broadway (28th) and freshman Connie Lewis (55th) rounded out the top seven. Girls running an alltime personal record (PR) included Webbe, Lewis, Logan Kelley and Shelby Shiver. The local girls were the only team that placed four runners in the top 15, who were recognized individually. The boys were paced by junior Aaron Smith who nished in 18th in a new PR of 18:26. Sophomore J.P. Piotrowski (24th, 18:53), sophomore Travis Parks (27th, 19:01), freshman Lane Williams (46th, 20:07) and sophomore Alan Pearson (49th, 20:17) completed the scoring for WHS with sophomores Ryan Dodson (54th, 20:29) and Mitchell Atkinson (59th, 20:34) rounding out the top seven. PRs were also recorded by Parks, Pearson, Albert Smythe, Jimmy French, Gil Damon, Riley Carrier, Toby Jordon, Justin Goates, Mark Veerapan and Riley Welch Overall, it was a pretty good meet for us. I thought both teams bumped it up a notch from last week, said Coach Paul Hoover. Our girls had another good outing and I was extremely pleased with the fact that we placed four girls in the top 15. Although we didnt have an individual boy in the top 15, Hoover said, our boys worked together, ran in packs and it paid off. To nish in fth place was actually pretty good. The kids really gave us a good effort this week. The teams will run next at the Prefontaine 5K Forest Run on Saturday, Sept. 22, at Silver Lake in the Apalachicola National Forest. The race begins at 8:30 a.m.CROSS COUNTRYWHS places at LincolnFOOTBALLWakulla easily rolls over NFC, 38-7PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFreshman receiver Keith Gavin on his way to the end zone after a pass reception against North Florida Christian. The War Eagle offense had 532 total yards, scoring ve TDs. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt was supposed to be tougher. In the past two seasons, North Florida Christian had defeated Wakulla in close games: two years ago, Wakulla lost by one point after going for a two-point conversion to win but failed to convert; and last year, NFC slipped out of Medart with a win after a roughing the punter penalty gave them a chance to continue a drive and score. NFC went on from there to an undefeated season and a state title in Division 2A. But it was a different team that Wakulla faced on Friday night and dominated handily, cruising to an easy 38-7 win. Even Wakulla Head Coach Scott Klees was surprised by how easily his War Eagles handled NFC. I was expecting a hardfought, close game, he said. But NFC is a young team, and two of their best players were out with injuries, Klees noted. For a smaller school like NFC, those injuries hurt the team more. And the War Eagles got a little bumped up: running back Demetrius Lindsey had an unspeci ed injury, and safety and receiver Mikal Cromartie twisted his ankle neither played in the second half. They joined Chris Grif n, the 6-6, 270 pound offensive lineman, who bruised his shoulder last week in Perry and who dressed out for the NFC game but didnt play. Meanwhile, the War Eagle offense played like a machine, rolling up 532 total yards and scoring ve touchdowns. Weve been over 400 yards in each game, Klees said, adding with a little understatement: Were off to a good start. Most of the offense came on the ground, with 37 rushing attempts and 299 yards that resulted in two TDs and a two-point conversion. Freshman running back Monterious Loggins was the top rusher for the team with 12 carries for 72 yards and a touchdown. Through the air, quarterback Caleb Stephens was an ef cient 8 of 13 for 138 yards and two TDs. Freshman quarterback Feleipe Franks spelled Stephens in the third quarter and was 4 of 7 for 95 yards and a touchdown. Top receiver was freshman Keith Gavin who pulled in three catches for 103 yards and a touchdown. Meanwhile the War Eagle defense played lockdown and had a shut-out until NFC scored a meaningless touchdown on a long run in the nal minutes of the game. And that came against some second-team defensive players. The defense is very physical, Klees said. Im so proud of the way theyre hitting. The challenge as a coach, Klees said, is how to keep them from reaching a plateau and making sure they keep getting better each week. Theres still room for a lot of improvement, he said. Overall, Klees said he felt the team was making a lot of mistakes but still doing a lot of things right. Wakulla drew a lot of yellow ags, and Klees attributed the penalties to younger guys lling in, miscommunication and in an attempt at diplomacy the coach offered that Some of those might not have been penalties. Continued on Page 5BUP NEXT: Wakulla hosts Fort White at home on Friday, Sept. 21, at 7:30 p.m. VOLLEYBALLLady War Eagles get win WCS plays rst sportSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla Christian School Lady Saints Volleyball Team was more than overjoyed to play their rst game against Holy Comforter Episcopal School on Thursday, Sept. 13. This was not only the rst game of the season for WCS, but it was the rst competitive athletic sport ever played by the school. Over the summer WCS joined FHSAA, a recognized association for sports in the state of Florida, and became a recognized school for athletics. In speaking with Coach Sherry Dudley, Coach Travis Bolin and Assistant Coach Kristin Campbell, the main focus was for the middle school girls to go out there, play their best and have fun. The Lady Saints won best two out of three games (16-25, 26-24, and 10-15). The Lady Saints were scheduled to play their next game (a doubleheader) on Monday, Sept. 17, against Riversprings Middle School in Crawfordville. PHOTO BY DONNA ATKINSON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe girls cross country team. In-Home Assessments and Referrals Offered for Comfort and Convenience If falls, weakness or inability to participate in activities become a concern for your loved one, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Tallahassee is here to help. We oer free inhome assessments with no physician orders needed. Once an evaluation is approved, HealthSouths team of professionals develop comprehensive, individualized treatment plans for a safe return home. If you have any questions or need more information contact us.IS YOUR LOVED ONE SAFE AT HOME?:HealthSouth Corporation:551345 LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Sept. 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. Who was Ed Ball is the title of the program to be presented by Madeleine Carr. Non-members can attend the program and enjoy lunch, beverage and dessert for a $7 fee. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a las 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Highway. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, Sept. 21 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Sept. 22 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 9621010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. Sunday, Sept. 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. Monday, Sept. 24 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Sept. 25 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the library. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. Wednesday, Sept. 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Sept. 27 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsThursday, Sept. 20 BUSINESS MIXER will be hosted by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Natures Classroom at the refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Call 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@embarqmail.com to RSVP. WAKULLA COUNTY REPUBLICAN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at 7 p.m. at Myra Jeans in Crawfordville. Come at 6 p.m. for conversation and a meal. Focus will be on the local races and upcoming events. All Republican candidates will be given time to update the committee. Friday, Sept. 21 FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATION YARD SALE will take place from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Townsends Nads Mini-Storage, 59 Shadeville Road. They are in need of donations and shoppers to help them continue the rescuing and rehabilitating of the areas sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife. Donated items can be dropped off at Townsends Nads Mini-Storage in Storage Unit 34 before the yard sale, or can be brought to the yard sale during set-up on Thursday, Sept. 20, between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. For more information about FWMA, please visit our website at www.wakullawildlife. org. The yard sale will also take place on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22 SPORTING CLAYS TOURNAMENT will be held starting at 9 a.m. at the Wakulla Sheriffs Of ce Range. This is a fundraiser for the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches. There are three relays at 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Refreshments and lunch will be available. The tournament will be $50 per person with a ve person team. Winners of each relay will receive a 12-gauge shotgun. Pre-register by calling Lt. Fred Nichols at 251-1676 or the range at 745-7290 or visit www. wcso.org. FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATION YARD SALE will take place from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Townsends Nads Mini-Storage, 59 Shadeville Road. For more information about FWMA, please visit our website at www.wakullawildlife. org. All donations are tax-deductible as we are a registered non-pro t. BENEFIT FISH FRY AND YARD SALE will be held at Hudson Park beginning at 8 a.m. for 9-year-old Daniel Fountain who is ghting brain cancer. He is having another surgery and after will have six weeks of radiation. Donations will also be accepted. Call Darrell and Carolyn Taylor at 6619694 or 528-5787. Monday, Sept. 24 WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC WOMENS CLUB will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the Democratic Headquarters in the North Pointe Center, 1626 Crawfordville Highway, Unit B, to discuss the upcoming election. The meeting is open to both men and women and the public is invited to attend. For more information, contact Joan Hendrix at granpetunia@comcast.net. NAMI WAKULLAS PROGRAM will feature guest speaker Bob Williams, author of Miracle on Luckie Street From Homeless to Millionaire, at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womens Club, 64 Ochlockonee Street. The meeting is free and open to everyone. Call 926-1033 for more information. Tuesday, Sept. 25 FOCUS WAKULLA will meet for a speed networking event from 6:15 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Best Western PLUS. Speed Networking will give young professionals in the area a chance to meet at least 20 other young professionals in less than 45 minutes. There will be tips on how to network and mingle and begin great conversations. Space is limited. Cost is $10 for dinner and the event. Wednesday, Sept. 26 CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held from noon to 1:15 p.m. at Riverside Cafe, 69 Riverside Drive, St. Marks. RSVP to the Chamber of ce at 926-1848. Thursday, Sept. 27 WAKULLA COUNTY UNITED WAY KICKOFF will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at La Parrillada Mexican Grill and Bar, Crawfordville. RSVP by Sept. 25 by emailing Megan Picht at megan@uwbb.org. Upcoming EventsFriday, Sept. 28 A TRIBUTE TO PATSY CLINE will be held at the Senior Center starring Margo Anderson and the Country Classic Band. Doors open at 7 p.m. Entertainment begins at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 per person or $25 per couple. There will be a cash bar and raf e. Proceeds help to bene t Senior Citizens services. Saturday, Sept. 29 PAMPER YOUR POOCH FUNDRAISER will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park by C.H.A.T of Wakulla. All natural bath and ea dip, nail clipping, anal gland extraction, photo shoot, micro chipping. All proceeds will help with food and medical expenses for Wakulla homeless pets at the C.H.A.T. adoption center. Sunday, Sept. 30 FIGHT FOR AIR STAIR CLIMB will be hosted by the American Lung Association in Florida at Plaza Tower, located at 300 S. Duval Street, Tallahassee. Participants will climb 22 stories/398 steps. Wakulla County Fire Rescue will be represented. All nishers will receive a medal. Visit www. FightForAirStairClimbTallahassee.org for more information or call (850) 241-1003. Saturday, Oct. 6 CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held for the United Way of the Big Bend hosted by St. Marks Powder at Wildwood Country Club. Registration time is 7:30 a.m. Teeoff is at 8:30 a.m. Two closest to the pin contest, two longest drive contest, putting challenge and hole in one contest with 2012 Dodge will be held. Cost is $75 per player and $150 per team. Sponsorships available. Contact Rachel Kipp at 577-2889 or email rachel.kipp@gd-ots.com. FIRST FSU COASTAL MARINE LAB REGATTA, Whatever Floats Your Boat, will be held from noon to 6 p.m. The challenge is to create a homemade boat that is interesting, buoyant and made from recycled materials. There is a $25 registration fee. The deadline to register is Sept. 25. There will be prizes for the rst boat to cross the nish line, most creative use of materials, Titanic Award and Peoples Choice. Register online at marinelab.fsu.edu/outreach/regatta.html. SHADEVILLE ELEMENTARYS 29TH ANNUAL FALL FESTIVAL will be held from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. The coronation will be at 2 p.m. in the lunchroom. Booths will open at 2 p.m. There will be bingo in the library. There will be booth prizes and a new booth called the Super Soaker. There will also be entertainment by The Polynesian Fire Knife Dancers, Say Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Government Meetings Monday, Sept. 24 WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 7 p.m. at the library. Thursday, Sept. 27 SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. at city hall for a workshop on a possible charter change to salaries for commissioners. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorWed love to thank everyone who came out last Friday night and made our second Annual Silent auction a rousing success. Your generous support raised more than $2,400 for the Friends of the Library with more receipts due to come in this week! As Ive said many times, funds raised by the Friends stay at the Library and over the past year have paid for our Summer Programs for the children of Wakulla County, paid for 12 new public access computers, as well as a major portion of our Book and Materials budget along with other needed expenses. Over the past 3 years the Friends have saved the taxpayers or Wakulla County more than $75,000 with their support. Wed also like to thank all the local businesses and our loyal patrons who donated so many great items for the auction. Lastly, but certainly by any de nition of the word not least, wed like to thank the members of the Friends who gave up so much of their time not just Friday night but over the past few months to make the auction such a success. This never would have gotten off the ground without the time and energy they volunteered. THANK YOU! Friday Night Movie This week were showing a romantic comedy starring many Academy Award winners and nominees. This PG-13 rated lm stars Judi Dench, Tom Wilkinson and Maggie Smith, among others, and tells the tale of a group of British retirees who decide to outsource their retirement to less expensive and seemingly exotic India. Enticed by advertisements for the newly restored Marigold Hotel, they arrive to nd the palace a shell of its former self. They nd love, go through life changing events and gain a different viewpoint of the world around them. For those who have already asked me to show the Tommy Lee Jones/ Meryl Streep lm Hope Springs, Fridays should be right up your alley and tide you over until Hope Springs comes out on DVD in a few months. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show. Quit Smoking Classes The next cycle of free Quit Smoking Classes sponsored by the Big Bend Area Health Education center has begun. This program meets every Tuesday evening at 6 p.m. and is designed by ex-smokers who know how tough it is to break the habit. Nicotine patches are available while supplies last. Please take advantage of this opportunity to get a fresh start and get the support you need on the road to better health. Political EventsThursday, September 27 POLITICAL FORUM for County Commission seats 1, 3, 5. Seat 1 will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Seat 3 at 7:30 p.m. and Seat 5 at 8:30 p.m.Library News... Chamber mixer from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. FWMA yard sale at Townsends Nads Mini-storage from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Bene t yard sale and sh fry beginning at 8 a.m. at Hudson Park. NAMI program with Bob Williams at 6:30 p.m. at Crawfordville Womens Club.ThursdayFridaySaturdayMonday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 Page 3BBy LORI SANDGRENWHS Cheer CoachThis summer, Wakulla High School JV and Varsity, along with Wakulla Middle, went to an elite summer camp at the University of Georgia. The teams participated in cheer, chants, stunts, dance routine and crowd involvement activities to get them ready for the start of the season. At the end of camp, all teams competed against each other in cheer and dance division. The camp was made up of 50 squads from Georgia and Florida. Wakulla County swept the competition. Varsity, JV and Wakulla Middle school placed rst in the cheer and rst in dance division as well as rst in overall best cheer program. Wakulla County was awarded the best cheer program by the staff of the Universal Cheerleading Association, recognizing it as an up and coming program to watch. Needless, to say it was a great camp. It was an honor to be recognized as having one of the elite cheer programs in the state of Florida. These girls work hard everyday bringing spirit to Wakulla County. Cheerleading has become a competitive sport and our girls are rising to the challenge everyday. Wakulla High School Cheerleaders are state champs and are being recognized state-wide for their accomplishments. SPORTS PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla cheerleaders from Wakulla High School, varsity and JV, and Wakulla Middle School at cheer camp.CHEERLEADINGWakulla cheerleaders sweep competition WHS captains Maddie Champany and Erica HarrellSports briefs Golf tournament at Golden EagleThe Tallahassee Technology (TalTech) Alliance Tallahassees not-for-pro t network of technology-centered businesses, academic centers, entrepreneurs and individuals will host its second Annual Beyond Par Golf Tournament on Monday, Sept. 24 at Golden Eagle Country Club. Registration begins at 10:30 a.m. and area golfers will tee off at noon. Professional golfer Kenny Knox will provide a golf instruction clinic at 11 a.m. The proceeds from the event will directly support the community educational programs of TalTech Alliance. To register, go to www. taltech.org/golf. Run For Lawson bene t run is Oct. 6The Lawson Mayfield Memorial Foundation is hosting its second annual Run For Lawson bene t run on Saturday, Oct. 6 on the campus of Holy Comforter Episcopal School and Welaunee Plantation grounds. Last years race attracted more than 600 participants and raised $35,000 for the National Meningitis Association. The foundation was started in memory of late Tallahassee teen Lawson May eld, whose life was cut short after she contracted bacterial meningitis. Perhaps the most signi cant addition to this years Run For Lawson will be the 10K race that will certainly challenge participants of any skill level. The event will begin with the One Mile Fun Run at 8 a.m., with the 5K and 10K races following at 8:30 a.m. For more information on Run For Lawson, visit www. runforlawson.org. Covenant Hospice sets Marianna runThe City of Marianna Fire Department and Covenant Hospice will hold a Care with Flare 5K Run/ Walk on Nov. 3 in Marianna. There will be a PostRace Celebration and Family Fun Day lled with food, drinks, games, in atables, music and awards. Entries made by Oct. 8 will be $20, receive a race packet and T-shirt. After Oct. 8, the fee is $25, and T-shirt and race packet will be a rst come, rst serve basis. Registration will start at 7:30 a.m. the day of the race, which begins at 9 a.m. The student entry fee is $10. There will also be a free kids one mile fun run for children under 14. Boys Town offers these strategies to assist children with sports tryouts. Talk to your child about which sport he or she would like to try and stress practice, practice, practice. Here are some strategies that can help: Talk with other parents or have your child talk with peers who have been on the team before or who have tried out for the sport, so you know what to expect. Have your child dress appropriately for the sport or activity and get them ready to work. Make nutritious meals and snacks that contain both carbohydrates and proteins to help your child maintain energy and rebuild muscles. Make time for your child to relax whether its listening to music, taking a bath or reading a book in a quiet room. Tryouts can be stressful so unwinding from the day can be just as important as having a good breakfast. Tips for helping kids with tryouts Florida Seniors Now Qualify for a FREE Easy-to-Use Mobile PhoneA new statewide program offers a free mobile phone for those 55 and older. Seniors are now entitled to a free mobile phone with built in help button. These basic phones are designed for seniors and have a huge display area with large dial buttons & feature a one-touch panic have an emergency. No contracts, no credit checks, no personal info required. Call our pre-recorded toll-free 24 hour info line for details. Supplies limited. Credit card required for activation. 1-800-651-4933ADVERTISEMENT Turn account receivables into CASH!!! Tired of wai ng 30, 60, 90 days? Meet payroll. Increase pro ts. Great for startups, bankruptcies, tax liens, bad credit & more. $20k to $10M+ www.jpcapitalsolu ons.com 863 589 6587 jpcapitalsolu ons@gmail.com Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. G-1 THG-1 1905 1905 Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: Back pain Muscle pain Arthritis pain Joint pain ATTORNEY ADVERTISING.Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. We may associate with local firms in states wherein we do not maintain an office. If no recovery, no fees or costs are charged, unless prohibited by State Law or Rule. 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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M at Delaware StateSaturday, 6 p.m.The game is not being broadcasted. Kentucky at #14 FloridaSaturday, 12:21 p.m.The game can be seen on CBS. #10 Clemson at #4 Florida StateSaturday, 8 p.m.The game can be seen on ABC. Dj Vu: Dj Vu: 2006 Revisited 2006 RevisitedThompson enjoys magical day against Demon Deacons Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Chris Thompson during one of his two rst-half touchdown runs against Wake Forest.Ken FieldsBy Marty Cohen One of the things Ive always tried to do, at least in print, was to refrain from taking specific jabs at other media members, after all, we share some common ground and weve all written things that were silly, foolish or wound up off track. But occasionally, a head-scratcher will slip through that just cant slide by without comment. This came from a national-type publication, one weve all seen at airports, hotels, everywhere. Anyway, this national columnist was forecasting some of the top college football games of the past weekend, and when it came to an instant analysis of Florida-Texas A&M, he said he liked the home team for a couple of reasons, one of which was Floridas record in games played in the state of Texas, a terrible 1-7-2. Oh brother. Generally Im all for backing up theories with solid facts, and Floridas number in the Lone State State is fact just one without merit. The last time Florida set foot in Texas for a game was 30 years ago, in the 1982 Bluebonnet Bowl against Lou Holtz Arkansas club. So the relevancy of that statistic is rendered meaningless, as if games from 30, 40 or 50 years ago have any relevancy to todays action. Yet when we got off the plane in Texas on Thursday, we were greeted by what could have been an incredible factor in the contest the heat. Or shall I say, the HEAT. It was a blast furnace to the face, two days of record temperatures that reached 104 degrees in Austin on Friday. And this was a whole lot different than Florida hot. When it gets unbearable in Florida, its a thick, sticky, humid heat that leaves you drenched in sweat. This Texas heat was a whole different deal were talking searing pizza oven hot. Yes its a dry heat, but thats the point this was not something the Florida guys would nd easily adaptable. But then the Gators got a break, as the temperatures dipped about 10 degrees or so on Saturday, and coupled with a nice breeze in College Station, the weather was manageable. Sure it was hot and a number of Florida players were felled by, uh, cramps (all but one came on defense, so you make the call whether they were deliberately trying to slow down the Aggies rapid- re offense), but it turned out to be an inconsequential element in the outcome. So as this historic matchup unfolded, I couldnt escape the feeling Id seen this game played out before, perhaps in a different setting against a different foe. And as Florida rallied on the road and nally held off Texas A&M by running out the clock in the closing minutes, it sort of hit me that this had the feeling of a 2006 Gator game, a lowscoring, grind-it-out affair that was common during Urban Meyers second season at the helm. By Tim Linafelt Chris Thompsons journey with the Wake Forest Demon Deacons ended Saturday with two electrifying touchdown runs, 197 rushing yards and a giant grin across his face. It began almost a year ago, in a hospital bed in Winston-Salem, N.C. He ended up there after leaving last years FSU-Wake Forest game on a cart with broken bones in his back, unsure of whether or not hed ever correctly walk again, let alone play football. What a difference a year makes, FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. I was sitting up there at the hospital bed, watching him last year. And hes actually consoling me when I was talking to him in the bed. That everything was going to be alright, let alone knowing what his future was. Hes going Coach, Ill be back. Indeed he is. If Thompson had highlighted FSUs 52-0 win over Wake Forest with just one of his signature, home run-length touchdown runs, it wouldve been enough to complete a storybook ending for a player that seemingly every teammate considers a friend. He did that with a darting, shifty 74-yard run in which he sprinted down the sideline, stopped and slipped past a Wake Forest defender and sped into the end zone. But when Thompson took the ball again on FSUs very next play, ran around the right side and once again saw nothing but 80 yards of grass in front of him, well, it started to border on the unbelievable. When I hit the hole, I was just like Man, this cant be happening, Thompson said. Eighty yards later, Thompson was in the end zone again and Florida States sideline and the fans in attendance erupted. When FSUs players and coaches talked about seeing the old Chris in fall camp, this is what they meant. In two plays, Thompson traveled 154 yards, virtually untouched. Like I said before this game, Chris looks better than ever, quarterback EJ Manuel said. What better game for him to have a coming-out party like that. He now has five career rushing touchdowns of at least 70 yards. His 197 yards, all of which came in the rst half, were the most rst-half rushing yards in Florida State history. And in the process, Thompson made a fan out of an opponent. I am really tickled to death that he is back, Wake Forest coach Jim Grobe said. I was worried. I had not realized how badly he was hurt to see him come back from that injury is pretty special. I wish hed waited until Clemson (next week) to have a big day, but its good to see him back. For Thompson, even getting through the week of practice leading up the game was a challenge. He freely admitted that he was going through a wide range of emotions leading up the game. A lot of people say its a revenge game and things like that, Thompson said, and at the beginning of the week, thats how I was feeling like I needed to get revenge. By Thursdays practice, Thompsons position coach, Eddie Gran, could tell that something was eating away at him. He snatched me out of practice, he was like, Whats going on? Thompson said after the game. I told him I was going through a lot of emotions and everything. Gran told Thompson to take a few minutes away, go to the sideline, drop to a knee and say a quick prayer. [Gran] was like Just put everything in Gods hands and itll all go from there. Later that night, Thompson called his mother, Cynthia James, and she gave him the same advice as Gran: put his burden in Gods hands. By the time FSU held its team chapel Saturday morning and team chaplain Clint Purvis echoed the same message Thompson received from both his coach and his mother, he couldnt help but smile. Its just crazy how all of this keeps happening this way, Thompson said. Right after that message, Coach Gran looked at me, like, You see? Ever since then, Ive just had a smile on my face. He wasnt the only one. Eyes brightened whenever anyone talked about Thompsons career day. Center Bryan Stork said having Thompson makes the offensive linemen look good. Fullback Lonnie Pryor said Thompson was like a little brother to me. And Thompson had to ght one more time to hold back his emotions as Fisher presented him with the game ball in the locker room. Its amazing, Fisher said. It cant happen to a better young man.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 Page 5BContinued fron Page 1B GAME RECAP Wakulla started strong in the opening period with a long, sustained drive that culminated in a Loggins 2-yard run for a touchdown. The point-after was no good. Later in the rst quarter, quarterback Feleipe Franks connected with his brother, receiver Jordan Franks for a 20-yard pass play for a touchdown. Kicker Dillon Norman added the extra point, and Wakulla was up 13-0 at the end of the rst quarter. In the middle of the second quarter, the War Eagle offense went for it on 4th down and 9 near mid eld and the pass fell incomplete. The NFC Eagles took over on downs and mounted a strong drive down to the Wakulla 2-yard line. Unable to push it in, NFC went for a eld goal that was no good. A Wakulla offensive drive stalled after some holding penalties, and NFC seemed to be moving the ball until Wakulla forced a fumble at the NFC 22-yard line. After a penalty backed up Wakulla, Caleb Stephens threw a pass to Keith Gavin in double-coverage and Gavin broke it loose for a 30-yard touchdown. Feleipe Franks came in for the two-point try and scored on a keeper to make it 21-0 with 1:22 remaining in the half, NFCs next offensive series was marked by a couple of big hits by War Eagle linebacker Dalton Bohannon, a senior. Wakulla took over after an NFC punt and, with the seconds ticking away, moved the ball down eld to set up Dillon Norman for a 44-yard eld goal as time expired to put Wakulla up 24-0. Feleipe Franks started the second half as quarterback, which Klees said had been decided prior to the game getting underway. Ahead or behind in the game, Franks had been told he was playing the third quarter, Klees said, as an effort to educate the young quarterback on preparing for the game and getting him experience. Klees stressed that Stephens is his No. 1 quarterback and, in a drive in the third quarter, the senior showed a nice touch on a oating pass to Dalton Norman for a score. The point-after was good and Wakulla was up 31-0 with less than three minutes in the third. In the fourth quarter, Franks was back at the helm on a War Eagle drive. He handed off to senior running back Sheldon Johnson who took it in from the 2. The extra point by Dillon Norman was good and the War Eagles were up 38-0 with 8 minutes remaining. That score set the clock to running under the mercy rule. After stopping an NFC drive, Wakulla was called for roughing the punter and the ball went back to the Eagles. With less than 5 minutes remaining, NFC tore off a 50-yard run down to the Wakulla 1, and punched it a few plays later. The extra point was good and made it 38-7. While the mercy rule was rescinded after the score, Wakulla took over and ran the clock out. UP NEXT: FORT WHITE Theyre a good football team, Klees said of Wakullas next opponent, Fort White. They beat Wakulla last year in a torrential rain storm on the nal play of the game, a hook-and-lateral. Like Wakulla, Fort White is undefeated. They handily beat Newberry, Perry and Hamilton so far. Theyre just so well coached, Klees said. Weve got to be ready to play. JV KEEPS WINNING The War Eagle junior varsity continued its streak of 16 wins in a row with a 30-19 victory over Lincoln JV. It was the teams biggest test so far, Klees said. Antonio Morris rushed for 102 yards and a touchdown in the win. Offensive lineman Isaiah Youmas scored out at 92 percent blocking, and defensive lineman Steven Weaver had 6 tackles and 3 assists. Up next for the JV is East Gadsden on Thursday.Wakulla easily rolls over NFC, 38-7Players of the WeekCALEB STEPHENS 8 of 13 for 138 yards and 2 TDs in passing DANIEL SANDERS 6 tackles and 2 assists DILLON NORMAN 3 for 3 extra points and a 43-yard eld goal DALTON NICHOLS 3 punts for an average of 40 yardsO ense Defense Special Teams Special Teams CORRECTION: The wrong photo of Special Teams Player of the Week ran last week. This is the photo that should have appeared: PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDEN PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA jumping catch by Wakulla War Eagle receiver Jordan Franks. Running back Demetrius Lindsey makes a hard cut during a run. Dillon Norman follows his blocker on a sweep play. Wakulla cheerleaders on the sideline. Wakulla students on the eld after the game singing the alma mater.More photos online at thewakullanews.com

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Asked Colors Constant Cords Crept Crust Dared Delay Dislike Dived Drown Edged Eight Equate Every Graph Heres Immediately Irons Marks Measured Midst Near-by Often Ought Pedals Phrase Proves Punch Quarreled Rally Refuge Roast Robot Saucer This page sponsored in part by: Shrank Sleeves Soils Stony Throw Timid Tires Tools Tough Twist Tyres Visits Weeks Weighed

