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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00426
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 09-13-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00426
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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 35th Issue Thursday, September 13, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices ..............................................................Page 2,3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Green Scene .................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 6B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11BINDEX OBITUARIES John Wayne Brim Evelyn Carraway Gowdy Doye Dean Hudson Sam McKinney Jackson Betty Rae Smith-Nix Weldon Mike Vowell Jr. Alta A. WoodsonSee Page 12A By JACKIE LAWHONSpecial to The NewsWilliam Boyd Stephens Sr. was hired by the City of Sopchoppy on June 28, 1973. He was hired to perform city maintenance and run the small city water system that only had about 60 customers. Sopchoppy was immediately impacted and forever changed by Bills outgoing, dynamic personality and he quickly earned the title of Mr. Sopchoppy. Making the move from Polk County with his wife, Bobbie, and four young children, Bill didnt let something like a major move slow him down, he jumped right into organizing the rst Sopchoppy Fourth of July Celebration two days after starting his new job. Even though this rst celebration consisted of a few cars parading through town with a small group gathering at the school to eat, it was the beginning of a celebration that has gone on for 39 years and has become one of the best known and most popular Fourth of July Celebrations in the area. Bill was responsible for putting Sopchoppy on the Nashville radar with his booking of many well-known country stars. Continued on Page 15A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netOral arguments for the rst appeal by convicted killer Gary Michael Hilton for the 2011 death sentence for the kidnapping and rst-degree murder of Cheryl Dunlap were held on Sept. 6 before the Florida Supreme Court. Hilton, 65, was found guilty on Feb. 15, 2011, by a 12-person jury of killing Dunlap. Dunlap disappeared from the Leon Sinks Geological Area in December 2007 and her body was found two weeks later in the Apalachicola National Forest. On April 21, 2011, Hilton was sentenced to death by the trial judge who agreed with the unanimous decision of the jury. Hilton was also convicted of the murder of hiker Meredith Emerson in Georgia in January 2008, for which he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to life in prison. In March, Hilton pleaded guilty to murdering a North Carolina couple, John and Irene Bryant, in October 2007. Continued on Page 15AMr. Sopchoppy Bill Stephens is dead at 72 High court hears appeal of Hilton death sentenceRemembering Sept. 11 Bill Stephens at Worm Gruntin Festival in 2011 By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netPeople gathered at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of- ce early Tuesday morning to pay their respects and remember the day that many Americans have vowed to never forget. A memorial service was held on Sept. 11 at 8:45 a.m., the time the rst World Trade Center tower was struck during the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. A moment of silence was held for the nearly 3,000 people who lost their lives on that tragic day 11 years ago, in New York, at the Pentagon and in a eld in Shanksville, Pa. Major Maurice Langston spoke of that day and how Americans came together and were different than they had been the day before the attacks. Hands went out, knees were bent and heads were bowed, Langston said. We were different on Tuesday than Monday. Chaplain Billy Berry agreed, saying, I remember the weeks after and the unity of this nation. Members of several law enforcement agencies, Wakulla County Fire Rescue, emergency medical services, county employees, veterans and citizens attended the event. The sheriffs of ce has held the event every year since the attacks. Those in attendance heard Bobbie Jo Crouch and Becky Cook sing patriotic anthems and watched as members of the Wakulla High School NJROTC raised the ag while David Miller played Taps. JENNIFER JENSENDavid Miller, above center, plays Taps as the ag is lower half-staff, during somber memorial ceremony. A salute, below.A promise to KISS A FROGBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netMolly Jones, a fourth-grade student at Medart Elementary School, made a promise last school year while running for sergeant-at-arms that she intended to keep. While writing her campaign speech with her father, Kyle, she decided to do something a little different to capture the students attention. Her idea was to have thenschool Principal Bobby Pearce kiss either a frog or a pig if the school received its 11th consecutive A rating. I thought it would be something cool for all the kids to see him kiss it, Molly Jones says. Kyle Jones says along with it being something unique, It was good motivation for the kids to do well on the FCAT. While brainstorming, Molly Jones says she ultimately decided a frog was the better choice over the pig. I thought a frog would be easier to catch, she says. During her campaign speech, she promised to do all she could to make it happen. And in the end, she won the race. Jones and her father caught the large bullfrog in a pond the day before an assembly was held at Medart on Sept. 10 to recognize the high performing school and the students for their performance on the FCAT. The nale of the assembly was Pearce and Jones both keeping the promise they had made last year. After catching the frog, she says she was scared of it, but eventually got used to it. During the assembly, she even showed the frog some love by kissing it on the head. Continued on Page 8A JENNIFER JENSENFourth-grader Molly Jones ran for sergeant-at-arms at Medart Elementary promising the principal would kiss a frog if the school was an A school. It was. On Monday, he did. SEEK students visit

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARINGSEPTEMBER 13, 2012 The City of St. Marks has tentatively adopted a budget for scal year 2012-2013. A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will be held on Tuesday, September 18, 2012 at 5:15 P.M. at 788 Port Leon Drive St. Marks, Florida PUBLIC NOTICECity of St. Marks Regular Meeting September 13, 2012 At 7:00 pm has been canceledThe City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Ofce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 COUNTY COMMI(SSIONBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe rst public hearing on the Wakulla County budget for the upcoming fiscal year, 2012-13, was held on Sept. 4 The $41.9 million-budget includes no new tax increases and the same millage rate from the previous year of 8.5 mills. The most notable change this year is creation and elimination of some county departments. County Administrator David Edwards said it was done to improve ef- ciency and put tasks and divisions in the proper departments. The re-organization includes eliminating the deputy county administrator position Tim Barden is leaving the county at the end of the year and the Of ce of Management and Budget and transferring budget management back to the clerk of the court. The transfer includes relocating a vacant Of ce of Management and Budget analyst position to the clerks of ce. The Public Information Of ce has also been renamed to the Communication and Public Services Office. That office will be responsible for special projects, agenda management, public records requests, recreation services, veteran services and library services. Previously, recreation, veterans services and the library were under the deputy county administrator. The county administrator will also now oversee the airport and probation services, which were under the deputy county administrator as well. The Office of Intergovernmental Affairs has been created and will be responsible for grants administration, contract management, legislative, economic development and the RESTORE Act. The Parks and Recreation Department has been split and renamed the Parks and Facilities Management. This department will be in charge of the maintenance of the parks and county buildings. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he felt this was a good idea. And like the idea of the recreation and organization aspect being split from the management of the facilities. Recreation will now fall under the Communications and Public Services Of ce. Commissioner Lynn Artz agreed and said it was important to increase the budget and staf ng in the facilities management department. Edwards said the county will also be hiring a parks and facilities management director and will look for someone with contracting experience. Other changes include having the Building Department be responsible for building inspections and code enforcement. Fire Rescue will include fire services, emergency medical services, animal control and the liaison with the emergency management department. Also included in the changes is hiring an of ce assistant. The current administrative coordinator will move to the of ce of Fire Rescue. The county will also hire a grants coordinator. Another change is the creation of the Sheriffs Fine and Forfeiture Fund which is dedicated to capturing all of the sheriffs of ces related costs into one fund. This will help the county move away from relying on the Jail Bed Revenue, Edwards said. That can go away with the stroke of a pen from the president, he said. Upcoming capital improvements include a new re and EMS station using money from the MSBU and one-cent sales tax; construction of the sheriffs annex using impact fees and one-cent sales tax; community center renovation using the legislative appropriation; and improvements to Hudson and Azalea parks. Other projects include capping the Lower Bridge Road land ll, xing nine different roofs on county buildings, restriping roads and replacing some equipment. This is the most comprehensive budget I think we have ever put together, said County Commissioner Mike Stewart. Stewart has been a proponent of lowering the millage rate, but said he felt it was not the right time. He added that building back reserves was crucial. Four years ago, we had no reserves, he said. We nally got the train back on the tracks. Merritt said two years ago, tough decisions had to be made and the reserves had been depleted. Weve got a plan to get us out of the hole, he said. And he added that the commission must stick with the plan. Commissioner Jerry Moore agreed that it was a good budget and added that Edwards has helped put them back on track. Weve got a new sheriff in town, he said. Commissioner Alan Brock liked the consistency of the budget and keeping the millage rate at the same amount instead of decreasing it then increasing it the next year and so on. He added that it makes the county more attractive to businesses. The nal budget hearing will be held on Sept. 17.Budget unveiled with no new taxes, 8.5 millage rateBeginning Sept. 4, the Wakulla Clerks Court Divisions resumed normal business hours of 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, Wakulla Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond announced last week. State funding for court service was cut for the year starting July 1st, said Thurmond. After a meeting of the Legislative Budget Commission last month, the budget cut was largely restored to clerks of ces across Florida. The Clerks Of ce is thankful for the decision of state leaders and is looking forward to getting back to business of providing the best service possible that our resources allow for the citizens of Wakulla County. By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 11 After months of political and legal wrangling, counties and the state have put on hold a lawsuit about the constitutionality of a new law that would cost counties tens of millions of dollars in disputed Medicaid charges. A document led Monday in Leon County circuit court calls for an abatement of the case until later this year, as counties and the state Agency for Health Care Administration continue talks about how to carry out the law. Also, the document says some counties could notify the state this week that they are dropping out of the lawsuit. The case stems from a dispute about whether counties have paid their full shares of required Medicaid costs going back to 2001. Legislative leaders, arguing that counties owed money, passed a law in March aimed at recouping back payments and collecting money in future years --while counties argued the states billing system was riddled with problems. An initial estimate indicated counties could owe as much as $325 million in back payments. But that number was cut by about half after AHCA officials visited each county to go through billing issues. A coalition of counties led the lawsuit in April, arguing in part that the new law violated a state constitutional ban on what are known as unfunded mandates imposed on local governments. The abatement of the lawsuit does not change those allegations or another claim by the counties that the state is legally barred from trying to recoup money from 2001 to 2008. But the document led Monday indicates that counties and AHCA of cials have been working closely on the complicated billing issues, including a statement that says counties have had unprecedented access to agency staff for collaboration in seeking solutions. The document, known as a stipulation, lists 54 of the 67 counties as plaintiffs in the lawsuit including Wakulla County along with the Florida Association of Counties. It was not clear late Tuesday afternoon how many counties might choose a settlement option that is outlined in the document. But if counties withdraw from the case, they would be able to avoid a controversial part of the law that allows the state to withhold what are known as revenue sharing payments to recoup Medicaid money from the past. Counties are adamantly opposed to losing the revenue-sharing payments, arguing they often have pledged that state money to cover speci c expenses. Medicaid case put on hold for nowClerk restores o ce hours

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Proposed Millage Levy General Fund 8.5000 Estimated Revenues: General FundSpecial RevenueCapital ProjectsEnterprise FundTotal All Funds Taxes: Millage Per$1000 95% Ad Valorem Taxes8.5000 1,117,398 $ 8,566,138 $ 2,247,826 $ 11,931,362 $ Sales, Use & Fuel Taxes 1,780,326 $ 1,281,978 $ 1,840,860 $ $ 4,903,164 $ Charges For Services 1,482,320 $ 2,889,482 $ $ 1,924,399 $ 6,296,201 $ Fines and Foreitures 132,500 $ 188,050 $ $ $ 320,550 $ Intergovernmental Revenue 4,519,846 $ 4,968,363 $ 2,693,548 $ 70,588 $ 12,252,345 $ Licenses and Permits 62,300 $ 20,000 $ $ $ 82,300 $ Miscellaneous Revenues 101,698 $ 1,000,000 $ 1,000,150 $ 2,101,848 $ Total Sources 9,196,388 $ 18,914,011 $ 4,534,408 $ 5,242,963 $ 37,887,770 $ Transfers In 68,392 $ 49,438 $ $ 34,104 $ 151,934 $ Fund Balances 102,506 $ 1,062,349 $ 2,072,545 $ 716,402 $ 3,953,802 $ 9,367,286 $ 20,025,798 $ 6,606,953 $ 5,993,469 $ 41,993,506 $ Expenditures: General Government 6,500,608 $ $ $ $ 6,500,608 $ Public Safety 1,841,578 $ 13,457,811 $ 443,047 $ $ 15,742,436 $ Physical Environment $ $ 4,859,856 $ 4,859,856 $ Transportation 1,689,078 $ 1,821,125 $ $ 3,510,203 $ Economic Environment $ $ $ $ Human Services 1,308,150 $ $ $ 1,308,150 $ Culture / Recreation 534,858 $ 2,092,653 $ 1,553,841 $ $ 4,181,352 $ Court-Related Expenses 500,626 $ 118,500 $ $ 619,126 $ Debt Service $ 281,331 $ 971,529 $ 559,108 $ 1,811,968 $ Total Expenditures 8,877,044 $ 19,329,649 $ 4,908,042 $ 5,418,964 $ 38,533,699 $ Transfers Out 90,242 $ 53,392 $ 8,300 $ $ 151,934 $ Fund Balances / Reserves 400,000 $ 642,757 $ 1,690,611 $ 574,505 $ 3,307,873 $ 9,367,286 $ 20,025,798 $ 6,606,953 $ 5,993,469 $ 41,993,506 $ Total Revenues, Transfers, Reserves and Fund Balances Total Expenditures, Transfers, Reserves and Fund BalancesBudget SummaryWakulla County, Florida Fiscal Year 2012/2013 September 13, 2012 The County of Wakulla has tentatively adopted a budget for Fiscal Year 2012/2013. A public hearing to make the FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will be held on: Monday, September 17, 2012 at 5:01 p.m. at Wakulla County Commission Chambers 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARINGSEPTEMBER 13, 2012 The Wakulla County Housing Authority is required by 24 CFR 903.17 to prepare a Five-Year Plan and an Annual Plan. The purpose of these plans is to provide a comprehensive guide to PHA policies, programs, operations, and strategies for meeting local housing needs and goals. The Five-Year Plan describes the mission of the PHA and the PHAs long-range goals and objectives for achieving its mission over the subsequent ve years. The Annual Plan provides details about the PHAs immediate operations, program participants, programs, and services, and the PHAs strategy of handling operational concerns, residents concerns and needs, programs and services for the upcoming scal year. As required, the Wakulla County Housing Authority is making a draft of the Annual Plan for Fiscal Year 2012 2013, along with required attachments and documents related to the plans, available to the public at least 45 days prior to the public hearing which will be held to receive input on the plan (date and location of hearing listed below). The Annual Plan for Fiscal Year 2012-2013 will be available for review, inspection and comment from Thursday, September 13, 2012 through October 30, 2012, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday at: Wakulla County Administration Building 3093 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, Florida 32327 The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing regarding the FY 20122013 Annual Plan on Monday, November 5, 2012 at its regularly scheduled Board of County Commissioners meeting commencing at 5:00 p.m. at: Wakulla County Commissioner Chambers 29 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Members of the public are invited to attend this meeting. To obtain further information about the Annual PHA Plan, please contact Wallisa Cobb, Housing Administrator, at (850) 877-1908. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITYA FAIR HOUSING/ EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/ HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTIONSEPTEMBER 13, 2012 Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Sopchoppy City Commission voted four to one to adopt the citys 201213 budget at its meeting on Sept. 10. The total budget is $1.47 million, which includes the water budget and general fund. There were no major changes in this years budget, said City Clerk Jackie Lawhon. The only significant change was a 3-percent raise across the board for employees. During the meeting, there was some confusion among commissioners as to what was voted on at the rst public hearing. Lawhon had recommended the commission give a 2-percent raise across the board, as well as a 3-percent raise to those employees affected by the law passed in 2011 that imposed a 3-percent tax on government employees to offset the states investment into the Florida Retirement System. The commission decided instead to give a 3-percent raise to all employees. However, Commissioner Martha Evans, who voted against the budget, said she did not realize that Lawhon was not affected by the law and would be getting a raise while the other employees broke even. Lawhon is in the deferred option retirement plan (DROP). I want to make sure all the employees bene t, Evans said. Commissioner Aginita Rosier said she understood that it was 3 percent to all employees, it was not simply intended to offset the 3-percent that will be taken for retirement. Mayor Colleen Skipper felt Lawhon shouldnt be treated differently and singled out because she has worked more than 30 years. Commissioner Lara Edwards agreed with Evans and said she too thought the 3-percent was meant as a reimbursement. Commissioner Richard Harden said either way, all employees were getting a bene t. Skipper felt the commission need to re-vote on the idea. Her and Evans felt they should increase the amount of the raise. They all work hard, Evans said. They all deserve whatever we give them. Edwards agreed but felt a Christmas bonus, helping with the retirement contribution and a raise was too much. More money needs to go into the city of Sopchoppy, Edwards said. Both Rosier and Harden agreed it should remain at 3 percent. The commission ended up voting four to one, with Evans opposing, to adopt the budget. In other news: County Administrator David Edwards appeared before the commission to give them an update on the Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail. The trail will go from Mashes Sands to Sopchoppy. A trailhead will be constructed in Sopchoppy on property that was donated to the city across from city hall. Edwards said the county will have around $250,000 for each trailhead, one at Mashes Sands and one in Sopchoppy. That can do a lot, he said. He asked the commission to begin brainstorming about what it would like to see at the trailhead. The commission also voted to send a resolution to the county to do striping on Rose Street from the gas station to both bridges. Lara Edwards brought up the idea and said she was told that a resolution would help push the project forward. Edwards also brought up the possibility of getting a more historic welcome sign for the city. She suggested the city contact St. Marks City Manager Zoe Mansfield and see who designed their sign. CITY OF SOPCHOPPY$1.47 M budget includes 3-percent raise for employees

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Longtime EMS Director Fran Councill is retiring Howard Kessler is running for county commission Former lieutenant files notice to sue WCSO Notice for another suit filed at WCSO Why more taxes and fees? Endorsing Langston for sheriff Ralph Thomas advocates for lower taxes Wildflowers add to value of public land thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. READERS WRITE:By DAVID EDWARDSCounty AdministratorGreetings, everyone. Id like to bring you up to speed on some recent activities in county government. By the time you read this, we will have adopted the FY2012-13 Tentative budget and millage rate. This budget provided staff with many challenges including balancing a budget in times of declining revenues while at the same time maintaining service levels for the citizens of Wakulla County. This budget has several structural changes including establishing a Fines and Forfeiture Fund to transfer the sheriffs general fund expenditures into, which will allow for more transparency in expenditures as it relates to public safety and the sheriffs of ce. Additionally, we have eliminated the Office of Management and Budget and are transferring the budget and nance duties to the clerk of court. We are separating Parks and Recreation and creating a Parks and Facilities Department. The nal budget will be presented to the board for adoption on Sept. 17. Im excited about this budget as it adds transparency, as well as further stabilizes your governmental operations. Also with the creation of the ve-year plan it has allowed us to look at the future as it relates to the effects of economic conditions and assessment needs so we can better manage and avert past nancial issues that we are now coming out of. Some community center news: the board has approved the floor plan which includes a kid zone, day camp, group fitness rooms, etc. We are also constructing an entire new building to serve as an multi-use gymnasium. Its anticipated that construction and renovation bids will go out soon and construction should begin in November-December. Other next steps are to negotiate a contract with YMCA. You should also be aware that we continue to stay involved with the RESTORE Act. The RESTORE Act takes 80 percent of the fines, ranging from $5 billion to $20 billion, that will be paid by companies responsible for the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and directs a portion back to the ve states that were affected by the spill. The ve states are Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. This money is then allocated to each state, and then broken down further. According to the level of nes that are assessed by the federal government, Wakulla could receive from $8 million to $40 million. Some areas where this funding may possibly be used is the TCC Environmental Institute, wastewater system, beach restoration, tourist development, park development, canal dredging, restoration at Port Leon, aqua culture and oyster relay, sheries, etc. Your county staff continues to be proactive to make sure we receive the maximum amount of funding. We have started a projects book and will continue to keep you informed through Board meetings, workshops, etc. If I can be of any assistance to you, please contact me. I think everyone knows that I have an open door policy, feel free to come see me, call me (926-0919 ext. 402), or send me an email at dedwards@ mywakulla.com. David Edwards is county administrator for Wakulla County.FROM THE COUNTY ADMINISTRATORS DESK:A view of whats happening in county governmentEditor, The News: Charlie Creel has been my friend for over 35 years. We worked together closely as Florida State troopers and that is where I really got to know Charlie. He was an outstanding trooper who treated people fairly and with respect. Later our careers separated us but we maintained contact over the years. Charlie is a professional law enforcement officer who has served the people of Florida with dignity. He is admired and respected. He also is a dedicated and devoted peace of cer who is committed to assuring that justice is served. I can assure the citizens of Wakulla County that Charlie Creel will be a great sheriff and that he will be relentless in his efforts to keep you safe. Charlie will bring his experience and knowledge to the sheriffs office to ght crime and protect the citizens. His creativity, innovation and fresh ideas will be welcomed by those seeking new law enforcement approaches. I am proud to endorse Charlie Creel for Wakulla County Sheriff. He is a good friend, an upright man and a solid police of cer. Sheriff Charlie Wells (ret) Manatee County Sheriff 1985-2007 Past President,Florida Sheriffs AssociationShort letters received from readers: Thank you for making the correct decision regarding cave diving at Wakulla Springs. Aaron BinnsInstructor, Tallahassee Community CollegeTallahassee Thank you to Dave and Jess at Apocalyptic Tattoo for the great customer party. The food, music and wonderful friends and family made for a fantastic night. Love you,Ma (Peg Attridge), Kelli and RandyPanaceaSHORT AND SWEET:Editor, The News: In response to the article, Religious embrace helping fuel support for gay marriage, says minister (Sept. 6 Wakulla News, obituary page): The article talks of support for gay marriage and clergy by several religious denominations, a preacher and a scholar. The scholar, Dr. Spitzer says that Western cultures condemnation of same sex love appears to have originated from Judeo-Christian scriptures, but contemporary biblical scholarship amends old interpretations. The liberal scholars call it contemporary biblical scholarship, I would call it the term used for changing known truth of scripture to t the culture or to satisfy the desires of the peoples hearts who are not comfortable with Gods law and the consequences of sin. The Bible is clear on what is sin. We either believe that God inspired this book and told us what he wanted us to know when it was written, or we choose to believe that God really didnt mean what he said and these previously mentioned scholars know better. Not surprisingly God foresaw these things and warned us about it. In 2 Timothy 4:1-5 Paul instructed Timothy to preach the word (meaning the entire written Word of God) because, (quoting verse 3-4NKJV); FOR THE TIME WILL COME when they will not endure sound doctrine, but according to their own desires, because they have itching ears, they will heap up for themselves teachers; and they will turn their ears away from the truth, and be turned aside to fables. When we read an article like this, look around at the changing attitudes in our culture or see that from the White House to political party platforms all the way to the town square, God and his word are being pushed aside in order to pursue mans wisdom, I think it is safe to say that the time Paul wrote of has come. By the way, standing up for and believing that the Bible is true as written and a guide for life does not make you a hater, quite the opposite. These articles like to lump together groups (label all who disagree as a hate group) in order to advance their cause. Fred Phelps and the Westboro Baptist Church will have to answer to God for their actions. Speaking for myself as a follower of Christ and a retired veteran I would have nothing to do with them. Dave Anderson bucanderson@yahoo.com e time Paul wrote of has come Dunking candidates at barbecue is planned State parks cant be all things to all people Richard Harden is an experienced leader Charlie Creel will be a great sheri Editor, The News: It is fall and politics and fundraisers are in full swing. For the third year, the re ghters in the county will be doing the Smoke and Fire barbecue contest and fundraiser. You may remember that we do this event for children who have suffered crippling or dis guring burns. We support the Camp Amigo project that sends these kids for a worry-free week at Rish State Park. The kids play with other kids with the same scars as them and they are attended to by re ghters. The other use of our funds is to send re ghters and Emergency Medical Service workers to train and further their education. We do this through the Richard Rhea Foundation and grants to people already in the emergency eld. The re explorers at the high school also bene t from our work. We try to have some entertainment at our event and this year we have added something everyone can enjoy, dunking your favorite (or least favorite) political candidate. We have invited all of the local candidates to spend some time in our dunking booth. We have several candidates who have accepted the invitation and are hoping the rest will join us. This will be near the end of the campaign trail so a little wet fun will be great. Our event will be Saturday, Oct. 27, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Hudson Park. Last year we served 750 dinners and are hoping to serve 1,000 this year. We have VFDs from Wakulla County, Tallahassee, Blountstown, Telogia, Franklin and Taylor counties. If you are a local business person, we can use more sponsors. If you are a local candidate your opponent is probably participating in this, so you should also. We will have more news as the time approaches. Mark your calendar for Oct. 27 to eat some award winning barbecue. We have held the price down and you can buy a plate with chicken, pulled pork, ribs and sides for $8. That is the best deal in town! If you have any questions, please contact me. Bill Russell 984-0148 Editor, The News: The Florida Park Service has a very dif cult job trying to balance visitor use and protection of the resources. With over 20 million visitors per year, many parks are in danger of being loved to death. The unique natural and cultural resources for which a park was acquired can easily be degraded to a point they are no longer exceptional. Whether to allow recreational diving at the ever popular Wakulla Springs is a perfect example of the con ict between use and protection. The recently announced decision to continue a 26-year policy of not allowing diving at the main spring of Wakulla Springs State Park demonstrates the strong leadership enjoyed within the Florida Park Service. Wakulla Springs State Park is among an elite few parks designated as a National Natural Landmark and on the National Register of Historic Places. We are lucky to have such a special park in our own back yard. The Division of Recreation and Parks got it right in this case by making the tough, but correct decision on the side of protection. Wakulla Springs is a national treasure deserving of this protection. George Apthorp Crawfordville Editor, The News: I would like to take this opportunity to support Richard Harden for county commissioner. I have known and worked with Richard Harden for six years at Franklin Correctional Institution and have witnessed his integrity, ethics and devotion to whatever he sets out to do. At work, in addition to being a correctional sergeant, he manages the facility safety program ensuring compliance with local, state, and federal regulations. He is familiar and pro cient in matters of insurance and workers compensation. He also supervises and operates the Emergency Operations Center during times of emergency. He is a certi ed instructor and for the past ve years has instructed new of cer recruits at the Training Academy located at Wakulla Correctional Institution. As a Wakulla county citizen, I have also been impressed by the leadership he has provided as a Sopchoppy city commissioner. He has proven himself to be a skilled and effective public servant we can depend on to always do what is best for the people he serves. The citizens of Sopchoppy have elected him four consecutive times and if you ride around Sopchoppy and see the new tennis courts, new city hall, restored depot, veterans monument, paved streets and city park then you can see why. The same leadership he has displayed in his job he has also displayed as an elected of cial. He is the only candidate is his commission race who has had any experience as an elected official and I think it is important that we elect leaders that are experienced and knowledgeable about our county and local government. Please join me in voting for Richard Harden for Wakulla County Commissioner District 5. Harold Hoover Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Page 5Areaders speak out More OpinionsEditor, The News: My late husband, Tom, and I met John Shuff in December 1973, when a power company clearcut a 20-foot swath, 350 feet long of 100 foot tall trees, to install our power lines. We had granted an easement without fully understanding the power companys intentions and were morti ed at the result. Although we were upset at the destruction, the damage was done. Having struck up a quick friendship, we decided to plant a row of cedar trees together to replace our loss. Those cedars are still there. John Shuff built my beautiful home in Beechwood Estates. He took what Tom had started, and built in every detail, just as I designed it. He meticulously went over my budget, explaining every detail and what it cost. He and his carpenters were master craftsmen. Interestingly, John builds intricate furniture as one of his hobbies and nished his building career managing a $9.5 million hospital project. For many years, John Shuff has had to deal with planning and zoning issues and local county governments in the Big Bend of Florida, as most of his construction career involved publicly funded projects. I have discussed many issues with John over the years, with him always analyzing both sides of the issue. He usually leaves me thinking: That is a new way of looking at it. John Shuff is a HARD worker. He has done well in life because of his dedication to whatever he is working on at the moment. Look at his record with the renovation of our historic courthouse and as president of the Chamber of Commerce last year. I always appreciated the monthly articles he wrote informing us of the current local government events and how it affected our businesses. Please vote for John Shuff on Nov. 6 for County Commissioner! Carol Ann Williams Real Estate Broker Editor, The News: I have worked alongside Mike Stewart for more than 16 years, 12 of which he has been a county commissioner. I know Mike to be an honorable man who only wants the best for Wakulla County. He routinely uses me as a sounding board for budget-related ideas knowing that I dont want to pay any more taxes than are legitimately needed. Consequently, I am fully aware that Mike always anguishes over the budgets looking for ways to provide essential services without raising taxes. He then exercises leadership within the board to offer workable solutions to responsibly tax citizens. When he returned to of ce in 2008, he and the other sitting commissioners were faced with a bloated budget and hundreds of thousands of dollars in lawsuits. Not until the current board was in place in 2010 could restorative actions be taken to address this mounting problem. Through Mikes efforts, the overall budget was reduced by almost $1.5 million (7.4 percent) from FY2010-11 to FY2011-12. This allowed for a quarter-point reduction in the millage rate. As chairman, Mike also led the way to reduce the number of employees in the bloated budget he had inherited. Without adversely affecting services, he and the current board painstakingly eliminated seven general fund positions, 3.5 building department positions, seven sheriffs of ce positions and 9.5 housing department positions. Mike has worked very closely with the Board to keep your and my ad valorem taxes at their lowest possible levels. This has been accomplished using the Public Service Tax (PST) and the garbage assessment. Recognizing that because of lower property values and homestead exemptions many citizens were paying little or nothing while receiving all the bene ts, the PST was developed so that all citizens could contribute. The majority of the board wanted to set the PST at 10 percent of electric and water bills. Mike could have easily just voted NO to the issue, and it would have passed with little opposition at 10 percent and no kilowatt reduction. But he demonstrated real leadership and got us the 7-percent rate and the 500-kilowatt reduction instead. This is the kind of leadership I want to keep on the Board. This PST is a flat tax that everyone pays into to supplement ad valorem taxes which are paid strictly by homeowners. Regarding the $196 garbage assessment, this is not only scally sound but in my opinion is the most environmentally friendly action this board has ever taken. Cost of operations at the land ll had exceeded collected revenues for many years with losses paid out of our general fund. Additionally, substantial (and costly) improvements had to be made quickly or signi cant DEP nes were threatened. Action had to be taken, and the current Board manned up and did the right thing. Many people are recycling for the rst time in their lives, and we are helping the environment. We have been told that we have seen a 50 percent reduction in illegal dumping as a result of the garbage assessment. Further, the 50 percent of the countys homeowners who were paying for garbage pickup service before the mandatory pickup are saving money. They were paying $25 or more monthly and now pay just over $16 monthly. More so, Mike even insisted that low income families be exempted and set up an application process for them. In conclusion, I know without a doubt that Mike Ste wart is the right man for this job, and if we lose him, we will lose a valuable asset for this county at a time when we can least afford it. Ron Huddleston Crawfordville Editor, The News: I am submitting this letter to you in support of my friend and former shipmate in the U.S. Navy, Ralph Thomas, who is running for County Commissioner District 1. If the people lead, then the leaders will follow. Ralph Thomas was the rst friend that I met when I joined the U.S. Navy in 1985. I can honestly say that Ralph has shown impeccable integrity and character for the 27 years that I have known him. I believe that his work ethic, loyalty, and attention to detail make him a great candidate for county commissioner. Thanks Ralph for continually honoring our friendship through the good times and bad with unwavering loyalty. I believe in you shipmate and wish you the best of luck. Dan Pope U.S. Navy veteran Editor, The News: James T. Tim Moore, the former commissioner of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, has endorsed T.W. Maurice Langston for the of ce of Sheriff in Wakulla County. In 1988, Moore was appointed by Gov. Bob Martinez to serve as the executive director of FDLE. He was active in state government for over 30 years. I am proud to back Maurice Langston for sheriff because of his honorable dedication and tireless service to this community, said Moore. As someone who has worked in literally every facet of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce, he knows rst-hand what the job entails and, more importantly, what it takes to run a successful operation. The rst few critical weeks will not be spent learning the job because he already knows it. Last week, Lt. Col. (Ret.) Billy Dickson of the Florida Highway Patrol announced his endorsement of Langstons bid for sheriff. A lifelong resident of Wakulla County, Langston has over 32 years of experience with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. Langston sits on numerous committees and boards including the Board of Directors of the Senior Citizens Center, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, and the Youth Recreation Board. I am very thankful for Tims help over the years and his endorsement of our campaign, said Langston. I look forward to working with him and learning from his lifelong experience in law enforcement how to better serve the people of Wakulla County. Maurice LangstonJohn Shu will be a good commissioner Ralph omas is unwaveringly loyal Ralph omas is a giving family man Mike Stewart wants the best for Wakulla FDLEs Tim Moore endorses LangstonMORE READERS WRITE:Editor, The News: I am David Whetstone and I have lived in Wakulla County for years. My parents were part of the rst graduating class of WHS. Ralph Thomas, is one of the most giving family men I know. He loves people and has done a great deal to help me with an orphanage that I have in Africa. He has also helped me a lot in the Wakulla area to reach our youth. I just strongly feel as though I need to recommend him to lead our community as he is willing to serve our people. David Whetstone Crawfordville 5:30 pm Social Time 6:00 pm Forum Wakuula County Senior Citizens Center 33 Michael Dr., Crawfordville Wakulla County Chamber of Commercepresents 2012 Candidates ForumTuesday, October 9th, 2012At the SHERIFF Maurice Langston REP Charlie Creel NP A PROPERTY APPRAISER Donnie Sparkman DEM Jim P arham NPA SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Robert Bobby Pearce DEM Kimball Kim Thomas NP A COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 Alan Brock DEM Ralph Thomas REP J enny Brock NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 Mike Stewart REP Ho ward Kessler NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 5 Richard Harden REP J ohn Shuff DEM Emily T. Smith NPARefreshments provided by Wakulla County Rotary Club Seating is limited SHERIFF Maurice Langston REP Charlie Creel NP A PROPERTY APPRAISER Donnie Sparkman DEM Jim P arham NPA SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Robert Bobby Pearce DEM Kimball Kim Thomas NP A COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 Alan Brock DEM Ralph Thomas REP J enny Brock NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 Mike Stewart REP Ho ward Kessler NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 5 Richard Harden REP J ohn Shuff DEM Emily T. Smith NPA The following candidates from local races have been invited to participate: JUSTDESSERTS! HOWARD KESSLER Please join us for a Campaign PartyHOWARD KESSLERPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Howard Kessler, NPA, for County Commissioner.Howard@HowardKessler.com 850-228-9641 FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER Bring your family and friends Lower taxes, open and accountable government, protection of our environment.I look forward to seeing you there.ICE CREAM & HOME MADE DESSERTS~ SPE CIAL SPEA KERS ~ TELL YOUR FRIENDS! THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT!WWW .HOWARD KESSLER .C OM