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(850) 544-1051 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $750/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1937 Boats 2002 DURACRAFT 18FT W/ 2010 YAMAHA90HPOnly 188 hours on motor: Wide Hull, Hydrolic Steering, Jack Plate, PT&T, GPS, FF, VHF, Stereo, Livewell, Trolling Motor, LOADED. Boat is Turn Key, Runs Perfect. $9500.00 OBO Call -352-257-3202 5372-0920 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE TALQUIN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. STATEMENT OF NON-DESCRIMINATION Talquin Electric Cooperative, Inc., is the recipient of federal financial assistance from the Rural Utilities Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and is subject to the provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Acts of 1964, as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, and the rules and regulations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture which provide that no person in the United States on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, religion, sex or handicap shall be excluded from participation in, admission or access to, denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any of this organizations programs or activities. The person responsible for coordinating this organizations non-discrimination efforts is Kenneth A. Cowen, Director of Administrative Services. Any individual, or specific class of individuals, who feels that this organization has subjected them to discrimination may obtain further information about the statutes and regulations listed above from and/or file a written complaint with this organization; or the Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250; or the Administrator, Rural Utilities Service, Washington, D.C. 20250. Complaints must be filed within 180 days after the alleged discrimination. Confidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible. September 20, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. 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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 5366-0920 TWN Estate: Crowson, Madelyn File No. 2012-80CPNotice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION FILE # 2012-80CP IN RE: ESTATE OF MADELYN JOYCE CROWSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MADELYN JOYCE CROWSON, deceased, whose date of death was December 8, 2011, and the last four digits of whose social security num5367-0920 TWN Vs. OGrady, Michael Case No. 652007CA000021FCXXXX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652007CA000021FCXXXX NATIONALCITYBANK OF INDIANA, ANATIONALBANKING ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. MICHAELJ OGRADY; KARIN S. OGRADY; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 14, 2007, and entered in Case No. 652007CA000021FCXXXX of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein NATIONALCITYBANK OF INDIANA, ANATIONALBANKING ASSOCIATION,is the Plaintiff and Michael J. OGrady; and Karin S. OGrady, are the Defendant(s). The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, on the 11th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 32, BLOCK K, MAGNOLIAGARDENS, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINNG FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida, this 30th day of August, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk, Wakulla County, Florida By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 WWR #10057686 5368-0920 TWN vs. Highwoods II Case No. 2012-CA-40 Notice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-CA-40 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. HIGHWOODS II, LLC, ET AL., CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 21, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse on September 27, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described parcels of property located in Wakulla County, Florida: PHASE II, PARCELA COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK A OF HIGHWOODS PLACE PHASE 1, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 65 OF 5369-0920 TWN vs. Barry, Joseph Case No. 11-355-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY CASE NO.: 11-355-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH C. BARRY, a/k/a JOSEPH C. BARRY, JR., BETTYG. BARRY, SUE ANN SMITH, CENTENNIALBANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, WAKULLABUSINESS CENTER PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, and UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION 1 and UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on October 4, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Begin at the intersection of Easterly right of way of U.S. Highway 319 and the Westerly boundary line of Lot 89 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING and said point being the point of curve to the right having a radius of 5679.67 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve and said right of way for 38.66 feet thru a central angle of 00 degrees 23 minutes 24 seconds, chord of said arc being North 28 degrees 07 minutes 16 seconds East 38.66 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving said right of way run South 62 degrees 51 minutes 25 seconds East 55.18 feet to a concrete monument; thence South 02 degrees 00 minutes 50 seconds West 151.83 feet to rod and cap lying on the Northerly right of way of Council Moore Road; thence run along said right of way North 87 degrees 59 minutes 10 seconds West 132.90 feet to a concrete monument marking the intersection of said right of way with the Easterly right of way of U.S. Highway Number 319; thence leaving said Northerly right of way run along said Easterly right of way North 27 degrees 08 minutes 35 seconds East 155.24 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any Person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. This Notice dated this 22nd day of August, 2012. Clerk, of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 5371-0927 TWN Vs. Hunter, Patricia Case No. 12-CA-229 FC Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 12-CA-229 FC, UCN: 652012CA000229XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. JAMES E. NORMAN; PATRICIAA. HUNTER; et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: PATRICIAA. HUNTER; Last Known Address 154 MILLCREEK RD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Current Residence is Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOTS 10 AND 11, BLOCK A MILLCREEK ESTATES, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 15, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTYFLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SMITH, HIATT& DIAZ, P.A.., Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is PO BOX 11438, Fort Lauderdale, FL33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days from first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED ON September 7, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Becky Whaley, As Deputy Clerk September 20 & 27, 2012 1183-125876 5373-0927 TWN Vs Arnett, Shawnda Case No. 12-203-CANotice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.:12-203-CACIRCUIT CIVILDIV 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff vs. SHAWNDAARNETT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHAWNDA ARNETT; CITIFINANCIALEQUITYSERVICES, INC; and LONNIE WILLIAMS, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: LONNIE WILLIAMS YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose that mortgage, given by SHAWNDA ARNETT, originally in favor of MERS as nominee for The CITGroup/Consumer Finance, Inc., dated September 19, 2003 and recorded on September 26, 2003, in Official Records Book 506, Page 269; as assigned to 21st Mortgage Corporation by Assignment of Mortgage recorded in Official Records Book 784, Page 19, all of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, encumbering the following real property located in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: All that certain land situate, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 101 of the Hartsfield Survey of lands in Wakulla County, Florida, which point is on the South boundary line of Lot 92 Hartsfield Survey; thence run South 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West along said South boundary, 1183.28 feet to the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning, run North 17 degrees 45 minutes 29 seconds West, 330.18 feet to an iron rod with Cap #5518; thence South 72 degrees 57 minutes 25 seconds West, 132.47 feet to an iron rod with Cap #5516; thence South 17 degrees 50 minutes 23 seconds East 330.47 feet to a point lying on the aforesaid South boundary of Lot 92; thence run North 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East, along said South boundary, a distance of 132.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT the following: Commence at the Northeast corner of that certain tract of land conveyed to Lonnie Williams and Mollie Taylor by John E. Beasley and Eva Crosby Beasley, his wife, 5374-0927 TWN Vs. Dedmon, Heidi L..09-CA-500 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 09-CA-500 HSBC BANK USA, NATIONALASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR THE ELLINGTON TRUSTSERIES 2007-1, Plaintiff, vs. HEIDI L. DEDMON, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HEIDI L. DEDMON, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC. (MIN#100144300010887910), HALCOUNCIL, YVONNE COUNCIL, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 AND #2, AND ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, et al. Defendant(s). RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 28, 2010 and an Order Rescheduling the Foreclosure Sale dated September 6, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 09-CA-500 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein HSBC BANK USA, NATIONALASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR THE ELLINGTON TRUSTSERIES 2007-1, Plaintiff, and HEIDI L. DEDMON, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC. (MIN #1001944300010887910), HALCOUNCIL, YVONNE COUNCIL, are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32326 at 11:00 AM, on the 11th day of October, 2012, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: TRACT 2, OF EVERGREEN ACRES, UNIT NO. 2, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 77, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on September 7, 2011 BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Becky Whaley Deputy Clerk Attorney for the Plaintiff: Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, Popkin & Rosaler, P.A., 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL33442. Telephone (954)360-9030 Facsimile:(954)420-5187. September 20 & 27, 2012 5377-0927 TWN Vs. Norup, Del A. 11000368CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 11000368CA FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. DELA. NORUPAND SUSAN NORUP, et al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 6, 2012, and entered in 11000368CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, is the Plaintiff and DELA. NORUP; SUSAN NORUP; UNKNOWN TENANT#1 N/K/AKAYLANORUP; UNKNOWN TENANT#2 N/K/AKELSEYBURNETTE are the Defendant(s). Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Lobby of Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. on October 11th, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 9, BLOCK B OF WILDWOOD ACRES, UNIT 2, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 78, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1996 MOBILE HOME IDENTIFICATION NO FLA14610809AAND FLA14610809B, TITLE NO V0528911 AND V0528912 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of September, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, as Deputy Clerk. IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less that 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. SEPTEMBER 20 & 27, 2012 11-13769 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices dated March 21, 1967, and recorded on Page 398 of Official Records Book 15, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; and thence run Southerly along the Easterly boundary of said tract of land, 89.00 feet; thence run West 100.00 feet to the East side of a road; thence run North along the East side of said graded road, 64.00 feet; thence run Easterly 100.00 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 1/4 of an acre, more or less, in Lot 92 of Hartsfield Survey of lands in Wakulla County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH that certain 2003 Value Made mobile home with Identification/Serial Numbers: CO2840AGAand CO2840AGB. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to SONYAK. DAWS, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Quintairos, Prieto, Wood & Boyer, P.A., 215 S. Monroe Street, Suite 510, Tallahassee, Florida 32301, within thirty (30) days after the first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on August 21, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County (seal) By:/s/Glenda Porter, as Deputy Clerk September 20 & 27, 2012 THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST, 180.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST, 169.69 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON ACURVE CONCAVE EASTERLY; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLYALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 361.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 13 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 55 SECONDS FOR ADISTANCE OF 84.46 FEET (CHORD BEARS SOUTH 25 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, 84.26 FEET); THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST, 197.41 FEET; THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST, 246.77 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST, 181.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PHASE II, PARCELB COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK A OF HIGHWOODS PLACE PHASE 1, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 65 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WESTERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 1, ADISTANCE OF 134.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID LOT LINE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 45.87 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 1; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 1, ADISTANCE OF 30.08 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID BOUNDARYLINE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST, 189.45 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST, 138.82 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON ACURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY; THENCE NORTHWESTERLYALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 277.13 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 19 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 09 SECONDS FOR ADISTANCE OF 95.38 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 26 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST, 94.91 FEET) TO APOINT OF REVERSE CURVE; THENCE NORTHWESTERLYALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 321.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 18 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 29 SECONDS FOR ADISTANCE OF 101.59 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 27 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST, 101.17 FEET); THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST, 10.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST, 40.87 FEET; THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST, 131.73 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS, DRAINAGE AND UTILITIES OVER, UNDER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK A OF HIGHWOODS PLACE PHASE 1, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 65 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST, 140.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY, 40.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST, 169.69 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING ARADIUS OF 361.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 49 SECONDS FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 100.31 FEET (CHORD BEARS SOUTH 26 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST, 99.99 FEET); THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST, 42.10 FEET TO APOINT ON ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST; THENCE NORTHWESTERLYALONG SAID CURVE HAVING ARADIUS OF 321.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 18 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 31 SECONDS FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 101.60 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 27 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST, 101.17 FEET; THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST, 170.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Date: September 5, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By:/s/Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!2323 Surf Rd. 3BR/2BA Bayfront road on Ochlockonee Bay, Screened Porch, Deck and Dock. No Smoking. No Pets. $1,150 per month. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Commercial building 4,300 square foot heated and cooled building on 1 acre of land Rents out for $1,800.00. Building is in excellent condition. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 55 Allison Dr. Panacea 3BR/2BA Furnished or Unfurnished. on Dickerson Bay $975 mo. No Smoking. No Pets RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 22 Coral Way 3BR./2BA with 1 car garage and fenced in yard on 1/2 acre. Pets okay with $250. fee, $950.mo/$950 Deposit. 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available, all utilities included. 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./$900 Deposit 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of ofce space, fenced 82 Mimosa 3BR/1.5BA $650Mo./$650 Deposit 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA Available Sept. 1, $900Mo./$900 Deposit 14 Cutchin Ct. 3BR/2BA $650 mo/$650 Deposit. 140 Duane St: 3BR/2BA $875 mo and $875 Security deposit. No smoking pets ok with owner approval and $250 pet fee. Available Oct. 1.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 Page 9B 5359-0920 TWN vs. Barry, Joseph Case No. 11-355-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY CASE NO.: 11-355-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH C. BARRY, a/k/a JOSEPH C. BARRY, JR., BETTYG. BARRY, SUE ANN SMITH, CENTENNIALBANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, WAKULLABUSINESS CENTER PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, and UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on October 4, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Commence at the Southwest corner of Lot 81 (also being the Southeast corner of Lot 86) of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North 72 degrees 31 minutes 32 seconds East along the South boundary of said Lot 81 and along the centerline of survey of State Road No. 30 (US Highway No. 98) a distance of 1162.00 feet; thence run North 17 degrees 45 minutes West 1453.00 feet, thence run North 72 degrees 30 minutes East 445.00 feet, thence run North 22 degrees 15 minutes West 937.00 feet to an old concrete monument on the approximate edge of Swirl Swamp, thence run South 77 degrees 30 minutes West along said swamps edge 1047.38 feet, thence continue South 77 degrees 30 minutes West 52.62 feet, thence run North 47 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 238.96 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 47 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 407.40 feet, thence run North 36 degrees 34 minutes 31 seconds East 27.26 feet, thence run North 22 degrees 13 minutes 54 seconds East 60.87 feet, thence run North 24 degrees 01 minutes 40 seconds East 45.54 feet, thence run North 19 degrees 34 minutes 40 seconds East 38.59 feet, thence run North 43 degrees 30 minutes 59 seconds East 35.04 feet, thence run North 27 degrees 00 minutes 05 seconds East 36.64 feet, thence run North 18 degrees 09 minutes 28 seconds West 43.34 feet, thence run North 01 degrees 01 minutes 34 seconds East 41.65 feet, thence run North 53 degrees 19 minutes 03 seconds East 40.02 feet, thence run North 86 degrees 01 minutes 13 seconds East 54.31 feet, thence run North 49 degrees 11 minutes 17 seconds East 48.95 feet, thence run North 76 degrees 10 minutes 44 seconds East 32.77 feet, thence run South 62 degrees 21 minutes 32 seconds East 43.16 feet, thence run South 24 degrees 35 minutes 12 seconds East 78.88 feet, thence run South 14 degrees 17 minutes 20 seconds West 54.71 feet, thence run South 04 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds West 47.01 feet, thence run South 07 degrees 13 minutes 11 seconds East 59.89 feet, thence run South 18 degrees 10 minutes 20 seconds East 37.95 feet, thence run South 34 degrees 37 minutes 59 seconds East 29.50 feet, thence run South 02 degrees 40 minutes 21 seconds West 20.31 feet, thence run South 45 degrees 15 minutes 53 seconds East 29.53 feet, thence run South 32 degrees 59 minutes 42 seconds East 30.59 feet, thence run South 04 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds East 35.07 feet, thence run South 32 degrees 18 minutes 21 seconds West 36.93 feet, thence run South 25 degrees 00 minutes 20 seconds West 40.47 feet, thence run South 29 degrees 09 minutes 27 seconds West 51.83 feet, thence run South 07 degrees 17 minutes 07 seconds West 36.95 feet, thence run South 47 degrees 05 minutes 20 seconds West 25.89 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 44 minutes 43 seconds East 26.47 feet, thence run South 08 degrees 50 minutes 25 seconds West 31.15 feet, thence run South 47 degrees 41 minutes 59 seconds West 11.80 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any Person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. This Notice dated this 22nd day of August, 2012. Clerk, of Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 5360-0920 vs. Irwin, William Case No. 652009CA000445CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 652009CA000445CA BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONALASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM M. IRWIN; LISAD. IRWIN; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANTS(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 4th day of October, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lots 30 and 31, Block 53, of WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT V, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 56, of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 22nd day of August, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration 5364-0920 TWN Vs. Dibona, Anthony Case No. 11000158CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case No.: 11000158CADivision: FLAGSTAR ABANK, FSB Plaintiff, v. ANTHONYA. DIBONAA/K/AANTHONYDIBONA, ETAL, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated June 21, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 11000158CA, DIVISION:, of the Circuit Court of theSecond Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and ANTHONYA. DIBONAA/K/AANTHONYDIBONA; WENDYM. DIBONAA/K/A WENDYDIBONA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANTHONYA. DIBONAA/K/AANTHONY DIBONA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WENDYM. DIBONAA/K/AWENDYDIBONA; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTYOWN UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2 are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 1 1:00 a.m. at front door of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327 on the 4th day of October, 2012 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, BLOCK F, OF SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 88, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 58 Gold Finch Way, Crawfordville, FL32327 If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on August 28, 2012 (COURTSEAL) BRENTX. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT By; /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintif f: Liana Hall, Esquire Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544 Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 at least 7 working days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 13 & 20, 2012 3524-28474 5365-0920 TWN Vs.Serai, Kanwaljit Case No. 2009-250-CANotice of Sale ber are 0644, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLACounty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is SEPTEMBER 13, 2012. Personal Representative: Brenda Joy Wilson 181 Avenue G, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 Attorney For Personal Representative: Kristy Branch Banks, Florida Bar Number: 517143 Attorney for Brenda Wilson P.O. Box 176, Apalachicola, FL32329 Telephone: (850) 670-1255 Fax: (850) 670-1256 E-Mail: info@kbblawfl.com September 13 & 20, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904)926-0905, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (SEAL) BY: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2009-250-CA HERITAGE COMMUNITYBANK d/b/a AMERIS BANK, Plaintiff, v. KANWALJIT SINGH SERAI a/k/a K.S. SERAI, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: Commence at an old concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North along the East boundary of the Southwest quarter of said Section 25 a distance of 667.78 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261) marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Southwest quarter of said Section 25, thence run North 89 degrees 04 minutes 30 seconds West 315.00 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 89 degrees 04 minutes 30 seconds West 547.05 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 00 degrees 23 minutes 26 seconds East 999.46 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run South 88 degrees 33 minutes 08 seconds East 116.83 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run North 00 degrees 32 minutes 13 seconds East 28.57 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 88 degrees 37 minutes 25 seconds East 419.88 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 11 minutes 14 seconds East 1023.81 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 12.68 acres, more or less. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein after, at public sale on September 27, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 7, at the W akulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, Florida 32327 If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Timothy D. Padgett, ESQ.,Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Counsel for Plaintiff September 13 & 20, 2012 5Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2Go to http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click Continue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click Continue. MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON SEPTEMBER 10, 2012SEPTEMBER 20, 2012

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 14 If you can read the political winds, thank a teacher. Gov. Rick Scott seems to have thought this week that maybe he could learn a thing or two from teachers, if hed just listen to them. Republicans have been on rocky terms with the education establishment for some time, and while teachers are a pretty diverse group, the union that represents many of them has never been a big fan of Scott. But people in the governors of ce must be reading something that tells them education might just be a popular topic for voters. And so this week, Scott headed out to see what teachers and parents are talking about in the states classrooms and kid drop-off zones. Scott visited schools in just about every corner of the state and in the middle this week, saying it was a listening tour to get good ideas for how to improve education. Scott also sent out letters to students around the state, urging them to focus on their schooling, and cautioning college freshmen about borrowing too much in student loans. This week, I am traveling all across Florida to meet with teachers, parents and students in order to get their ideas for ways we can strengthen our education system, Scott said last weekend in his regular radio address. Our goal is better prepare our kids for college and careers. Some of my meetings will be roundtables where I will sit down and have a conversation on the types of policies we need to put in place at the state level. A number of Democrats, including lawmakers and candidates, dismissed the tour as a public relations stunt that wont change much, and criticized Republicans for presiding over several years of budget cuts to public schools. While the Republicanled Legislature, pushed by Scott, did increase school spending by about $1 billion last year, the education budget was cut by roughly the same amount the year before, making the increase a wash. Its sad that politicians like Rick Scott have chosen to gut this vital investment draining millions of dollars from local public schools while handing out tax breaks to special interests, one Democratic House candidate, Karen Castor Dentel, said in a statement this week. Among the most vocal critics of Republican education policy over the last decade and a half has been the Florida Education Association, the states largest teacher union. An FEA spokesman has called Scotts new interest in the details of education policy a campaign move. But on Friday, the governor was concluding his reach-out and listen tour with a dinner with the FEA at the Governors Mansion, so maybe theres some common ground that can be found. What exactly the governors education agenda will be during the next two years is a bit hard to glean. He did several radio interviews this week in which he was thrown open-ended softballs on what he was learning from the school visits, and Scott talked about some of the things he heard from teachers, but didnt say what that might mean for policy changes. For example, Scott mentioned in a few interviews that he heard from a lot of teachers that they pay for supplies out of their pockets. He also wrote about that on a blog his office published this week. The Southwest faculty also shared that they often could use help to purchase supplies for their classrooms that they now pay for personally, Scott wrote on the blog after visiting Southwest Miami High School. Whether he may have any ideas for that help, Scott didnt say. In fact, Scott never mentioned though in fairness, he ever asked in the radio interviews whether taking note of the supply issue might mean he will push for some policy change. Teacher pay didnt get talked about much this week, nor did Scott make any mention of what he will ask lawmakers for in terms of the education budget for the coming year. After visiting classrooms, we talked to a group of teachers, Scott wrote on his blog. Each of them offered great suggestions on how requirements and regulations from the state could be changed to allow them to focus more on student learning. What those suggestions were, Scott didnt say, and the meetings were closed to the public and press. So if the governor didnt write what he learned, no one did. Similarly, Scott said several times this week that he heard from teachers that there are too many different tests that students must take, and there doesnt seem to be much coordination in terms of the measurement system. But Scott didnt discuss again he wasnt asked what his administration might do about that. He did mention a couple of times that Florida is moving away from the FCAT, but that is something thats been in the works for several years. The previous governor, Charlie Crist, signed a law shifting away from that particular test. Scott did say in his blog that all the students, parents and teachers he met agree with him that jobs are important, and that education is important for preparing students to be able to get them. MO MONEY, OR NO MONEY? If the governor is thinking about asking for an increase in the education budget, he may have a sales job in the Legislature, the incoming Senate president indicated this week. Theres no question Scott, whose popularity has never been as high as hed like, got some good will from this years decision to restore the education cuts from 2011. State revenue forecasters said this week that tax collections are up a bit, and lawmakers are expected for the rst time in several years to be looking at beginning the budget writing process in the black. But while the Legislature will have about $71.3 million of breathing room when they begin crafting the budget for the coming scal year, most in the Legislature expressed caution, a fear that the situation could still change, and a warning that the amount in the black is, overall, pretty small. Incoming Senate President Don Gaetz this week called it a footnote to the states roughly $70 billion budget. In reality, Gaetz said in an interview with The News Service, there is no extra money. Gaetz, a former school superintendent, also said that more spending doesnt necessarily mean better outcomes and hes seen that rst hand. The question about education spending is not just how much, but how it is being used, Gaetz said. We need to redeploy some not all but some education dollars for 21st Century methods, like online education. It isnt always the case that more money, shoved at a 1950s model, is always the best. Scott clearly thinks that more money is, at a minimum, a good talking point, however. During at least one of his school visits this week, a big sign touting $1 Billion for Education was strategically placed behind Scott as he met with teachers, ensuring it would be in the photos of the event. The forecast for increased revenue didnt get the cheers expected because, well, its not that much. It is very good news in terms of the fact that theres no budget gap, but we would give you the warning that theres not much of a cushion there, the Legislatures head of revenue forecasting, Amy Baker, said midweek. She also warned that there are plenty of things to be worried about in terms of the economy and that a retrenchment isnt out of the picture. PRISON PRIVATIZATION Also this week, the Legislative Budget Commission, gave its OK to a planned privatization of the health care services at the states prisons. The state prisons department was initially authorized by lawmakers to privatize health services last year in the state budget, but the plan got held up in the courts. When the new budget year started July 1, the authorization in the budget technically expired. The Department of Corrections and backers of the privatization plan say the agency doesnt need approval of the full Legislature to make the policy change. But the department had to go to the LBC, which approves mid-year budget amendments, to get money moved around so the process could go forward. The budget change passed the panel on a 6-4 party-line vote with Republicans in favor. That should mean the proposal will go forward in January. But unlike the jumpsuits worn by some prisoners, the future of the plan is hardly black and white. A union that represents many state workers, AFSCME, has vowed a new lawsuit on the issue. Meanwhile, one of the contractors interested in providing health services in the prison system has led a case at a state appeals court over the bidding. WILL FLA DEMOCRATS GIVE CRIST A BEAR HUG OR THE FINGER? Fresh off his speaking turn at the Democratic National Conv ention, Charlie Crist returned to Florida, and quickly found that while he may not be welcomed by all Democrats as a candidate, he would fare pretty well. The former Republican governor drew nearly 30 percent of the support of Democratic voters who were polled on their choices for a gubernatorial candidate in 2014 within the margin of error of a dead heat with the partys last gubernatorial nominee, Alex Sink. The poll showed Crist and Sink well ahead of anyone else, with Miami advocate Anthony Kennedy Shriver far back in third. Crists break with the Republican Party (stipulated: he says he didnt leave, they left him, but whatever) may have begun when he famously hugged President Obama. After Fort Pierce pizza shop owner Scott Van Duzer was photographed lifting President Obama off the ground in a bear hug during an Obama campaign stop this week, Crist decided to get in on the action. He showed up at Van Duzers shop to claim his own hug. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott spends the week in school, visiting classrooms from Miami to Quincy and at points in between, listening to teachers, students and parents, and even later meeting with union of cials. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: You know what Im here for. Charlie Crist, reportedly, as he walked into the pizza shop where President Obama got a bear hug this week, and claimed his own hug from shop owner Scott Van Duzer.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Dont know the answer? Ask the teacherBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 26 32 39 43 51 55 63 66 69 2 27 52 3 28 53 4 29 47 5 23 44 21 33 40 48 56 64 67 70 6 15 18 34 45 57 7 30 58 8 31 54 9 24 41 49 25 35 50 65 68 71 10 16 19 22 42 46 59 11 36 60 12 37 61 13 38 62 ACROSS 1. Like a lot 6. Figure skater Katarina 10. Say "!@#$%" 14. Garbo line ender 15. Bar mitzvah dance 16. Declare openly 17. Escapades 18. School on the Thames 19. Stubborn beast 20. Part of the system that produces white blood cells 22. Trudge along 23. Nettle 24. Simple hydrocarbon 26. Natty of "The Leather-Stocking Tales" 30. Bend over backwards? 32. Jacob's twin 33. Small songbird 35. Windows typeface 39. Six years, for a senator 40. Washday units 42. Treater's words 43. Highly skilled 45. Reaso n to cancel school 46. Home furnishings chain 47. One of us 49. Nantucket, for one 51. Cost, slangily 54. Volcanic output 55. March 17th slogan word 56. Beethoven, notably 63. Bankroll 64. Coal-rich region 65. Quebec's __ Peninsula 66. Genesis victim 67. Ticklish Muppet 68. Set free 69. Gross minus net, to a trucker 70. Baseball's Dizzy or Daffy 71. MiddaysDOWN1. It may be unmitigated 2. Oil of __ (cosmetics brand) 3. Dressmaker's dummy 4. Like a GI peeling spuds 5. Send again 6. Spiral-shelled critter 7. I, as in Ithaca? 8. Sci-fi film of '82 9. Bicycle built for two 10. Emollient in some skin creams 11. That thing hanging from your palate 12. Wise Athenian 13. Ingmar or Ingrid Bergman 21. Sound of an empty stomach 25. Unfilled, on a TV sched. 26. Early VCR format 27. Played for a sap 28. Stable mother 29. Service station attendant's fistful 30. Rimes of country 31. __-European (language group) 34. Parks in 1955 news 36. "__ Dinka Doo" 37. Sermon closer 38. X-ray vision thwarter 41. Swing-and-a-miss sound 44. Harbor workhorse 48. __ up (erred) 50. Japanese bigwig of old 51. Make more lean 52. Resort spot off Venezuela 53. Worker with a pick 54. Golf green surrounder 57. Dubya's school 58. Doll's cry 59. Prefix meaning "one-billionth" 60. Analogy words 61. Wash cycle 62. Shirts with slogansAmerican Prole Hometown Content 9/16/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 1 23 2456 672 839 216 176295 7 89 2963 164 2009 HometownContent 951 2637 4 8 274895361 683471952 839 542176 562719834 147638295 716 384529 428957613 395126487 G A L L B E T A D E F A T O L A Y U S E D A R U B A F O R M M A R E M I N E R O N K P P U M P H A N D L E R E S H I P T U G G R O W L M E S S E D W H E L K R O S A Y A L E I O T A L E A N N M A M A T R O N I N D O A P R O N T A N D E M S W I S H T B A S H O G U N C A M P H O R O I L N A N O U V U L A I N K A I S T O S O L O N A M E N S P I N S W E D E L E A D T E E S

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 Page 11B 1. LITERATURE: Who was Englands first, unofficial poet laureate? 2. MUSIC: Which musical group had a hit with Penny Lane? 3. MEASUREMENTS: How many meters are in an are, a unit of land measurement? 4. INVENTIONS: Who invented frozen food in 1923? 5. GEOGRAPHY: Which countries share the region of Patagonia? 6. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the traditional birthstone associated with July? 7. ASTRONOMY: The moon called Titan orbits which planet in our solar system? 8. HISTORY: In what year did Ohios National Guard kill four war protesters at Kent State University? 9. MOVIES: Which Disney movie featured a character named Dory? 10. RELIGION: Who is the patron saint of carpenters? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Ben Jonson 2. The Beatles 3. 100 square meters 4. Clarence Birdseye 5. Argentina and Chile 6. Ruby 7. Saturn 8. 1970 9. Finding Nemo 10. St. Joseph YOUR AD HERE

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet (ARA) The average super market offers some 45,000 food products, most of which are packaged, processed and a poor choice for someone who wants to eat healthy even when the package says otherwise with claims of being natural, whole grain and even organic. People love the idea of convenience, especially with their food, says registered dietitian Anika DeCoster, assistant program manager of LifeTime WeightLoss, a division of Life Time, The Healthy Way of Life Company. Most of the convenience and processed foods on the market are barely recognizable to the human body. The body cant properly digest, absorb or use nutrients in these modi ed foods effectively, which negatively impacts metabolism, weight and energy production. Of those 45,000 products, there are four DeCoster says you can stop buying now. Breakfast cereal. Most Americans consume an over-abundance of sugar, not just in desserts but also via processed foods, like breakfast cereals that contain simple carbohydrates, which our bodies treat like sugar when they enter the bloodstream. Fruit juice and soda. One of the main culprits of the obesity epidemic, soda even diet soda has a negative impact on healthy eating. Fruit juice, while seemingly more healthy since it is made with fruit, contains so much sugar, it outweighs any bene ts. Water is the only beverage a body truly needs. Salad dressing. Eating a salad? Good for you. Top it with dressing loaded with sugar, additives and preservatives and youve just doused those healthy vegetables with an unhealthy dose of products your body doesnt need. Making your own salad dressing is simple: whisk together oil like olive, walnut, or sesame seed with acid, like red wine vinegar, balsamic vinegar or lemon juice. Non-fat avored yogurt. Instead, buy plain full-fat Greek yogurt and add your own flavorings such as nuts/seeds, a little organic honey or berries, DeCoster says. Thats right, full-fat. The fat in the yogurt helps your body absorb fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin D.Four foods you dont need ~ BY Le CHAT BOUTIQUE ~ AND LOCAL CANDIDATES ~ WHAT: A DAY AT THE SPA FOR YOUR SPECIAL POOCH WHEN: SATURDAY, Sept. 29, 2012 FROM 10:00 A.M. 3:00 P.M.WHERE: Hudson Park, CrawfordvilleAMENITIES FOR THE DISCRIMINATING POOCH: All Natural Ingredients; Aromatherapy Bubble Bath (lavender, vanilla, mintmore); Le Flea & Tick Spray; PAWdicures; DONATIONS: $10.00 ALL AMENITIES/Flea spray included $ 5.00 REGULAR BATH ONLY $ 5.00 GLAMOUR PHOTO (pearls, bow ties, hats, ribbons, boas, etc.) $ 25.00 Micro chipping, including registration of micro chipNATURAL GOURMET DOGGIE BISCUITS FOR PURCHASEPlease remember to spay and neuter your pets. CHAT needs volunteers. CHAT Memberships start at $15 a year. C.H.A.T. OF Wakulla Inc. PO Box 1195 Crawfordville FL 32326www.chatofwakulla.orgA copy of the ofcial registration CH-13163 and nancial information may be obtained from the FL Division of Consumer Services. Registration does not imply endorsement, approval, or recommendation by the State. October Is Breast Cancer Awareness MonthThe Wakulla News Pink Paper Day Thursday, October 4The Wakulla News will be IN THE PINK on Oct. 4 when the entire newspaper will be printed on PINK NEWSPRINT as part of the fight against breast cancer. Some of the proceeds from advertising, special tribute opportunities, subscriptions sales and donations in conjunction with the Oct. 4 PINK PAPER will go to the We Can Foundation a nonprofit organization that assists local cancer patients with out of pocket expenses such as gas and medications. This is one of the largest grassroots movements to make funding available for breast cancer screening, treatment and care as well as federal funding for breast cancer research.Be a part of this special promotion and make a difference in your community!(850) 926-7102 Pick up the same ad during October for 10% Off.Special Rate IncentivesFull Page. ...........................$400 Half Page............................$300 Quarter Page .....................$125*All other sizes will be billed at the 13 Week Contract Rate. Publish Date: October 4th Ad Deadline: September 28th Please support the fight against cancer by advertising on this special page October 4th.The Wakulla News will be IN THE PINK on October 4 when the entire newspaper will be printed on PINK NEWSPRINT as part of the fight against breast cancer. Some of the proceeds from adv ertising, spe cial tribute opportunities, subscriptions sales and donations in conjunction with the News October 4 PINK PAPER will go to the W e Can Foundation a nonprofit organization that assists cancer patients with out of pocket expenses such as gas and medications. ONLY$40.00Pick up your ad for the rest of the October for ONLY $25.00 each!2x3(3.389x3) Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator