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Church BriefsWho says the IRS is a meany?REV. JAMES L. SNYDER I often hear derogatory remarks directed towards the IRS. I must admit that many of these critical remarks originated with me. Not that I do not like my good old Uncle Sam, it is that he is a little demanding When it comes to tax time. Every year I complain about ling my income tax and paying out gobs and gobs of dollars to the United States government. I know it is important to pay taxes, and, I pay my fair share even though it may be grudgingly. Throughout the years, I have complained that dear old Uncle Sam never writes me a letter. I will have to amend that complaint because I recently received a personalized letter from the IRS. Well, you can imagine my surprise at getting this letter. With trembling hands, I opened the letter, anxious to know what was going on in the world of Uncle Sam. I expected a detailed letter of what he was doing and how he was getting along and how the kids were and all that sort of thing. Imagine my surprise when none of that information was contained in the letter. From the contents of the letter, and I must say a lot of it was goobly glop, I had fallen far short of my share of income tax this past year. According to the letter, I was a gazillion dollars short of what he had expected from me and quite frankly, he was disappointed in this behavior on my part. Do not ask me how many zeros a gazillion dollars have because I do not know. I do not have that many ngers or toes. Although I read the letter several times it was not quite clear how much I actually owed and what plans there were in place for me to pay it back. From what I could understand from the letter, I owed good old Uncle Sam an arm and a leg, and he was highly expecting that I would come through for him. Well, that kind of letter did not set well with me. I was tempted to leave the country, then sneak back as an illegal alien, and not have to worry about all this nasty stuff. But, I did not have that much energy available. There was a phone number I was to call if I had any personal questions. Boy, did I have some personal questions. I was fully expecting not to get a real human voice when I called. But, again, I was pleasantly surprised. Within 30 minutes and after dozens of pushing this button and pushing that button I had on the other end of the phone a very pleasant and cheerful voice, a representative of the IRS. After we exchanged some personal niceties and followed up on the weather report from each of our locations, we nally got down to the real business of the phone call. I must confess I was not expecting such pleasantries from an IRS agent. I assumed she had the telephone in one hand and a loaded, fully cocked revolver in the other. If she did, she concealed it most admirably. Then we got down to the nitty-gritty of what the IRS is all about: collecting taxes from potentially delinquent taxpayers, like myself. The thought that I deliberately was delinquent was rather humiliating for me. Simply put, I just did not pay enough in, but this telephone call was going to rectify all of that. After she crunched all the gures and as I waited patiently on my end of the phone, she was able to determine I owed the government an arm and a leg. It was then that the negotiations began in earnest. I must confess she could not have been any nicer had she been my grandmother. She then began to query as to which arm and which leg I was going to give to the government. This presented a real dif cult decision on my part. Throughout the years, I have grown quite fond of both arms and both legs. Then I asked her if I could counter a proposal. She replied in the af rmative. Would you consider, I began rather slowly, an arm OR a leg? There was a pause on the other and of the phone when I could tell she was thinking. Whenever you get a government employee to think, watch out. I could hear the old wheels grinding and grinding. Finally, she said, I think that would be acceptable. And, Ill even allow you to select either arm or leg. We like to work with people. Now the burden was on me. I now owed the government an arm OR a leg and I just had to select which one. I rst considered my arms. In thinking about them, I use both of my arms although the left one less than the right one every day. What with writing and eating my arms are rather busy throughout the day. Then I considered my legs. I like my right leg and so the choice became rather easy for me. Now, the United States government has at least one leg to stand on, thanks to Yours Truly. I have something greater to stand on. Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage (Galatians 5:1 KJV). Jesus Christ trumps Uncle Sam when it comes to liberty.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. Call for vocalists to perform in Handels Messiah The Community Choir is calling for vocalists and singers for the holiday musical program Handels Messiah, to be performed on Sunday, Dec. 9, at the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church in Sopchoppy at 3 p.m. The opportunity to be a part of this production is available to anyone in the Wakulla County area so new participants are encouraged to participate. Please join us at practice beginning Oct. 28 at 2:30 p.m. at the church. Reba Mason will be directing. Light refreshments will be served. Mark your calendars. Please call Reba Mason at (850) 9623804 for additional information. Big Bend Hospice to host Bereavement Conference Big Bend Hospice will hold its eighth annual Bereavement Conference on Friday, Sept. 28, at Tallahassee Community College. The event is billed as Tapestries: Stories of Love, Loss and Hope. To register, go to bigbendhospice,org and click on the link. For more information, contact Lisa Baggett at (850) 878-5310 or email lisa@ bigbendhospice.org. OUT TO PASTORBy CYNTHIA WEBSTERSpecial to The NewsTotal separation of church and state is impossible since the very same people make up both institutions. However, over the past several decades there has been an attempt by one to deny the rights of the other. Even people of Faith have accepted many of these dictates, i.e. prayer being removed from public school. In recent years, however, the lawsuits against where and how one can pray and the constant chipping away at basic religious rights has turned at times into a full edged assault. For example, in recent months alone the mayor of Boston the very seat of Freedom of Religion in our country told a successful, private business that it would be unwelcome in his city and the reason because the companys owner dared to state publicly the tenants of his Christian faith. Not only did Christians but people everywhere understood the inherent wrong in this attempt to hurt one of Americas great small businesses. Chick-Fil-A appreciation day became one of the most successful spontaneous displays of people decrying a wrong in recorded history. Also, people rose up in protest when families of wounded military men and women were told they could not take the Bible into hospital rooms. The decision was reversed. Catholic Institutions across the country recently brought a joint lawsuit against the federal government as a result of the government mandating them to provide health insurance coverage for procedures the Church does not recognize, i.e. abortion inducing drugs. People know that faith is under attack some are pleased but the majority of Americans know it is wrong. And people also know that our Nation is in deep trouble both economically and morally. Most importantly, people are deciding that in this journey of church and state, Christians need to stand together and pray for the nation, for its leaders and for guidance and wisdom. The 40 days before the 2012 election has been designated by National Clergy as a time of prayer. Come join the Footsteps For Faith and Freedom 40 day prayer walk. Each day, Monday thru Saturday, from Sept. 27 to Nov. 5, houses of worship, clergy and people from across the county will meet, pray and walk for about an hour. There is no commitment to a second walk or even to complete the rst, but we urge you to make that decision after experiencing for yourself the power of collective voice raised in prayer and fellowship. People unable to walk but who know their voice counts are encouraged to join the walk by bringing a chair or sharing a bench with another Christian. A schedule will be published in churches throughout the county and in The Wakulla News prior to Sept. 27. For more information contact either your home church or call 926-9254.Prayer walk planned on Sept. 27

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Special to The News My Hope Chest, a Florida-based non-profit, is proud to introduce the Breast Reconstruction Awareness Ribbon, the rst ribbon to support uninsured and underinsured breast cancer survivors. This new ribbon speaks to the restoration, transformation and the completion from the cancer journey that many survivors seek through reconstructive surgery after mastectomy. For those who desire, breast reconstruction provides closure and a new wholeness allowing a woman to put the disease behind her at last. The traditional pink ribbon has branded breast cancer awareness, education and research but overlooks a huge population of underserved survivors that live with scars and a constant reminder of the disease, founder Alisa Savoretti said. There are hundreds of breast cancer groups in America focused on prevention and nding a cure, while the need for breast reconstruction has own under the radar of the pink ribbon. The colors in the breast reconstruction ribbon transition and transform, just like the survivors My Hope Chest helps to become whole again. The ribbon goes from pink the original breast cancer color, to white known as the light or the power of healing. The white blends to yellow, the color of hope, sunshine and new beginnings. The Breast Reconstruction Awareness Ribbon symbolizes transformation and closure from the disease. My Hope Chest hopes this new symbol will help others recognize this need and shine the light on this epidemic for thousands who have sacri ced a piece of themselves to save their life. Founded in 2003 by Savoretti, My Hope Chest services pick up where other breast cancer organizations leave off providing nal step of breast cancer treatment and helping women become whole again. Savoretti knows from rst-hand experience how breast reconstruction after cancer helps restore not only the body but also transforms and heals the mind and spirit. She founded the organization after her own struggle with breast cancer. My Hope Chest is a national non-pro t organization that provides breast reconstruction for uninsured and underprivileged breast cancer survivors. For more information on My Hope Chest, visit their website at www.myhopechest.org/. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Page 7AObituaries John Wayne Brim Evelyn Carraway Gowdy Doye Dean Hudson Sam McKinney Jackson Betty Rae Smith-Nix Weldon Mike Vowell Jr. Alta A. WoodsonDoye Dean Hudson, 71, of Crawfordville, died on Tuesday, Sept. 4. He was a native of Holmes County, living most of his life in Tallahassee and the Crawfordville area. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 8, at New Light Church with burial at New Light Church Cemetery. Family received friends on Friday, Sept. 7, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Beggs Funeral Home on Apalachee Parkway. In lieu of flowers, at Doyes request, donations may be made to his daughter and son-in-laws Missionary work in reaching the youth of America, the Ministry of Mike and Stacy Reason, through Gospel Light Church, 3415 Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee FL 32311. Survivors include his wife of 48 years, Sherry Hudson; sons, John W. Hudson (Lori) of Crawfordville and Paul W. Hudson (Charity) of Woodville; daughters, Stacy H. Reason (Mike) of Crawfordville, Dena Hudson of Tallahassee and Jan Hudson of Crawfordville; a brother, Billy Hudson (Betty); four sisters, Edna Beagles, Barbara Bratcher, Virginia Pauline Youree (Delbert) and Hazel Allen (Bob), all of Tallahassee; eight grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Beggs Funeral Home, 3322 Apalachee Parkway in Tallahassee (850)942-2929 was in charge of arrangements. Alta A. Woodson, 102, of Bethalto, Ill., died on Aug. 24 at Villa Rose Senior Living Community in Bethalto. She was born in Sampsel, Mo., to Henry and Lura Mae (Knox) Isenberg on June 13, 1910. She married Claude C. Jack Woodson on Oct. 28, 1929, in Alton, Ill. A celebration of life was held at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 8, at River Bend Calvary Chapel in East Alton, Ill. In lieu of owers, memorials may be made to River Bend Calvary Chapel, or The National Kidney Foundation. Survivors include her grandchildren, Susan and Brian Irvine of Godfrey, Ill., and Steven and Robin Woodson of Moro, Ill.; great-grandchildren, Josh Woodson of Bethalto, Emily Irvine of St. Louis, Grant Irvine of St. Louis, and Mike and Kelsie (Woodson) Chavez of Apple Valley, Calif.; and two great-great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband; son; and siblings, Marvin Isenberg, Alma Fears, Uel Isenberg, Mae Crank and Reatha Neumann. Sam McKinney Jackson, 85, of Climax, Ga., died on Thursday, Sept. 6, at his home. The funeral service was held at 11 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 10, at Ivey Funeral Home Chapel in Bainbridge, Ga. Graveside Masonic Rites will follow at Cedar Grove Cemetery near Climax. The family received friends from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 10, prior to the funeral service at Ivey Funeral Home. Survivors include his wife of 62 years, Martha Blanche Mitchell Jackson of Climax; his sons, Harold Jackson (Susan) of Camilla, Ga., and Edwin Jackson (Melanie) of McDonough, Ga.; his daughters, Beverly Read (Don) of Lexington Park, Md., and Peggy Taff (Scott) of Crawfordville; his sister, Jean Chisson of Dupo, Ill.; six grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Online visitors may sign the guest register at www. iveyfuneral.com. Evelyn Carraway Gowdy, 81, passed away Thursday, Sept. 6, in Crawfordville. She retired from the U.S. Postal Service and as secretary of First Baptist Church of Tallahassee. She was a lifelong member of First Baptist Church of Crawfordville. Visitation was held Saturday, Sept. 8, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Crawfordville. Services were held Sunday, Sept. 9, at First Baptist Church of Crawfordville at 2:30 p.m. Burial followed at Whiddon Lake Cemetery. Survivors include her husband of 63 years, Gilbert Gowdy; two sons, Duane and Craig Gowdy; and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She is also survived by one sister. She was predeceased by one brother and two sisters. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville, was in charge of arrangements (850-9263333) or www.bevisfh.com. Bettie Rae Smith-Nix, 66, of Cartersville, Ga., passed away Saturday, Sept. 1, at her residence. Born Dec. 3, 1945, in Tallahassee, she was the daughter of the late Harvey Smith and Daisy Whit ed Smith. She was also preceded in death by her brothers, Alvin and Thomas Smith. Bettie was a homemaker and of the Baptist faith. She was the life of the family. Bettie loved to laugh, travel and shop for antiques, but most of all she loved her family. Survivors include her husband of 45 years, James Earl Nix; her daughter, Tina Marie Knickerbocker and her son, Kenneth Thomas Nix of Cartersville, Ga.; her granddaughters, Sherri Wade and Lori Beth Knickerbocker of Cartersville; her brothers and sistersin-law, Harvey and Linda Smith of Cleveland, Ohio, Ira and Gertie Smith of Woodville, and Trixie Lee (Bo) and Connie Smith of Woodville; her sisters and brothers-in-law, Ellen and Harold Nix of Jasper, Ga., Faye and Mark Crago of Tallahassee, Margie Smith-Hardin and Bill of Tallahassee; and many nieces and nephews. Memorial services were conducted on Tuesday, Sept. 4, in the Chapel of Parnick Jennings Funeral Home and Cremation Services. Burial services will be conducted on Friday, Sept. 14, at 5:30 p.m. at Woodville Cemetery in Woodville. Immediately following the services please join the family for a memorial celebration at 75 Bert Thomas Lane in Woodville. (850) 933-2903. Evelyn Carraway Gowdy Betty Rae Smith-Nix Doye Dean Hudson Alta A. Woodson Sam McKinney JacksonJohn Wayne Brim, 59, of Crawfordville, died on Saturday, Sept. 8, in Tallahassee from injuries sustained in a traf c accident while trying to save the life of the other driver. He was born Sept. 14, 1952, in Bainbridge, Ga. He was a truck driver with Freehold Cartage Inc. He was a son of the late Benjamin Joe Brim, and Betty Brooks Brim, who survives. The funeral will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 13, at Abbey Funeral Home, with interment at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. The family will receive friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 12, at the funeral home. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to the Shriners Club. He is survived by his wife of almost 41 years, Martha Hollingsworth Brim; sons, William (Tracy) Brim and Jason Brim; grandchildren, Jessica, Joshua, Justin and Jayda Brim; brothers, Ronnie (Becky) Brim and Sidney Brim; sisters, Susie (Eddie) Hernandez and Teresa (Ed) Self; numerous aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins. Online condolences at www.abbeyfh.com.John Wayne BrimWeldon Mike Vowell Jr., 65, of Sopchoppy, died on Saturday, Sept. 1, at the VA Hospital in Gainesville. He was a very proud veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. His ashes will be spread on the grave of his daughter, Katherine Louise Vowell in Garland, Texas, at a later date. Donations, in his name may be made to the Lake City VA Medical Center, 619 S. Marion Ave., Lake City FL 32025, Attn. TOPC. Survivors include a son, Weldon C. Vowell III; and a daughter, Heather Marie Bruce; and one grandchild; and a sister, Janice Montalto of Crawfordville; as well as many nieces, nephews, cousins and tons of friends. Besides a daughter, he was predeceased by a sister, Barbara Vowell who died at birth.Weldon Mike Vowell Jr.New ribbon supports breast reconstruction after cancer 1 1-866-742-1373 www.AdNetworksFlorida.com The key to advertising success Classified Display Metro Daily Online LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief Support850-878-5310 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. 