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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIn a show of local bipartisanship, the heads of the local Democratic and Republican parties came together last week to announce a plan to hold a series of forums for candidates. Party chairs Jonathan Kilpatrick of the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee and Rachel Pienta of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee jointly announced the forums last week at The Wakul-la News. The forums are set for Oct. 8, 22, and 25. The times and locations will be announced. The forums will include races for state House District 7 … and it was con“ rmed that Republican candidate Halsey Beshears and Democrat Robert Hill will appear at the Oct. 22 forum … as well as sheriff, school superintendent, property appraiser and the three county commission races. We decided to co-host these forums during this electoral cycle to provide a venue for equal, across-the-aisle, fair representation of the candidates,Ž Pienta said. While we may differ on our perspectives regarding ideologies and policies,Ž Kilpatrick said, the parties can “ nd common ground in our respect for the democratic election process.Ž Pienta said that an impetus for the joint forums was the concern about the recent League of Women Voters forum. There was so much outcry after that last one at the library,Ž she said, referring to the Aug. 23 forum for school superintendent and property appraiser candidates. Continued on Page 2A By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCounty commissioners and citizens expressed deep concern about new proposed flood maps unveiled last week, complaining about expanded ” ood zones and the potential “ nancial impact on residents and businesses. County Planning Director Luis Serna told commissioners at their meeting on Monday, Sept. 17, that the preliminary maps will affect homeowner insurance rates and building in those areas. He encouraged citizens to check the online map to see if the designation of their property had changed. The maps are online at the Northwest Florida Water Management Districts website, www.nwfwmd.state. ” .us, and click on the ” ood information portal. Some of the signi“ cant changes mentioned included the base ” ood elevation for the City of St. Marks being raised 10 feet, and the ” ood zone going well upriver. While most of the changes are in the coastal area and along the rivers, there was concern that the map shows expanded flooding areas in places such as Wakulla Gardens … and there were concerns that the “ nancial impact on some residents there could be devastating. You may well get notice from your mortgage company that you need flood insurance,Ž Commissioner Mike Stewart warned residents. Their major concern appeared to be having time to appeal the maps. Rules for adoption of the maps give parties 90 days to appeal. Continued on Page 15A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 36th Issue Thursday, September 20, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Arts & Entertainment ....................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 6B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 10B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B INDEX OBITUARIES Daniel Lawrence Calhoun Capt. David Sams Gibbs Bernadette Parker Sue Calhoun Preacher James ‘Jimmy’ Darnell Smith William ‘Bill’ Boyd Stephens Sr.Parties come together to hold forumsFlood maps criticizedCoastal Cleanup is held PHOTO BY LYNDA KINSEY FOR KEEP WAKULLA COUNTY BEAUTIFUL/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSVolunteer Marc Dickieson removes a sofa and carpet from the marsh on Bottoms Road in Panacea.FEMA MAP/NWFWMD.STATE.FL.US WEBSITEConcern expressed about “ nancial impacts on citizens, businessesCounty budget of $42M approved with little comment. See story, Page 3A. WILLIAM SNOWDENLocal party chairs Democrat Rachel Pienta and Republican Jonathan Kilpatrick last week. This past Saturday marked the 27th annual Coastal Cleanup, and more than 9 million people in 52 countries worked to clean shorelines. Locally, the event was sponsored by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, and Bruce Ashley reported at the county commission meeting on Monday that 130 volunteers showed up at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday morning, and 440 volunteers were at Woolley Park in Panacea. Among the unusual items found, Ashley said, included a living room suite with a sleeper sofa and carpet, a full bike rack, in addition to lots of glass, metal, textiles and other non-biodegradable items. KWCB Director Jo Anne Palmer will have a full report next week.Complaint about robo-calls that message says is from Wakulla Democrats, but actually from another group. See story, Page 2A. A water pipe of cypress at the Colorado museum & See Page 12A Help shape the future of Tallahassee Community College in Wakulla CountyAnd register for a $500 scholarship drawing! GreatIdeas@TCC.fl.edu (850) 201-8632 We want to hear from you on whats important. Attend TCCs Town Hall Listening Session for a community discussion on how we can better serve area residents and partner with local businesses. Ribbon cutting and reception for our new facility to follow.October 10 | 6 p.m. | 2932 Crawfordville Highway

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThanks to a grant funded by the Environmental Protection Agencys Gulf of Mexico Alliance initiative and a partnership with Florida A&M University, all the elementary schools in Wakulla County and the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center will be getting a visit from the Gulf Specimen Marine Labs Sea Mobile in the near future. COAST Charter School in St. Marks was the “ rst school to host the mobile lab on Sept. 12. Students from prekindergarten to eighth grade learned about the importance of marine resources and how they are affected by coastal watersheds. Students “ rst heard a presentation in the auditorium about coastal watersheds and then class by class came outside to learn more about watersheds. They “ rst visited with Kimberly Davis, environmental education coordinator for FAMUs Center for Water and Air Quality, and her display that showed the students how fertilizers and other things affect watersheds and marine life and end up in the water. The students were then able to see and touch some of this marine life on the Sea Mobile. Tom Harrah, who runs the Sea Mobile, said Gulf Specimen was contacted by FAMU about the partnership after they attended the Riverfront Festival in Carrabelle. We thought our two displays went really well together,Ž Harrah said. Then FAMU came across funding and decided to partner with Gulf Specimen. They will visit six schools in Wakulla County. A lot of schools dont come to the lab,Ž Harrah said. This gives us the chance to offer them a free booking.Ž And the hope is that the children will then also want to visit the lab in the future and learn and see even more marine life. COAST was the “ rst place they visited together. Its been going really good,Ž Davis said. Along with the schools, they will also be at several different festivals in the area and will visit the senior centers in Leon County and Wakulla. Weve got quite a few bookings,Ž Harrah said. Its kind of exciting for us.ŽGulf Specimen takes Sea Mobile to COASTContinued from Page 1A Several citizens complained about the perception of bias at the forum. And Pienta, who was a founding member of the local group, “ led a complaint with the state organization. Pienta said last week that she believed there was a bias for no party candidates shown at the forums. Pienta was discouraging Democratic candidates from attending the next League forum, scheduled for Sept. 27, which is set for county commission candidates. Kilpatrick wouldnt say that Republican candidates were discouraged from attending, but noted that a rally for GOP candidates is set at Wildwood Bistro on the same night as the forum. Its the candidates choice which they want to attend,Ž he said. Kilpatrick said the three forums planned by the two local parties would give our candidates an opportunity to get their message out without making them a target to be twisted.Ž Besides the Democrat and Republican candidates, the NPA candidates will be invited to participate as well. Pienta and Kilpatrick will serve as moderators at the forums. Questions can be submitted by citizens, and what the process is for submitting questions will be announced later. Our questions will be much more about policy, ideology,Ž Kilpatrick said.Parties to hold forums NOTICE OF TALQUIN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. ANNUAL MEETINGSATURDAY, SEPT 29, 2012Registration and Voting: 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. Business Portion of Meeting: 10:00 a.m.100 VALUABLE PRIZESIncluding: 42” at screen TV, 32 G iPad, Wii game system, iPods, trolling motor, electric energy ef ciency kits & more!Entertainment: 9:00 – 9:45 a.m. “Country Connections” at theJames A. Shanks Middle School Gymnasium 1400 W. King Street, Quincy, Florida LindysChicken Since19687locations SPECIALS SPECIALS TENDERS 3 Large Chicken Tenders w/ Fries .......... $4.89 HOT WINGS 5 Piece w/ Fries ....................................... $4.89 2 Whole Wings w/ Fries & Biscuit .................................... $4.89 Includes Side & Small Drink Chicken Fillet combo .................................. $6.99 3 Tenders special ........................................ $6.39 5 Hot Wings ................................................. $6.39 Chicken Salad or BBQ Sandwich ............... $5.99 Pork Chop Sandwich .................................. $6.99 2 Whole Wings ............................................ $6.39 2 PC Dark with only Mashed Potatoes ....... $5.19 COMBO MEALS COMBO MEALS By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThere have been reports of robo-calls being made to local residents, in which the recorded message apparently identi“ es the call as being made for Wakulla Democrats. Rachel Pienta, chair of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee, said on Tuesday, Sept. 18, she had no knowledge of the calls other than complaints she had received. Robo-calls are expensive,Ž Pienta said. Wakulla Democrats dont have money for that.Ž Pienta said she had a report from a local Democrat who was angry about the call, complaining that it would just turn off voters. She was unfamiliar with what exactly was being said on the calls. Several Democratic staffers received the calls, but hung up. One report sent in an email states: The call starts off by saying Greetings from (Wakool-a) Wakulla Democratic Party.Ž The number on the caller ID shows up as (425) 3908108 and is identi“ ed VOTE USA from Renton, Va. There was some indication it may be a Republican political organization. It also appears the group has been the subject of a warning of a phone scam in Indiana in which callers reportedly told people that lines were expected to be long on election day and that they could vote over the phone. You cannot vote over the phone.Suspicious phone calls reported SEA LAB: Students at COAST Charter School get hands-on with Gulf Specimens Sea Mobile.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Please RecycleBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe 2012-13 budget for Wakulla County was unanimously approved by the county commission on Sept. 17 with very little comment from the public. Unlike previous years, this years budget of $42.4 million budget did not appear to be controversial. There were no new taxes or tax increases in the approved budget and the millage rate will remain the same at 8.50 mills. That is $8.50 in taxes for each $1,000 of property value. For an average home of $100,000 with a $50,000 homestead exemption, that amounts to $425 in county taxes. That does not include other assessments or taxes. To generate the same tax revenue as the previous year, the millage rate would need to be 8.8354 mills, the roll back rate. The slight increase in the budget, of $438,00, from the “ rst public hearing is attributed to the commission approving grants for the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council; an increase in cash forward for the “ re MSBU fund for a tanker truck, brush truck and radios; adjustment to cash forward that decreased the law enforcement education fund; and an increase in cash forward to put in reserve for corrections in the sheriffs “ ne and forfeiture fund. One of the most significant changes to the countys budget is the creation of the “ ne and forfeiture fund which is dedicated to capturing all of the sheriffs of“ ces related costs into one fund. This will help the county move away from relying on the jail bed revenue, said County Administrator David Edwards. Other changes to the budget were caused by the re-organization of the county administration. This includes the elimination of the deputy county administrator position … Tim Barden is leaving the county at the end of the year … and the Of“ ce of Management and Budget and transferring budget management back to the clerk of the court. The Public Information Of“ ce has also been renamed to the Communication and Public Services Office and will include special projects, agenda management, public records requests, recreation services, veteran services and library services. Previously, recreation, veterans services and the library were under the deputy county administrator. The county administrator will also now oversee the airport and probation services, which were under the deputy county administrator as well. The Office of Intergovernmental Affairs has been created and will be responsible for grants administration, contract management, legislative, economic development and the RESTORE Act. The Parks and Recreation Department has been split and renamed the Parks and Facilities Management. This department will be in charge of the maintenance of the parks and county buildings. The county is looking to hire a director for this department and hopes to find someone with building or construction experience. Other changes include having the Building Department be responsible for building inspections and code enforcement. Fire Rescue will include “ re services, emergency medical services, animal control and the liaison with the emergency management department. Major capital improvements include building the sheriffs annex and a new “ re and emergency medical services building. There are also plans to make upgrades to Hudson and Azalea parks and renovate the community center.COUNTY COMMISSION CITY OF ST. MARKSCounty approves $42M budget with little commentStreetscaping project should be finished by Stone Crab FestivalBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter heavy rains pushed back the start date for construction of the streetscape in St. Marks, work has begun and the project should be “ nished before the Stone Crab Festival on Oct. 20, said City Manager Zoe Mans“ eld. The project in on schedule, even with the rain,Ž Mans“ eld said. The streetscape will include sidewalks down both sides of Port Leon Drive from Pine Street to Riverside Drive and will connect with the St. Marks Trail. There will also be an imprint of a lighthouse in the center of the road of Riverside Drive, benches, trash cans, period lighting and landscaping improvements. The city was awarded a $600,000 Community Redevelopment Block Grant for downtown revitalization. Hale Contracting was awarded the bid for construction. Their bid was $398,123. Hydra Engineering developed the plans for the project and Fred Fox is administering the grant. Hydra Engineering is really on top of things,Ž Mans“ eld said. They are doing a great job for us.Ž The contractor has 90 days to complete the project, but Mans“ eld said they are shooting for 45 days. Our little city will be looking good and have a safe walking path to our downtown area,Ž Mans“ eld said. CITY OF ST. MARKS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JENNIFER JENSEN New sidewalks are being installed in St. Marks down both sides of Port Leon Drive and will connect with the St. Marks Trail. The work is being paid for with a state grant. The board approves a property tax rate of 8.50 mills, the same as last years tax. Notice of Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment TransmittalCopies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.NO FINAL ACTION ADOPTING THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT WILL BE TAKEN AT THESE MEETINGS.SEPTEMBER 20, 2012 Public HearingThe Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, October 8, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, November 5, 2012, beginning at 5:00 P.M., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. The proposed amendment is included in a proposed ordinance entitled: NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS SEPTEMBER 20, 2012 The Wakulla County Planning Commission and/or Board of County Commissioners propose to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, October 8, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, November 5, 2012 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony.City of Sopchoppy SEPTEMBER 20, 27, 2012 SPECIAL WORKSHOPTHE CITY OF SOPCHOPPY WILL BE HOLDING A SPECIAL WORKSHOP MEETING, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012, 6:30 P.M. THE PURPOSE OF THIS MEETING IS TO GET COMMUNITY INPUT ON A PROPOSAL TO PROVIDE A SALARY OR STIPEND TO MEMBERS OF THE SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION.The Council welcomes any input on this issue and urges you to attend. For further information please call the clerks of“ce at 962-4611.

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• ‘Mr. Sopchoppy’ Bill Stephens is dead at 72 • William “Bill” Boyd Stephens Sr. obituary • The time Paul wrote of has come (Letters) • John Wayne Brim obituary • High court hears appeal of Hilton death sentence • Clerk restores office hours • Charlie Creel will be a great sheriff (Letters) • Medicaid case put on hold for now thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Editor, The News: Wakulla County will soon experience the most important change in education it has made in two decades. The Nov. 6 election will chart the course of public education for years to come. It is our honor, the principals of the Wakulla County School District, to recommend Bobby Pearce as superintendent of schools. Pearce has distinguished himself as a student, an athlete, a husband and father, a teacher, a coach, a principal and assistant superintendent. Bobby Pearce is a man of integrity who has served the parents and children of Wakulla County for more than 24 years. He has also run his own successful small business which has reinforced his appreciation of a dollars value. Pearce has been both mentor and trusted colleague to all of us over the years. Most importantly, we are con“ dent that with Pearce as our leader, Wakullas high performing status will not only continue but will reach new heights. The future of Wakullas children is at stake. Mr. Pearce has the strength to move us forward in dif“ cult times. As the principal of Medart Elementary his school earned 10 consecutive AŽ grades while having the highest percentage of economically disadvantaged students in the district. Bobby Pearce is respected because he can be trusted. He respects all people and treats them with dignity. Bobby Pearce is the clear choice to be the next superintendent of Wakulla County. Please join us, the principals of Wakullas schools, as we enthusiastically support him in that endeavor. Mike Crouch Wakulla High School Mike Barwick Wakulla Middle School Dod Walker Riversprings Middle School Sharon Kemp Medart Elementary Susan Brazier Shadeville Elementary Angie Walker Crawfordville Elementary Jackie High Riversink Elementary Tom Askins Sopchoppy Education Center Kim Dutton Wakulla Education Center Editor, The News: I have learned that the Sopchoppy City Commission is having a workshop on Sept. 27 with the intent to adopt itself a salary for the “ rst time in its history. This is on top of some of its members adopting a tradition of going on paid conference after paid conference. In this time of economic recession, people loosing jobs, and budget tightening in both the private and public sectors, it is shocking that the commissioners are seeking a taxpayer salary. Having served on the Sopchoppy City Commission for over 20 years, without compensation, out of a sense of a duty to serve my community, I “ nd it hard to believe that a salary is warranted. After all, the commission sets its meeting times and can set the meeting after the council members day jobs, and they usually do. So no time off work to worry about. And traveling to the meeting in our one-squaremile city cannot be that much of a “ nancial burden to require a salary to compensate for it. Other than seeking ego aggrandizement and taxpayer money in their pockets, I can think of no justi“ cation for paying the Sopchoppy City Commission a salary. I hope the citizens of Sopchoppy and the customers of the Sopchoppy water system who live outside the city limits whose hardearned money will be used to pay this proposed salary will let the council members know their thoughts. Eddie Evans SopchoppySchool principals endorse Bobby Pearce Kessler is a champion for taxpayers Charlie Creel is very professional, caring Firearm training at facility is excellent Sopchoppy commissioners paid a salary? Fleetwood family appreciates supportA father is instrumental in a daughter’s lifeBy RITA HANEY Reviewing books available for parents is a favorite past time. Books allow us to both gain and process information at our own pace and through our own belief system. There is no need for defense or argument. When a book is found at our own public library it is a double bonus. Bringing up GirlsŽ by Dr. James Dobson is informative and easy to read. Dr. Dobson states his foundation for living and raising children is Christian and freely states this is his guidepost. This means a “ rm sense of values which the family knows, understands and all members of the family are responsible for their behavior. Fathers are instrumental in a girls life. A friend of mine, Ward, told me he was taking his niece (father not in the home) on a date.Ž He said he wanted her to learn and appreciate how she was to be treated when she dated. Ward further reported that over the last few years he had ensured that his niece felt valued and loved for who she was. This behavior on Wards part also made her feel protected. Young girls do not necessary say they need protection busy as they are “ ghting for freedom and their own identity. However, this idea of protection was made clear to me when a blended family was planning an adoption by the husband of his 13-year-old stepdaughter. Why,Ž she asked him, do I need this (adoption)?Ž The stepdad replied: Protection.Ž This word was met with a thoughtful silence. Yes, young girls need to know they deserve respect. They need to know that in their need to discover who they are becoming someone is watching. A relationship with a father is a blessing that is beyond measure. Yes, maybe it works best if the father and mother are in the same household. However, the important thing to remember is quantity is not necessarily quality and a father, be it weekend or joint custody, has a place in his daughters life that is invaluable. Divorce is a painful experience for all members of the family. There may be a discussion on which is better … for parents to live together and be miserable and unhappy, or to experience the pain of divorce. Neither is ideal. What is necessary is that fathers … as well as mothers … have an active role in their childs life. We live in a chaotic world. Most people work at least eight hours a day. Many people live from paycheck to paycheck, causing extraordinary stress on parents, In this setting, having responsibility for housework, laundry, packing lunches, servicing the car, yard work and the list goes on should involve all members of the family, Feeling a part of something is an important quality. Guiding Good Choices,Ž a family seminar geared for parents of 9to 12-year-olds reports that the feeling of belonging is how street gangs operate and entice young people to join. A gang is a strong example. Being part of a group at school for example … everyone has a role and a position that all members know. When kids have a feeling of belonging at home, a role to play, some responsibility that all members of the family rely on, they know they are appreciated and a creates a resistance to those unfriendly social behaviors outside the home. Parents are important. Fathers are necessary. Providing a “ rm foundation of values, learning to accept responsibility for behavior and being loved and appreciated for who they are. Fathers matter. Bringing up GirlsŽ by Dr. James Dobson is available at the Wakulla County LibraryRita Haney, MSW, LCSW is a social worker in Crawfordville,. She can be reached at 926-2039.READERS WRITE:Editor, The News: As a champion for the taxpayers, Dr. Howard Kessler has my support. While serving as a past commissioner, he consistently voted against over-spending, and bloated, top-heavy government. Dr. Kessler is a “ scal conservative who was always careful with the peoples money. He did his homework, and asked the tough questions to staff and other commissioners that no one else would ask. In tough economic times, he worked hard to reduce county expenditures, and under his tutelage, grants were written, and surplus funds were made available. He is for transparency in government. No commissioner devoted himself so tirelessly to the citizens. He was accessible to all citizens and kept regular of“ ce hours. Today, it is hard to “ nd a commissioner who is in the of“ ce. Dr. Kessler was never in a rush to end the board meetings. He wanted to take the time it took to serve the citizens. His commitment was to do good things for all of the people in this county, not just for his friends. He leads by example, and I know him to be a man of integrity. He is respectful of the people. He never yelled at citizens, and I never heard him speak ill of them behind their backs. He is honest and honorable. He is a man of conscience, integrity and convection who is dedicated to service, and helping all who ask of him. And he does not do this for political gain, but it is because that is who is he is. I hope you will take the time to meet, and vote for Howard Kessler for county commission. Sue Damon Shell Point Editor, The News: We apologize for taking so long to do this, but its better late than never, right? We want to thank Bethany Lassiter of Dazzles Studio for the yard sale she held for Austin Fleetwood and his mom, Tammy, on June 9, to help in defraying medical costs for Austins cancer treatment. Of course, it couldnt have been so successful without all the donations and baked goods provided by caring people of this community. It turned out well despite the rain. We also want to thank Shane and Metra Weaver for Austins bene“ t held on July 7. We are so grateful for those who cooked, served, made or donated items to sell and raf” e off, the entertainment, the “ re truck and volunteers who stayed with it, and the participation of the car show. It was a beautiful day shared with loving people and we had a great time! The day ended with a successful Teen Dance and they had a good time and we thank the DJ for his services. We are blessed to be in a community that pulls together in time of need. Wakulla does love Jesus and not just Wakulla because He is being seen over and over through the love, support and prayers from people … people we dont even know. The Fleetwood family Editor, The News: An open letter to Sheriff Donnie Crum: This is to commend you and your WCSO Training Staff for the exceptionally “ ne “ rearms training you provide to the citizens of Wakulla County and to the Law Enforcement/Private Security Community at the Firearms Training Facility. As you know, I served as range master at the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy for 17 years and retired in 1997. I have assisted WCSO as a volunteer instructor and attended your Firearms Training Facility as a student, and I know a good Firearms Training Program when I see one. The WCSO Training Staff is second to none, and your staff is far more courteous and accommodating than most. Lt. Fred Nichols and Sgt. Ed Tyre are two of the most professional “ rearms instructors I have had the pleasure of being associated with in my 40-plus years as a certi“ ed “ rearms instructor. As the president of Plantation Security Inc., a resident of Wakulla County, and a retired range master, it is a pleasure for me volunteer my services and to contribute to the “ nancial support of this “ ne facility. Thanks for a job well done! Major Alan Lamarche Shell Point Editor, The News: The purpose for this message is to show my support for Charlie Creel as the next sheriff of Wakulla County. I worked with Charlie when he was head of security for the Lt. Governor of Florida and found him to be a very professional and caring law enforcement of“ cer and person. I personally observed him working on state law enforcement issues and was impressed with his management skills. Not only is Charlie a great person, he is also very capable of ef“ ciently running the of“ ce of the sheriff and will have the best interest of the citizens of Wakulla County on his mind daily. I feel that I am very quali“ ed to make this statement being a retired (36 year) law enforcement of“ cer myself. I started with four years at the Panama City Police Department, eight years with the Pensacola Police Department and 23 years with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement where I was chief of Executive Protection for three governors and eventually rose to the rank of assistant commissioner. I was colonel of the DOTs Motor Carrier Compliance of“ ce, and ultimately retiring from the Florida Highway Patrol as a lieutenant colonel. The experience I have in law enforcement has taught me much about the behavior of people and through this I can say Charlie is a step above the rest! Good luck, Charlie. Scotty Sanderson

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 – Page 5AEditor, The News: This letter is my response to Ron Huddlestons letter last week (Mike Stewart wants the best for WakullaŽ) regarding his defense of the exorbitant taxes thrust upon the citizens of Wakulla County by the current commission. All citizens are important whether or not they rent or own their home. Lets not re-invent history or distort facts! The 7 percent taxes placed on all utilities in the county are, by de“ nition, clearly a tax! If the county collects money from the citizens and puts it in the general fund and uses it to pay their bills, its a tax on the citizens. Dont tell us that it is not. The commission voted on these taxes because they are spending more than they have budgeted. I am fed up with hearing that the commission is languishing over dif“ cult decisions. The truth is the commission is not giving their job of managing the budget the effort it deserves. The citizens are tired of paying for their inability to manage. Mr. Huddleston, I dont know what your expertise in budgeting is that would cause a member of the commission to consult you, but I can tell you that I spent a great deal of my career monitoring budgets and dealing with “ nancial issues. Overspending, taxing the people, and then writing a big letter trying to justify it, is an effort in futility! I am voting for Howard Kessler because he consistently voted NO to tax increases. Your candidate consistently voted YES. Dr. Kessler is the candidate of my choice. He has always been there for the citizen. Chuck Hickman An overtaxed citizen Crawfordvillereaders speak out More OpinionsTaxes are taxes, whatever you call them John Shu is choice for strong future Alan Brock has proven leadership Maurice Langston is right for sheri Emily Smith will be good for Wakulla omas says hes taking the high road More speci“ cs needed from candidateEditor, The News: It was the late 1980s when my father brought his family back home to Wakulla County. My favorite memories were made right here in this county. I took my “ rst job as a carpenter working for Curleys Construction. This led to a good career working as a custom carpenter right here in Wakulla County. In 2003, my wife Leilania and I decided to build our “ rst house and could think of no place in the world we would rather be than in Wakulla. It was this decision that led to my meeting John Shuff. John watched me as I worked tirelessly night after night and every available minute on the weekends to make our dream a reality. Shortly after the completion of our home, John approached me about adding a small addition and garage to his home, which is coincidentally across the street from mine, and we struck an agreement. This agreement was the start of a friendship that I have been very thankful for and proud to be a part of. It turned out to be bene“ cial to me in my career as well when John asked me to be the carpenter that helped him and many others rebuild our beloved Old Courthouse.Ž You cant imagine how proud I was to be a part of such an important part of preserving this countys heritage. It was during this project that I “ rst got a good up-close look at Johns love for, and commitment to, this wonderful community. Since that time I have worked on several projects with John, the most recent of which was a $9.5 million rebuild of the Eastside Psychiatric Hospital in Tallahassee. Believe me this was a major project for anyone to take on. Never once did it take away from his focus and dedication to the commitments he made in helping to better our county. Mr. Shuff has worked closely with members of our local government on many issues over the years. He recognizes the need for continued, responsible growth in our community. To have and maintain responsible growth is essential to securing a future in this community for our children. In order to do this we must have accountable, responsible government. As a father of three wonderful, beautiful daughters, all of whom I pray will have the chance to live and raise families in Wakulla, I believe I have a vested interest in our countys future. John Shuff is our choice to help shape that future. Thank you, Paul Nichols Crawfordville Editor, The News: Im proud to show my support for Emily Smiths campaign for county commissioner. Emily is involved with many community services and projects and will listen to the needs of all the people. She is knowledgeable and thoughtful about the countys history and challenges. As county commissioner, Emily will weigh all issues with the best interests of Wakulla County citizens at heart. You may know Emily from her work with the renewable fuels presentations as part of FAMUs Small Farms Program. Several years ago she worked with Crescent Moon Farms and Purple Martin Nurseries. More recently, she commuted to Tallahassee as a graduate student and instructor of freshman research and writing. Ive seen Emily speaking at our Board of County Commission meetings and know that she has reviewed most of the online commission meetings of the past as well. She has attended and sponsored many meetings and citizen help-sessions over the past few months as she strives to assist Wakulla County folks with their everyday problems and concerns. Everyone who knows Emily admires her strength of character and her love for Wakulla County. If you dont know Emily, I hope that you will visit her website (www. EmilyForWakulla.com), or will attend some of the planned public forums. Please join me in voting for Emily Smith on election day, Tuesday, Nov. 6. Sandy Tedder Sopchoppy Editor, The News: I read Howard Kesslers announcement that he was running in the paper last week, and read what he feels he could do better than our current board, and wasnt surprised to see the vague mention of government cuts and ef“ ciency improvements that he often alludes to without speci“ cs. Howards last two years on the county commission were the best chance for him to implement any major changes that he had spoken about in the years prior. With six years of experience under his belt, he understood the system, the rules and the process. I have little doubt that if he presented a reasonable argument that he could have passed almost anything with the votes of Commissioner George Green and Commissioner Lynn Artz, and if it was a good idea I am sure that Commissioner Alan Brock and Commissioner Mike Stewart would have joined also. He was the chairman, their chosen leader. But what does he have to show for those two years? What major tax breaks, staf“ ng or program changes did he try to implement? From what I can tell his main focus was on removing the county administrator. He was successful, but he could have done so much more. I read with interest where he wants to see the PST, or Public Services Tax, removed. This is a tax that is paid by every citizen who pays a water, electric or gas bill for their home. It allowed the county to reduce the revenue from the property tax by almost 2 million dollars. Everyone pays in, based on how much they use … giving people real control over their taxes. He suggested removing this tax and deciding what programs to cut the funding for through discussion of the Board of County Commissioners. He then listed many programs that he wouldnt want to see altered or cut because of this reduction … not leaving much room for budget cuts. After his eight years of service, I ask that Howard present to us the areas where he thinks Wakulla County should be looking for budget cuts. It is true, that if re-elected he would be one of five commissioners, so it would not be his decision alone. But I think it is important that we have a understanding of where he thinks there is waste in our county government, what sections would he look to cut to offset the loss of revenue. I want to know what service Howard Kessler believes we are able to go without. It is easy to speak of hypothetical government cuts … it isnt easy to actual decide what should go. It is my understanding that Wakulla County is doing financially well with our current system, if Howard wants to cut services to cut taxes he should be clear about what he thinks should be cut, and with his years of experience it should be easy for him to do so. I look forward to Howards next Letter to the Editor explaining where the cuts should be made to offset his proposed tax decreases or a letter explaining his change in position. Bob Danzey CrawfordvilleMORE READERS WRITE:Editor, The News: I have paid attention to politics for my entire adult life and I have seen enough to know that political campaigns often becomes ugly and mean-spirited. As citizens, we have come to expect this as normal behavior in the political arena, even though it disgusts us when we see politicians stoop to this level. I am not a typical politician, nor do I want to be one. I certainly do not want to win a political of“ ce so bad that I am willing to compromise my morals and values. If the only way to victory is by attacking my opponents and impugning their integrity, I would prefer to lose with my own integrity intact. I am running to serve the citizens of Wakulla County as a Commissioner for District one. I CHOOSE to make my campaign about the strengths and experience that I will bring to the position. My strengths are not increased by trampling on the integrity of my opponents. I have come to know Commissioner Alan Brock since he was elected in 2008. It is my sincere belief that he is a man of honor. He is trustworthy and sincere in his desire to do his very best to make Wakulla County a better place. He and I have different ideas of what is best for our county and I would have made some decisions differently than he did. Nonetheless, I have nothing but respect for him as a person. My knowledge of my other opponent, Jenny Brock, is very limited. I have exchanged greetings with her in passing, but have never worked with her on local issues, nor have I ever had an in-depth conversation with her. From my limited exposure to her, I have nothing but respect for her as a person. As we enter the “ nal few weeks of this campaign, I am committed to staying on the high road.Ž I will continue to focus my conversations on my abilities and how I intend to tackle the tough issues that affect Wakulla County. You will not see me resort to character assassinations of either of my opponents. You will not see me participate in a last-minute smear campaign, designed to create doubt about my opponents. Politicians often utilize this tactic when they want to create confusion, but they dont want to give ample time for the whole truthŽ to be revealed and discussed. You will not see attacks on my opponents that come from my supporters or from an unknown Political Action Committee. I will not allow any person or group to do so called dirty workŽ on my behalf. The citizens of Wakulla County are tired of underhanded politics. We need strong leaders with a strong work ethic who will model the behaviors our parents, pastors and teachers instilled into us. I am that person, and I promise to always put my entire heart and soul into serving the best interests of the good people of Wakulla County. If you have questions about who I am, or what I stand for, I invite you to give me a call at 559-0608. Together, we will ensure that our government is a reflection of the same strong values that bind our families together. May Gods blessings be upon your family and our community! Ralph Thomas Candidate for commission District 1 Editor, The News: I met Alan Brock when he ran for commissioner four years ago in 2008. Over the last four years Alan has a proven track record of success when it comes to issues involving our community. Alan championed the BP Restore ActŽ and because of his continued vigilance and stewardship our community will receive millions in much-needed dollars. With passage of the federal Restore Act, Wakulla County and seven other Northwest Florida counties affected by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill are assured of receiving millions of dollars when “ nes are assessed against BP for the spill. The funding will potentially change the course of environmental restoration and economic development within our community. At a time when Wakulla County is faced with reduced “ nancial resources due to a troubled economy, these funds will be critical in assisting our community efforts to help our citizens, local businesses and local economy recover from this devastating recession. Alan championed the solid waste services. In 2005, when the existing land“ ll facility was closed and the county chose not to build a new transfer station, the state was threatening to “ ne the county for non-compliance. Alans promotion of this county-wide solid waste collection service provides the citizens of Wakulla County a valuable service, has increased recycling, decreased illegal dumping and lowered the overall annual cost per household for trash collection. At a time when everyone should be concerned about the condition we leave the environment for our children and future citizens, this service is something everyone can participate in and be proud of. It is meaningful decisive actions like these that make the difference in the responsible stewardship of this community. Alan led the effort to hire David Edwards as our new county administrator. One only needs to read page 4A of The Wakulla News, Sept. 13 issue (A view of whats happening in county governmentŽ by David Edwards) to see that the hiring of this skilled management professional has encouraged the reorganization of and the ef“ cient streamlining of the local government structure saving the citizens of Wakulla County tax dollars and increasing the ef“ ciency of our county government. I have watched Alans determination to see this community take positive steps toward acquisition of alternative funding, responsible growth and ef“ cient government. Many of the decisions made have not been easy or popular with everyone. However, that is why we elect our leaders to do the county business. A commissioner who thoughtfully listens to alternative viewpoints, studies the problem and carefully considers the various issues prior to making his decisions is exactly what we ask of our elected of“ cials. Alan is a moderate voice willing to seek out compromise with his fellow commissioners and craft “ scal budgets, promote responsible growth and encourage ef“ cient government that works and serves the interests and people of Wakulla County. This cooperation provides meaningful outcomes and illustrates maturity as a commissioner and citizen. Join me in voicing your support at the polls for a proven leader who cares deeply for Wakulla County and its citizens. Vote for Alan Brock for four more years of proven leadership. It is time for Alans proven leadership! Bret D. Hammond Wakulla StationYou can count on Richard Harden Editor, The News: I would like to endorse Richard Harden for county commission. I have known Richard for close to 33 years. He is always a person that you could count on to be very honest and trustworthy. He has always cared about his community and has shown that in his dedication to Sopchoppy. He is a very hardworking individual who listens to his supporters and is not afraid to do the right thing. He is very fiscally conservative and tries his very best to make the right decisions for the community. If you call Richard you can believe he listens to your concerns. He would be a valuable asset to the Wakulla County Commission. Hard work, dedication, loyalty, professionalism and honesty … those are characteristics not usually found in a candidate, but Richard has all of them. Patricia Ratliff Owner, Serendipty Salon St. Marks Editor, The News: We are writing today to support and rally for Maurice Langston running for Wakulla County sheriff. Our community deserves sound, knowledgeable, and ethically responsible leadership. Wakulla needs to continue to move forward, and Maurice is the person who can facilitate this movement and support the needs of our citizens. Maurice understands the strengths of our community but also has the ability to access the needs and implement changes or programs to support Wakulla County. He has proven leadership and knows how to talk the talk and walk the walk.Ž Maurice is also known as a devout family man. He and his family have overcome stressors that had the potential to devastate the most strong. However, Maurice has led his family to overcome with grace and dignity … characteristics he would bring to the elected of“ ce of sheriff for Wakulla County. Integrity, compassion, and knowledge … values your parents tried to instill in you. Maurice has made his parents proud and he will do the same for the citizens of Wakulla County as our Sheriff. Vote Right. Vote Langston. Ray and Patricia Hubbird Crawfordville

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Churchreligious views and events Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Church BriefsThe umpire (gasp) wore shortsREV. JAMES L. SNYDER Okay, right up front I want to confess that I am an old fogey. In my defense, as if I needed one, I was born an old fogey. I have what may be called old-fogeyitis, a rare psychological disorder only affecting people born of woman. For many years, I beat myself over the head because I did not understand old fogeyitis syndrome. Years ago, I have learned to accept it, whether others accept it or not is not my problem. It was a wonderful day when I realized I could have a lot of other things much worse than oldfogeyitis. Just this week I saw an article in the picture of supposedly the ugliest woman in the world. As I looked at her picture, it reminded me of one of my old aunts. I know Im not the prettiestŽ face in town but I wasnt born this way. My face is the result of the stress through the years from the old-fogeyitis syndrome. One of the amazing traits of this syndrome is the marvelous selective memory. My memory is so good I can remember things that never happened. Some people look at me when I recall one of these pseudo-memories as if I was senile. Oh no. It is not senility it is old-fogeyitis. I really did not know how bad it was until this past week. My oldest granddaughter was playing softball and invited me to come and watch her “ rst game. She made me one of those offers that I couldnt refuse.Ž It has been a longtime since I seen a slow pitch softball game much less played in one. I remembered those glorious days of yesteryear when I played slow pitch softball. According to my memory, I was the star pitcher on my team. What memories they were. Since they are my memories, I feel I have the right to make them what I want them to be. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage, our youngest daughter and her daughter joined me as we watched my granddaughters “ rst game. We brought our own chairs so we were able to set up our seating arrangements where we could watch our granddaughter play her “ rst game. I am not prejudiced, but from where we were sitting, she was the star player on her team. I am not sure how her team could ever get along without her. It is my humble opinion that greatness like this is inherited. You do not learn that kind of thing on your own, it is something that is passed down to you thr ough your genes. I must have passed it on to her because I do not have it anymore. Continued on Page 15A Yard sale set at Little Salem P.B. Church The pastor’s aide at Little Salem Primitive Baptist Church will be having a yard sale on Saturday, Sept. 22, beginning at 8 a.m. Fish and chicken dinners will also be on sale. The church is located at 1998 Wakulla Arran Road. Call for vocalists to perform in Handel’s Messiah The Community Choir is calling for vocalists and singers for the holiday musical program Handel’s Messiah, to be performed on Sunday, Dec. 9, at the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church in Sopchoppy at 3 p.m. The opportunity to be a part of this production is available to anyone in the Wakulla County area so new participants are encouraged to participate. Please join us at practice beginning Oct. 28 at 2:30 p.m. at the church. Reba Mason will be directing. Light refreshments will be served. Mark your calendars. Please call Reba Mason at (850) 9623804 for additional information.  Big Bend Hospice to host Bereavement Conference Big Bend Hospice will hold its eighth annual Bereavement Conference on Friday, Sept. 28, at Tallahassee Community College. The event is billed as “Tapestries: Stories of Love, Loss and Hope.” To register, go to bigbendhospice,org and click on the link. For more information, contact Lisa Baggett at (850) 878-5310 or email lisa@ bigbendhospice.org. OUT TO PASTOR By CYNTHIA WEBSTERSpecial to the News The world is in a mess. There is not one person in all of Wakulla County who fails to realize this. Yet this has not happened overnight. For decades we have allowed so many wrongs to continue even when we knew them to be wrong. Promises have been falsely made to the people that can not be kept, television and movies use language that should be unacceptable, and children are being given false hope about their future. Our culture is more crass, our values less evident and our prayers less frequent. No one denies this and few claim that this is the way it should be. And yet we continue to look to the government and accept what they tell us. We expect all that is wrong to be “ xed without bothering to understand the issues. And worst of all we do know that by doing this we are placing our trust in the wrong hands. The answer lies in the fervent prayers of righteous men.Ž Christians, lifting their voices in prayerful unison asking for national healing, for wisdom and that His will be done, shall be heard. And that is the good news … people from across Wakulla County, from all denominations are deciding to stand up and stand out on faith by being a part of the Footsteps for Faith and Freedom prayer walk from Sept. 27 to Nov. 5. And we want you to be a part of it too. Here is how it works. Monday through Saturday people will meet up for about an hour. We will be lifted up in prayer by one of our clergy and then walk in fellowship. This is not a procession, a parade, nor even a group walk. Rather it is simply a walk. You might choose to walk alone, walk with a friend, walk with a family member, walk with your dog, or perhaps push your baby in the stroller. It does not matter even that you walk. You might want only to bring a chair or sit on the bench, enjoy the fall air and pray. This is not an invitation to a 40-day commitment but rather an opportunity to join with others who believe that our countrys survival depends on Gods presence in the decisions that we as a nation make and in the life choices that we as His children choose. Through prayerful petition we can seek together both Gods blessing and his mercy on America and on our homes. Day One of Footsteps for Faith and Freedom is Thursday, Sept. 27, at Azalea Park at 7 p.m. Future prayer walks will take place at 7 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday and at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. Put the date on your calendar, tuck a bottle of water in your belt, and get ready to experience a wonderful hour with other Christians who know that now is the time to stand up and step out in our Faith. For additional information or for a ride contact your home church or footstepsforfaithnfreedom@ gmail.com.Footsteps for faith and freedomBy ETHEL SKIPPER Thought for the week: In the First Book of John it teaches us how to know God through Love. It reads, Beloved, let us love one another, for love is of God, and everyone that loveth is born of God, and knoweth God. He that loveth not knoweth not God, for God is love. In this was manifested the love of God toward us, because God sent his only begotten son into the world, that we might live through him. Herein is love, not that we loved God but that he loved us and sent his son to be propitiation for our sins. If God so loved us, we ought to love one another. No man has seen God at any time. If we love one another, God dwelleth in us, his love is perfected in us.Ž Jesus commanded his disciples to love one another just as he had loved them. Their love for one another would be the trademark characteristic that would identify them as his disciples. As children of God who is love, all believers naturally bear the characteristic of their Father. He is light-walking, practicing righteousness and abiding in Christ. If love is absent, there is no knowledge of God. Let us love one another and pray for our world that we live in. Our prayers are for those that are not saved, the sick and shut-in, the homeless, those in the nursing homes, hospitals, prisons. Let us pray for peace. We wish a happy birthday to Crystal Green, Mother Doris Mackey and Eddie Brannen Sr., from Mother Eva M. Johnson. The “ fth Sunday Union meeting of the Church of Christ Written in Heaven will be held in Panama City from Sept. 28 to Sept. 30 at Trinity Temple Church of Christ W.I.H. Union Director Andrew Morris. Beginning Oct. 9 and through Oct. 14, there will be a church celebration for Pastor Ethel M. Skipper to recognize 24 years of pastoring. There will be church each night, featuring choir singing, preaching and praising the Lord. You dont want to miss this occasion. Mount Olive No. 1 Church will be in service Friday night, Sept. 21, at 7 p.m. Guest will be Skipper Temple Church. Everyone is welcome. Host pastor Elder Donald Jefferson.Ethel Skipper is a longtime columnist for The Wakulla News.Love, for love is of GodWalks in support of faith begins on ursday, Sept. 27, at Azalea Park at 7 p.m.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 – Page 7AObituaries Daniel Lawrence Calhoun Capt. David Sams Gibbs Bernadette Parker Sue Calhoun Preacher James ‘Jimmy’ Darnell Smith William ‘Bill’ Boyd Stephens Sr.William BillŽ Boyd Stephens Sr., of Sopchoppy, passed away Monday, Sept. 10. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Bobbie Stephens. He was born in Thomas County, Ga., and had lived in Wakulla County since 1973 coming from Lakeland. He was retired from the City of Sopchoppy as a public water systems operator. He attended Lake Ellen Baptist Church. He was Past Master of Ashmore Masonic Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32308. Visitation for family and friends was held Wednesday, Sept. 12, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. Services were held Thursday, Sept. 13, at 3 p.m. at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. Burial followed at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. Survivors include four children, Brenda Villiard (Kevin) of Sopchoppy, Pamela Smith (Ronnie) of Joplin, Mo., William BillŽ B. Stephens Jr. (Sheila) of Crawfordville, and Michael D. Stephens (Deanna) of Jacksonville; two sisters, Betty Ann Smith of Medart and Faye Andrews (J.C.) of Tallahassee; a brother, Andy Jack Stephens (Sandy) of Coolidge, Ga.; 12 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville, is assisting with arrangements (850-926-3333) or www.bevisfh.com. Sue Calhoun Preacher, 73, passed away on Tuesday, Sept. 11, in Crawfordville. She was born Madrena Sue Calhoun in Campbell County, Va., on June 24, 1939 and had lived in Tallahassee since 1982. She was self-employed at Abacomp Accounting and Tax, with her daughter and business partner, since 1982. She retired from the State of Florida (Pharmacy Services) after 26 years. She had been an active member of Crawfordville United Methodist Church since 2009 and was a member of Eastern Star. She won awards for her paintings in Jacksonville. She wrote a column Lloyd NotesŽ for the Monticello News under the name Sue Gramling in the 1970s. Memorial services will be held on Saturday, Sept. 22, at 11 a.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Church in Crawfordville. The family requests no ” owers or plants. In lieu of ” owers, memorial donations may be made to Crawfordville United Methodist Church Outreach Ministries, 176 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville FL 32327. Survivors include her daughter, Rebecca M. Gramling of Tallahassee; sister-in-law, Lynette Calhoun of Tallahassee; nieces, Kimberly Bingham of Spokane, Wash., Wendy Calhoun of Tallahassee and Teresa Herrin of North Ft. Myers; and 10 great-nieces and six great-nephews. She was predeceased by her parents and her siblings. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville, is assisting with arrangements (850-926-3333) or www.bevisfh.com. Daniel Lawrence Calhoun, 69, died on Tuesday, Sept.11, in Crawfordville. He was born in Moccasin Gap, Va. He was a retired truck driver. Memorial services will be held on Saturday, Sept. 22, at 11 a.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Church in Crawfordville, FL. Survivors include his wife of 42 years, Lynnette Calhoun of Tallahassee; two daughters, Kim Bigham of Spokane, Wash., and Wendy Calhoun of Tallahassee; eight grandchildren and eight greatgrandchildren; and a niece, Rebecca Gramling of Tallahassee. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville, is assisting with arrangements (850926-3333) or www.bevisfh. com. Bernadette Helen Darling Parker, 80, of Sopchoppy, formerly of Charles City, Iowa, died Aug. 31 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital in Tallahassee. She was born May 9, 1932, in Greenwood, Wis., the daughter of Merrill and Helen (Johnson) Darling. Funeral services were held on Sept. 8 at Hauser Funeral Home in Charles City with burial at Riverside Cemetery in Charles City. Survivors include five children, Mavis (Cary) LaBounty of Sopchoppy, Fritz Parker of Charles City, Altha Morgan of Fort Worth, Texas, Clifford Parker Jr. of Charles City, and Dea Neve of Charles City; 16 grandchildren; 24 great-grandchildren; six great-great-grandchildren; and a sister, Marilyn (Gene) Putney of Barnum, Minn. She was predeceased by her parents; her husband, Clifford; a great granddaughter, Morgan Swartwood; special friend, Herman Putney Jr.; and son-in-law, Kevin Neve. James Jimmy Darnell Smith died on Wednesday, Sept. 12, in Eastpoint. He lived most of his life on St. George Island where he will be remembered for his artistic and musical talents. His marquetry (wood inlay) artwork is featured in many of the homes on the island. Survivors include one son, Shawn Christopher Smith of Eastpoint; a brother, Michael Smith of Crawfordville; three sisters, Patricia Davis of Crawfordville, Sharlene Posey of Kansas City, and Tina Langston (Daryl) of Sopchoppy; and numerous nephews and nieces. He was predeceased by his parents, Alsey May and Mary Ellen Smith of Crawfordville. The family would like to extend a special thanks to all his dedicated friends in Franklin and Wakulla counties for their support during his illness over the last nine years and for their calls concerning donations. They can be made to The Jimmy Smith Fund, C/O Centennial Bank, P.O. Box 610, Crawfordville FL 32326.William ‘Bill’ Boyd Stephens Sr. Sue Calhoun Preacher Daniel Lawrence Calhoun Bernadette Helen Darling Parker James ‘Jimmy’ Darnell SmithCapt. David Sams Gibbs, 69, of Panacea, died on July 29 at his home with family members and caregivers by his side. He was born July 6, 1943, to James Frank and Sara Sams Gibbs of Tifton, Ga. He spent his last years out as a boat captain “ shing the waters along Panaceas coast and inland rivers. Memorial Services will be held in Tifton at the First Baptist Church Chapel at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 22, and at Bayside Marina in Panacea on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 2 p.m. followed by a gathering of friends and family at the Panacea Moose Lodge. Memorials donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308, or www.bigbendhospice.org. Survivors include his sister Jane Sinclair (Jim) of Tifton; several nieces and nephews; special thanks to friends and caregivers, Sonny Lemire of Panacea and Marko Mills of Crawfordville; and Big Bend Hospice. He was predeceased by a brother, James JimŽ Gibbs.Capt. David Sams Gibbs Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! 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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsPamper your Pooch, an event held by CHAT of Wakulla, Inc., will be Saturday, Sept. 29 at Hudson Park. This year is a little different, as local candidates have been invited to help out at the event. Alan Brock, Jenny, Brock, Bobby Pearce, Charlie Creel, Donnie Sparkman, Emily Smith, Howard Kessler, Jim Parham, John Shuff, Kimball Thomas, Maurice Langston and Ralph Thomas have agreed to do the dirty work for CHAT. Two candidates will be scheduled each hour between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. CHAT volunteers will towel dry, apply all natural ” ea/tick treatment and take care of pawdicures. Also offered will be anal gland extraction and microchipping by Dr. Faith Hughes, of VCA Wakulla Animal Hospital; photo shoot and all natural baked doggy treats by Purrs and Waggs.CHAT event gets help from candidates Williams marries Amesha Brannen Rotary program will feature Ed Ball Special to The NewsWho was Ed BallŽ is the title of the program to be presented by historian Madeleine Carr at the Rotary Club of Wakulla County on Thursday, Sept. 21. The meeting will be held at noon at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center, 33 Michael Drive. Non-members can attend the program and enjoy lunch for $7. Learn about how pre-war and post-war Florida provided Ball an adventurous life. The program coincides with the 75th Anniversary of the Historic Wakulla Springs Lodge built by “ nancier Ball. Completed on September 25, 1937. For more information, contact Doug Jones at 9261177. happenings in our community Community Amesha Brannen of Sopchoppy and Reginald Williams of Crawfordville were married on Aug. 31 at 3 p.m. at Faith Healing & Anointing Temple by Pastor Bettye Lovett. The bride is the daughter of Eddie and Ethel Brannen. The groom is the son of Evelyn and Phillip House and Ben Williams. The couple had their honeymoon in Panama City Beach. The couple will live in Crawfordville. Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Williams, at right Special to The NewsIn spite of persistent downpours, more than 50 people attended the Blue Ribbon Reunion event on Sept. 8 at the Wakulla Democratic Party Headquarters. The event brought together many individuals who actively worked for the election of Barack Obama in 2008 and volunteers working on the presidents re-election campaign. A special memorial tribute was made to Ralph Lewis, one of the key organizers of the successful 2008 campaign, who passed away shortly after the election. David Roddenberry presented a plaque in his honor to members of his family and Ralphs grandson, Alexander Lewis spoke on behalf of the family. On Saturday, volunteers signed up to help at the headquarters and they also enjoyed a delicious meal of barbecue chicken, hot dogs, salad and dessert. The Wakulla Democratic Party Headquarters located in the North Pointe Center, 1626 Crawfordville Highway, Unit B, is open Monday through Friday from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. and on Saturday from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Call 745-6169 or come by for more information.Blue Ribbon event was well attended SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPeople in the attendance at the Blue Ribbon Reunion held by the Wakulla Democratic Party listen to a presentation honoring organizer Ralph Lewis. 100th birthday party for Eloise The family of Eloise Kemp Strickland would like to invite all her family and friends to her 100th Birthday Celebration on Saturday, Sept. 29 at the Historic Sopchoppy High School Gymnasium. The drop-in time is 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. No gifts please. Eloise Kemp Strickland, at left Email your community news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space is available. Jones and Fisher to wed this weekend Annie Bell Jones and Keith Fisher, both of Tallahassee, announce their upcoming wedding. She is the daughter of Maddie Parks and Kalvin Young of Tallahassee. He is the son of John and Christine Johnson of Crawfordville. The wedding will be Sept. 22 at 3 p.m. at the Retreat at Bradleys Pond. Annie Jones and Keith Fisher, at left I LIKEMIKEREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 C WAKULLA COUNTY VOTERS HAVE TWO CHOICES: 1. VOTE FOR MIKE STEWART, A MAN OF ACTION AND PROVEN PERFORMANCE, WHO STANDS UP FOR YOUR RIGHTS AND LOOKS FOR SOLUTIONS. 2. VOTE FOR HOWARD KESSLER A PERSON WHO I BELIEVE HAS A RECORD OF HIDING BEHIND THE NOŽ VOTE, INACTION AND OF BRINGING NOTHING TO THE TABLE AS A WORKABLE SOLUTION. ITS YOUR CHOICE... ƒ BUT I LIKE MIKE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3www.mikestewart2012.comPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MIKE STEWART, REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3facebook.com/ mike.stewart.3363 FREEto the PublicAny questions please contact our oce at 850-926-1033Featured Guest & Speaker:MR. BOBWILLIAMSONAuthor of Miracle on Luckie StreetRemarkable personal story From H omeless to Millionnaire...ŽNAMI WAKULLA(NATIONALALLIANCEONMENTALILLNESS)Cordially Invites You to Attend Date: Place: Time: Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief Support850-878-5310

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 – Page 9A2012 General Election Local Candidates SHERIFF Maurice Langston … REP Charlie Creel NPA PROPERTY APPRAISER Donnie Sparkman DEM Jim Parham NPA SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Robert BobbyŽ Pearce DEM Kimball KimŽ Thomas NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 Alan Brock DEM Ralph Thomas REP Jenny Brock NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 Mike Stewart REP Howard Kessler NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 5 Richard Harden REP John Shuff … DEM Emily T. Smith NPA2012 Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Political Forum Questions Form Questions will be screened and approved by the forum committee based on the following guidelines: 1. The question must be directed to all candidates for the speci“ c race. 2. The question must be concise and relevant to the current issues. Ask The Candidates Please complete the form below to submit your question to the candidates for their respective races. Deadline for submitting questions is Oct. 2. First Name ________________________________________________ Where do you live in Wakulla? ____________________________ Local race to which your question applies: (see list at left) ____________________________________________________________ What is your question for the candidates? ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Mail this form to: Wakulla Chamber Political Forum P. O. Box 148 Crawfordville FL 32326 education news SchoolSpecial to The NewsAs a part of its strategic planning process, Tallahassee Community College is organizing three listening session town halls to receive feedback from the community and shape its next strategic plan. A drawing for a $500 TCC scholarship will also take place at each town hall. The events are hosted by President Jim Murdaugh and will be held in each of the three counties in TCCs service district. In Wakulla County, it will be held on Oct. 10 from 6 to 7 p.m. at TCCs Wakulla Center, 2932 Crawfordville Highway At these events, TCC hopes to learn more about community members priorities, goals and hopes when it comes to higher education, workforce development and TCCs role in the community. The feedback from these events will be used to inform TCCs strategic plan,Ž said Dr. Murdaugh. We pride ourselves as an institution on listening to the community and aligning our priorities with those that we serve. Participation in these events by the Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla communities will help ensure that our strategic plan is not only relevant, but student-focused and forward-thinking.Ž Questions to be discussed at the town hall events include how TCC can better serve residents and partner with local businesses, what TCC can do to prepare students for the future and what TCC should prioritize to help achieve the greatest potential for the Big Bend region. For more information on the town hall events, or to provide comments on TCCs strategic planning process, contact the College at GreatIdeas@tcc.” .edu or (850) 2018632, or visit www.tcc.” .edu/ GreatIdeas. By DAVID ROYSE THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 14...Gov. Rick Scott will push lawmakers to avoid cutting the education budget this year, the governor said following a dinner with union of“ cials late Friday. And if theres enough money, hell again push for an increase. Scott, who championed the restoration of $1 billion to this years education budget after signing a 2011 budget that cut the same amount, told reporters that he promised union of“ cials with the Florida Education Association that he will call on lawmakers to at least hold the line on spending for schools. In our dinner tonight, I told the FEA that as we continue to develop our education agenda we are going to, at a minimum, sustain current state funding for education in the next budget and depending on the states economic outlook, aim to increase education funding where we can improve student outcomes.Ž Scott had dinner at the Governors Mansion Friday night with representatives of the union as the culmination of a week focused on education, during which the governor visited several schools. Our goal is to better prepare students for college and careers and our policies in the next budget and the next legislative session will be designed around that,Ž Scott said. The dinner was noteworthy because the teachers union and most state Republican leaders have not been very friendly over the last few years. In fact Scott signed legislation last year that put in place a merit pay system that the union opposed in a high pro“ le battle between the FEA and the GOP. Scotts promise to try to increase, or at least maintain current education spending, may put him at odds with his own party in the Legislature. Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville and the incoming Senate president, said earlier this week that he didnt see enough money in the outlook for incoming taxes to be thinking about boosting education spending. The $1 billion increase has proven popular, even if it was a restoration of earlier cuts. School districts have seen their overall budgets decreased signi“ cantly in the last several years. Scott will release his proposed budget in January and lawmakers will convene in the regular session in March.Scott will push to avoid education cutsTCC will hold a town hall meetingSpecial to The NewsFor orthopedic surgeon Sean Adelman … a father of three, including Dev, a highschool age daughter with Down syndrome … life lessons are not the exclusive province of the young. Adelman is the author of Sams Top Secret JournalŽ (www.raiseexpectations.com), a Nancy Drew-style childrens book series featuring a protagonist with Down syndrome. School and other social functions provide many “ rst worldly experiences that are important to developing students. And diversity is so important. Studies have shown that those with learning challenges bene“ t from inclusive educationŽ … a movement that integrates special-ed students with non-special-ed students … and so does the rest of the student body. € Empathic development: The best way to a better society is to have empathy for our fellow human beings. During the 1990s, inclusion of specialed students jumped from 48 percent to 70 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Education. € Diversity and the real world: Children who attend inclusive schools are better able to navigate the complexities of our diverse adult society. Students with and without special needs bene“ t from exposure to classmates who face different life circumstances. € The meaning of friendship: Children need to develop social skills and to know how to create and sustain meaningful friendships for a healthy adult life. Bene“ ts of inclusion with special ed students 5:30 pm Social Time • 6:00 pm Forum Wakuula County Senior Citizens Center 33 Michael Dr., Crawfordville Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce presents 2012 Candidates Forum Tuesday, October 9th, 2012At the SHERIFF Maurice Langston … REP Charlie Creel NPA PROPERTY APPRAISER Donnie Sparkman DEM Jim Parham NPA SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Robert BobbyŽ Pearce DEM Kimball KimŽ Thomas NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 Alan Brock DEM Ralph Thomas REP Jenny Brock NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 Mike Stewart REP Howard Kessler NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 5 Richard Harden REP John Shuff … DEM Emily T. Smith NPA Refreshments provided by Wakulla County Rotary Club Seating is limited SHERIFF Maurice Langston … REP Charlie Creel NPA PROPERTY APPRAISER Donnie Sparkman DEM Jim Parham NPA SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Robert BobbyŽ Pearce DEM Kimball KimŽ Thomas NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 Alan Brock DEM Ralph Thomas REP Jenny Brock NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 Mike Stewart REP Howard Kessler NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 5 Richard Harden REP John Shuff … DEM Emily T. Smith NPA The following candidates from local races have been invited to participate: The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Club’s2012 ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZAWildwood Country Club Thursday • October 11 • 2012 6:30pm Social 7:00pm Dinner, Auction, & Show please join us forBeall’s Maurice’s Way Out West Carroll’s Boot Country Crum’s Mini MallTICKETS $30.00 eachall proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County students