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Continued from Page 1AWhen the grades initially came out, Medart had received a B. The scores were re-evaluated and it turned out Medart had in fact received an A. Susan Jones says they contacted Pearce following the announcement to remind him of his promise and see if he was agreeable to it. He was. We want to instill in our daughter, if you make promises, you try and keep them, she says She jokes that it would be nice if more politicians followed through with their campaign promises. Kyle Jones adds that during election season, this kind of takes a less serious approach. Molly Jones says she was a little surprised Pearce agreed to kiss the frog, but was excited to see it happen. Pearce says its easy to come back to Medart and participate in these types of events and he too wanted to keep the promise he made. Although he did mention that he hates frogs. They have consistently outdone themselves, Pearce says of Medart. Medarts a special place. During the assembly, Molly Jones held the frog while Pearce planted a kiss on his lips, but not before applying lip balm to the frogs lips. Susan Jones was prepared with wipes and offered them to Pearce following the liplock. Molly Jones says she is running for vice president this school year, but didnt mention whether she plans to make any unique promises during her speech. Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityTillman and Evans announce weddingMargaret Alison Evans, of Williston, and Jered M. Tillman, of Gainesville, announce their engagement. She is the daughter of Margaret Case of Crawfordville and Waldon and Trica Evans of Sopchoppy. He is the son of Dave and Kathleen Truax of Iron Mountain Mich., and Roger and Vicky Tillman of Grays Lake, Ill. The wedding is planned for May 4, 2013, at 3 p.m. at Newnans Lake in Gainesville. An alternate location, in case of inclement weather, is Morriston Baptist Church. Margaret Alison Evans and Jered M. Tillman Roedy Caedem Wells celebrated his rst birthday on Sept. 6. His parents are Chase and Jessica Wells of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are Bobby and Karen Wells. His maternal grandparents are Wendy Riggs and Danny Riggs. His uncle is Cole Wells. Roedy Wells, at rightHappy rst birthday, Roedy A promise to kiss a frogJENNIFER JENSENMolly Jones holds the frog for former Medart principal Bobby Pearce to kiss.Molly Jones says she is running for vice president this school year, but didnt mention whether she plans to make any unique promises during her speech. 4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida To make a donation to the auction or for more information about the event, please contact: Sue Belford at 850-926-4244 or e-mail FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com Friends of Wakulla County Public Library Bring your family & friends Bid on great items Support your Library Programs The Silent Auction includes Gift Certi cates, Health and Beauty Products, Auto Detailing Supplies, Baby Items, Fishing Charter, Gifts, Artwork, Dinners, Wine and Lots More!Food & Drinks will be provided. SECOND ANNUAL MW 10-5 T & F 10-6 Sat. 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850)926-6241SALE Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts Color F acial Waxings Specialty Cuts F lat T ops F eather Locks Color P erms Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. c e H a i r S a l o e H l o H a i a l o i r S a c e c e o n o o o n o o n Tues -S at 54 529 05 & t. t. . . . STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Clubs2012 ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZAWildwood Country Club Thursday October 11 2012 6:30pm Social 7:00pm Dinner, Auction, & Show please join us forBealls Maurices Way Out West Carrolls Boot Country Crums Mini MallTICKETS $30.00 eachall proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County students Young competes in mustang competition Special to The NewsWakullas own, Trey Young, attended the Extreme Mustang Makeover Team Roping held at the Wild re Ranch Arena in Salado, Texas, Aug. 31 through Sept. 1. Twenty trainers entered the competition and competed in pattern, heeling, steer stopping and team roping classes. All competing mustangs were available for adoption. This event is an effort to train wild horses so they can be adopted. Young received his 4-yearold mustang, Monster, from Twin Peaks, Calif. He had just four months to break and train his horse. He won first place in team roping and reining and third in steer stopping, taking home $5,700. He had the highest point horse, as well as the highest selling horse when it came time for adoption. His TV show, The American Horseman airs on HRTV on Tuesdays at 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. For more information, visit www.treyyoung. com. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTrey Young

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsSeptember Teachers of the Month are Shadeville Elementary Schools Mandy Gerrell and Wakulla High Schools Tom Graham. They are recognized with Food Service Department employee of the month Amanda Leach. Superintendent David Miller and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the dependability and dedication these employees bring to the district, as well as the positive attitude they display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. Gerrell started her career in education as a pre-K paraprofessional and was later hired as a rst grade teacher at Shadeville. Gerrell hit the ground running in August 2008 and has earned the respect of her peers in short order as an energetic, creative and focused educator. A product of the Wakulla County School District, Gerrell re ects on the positive experiences she had as a young girl in school. Gerrell shares one of her favorite quotes from the great Dr. Seuss, A person is a person no matter how small. Gerrell adds, The students are small, cute and say the darndest things but are capable of so much. Helping them become successful students academically and socially is my goal and just one of the many, many things I love about my job. Gerrell attended Shadeville, Wakulla Middle and graduated from Wakulla High School. She then attended and graduated from Flagler College with a bachelors degree in Elementary Education. Gerrell contributes as a school advisory council member and the calendar committee representative. Shadeville Principal Susan Brazier applauds Gerrells instructional skills and ability to create excitement in the classroom. Brazier notes, Mandy Gerrell creates a positive relationship with her students by offering a warm and inviting atmosphere for them to learn which in turn increases student achievement. Sometimes you just know a person was meant to teach. That is true for Mandy Gerrell. She is a marvelous teacher. Also recognized as a September Teacher of the Month is Wakulla High Schools PE teacher and coach, Graham. Graham has dedicated 14 years of service to Wakulla High School. Prior to working at WHS, he was a teacher and coach in Franklin County at Carrabelle High School. Graham has coached or is currently coaching JV football, girls golf, softball and girls basketball. Whether contributing as a teacher or a coach, Graham sites the common goal as, to help students reach a certain goal. Graham adds, Both the time and intensity of interacting with students as a coach is extended and ampli ed. Originally from Greensburg, Penn., Graham attended the University of Kentucky and graduated from Southern Illinois University with a bachelors degree in physical education. Before he started teaching, he served four years in the U.S. Air Force and then worked as a juvenile investigator and probation of cer in St. Louis, Mo. He moved to Wakulla County in 1984. WHS Principal Mike Crouch notes, Tom Graham is a dedicated coach and a team player. He maintains a positive attitude about his students and his colleagues. He has led our Girls Softball team to 10 straight District titles. It is obvious he cares about his students. The September Employee of the Month is Food Service Department baker and cashier, Leach. Leach has been dedicated to the students at Riversprings Middle School the past six years. Leach grew up in Tallahassee and graduated from Rickards High School. She is grateful to Barbara Spears who told her about an opening in Wakulla County and helped her complete an application for employment. I really enjoy the kids because you never know whats going to happen next. Also, I enjoy the ladies in the kitchen. We have fun at work, which makes coming to work each day that much better, shares Leach. Finding little pleasures in each day is easy for Leach. She smiles when she remembers the day Mrs. Debbie cut the end off of a cucumber and it looked like a smiling face. Leach said, It put a smile on all of our faces and reenergized us all. Riversprings Middle School Cafeteria Manager Ingrid Funderburke shares, Amanda is a great worker. She is happy, dependable, works hard and is willing to do whatever it takes to get the job done. Food Service Director Gail Mathers recognizes her positive traits as well. She notes, Amanda takes her job and serving the children to heart. She excels in her position as casher in both managing student lunch accounts and getting the students through the line quickly on a daily basis. When not cashiering, Amanda can be found baking or assisting with any other task that needs attention in order for lunch to be ready. It has been a pleasure to have her as a part of the Food Service team these past six years.Teachers and employee of the month announced Mandy Gerrell Tom Graham Amanda Leach Annual 4-H Youth Science Day is almost hereSpecial to The NewsFor the fifth annual 4-H National Youth Science Day (NYSD), The Ohio State University Extension has designed the 4-H Eco-Bot Challenge: the 2012 National Science Experiment. The experiment will introduce youth to robotic engineering concepts as they program an autonomous robot to clean up a simulated environmental spill. On Oct. 10, young people across the nation will become scientists for the day during 4-H National Youth Science Day. In this years experiment, the 4-H Eco-Bot Challenge, youth will enhance their engineering skills by assembling their own Eco-Bots and surface controls to manage an environmental clean-up. Youth will then test the interaction between the Eco-Bots design features and various surface control con gurations to determine the most effective clean-up solution for the simulated spill. This exciting hands-on activity involves students making eco-bots using toothbrush motors to simulate cleaning up spills using robots. This is designed to target grades 4 12, so everyone can do this at some level if they are interested. 4-H Agent Sherri Kraeft has 10 kits available and would like to schedule times to meet with groups or classrooms to perform the experiment together. Teachers are also welcome to purchase or download any of the materials from the website to use on their own, but Kraeft would ask that if a classroom does the experiment, to let her know so that she can document it. She will be registering Wakulla Countys school system, so there is no need to replicate this individually. Throughout the year, 4-H Science programming researched and developed by the 111 land-grant colleges and universities across the nation that oversee 4-H youth development programs in every state provides youth with an opportunity to take on science challenges and understand the impact of the top issues that face their region. By connecting important scienti c lessons to civic engagement, 4-H youth become a living, breathing, culturechanging movement for doing the right thing, breaking through obstacles and pushing the country forward to successfully face the challenges of the future. One Million New Scientists. One Million New Ideas. For more than 100 years, 4-H has been at the forefront of teaching youth about science, engineering and technology. 4-H National Youth Science Day is an important annual part of 4-Hs One Million New Scientists, with a bold goal of attracting one million new youth to science, engineering and technology programs by the year 2013. Now entering its fth year, 4-H National Youth Science Day seeks to spark an early youth interest and leadership in science. Currently, more than ve million young people across the nation participate in 4-H science, engineering and technology programming in topics as varied as robotics, rocketry, wind power, GPS mapping, agricultural science, water quality and biofuels. For more information about 4-H National Youth Science Day, visit www.4-H.org/NYSD. SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! 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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-7 Closed Sun. & Wed. www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Bonnet Creek Fall Retreat From $179 per night Includes a $50 daily Resort Credit and daily self-parking For reservations call 888-208-7440. Ask for promotion code BCFT. Visit HiltonBonnetCreek.com/fall From FWC News Bottlenose dolphins are beautiful marine mammals. Tourists who travel to the Gulf Coast love to see them. But dolphins should never be fed. Sometimes, unfortunately, they are. Thats the assessment of of cials with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and NOAAs National Marine Fisheries Service. However, it is illegal to feed dolphins under the Marine Mammal Protection Act, a federal law thats been in effect since 1972. On July 16, the FWC received a call about a dolphin biting a female swimmer at the Panama City Pass. The unidenti ed swimmer was reportedly part of a dolphin tour but was not feeding dolphins when she was bitten on the leg. Her injuries were minor and did not require medical treatment, according to a report. Dolphins are large, powerful creatures, and its illegal to feed them for several reasons, said Elsa Haubold, section leader in the FWCs Species Conservation Planning Section. They have sharp teeth, and anyone who offers them food is subject to being bitten and injured. Not only that, when you teach dolphins to associate people with sh or other food items, the dolphins teach this behavior to their young and you perpetuate a vicious cycle. Its really up to people to help us break this cycle. Haubold said dolphins that are fed are also raising the ire of anglers by snatching sh off their lines. She said in some instances, the dolphins themselves end up being hooked and injured. Seeing dolphins up close and personal has become so popular that a number of dolphin-tour businesses in Panama City cater to tourists. We recognize tourism is important, but when it comes to dolphins, we encourage people to view them from a distance, Haubold said. Pam Anderson, operations manager at Capt. Andersons Marina on Panama City Beach, said they take tourists out to see dolphins but follow the no feeding rule. We do not allow dolphin feeding on our boats. We dont need to, she said. When the captain stops the boat, dolphins usually come around. FWC Maj. Bruce Cooper oversees law enforcement efforts in the Florida Panhandle. He said anyone who feeds dolphins is violating the law. Cooper said that during a recent plainclothes operation by FWC of cers, two Panama City dolphintour boat operators were identi ed feeding dolphins during a dolphin-viewing trip. The investigation is continuing, with possible charges forthcoming. We want people to enjoy themselves when they are out recreationally or on a commercial vessel to see dolphins, but the law is in place for a reason, he said.Of cials say never feed dolphinsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety Internet-completion course in Wakulla County. The course is at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ces Otter Creek Range, 65 Qualify Lane, Crawfordville, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 15. To gain admittance, students must complete the Internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the nal report from the online portion of the course. The nal report form does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under 16 years of age at all times. Students should bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satis es hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling Hunter Safety Coordinator George Warthen at the FWCs regional of ce in Panama City at (850) 265-3676.Free hunter safety course o ered in Wakulla on Sept. 15 FALL CAMPINGThere are many benefits to camping when the leaves change color, the crowds leave the park and the temperature drops. Most insects have died off or have reduced their activity. Fewer people means that perfect campsite is going to be easier to find. Crisp air, crystal clear skies, and changing plant life offer new experiences and sights. If you are going to be camping at altitude be very aware of the weather forecast. A chance of rain may mean dangerous conditions at higher elevations. Dont underestimate the power of hypothermia. With daytime highs reaching only into the 50s and 60s in most parts of the country, treat getting wet as an emergency. Larry Whiteley is Host of the award-winning Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World Radio For more tips, log onto basspro.comSEEING DEERThis may sound funny to someone who has never hunted deer, but one of the hardest things in deer hunting may be simply to see a deer thats there to be seen. Mature bucks are seldom caught standing in the open in broad daylight. Instead, learn to look into and through bushes instead of at them. Try to pick bits and pieces of a deer out of the bush. With your eyes and binoculars, look not for a deer but for something different; a shape, color, line, shadow, reflection, or mass that doesnt quite fit into the scene. The clue may be nothing more than a few inches of antler, a white horizontal belly, or the shiny blackness of an eye, and then all of a sudden the whole animal takes shape. Bob Foulkrod is Co-Host of 100% Real Hunting on Versus Network For more tips, log onto basspro.comTURKEY WITH A BOWIf you enjoy challenges then try taking a turkey with a bow this fall. Since turkeys are programmed to look up because thats where hawks and owls come from, you wont have much luck trying to take one from a treestand. From the ground you can use your ears to locate them, your eyes to tell you where they are going, and your legs to get yourself between where they are and where they want to be. Then wait for them to get there, draw when theyre not looking, and pick a spot. Now doesnt that sound easy? Dont kid yourself. The turkeys defenses are extremely keen and I can almost guarantee you that if they could smell, you would never shoot one with a bow. Jerry Martin is a Member of the RedHead Pro Hunting Team For more tips, log onto basspro.com Editors Note: Capt. Jody Campbells shing column, From the Dock, which appears every other week on this page, will resume next week. Campbell was out-of-town last week and wasnt able to sh, nor was he able to get up with his usual sources of shing information. He promises lots of shing info when his column resumes next week.From the Dock will resume