PAGE 10

Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsHere it is the middle of September and were getting ready to get into the fall “ shing pattern. The water will start cooling off on the flats and “ sh will start heading to the oyster bars and up the creeks and rivers. Hopefully the rains will stop before cold weather gets here because the trout just do not like fresh water. Anytime you “ nd them in the creeks and rivers the water has a high salinity level. Let it rain a lot and dump a lot of freshwater into the creeks and rivers and you can kiss the trout goodbye until early spring. I cant count the times Ive been catching trout in the rivers and creeks and go back after a heavy rain and nothing. JR at the Aucilla River said if trout are in the river and you get a fairly heavy rain, the tell-tale sign that the fish will be gone is leaves floating down the river. I was talking with JR today and he said “ shing wasnt real good though some “ sh are being caught. The water around the Aucilla and Econfina are still very black and he said the clearest water he has seen is over around Gray Mare Rock. One of these days hes probably gonna be on a reality TV show. He has started taking people bow hunting for alligators if they have a permit to harvest one. He has rigged his airboat with four big lights and going out at night it looks like daylight. If anybody knows the waters down there, he does. He said he knows most of the alligators down there by name. So far they have taken seven with a bow and “ ve were over 10 feet. The latest trip he had was this past weekend and a 14-year-old girl shot a 10foot 2-inch gator. JR said that gator would not be eating any more of his red“ sh. If you have a permit to harvest an alligator in Jefferson, Wakulla or Taylor counties, give JR a call at his store. The number there is (850) 584-4595. If hes not there hes out “ shing, hunting or looking for alligators. I talked with Capt. Randy Peart today and he said charters have been slow but he went to the Econ“ na last Saturday. He said despite the east wind that they managed to catch seven trout and two reds. He said he had to “ nd rockgrass to “ nd the trout. Capt. David Fife has been catching quite a few reds in the Spring Creek Oyster Bay area and also catching lots of big silver trout. Jeff May from Carrolton, Ga., was down this weekend and said they went out southeast of Shell Point in search of grouper and came back with seven nice grouper and lots of rock bass and pink mouth grunts. They had planned to “ sh on Monday but 5 to 7 foot seas kept them at the dock. I fished with Jeff and Doddie Dickman from Evansville, Ind., a week ago and we caught lots of trout and ” ounder the two days we “ shed. We managed a couple of nice reds and Jeff Landed a 6-pound trout, which was his largest ever. Everything was either caught on live shrimp or a Gulp. On Saturday I fished with Bryant Collin from Camilla, Ga., and his son and a friend. We ended the day with seven reds, 11 trout and three flounder. We probably caught 30 trout that were about 14.75-inches long. Everything was caught around the oyster bars around Shell Point and we couldnt “ nd anything on the ” ats. The Gulp and live shrimp caught everything. I take a lot of kids “ shing and have had them on my boat as young as 4, though I sure tried to talk her mother into leaving her at home because it was so cold. She was the only adult and there was no father involved. This was years ago and it was so cold and windy that I tried to talk her out of going at all. I could hear the three older kids when I was talking with her on the phone and they sounded like they were almost in tears when she told them we might not go. I told them to dress warm and I would give it my best, but dont be surprised if we dont catch anything. All of the kids caught fish and even the 4-year-old reeled in a big trout with the help of her mother. On Saturday the young man I took out “ shing was 10 and he caught his “ rst red“ sh. In fact he caught three and you would not believe how excited he got. The point of all of this is if you have a son or daughter take them “ shing. With all the electronic games that kids are hooked on, if we dont get the younger generation interested, years from now the boat ramps are gonna be empty. Remember to know your limits, be careful out there and take a kid “ shing. If you dont have a kid, take one of your friends kids “ shing. Good luck and good “ shing!Shifting into a fall shing pattern From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle G E T READY FOR HUN T IN G Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts • Color • F acial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • F lat T ops F eather Locks • Color • P erms • Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. c e H a i r S a l o n e H l o H a i a l o i r S a c e c e o n o o n Tues -S at 54 529 05 & t. . . . F STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO If Wakulla is to become greater it would be good to hire a property appraiser who has worked in and understands the dynamics of greater markets (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers … if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bar“eld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year. YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible. For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program. Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor ofƒ From FWC NewsThe 2012 recreational season for bay scallops, which was extended two weeks earlier this year, will close Tuesday, Sept. 25. The “ nal day of harvesting is Sept. 24. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) extended the season temporarily in 2010 and 2011 to help alleviate economic hardships caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The season was extended permanently in June 2012. This extension will help increase business opportunities during a time of the year when other “ sheries are closed and tourism has decreased. The 2012 season began July 1. Before the change, the season was set to end Sept. 11. Surveys will be conducted after the season closes to assess the scallop population. Bay scallops can be recreationally harvested in Gulf of Mexico state waters (shore to nine nautical miles) from the Pasco-Hernando County line northward to the west bank of the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County. The recreational bag limit is two gallons of whole bay scallops or one pint of meat per person, per day, with a vessel limit of 10 gallons of whole bay scallops or a half-gallon of meat. There is no commercial harvest for bay scallops in Florida state waters. Scallop harvesters can assist the FWCs scallop researchers by completing an online survey at http://svy. mk/bayscallops, indicating where they harvest scallops, how many they collect and how long it takes to harvest them. FWC staff and some vendors in harvest areas also distribute postage-paid survey cards that collect similar data. Participants can email BayScallops@MyFWC.com to ask questions or send additional information. Harvesters are asked to submit all information for the 2012 season by Oct. 31. Visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater,Ž Recreational RegulationsŽ and Bay ScallopsŽ to learn more.Scallop season closes Sept. 25

PAGE 11

As most of you have read before, Flotilla 12 is part of a larger Division running from the Econ“ na River all the way to Pensacola. Division 1 is part of the eighth Coastal Region District. This runs from New Mexico to parts of Florida and Georgia. Within our Flotilla, we have members who have served on both division and district staff as well as elected of“ ces. Last week the eighth Coastal Region held its SEPTRAIN fall training and meeting in Dallas. Two of our members, Chuck Hickman and Duane Treadon, attended the meeting. Duane sent in this report. As the Districts Program Visitor (PV) Staff Officer Chuck Hickman is responsible for overseeing the Auxiliarys PV program from New Mexico to St. Marks. Members involved in PV provide ” yers and brochures about safe boating to the public at various retail and government locations throughout their areas. This free material promotes one of the key components of the Auxiliarys mission, Recreational Boating Safety or RBS. You may have seen displays from Flotilla 12 in locations around our area. If you are interested in setting up your location as a PV site contact our local PV staff of“ cer Mike Harrison at FSO-PV@uscgaux.net As division Communication Service (CS) Of“ cer Duane Treadon was asked to attend a special offering of the Coast Guards AUX-4 class. CS of“ cers have many duties but one of their larger duties is website and social media development for their ” otillas. AUX-4 is a class dedicated to teaching students how to utilize the Auxiliarys WOW II website development platform. This training is such an important tool for ” otillas since all of the CS of“ cers are volunteers and may not have the skills to build and maintain a website. As part of a National effort within the Auxiliary to make all webpages look similar, be on the look out for changes in our page (www.uscgaux.net). During the business meeting of the District Board and Staff, our Division Commander Mo Davis was elected as the new District Captain East. Bravo Zulu Mo! What an honor to have one of our own represent us again in such a prestigious position. We have also had Jeff Brooks from our division and Rich Rasmussen from our ” otilla in that position. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident … Challenge yourself to learn something new about boating safety so that you are ready when the challenges arise. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMo Davis and Jeff Brooks.FWC Law Enforcement operations Winter Storage. The winter brings cooler and rougher ocean water that often lessens diver enthusiasm. If you want to continue diving during the winter, the caverns of North Florida from Morrison Springs and Jackson Blue to our west, Orange Grove, Peacock, Troy and Ginnie to our east and Divers Den and Blue Grotto to our south make for wonderful dives (as long as you are Cavern quali“ ed). Their waters are usually clear and constant temperature year around. The drive time is between one and two hours. Those who can, travel to warm dive destinations in the winter. When winter interest step up such as hunting, school and football, our diving equipment is forgotten. How should we store it and where? Proper storage now can save money and needless delays next spring. So gather up your dive equipment and lets get started. Many folks take their regulator in for its annual inspection before storage, others in the spring before use. Cylinders need to be stored full of breathing gas, or completely empty and open. A partially “ lled aluminum cylinder stored in a closet becomes a bomb when your house burns down. Recall you basic physics: you can expect a 5 psi increase in pressure for every 1 degree increase in ambient temperature. A full cylinder at 3000 psi will pop its safety burst disc before the cylinder melts down and relieve the pressure of the cylinder. A half-“ lled cylinder will not, resulting in a failure to contain the gas and a sudden explosive rupture. Shrapnel from the cylinder wall will cause further damage and possible injury. Now is the time to inspect the dates for testing and schedule any tests before you need to use your cylinders. We are often asked to “ ll out of hydro or VIP cylinders in the spring, causing further unwanted delays. Store your cylinders standing up with some type of restraint to keep them from falling over. Cylinders may be tied to a wall or closet using an eye bolt and some 1/4 inch line from the bolt and around the valve. Steel round bottom cylinders need a boot to be more stable standing up. I am certain you rinse your equipment after each dive. But now you should soak all of it. Fill your BC with fresh water and submerge it in a tub of fresh water overnight. Be sure to seal the “ rst stage of your regulator (dust cap) before submerging the entire regulator in with the BC. Yes, toss in your “ ns, mask, snorkel, gloves, speargun, dive gear bag and wet suit as well. You need to soak out the salts before a long storage. The next day, remove the equipment from the tub and drain the BC, hang everything out to dry in the shade, and in” ate the BC with dry air from your tank. Once dry, your rubber parts can be lightly powdered with talcum, a natural preservative. I do not recommend dumping talcum into the snorkel or the second stage of the regulator however. If you forget to clean it out next spring, breathing talcum is unpleasant. Roll or fold up your wet suit (do not hang it on a wire hanger!) and store it on a shelf away from any motors or gas furnace as ozone generated by these devices will destroy the rubber. Hang your BC in the same closet on a strong hanger or one that is designed for dive equipment. Your regulator can be coiled up on a shelf or attached to the special BC hanger that has clips for the regulator. Much of the rest of your equipment can go back into your gear bag, now that it has dried, and stored on yet another shelf. When the soft spring breeze beckons you to dive again, you will “ nd your dive equipment ready to reliably serve your underwater needs once again. This report represents some events the FWC handled over Aug. 31 to Sept. 7, but does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. ESCAMBIA COUNTY: Officer Matt Cushing checked individuals “ shing from a vessel near the Pensacola Pass. While speaking to them, Of“ cer Cushing learned a third subject was scuba diving but observed there was no divers down ” ag displayed. Of“ cer Cushing waited in the area for the diver to surface. When the diver surfaced, Of“ cer Cushing found the subject to be in possession of an undersized gag grouper. Citations were issued for the two violations. WALTON COUNTY: Of“ cers Randall Brooks and Ken White responded to Santa Rosa Beach to assist a dolphin rescue team with a beached whale. The rescue team transported the whale to Gulf World in Panama City for treatment. BAY COUNTY: Officer Mike Nobles was checking “ shermen when he found one to be nervous and very evasive during conversation. Of“ cer Nobles determined that the “ sherman had outstanding warrants as a felony traf“ c offender. The subject was arrested and transported to the Bay County Jail. € Lt. Jay Chesser, and Officers Neal Goss and Mike Nobles responded to a boating accident on Deer Point Lake involving two personal watercrafts (PWCs) that collided head on. Both operators were transported to local trauma centers. Of“ cers assisted in transporting the injured to shore, securing and recovering the damaged vessels, and working the crime scene gathering statements and other information. The investigation is ongoing. P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday p Thu Sep 20, 12 Fri Sep 21, 12 Sat Sep 22, 12 Sun Sep 23, 12 Mon Sep 24, 12 Tue Sep 25, 12 Wed Sep 26, 12 Date 4.2 ft. 4:45 AM 4.0 ft. 5:24 AM 3.2 ft. 12:20 AM High -0.0 ft. 11:57 AM 0.2 ft. 12:58 PM 1.9 ft. 12:12 AM 2.1 ft. 1:15 AM 2.1 ft. 2:53 AM 1.9 ft. 4:42 AM 1.5 ft. 6:00 AM Low 3.3 ft. 6:21 PM 3.0 ft. 7:25 PM 3.8 ft. 6:13 AM 3.5 ft. 7:26 AM 3.3 ft. 9:27 AM 3.4 ft. 11:15 AM 3.6 ft. 12:25 PM High 1.6 ft. 11:27 PM 0.5 ft. 2:14 PM 0.6 ft. 3:41 PM 0.7 ft. 5:01 PM 0.7 ft. 6:04 PM 0.7 ft. 6:53 PM Low 2.8 ft. 8:48 PM 2.8 ft. 10:20 PM 2.9 ft. 11:31 PM High Thu Sep 20, 12 Fri Sep 21, 12 Sat Sep 22, 12 Sun Sep 23, 12 Mon Sep 24, 12 Tue Sep 25, 12 Wed Sep 26, 12 Date 4.3 ft. 4:42 AM 4.1 ft. 5:21 AM 3.2 ft. 12:17 AM High -0.0 ft. 11:54 AM 0.2 ft. 12:55 PM 2.0 ft. 12:09 AM 2.2 ft. 1:12 AM 2.3 ft. 2:50 AM 2.0 ft. 4:39 AM 1.6 ft. 5:57 AM Low 3.4 ft. 6:18 PM 3.1 ft. 7:22 PM 3.9 ft. 6:10 AM 3.6 ft. 7:23 AM 3.4 ft. 9:24 AM 3.5 ft. 11:12 AM 3.7 ft. 12:22 PM High 1.8 ft. 11:24 PM 0.5 ft. 2:11 PM 0.7 ft. 3:38 PM 0.7 ft. 4:58 PM 0.7 ft. 6:01 PM 0.7 ft. 6:50 PM Low 2.8 ft. 8:45 PM 2.8 ft. 10:17 PM 3.0 ft. 11:28 PM High Thu Sep 20, 12 Fri Sep 21, 12 Sat Sep 22, 12 Sun Sep 23, 12 Mon Sep 24, 12 Tue Sep 25, 12 Wed Se p 26, 12 Date 3.9 ft. 5:21 AM 2.7 ft. 12:07 AM 2.9 ft. 12:56 AM High -0.0 ft. 1:01 PM 1.5 ft. 12:31 AM 1.7 ft. 1:16 AM 1.9 ft. 2:19 AM 1.9 ft. 3:57 AM 1.7 ft. 5:46 AM 1.4 ft. 7:04 AM Low 3.1 ft. 6:57 PM 3.8 ft. 6:00 AM 3.5 ft. 6:49 AM 3.3 ft. 8:02 AM 3.1 ft. 10:03 AM 3.2 ft. 11:51 AM 3.4 ft. 1:01 PM High 0.2 ft. 2:02 PM 0.4 ft. 3:18 PM 0.6 ft. 4:45 PM 0.6 ft. 6:05 PM 0.6 ft. 7:08 PM 0.6 ft. 7:57 PM Low 2.8 ft. 8:01 PM 2.6 ft. 9:24 PM 2.6 ft. 10:56 PM High Thu Sep 20, 12 Fri Sep 21, 12 Sat Sep 22, 12 Sun Sep 23, 12 Mon Sep 24, 12 Tue Sep 25, 12 Wed Sep 26, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 4:37 AM 3.0 ft. 5:16 AM 2.4 ft. 12:12 AM High -0.0 ft. 12:08 PM 0.2 ft. 1:09 PM 1.4 ft. 12:23 AM 1.5 ft. 1:26 AM 1.5 ft. 3:04 AM 1.4 ft. 4:53 AM 1.1 ft. 6:11 AM Low 2.5 ft. 6:13 PM 2.3 ft. 7:17 PM 2.9 ft. 6:05 AM 2.6 ft. 7:18 AM 2.5 ft. 9:19 AM 2.6 ft. 11:07 AM 2.7 ft. 12:17 PM High 1.2 ft. 11:38 PM 0.4 ft. 2:25 PM 0.5 ft. 3:52 PM 0.5 ft. 5:12 PM 0.5 ft. 6:15 PM 0.5 ft. 7:04 PM Low 2.1 ft. 8:40 PM 2.1 ft. 10:12 PM 2.2 ft. 11:23 PM High Thu Sep 20, 12 Fri Sep 21, 12 Sat Sep 22, 12 Sun Sep 23, 12 Mon Sep 24, 12 Tue Sep 25, 12 Wed Sep 26, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 4:29 AM 3.2 ft. 5:08 AM 3.0 ft. 5:57 AM 2.5 ft. 12:04 AM High -0.0 ft. 11:36 AM 0.2 ft. 12:37 PM 0.5 ft. 1:53 PM 2.0 ft. 12:54 AM 2.1 ft. 2:32 AM 1.9 ft. 4:21 AM 1.5 ft. 5:39 AM Low 2.6 ft. 6:05 PM 2.3 ft. 7:09 PM 2.2 ft. 8:32 PM 2.7 ft. 7:10 AM 2.6 ft. 9:11 AM 2.7 ft. 10:59 AM 2.8 ft. 12:09 PM High 1.6 ft. 11:06 PM 1.8 ft. 11:51 PM 0.6 ft. 3:20 PM 0.7 ft. 4:40 PM 0.7 ft. 5:43 PM 0.7 ft. 6:32 PM Low 2.2 ft. 10:04 PM 2.3 ft. 11:15 PM High Thu Sep 20, 12 Fri Sep 21, 12 Sat Sep 22, 12 Sun Sep 23, 12 Mon Sep 24, 12 Tue Sep 25, 12 Wed Sep 26, 12 Date 3.5 ft. 4:17 AM 3.5 ft. 4:57 AM 3.4 ft. 5:48 AM 2.6 ft. 12:05 AM 2.7 ft. 12:36 AM 2.7 ft. 1:01 AM High 0.4 ft. 11:28 AM 0.4 ft. 12:46 PM 0.5 ft. 2:16 PM 2.1 ft. 12:21 AM 2.0 ft. 2:42 AM 1.8 ft. 4:20 AM 1.5 ft. 5:28 AM Low 2.7 ft. 7:36 PM 2.6 ft. 9:18 PM 2.6 ft. 11:11 PM 3.2 ft. 6:54 AM 3.0 ft. 8:24 AM 3.0 ft. 10:11 AM 3.0 ft. 11:47 AM High 2.0 ft. 10:28 PM 2.0 ft. 11:04 PM 0.5 ft. 3:39 PM 0.5 ft. 4:47 PM 0.6 ft. 5:42 PM 0.7 ft. 6:28 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 20 Sept. 26First Sept. 22 Full Sept. 29 Last Oct. 7 New Oct. 15Major Times 5:12 AM 7:12 AM 5:41 PM 7:41 PM Minor Times 12:16 PM 1:16 PM 11:02 PM 12:02 AM Major Times 6:11 AM 8:11 AM 6:41 PM 8:41 PM Minor Times --:---:-1:20 PM 2:20 PM Major Times 7:10 AM 9:10 AM 7:39 PM 9:39 PM Minor Times 12:00 AM 1:00 AM 2:17 PM 3:17 PM Major Times 8:08 AM 10:08 AM 8:36 PM 10:36 PM Minor Times 1:01 AM 2:01 AM 3:10 PM 4:10 PM Major Times 9:03 AM 11:03 AM 9:29 PM 11:29 PM Minor Times 2:03 AM 3:03 AM 3:56 PM 4:56 PM Major Times 9:55 AM 11:55 AM 10:20 PM 12:20 AM Minor Times 3:05 AM 4:05 AM 4:38 PM 5:38 PM Major Times 10:45 AM 12:45 PM 11:08 PM 1:08 AM Minor Times 4:05 AM 5:05 AM 5:16 PM 6:16 PM Average Average Average Average+ Average Average Average7:24 am 7:35 pm 12:17 pm 11:03 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:25 am 7:34 pm 1:20 pm --:-7:25 am 7:33 pm 2:18 pm 12:01 am 7:26 am 7:31 pm 3:10 pm 1:02 am 7:26 am 7:30 pm 3:57 pm 2:04 am 7:27 am 7:29 pm 4:39 pm 3:06 am 7:28 am 7:28 pm 5:17 pm 4:06 am31% 39% 46% 54% 61% 68% 75% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com & Red Clay Footprints By John RobertsA morsel of genuine history is a thing so rare as to be always valuableŽ … Thomas Jefferson In my spare time I try to help out at the Wakulla County Historical Society Museum by volunteering, as needed, to work at the Museum located at 24 High Street (the old jail), in Crawfordville. Now and then, something kind of unusual happens there, and such was the case on July 27, when a gentleman, Clint Stalcup, dropped by with a piece of wood in his hand which he said he would like to donate to the museum. He said the piece of wood was from Cripple Creek, Colo. Cal Jamison, the museum director, was visiting at the time and we both silently wondered what on earth we may do with a piece of wood from Colorado. Stalcup explained right away that the hollowed out cylindrical shaped artifact had connections to North Florida. He explained that Cripple Creek was a mining town in the late 1800s and the artifact was a portion of water pipe which had been laid down underground in about 1894. He added that he was with the crew that dug up the wooden pipe, and was thereby able to cut off a small section of it. He said the pipe was in sections, 8 feet in length and secured together by non-metallic straps. The wood showed no sign of decay after having been in the ground until it was dug up in 2006 (112 years). Stalcup said a ledger at Cripple Creek disclosed the wood was cypress and originated from a company in North FloridaŽ and was shipped to Colorado in 1894. We were happy to accept this artifact and Jamison took measurements of it which were 7.5 inches high, outside diameter, 7 inches, and inside diameter, 4 inches. Photographs were taken and one is included here. Note that the center of the pipe was hollowed out perfectly and a shallow groove was observed at the bottom where the water had flowed for so many years. Who would guess that our wonderful cypress wood could serve as a water pipe for all those years without having to be repaired or replaced? No wonder cypress is often called The wood eternal.Ž Aboard the USS Fremont at the 1968 Republican Convention in Miami Beach, Aug. 5…8, 1968 I know most of you folks have been saturated with non-stop politics, I certainly am, but if you will stay with me here, I want to tell you something you all probably never knew about the Republican Convention of 1968. I want to tell you about my experiences at that convention, and in particular the role the USS Fremont (AKA-44) had in it. Now, before I go into detail, a little about the Fremont. She was a special ship, a real veteran of World War II. The ship was an Attack Transport, launched at Pascagoula, Miss., on March 31, 1943, 492 feet long, 69 feet beam, with a crew of 369 enlisted and 25 of“ cers. The Fremont had berthing spaces for 1,200 U.S. Marines and, during the war, took them to combat on the Paci“ c beaches at Saipan, Peleliu, Leyte, Linguyan Gulf and Iwo Jima. The Fremont placed her 21 assault boats in the water in as little time as 19 minutes, and earned the coveted Amphibious Assault Award for 13 consecutive years … the only ship in the Navy to accomplish that feat. A “ ne classic movie starring Jeff Chandler, Away All Boats,Ž portrayed the wartime exploits of an Attack Transport ship such as the Fremont. The ship was decommissioned in 1969. During the planning stages for the 1968 Republican Convention, the U.S. Navy stepped up to assist the U.S. Secret Service with a plan to solve the berthing and feeding of their personnel and other support agencies who would provide security for the Convention to be held at Miami Beach from Aug. 5 through Aug. 8. I dont know if the “ gures are correct, but my research disclosed security personnel, to include Army explosives specialists, numbered about 200. With accommodations at local hotels at Miami Beach and vicinity very dif“ cult to obtain, the assistance offered by the Navy seemed to be a real blessing, and the plan was put into effect. The USS Fremont was tasked to provide that assistance. Because of the large task at hand, the Secret Service reached out to other agencies to provide assistance, including the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS). I was then an NCIS Special Agent assigned to the local of“ ce in Key West. I was detailed to report to Miami Beach on July 28, 1968, and report to the Secret Service for duty. I was told lodging would be provided by the USS Fremont which would be berthed at Miami Beach. Fortunately, I still have a copy of my personal log which I kept during my duties there with which to refresh my memory. I recall how fortunate I thought I was to have my accommodations aboard ship at Miami Beach. I was to be in for a very big surprise. From my personal log: Departed Key West, Fla., 1500 (3 p.m.), 28 July, arrived aboard USS FREMONT, 1900 (7 p.m.), 28 July 1968.Ž Now for my big surprise: No one had told me the Fremont was to be a ” oating hotelŽ for the Secret Service and others in support. As I checked aboard on the quarterdeck of the Fremont, I properly identi“ ed myself with credentials and told the of“ cer of the deck that I understood I had a berthing space on board (I was thinking an officers stateroom). The messenger of the watch told me to accompany him and we began walking forward on the ship. I told the young man there must be some mistake as we were going in the direction of the Troop SpacesŽ on the Fremont. He said there was no mistake. You folks are berthing down there.Ž As a former enlisted tin can (destroyer) sailor, I am not too proud to sleep anywhere on a ship, but keep in mind, I was armed with a .357 magnum pistol, carrying ammunition, my credentials, handcuffs and badge. We were required to wear proper attire at all times, which meant starched shirts and clean, pressed suits and ties. Maybe some of you who served in the old Army or Marine Corps went to war on those transports and can visualize the predicament all of us were in. To top it off, for the “ rst couple of days and nights, the air conditioning was inoperative in the berthing compartment. Imagine the heat below decks at Miami Beach in the summertime. I am not exaggerating when I tell you there was fog down there and I could swear it even rained on us a few times! The humidity was so high that all our clothes were damp when we put them on. It was very dif“ cult, but by showering several times a day and sleeping with our firearms, credentials, wallets, etc., under our very thin mattresses, we made it. Early on, nearly all of the Secret Service agents and others began to abandon ship and found accommodations elsewhere. There were several NCIS agents aboard and we had the same idea in mind, but understandably were ordered to remain on board since it would have been an insult to the Navy if we, too, left the ship. After all, the captain and crew were doing the best they could, and they did very well under the circumstances. From my log, I can tell you my duties with the Secret Service were good ones. I initially worked general surveillance at the Fontainebleau Hotel for three days for Harold Stassen and Ronald Reagan. I worked from Aug 4 through the Aug. 8 at a remote television monitor from the Secret Service Command Trailer with which I could scan the crowd on the ” oor of the convention for any suspicious or unusual activity. It was a nice sit down jobŽ and the trailer was air conditioned and comfortable. I remember that Richard Nixon was nominated for president and Spiro Agnew for vice president. From my log, 9 August 1968 … Secured. Departed Miami, Fla. At 1130 (11:30 a.m.), arrived Key West, Fla. at 1500 (3pm).Ž All in all, I enjoyed my work at Miami and would not have wanted to miss it for anything. I even look back fondly on my short stint aboard a very “ ne and famous ship, the USS Fremont, and am proud of our Navy for doing its best to support the American people and their Republican Convention.A water pipe of cypress at the museum from Colorado SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe section of wooden water pipe that arrived at the historical museum that had been used underground in Colorado for more than 100 years. The wood is North Florida cypress. The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews. com F o r l o c a l For local n e w s news a n d and p h o t o s photos v i s i t u s visit us o n l i n e online w w w T h e W a k u l l a N e w s c o m www.TheWakullaNews.com

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 – Page 13AThe Sopchoppy Opry and Southbound Band welcomes Swiftwater with members Mary Catherine Smith-Jacobs, Larry Strickland, Sharlyn Marie Smith and Wretha and Al Webb. The group will appear on Saturday, Sept. 29 at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium for an evening of classic country, bluegrass and gospel music. Swiftwater, known for beautiful voices and tight harmony, fuse classic country with bluegrass for a unique traditional-plus sound. Call 962-3711 for tickets. ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSwiftwater at the OprySpecial to The NewsPosh Java will be hosting a concert by Belmont & Jones (Charlie Engstrom and Carrie Hamby), on Saturday, Sept. 29, at 8 p.m. Original music and blues from the wellŽ of deep country. This is not urbanized or electrified blues, but traditional music that has virtually slipped into oblivion. In” uenced by 1920s and 30s style blues artists Ma Rainey, Memphis Minney, Charlie Patton, Son House and Skip James, Belmont & Jones keeps it pure and simple: usually two guitars and one vocalist. Nationally touring blues artist Bill Shef“ eld recently said about Belmont & Jones, I could listen to these guys all night.Ž Carrie Hamby resides in Tallahassee and Charlie Engstrom in New Orleans, but spends quite a bit of time in Tallahassee. Both are seasoned musicians and songwriters in many styles of music, and this show will take us back in time to when the blues were pure and simple, and soulfully true. Listen to Belmont & Jones on Youtube to hear this duo perform. Cover is $10. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Posh is located on the corner of Rose Street and Winthrop Avenue in downtown Sopchoppy. UPCOMING SHOWS Lis and Lon Williams will return to Posh Java on Saturday, Oct. 6, at 8 p.m. Lis plays rhythm guitar and banjo as well as sings lead and harmony vocals. Her guitar style adds a percussive quality to some of the tunes. Lons smooth style on the upright bass provides a grounding force, and his honest vocal style adds to their original music. Janet Goodman, Music News Nashville, describes the Williamsons music as resonating vintage charm, somewhere between 1930s movie musicals and folk/bluegrass fare, where melodies are everything.Ž Check out reviews and listen to the Williamsons by visiting www.elisabethwilliamson.com, www.gatorbonerecords.com or by going to youtube. Tickets are $10. Local singer/ songwriter Rick Ott will perform on Saturday, Oct. 13, at 8 p.m. Original music and popular covers. Rock n roll, Americana, country, folk and gospel influences. Visit www.reverbnation.com/ rickott. Tickets are $10. David Olney internationally acclaimed singer/songwriter, with Nashville-based guitarist Sergio Webb are back by popular demand on Friday, Oct. 19, at 8 p.m. Sold out in the past, these two performers are truly memorable. Olneys intelligent compositions radiate the intensity that has earned him a place as one of the most respected singer-songwriters in the world today. His style encompasses bluesy rock n roll, honkey tonk, beautiful love songs, and Americana Music at its best. Visit www. davidolney.us. Reservations for this concert are $15 per person. Nikki Talley will perform at Posh Java on Saturday, October 20, at 8 p.m. Talley is an energetic mountain girl with a big voice. She is one half of a full-time touring husband and wife duo based out of Asheville, N.C., contributing acoustic guitar, claw hammer banjo and trademark stunning vocals. Husband, Jason Sharp, will accompany her on “ nger style and ” at picking guitar, as well as bass. Talley offers a “ ery stage performance, hauntingly seductive and raw gritty lyrics, lifted by a voice that harkens back to her Appalachian roots, and shores up on the edges of contemporary country, folk and old time. www.nikkitalley.com. Tickets are $10. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com. Blues duo Belmont & Jones slated to appear at Posh Java TCC to hold open house for Dali exhibitTallahassee Community College is hosting an open house event at its main Tallahassee campus on Thursday, Sept. 20 from 4 to 7 p.m. to celebrate the arrival of the Dal on Tour exhibition. Dal on Tour is a collection of photographic reproductions of Spanish surrealist Salvador Dal’s work. The open house and exhibition will take place on the rst oor of the library on TCC’s main campus. “This is a great opportunity to experience the work of one of the 20th century’s most famous and in uential artists,” said Deborah Robinson, director of Library Services. “We’re thrilled that we could work with the Dal Museum to share this collection with our students and the community.” Dal on Tour features reproductions of some of Dal’s most famous paintings, including The Discovery of America by Christopher Columbus, The Ghost of Vermeer of Delft Which Can Be Used as a Table and Geopoliticus Child Watching the Birth of the New Man. The open house will include remarks by TCC faculty member Jen Robinson. The collection will be on display in the library until Nov. 15. It was brought to TCC by Library Services, Rosalinda Wright and the Global Gateway program. For more information on cultural events happening at TCC’s Library, contact Karen Doster at 850-201-6194 or dosterk@tcc. .edu. Gadsden Arts to host local authorsMeet area authors at the Gadsden Arts Center’s rst Local Authors Showcase on Thursday, Sept. 27 beginning at 3:30 p.m. It’s free. Authors will read excerpts from their work and sign books. The featured local authors include Rhett DeVane, Felicia Thomas, Terry Lewis, Regina N. Lewis, Doug Alderson, Carol Hair Moore, Elton Patterson and Margena B. Myrick. While you’re at Gadsden Arts, see the four newest exhibitions: Inside/Out: Beth Appleton assemblages and Deborah LaGrasse sculpture; Bound and Unfettered: works by Ben Bivins; Tallahassee Watercolor Society Brush Strokes Exhibit, and Gadsden Arts Center Artists Guild. These exhibitions run until Nov. 3. The Gadsden Arts Center is located on Quincy’s historic Courthouse Square at 13 N. Madison St. For more information, call (850) 875-4866 or www.gadsdenarts.orgon. Arts briefs SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBelmont & Jones are scheduled to appear at Posh. 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 $14,214,813 $42,901,664 Friday f September 28 6:30pm 9:30pm 4679 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FLwww.EdenSpringsRehab.comEden Springs Nursing and Rehab( 850 ) 926-7181u Private Rehab Suites tu Physical Therapy t u Stroke Specialist tCome by for a tour and see our facility and services!REHABƒRECOVERƒENJOY LIFE! Everyone is invited to attend theThird Annual Senior PromLuau! A Well-Kept Secret Where Youll Experience The Personal TouchŽ. For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & Exterior Together We Are Providing Employment for Local Craftsman FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn Sept. 9, an employee at Hardees in Crawfordville reported a disorderly conduct involving a customer. The customer became upset with the employee and threw sausage gravy on the drive-through window. Lt. Jimmy Sessor collected the tag number from the suspect vehicle and went to the suspects home. Warren Roth, 47, of Crawfordville was issued a notice to appear in court for disorderly conduct. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce this week: SEPTEMBER 6 € Beth Paternita of Panacea reported a traf“ c crash on Surf Road. The victim was visiting a friend when she discovered damage to her vehicle. Damage was estimated at $2,000. A person of interest was identi“ ed. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated some illegal dumping on Ridgeway Court in Crawfordville. A concerned citizen contacted the sheriffs office about an area littered with debris that was 100 feet long and 30 feet wide. The debris in the area included a mattress, television, shelves and other miscellaneous items. The citizen told the deputy that the home was in foreclosure and items were recently removed from the home and left outside. The litter control unit was noti“ ed to be prepared to remove the debris if necessary. € Erica Bunch of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Two unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank account. The transactions totaled $60 with additional charges pending. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € Keri Copeland of Panacea reported a grand theft in St. Marks. A cast iron wood burning stove, valued at $500, was removed from the victims property. The suspect vehicle used to transport the stove was discovered at an area convenience store and two suspects were identi“ ed. Deputy Nick Gray interviewed the suspects who returned the stove to the victim. Due to the stove being returned, the victim decided not to press charges. SEPTEMBER 7 € Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a grand theft. Three black females left the store with a shopping cart full of merchandise and failed to pay for the items. The three women got into a vehicle in the parking lot and left the area at a high rate of speed northbound on U.S. Highway 319. The value of the stolen property was estimated at $1,500. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € Travoris McWhite of Crawfordville reported the fraudulent use of a credit card. Two transactions were observed for $171 in Mission and Pharr, Texas. Contact will be made with law enforcement in the Texas communities to pursue an investigation there. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. € Ruby Gilyard of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Suspects picked up medications that did not belong to them. Deputy Cole Wells and Reserve Deputy Roy Gunnarsson investigated and identi“ ed the suspects. The victim decided not to pursue criminal charges when the medications were returned. € Nathaniel Rawls of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of $480 worth of household items including a mattress, sheets and electronics. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Damage to the residence was estimated at $70. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. € William Middleton of Tallahassee reported the theft of a marine battery from St. Marks. The battery is valued at $50. The battery was stolen while the victim was at the Lighthouse Road boat ramp. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. SEPTEMBER 8 € William Benton of Metcalf, Ga., reported a vehicle theft from Shell Point. The vehicle and contents are valued at $25,000 and a suspect was identi“ ed. The Thomas County Sheriffs Of“ ce in Georgia reported recovering the abandoned vehicle in their jurisdiction. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € Kaitlien Salem of Crawfordville reported the theft of jewelry from her mailbox. Contents of her mail were missing from her mailbox. The value of the stolen property was $20 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. The victim planned to share the information with the U.S. Postal Service as well. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. SEPTEMBER 9 € Howard Dale Britt, 55, of Crawfordville was stopped by Detective Matt Helms for an inoperable headlight. Britt did not have a valid driver license due to it being suspended in 2009. Britt was arrested for operating a motor vehicle while license is suspended or revoked with knowledge. SEPTEMBER 10 € Tamara Ingram of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone shattered her vehicle window at her home. Damage was estimated at $100. A person of interest has been identi“ ed. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. SEPTEMBER 11 € Linda Fruggiero of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported the unauthorized removal of funds from her bank account. The victim reported the loss of $826. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. € Alan Dale Brown, 48, of Crawfordville was arrested and charged with battery by a person detained in a jail facility following an altercation with a 21-year-old inmate in one of the jail dorm pods. The altercation began over the noise level in the dorm pod. Brown was observed striking the victim in the ear with a closed “ st creating a minor injury to the victim. The victim was treated by the jail medical staff. Detention Deputy Richard Moon investigated along with Deputy Alan Middlebrooks, Deputy Chris Grif“ n and Deputy Jeff Carroll. € Emily Winston of The Inn at Wildwood reported a grand theft. A suspect left the hotel without paying for a four-night stay. The suspect has been identi“ ed. She owes the Inn $306. Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Rachel Capps of Crawfordville reported a fraudulent use of a Social Security number. The victim discovered that a suspect in western Florida had used her Social Security number to open a bank account. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Two juveniles were involved in a traf“ c crash at Wakulla High School. The vehicles were traveling toward the sports complex parking spaces when the “ rst vehicle made a wide right turn to pull into a parking space. The second vehicle was behind the “ rst and attempted to pass on the right side of the “ rst vehicle and was struck. One driver made an improper turn without using a turn signal and the other driver improperly passed on the right. Both vehicles were towed due to their damage. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. SEPTEMBER 12 € The Wal-Mart Asset Protection Team reported a retail theft. Curtiss Lesvan Diggs, 50, of Tallahassee was allegedly observed taking items from the hardware section and concealing them inside his clothing. Asset Protection stopped the suspect after he passed the last point of sale. The items were recovered and valued at $35. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. € Margaret Jones of Crawfordville reported a suspect, who has been identified, running into her mailbox with a motor vehicle. The victim requested the suspect pay for the mailbox damage and Lt. Jimmy Sessor issued the suspect a trespass warning for the property. Deputy Will Hudson also investigated. € Matthew Goodheart of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of an electronic game system from his home. The stolen property is valued at $325. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € Crystal McKeown of Crawfordville reported a fraud and credit card offense. The victim was contacted by a knife company regarding an order that she had never made. The shipping order was for $348. The company cancelled the shipping and charges. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € Justin Carroll of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to a vehicle. A piece of metal was thrown through the victims truck window while it was parked. Damage was estimated at less than $200. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,067 calls for service during the past week including: 13 residential and business alarms; 74 citizen contacts; 11 disturbances; 21 E-911 emergency calls; 45 investigations; 48 medical emergencies; 290 business and residential security checks; 27 special details; 12 suspicious vehicles; 66 traf“ c enforcements; 192 traf“ c stops; 16 disabled vehicles; and 11 reckless vehicles.Sheri s Report Charlie Creel:GOOD LAW ENFORCEMENT MANAGEMENT BUILDS RESPECTADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENTOne of the frequent complaints I hear from people as I go door-to-door in Wakulla County is a lack of respect for the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ce, especially the way our tax dollars are spent to enforce the law. I believe respect for the law and those who enforce it is imperative and must be restored. The WCSO takes 53% of our property taxes, yet the crime rate in our county is one of the worst in Florida. According to FDLE, the crime rate in Wakulla County for 2011 from 2010 was up 15.4%, the seventh highest of any county in the state. Even more disturbing is the number of people who say they never hear back from the WCSO on the status of their case after they report burglaries on their homes or vehicles. Is this failure the result of a lack of money or bad management? As your sheriff, I want to make a 180-degree change to bring back respect for the WCSO. To do that, my “rst step would be to have a comprehensive, credible audit by the Florida Auditor Generals Of“ce. A thorough audit makes common business sense. No one should follow a 30+ year administration without having a full review of how money has been spent and is being spent. Unfortunately, as things stand, no one outside the WCSO seems to know where our money goes. For example, look at this months sheriffs report in the Wakulla Area Times. The report is “lled with budget “gures, but no explanation for what those “gures represent. Without details, I consider those “gures nothing but numbers. For instance, the report says the WCSO is requesting $165, 314 for E-911, and then states E-911 has two employees. Are we to assume that each E-911 employee is making more than $80,000 per year? The report also states that the average salary at the WCSO is $35,000 per year. It is a fact that most employees at the sheriffs of“ce make less than this. Does this mean that the top-heavy administration and their sizeable salaries cause the average salary to be $35,000? It is true the WCSO has reduced deputys ranks to not appear so topheavy with administrators but what the citizens do not realize is their salaries were not reduced along with the reduction in rank. Lists of “gures, such as the ones in the sheriffs report, make it clear that, if this county is going to be serious about bringing down its shameful crime rate, an audit has to be performed to manage and spend your tax dollars more effectively. A credible audit “rst would show the inventory of all the county-owned WCSO property, as well as all contracts, grants, invoices and salaries. Then, using this audit, the WCSO could go back to a zero-based budget. That means throw away all past budgets and start over with a new budget based on evaluating and assessing the true needs of the department. I would take this independent audit to craft a budget that is lean, ef“cient, and transparent to the citizens, while providing the services we all deserve and CAN afford. For a genuine FRESH START with a sheriff who will work FULL-TIME on law-enforcement, I ask for your vote and support on Nov. 6.Please contact me at ( 850 ) 926-4712 Post Of“ce Box 482, Crawfordville, FL 32326 charlieforsheriff@gmail.com www.charliecreel.comPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Af“liation, for sheriff. No one should follow a 30+ year administration without having a full review of how money has been spent and is being spent.Ž 000BK7Z HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 – Page 15AContinued from Page 6A It was then that I saw it, which kicked in the oldfogeyitis syndrome. What I saw shocked me and it takes a lot to shock me. Up to this point, I was primarily focused on my granddaughter and her pristine playing on the “ eld, so I did not see right away what I eventually saw. It happened when my granddaughter stepped up to bat for the first time. After that, the whole game went blank for me. Behind my lovely granddaughter was the catcher all dressed in the catchers out“ t. That did not startle me. Behind the catcher was the umpire, or so he was pretending to be, and that is what startled me. It was a girls slow pitch softball team and every one of them was dressed in their softball players out“ t. I believe in dressing for the occasion. The occasion was a softball game and those involved in the softball game were wearing attire consistent with the game at hand. Then I saw the umpire. And the umpire was wearing shorts! Shorts! It is not that I object to a man wearing shorts as long as he does not wear them out in public. The last time I wore shorts I was 3 years old and it was only because my mother made me wear them. When I had control of my wardrobe, I put away those shorts and began wearing pants like a man. I think if the good Lord wanted us to wear shorts, in public that is, He would have made our legs more visually appealing. A mans legs are not appealing, unless they have been in the sun too long and the skin begins to peel. A man, especially an old man, has knobby knees, hairy legs and varicose veins none of which should be part of public domain. This is not something I want to see when I am out in public. I can dutifully attest to the fact that my legs have not seen direct sunlight in over 50 years. I attribute this to the fact that I wear pants every day of my life. Not short pants, but pants that go all the way down to my ankles. Short pants look like you cannot afford to buy the whole thing. For some reason I could not watch the game with the same enthusiasm. When I got home that night I settled down a little bit and thought of a verse of Scripture, something Jesus said. Judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous judgmentŽ (John 7:24 KJV). In spite of my severe old-fogeyitis condition, I must remember not to judge people according to their appearance. It is not what a man looks like but rather, what he does that makes him the man he is.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@ att.net. Snyder: e umpire (gasp) wore shorts LWV Vote Wakulla 2012Ž CANDIDATE FORUMSPresented by The League of Women Voters#The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization encouraging the informed and active participation of all citizens in the political process. CLIP AND SAVE THESE FORUM DATES! All forums will take place at theSeating is limited Doors open at 6:15For more information call: Membership in the Wakulla League is open to all interested citizens. New jobs in Wakulla depend upon a reputation of fair t reatment for all "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE CANDIDATE FORUMSHERIFF, WAKULLA COUNTY OPEN SEATCharles CharlieŽ Creel T. W. MauriceŽ Langston(Both candidates invited to appear)SPONSORED BY: WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION & CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA TUESDAY, Sept. 25th, 2012 7:00 pm NEW BRIDGE HOPE CHURCH CAFETERIA 1282 SPRING CREEK HIGHWAY(ACROSS FROM MACKS MEATS)Doug Jones, moderatorMEET THE CANDIDATES HEAR THE CANDIDATES ON THE ISSUESPREPARED QUESTIONS AND QUESTIONS FROM THE FLOORWe reserve the right to refuse any questions we deem inappropriate.Advertisement paid for by Concerned Citizens of Wakulla, Inc. and the WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION Continued from Page 1A Commissioners indicated they would seek a six month extension to make their case about errors on the map. The board directed Chairman Alan Brock to sign and send a letter asking for the additional time, and to also make contact with Congressman Steve Southerland and other coastal counties about the situation. The new Flood Insurance Rate Maps were originally unveiled in May, and a workshop meeting to discuss the maps was held on Thursday, Sept. 13, with Wakulla County staff and personnel from FEMA and Northwest Water Management District. (An earlier meeting set for June had to been postponed because of the impacts of Tropical Storm Debby). One part of the process that seemed to stick in the craw of commissioners was the six years spent on the study, but the lack of time for local residents to have input or appeal the “ ndings. It generated quite a few complaints on the board and among citizens about this as another example of big government forcing things on the citizens. Planning & Zoning appointee Chris Russell complained to commissioners that there are a lot of problems with the data … bad information used in the study and basic errors. This thing really needs to be stopped.Ž In an email to Congressman Southerland that he made available to The News, Russell wrote of the study that, Instead of fully incorporating the geographical sets, elevation data, etc. that can be found in the several Letter of Map Amendments (LOMA) previously completed in Wakulla County, FEMA moved forward with utilizing approximate methods to delineate Zone A in Wakulla County. It is reasonable to believe that had the data points generated from the previous LOMAs been included in the FIRMs, the boundaries of Zone A, and possibly other zones, would be different.Ž Russell also noted that recent hydrological events such as Tropical Storm Debby were not included in the Flood Insurance Study. Thus,Ž he wrote, the factual completeness of the FIS is in question.Ž County Administrator David Edwards indicated that the St. Marks ” ood zone was impacted by consideration of the 1843 hurricane that wiped out the town of Port Leon … a storm for which there is very little real data. County Commissioner Jerry Moore warned repeatedly that the impact on property values in these ” ood areas and the impact overall on business in the county would be great. County Commissioner Randy Merritt voted along with the other board members, but he expressed wariness about the county spending money on what he called a very, very uphill battle.Ž I want to do whatever we can,Ž Merritt said. I just dont want there to be false hope that we can change the federal government.Ž Brock indicated he was extremely concerned about the impact on St. Marks and further upriver. Citizen Ralph Thomas of Crawfordville told commissioners he pays $300 for ” ood insurance and isnt in a ” ood zone. He put the cost at $4,500 for ” ood insurance in a ” ood zone. He added his opinion that the expanded ” ood zone would decimate our economy.Ž Clay Kuerksteiner of Ochlockonee Bay commented that when property values on the coast go down, taxes will go up in other areas.Flood maps criticizedSpecial to The NewsA 32-year-old Crawfordville man was arrested Wednesday, Sept. 12 following a multi-agency investigation involving child pornography, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. Joshua Paul Cerwin was arrested by Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) and Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce deputies following the execution of a search warrant at Cerwins home. He is charged with promoting the sexual performance of a child. Cerwin is accused of intentionally downloading videos containing child pornography during the month of July. The suspect admitted to setting up a “ lesharing program so that any child pornography “ les he downloaded could be available to others worldwide. During the execution of the search warrant, law enforcement of“ cials seized computer equipment and other related computer items for forensic analysis. Cerwin remains at the Wakulla County Jail pending his “ rst appearance on Thursday, Sept. 13.Man arrested on child pornography charge Joshua Paul Cerwin Jeff True is new manager at Wakulla SpringsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter the departure of Wakulla Springs Lodge Manager Derek Adams, assistant manager Jeff True stepped in. True took the of“ cial title of manager about two weeks ago. There are lots of different changes around here,Ž True said. There has been quite a bit of turnover since Cape Leisure took over the 27-room lodge, restaurant and gift shop at Wakulla Springs State Park from the state in July 2011. True is the third manager Wakulla Springs Lodge has had in that short amount of time. We want it to be a real quick transition,Ž True said. True was hired in February as the assistant manager. He has been in Wakulla County for seven years and said he has always loved Wakulla Springs and also liked the fact that it was a green hotel. He worked at the Inn at Wildwood, which was also a green hotel, but chose to step away from that situation after the bank took it over. When he saw Cape Leisure had positions available, he decided to apply. One thing True wants to focus heavily on is getting Wakulla Springs back involved with the community and remind people the lodge is still open. We need to get the word back out,Ž True said. Prior to Cape Leisure taking over the lodge and restaurant, there was talk of the state closing it because of the huge costs associated with keeping it open. Although that was more than a year ago, people still think Wakulla Springs Lodge is closed, True said, Wakulla Springs isnt going away,Ž True said. There are several events planned for the future. One upcoming event is the lodges 75th anniversary on Sept. 25. An invitation-only rededication ceremony will be held at the lodge. True said the ribbon will be cut again and the Wakulla County Commission has issued a proclamation declaring Sept. 25, 2012, as Wakulla Springs Lodge Day. They have also brought back the popular all-you-can eat fried shrimp at the restaurant on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, he said. They have also hired a sales manager who starts soon. True said he is looking forward to having her out in the county and working with the community. True said he and his staff plan to work hard to get Wakulla Springs back on the map. Cape Leisure entered into a 5-year agreement with the state, which still owns the property. The lodge was built in 1937 by entrepreneur Edward Ball and has been kept mostly in its original condition, with some improvements. The State of Florida purchased the site in 1986 and operated the lodge until July 1, 2011. As a cost-saving measure, the state sought out a private vendor to run the concessions and Cape Leisure was chosen. Cape Leisures other clients include the National Historic Landmark Ribault Club at Fort George Island in Jacksonville, Anastasia State Park in St. Augustine, Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, Jetty Park in Cape Canaveral and Natural Bridge of Virginia. For more information, call 4212000 or visit www.wakullaspringslodge.com. Manager Jeff True

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LES HARRISONWakulla Extension DirectorThe first indication of a problem is the mysterious white blob about the diameter of a quarter in the grass. The frothy material hides a potential menace to the funds and hours of labor committed to the groomed and manicured lawn. This globule is usually the “ rst sign a spittlebug is attempting to colonize the yard. These insects occur throughout much of Florida, but are more common in north and northwestern counties. The telltale white blob or spittle hides the immature form of this pest from the view of predators and parasites. It also insulates the spittlebug nymphs against heat and cold, and acts as a moisture control mechanism. The insect would quickly dry up without the layer of froth. While they prefer centipede-grass, these invaders will attack all turf grass species and other plants. Their eggs are laid at the base of the grass in the thatch, in hollow grass stems, or behind the leaf sheaths. One generation may last two to two-and-a-half months, and there are two generations per year. Eggs laid by the second generation overwinter and hatch the following spring, from late March to late April. The first generation adults are abundant in June. The adult population peaks again in early August to early September. A secret to their success is most spittle masses are not obvious because they are located near the soil surface or in the thatch. Adults are likely to be seen in the early morning hours when they are most active. Spittlebugs seek protection and camou” age near the soil surface during the heat of the day. They will jump from the leaf surfaces when the turf is disturbed. Nymphs and adult spittlebugs suck plant juices through their piercing-sucking mouthparts. Damage is primarily caused by adults when they inject a phytotoxic into the plants while feeding. Much of the excess “ ltered ” uids go into the production of the froth, which has an acrid taste, deterring predators from attacking the next generation. The infested turf wilts and the leaf tips turn yellow. Eventually the grass changes to brown and then curls. Spittlebugs are rarely a problem on well-managed turf. Allowing for an excess thatch accumulation provides for excellent reproductive habitat. The surplus rain of 2012 has added to the likelihood of an infestation. Follow approved practices regarding mowing, fertilization and irrigation to reduce thatch buildup, and dethatch if necessary. If greater control is needed, purchase an insecticide speci“ cally labeled for spittlebugs. To learn more about spittlebugs, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u” .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” edu or at (850) 926-3931.That globule of froth in the grass means spittlebugs PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSPITTLEBUGS: The blob of spittle, above, hides the immature form of the pest in the thatch of grass. The adult insect, left. American Red Cross hurricane and “ rst-aid apps exceed 1 million downloadsSpecial to The NewsThe American Red Cross announced recently that over the past three months, more than 1 million smart phone users have downloaded the First Aid and Hurricane apps. These free apps are part of a series created by the American Red Cross for both iPhone and Android platforms. The apps provide users with real time information on what to do before, during and after emergencies. The advances in smart phone technology have allowed the Red Cross to revolutionize how the public gets its safety and preparedness information,Ž said Dan Samborn, CEO Capital Area Chapter. Early evidence suggests it is making a difference in emergency situations. In reviews of the app, people have reported using it to respond to everything from cuts and sprains, to choking, seizures and strokes. As Hurricane Isaac approached the Gulf Coast, our Hurricane App was put to the test. Hundreds of thousands of people downloaded the app and spent an average of 30 minutes using the app … demonstrating its value to consumers. Nearly 2 million weather alerts were issued and usage of the Shelter Finder feature doubled during and after Isaac. People also used the app to send Im SafeŽ messages to their loved ones. National Red Cross experts in health, safety and preparedness have thoroughly reviewed and “ eld tested the information and advice provided in Red Cross apps. Apps can help prepare people for emergencies, but they are not a substitute for training. Red Cross First Aid and CPR/AED training empowers people to know how to respond to emergencies in case advanced medical help is delayed. People can go toredcross.org/takeaclass for course information and to register. The Red Cross locally responds to 3-5 disasters each week and we help people get ready to respond to emergencies by providing these apps for free. The Red Cross needs the help of the public to continue this effort. People can make a donation to the Red Cross by mail: 1115 Easterwood Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32311 by calling 878-6080, going to redcross.org or texting REDCROSS to 90999. Of“ce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. … 5 p.m. (850) 877-55892770 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 110, Tallahassee, FL 32308 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.com Stephanie Lee, MDDr. Lee is joining Dr. Michael Douso and Dr. Kathrine Lupo at Capital Regional Womens Health. As an FSU School of Medicine graduate, she is happy to return to Tallahassee.Capital Regional Womens Health accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers.Next Day Appointments AvailableCapital Regional Medical Center Welcomes Dr. Stephanie Lee Specializing in Gynecology & Obstetrics Expert physicians.Quality obstetrical & gynecological care. GIANT YARD SALE Dedicated to the rescue & rehabliltation of injured and orphaned wild mammals and birds Thurs. Sept. 20 • 8am 3pm Fri. Sept. 21 • 8am 3pm Sat. Sept. 22 • 8am 1pm At Townsend s Nads Mini Storage, 59 Shadeville Rd., CrawfordvilleDonations can be dropped at Unit 34 during the yard sale For more information about FWMA visit our website: www.wakullawildlife.org 100% of contributors are retained by FWMA for use in pursing our mission. ALL DONATIONS GREATLY APPRECIATED ALL DONATIONS GREATLY APPRECIATED GIANT YARD SALE (setup) !!" 2012 Go to www.bigbendhospice.org to Sign-up Today! 11:30am Registration and Lunch 12:30pm Tee-o October 26, 2012Wildwood Country ClubSAVE THE DATE!For more information, call Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308Wakulla County Big Bend Hospice