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMark Rosen, Norma Hill and Fran Keating.Chuck Hickman, Fran Keating, Norma Kill, Raye Crews.Members during a meeting. Bill Wannall, Bob Asxtalos, Ray Willis. Some events the FWC handled during the week of Aug. 31-Sept. 6: ESCAMBIA COUNTY: Of- cer Matt Cushing checked individuals fishing from a vessel near the Pensacola Pass. While speaking to them, Officer Cushing learned a third subject was scuba diving but observed there was no divers down ag displayed. Of cer Cushing waited in the area for the diver to surface. When the diver surfaced, Of cer Cushing found the subject to be in possession of an undersized gag grouper. Citations were issued for the two violations. WALTON COUNTY: Of- cers Randall Brooks and Ken White responded to Santa Rosa Beach to assist a dolphin rescue team with a beached whale. The rescue team transported the whale to Gulf World in Panama City for treatment. BAY COUNTY : Officer Mike Nobles was checking shermen when he found one to be nervous and very evasive during conversation. Of cer Nobles determined that the fisherman had outstanding warrants as a felony traffic offender. The subject was arrested and transported to the Bay County Jail. Lt. Jay Chesser, and Of- cers Neal Goss and Mike Nobles responded to a boating accident on Deer Point Lake involving two personal watercrafts (PWCs) that collided head on. Both operators were transported to local trauma centers. Of cers assisted in transporting the injured to shore, securing and recovering the damaged vessels, and working the crime scene gathering statements and other information. The investigation is ongoing.FWC Law EnforcementA change in the season. The cooler weather is a welcome change that marks more than just the end of our summer. The beginning of the school year also marks a change in the rhythm of our culture. Parents, now distracted by the demands of a new school year, are no longer thinking about going to the beach, diving or shing. By the end of August, customer traf c at Wakulla Diving Center has dropped from 20 to 4 a day. By the end of September, our cave diving community will have replaced the ocean focus folks, especially this year with the much anticipated opening of the springs of Wakulla Springs State Park. This enthusiasm brought Steve Cushman from Texas to open Cave Connections, a dedicated cave diving store just to the west of Indian Springs on Rt 267. The National Speleological Societys Cave Diving Section scheduled their national conference at Wakulla High School this year! Folks from across Europe have been planning their diving vacations in anticipation of this great opportunity. Only, one small detail was omitted. The State of Florida said no, go away, we dont want your business in Wakulla County. So, we will continue to truck our customers out of the county to spend their funds in Jackson, Lafayette, Suwannee, and counties to the south who have recognized the value of this community. I dont know what the new dive store will do. I suspect the NSS-CDS may reschedule their conference of 300 people elsewhere in the state. We are now digging in for a series of in-house projects to expand alternative diving opportunities, such as travel to other counties, off shore ventures, and even more rebreather stuff. The national diving front is an alternate arena we are now free to pursue. Next summer will come soon enough. And please dont talk to me about jobs or the economic needs of our county. I just dont think we care. Saturday morning, members of Flotilla 12 were planning to conduct a quali cation mission for new crew members to reach full qualification status. This was going to be a big event for us, because not only were we going to have to do our best for Division examiner, we were also going to be under the watchful eye of the gold side. However, as many of you may have noticed Saturday was a day full of rain, winds and waves. We hope to get the mission rescheduled for later this fall so that we are all prepared when needed. Saturday night we held our monthly business meeting at the Crawfordville Fire Station. We had a very good turnout in spite of the weather and football games, 16 members, 2 members in process, and one guest. We discussed many items that are up and coming for us to participate in providing safe boating information as well as increase the visibility of the Coast Guard and Coast Guard Auxiliary. The month of October will keep us on our toes and very busy. Following our rst Saturday monthly meeting, we will have a Division Meeting the second weekend. The weekend of 20 October will be stone Crab Festival followed by the 6th annual FSU Coast Guard Fly Over. Also in the mix are the Crooked River Festival and the North Florida Fair. As our meeting concluded, Norma Hill and Raye Crews presented Diversity training as part of our continuing member training. Sunday morning, not to be dismayed by Saturdays rain, a facility and crew met dockside while a second crew met at the communications trailer to provide communications support for our patrol. Getting the communications back on line has been a labor of love and one that could not have happened without the support of Station Panama City. After 7 trips and the hard work of 3 very dedicated Coast Guard personnel and several auxiliarists, we are operational! Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos was the Coxswain of the day and sent in the following report on the patrol: Today, for the rst time in years, Flotilla 12 conducted a patrol while simultaneously operating the communications station in St Marks. We had 2 radio watchers, Tim Ashley and Mike Harrison as well as a trainee, Geoff Gonzales, at the comms trailer from 9:00 until 3:30. Phil Hill also stopped in to assist. We were able to communicate clearly with our own facility as well as Station Panama City. Throughout the day, the facility positions were marked on the navigation chart. On patrol we had a Coxswain Bob Asztalos and 4 crewmembers: Raye Crews, Chuck Hickman, Norma Hill and Fran Keating, who conducted red tide testing, practiced search patterns and person overboard drills. We tested a new sling for hoisting a person in the water onboard the facility. The sling did make it easier to lift the simulated person but we will need to continue practicing to become comfortable in the event we need to use this for a real person. It was a beautiful day, everyone received lots of training and performed in an outstanding manner both on the water and over the radio. Many thinks also to Tim Ashley and Norma Hill for contributing information as well. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident Today made us proud to be a part of the Auxiliary and our drive to be Semper Paratus, always ready. Are you ready? Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday p Thu Sep 13, 12 Fri Sep 14, 12 Sat Sep 15, 12 Sun Sep 16, 12 Mon Sep 17, 12 Tue Sep 18, 12 Wed Sep 19, 12 Date 3.4 ft. 1:25 AM 3.6 ft. 1:55 AM 3.7 ft. 2:22 AM 3.9 ft. 2:48 AM 4.0 ft. 3:14 AM 4.1 ft. 3:42 AM 4.2 ft. 4:12 AM High 1.4 ft. 6:54 AM 1.0 ft. 7:37 AM 0.7 ft. 8:17 AM 0.3 ft. 8:56 AM 0.0 ft. 9:37 AM -0.1 ft. 10:19 AM -0.1 ft. 11:05 AM Low 3.8 ft. 1:00 PM 4.0 ft. 1:44 PM 4.1 ft. 2:27 PM 4.2 ft. 3:10 PM 4.2 ft. 3:54 PM 4.0 ft. 4:39 PM 3.7 ft. 5:27 PM High 0.5 ft. 7:40 PM 0.5 ft. 8:12 PM 0.5 ft. 8:43 PM 0.7 ft. 9:13 PM 0.9 ft. 9:44 PM 1.1 ft. 10:16 PM 1.4 ft. 10:50 PM Low Thu Sep 13, 12 Fri Sep 14, 12 Sat Sep 15, 12 Sun Sep 16, 12 Mon Sep 17, 12 Tue Sep 18, 12 Wed Sep 19, 12 Date 3.5 ft. 1:22 AM 3.6 ft. 1:52 AM 3.8 ft. 2:19 AM 4.0 ft. 2:45 AM 4.1 ft. 3:11 AM 4.2 ft. 3:39 AM 4.3 ft. 4:09 AM High 1.5 ft. 6:51 AM 1.1 ft. 7:34 AM 0.7 ft. 8:14 AM 0.3 ft. 8:53 AM 0.0 ft. 9:34 AM -0.1 ft. 10:16 AM -0.2 ft. 11:02 AM Low 3.8 ft. 12:57 PM 4.1 ft. 1:41 PM 4.2 ft. 2:24 PM 4.3 ft. 3:07 PM 4.2 ft. 3:51 PM 4.1 ft. 4:36 PM 3.8 ft. 5:24 PM High 0.5 ft. 7:37 PM 0.5 ft. 8:09 PM 0.6 ft. 8:40 PM 0.8 ft. 9:10 PM 1.0 ft. 9:41 PM 1.2 ft. 10:13 PM 1.5 ft. 10:47 PM Low Thu Sep 13, 12 Fri Sep 14, 12 Sat Sep 15, 12 Sun Sep 16, 12 Mon Sep 17, 12 Tue Sep 18, 12 Wed Se p 19, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 2:01 AM 3.3 ft. 2:31 AM 3.5 ft. 2:58 AM 3.6 ft. 3:24 AM 3.7 ft. 3:50 AM 3.8 ft. 4:18 AM 3.9 ft. 4:48 AM High 1.3 ft. 7:58 AM 0.9 ft. 8:41 AM 0.6 ft. 9:21 AM 0.3 ft. 10:00 AM 0.0 ft. 10:41 AM -0.1 ft. 11:23 AM -0.1 ft. 12:09 PM Low 3.5 ft. 1:36 PM 3.7 ft. 2:20 PM 3.9 ft. 3:03 PM 3.9 ft. 3:46 PM 3.9 ft. 4:30 PM 3.7 ft. 5:15 PM 3.4 ft. 6:03 PM High 0.4 ft. 8:44 PM 0.4 ft. 9:16 PM 0.5 ft. 9:47 PM 0.6 ft. 10:17 PM 0.8 ft. 10:48 PM 1.0 ft. 11:20 PM 1.3 ft. 11:54 PM Low Thu Sep 13, 12 Fri Sep 14, 12 Sat Sep 15, 12 Sun Sep 16, 12 Mon Sep 17, 12 Tue Sep 18, 12 Wed Sep 19, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 1:17 AM 2.7 ft. 1:47 AM 2.8 ft. 2:14 AM 2.9 ft. 2:40 AM 3.0 ft. 3:06 AM 3.1 ft. 3:34 AM 3.1 ft. 4:04 AM High 1.0 ft. 7:05 AM 0.8 ft. 7:48 AM 0.5 ft. 8:28 AM 0.2 ft. 9:07 AM 0.0 ft. 9:48 AM -0.1 ft. 10:30 AM -0.1 ft. 11:16 AM Low 2.8 ft. 12:52 PM 3.0 ft. 1:36 PM 3.1 ft. 2:19 PM 3.2 ft. 3:02 PM 3.1 ft. 3:46 PM 3.0 ft. 4:31 PM 2.8 ft. 5:19 PM High 0.3 ft. 7:51 PM 0.3 ft. 8:23 PM 0.4 ft. 8:54 PM 0.5 ft. 9:24 PM 0.7 ft. 9:55 PM 0.8 ft. 10:27 PM 1.0 ft. 11:01 PM Low Thu Sep 13, 12 Fri Sep 14, 12 Sat Sep 15, 12 Sun Sep 16, 12 Mon Sep 17, 12 Tue Sep 18, 12 Wed Sep 19, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 1:09 AM 2.8 ft. 1:39 AM 2.9 ft. 2:06 AM 3.0 ft. 2:32 AM 3.1 ft. 2:58 AM 3.2 ft. 3:26 AM 3.3 ft. 3:56 AM High 1.4 ft. 6:33 AM 1.0 ft. 7:16 AM 0.6 ft. 7:56 AM 0.3 ft. 8:35 AM 0.0 ft. 9:16 AM -0.1 ft. 9:58 AM -0.1 ft. 10:44 AM Low 2.9 ft. 12:44 PM 3.1 ft. 1:28 PM 3.2 ft. 2:11 PM 3.3 ft. 2:54 PM 3.2 ft. 3:38 PM 3.1 ft. 4:23 PM 2.9 ft. 5:11 PM High 0.5 ft. 7:19 PM 0.5 ft. 7:51 PM 0.5 ft. 8:22 PM 0.7 ft. 8:52 PM 0.9 ft. 9:23 PM 1.1 ft. 9:55 PM 1.4 ft. 10:29 PM Low Thu Sep 13, 12 Fri Sep 14, 12 Sat Sep 15, 12 Sun Sep 16, 12 Mon Sep 17, 12 Tue Sep 18, 12 Wed Sep 19, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 1:44 AM 2.9 ft. 2:03 AM 2.9 ft. 2:20 AM 3.0 ft. 2:36 AM 3.1 ft. 2:55 AM 3.2 ft. 3:17 AM 3.4 ft. 3:44 AM High 1.6 ft. 6:13 AM 1.4 ft. 6:54 AM 1.1 ft. 7:33 AM 0.9 ft. 8:11 AM 0.6 ft. 8:51 AM 0.5 ft. 9:35 AM 0.4 ft. 10:26 AM Low 3.1 ft. 12:18 PM 3.2 ft. 1:18 PM 3.2 ft. 2:14 PM 3.2 ft. 3:10 PM 3.1 ft. 4:07 PM 3.0 ft. 5:08 PM 2.8 ft. 6:16 PM High 0.6 ft. 7:02 PM 0.7 ft. 7:35 PM 0.9 ft. 8:06 PM 1.1 ft. 8:34 PM 1.4 ft. 9:02 PM 1.6 ft. 9:30 PM 1.8 ft. 9:58 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 13 Sept. 19First Sept. 22 Full Sept. 29 Last Oct. 7 New Sept. 15Major Times --:---:-11:28 AM 1:28 PM Minor Times 4:48 AM 5:48 AM 6:00 PM 7:00 PM Major Times --:---:-12:17 PM 2:17 PM Minor Times 5:48 AM 6:48 AM 6:37 PM 7:37 PM Major Times 12:41 AM 2:41 AM 1:06 PM 3:06 PM Minor Times 6:50 AM 7:50 AM 7:15 PM 8:15 PM Major Times 1:32 AM 3:32 AM 1:57 PM 3:57 PM Minor Times 7:53 AM 8:53 AM 7:54 PM 8:54 PM Major Times 2:23 AM 4:23 AM 2:50 PM 4:50 PM Minor Times 8:58 AM 9:58 AM 8:34 PM 9:34 PM Major Times 3:17 AM 5:17 AM 3:45 PM 5:45 PM Minor Times 10:04 AM 11:04 AM 9:19 PM 10:19 PM Major Times 4:13 AM 6:13 AM 4:42 PM 6:42 PM Minor Times 11:11 AM 12:11 PM 10:08 PM 11:08 PM Good Better Best Best++ Better++ Good Average7:20 am 7:44 pm 4:49 am 6:01 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:21 am 7:43 pm 5:49 am 6:38 pm 7:22 am 7:41 pm 6:51 am 7:16 pm 7:22 am 7:40 pm 7:54 am 7:55 pm 7:23 am 7:39 pm 8:59 am 8:36 pm 7:23 am 7:38 pm 10:05 am 9:20 pm 7:24 am 7:36 pm 11:12 am 10:09 pm20% 13% 6% 1% 9% 16% 24% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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Green Scene Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Wow, how my life has changed since I moved to Wakulla County. Surrounding myself with so many environmentally conscious people and having sustainable living as one of the key issues being addressed by UF/IFAS, I have become a real believer. Making the choice to live more sustainably for monetary and environmental reasons has involved taking many small steps. I think of my mother who was a real conservative long before it was fashionable. I consider my mom when I see my daughter roll her eyes with some of my practices. Someday I hope that she will think of me in a positive way as she remembers some of the practices I instilled into my life just as I remember my mother. UF/IFAS has so many materials to assist consumers with making sustainable living changes. The website www.livinggreen.ifas.u .edu is where I turn for researchbased materials to keep me primed on this aspect of my work. Recently UF/IFAS posted a wonderful collection of sustainable living ideas called Sustainable Living Handbook: A Citizens Guide to Thoughtful Action from the University of Oregon. Through it I was reminded of a good de nition of what sustainable living can mean: Sustainable living is a lifestyle that is deeply satisfying, ful lling, and appealing because it is socially, environmentally, and economically responsible. Sustainable living is about making informed choices, even small ones that improve both the quality of our lives and that of the planet for future generations. Sustainable living is to many people the ongoing decision-making process based on ones individual de nition of quality of life. It is about making decisions that make sense to each of us, given our needs and values. It is about living with intention, making deliberate choices and being actively involved with saving money and the environment. BARRIERS TO SUSTAINABLE LIVING One of the identi ed barriers that many face when trying to live and act sustainably is just too much stuff. We are a population that is bombarded by strong messages that to be happy, respected among our friends, and considered successful, we must acquire certain things or live a certain way. American consumption far exceeds consumption in any other country. According to authors Peter Menzel, Charles Mann and Paul Kennedy in their book The Material World: A Global Family Portrait, if everyone in the world lived an American lifestyle, it would require four Earths to sustain that level of consumption. Consider these facts: The average American family has 9,918 pounds of belongings, according to the American Moving and Storage Association. The self-storage industry is one of the fastest growing new business sectors. One in 10 America households rents a storage locker. In 1950, the average American house size was 983 square feet. In 2005, its 2,414 square feet and we still need to rent storage units for our extras. About 43 percent of American families spend more than they earn each year. Recently many families in Wakulla County lost their home and/or belongings through ood waters. I am sure those individuals continue to struggle with their losses and now have a different attitude towards their home and its contents. We must continue to remember them as they put their lives back together again. I am con dent they have reexamined what ultimately is most important to them. Perhaps we can learn through their experience. I encourage you to ask these questions as you picture your homes favorite room. If there was a re or a ood, what items would you want to save? What items would be most helpful in an emergency? What items bring you the great pleasure or truly make your life easier? And as we examine our homes with all of the extras we have accumulated, ask yourself: What about all the other items in this room? Why do I have them? Everyone knows the three Rs: Reduce, reuse, and recycle. Try adding two more: Repair. Can you x it? And nally, the most important: Refuse! Refuse to take something or buy something you really dont need or want. Separating our wants from our needs is where the making intentional choices enter the picture. Think carefully about each purchase to ultimately make good choices. When we make wise choices based on our needs, we will have to do less reducing, reusing, repairing and or recycling! And nally, consider this Kenyan proverb, Treat the world well. It was not given to you by your parents; it was lent to you by your children. Shelley Swenson is UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Agent II for Family, Youth, & Community Sciences/ Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program Agent. She can be reached at (850) 926-3931.Sustainable living through small steps By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING By LYNN ARTZSpecial to The News Teenagers from across Florida made their way to Wakulla County to attend the 2012 SEEK environmental conference. Nearly 60 high school students (sent by dozens of garden clubs) attended one of two 4-day conference sessions based at Wakulla Springs Lodge in July. Both conference sessions included the activities that have made this an outstanding, life-changing experience for students in previous years. The students explored the salt marshes of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, swam and canoed in the waters of Wakulla Springs (a rst magnitude spring), and visited the Apalachicola National Forest to learn about the longleaf pine ecosystem that once dominated the southeast. Wildlife were abundant and often very close, including manatees, turtles, alligators, osprey, a stingray, and a shark. The National Forest eld trip included the banding of a red-cockaded woodpecker and the unexpected capture of a water moccasin. A presentation on Floridas owls included live examples of each species. A presentation on Florida black bears included entertaining videos of bear behavior. The touch tanks and fascinating critters at Gulf Specimen Marine Lab delighted the students as always. Conference participants calculated their carbon footprints, visited FSUs LEED Platinum off-grid, zero emissions building (OGZEB), and toured Marpan Recycling, the only Class 3 recycling facility in the state. As a service project, both groups of students uprooted dog fennel and ragweed and collected litter and recyclables from Wakulla Countys Roadside Wild ower Preservation Project along the Coastal Highway (98). Members of the Iris Garden Club assisted in this effort. SEEK (Save the Earths Environment through Knowledge) is an annual statewide conference sponsored by the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs and coordinated by Lynn Artz. For more information, please visit SEEKs webpage at ww.ffgc.org.In addition to coordinating the SEEK Conference, Lynn Artz is a member of the local Iris Garden Club and is a Wakulla County commissioner.SEEK students visit PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents at the SEEK (Save the Earths Environment through Knowledge) Conference at Wakulla Springs in July. Students canoeing, above, and walking through a eld of pitcher plants in the Apalchicola National Forest, left. Biologist Chuck Hess, at right, holding a water moccasin that he wrangled for the students to look at.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Page 13A the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringBob DonawayJuly 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromMy wife and I have been entering in the Off the Eatin Path since the program rst began. She has won once and now I am a winner too! Thank You! OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l a t nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlorank You So Much! ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & ExteriorTogether We Are Providing Employment for Local CraftsmanFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Dear EarthTalk: How energy efficient (and comfortable) is underfloor heating, sometimes known as radiant heating? Marcy Dell Boston Under oor radiant heating involves under laying the oor with a hot element or tubing that transfers heat into the room via infrared radiation and convection, obviating the need for forced or blowing air. According to the U.S. Department of Energys Energy Savers website, radiant heating has a number of advantages over other forms of heat distribution: It is more efficient than baseboard heating and usually more efficient than forced-air heating because no energy is lost through ducts. It is also exible as it can run off of a variety of energy sources: Gas, oil, wood, solar and other sources or combinations thereof can feed radiant systems. And radiant heating is a good choice for those with severe allergies as no potentially irritating particles get blown around the room. Several aspects of radiant heating make it more energy ef cient. For starters, the uniform heat distribution over the entire surface of a oor heats the lower half of the room, enveloping inhabitants in warmth at a lower overall temperature in some cases up to ve degrees Fahrenheit cooler than a conventional heating system. Radiators and other forms of point heating circulate heat inef ciently and hence need to run for longer periods to obtain comfort levels, reports the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNet). They draw cold air across the floor and send warm air up to the ceiling, where it then falls, heating the room from the top down, creating drafts and circulating dust and allergens. RESNet adds that radiant systems transmit heat on average some 15 percent more ef ciently than conventional radiators. The ef ciency gains can be magni ed signi cantly with good insulation and a well-designed system. While tearing out old heating systems and/or replacing decent existing ooring might be overkill for the sake of moving to radiant heat, those embarking on new building projects or contemplating major renovations should certainly consider it. According to TLC Networks Green Living Guide, there are two main types of radiant heating, electric and hydronic. In the former, heated wires installed in the floor radiate heat upward. This type of radiant heat is most commonly used to retrofit a single room especially a bathroom or kitchen in an older house or building. Meanwhile, hydronic radiant heating, whereby heated water is forced through tubes under the floor, is more often designed into a new structure from the get-go, and is more energy ef cient overall. TLC points out that while radiant heat is definitely more ef cient in smaller, snug homes with lower roofs, it might not always be the greenest solution in homes with bigger rooms: In some scenarios it can be less energy ef cient than forced-air heating. TLC recommends consulting with a reputable heating contractor to see if radiant heating is a sensible way to go. Of course, pairing a radiant heating system with an energy efficient EnergySTAR-approved programmable thermostat can indeed save households hundreds of dollars a year on home heating bills while keeping inhabitants warmer all year long. Many states offer nancial incentives to upgrade home and commercial heating systems in ways that boost energy efficiency. Check out the free Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy (DSIRE) to nd out what kinds of tax rebates or other incentives might be available in your neck of the woods. Dear EarthTalk: Are there certain brands or retail stores where sustainable furniture options can be had? And what should I look for when shopping for greener furniture? W. Cary Trenton, NJ While we now opt often for greener cars, appliances, household cleaners and food to up the sustainability quotient of our lifestyles, the furniture we spend all day and night in close contact with is often far from eco-friendly. The vast majority of sofas, chairs, beds and other upholstered furniture we love to lounge on contain potentially carcinogenic formaldehyde and/or toxic ame retardants and stain resistors that have been linked to developmental and hormonal maladies. And much of the wood used in desks, chairs, tables and the like (as well as in the frames of upholstered furniture) comes from unsustainably harvested lumber which contributes to the deforestation of tropical rainforests. But today, thanks to increased consumer awareness and demand, there are more green choices in furniture available than ever before. A good place to start the search for that perfect couch or chair is the website of the Sustainable Furniture Council (SFC), a non-pro t formed in 2006 to help develop solid standards and certi cation processes within the home furnishings industry. The organization has become a leading information source and network of some 400 green furniture makers and related retailers, suppliers and designers as well as other non-pro ts. Consumers looking for greener furniture can browse SFCs membership list which features contact information and website links accordingly. Buyers beware: Just because a furniture maker is listed with SFC doesnt mean it eschews all chemicals or unsustainably harvested wood entirely, but only that it is making strides in that direction. Consumers should still be knowledgeable about which green features they are looking for and/or which kinds of materials to avoid. Of course, with something like furniture you really need to see and f eel it in order to decide whether it will work in your space. Eco-conscious consumers making the rounds at local furniture stores should keep a few key questions in mind for salespersons. Does the piece in question contain formaldehyde, flame retardants or stain resistant sprays? Is the fabric used certified under the Global Organic Textile Standard program (GOTS, which mandates that at least 70 percent of bers are derived from organic sources and do not contain chemical dyes or other additives)? Is the wood used certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) as sustainably harvested? Does the piece contain any parts or pieces that come from bamboo or reclaimed wood or recycled metal or plastic? And is it easy to disassemble into reusable or recyclable parts if it needs to be replaced down the line? If the salesperson doesnt know the answers, chances are the piece does not pass environmental muster. Limiting your search to brick-and-mortar and Internet-based retailers that specialize in green products is one way to reduce the amount of research and self-education needed, especially because salespersons in such stores are usually up-to-speed on the latest and greatest in sustainable furnishings. Some leading national furniture chains that carry a sizeable inventory of sustainable goods include Crate and Barrel, Room and Board and West Elm, but many more single store eco-friendly furniture stores exist across the country. Some leading online green furniture retailers include Eco-Friendly Modern Living, Furnature, InMod, Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, SmartDeco, Southcone and Viesso. Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Subscribe www.emagazine. com/subscribe. How energy ef cient is radiant heating? Thanks to increased consumer awareness and demand, there are more green choices in furniture available than ever before. Pictured: A Savvy Rest organic crib mattress distributed by Furnature. Radiant under oor heating is more ef cient than baseboard or forced-air heating and can run off of a variety of energy sources. It is also a good choice for those with allergies as no potentially irritating particles get blown around the room. Pictured: an installation in progress. PHOTO FROM SAVVY REST GREEN SCENE

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Aug. 31, the sheriffs of ce received a complaint of a reckless driver on U.S. Highway 319 at McDonalds restaurant. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston and Deputy Stephen Simmons responded and observed the suspect vehicle leaving the establishment northbound at a high rate of speed. Sgt. Johnston observed the suspects vehicle tires cross the center line for approximately 200 yards. A traf c stop was initiated at 2605 Crawfordville Highway. Field sobriety exercises were conducted on the driver, James Lee McIntyre, 22, of Crawfordville. McIntyre was charged with DUI and operating a motor vehicle while license was suspended or revoked with knowledge. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: AUGUST 30 On Aug. 30, Wakulla High School administrators and Deputy Joe Page discovered marijuana inside a students vehicle parked in the WHS parking lot. The 15-year-old male student confessed to owning the baggy of marijuana which contained 2.3 grams. Deputy Scott Rojas issued the student a civil citation and the baggy of marijuana was turned in to the Evidence Division. On Aug. 30, Wal-Mart asset protection team members reported a retail theft. Amanda Lea Brown, 21, of Crawfordville was observed concealing items in her purse. Cosmetics and other items, valued at $44, were turned over the Wal-Mart staff after Brown attempted to leave the store without paying for the items. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. SEPTEMBER 2 On Sept. 2, Michael Monteith of Captain Seaniles in Crawfordville reported a retail theft and aggravated battery. Michelle Lynn Cholmondeley, 53, of Crawfordville was allegedly observed taking $216 worth of alcohol from the establishment without paying for it. A Seaniles employee attempted to stop the suspect and was allegedly struck on the leg by Cholmondeleys vehicle as she attempted to leave the parking area. Deputy Scott Powell made the arrest and warned the suspect about taking any illegal narcotics or contraband into the jail facility. As a female detention deputy searched the suspect, she discovered generic pills on the suspect. In addition to retail theft and aggravated battery, Cholmondeley was charged with possession of a controlled substance and introduction of contraband into a detention facility. On Sept. 2, Linda Good of Crawfordville reported the theft of a mailbox. The victims mailbox and post are valued at $40. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. On Sept. 2, Louis Williford of Crawfordville reported the theft of a mailbox. The mailbox was valued at $40 and was recovered and returned to the victim. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. On Sept. 2, Jessie Davis of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his vehicle. A vehicle window was broken. The vehicle is owned by the victims employer. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. On Sept. 2, Pamela Sapp of Crawfordville reported the theft of a mailbox and post, valued at $40. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. On Sept. 2, Michael Flowers of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A suspect stole six gallons worth of gasoline from his boat. The gas was valued at approximately $20. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On Sept. 2, a residential burglary was reported at Radical Restoration Ministries in Panacea. One of the residents of the ministry reported the theft of cash and checks from the home. The exact amount of property taken is still to be determined. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. A criminal mischief was also reported at the location as a window was discovered broken. On Sept. 2, an 18-yearold Crawfordville woman was shot in the knee while attempting to rescue a cat from a dog on her property. EMS treated the victim at her home and transported her to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Investigators determined that the victims father shot at the dog in an attempt to rescue the woman and the cat and his daughter was accidentally shot. Evidence was collected at the scene and the investigation was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. The dead dog was turned over to the Animal Control Unit. Deputy Nick Gray, Detective Matt Helms, Lt. Bruce Ashley, Lt. Brent Sanders, Deputy Bill Poole and Reserve Deputy Roy Gunnarsson investigated. On Sept. 2, Gary Hames of Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief. The victim was driving his vehicle on Spring Creek Highway near StephensDonaldson Road when juveniles, ages 11 and 12, shot out the window of his vehicle with a BB gun. Damage to the vehicle and window was estimated at $1,500. The victim agreed not to prosecute the juveniles if their parents paid for the damage. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. SEPTEMBER 3 On Sept. 3, Ernest Kilpatrick of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from his porch. The bike is valued at $80. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On Sept. 3, Terry Brown of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at her home. A concrete eagle yard decoration was tampered with. The decoration is valued at $500. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. On Sept. 3, Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated a disturbance call in Panacea when he discovered a mobile home on re. A fuel can was observed nearby and the state Fire Marshal was contacted. A suspect was identi ed. Wakulla re ghters were called to the scene to put out the blaze which occurred at an unoccupied dwelling. A suspect was discovered on the ground several hours later just off Coastal Highway 98. The suspect was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital on a Marchman Act. Detective Matt Helms and Sgt. Jeremy Johnston also investigated. SEPTEMBER 4 On Sept. 4, Gregory Bowyer of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim reported that his credit card number was used 12 times in South Florida. The charges totaled $1,012. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. On Sept. 4, Christopher Thomas of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of his vehicle. The vehicle was stolen from the victims home and is valued at $5,000. It was entered in the FCIC/NCIC data base. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. SEPTEMBER 5 On Sept. 5, Jeconiah Spillane of Crawfordville reported the theft of tire rims from his home. The rims are valued at $250 and a suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. On Sept. 5, Cheri Kempf of Crawfordville reported a credit fraud. The victim was noti ed about being approved for a loan she did not seek. The fraud occurred over the internet. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On Sept. 5, Gloria Turner of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Suspects contacted the victim and informed her that she had won a large amount of money through a lottery. The suspects asked the victim to send money to cover taxes and for her winnings to be released. The victim lost $461 through the scam. Suspects have been identified. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On Sept. 5, Donna Sherling of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Entry was made into the victims home, but the only item missing was a luggage carrier valued at $150. Damage to the property was estimated at $180. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On Sept. 5, Charles Connon of Crawfordville reported recovering a purse on Crawfordville Highway. The purse contained personal property owned by Terra Tyre of Tallahassee. Contact was made with a relative of the purse owner to collect the purse. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,011 calls for service during the past week including 21 business and residential alarms; 13 disturbances; 38 investigations; 44 medical emergencies; 13 thefts; 52 traffic enforcements; 132 traffic stops; 17 reckless vehicles; 18 wanted people; and 14 welfare checks. I LIKEMIKEREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 C WAKULLA COUNTY VOTERS HAVE TWO CHOICES IN THE DISTRICT 3 COUNTY COMMISSION RACE: 1. VOTE FOR MIKE STEWART AND HARMONY WILL CONTINUE ON THE BOARD. 2. VOTE FOR HOWARD KESSLER AND I BELIEVE DISSENSION WILL RETURN TO THE BOARD. ITS YOUR CHOICE... BUT I LIKE MIKE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3www.mikestewart2012.comPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MIKE STEWART, REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3facebook.com/ mike.stewart.3363 Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.comIf Wakulla is to become greater it would be good to hire a property appraiser who has worked in and understands the dynamics of greater markets (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Office has embraced new technology to keep motorists on Wakulla roadways safe. The WCSO has acquired Speed Spies through the Florida Department of Transportation to keep an eye on motorists. The equipment was acquired through DOT points that were amassed when the sheriffs office won a recent state Law Enforcement Challenge. WCSO was awarded a first place trophy and points redeemable for the purchase of traffic safety related equipment after placing rst in the DOT and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration state contest. The technology was deployed this week to analyze speed problems on Lonnie Raker Lane and East Ivan Road. The equipment counted 202 vehicles that were 10 miles per hour or more over the 45 mile per hour speed limit on East Ivan Road and 201 vehicles traveling 10 miles per hour or more over the speed limit on Lonnie Raker Lane. The Speed Spies record and inform the WCSO of the times when the violations occur to effectively target traf c enforcement on the roads. The Speed Spies will be deployed at locations all over the county in an effort to crack down on the speeding issues. Traf c enforcement will be directed in those areas immediately. The highest speed recorded in the 45 mile per hour zone on Lonnie Raker Lane was 92 miles per hour and the highest speed recorded on East Ivan Road (45 MPH zone) was 82 miles per hour.Speed Spies technology watches roads

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Continued from Page 1A In the ever-popular Mr. Legs contest held annually at the 4th of July Celebration, Bill was the man to beat and was crowned Mr. Legs many years in a row. He could also be seen participating in sack races and egg toss contest. Never one to shy away from entertaining, Bill absolutely loved performing in local square dance and clogging groups. Within a few months of coming to Sopchoppy, Bill was instrumental in activating the Sopchoppy Volunteer Fire Department which was the rst organized volunteer re department in Wakulla County, STATION #1. He asked the Sopchoppy City Commission to purchase four complete fire suits, new hoses and upgrade the equipment. Upon his request, the Sopchoppy City Council agreed to pay any volunteer who attended a meeting 50 cents per meeting. In thinking about this, Bill might have also been responsible for the rst paid re department in the county, just a thought! In 1975 the City Commission bought 40 acres of land on the Sopchoppy River to develop a City Park. No doubt that Bills influence on the council went a long way in their decision to purchase this land and his leadership and ability to see things through to completion are certainly the reason that many people still enjoy the use of the Sopchoppy City Park today. I met Bill when he rst came to Sopchoppy, but I was a young stay-at-home mom and really didnt get to know Bill until I was hired in 1979 as the Sopchoppy City Clerk. Working beside Bill for the next 27 years he became not just a co-worker but a good and dependable friend. Together we re-modeled City Hall, fought res, read meters, responded to sick neighbors, celebrated new lives and good times and cried together and supported each other in death and bad times. Bill was always the rst to offer help to neighbors in time of trouble. Many times he organized fish fries and other means of raising money for those in need. Bills willingness to help others often went over the top. His favorite place to shop for the city was the state surplus in Starke. He would often come back to the City with ideas of buying used campers for the homeless or a Boston Whaler boat to put in the Sopchoppy River to rescue people during oods. Even though the city council vetoed many of these requests, he did manage to buy an army truck or two. His trips to Starke brought much laughter and jokes at council meetings and nally I was assigned to accompany him on these buying trips to hold him back probably the hardest assignment I was ever given. People gravitated to Bill. He loved people and people loved Bill. There were many days working side by side in a 12-by-12 of ce that getting any work done was impossible because many of the elderly gentlemen in town along with a few of our commissioners would gather at the office and together they would laugh and tell stories or play a spelling game which usually resorted in the loser pushing a potato around the oor with their nose. Bill had a vision for the Sopchoppy Water System and as chances for expansion came to the city he was always excited to meet the challenge and encourage the city to purchase and install new wells and expand. When Bill began working for the city in 1973, there were fewer than 100 water customers and one well. By the time he retired in 2006, the water system had expanded to Mike Stewart Drive in Crawfordville with a customer base of 3,000 and seven wells. He built a system that the residents of Sopchoppy should be proud of and one that has provided the resources for the City of Sopchoppy to accomplish many things. We the people of Sopchoppy and Wakulla County owe Bill a debt of gratitude. He will be missed.Jackie Lawhon is the city clerk of Sopchoppy. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Page 15ASpecial to The NewsSgt. Ronald Boonie Mitchell and his partner K-9 Gunny of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce were honored as the winner of the 2011-12 Florida Missing Childrens Day Jimmy Ryce K-9 Trailing Team of the Year. The award was sponsored by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement Missing Endangered Persons Information Clearinghouse and recognizes exceptional or extraordinary efforts in a missing child investigation. Sgt. Mitchell and Gunny were honored at the State Capitol in Tallahassee on Monday, Sept. 10 during a formal ceremony. Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum said he is pleased with the outstanding work of the WCSO K-9 Unit. I think it is great that one of our of cers has been recognized for the outstanding work that he does, said Sheriff Crum. Too often the work of law enforcement goes unnoticed. On Oct. 4, 2011, Mitchell was dispatched to Obediah Triplett Road and Wakulla Beach Road in Crawfordville to locate a missing 4-yearold boy. Barefoot tracks were observed on Wakulla Beach Road and K-9 Gunny was tted for his tracking lead. Gunny made several loops in the dirt road as he began his tracking activities. Working against the clock as the sun was beginning to go down, Gunny began to track in a wooded area with no tracks or visible signs of the child traveling in the direction. After jogging through the wooded area for several minutes, Mitchell observed a child running in the woods in the distance. Unable to get the child to stop at rst, Mitchell put Gunny in the down stay position and asked the child if he wanted to pet the dog. The child stopped and walked back toward Mitchell. The of cer put the child on his back as Gunny retraced the route back out of the woods. The child was returned to his mother unharmed. The total track by Gunny was approximately one mile through thick briars and thorny plants and lasted approximately one hour. Im stunned, said Mitchell when he found out about the award. The award is for the entire state? Mitchell added that it means so much to be able to help locate missing children. Its great to be able to catch a felon, but it is 100 times better to nd a child because the child could die, he said. Mitchell and Gunny share a unique bond because Gunny was injured in the line of duty in December 2010 and Mitchell, with the assistance of Crawfordville veterinarian Dr. Norm Griggs, nursed Gunny back to health after multiple surgeries and got the dog back to where he could work again. Dr. Griggs was able to attend the ceremony. 000CFG4 Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Importers of Mexican Arts and CraftsWWW.ARTEMEXICOFLORIDA.COM***********************************presenting a special show at the Crawfordville Womans Club behind Hudson Park Beautiful new merchandise from Baja, Oaxaca & South Central Mexico MW 10-5 T & F 10-6 Sat. 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850)926-6241SALE Mr. Sopchoppy Bill Stephens is dead Appeal of Hilton death sentence heardContined from Page 1AA notice of appeal of the death sentence was led on May 4, 2011. In his appeal, his attorney lists six issues where they feel the trial court erred. The rst was admitting recorded statements Hilton made to law enforcement of cers because they referenced inadmissible collateral crimes. Assistant Public Defender William McLain said this statement was Hilton saying, I didnt start hunting until September. McLain said, It suggested other crimes besides the ones occurring in December and January. However, during the oral arguments, several of the justices stated that this particular statement was ambiguous. Assistant Attorney General Meredith Charbula argued that the trial judge found that it did not imply he committed other crimes. However, she stated that it is reasonable to conclude that he started hunting for Cheryl Dunlap. Another issue McLain brought forward was the court allowing the states witness, Dr. Gregory Prichard, testify about allegations of Hiltons past criminal conduct, which included a police interview of Hiltons ex-wife who spoke about Hiltons fraudulent activity and that he had sexually molested her children. Thats certainly going to in ame the jury, McLain said. These were arrests and allegations, not convictions, he said. Prichard was an expert for the state and testi ed that he disagreed with the defenses experts about Hiltons mental state and believed Hilton was a psychopath. In Prichards testimony, he also spoke about Hiltons statement about hunting, as well as the allegation that Hilton came up with the idea for a horror movie, Deadly Run, which involved turning pretty girls loose and hunting them like pretty, McLain said. Dr. Prichards testimony clearly linked the Deadly Run movie and Hilton, McLain said. He added that Hitlon being involved in the movie was never proven. He used it as a character attack even though there was no proof he was even involved in it. Hiltons attorney also stated in the initial brief that the court relied on the facts surrounding the murder of Emerson and Hiltons statements to justify the heinous, atrocious or cruel (HAC) and the cold, calculated and premeditated (CCP) aggravating circumstances. With no facts suf cient to prove HAC or CCP aggravating circumstances, the court improperly relied on assumptions from collateral crimes in attempt to show proof of the aggravators, it stated. Charbula argued that the claim that Hilton molested children was never mentioned by the prosecutor and the movie was barely mentioned. She added that making a movie such as this one, pales in comparison to killing Meredith Emerson. Given the strong aggravators in this case and including the prior murder of Meredith Emerson, its clearly harmless beyond a reasonable doubt, Charbula said.Sgt. Mitchell and Gunny are Trailing Team of the Year SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSgt. Ronald Boonie Mitchell and Gunny, center, with Lt. Dale Evans, Sheriff Donnie Crum, Major Maurice Langston, and Capt. Chris Savary. Funeral services setStephens obituary was received too late for this issue. The full obituary is online. Visitation for family and friends will be Wednesday, Sept. 12, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. Services will be Thursday, Sept. 13, at 3 p.m. at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. Burial will follow at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32308. Hilton at his murder trial in 2011FILE PHOTO

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LES HARRISONWakulla Extension DirectorThey have been the subject of countless irritated conversations, undeleted expletives, and even a conspiracy theory involving a maniacal university researchers desire to unleash an insect plague on Floridas burgeoning vehicle population. The Lovebug, Plecia nearctica, is the focus of exasperation, urban legend and general misunderstanding. In the 1970s an anonymous practical joker fabricated the myth of a University of Florida entomologist who developed a slow ying insect which would populate the roadways and cover cars with goo as a punishment for a variety of societal transgressions. Over time some of the details morphed to suit the tellers perspective. One version of the tale had the professors brother owning an auto-body paint shop and the bugs were part of a get-rich-quick scheme. The truth has no real intrigue, just the chronicle of a prolific insect that took advantage of environmental factors to expand its range. Lovebugs originated in Central America, but migrated to Galveston, Texas, by 1940 where they were rst reported in the United States. By 1949 they had reached Escambia County and today are found in every Florida county and all Gulf coast states. Lovebugs are most infamous for decorating automobile and trucks. They have a justi able reputation for etching vehicle paint at the point of impact, but it is not really their fault. While it is true their body uids are slightly acid, the damage to the nish occurs with time. If the lovebugs residue remains on the vehicle for several days, bacterial action increases the acidity and etches the paint. These creatures have an unfortunate craving for diesel and gasoline exhaust fumes. Hot engines and vehicle vibrations may also contribute to their interest in highways, and the ultimate demise of some unlucky pairs. Post-appearance chemical control of lovebugs is pointless. Adult males live for two to three days or a bit longer and females may live for a week or a little longer. A spraying program would need to be daily to achieve any level of control. About four weeks in April through May and August through September have the largest populations of lovebugs. In addition to the two large emergences, this species has been collected in Florida every month of the year except November. The females lay approximately 350 gray, irregularly shaped eggs in or on the soil surface under partially decayed vegetable matter which is used for food and shelter. Slate-gray larvae are often found in groups where moisture under the decaying vegetation is constantly present. One of the positive byproducts of the heavy rains and standing waters currently being experienced in Wakulla County is many of the larvae will drown. Unfortunately, standing water does encourage mosquito reproduction with all its associated problems. The reduction of the annual forest burning cycle and development of improved pastures may have contributed to the presence of larger populations of lovebugs by minimizing egg and larva loss. Pastures with ample livestock manure are also attractive larva incubation sites. Biological controls may prove to be the ultimate answer to the lovebugs excesses. There are 16 native fungi UF/IFAS Extension Entomologist have identi ed as potentially lethal to these pests. Research is ongoing. To learn more about lovebugs, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u edu or at (850) 926-3931.Lovebugs: exasperation, urban legend, misunderstanding PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLOVEBUGS: The insects were rst seen in the U.S. in Galveston, Texas, in 1940 and have since migrated to Florida. Expert physicians.Quality medical care.Ofce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comFamily Practice Accepting new patients X-Ray Services Pediatric patients 2 yrs. & older Offering specialty care: Capital Regional Cardiology Associates 850-877-0216 Capital Regional Medical Group Podiatry Services 850-878-8235 Capital Regional Surgical Associates 850-219-2306 Robert Frable, DO Aida Torres, ARNPCRAWFORDVILLE

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 FSU beats Savannah State in rain-shortened gameIn The Huddle, Page 4BDolly Moody on how to love your feetYoga For life, Page 5BWakulla-Taylor game photosPage 3Bsports news and team views SportsBy ELIZABETH ANDREWS Special to The NewsThe Wakulla High Schools Varsity volleyball team played four games last week making their current record 2-3. The rst game was at Lincoln on Wednesday, Sept. 5. Despite Breighly Boltons seven kills and Haley Browns four, the team lost all three matches with scores of 20-25, 12-20 and 12-20. The team was led in blocks by junior Shannan Wood, with eight. The second game was against Rickards at home on Thursday, Sept. 6. Varsity took home three straight match wins with the help of Shannan Wood with nine kills, Haley Brown with eight and Marina Petrandis and Breighly Bolton with four each. Chelsea Carroll had an amazing 13 assists followed by Caylee Cox with seven. The Lady Eagles had 19 unreturned serves, or aces, seven by Haley Brown, four by Chelsea Carroll and three by Albrey Sorrell. The third game was against Chiles on Friday, Sept. 7 at home. The girls fought hard in the rst match, with a score of 2325, but fell short in the end with matches two and three by a score of 13-25 and 18-25. Jordan Pryor had an outstanding 12 digs followed by Albrey Sorell with seven and Chelsea Carroll served up three aces. Breighly Bolton led the team in kills with ve and blocks with four. Followed by Shannan Wood with four kills and three blocks. Chelsea Carroll had nine assists and Caylee Cox had six. The fourth game was at Franklin on Monday, Sept. 10, the girls lost the rst match 22-25, but came back and won the next three matches with scores of 25-9, 25-12 and 25-10. Haley Brown lead the team in kills with 15, followed by Shannan Wood with 13. Marina Petrandis and Breighly Bolton both had eight kills. Jordan Pryor had 10 digs and two aces, Chelsea Carroll had 24 assists and six aces and Caylee Cox had 14 assists. The next game is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 13, against Suwannee at home at 6 p.m. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach The 2012 WHS cross country teams opened their 2012 campaign at the Lions Roar Meet held on Saturday, Sept. 8, at the newly improved Apalachee Regional Park, which is also the site of this years State Finals Meet. Representatives from about 20 teams from Florida and Georgia were in attendance, many coming to get a preliminary look at the new State Course. As is typical for this time of year, the runners were greeted with high temperatures and humidity, which somewhat slowed the times, but not the competitiveness of the eld. The local teams performed solidly for the first meet of the year, with the girls nishing in fourth place and the boys in ninth. The local girls were paced by junior Margaret Wiedeman who nished in 16th place in 23:16. Rounding out the top ve for WHS were Kasey James (18th, 23:40), Raychel Gray (19th, 23:46), Lydia Wiedeman (21, 23:53) and new comer Kayla Webbe (29, 24:56) who just transferred in from Moultrie, Ga. The meet was won by Fort Walton Beach High School, with Lowndes High School (Georgia) nishing in second and Leon High School third and the only local team to nish ahead of the WHS squad.VOLLEYBALL CROSS COUNTRYLady War Eagles go 2-3Season opens at Lions RoarFOOTBALLWar Eagles soar over Bulldogs, 41-20 PHOTO BY WILLIAM SNOWDENDemetrius Lindsey celebrates with linemen Jonathan Chunn, 70, and John Cole, 57, after powering into the end zone for a touchdown that sealed the game for Wakulla. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles continued their winning ways with a tough road victory over the hard-playing Taylor County Bulldogs on Friday night in Perry. The Bulldogs put eight men in the box to take away the run and the War Eagles responded by passing the ball. That loosened up the defense for the running game, and the War Eagles dominated in the second half. It was two good football teams playing extremely hard, said Head Coach Scott Klees of the game. Im proud of our team we needed a game where we needed to play all four quarters. But Klees said he also saw his team wasnt in the type of conditioning they needed and blamed himself for it. Weve got to get in better shape, he said. Quarterback Caleb Stephens was 13 for 23 for 205 yards and two touchdowns and two interceptions. Stephens also has become a rushing threat, running the ball three times for 33 yards and a touchdown. Receiver Jordan Franks had a big night, catching six passes for 91 yards and two touchdowns. Freshman Keith Gavin also had five catches for 72 yards. After the Bulldog defense was softened up by the air attack, running back Demetrius Lindsey started tearing off runs, gaining 128 yards on 9 rushes and scoring a touchdown. He was named Offensive Player of the Week. In total, the War Eagle offense generated more than 400 yards, with the ground attack rolling up 233 yards and three touchdowns. The War Eagle defense played tough, and Dequon Simmons won the Knock Em Back Award with 14 tackles two of which were bone-jarring hits on Bulldog receivers trying to come over the middle. He was agged for unsportsmanlike conduct for one, with referees claiming he was taunting the receiver by standing over him. After the penalty yardage was marked off, the Bulldogs ran the same pass play and Simmons unleashed another hit on a different receiver. Briceton Beverly was Defensive Player of the Week with 7 tackles and 3 sacks. Putting in an incredible performance on both sides of the ball was Mikal Cromartie. On defense, he had six tackles, an interception he returned 55 yards for a touchdown, plus three pass breakups two of which were on the goal line and looked like touchdowns for the Bulldogs until he knocked the ball loose. On the offensive side of the ball, Cromartie carried the ball twice for 18 yards and caught a pass for a 38 yard gain. As punt returner, Cromartie had two for 40 yards. One downside offensive lineman Chris Grif n was dinged up near the end of the game with ice on his shoulder. The 6-6, 270pound senior who has already committed to play at Georgia Tech, may have bruised his shoulder. Klees said on Monday that he wasnt sure about Grif ns condition. GAME RECAP The Bulldogs got on the board rst, moving the ball well with rushing and then a one-yard slant pass at the goal line with just over 4 minutes left in the rst quarter. The extra point was blocked by Wakulla. Continued on Page 3BUP NEXT: North Florida Christian in Tallahassee on Friday, Sept. 14, at 7:30 p.m. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle G E T READY FOR HUN T IN G GIANT YARD SALE Dedicated to the rescue & rehabliltation of injured and orphaned wild mammals and birds Thurs. Sept. 20 8am 3pm Fri. Sept. 21 8am 3pm Sat. Sept. 22 8am 1pmAt Townsend s Nads Mini Storage, 59 Shadeville Rd., CrawfordvilleDonations can be dropped at Unit 43 (thru August) or brought to the yard sale For more information about FWMA visit our website: www.wakullawildlife.org 100% of contributors are retained by FWMA for use in pursing our mission. ALL DONATIONS GREATLY APPRECIATED ALL DONATIONS GREATLY APPRECIATED GIANT YARD SALE(setup) Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator MOLD? ALLERGIES?HURRICANE SEASON is HEREAnyone in need of a certied building contractor with a mold certication please feel free to contact me.WE ALSO WORK WITH YOUR EMERGENCY AND INSURANCE COVERAGEMIKE PECKHAM 850-980-2821Always remember a workers comp. exempt card does not protect the homeowner. lic. no cbc1253204

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Sept. 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla ofce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Sept. 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Sept. 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. Sunday, Sept. 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. Monday, Sept. 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Sept. 18 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Wednesday, Sept. 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Sept. 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla ofce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a las 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Highway. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 9266050. Special EventsThursday, Sept. 13 WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE will meet at the library at 7 p.m. House District 7 Candidate Robert Hill is the guest speaker. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call Doug Jones at 926-1177. Friday, Sept. 14 SILENT AUCTION will be held to bene t the Wakulla County Public Library from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. Items include gift certi cates, vacations, marine supplies, art, school supplies and more. Refreshments will be provided. Sign up to be a bidder, browse through a book of all the items and start bidding on Sept. 1 at the library. Call (850) 926-4244 or FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail. com for more information. CAMPAIGN PARTY for County Commissioner Candidate Howard Kessler will be held at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, at 7:30 p.m. There will be music by Randall Big Daddy Webster. Desserts and refreshments will be served. Call 228-9641 for more information. Saturday, Sept. 15 A FAMILY NIGHT OUT will be held at the Senior Center at 7 p.m. Comedian and impressionist Michael Kelley weaves humor and encouragement through his show Voices That Change using his favorite singers, actors, and politicians. All is done in a way that delivers the Gospel message. Tickets are $10 each and can be purchased at the door or in advance by calling 210-1276. All proceeds go to the Wakulla Pregnancy Center. TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet from 10 a.m. to noon at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road. The group will have a special guest, Lee Nettles, who will introduce basic skateboarding for autistic children to the group. All safety equipment is provided. All spectrum children and their children are invited. Call 274-9474 for more information. 2012 COASTAL CLEANUP hosted by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will start at 9 a.m. at Woolley Park in Panacea. Trash and debris pickup will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. A free lunch and prize giveaway will be held from 11 a.m. to noon for participants. For more information, call 745-7111 or email helpkwcb@gmail.com or visit their website at kwcb.org. STEVE STERNBERG will perform at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com. Seats are $10. Posh Java is located on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. in downtown Sopchoppy. Monday, Sept. 17 WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC WOMENS CLUB will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the Democratic Headquarters in the North Pointe Center, 1626 Crawfordville Highway, Unit B, to discuss the upcoming election. The meeting is open to both men and women and the public is invited to attend. For more information, contact Joan Hendrix at granpetunia@ comcast.net. Tuesday, Sept. 18 SARRACENIA CHAPTER of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. The feature is An Evening of Old Botanists, to be presented by author Gail Fishman, on the basis of her book Journeys Through Paradise: Pioneering Naturalists in the Southeast. Wednesday, Sept. 19 FREE BUSINESS CONSULTING will be held by Christine S. Urban, business analyst, MBA from the Small Business Development Center at the Wakulla County Extension Service, 84 Cedar Avenue, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call and make an appointment at 5612041 or send an email to Christine.urban@ famu.edu. Thursday, Sept. 20 BUSINESS MIXER will be hosted by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. It will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Natures Classroom at the refuge. It is located at 1255 Lighthouse Road. Call 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@embarqmail.com to RSVP by Sept. 17. Friday, Sept. 21 FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATION YARD SALE will take place from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Townsends Nads Mini-Storage, 59 Shadeville Road. Donated items can be dropped off at Townsends Nads Mini-Storage in Storage Unit 34 before the yard sale, or can be brought to the yard sale during setup on Thursday, Sept. 20, between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. For more information, visit www. wakullawildlife.org. The yard sale will also take place on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22 SPORTING CLAYS TOURNAMENT will be held starting at 9 a.m. at the Wakulla Sheriffs Of ce Range and Training Center. This is a fundraiser for the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches. There are three relays at 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Refreshments and lunch will be available. The tournament will be $50 per person with a ve person team. Winners of each relay will receive a 12-gauge shotgun. Contact Lt. Fred Nichols at (850) 251-1676, call the Wakulla Range at (850) 745-7290 or visit www.wcso.org. FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATION YARD SALE will take place from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Townsends Nads Mini-Storage, 59 Shadeville Road. For more information, visit www.wakullawildlife.org. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Open house to view updated ood maps in commission chambers. Library silent auction from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. KWCB Coastal Cleanup starting at 9 a.m. at Woolley Park in Panacea. A Family Night Out at the Senior Center at 7 p.m. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySaturday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Government Meetings Thursday, Sept. 13 OPEN HOUSE to view the updated ood maps and learn more about ood risks in the county will be held by the Northwest Florida Water Management District and the Federal Emergency Management Agency from 4 to 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway. Monday, Sept. 17 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. T uesday, Sept. 18 ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold a nal public hearing on the budget and millage rate at 5:15 p.m. at city hall. Wednesday, Sept. 19 WAKULLA ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 10:30 a.m. in the Wakulla County Administration Conference Room.By JO ANN PALMERKWCB DirectorIts that time of year again when Wakulla County will be visited by residents from our surrounding counties with one common purpose, cleaning our shorelines and waterways. On Saturday, Sept. 15, KWCB will host the 27th Annual Ocean Conservancy International Coastal Cleanup. We will be part of the global effort participated with over 52 countries worldwide, cleaning 22,000 miles of shoreline and riding the ocean, lakes and streams of 9,800,000 pounds of debris. The four major sites for the 2012 cleanup will be St. Marks Refuge, Shell Point, Mashes Sands and Bottoms Road. Volunteers can either proceed directly to the site of their choice or come directly to Woolley Park in Panacea. At any site, you will sign in, and be directed to an area to clean. You can sign up in Panacea and nd out more information on all the sites. You do not have to be familiar with the sites to participate. Many volunteers go from Woolley Park to other areas where needed. Volunteers can sign up early by going to our website at kwcb.org and download the pre-registration form. Following the cleanup, all participants are invited to come to the headquarters at Woolley Park in Panacea for a free lunch hosted by Wal-Mart. Manager Richard Russell, NJROTC cadets from Wakulla High School, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce staff, and the Board of Directors of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will be serving hotdogs, chips and drinks from Refreshment Services Pepsi as a thank you. Participants will also receive a complimentary T-shirt featuring the new KWCB logo and the names of our 2012-13 sponsors. We will once again present the $100 cash prize for the most cigarette butts collected on Saturday by a group, and will be handing out door prizes generously donated by our local businesses. Even though this is hard, hot work, we know it is so important and we appreciate everyone coming out to support this great effort. Trash doesnt fall from the sky, it falls from human hands, and human hands have the power to stop it. You and your friends, neighbors, family and colleagues can truly make a difference through this remarkable experience and internationally. We challenge you to get your group together, get registered and come prepared on Saturday. You should wear comfortable shoes, tennis shoes are ideal, bring a hat, gloves, sunscreen and insect repellent. Bags are provided. If you have any questions, call the office of KWCB at (850) 745-7111. Visit our Facebook page at Keep Wakulla County Beautiful for updates. Remember, reuse where possible, recycle, and reduce your trash. Its good for everyone. Keep Wakulla County Beautiful... Political EventsThursday, September 27 POLITICAL FORUM for County Commission seats 1, 3, 5. Seat 1 will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Seat 3 at 7:30 p.m. and Seat 5 at 8:30 p.m.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSVolunteers help clean Mashes Sands during the Coastal Cleanup.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Page 3BContinued from Page 1B The War Eagles came back with strong kickoff return by Brandon Nichols to the 45. Stephens hit a long pass to Franks. With a rst-and-goal at the 6, Stephens hit Franks on a fade route for a touchdown. The extra point by Dillon Norman was good, and the War Eagles were up 7-6 with 3:45 in the rst. On the Bulldogs next possession, Cromartie jumped the pass route, intercepting the ball and taking it in for a touchdown. Extra point was good, and the War Eagles were up 14-6 with 2:09. In the second period, the Bulldogs were unable to move the ball, and Cromartie had a punt return that set the War Eagles up in good eld position. Stephens connected with Gavin on a 35-yard pass play, and then hit Franks on a fade route to go up 20-6. The extra point was no good. It was 20-6 at the half. The Bulldogs were trying to put a drive together on their rst series of the second half, and the quarterback was scrambling, breaking some tackles, and tossed the ball into the back of the end zone where his receiver caught it. The point after was good, and the Bulldogs were back in the game, 20-13. But the War Eagles responded with a drive down to the Taylor County 10 yard line, where Stephens scored on a run in which he reached over the goal line while going down to the ground, but before his knee touched. The extra point was good, and the War Eagles were up 27-13. The Bulldogs came right back with a long drive, scoring on a touchdown pass and adding the extra point to just be down 27-20. The War Eagles answered with a long, sustained drive that ate up the rest of the third quarter and ended with a touchdown to go up, 34-20. In the fourth quarter, the War Eagles stopped a Bulldog drive by recovering a fumble. Wakulla was unable to move the ball, though, and turned it over on downs. Taylor County couldnt do much either they punted, and Cromartie returned the punt from the 30 to mid eld. Then Lindsey, Norman and Stephens all tore off runs to put the ball deep in Bulldog territory. On third and goal, with less than a minute remaining, Lindsey took the ball in with a twisting, spinning run. The extra point was good. The nal score, 41-20. UP NEXT: NORTH FLORIDA CHRISTIAN They beat us the last two times we played them, Klees said of NFC. Theyre ranked No. 1 in the state in their division. NFC won the state title last year in their division, while Wakulla was state runner up. Its gonna be a great high school football game, he said. Its gonna be a very physical, hard-fought game a game that comes down to the last second. JV CONTINUES ROLLING The junior varsity kept its streak of 18 victories in a row going with a 30-20 victory over the Leon Lions JV on Thursday, Sept. 6, Klees praised the effort of Antonio Morris, who rushed for more than 100 yards and two TDs in the game. This week they face a challenge with the Lincoln JV. Theyll be tested, Klees said.War Eagles soar over Bulldogs, 41-20Players of the WeekDEMETRIUS LINDSEY 9 rushes for 128 yards and a touchdown BRICETON BEVERLY 7 tackles and 3 sacks DALTON NICHOLS 3 punts for an average of 40 yardsO ense Defense Special Teams After a performance by the marching bands, members of the War Eagle and and Bulldog cheer squads competed in a throwing competition sponsored by the Optimist Clubs of Taylor and Wakulla county. At stake was $800 with $500 for the winner, with $300 for the other. The Bulldog cheerleaders won. Halftime showWILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla QB Caleb Stephens reaches over the goal line for a touchdown. Mikal Cromartie, right, picks off a pass and returns it 55 yards for a score. Players, cheerleaders, band members take the eld, link arms and sing the alma mater after the win. Band members watch the game.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M at HamptonSaturday, 6 p.m.The game can be seen on famuathletics.com. #18 Florida at #23 TennesseeSaturday, 6 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. Wake Forest at #5 Florida StateSaturday, 12 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. e Keys to e Keys to Success in 2012 Success in 2012A bizarre night at Doak Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! by Bob Ferrante The expected was the Florida State would light up the scoreboard. The unexpected was that the game would be halted by two lightning delays, which did a far better job at stalling the Seminoles offense than Savannah State. With the Seminoles leading by seven touchdowns late in the second quarter, and with both teams in their locker rooms during a 56-minute lightning delay, coaches and game of cials came to an unusual but not unprecedented decision. They saw more bad weather on the radar coming toward Tallahassee, and FSU coach Jimbo Fisher, Savannah State coach Steve Davenport and the ACC crew agreed to a running clock for the nal 34 minutes of the game. But the weather didnt cooperate, contributing a second lightning delay midway through the third quarter. It took nearly 45 minutes for school administrators to con- rm that they could cancel the remainder of the contest and ensure that the game would be considered of cial. And at that point, with No. 6 FSU leading 55-0, the game was halted with 8:59 left in the third quarter and of cially called at 9:35 p.m. Well, thats a first, FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. Never had that occur in my career. Its easy for me to say I want to keep playing. But I understand the situation theyre in plus they have bad weather coming and (Savannah State has) a bus ride. But as a competitor, I want to keep playing because I want to see some of our young guys. But I totally understand. I dont have a problem with that. The coaches, administrators and of cials tossed around scenarios as they combed through the NCAA rulebook. Among them, bizarrely, was the option that the game could have ended in a 0-0 tie something nobody in the room wanted. There was a discussion there at the end after the weather delay of whether or not we were going to have to call it a 0-0 tie and that was obviously not fair to them, Davenport said. We made a decision that it was going to end right where it was. The Seminoles went into the game a 70.5-point favorite against Savannah State in what was the largest point spread ever in college football. And FSU was on pace to surpass the mark. FSU scored touchdowns on its rst seven rst-half possessions including touchdown grabs by Rodney Smith, Greg Dent and Kelvin Benjamin. Benjamin added another touchdown reception in the third quarter from third-string QB Jacob Coker as FSU put its nal points on the board with 11:24 left in the third quarter. FSU came up short of matching its school records for points (77) and margin of victory (74), but with clear weather and another 24 minutes of football the potential was there for more points. The Tigers finished with just nine passing yards and 19 rushing yards less than a yard per play. They are who we thought they are, Davenport said. People are talking national championship and I can understand that. They are tremendous in every facet of the game.Florida State players walk off the eld during a lightning delay. FSU beat Savannah State, 55-0, in a game that was suspended during the third quarter. Colin Hackley/OsceolaBy Marty Cohen Once the calendar ipped to August, Will Muschamp admitted he was done talking that is. For the preceding seven months, Muschamp talked plenty about entering Year Two as the head coach at Florida, taking care of all his speaking obligations to booster clubs, media folks, whoever he was supposed to address concerning the direction of his program. But upon strolling to the podium for Floridas own Media Day on the eve of preseason camp, Muschamp let it be known, several times, that the time for talking was over. It didnt mean he planned to erect a Cone of Silence around the Florida program, although if he had his druthers, he probably would have approved the idea. What he meant was that it was time to get back on the eld and produce. He reiterated the theme several times, how the Gators needed to display signs of progress on the field, on Saturdays, rather than trying to simply convince us the program was headed in the right direction. Muschamp firmly believes the foundation has been laid and he often states he is building for the long haul, not simply a quick x. But he also knows the painful reality that the past two seasons have been well below the standard Florida has established over the past 20 years, rst under Steve Spurrier and then Urban Meyer. He doesnt need to be reminded of the gory numbers a 15-11 mark the past two seasons including 7-6 in his initial foray in 2011. The Gators stumbled through last fall, particularly after starting senior quarterback John Brantley was sidelined right before halftime against eventual national champ Alabama in the fth game, leading to a freefall that produced just two wins in the nal eight regular-season contests. The Gators fashioned an unseemly 3-5 mark in the SEC, just the fourth time in the past 40 seasons they nished with a losing record in conference play. While Muschamp is eager to move past the struggles of last season, he also wants his players to remember the feelings that accompanied the defeats, and use that bitter taste as motivation for 2012. With a deeper, more experienced team at most spots and a bit more favorable schedule (any time it doesnt say Alabama on the slate, thats a positive these days), there is reason to believe that Muschamps optimistic talk since January will actually bear fruit this fall. But its time to put the rhetoric aside, and turn the words into results. Both South Carolina and Georgia have represented the SEC East in Atlanta the past two seasons, and are deemed the favorites to appear again in the SEC Championship Game. Muschamp stated atly that any Florida season that doesnt include a stop in Atlanta the rst Saturday in December should be deemed a failure.

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Our feet take a daily pounding from the shoes we wear, the way we walk, the activities we enjoy (e.g., running), or simply from inactivity. Most of us underestimate the effects tired, tight, misaligned, and in exible feet, ankles, and toes can have on the rest of us. Arch, hip, and back pain are only some of the side effects of neglected feet. Those with tight leg muscles such as the calves and hamstrings might want to give some TLC to their tootsies too if they want to improve their exibility. Here are a few basic tips and moves you should do on a daily basis to help improve circulation and mobility in your feet. The rest of your body will thank you. Toe lifts: Sit or stand while you ground evenly through the four points of your feet: big toe mound, little toe mound, and inner and outer heel. Slowly lift your toes off the ground and spread them out. Bonus tips: lower the toes one at a time, working rst from the pinky inwards and then try it again by lowering the big toe rst. Or, try to lift only your big toes off the oor, then only your little toes. Will them to lift and watch that your hands and ngers dont try to help. Toe abduction: Ground in the feet as you did above and now gently work to move the big toe outwards away from the other toes. Bonus tip: If you can do so comfortably, while seated, bend over and place your hand along the inner arch of your foot. Feel the muscles along the arch contract as you gently work to abduct (move away) your big toe from the rest of the toes. When you touch the area you want to activate, you send a signal to your brain to get that area moving. Release ball: Using a tennis ball, gently and slowly roll out the undersides of your feet while standing. Use a chair or wall for balance. Keep your foot and toes relaxed throughout. Stop rolling and release the foot down onto the ball when you feel a tight or sore spot. Bonus tip: Once this feels easier, graduate up to a golf or tiny release ball. Toe separators: Why not release the muscles of your toes and feet while you do other things! Use corks or toe separators (think the things you use for a pedicure) between the toes to gradually realign the bones of your feet. Bonus tip: cut the corks in thirds or halves to start and then gradually increase the width of the corks as your feet release. Dont force large separators between your toes so you feel pain. By spending 10 minutes on the above every day, you will release the connective tissue in the feet that connects up the body to the legs, hips, and back, thus increasing your flexibility and reducing your pain throughout. You will enjoy a nice massage that stimulates blood ow in the feet and helps you de-stress. You will be able to treat bunions, plantar fasciitis, and other foot aliments. And nally, you will be well on your way to keeping your feet and toes healthy which in turn will have an effect in the entire rest of your body. Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140 or focusyoga@yahoo.com. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Page 5BHEALTH & FITNESS How to love your feet YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Continued from Page 1B Sophomore J.P. Piotrowski was the first WHS boy to nish in the boys race, running 19:20 and nishing in 46th place with Aaron Smith just 6 seconds behind in 19:26. Rounding out the top six for the War Eagles were Alan Pearson (73rd, 20:39), Travis Parks (75th, 20:43), Mitchell Atkinson (78th, 20:53) and Albert Smythe (83rd, 21:09). This wasnt a meet about time, said Coach Paul Hoover. This was a meet about beginning to get the kids into the racing mode, to give them some idea as to how they stack up against the other runners in the area and to give our new runners a chance to experience a high school meet. This time of year is really exciting, said Hoover. We are nally able to get the kids into competition and we begin to see what well have for the year. We lost ve girls from last years top nine on a team that quali ed for the state meet, but we still have a real solid group that can be at least as good, if not better than last years team. We dont have the depth we did last year, so our girls will have to stay together and some of the other girls are going to have to step up. Our