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 sports news and team views SportsFSU makes statement in win over Wake Forest In The Huddle, Page 4B Wakulla cheerleaders sweep competition Page 3B Wakulla-NFC game photos Page 5B By ELIZABETH ANDREWS Special to The NewsThe Lady War Eagles put another district win under their belt defeating Suwannee on Thursday, Sept. 13, in three straight matches at home. The scores were 25-14, 25-15 and 2516. Their current record is 3-3 with a 2-0 district record, putting them in a perfect position for a district championship. Shannan Wood was the star of the game with an astonishing 12 kills and 3 blocks. Haley Brown contributed eight kills and “ ve digs and Breighly Bolton had three aces, five kills and two blocks. Chelsea Carroll had a great game with two aces, three digs, eight assists and one block. Tamia Potter also helped the Eagles add to the scoreboard with an outstanding “ ve aces. The next game is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 20, at FAMU High at 6:30 p.m. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach This past Saturday the WHS cross country teams traveled to Tom Brown Park in Tallahassee to compete in the annual Lincoln Invitational Meet. Teams or representatives from about 20 high schools from Georgia and Florida were in attendance. After the dust had cleared, the WHS girls ended up in second place, only 10 points behind perennial powerhouse Maclay High School. The local boys team also had a good outing, “ nishing in 5th place. In the girls race, junior Margaret Wiedeman went out with the leaders and maintained that contact to “ nish in 4th place out of the 114 runners in the good time of 21:32 for the 5K distance. She was followed closely by senior Raychel Gray (8th, 22:19), sophomore Kasey James (11th, 22:59), sophomore Lydia Wiedeman (13th, 23:00) and junior Kayla Webbe (19th, 23:29). Sophomore Lilanna Broadway (28th) and freshman Connie Lewis (55th) rounded out the top seven. Girls running an alltime personal record (PR) included Webbe, Lewis, Logan Kelley and Shelby Shiver The local girls were the only team that placed four runners in the top 15, who were recognized individually. The boys were paced by junior Aaron Smith who “ nished in 18th in a new PR of 18:26. Sophomore J.P. Piotrowski (24th, 18:53), sophomore Travis Parks (27th, 19:01), freshman Lane Williams (46th, 20:07) and sophomore Alan Pearson (49th, 20:17) completed the scoring for WHS with sophomores Ryan Dodson (54th, 20:29) and Mitchell Atkinson (59th, 20:34) rounding out the top seven. PRs were also recorded by Parks, Pearson, Albert Smythe, Jimmy French, Gil Damon, Riley Carrier, Toby Jordon, Justin Goates, Mark Veerapan and Riley Welch Overall, it was a pretty good meet for us. I thought both teams bumped it up a notch from last week,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. Our girls had another good outing and I was extremely pleased with the fact that we placed four girls in the top 15. Although we didnt have an individual boy in the top 15,Ž Hoover said, our boys worked together, ran in packs and it paid off. To “ nish in “ fth place was actually pretty good. The kids really gave us a good effort this week.Ž The teams will run next at the Prefontaine 5K Forest Run on Saturday, Sept. 22, at Silver Lake in the Apalachicola National Forest. The race begins at 8:30 a.m.CROSS COUNTRYWHS places at LincolnFOOTBALLWakulla easily rolls over NFC, 38-7PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFreshman receiver Keith Gavin on his way to the end zone after a pass reception against North Florida Christian. The War Eagle offense had 532 total yards, scoring “ ve TDs. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt was supposed to be tougher. In the past two seasons, North Florida Christian had defeated Wakulla in close games: two years ago, Wakulla lost by one point after going for a two-point conversion to win but failed to convert; and last year, NFC slipped out of Medart with a win after a roughing the punter penalty gave them a chance to continue a drive and score. NFC went on from there to an undefeated season and a state title in Division 2A. But it was a different team that Wakulla faced on Friday night … and dominated handily, cruising to an easy 38-7 win. Even Wakulla Head Coach Scott Klees was surprised by how easily his War Eagles handled NFC. I was expecting a hardfought, close game,Ž he said. But NFC is a young team, and two of their best players were out with injuries, Klees noted. For a smaller school like NFC, those injuries hurt the team more. And the War Eagles got a little bumped up: running back Demetrius Lindsey had an unspeci“ ed injury, and safety and receiver Mikal Cromartie twisted his ankle … neither played in the second half. They joined Chris Grif“ n, the 6-6, 270 pound offensive lineman, who bruised his shoulder last week in Perry and who dressed out for the NFC game but didnt play. Meanwhile, the War Eagle offense played like a machine, rolling up 532 total yards and scoring “ ve touchdowns. Weve been over 400 yards in each game,Ž Klees said, adding with a little understatement: Were off to a good start.Ž Most of the offense came on the ground, with 37 rushing attempts and 299 yards that resulted in two TDs and a two-point conversion. Freshman running back Monterious Loggins was the top rusher for the team with 12 carries for 72 yards and a touchdown. Through the air, quarterback Caleb Stephens was an ef“ cient 8 of 13 for 138 yards and two TDs. Freshman quarterback Feleipe Franks spelled Stephens in the third quarter and was 4 of 7 for 95 yards and a touchdown. Top receiver was freshman Keith Gavin who pulled in three catches for 103 yards and a touchdown. Meanwhile the War Eagle defense played lockdown … and had a shut-out until NFC scored a meaningless touchdown on a long run in the “ nal minutes of the game. And that came against some second-team defensive players. The defense is very physical,Ž Klees said. Im so proud of the way theyre hitting.Ž The challenge as a coach, Klees said, is how to keep them from reaching a plateau and making sure they keep getting better each week. Theres still room for a lot of improvement,Ž he said. Overall, Klees said he felt the team was making a lot of mistakes … but still doing a lot of things right. Wakulla drew a lot of yellow ” ags, and Klees attributed the penalties to younger guys “ lling in, miscommunication and … in an attempt at diplomacy … the coach offered that Some of those might not have been penalties.Ž Continued on Page 5BUP NEXT: Wakulla hosts Fort White at home on Friday, Sept. 21, at 7:30 p.m. VOLLEYBALLLady War Eagles get win WCS plays “ rst sportSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla Christian School Lady Saints Volleyball Team was more than overjoyed to play their “ rst game against Holy Comforter Episcopal School on Thursday, Sept. 13. This was not only the “ rst game of the season for WCS, but it was the “ rst competitive athletic sport ever played by the school. Over the summer WCS joined FHSAA, a recognized association for sports in the state of Florida, and became a recognized school for athletics. In speaking with Coach Sherry Dudley, Coach Travis Bolin and Assistant Coach Kristin Campbell, the main focus was for the middle school girls to go out there, play their best and have fun. The Lady Saints won best two out of three games (16-25, 26-24, and 10-15). The Lady Saints were scheduled to play their next game (a doubleheader) on Monday, Sept. 17, against Riversprings Middle School in Crawfordville. PHOTO BY DONNA ATKINSON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe girls cross country team. In-Home Assessments and Referrals Offered for Comfort and Convenience If falls, weakness or inability to participate in activities become a concern for your loved one, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Tallahassee is here to help. We oer free inhome assessments with no physician orders needed. Once an evaluation is approved, HealthSouths team of professionals develop comprehensive, individualized treatment plans for a safe return home. If you have any questions or need more information contact us. IS YOUR LOVED ONE SAFE AT HOME? 2012:HealthSouth Corporation:551345 LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Sept. 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. “Who was Ed Ball” is the title of the program to be presented by Madeleine Carr. Non-members can attend the program and enjoy lunch, beverage and dessert for a $7 fee.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a las 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Highway. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, Sept. 21  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Sept. 22  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 9621010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. Sunday, Sept. 23  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. Monday, Sept. 24  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Sept. 25  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the library. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. Wednesday, Sept. 26  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Sept. 27  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsThursday, Sept. 20  BUSINESS MIXER will be hosted by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Nature’s Classroom at the refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Call 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@embarqmail.com to RSVP.  WAKULLA COUNTY REPUBLICAN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at 7 p.m. at Myra Jeans in Crawfordville. Come at 6 p.m. for conversation and a meal. Focus will be on the local races and upcoming events. All Republican candidates will be given time to update the committee. Friday, Sept. 21  FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATION YARD SALE will take place from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Townsends Nad’s Mini-Storage, 59 Shadeville Road. They are in need of donations and shoppers to help them continue the rescuing and rehabilitating of the area’s sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife. Donated items can be dropped off at Townsends Nad’s Mini-Storage in Storage Unit 34 before the yard sale, or can be brought to the yard sale during set-up on Thursday, Sept. 20, between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. For more information about FWMA, please visit our website at www.wakullawildlife. org. The yard sale will also take place on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22  SPORTING CLAYS TOURNAMENT will be held starting at 9 a.m. at the Wakulla Sheriff’s Of ce Range. This is a fundraiser for the Florida Sheriff’s Youth Ranches. There are three relays at 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Refreshments and lunch will be available. The tournament will be $50 per person with a ve person team. Winners of each relay will receive a 12-gauge shotgun. Pre-register by calling Lt. Fred Nichols at 251-1676 or the range at 745-7290 or visit www. wcso.org.  FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATION YARD SALE will take place from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Townsends Nad’s Mini-Storage, 59 Shadeville Road. For more information about FWMA, please visit our website at www.wakullawildlife. org. All donations are tax-deductible as we are a registered non-pro t. BENEFIT FISH FRY AND YARD SALE will be held at Hudson Park beginning at 8 a.m. for 9-year-old Daniel Fountain who is ghting brain cancer. He is having another surgery and after will have six weeks of radiation. Donations will also be accepted. Call Darrell and Carolyn Taylor at 6619694 or 528-5787. Monday, Sept. 24  WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC WOMEN’S CLUB will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the Democratic Headquarters in the North Pointe Center, 1626 Crawfordville Highway, Unit B, to discuss the upcoming election. The meeting is open to both men and women and the public is invited to attend. For more information, contact Joan Hendrix at granpetunia@comcast.net.  NAMI WAKULLA’S PROGRAM will feature guest speaker Bob Williams, author of “Miracle on Luckie Street From Homeless to Millionaire,” at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Women’s Club, 64 Ochlockonee Street. The meeting is free and open to everyone. Call 926-1033 for more information. Tuesday, Sept. 25  FOCUS WAKULLA will meet for a speed networking event from 6:15 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Best Western PLUS. Speed Networking will give young professionals in the area a chance to meet at least 20 other young professionals in less than 45 minutes. There will be tips on how to network and mingle and begin great conversations. Space is limited. Cost is $10 for dinner and the event. Wednesday, Sept. 26  CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held from noon to 1:15 p.m. at Riverside Cafe, 69 Riverside Drive, St. Marks. RSVP to the Chamber of ce at 926-1848. Thursday, Sept. 27  WAKULLA COUNTY UNITED WAY KICKOFF will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at La Parrillada Mexican Grill and Bar, Crawfordville. RSVP by Sept. 25 by emailing Megan Picht at megan@uwbb.org. Upcoming EventsFriday, Sept. 28  A TRIBUTE TO PATSY CLINE will be held at the Senior Center starring Margo Anderson and the Country Classic Band. Doors open at 7 p.m. Entertainment begins at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 per person or $25 per couple. There will be a cash bar and raf e. Proceeds help to bene t Senior Citizens services. Saturday, Sept. 29  PAMPER YOUR POOCH FUNDRAISER will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park by C.H.A.T of Wakulla. All natural bath and ea dip, nail clipping, anal gland extraction, photo shoot, micro chipping. All proceeds will help with food and medical expenses for Wakulla homeless pets at the C.H.A.T. adoption center. Sunday, Sept. 30  FIGHT FOR AIR STAIR CLIMB will be hosted by the American Lung Association in Florida at Plaza Tower, located at 300 S. Duval Street, Tallahassee. Participants will climb 22 stories/398 steps. Wakulla County Fire Rescue will be represented. All nishers will receive a medal. Visit www. FightForAirStairClimbTallahassee.org for more information or call (850) 241-1003. Saturday, Oct. 6  CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held for the United Way of the Big Bend hosted by St. Marks Powder at Wildwood Country Club. Registration time is 7:30 a.m. Teeoff is at 8:30 a.m. Two closest to the pin contest, two longest drive contest, putting challenge and hole in one contest with 2012 Dodge will be held. Cost is $75 per player and $150 per team. Sponsorships available. Contact Rachel Kipp at 577-2889 or email rachel.kipp@gd-ots.com.  FIRST FSU COASTAL MARINE LAB REGATTA, Whatever Floats Your Boat, will be held from noon to 6 p.m. The challenge is to create a homemade “boat” that is interesting, buoyant and made from recycled materials. There is a $25 registration fee. The deadline to register is Sept. 25. There will be prizes for the rst boat to cross the nish line, most creative use of materials, Titanic Award and People’s Choice. Register online at marinelab.fsu.edu/outreach/regatta.html.  SHADEVILLE ELEMENTARY’S 29TH ANNUAL FALL FESTIVAL will be held from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. The coronation will be at 2 p.m. in the lunchroom. Booths will open at 2 p.m. There will be bingo in the library. There will be booth prizes and a new booth called the “Super Soaker.” There will also be entertainment by The Polynesian Fire Knife Dancers, “Say Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Government Meetings Monday, Sept. 24  WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 7 p.m. at the library. Thursday, Sept. 27  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. at city hall for a workshop on a possible charter change to salaries for commissioners. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorWed love to thank everyone who came out last Friday night and made our second Annual Silent auction a rousing success. Your generous support raised more than $2,400 for the Friends of the Library with more receipts due to come in this week! As Ive said many times, funds raised by the Friends stay at the Library and over the past year have paid for our Summer Programs for the children of Wakulla County, paid for 12 new public access computers, as well as a major portion of our Book and Materials budget along with other needed expenses. Over the past 3 years the Friends have saved the taxpayers or Wakulla County more than $75,000 with their support. Wed also like to thank all the local businesses and our loyal patrons who donated so many great items for the auction. Lastly, but certainly by any de“ nition of the word not least, wed like to thank the members of the Friends who gave up so much of their time not just Friday night but over the past few months to make the auction such a success. This never would have gotten off the ground without the time and energy they volunteered. THANK YOU! Friday Night Movie This week were showing a romantic comedy starring many Academy Award winners and nominees. This PG-13 rated “ lm stars Judi Dench, Tom Wilkinson and Maggie Smith, among others, and tells the tale of a group of British retirees who decide to outsourceŽ their retirement to less expensive and seemingly exotic India. Enticed by advertisements for the newly restored Marigold Hotel, they arrive to “ nd the palace a shell of its former self. They “ nd love, go through life changing events and gain a different viewpoint of the world around them. For those who have already asked me to show the Tommy Lee Jones/ Meryl Streep “ lm Hope Springs,Ž Fridays should be right up your alley and tide you over until Hope SpringsŽ comes out on DVD in a few months. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show. Quit Smoking Classes The next cycle of free Quit Smoking Classes sponsored by the Big Bend Area Health Education center has begun. This program meets every Tuesday evening at 6 p.m. and is designed by ex-smokers who know how tough it is to break the habit. Nicotine patches are available while supplies last. Please take advantage of this opportunity to get a fresh start and get the support you need on the road to better health. Political EventsThursday, September 27 POLITICAL FORUM for County Commission seats 1, 3, 5. Seat 1 will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Seat 3 at 7:30 p.m. and Seat 5 at 8:30 p.m.Library News... Chamber mixer from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. FWMA yard sale at Townsends Nad’s Mini-storage from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Bene t yard sale and sh fry beginning at 8 a.m. at Hudson Park. NAMI program with Bob Williams at 6:30 p.m. at Crawfordville Women’s Club.ThursdayFridaySaturdayMonday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 – Page 3BBy LORI SANDGRENWHS Cheer CoachThis summer, Wakulla High School JV and Varsity, along with Wakulla Middle, went to an elite summer camp at the University of Georgia. The teams participated in cheer, chants, stunts, dance routine and crowd involvement activities to get them ready for the start of the season. At the end of camp, all teams competed against each other in cheer and dance division. The camp was made up of 50 squads from Georgia and Florida. Wakulla County swept the competition. Varsity, JV and Wakulla Middle school placed “ rst in the cheer and “ rst in dance division as well as “ rst in overall best cheer program. Wakulla County was awarded the best cheer program by the staff of the Universal Cheerleading Association, recognizing it as an up and coming program to watch. Needless, to say it was a great camp. It was an honor to be recognized as having one of the elite cheer programs in the state of Florida. These girls work hard everyday bringing spirit to Wakulla County. Cheerleading has become a competitive sport and our girls are rising to the challenge everyday. Wakulla High School Cheerleaders are state champs and are being recognized state-wide for their accomplishments. SPORTS PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla cheerleaders from Wakulla High School, varsity and JV, and Wakulla Middle School at cheer camp.CHEERLEADINGWakulla cheerleaders sweep competition WHS captains Maddie Champany and Erica HarrellSports briefs Golf tournament at Golden EagleThe Tallahassee Technology (TalTech) Alliance – Tallahassee’s not-for-pro t network of technology-centered businesses, academic centers, entrepreneurs and individuals – will host its second Annual Beyond Par Golf Tournament on Monday, Sept. 24 at Golden Eagle Country Club. Registration begins at 10:30 a.m. and area golfers will tee off at noon. Professional golfer Kenny Knox will provide a golf instruction clinic at 11 a.m. The proceeds from the event will directly support the community educational programs of TalTech Alliance. To register, go to www. taltech.org/golf. Run For Lawson bene t run is Oct. 6The Lawson Mayfield Memorial Foundation is hosting its second annual Run For Lawson bene t run on Saturday, Oct. 6 on the campus of Holy Comforter Episcopal School and Welaunee Plantation grounds. Last year’s race attracted more than 600 participants and raised $35,000 for the National Meningitis Association. The foundation was started in memory of late Tallahassee teen Lawson May eld, whose life was cut short after she contracted bacterial meningitis. Perhaps the most signi cant addition to this year’s Run For Lawson will be the 10K race that will certainly challenge participants of any skill level. The event will begin with the One Mile Fun Run at 8 a.m., with the 5K and 10K races following at 8:30 a.m. For more information on Run For Lawson, visit www. runforlawson.org. Covenant Hospice sets Marianna runThe City of Marianna Fire Department and Covenant Hospice will hold a Care with Flare 5K Run/ Walk on Nov. 3 in Marianna. There will be a PostRace Celebration and Family Fun Day lled with food, drinks, games, in atables, music and awards. Entries made by Oct. 8 will be $20, receive a race packet and T-shirt. After Oct. 8, the fee is $25, and T-shirt and race packet will be a rst come, rst serve basis. Registration will start at 7:30 a.m. the day of the race, which begins at 9 a.m. The student entry fee is $10. There will also be a free kid’s one mile fun run for children under 14. Boys Town offers these strategies to assist children with sports tryouts. Talk to your child about which sport he or she would like to try and stress practice, practice, practice. Here are some strategies that can help: € Talk with other parents or have your child talk with peers who have been on the team before or who have tried out for the sport, so you know what to expect. € Have your child dress appropriately for the sport or activity and get them ready to work. € Make nutritious meals and snacks that contain both carbohydrates and proteins to help your child maintain energy and rebuild muscles. € Make time for your child to relax „ whether its listening to music, taking a bath or reading a book in a quiet room. Tryouts can be stressful so unwinding from the day can be just as important as having a good breakfast. Tips for helping kids with tryouts Florida Seniors Now Qualify for a FREE Easy-to-Use Mobile PhoneA new statewide program offers a free mobile phone for those 55 and older. Seniors are now entitled to a free mobile phone with built in “help button”. These basic phones are designed for seniors and have a huge display area with large dial buttons & feature a one-touch panic have an emergency. No contracts, no credit checks, no personal info required. Call our pre-recorded toll-free 24 hour info line for details. Supplies limited. Credit card required for activation. 1-800-651-4933ADVERTISEMENT Turn account receivables into CASH!!! Tired of wai ng 30, 60, 90 days? Meet payroll. Increase pro ts. Great for startups, bankruptcies, tax liens, bad credit & more. $20k to $10M+ www.jpcapitalsolu ons.com 863 589 6587 jpcapitalsolu ons@gmail.com Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. G-1 THG-1 1905 1905 Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain ATTORNEY ADVERTISING.Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. We may associate with local firms in states wherein we do not maintain an office. If no recovery, no fees or costs are charged, unless prohibited by State Law or Rule. Weitz & Luxenberg, PC is licensed by, and a member of good standing of the New York State Bar. Lawrence Goldhirsch, Esq., member, FL Bar. P.C.LAW OFFICES &WEITZ LUXENBERGASBESTOS |DRUGS/MEDICAL DEVICES | ENVIRONMENTAL |NEGLIGENCE 1.800.LAW.6789 |www.weitzlux.com700 BROADWAY| NEWYORK, NY 10003 We are also investigatingMETAL ON METAL HIP REPLACEMENTS & FOSAMAX FEMUR FRACTURES Are you suffering after being implanted with a STRYKER REJUVENATE Modular Hip Implant? Have you experienced failure of your Stryker Rejuvenate hip implant, resulting in pain and other complications that may have required revision surgery? If so, please know that we are investigating these injuries … and those caused by other brands …for possible legal action. On July 4, 2012, Stryker Orthopaedics announced a voluntary USA Recall of certain models of its Rejuvenate and ABG II hip implants, leading to increased concern. Weitz & Luxenberg can help you understand your legal options. 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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M at Delaware StateSaturday, 6 p.m.The game is not being broadcasted. Kentucky at #14 FloridaSaturday, 12:21 p.m.The game can be seen on CBS. #10 Clemson at #4 Florida StateSaturday, 8 p.m.The game can be seen on ABC. D j V u : Dj Vu: 2 0 0 6 R e v i s i t e d 2006 RevisitedThompson enjoys magical day against Demon Deacons Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Chris Thompson during one of his two “ rst-half touchdown runs against Wake Forest.Ken FieldsBy Marty Cohen One of the things Ive always tried to do, at least in print, was to refrain from taking specific jabs at other media members, after all, we share some common ground and weve all written things that were silly, foolish or wound up off track. But occasionally, a head-scratcher will slip through that just cant slide by without comment. This came from a national-type publication, one weve all seen at airports, hotels, everywhere. Anyway, this national columnist was forecasting some of the top college football games of the past weekend, and when it came to an instant analysis of Florida-Texas A&M, he said he liked the home team for a couple of reasons, one of which was Floridas record in games played in the state of Texas, a terrible 1-7-2. Oh brother. Generally Im all for backing up theories with solid facts, and Floridas number in the Lone State State is fact … just one without merit. The last time Florida set foot in Texas for a game was 30 years ago, in the 1982 Bluebonnet Bowl against Lou Holtz Arkansas club. So the relevancy of that statistic is rendered meaningless, as if games from 30, 40 or 50 years ago have any relevancy to todays action. Yet when we got off the plane in Texas on Thursday, we were greeted by what could have been an incredible factor in the contest the heat. Or shall I say, the HEAT. It was a blast furnace to the face, two days of record temperatures that reached 104 degrees in Austin on Friday. And this was a whole lot different than Florida hot. When it gets unbearable in Florida, its a thick, sticky, humid heat that leaves you drenched in sweat. This Texas heat was a whole different deal … were talking searing pizza oven hot. Yes its a dry heat, but thats the point … this was not something the Florida guys would “ nd easily adaptable. But then the Gators got a break, as the temperatures dippedŽ about 10 degrees or so on Saturday, and coupled with a nice breeze in College Station, the weather was manageable. Sure it was hot and a number of Florida players were felled by, uh, cramps (all but one came on defense, so you make the call whether they were deliberately trying to slow down the Aggies rapid-“ re offense), but it turned out to be an inconsequential element in the outcome. So as this historic matchup unfolded, I couldnt escape the feeling Id seen this game played out before, perhaps in a different setting against a different foe. And as Florida rallied on the road and “ nally held off Texas A&M by running out the clock in the closing minutes, it sort of hit me that this had the feeling of a 2006 Gator game, a lowscoring, grind-it-out affair that was common during Urban Meyers second season at the helm. By Tim Linafelt Chris Thompsons journey with the Wake Forest Demon Deacons ended Saturday with two electrifying touchdown runs, 197 rushing yards and a giant grin across his face. It began almost a year ago, in a hospital bed in Winston-Salem, N.C. He ended up there after leaving last years FSU-Wake Forest game on a cart with broken bones in his back, unsure of whether or not hed ever correctly walk again, let alone play football. What a difference a year makes,Ž FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said.  I was sitting up there at the hospital bed, watching him last year. And hes actually consoling me when I was talking to him in the bed. That everything was going to be alright, let alone knowing what his future was. Hes going Coach, Ill be back.Ž Indeed he is. If Thompson had highlighted FSUs 52-0 win over Wake Forest with just one of his signature, home run-length touchdown runs, it wouldve been enough to complete a storybook ending for a player that seemingly every teammate considers a friend. He did that with a darting, shifty 74-yard run in which he sprinted down the sideline, stopped and slipped past a Wake Forest defender and sped into the end zone. But when Thompson took the ball again on FSUs very next play, ran around the right side and once again saw nothing but 80 yards of grass in front of him, well, it started to border on the unbelievable. When I hit the hole, I was just like Man, this cant be happening,Ž Thompson said. Eighty yards later, Thompson was in the end zone again and Florida States sideline … and the fans in attendance … erupted. When FSUs players and coaches talked about seeing the old ChrisŽ in fall camp, this is what they meant. In two plays, Thompson traveled 154 yards, virtually untouched. Like I said before this game, Chris looks better than ever,Ž quarterback EJ Manuel said. What better game for him to have a coming-out party like that.Ž He now has five career rushing touchdowns of at least 70 yards. His 197 yards, all of which came in the “ rst half, were the most “ rst-half rushing yards in Florida State history. And in the process, Thompson made a fan out of an opponent. I am really tickled to death that he is back,Ž Wake Forest coach Jim Grobe said. I was worried. I had not realized how badly he was hurt ƒ to see him come back from that injury is pretty special. I wish hed waited until Clemson (next week) to have a big day, but its good to see him back.Ž For Thompson, even getting through the week of practice leading up the game was a challenge. He freely admitted that he was going through a wide range of emotions leading up the game. A lot of people say its a revenge game and things like that,Ž Thompson said, and at the beginning of the week, thats how I was feeling … like I needed to get revenge.Ž By Thursdays practice, Thompsons position coach, Eddie Gran, could tell that something was eating away at him. He snatched me out of practice, he was like, Whats going on?Ž Thompson said after the game. I told him I was going through a lot of emotions and everything.Ž Gran told Thompson to take a few minutes away, go to the sideline, drop to a knee and say a quick prayer. [Gran] was like Just put everything in Gods hands and itll all go from there.Ž Later that night, Thompson called his mother, Cynthia James, and she gave him the same advice as Gran: put his burden in Gods hands. By the time FSU held its team chapel Saturday morning and team chaplain Clint Purvis echoed the same message Thompson received from both his coach and his mother, he couldnt help but smile. Its just crazy how all of this keeps happening this way,Ž Thompson said. Right after that message, Coach Gran looked at me, like, You see? Ever since then, Ive just had a smile on my face.Ž He wasnt the only one. Eyes brightened whenever anyone talked about Thompsons career day. Center Bryan Stork said having Thompson makes the offensive linemen look good. Fullback Lonnie Pryor said Thompson was like a little brother to me.Ž And Thompson had to “ ght one more time to hold back his emotions as Fisher presented him with the game ball in the locker room. Its amazing,Ž Fisher said. It cant happen to a better young man.Ž

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 – Page 5BContinued fron Page 1B GAME RECAP Wakulla started strong in the opening period with a long, sustained drive that culminated in a Loggins 2-yard run for a touchdown. The point-after was no good. Later in the “ rst quarter, quarterback Feleipe Franks connected with his brother, receiver Jordan Franks for a 20-yard pass play for a touchdown. Kicker Dillon Norman added the extra point, and Wakulla was up 13-0 at the end of the “ rst quarter. In the middle of the second quarter, the War Eagle offense went for it on 4th down and 9 near mid“ eld and the pass fell incomplete. The NFC Eagles took over on downs and mounted a strong drive down to the Wakulla 2-yard line. Unable to push it in, NFC went for a “ eld goal that was no good. A Wakulla offensive drive stalled after some holding penalties, and NFC seemed to be moving the ball until Wakulla forced a fumble at the NFC 22-yard line. After a penalty backed up Wakulla, Caleb Stephens threw a pass to Keith Gavin in double-coverage … and Gavin broke it loose for a 30-yard touchdown. Feleipe Franks came in for the two-point try and scored on a keeper to make it 21-0 with 1:22 remaining in the half, NFCs next offensive series was marked by a couple of big hits by War Eagle linebacker Dalton Bohannon, a senior. Wakulla took over after an NFC punt and, with the seconds ticking away, moved the ball down“ eld to set up Dillon Norman for a 44-yard “ eld goal as time expired to put Wakulla up 24-0. Feleipe Franks started the second half as quarterback, which Klees said had been decided prior to the game getting underway. Ahead or behind in the game, Franks had been told he was playing the third quarter, Klees said, as an effort to educate the young quarterback on preparing for the game and getting him experience. Klees stressed that Stephens is his No. 1 quarterback and, in a drive in the third quarter, the senior showed a nice touch on a ” oating pass to Dalton Norman for a score. The point-after was good and Wakulla was up 31-0 with less than three minutes in the third. In the fourth quarter, Franks was back at the helm on a War Eagle drive. He handed off to senior running back Sheldon Johnson who took it in from the 2. The extra point by Dillon Norman was good and the War Eagles were up 38-0 with 8 minutes remaining. That score set the clock to running under the mercy rule. After stopping an NFC drive, Wakulla was called for roughing the punter and the ball went back to the Eagles. With less than 5 minutes remaining, NFC tore off a 50-yard run down to the Wakulla 1, and punched it a few plays later. The extra point was good and made it 38-7. While the mercy rule was rescinded after the score, Wakulla took over and ran the clock out. UP NEXT: FORT WHITE Theyre a good football team,Ž Klees said of Wakullas next opponent, Fort White. They beat Wakulla last year in a torrential rain storm on the “ nal play of the game, a hook-and-lateral. Like Wakulla, Fort White is undefeated. They handily beat Newberry, Perry and Hamilton so far. Theyre just so well coached,Ž Klees said. Weve got to be ready to play.Ž JV KEEPS WINNING The War Eagle junior varsity continued its streak of 16 wins in a row with a 30-19 victory over Lincoln JV. It was the teams biggest test so far, Klees said. Antonio Morris rushed for 102 yards and a touchdown in the win. Offensive lineman Isaiah Youmas scored out at 92 percent blocking, and defensive lineman Steven Weaver had 6 tackles and 3 assists. Up next for the JV is East Gadsden on Thursday.Wakulla easily rolls over NFC, 38-7Players of the WeekCALEB STEPHENS 8 of 13 for 138 yards and 2 TDs in passing DANIEL SANDERS 6 tackles and 2 assists DILLON NORMAN 3 for 3 extra points and a 43-yard “ eld goal DALTON NICHOLS 3 punts for an average of 40 yardsO ense Defense Special Teams Special Teams CORRECTION: The wrong photo of Special Teams Player of the Week ran last week. This is the photo that should have appeared: PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDEN PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA jumping catch by Wakulla War Eagle receiver Jordan Franks. Running back Demetrius Lindsey makes a hard cut during a run. Dillon Norman follows his blocker on a sweep play. Wakulla cheerleaders on the sideline. Wakulla students on the “ eld after the game singing the alma mater. More photos online at thewakullanews.com

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Asked Colors Constant Cords Crept Crust Dared Delay Dislike Dived Drown Edged Eight Equate Every Graph Here’s Immediately Irons Marks Measured Midst Near-by Often Ought Pedals Phrase Proves Punch Quarreled Rally Refuge Roast Robot Saucer This page sponsored in part by: Shrank Sleeves Soils Stony Throw Timid Tires Tools Tough Twist Tyres Visits Weeks Weighed

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(850) 544-1051 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $750/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1937 Boats 2002 DURACRAFT 18FT W/ 2010 YAMAHA90HPOnly 188 hours on motor: Wide Hull, Hydrolic Steering, Jack Plate, PT&T, GPS, FF, VHF, Stereo, Livewell, Trolling Motor, LOADED. Boat is Turn Key, Runs Perfect. $9500.00 OBO Call -352-257-3202 5372-0920 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE TALQUIN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. STATEMENT OF NON-DESCRIMINATION Talquin Electric Cooperative, Inc., is the recipient of federal financial assistance from the Rural Utilities Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and is subject to the provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Acts of 1964, as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, and the rules and regulations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture which provide that no person in the United States on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, religion, sex or handicap shall be excluded from participation in, admission or access to, denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any of this organizations programs or activities. The person responsible for coordinating this organizations non-discrimination efforts is Kenneth A. Cowen, Director of Administrative Services. Any individual, or specific class of individuals, who feels that this organization has subjected them to discrimination may obtain further information about the statutes and regulations listed above from and/or file a written complaint with this organization; or the Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250; or the Administrator, Rural Utilities Service, Washington, D.C. 20250. Complaints must be filed within 180 days after the alleged discrimination. Confidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible. September 20, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. 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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 5366-0920 TWN Estate: Crowson, Madelyn File No. 2012-80CPNotice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION FILE # 2012-80CP IN RE: ESTATE OF MADELYN JOYCE CROWSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MADELYN JOYCE CROWSON, deceased, whose date of death was December 8, 2011, and the last four digits of whose social security num5367-0920 TWN Vs. OGrady, Michael Case No. 652007CA000021FCXXXX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652007CA000021FCXXXX NATIONALCITYBANK OF INDIANA, ANATIONALBANKING ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. MICHAELJ OGRADY; KARIN S. OGRADY; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 14, 2007, and entered in Case No. 652007CA000021FCXXXX of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein NATIONALCITYBANK OF INDIANA, ANATIONALBANKING ASSOCIATION,is the Plaintiff and Michael J. OGrady; and Karin S. OGrady, are the Defendant(s). The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, on the 11th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 32, BLOCK KŽ, MAGNOLIAGARDENS, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINNG FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida, this 30th day of August, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk, Wakulla County, Florida By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 WWR #10057686 5368-0920 TWN vs. Highwoods II Case No. 2012-CA-40 Notice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-CA-40 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. HIGHWOODS II, LLC, ET AL., CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 21, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse on September 27, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described parcels of property located in Wakulla County, Florida: PHASE II, PARCELA COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK AŽ OF HIGHWOODS PLACE PHASE 1, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 65 OF 5369-0920 TWN vs. Barry, Joseph Case No. 11-355-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY CASE NO.: 11-355-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH C. BARRY, a/k/a JOSEPH C. BARRY, JR., BETTYG. BARRY, SUE ANN SMITH, CENTENNIALBANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, WAKULLABUSINESS CENTER PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, and UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION 1 and UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on October 4, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Begin at the intersection of Easterly right of way of U.S. Highway 319 and the Westerly boundary line of Lot 89 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING and said point being the point of curve to the right having a radius of 5679.67 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve and said right of way for 38.66 feet thru a central angle of 00 degrees 23 minutes 24 seconds, chord of said arc being North 28 degrees 07 minutes 16 seconds East 38.66 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving said right of way run South 62 degrees 51 minutes 25 seconds East 55.18 feet to a concrete monument; thence South 02 degrees 00 minutes 50 seconds West 151.83 feet to rod and cap lying on the Northerly right of way of Council Moore Road; thence run along said right of way North 87 degrees 59 minutes 10 seconds West 132.90 feet to a concrete monument marking the intersection of said right of way with the Easterly right of way of U.S. Highway Number 319; thence leaving said Northerly right of way run along said Easterly right of way North 27 degrees 08 minutes 35 seconds East 155.24 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any Person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. This Notice dated this 22nd day of August, 2012. Clerk, of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 5371-0927 TWN Vs. Hunter, Patricia Case No. 12-CA-229 FC Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 12-CA-229 FC, UCN: 652012CA000229XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. JAMES E. NORMAN; PATRICIAA. HUNTER; et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: PATRICIAA. HUNTER; Last Known Address 154 MILLCREEK RD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Current Residence is Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOTS 10 AND 11, BLOCK AŽ MILLCREEK ESTATES, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 15, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTYFLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SMITH, HIATT& DIAZ, P.A.., Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is PO BOX 11438, Fort Lauderdale, FL33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days from first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED ON September 7, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Becky Whaley, As Deputy Clerk September 20 & 27, 2012 1183-125876 5373-0927 TWN Vs Arnett, Shawnda Case No. 12-203-CANotice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.:12-203-CACIRCUIT CIVILDIV 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff vs. SHAWNDAARNETT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHAWNDA ARNETT; CITIFINANCIALEQUITYSERVICES, INC; and LONNIE WILLIAMS, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: LONNIE WILLIAMS YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose that mortgage, given by SHAWNDA ARNETT, originally in favor of MERS as nominee for The CITGroup/Consumer Finance, Inc., dated September 19, 2003 and recorded on September 26, 2003, in Official Records Book 506, Page 269; as assigned to 21st Mortgage Corporation by Assignment of Mortgage recorded in Official Records Book 784, Page 19, all of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, encumbering the following real property located in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: All that certain land situate, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 101 of the Hartsfield Survey of lands in Wakulla County, Florida, which point is on the South boundary line of Lot 92 Hartsfield Survey; thence run South 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West along said South boundary, 1183.28 feet to the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning, run North 17 degrees 45 minutes 29 seconds West, 330.18 feet to an iron rod with Cap #5518; thence South 72 degrees 57 minutes 25 seconds West, 132.47 feet to an iron rod with Cap #5516; thence South 17 degrees 50 minutes 23 seconds East 330.47 feet to a point lying on the aforesaid South boundary of Lot 92; thence run North 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East, along said South boundary, a distance of 132.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT the following: Commence at the Northeast corner of that certain tract of land conveyed to Lonnie Williams and Mollie Taylor by John E. Beasley and Eva Crosby Beasley, his wife, 5374-0927 TWN Vs. Dedmon, Heidi L..09-CA-500 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 09-CA-500 HSBC BANK USA, NATIONALASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR THE ELLINGTON TRUSTSERIES 2007-1, Plaintiff, vs. HEIDI L. DEDMON, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HEIDI L. DEDMON, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC. (MIN#100144300010887910), HALCOUNCIL, YVONNE COUNCIL, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 AND #2, AND ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, et al. Defendant(s). RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 28, 2010 and an Order Rescheduling the Foreclosure Sale dated September 6, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 09-CA-500 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein HSBC BANK USA, NATIONALASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR THE ELLINGTON TRUSTSERIES 2007-1, Plaintiff, and HEIDI L. DEDMON, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC. (MIN #1001944300010887910), HALCOUNCIL, YVONNE COUNCIL, are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32326 at 11:00 AM, on the 11th day of October, 2012, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: TRACT 2, OF EVERGREEN ACRES, UNIT NO. 2, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 77, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on September 7, 2011 BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Becky Whaley Deputy Clerk Attorney for the Plaintiff: Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, Popkin & Rosaler, P.A., 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL33442. Telephone (954)360-9030 Facsimile:(954)420-5187. September 20 & 27, 2012 5377-0927 TWN Vs. Norup, Del A. 11000368CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 11000368CA FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. DELA. NORUPAND SUSAN NORUP, et al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 6, 2012, and entered in 11000368CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, is the Plaintiff and DELA. NORUP; SUSAN NORUP; UNKNOWN TENANT#1 N/K/AKAYLANORUP; UNKNOWN TENANT#2 N/K/AKELSEYBURNETTE are the Defendant(s). Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Lobby of Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. on October 11th, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 9, BLOCK BŽ OF WILDWOOD ACRES, UNIT 2, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 78, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1996 MOBILE HOME IDENTIFICATION NO FLA14610809AAND FLA14610809B, TITLE NO V0528911 AND V0528912 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of September, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, as Deputy Clerk. IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less that 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. SEPTEMBER 20 & 27, 2012 11-13769 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices dated March 21, 1967, and recorded on Page 398 of Official Records Book 15, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; and thence run Southerly along the Easterly boundary of said tract of land, 89.00 feet; thence run West 100.00 feet to the East side of a road; thence run North along the East side of said graded road, 64.00 feet; thence run Easterly 100.00 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 1/4 of an acre, more or less, in Lot 92 of Hartsfield Survey of lands in Wakulla County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH that certain 2003 Value Made mobile home with Identification/Serial Numbers: CO2840AGAand CO2840AGB. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to SONYAK. DAWS, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Quintairos, Prieto, Wood & Boyer, P.A., 215 S. Monroe Street, Suite 510, Tallahassee, Florida 32301, within thirty (30) days after the first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on August 21, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County (seal) By:/s/Glenda Porter, as Deputy Clerk September 20 & 27, 2012 THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST, 180.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST, 169.69 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON ACURVE CONCAVE EASTERLY; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLYALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 361.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 13 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 55 SECONDS FOR ADISTANCE OF 84.46 FEET (CHORD BEARS SOUTH 25 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, 84.26 FEET); THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST, 197.41 FEET; THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST, 246.77 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST, 181.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PHASE II, PARCELB COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK AŽ OF HIGHWOODS PLACE PHASE 1, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 65 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WESTERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 1, ADISTANCE OF 134.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID LOT LINE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 45.87 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 1; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 1, ADISTANCE OF 30.08 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID BOUNDARYLINE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST, 189.45 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST, 138.82 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON ACURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY; THENCE NORTHWESTERLYALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 277.13 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 19 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 09 SECONDS FOR ADISTANCE OF 95.38 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 26 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST, 94.91 FEET) TO APOINT OF REVERSE CURVE; THENCE NORTHWESTERLYALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 321.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 18 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 29 SECONDS FOR ADISTANCE OF 101.59 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 27 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST, 101.17 FEET); THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST, 10.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST, 40.87 FEET; THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST, 131.73 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS, DRAINAGE AND UTILITIES OVER, UNDER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK AŽ OF HIGHWOODS PLACE PHASE 1, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 65 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST, 140.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY, 40.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST, 169.69 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING ARADIUS OF 361.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 49 SECONDS FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 100.31 FEET (CHORD BEARS SOUTH 26 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST, 99.99 FEET); THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST, 42.10 FEET TO APOINT ON ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST; THENCE NORTHWESTERLYALONG SAID CURVE HAVING ARADIUS OF 321.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 18 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 31 SECONDS FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 101.60 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 27 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST, 101.17 FEET; THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST, 170.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Date: September 5, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By:/s/Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!2323 Surf Rd. 3BR/2BA Bayfront road on Ochlockonee Bay, Screened Porch, Deck and Dock. No Smoking. No Pets. $1,150 per month. Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Commercial building 4,300 square foot heated and cooled building on 1 acre of land Rents out for $1,800.00. Building is in excellent condition. 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 55 Allison Dr. Panacea 3BR/2BA Furnished or Unfurnished. on Dickerson Bay $975 mo. No Smoking. No Pets RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 22 Coral Way 3BR./2BA with 1 car garage and fenced in yard on 1/2 acre. Pets okay with $250. fee, $950.mo/$950 Deposit. • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available, all utilities included. • 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./$900 Deposit • 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok • 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced • 82 Mimosa 3BR/1.5BA $650Mo./$650 Deposit • 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA Available Sept. 1, $900Mo./$900 Deposit • 14 Cutchin Ct. 3BR/2BA $650 mo/$650 Deposit. • 140 Duane St: 3BR/2BA $875 mo and $875 Security deposit. No smoking pets ok with owner approval and $250 pet fee. Available Oct. 1.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 – Page 9B 5359-0920 TWN vs. Barry, Joseph Case No. 11-355-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY CASE NO.: 11-355-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH C. BARRY, a/k/a JOSEPH C. BARRY, JR., BETTYG. BARRY, SUE ANN SMITH, CENTENNIALBANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, WAKULLABUSINESS CENTER PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, and UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on October 4, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Commence at the Southwest corner of Lot 81 (also being the Southeast corner of Lot 86) of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North 72 degrees 31 minutes 32 seconds East along the South boundary of said Lot 81 and along the centerline of survey of State Road No. 30 (US Highway No. 98) a distance of 1162.00 feet; thence run North 17 degrees 45 minutes West 1453.00 feet, thence run North 72 degrees 30 minutes East 445.00 feet, thence run North 22 degrees 15 minutes West 937.00 feet to an old concrete monument on the approximate edge of Swirl Swamp, thence run South 77 degrees 30 minutes West along said swamps edge 1047.38 feet, thence continue South 77 degrees 30 minutes West 52.62 feet, thence run North 47 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 238.96 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 47 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 407.40 feet, thence run North 36 degrees 34 minutes 31 seconds East 27.26 feet, thence run North 22 degrees 13 minutes 54 seconds East 60.87 feet, thence run North 24 degrees 01 minutes 40 seconds East 45.54 feet, thence run North 19 degrees 34 minutes 40 seconds East 38.59 feet, thence run North 43 degrees 30 minutes 59 seconds East 35.04 feet, thence run North 27 degrees 00 minutes 05 seconds East 36.64 feet, thence run North 18 degrees 09 minutes 28 seconds West 43.34 feet, thence run North 01 degrees 01 minutes 34 seconds East 41.65 feet, thence run North 53 degrees 19 minutes 03 seconds East 40.02 feet, thence run North 86 degrees 01 minutes 13 seconds East 54.31 feet, thence run North 49 degrees 11 minutes 17 seconds East 48.95 feet, thence run North 76 degrees 10 minutes 44 seconds East 32.77 feet, thence run South 62 degrees 21 minutes 32 seconds East 43.16 feet, thence run South 24 degrees 35 minutes 12 seconds East 78.88 feet, thence run South 14 degrees 17 minutes 20 seconds West 54.71 feet, thence run South 04 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds West 47.01 feet, thence run South 07 degrees 13 minutes 11 seconds East 59.89 feet, thence run South 18 degrees 10 minutes 20 seconds East 37.95 feet, thence run South 34 degrees 37 minutes 59 seconds East 29.50 feet, thence run South 02 degrees 40 minutes 21 seconds West 20.31 feet, thence run South 45 degrees 15 minutes 53 seconds East 29.53 feet, thence run South 32 degrees 59 minutes 42 seconds East 30.59 feet, thence run South 04 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds East 35.07 feet, thence run South 32 degrees 18 minutes 21 seconds West 36.93 feet, thence run South 25 degrees 00 minutes 20 seconds West 40.47 feet, thence run South 29 degrees 09 minutes 27 seconds West 51.83 feet, thence run South 07 degrees 17 minutes 07 seconds West 36.95 feet, thence run South 47 degrees 05 minutes 20 seconds West 25.89 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 44 minutes 43 seconds East 26.47 feet, thence run South 08 degrees 50 minutes 25 seconds West 31.15 feet, thence run South 47 degrees 41 minutes 59 seconds West 11.80 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any Person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. This Notice dated this 22nd day of August, 2012. Clerk, of Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 5360-0920 vs. Irwin, William Case No. 652009CA000445CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 652009CA000445CA BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONALASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM M. IRWIN; LISAD. IRWIN; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANTS(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 4th day of October, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lots 30 and 31, Block 53, of WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT V, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 56, of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 22nd day of August, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration 5364-0920 TWN Vs. Dibona, Anthony Case No. 11000158CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case No.: 11000158CADivision: FLAGSTAR ABANK, FSB Plaintiff, v. ANTHONYA. DIBONAA/K/AANTHONYDIBONA, ETAL, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated June 21, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 11000158CA, DIVISION:, of the Circuit Court of theSecond Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and ANTHONYA. DIBONAA/K/AANTHONYDIBONA; WENDYM. DIBONAA/K/A WENDYDIBONA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANTHONYA. DIBONAA/K/AANTHONY DIBONA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WENDYM. DIBONAA/K/AWENDYDIBONA; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTYOWN UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2 are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 1 1:00 a.m. at front door of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327 on the 4th day of October, 2012 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, BLOCK F, OF SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 88, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 58 Gold Finch Way, Crawfordville, FL32327 If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on August 28, 2012 (COURTSEAL) BRENTX. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT By; /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintif f: Liana Hall, Esquire Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544 Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 at least 7 working days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 13 & 20, 2012 3524-28474 5365-0920 TWN Vs.Serai, Kanwaljit Case No. 2009-250-CANotice of Sale ber are 0644, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLACounty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is SEPTEMBER 13, 2012. Personal Representative: Brenda Joy Wilson 181 Avenue G, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 Attorney For Personal Representative: Kristy Branch Banks, Florida Bar Number: 517143 Attorney for Brenda Wilson P.O. Box 176, Apalachicola, FL32329 Telephone: (850) 670-1255 Fax: (850) 670-1256 E-Mail: info@kbblawfl.com September 13 & 20, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904)926-0905, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (SEAL) BY: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2009-250-CA HERITAGE COMMUNITYBANK d/b/a AMERIS BANK, Plaintiff, v. KANWALJIT SINGH SERAI a/k/a K.S. SERAI, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: Commence at an old concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North along the East boundary of the Southwest quarter of said Section 25 a distance of 667.78 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261) marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Southwest quarter of said Section 25, thence run North 89 degrees 04 minutes 30 seconds West 315.00 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 89 degrees 04 minutes 30 seconds West 547.05 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 00 degrees 23 minutes 26 seconds East 999.46 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run South 88 degrees 33 minutes 08 seconds East 116.83 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run North 00 degrees 32 minutes 13 seconds East 28.57 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 88 degrees 37 minutes 25 seconds East 419.88 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 11 minutes 14 seconds East 1023.81 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 12.68 acres, more or less. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein after, at public sale on September 27, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 7, at the W akulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, Florida 32327 If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Timothy D. Padgett, ESQ.,Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Counsel for Plaintiff September 13 & 20, 2012 5 Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2 Go to http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click ContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ. MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON SEPTEMBER 10, 2012SEPTEMBER 20, 2012

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 14 … If you can read the political winds, thank a teacher. Gov. Rick Scott seems to have thought this week that maybe he could learn a thing or two from teachers, if hed just listen to them. Republicans have been on rocky terms with the education establishment for some time, and while teachers are a pretty diverse group, the union that represents many of them has never been a big fan of Scott. But people in the governors of“ ce must be reading something that tells them education might just be a popular topic for voters. And so this week, Scott headed out to see what teachers and parents are talking about in the states classrooms and kid drop-off zones. Scott visited schools in just about every corner of the state and in the middle this week, saying it was a listening tour to get good ideas for how to improve education. Scott also sent out letters to students around the state, urging them to focus on their schooling, and cautioning college freshmen about borrowing too much in student loans. This week, I am traveling all across Florida to meet with teachers, parents and students in order to get their ideas for ways we can strengthen our education system,Ž Scott said last weekend in his regular radio address. Our goal is better prepare our kids for college and careers. Some of my meetings will be roundtables where I will sit down and have a conversation on the types of policies we need to put in place at the state level.Ž A number of Democrats, including lawmakers and candidates, dismissed the tour as a public relations stunt that wont change much, and criticized Republicans for presiding over several years of budget cuts to public schools. While the Republicanled Legislature, pushed by Scott, did increase school spending by about $1 billion last year, the education budget was cut by roughly the same amount the year before, making the increase a wash. Its sad that politicians like Rick Scott ƒ have chosen to gut this vital investment … draining millions of dollars from local public schools while handing out tax breaks to special interests,Ž one Democratic House candidate, Karen Castor Dentel, said in a statement this week. Among the most vocal critics of Republican education policy over the last decade and a half has been the Florida Education Association, the states largest teacher union. An FEA spokesman has called Scotts new interest in the details of education policy a campaign move. But on Friday, the governor was concluding his reach-out and listen tour with a dinner with the FEA at the Governors Mansion, so maybe theres some common ground that can be found. What exactly the governors education agenda will be during the next two years is a bit hard to glean. He did several radio interviews this week in which he was thrown open-ended softballs on what he was learning from the school visits, and Scott talked about some of the things he heard from teachers, but didnt say what that might mean for policy changes. For example, Scott mentioned in a few interviews that he heard from a lot of teachers that they pay for supplies out of their pockets. He also wrote about that on a blog his office published this week. The Southwest faculty also shared that they often could use help to purchase supplies for their classrooms that they now pay for personally,Ž Scott wrote on the blog after visiting Southwest Miami High School. Whether he may have any ideas for that help, Scott didnt say. In fact, Scott never mentioned … though in fairness, he ever asked in the radio interviews … whether taking note of the supply issue might mean he will push for some policy change. Teacher pay didnt get talked about much this week, nor did Scott make any mention of what he will ask lawmakers for in terms of the education budget for the coming year. After visiting classrooms, we talked to a group of teachers,Ž Scott wrote on his blog. Each of them offered great suggestions on how requirements and regulations from the state could be changed to allow them to focus more on student learning.Ž What those suggestions were, Scott didnt say, and the meetings were closed to the public and press. So if the governor didnt write what he learned, no one did. Similarly, Scott said several times this week that he heard from teachers that there are too many different tests that students must take, and there doesnt seem to be much coordination in terms of the measurement system. But Scott didnt discuss … again he wasnt asked … what his administration might do about that. He did mention a couple of times that Florida is moving away from the FCAT, but that is something thats been in the works for several years. The previous governor, Charlie Crist, signed a law shifting away from that particular test. Scott did say in his blog that all the students, parents and teachers he met agree with him that jobs are important, and that education is important for preparing students to be able to get them. MO MONEY, OR NO MONEY? If the governor is thinking about asking for an increase in the education budget, he may have a sales job in the Legislature, the incoming Senate president indicated this week. Theres no question Scott, whose popularity has never been as high as hed like, got some good will from this years decision to restore the education cuts from 2011. State revenue forecasters said this week that tax collections are up a bit, and lawmakers are expected for the “ rst time in several years to be looking at beginning the budget writing process in the black. But while the Legislature will have about $71.3 million of breathing room when they begin crafting the budget for the coming “ scal year, most in the Legislature expressed caution, a fear that the situation could still change, and a warning that the amount in the black is, overall, pretty small. Incoming Senate President Don Gaetz this week called it a footnoteŽ to the states roughly $70 billion budget. In reality, Gaetz said in an interview with The News Service, there is no extra money.Ž Gaetz, a former school superintendent, also said that more spending doesnt necessarily mean better outcomes and hes seen that “ rst hand. The question about education spending is not just how much, but how it is being used,Ž Gaetz said. We need to redeploy some … not all … but some education dollars for 21st Century methods, like online education. It isnt always the case that more money, shoved at a 1950s model, is always the best.Ž Scott clearly thinks that more money is, at a minimum, a good talking point, however. During at least one of his school visits this week, a big sign touting $1 Billion for EducationŽ was strategically placed behind Scott as he met with teachers, ensuring it would be in the photos of the event. The forecast for increased revenue didnt get the cheers expected because, well, its not that much. It is very good news in terms of the fact that theres no budget gap, but we would give you the warning that theres not much of a cushion there,Ž the Legislatures head of revenue forecasting, Amy Baker, said midweek. She also warned that there are plenty of things to be worried about in terms of the economy and that a retrenchment isnt out of the picture. PRISON PRIVATIZATION Also this week, the Legislative Budget Commission, gave its OK to a planned privatization of the health care services at the states prisons. The state prisons department was initially authorized by lawmakers to privatize health services last year in the state budget, but the plan got held up in the courts. When the new budget year started July 1, the authorization in the budget technically expired. The Department of Corrections and backers of the privatization plan say the agency doesnt need approval of the full Legislature to make the policy change. But the department had to go to the LBC, which approves mid-year budget amendments, to get money moved around so the process could go forward. The budget change passed the panel on a 6-4 party-line vote with Republicans in favor. That should mean the proposal will go forward in January. But unlike the jumpsuits worn by some prisoners, the future of the plan is hardly black and white. A union that represents many state workers, AFSCME, has vowed a new lawsuit on the issue. Meanwhile, one of the contractors interested in providing health services in the prison system has “ led a case at a state appeals court over the bidding. WILL FLA DEMOCRATS GIVE CRIST A BEAR HUG OR THE FINGER? Fresh off his speaking turn at the Democratic National Convention, Charlie Crist returned to Florida, and quickly found that while he may not be welcomed by all Democrats as a candidate, he would fare pretty well. The former Republican governor drew nearly 30 percent of the support of Democratic voters who were polled on their choices for a gubernatorial candidate in 2014 … within the margin of error of a dead heat with the partys last gubernatorial nominee, Alex Sink. The poll showed Crist and Sink well ahead of anyone else, with Miami advocate Anthony Kennedy Shriver far back in third. Crists break with the Republican Party … (stipulated: he says he didnt leave, they left him, but whatever) … may have begun when he famously hugged President Obama. After Fort Pierce pizza shop owner Scott Van Duzer was photographed lifting President Obama off the ground in a bear hug during an Obama campaign stop this week, Crist decided to get in on the action. He showed up at Van Duzers shop to claim his own hug. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott spends the week in school, visiting classrooms from Miami to Quincy and at points in between, listening to teachers, students and parents, and even later meeting with union of“ cials. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: You know what Im here for.Ž Charlie Crist, reportedly, as he walked into the pizza shop where President Obama got a bear hug this week, and claimed his own hug from shop owner Scott Van Duzer.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Don’t know the answer? Ask the teacherBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 26 32 39 43 51 55 63 66 69 2 27 52 3 28 53 4 29 47 5 23 44 21 33 40 48 56 64 67 70 6 15 18 34 45 57 7 30 58 8 31 54 9 24 41 49 25 35 50 65 68 71 10 16 19 22 42 46 59 11 36 60 12 37 61 13 38 62 ACROSS 1. Like a lot 6. Figure skater Katarina 10. Say "!@#$%" 14. Garbo line ender 15. Bar mitzvah dance 16. Declare openly 17. Escapades 18. School on the Thames 19. Stubborn beast 20. Part of the system that produces white blood cells 22. Trudge along 23. Nettle 24. Simple hydrocarbon 26. Natty of "The Leather-Stocking Tales" 30. Bend over backwards? 32. Jacob's twin 33. Small songbird 35. Windows typeface 39. Six years, for a senator 40. Washday units 42. Treater's words 43. Highly skilled 45. Reaso n to cancel school 46. Home furnishings chain 47. One of us 49. Nantucket, for one 51. Cost, slangily 54. Volcanic output 55. March 17th slogan word 56. Beethoven, notably 63. Bankroll 64. Coal-rich region 65. Quebec's __ Peninsula 66. Genesis victim 67. Ticklish Muppet 68. Set free 69. Gross minus net, to a trucker 70. Baseball's Dizzy or Daffy 71. MiddaysDOWN1. It may be unmitigated 2. Oil of __ (cosmetics brand) 3. Dressmaker's dummy 4. Like a GI peeling spuds 5. Send again 6. Spiral-shelled critter 7. I, as in Ithaca? 8. Sci-fi film of '82 9. Bicycle built for two 10. Emollient in some skin creams 11. That thing hanging from your palate 12. Wise Athenian 13. Ingmar or Ingrid Bergman 21. Sound of an empty stomach 25. Unfilled, on a TV sched. 26. Early VCR format 27. Played for a sap 28. Stable mother 29. Service station attendant's fistful 30. Rimes of country 31. __-European (language group) 34. Parks in 1955 news 36. "__ Dinka Doo" 37. Sermon closer 38. X-ray vision thwarter 41. Swing-and-a-miss sound 44. Harbor workhorse 48. __ up (erred) 50. Japanese bigwig of old 51. Make more lean 52. Resort spot off Venezuela 53. Worker with a pick 54. Golf green surrounder 57. Dubya's school 58. Doll's cry 59. Prefix meaning "one-billionth" 60. Analogy words 61. Wash cycle 62. Shirts with slogans American Prole Hometown Content 9/16/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 23 2456 672 839 216 176295 7 89 2963 164 200 9 HometownContent 951 2637 4 8 274895361 683471952 839 542176 562719834 147638295 716 384529 428957613 395126487 G A L L B E T A D E F A T O L A Y U S E D A R U B A F O R M M A R E M I N E R O N K P P U M P H A N D L E R E S H I P T U G G R O W L M E S S E D W H E L K R O S A Y A L E I O T A L E A N N M A M A T R O N I N D O A P R O N T A N D E M S W I S H T B A S H O G U N C A M P H O R O I L N A N O U V U L A I N K A I S T O S O L O N A M E N S P I N S W E D E L E A D T E E S

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 – Page 11B 1. LITERATURE: Who was Englands first, unofficial poet laureate? 2. MUSIC: Which musical group had a hit with Penny LaneŽ? 3. MEASUREMENTS: How many meters are in an are,Ž a unit of land measurement? 4. INVENTIONS: Who invented frozen food in 1923? 5. GEOGRAPHY: Which countries share the region of Patagonia? 6. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the traditional birthstone associated with July? 7. ASTRONOMY: The moon called Titan orbits which planet in our solar system? 8. HISTORY: In what year did Ohios National Guard kill four war protesters at Kent State University? 9. MOVIES: Which Disney movie featured a character named Dory? 10. RELIGION: Who is the patron saint of carpenters? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Ben Jonson 2. The Beatles 3. 100 square meters 4. Clarence Birdseye 5. Argentina and Chile 6. Ruby 7. Saturn 8. 1970 9. Finding NemoŽ 10. St. Joseph YOUR AD HERE

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 20, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet (ARA) The average super market offers some 45,000 food products, most of which are packaged, processed and a poor choice for someone who wants to eat healthy even when the package says otherwise with claims of being natural, whole grain and even organic. People love the idea of convenience, especially with their food,Ž says registered dietitian Anika DeCoster, assistant program manager of LifeTime WeightLoss, a division of Life Time, The Healthy Way of Life Company. Most of the convenience and processed foods on the market are barely recognizable to the human body. The body cant properly digest, absorb or use nutrients in these modi“ ed foods effectively, which negatively impacts metabolism, weight and energy production.Ž Of those 45,000 products, there are four DeCoster says you can stop buying now. Breakfast cereal. Most Americans consume an over-abundance of sugar, not just in desserts but also via processed foods, like breakfast cereals that contain simple carbohydrates, which our bodies treat like sugar when they enter the bloodstream. Fruit juice and soda. One of the main culprits of the obesity epidemic, soda … even diet soda … has a negative impact on healthy eating. Fruit juice, while seemingly more healthy since it is made with fruit, contains so much sugar, it outweighs any bene“ ts. Water is the only beverage a body truly needs. Salad dressing. Eating a salad? Good for you. Top it with dressing loaded with sugar, additives and preservatives and youve just doused those healthy vegetables with an unhealthy dose of products your body doesnt need. Making your own salad dressing is simple: whisk together oil … like olive, walnut, or sesame seed … with acid, like red wine vinegar, balsamic vinegar or lemon juice. Non-fat ” avored yogurt. Instead, buy plain full-fat Greek yogurt and add your own flavorings such as nuts/seeds, a little organic honey or berries,Ž DeCoster says. Thats right, full-fat. The fat in the yogurt helps your body absorb fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin D.ŽFour foods you dont need ~ BY Le CHAT BOUTIQUE ~ AND LOCAL CANDIDATES ~ WHAT: A DAY AT THE SPA FOR YOUR SPECIAL POOCH WHEN: SATURDAY, Sept. 29, 2012 FROM 10:00 A.M. … 3:00 P.M.WHERE: Hudson Park, Crawfordville AMENITIES FOR THE DISCRIMINATING POOCH: All Natural Ingredients; Aromatherapy Bubble Bath (lavender, vanilla, mintƒmore); Le Flea & Tick Spray; PAWdicures; DONATIONS: $10.00 ALL AMENITIES/Flea spray included $ 5.00 REGULAR BATH ONLY $ 5.00 GLAMOUR PHOTO (pearls, bow ties, hats, ribbons, boas, etc.) $ 25.00 Micro … chipping, including registration of micro chipNATURAL GOURMET DOGGIE BISCUITS FOR PURCHASE Please remember to spay and neuter your pets. CHAT needs volunteers. CHAT Memberships start at $15 a year. C.H.A.T. OF Wakulla Inc. PO Box 1195 Crawfordville FL 32326www.chatofwakulla.orgA copy of the of“cial registration CH-13163 and “nancial information may be obtained from the FL Division of Consumer Services. Registration does not imply endorsement, approval, or recommendation by the State. October Is Breast Cancer Awareness MonthThe Wakulla News Pink Paper Day Thursday, October 4The Wakulla News will be  IN THE PINK Ž on Oct. 4 when the entire newspaper will be printed on PINK NEWSPRINT as part of the fight against breast cancer. Some of the proceeds from advertising, special tribute opportunities, subscriptions sales and donations in conjunction with the Oct. 4 PINK PAPER will go to the We Can Foundation a nonprofit organization that assists local cancer patients with out of pocket expenses such as gas and medications. This is one of the largest grassroots movements to make funding available for breast cancer screening, treatment and care as well as federal funding for breast cancer research.Be a part of this special promotion and make a difference in your community!(850) 926-7102 Pick up the same ad during October for 10% Off.Special Rate IncentivesFull Page. .................. ........ .$400 Half Page............................$300 Quarter Page .................... .$125*All other sizes will be billed at the 13 Week Contract Rate. Publish Date: October 4th Ad Deadline: September 28th Please support the fight against cancer by advertising on this special page October 4th. The Wakulla News will be IN THE PINKŽ on October 4 when the entire newspaper will be printed on PINK NEWSPRINT as part of the fight against breast cancer. Some of the proceeds from advertising, spe cial tribute opportunities, subscriptions sales and donations in conjunction with the News October 4 PINK PAPER will go to the We Can Foundation a nonprofit organization that assists cancer patients with out of pocket expenses such as gas and medications. ONLY$40.00 Pick up your ad for the rest of the October for ONLY $25.00 each! 2x3 (3.389Žx3Ž) Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator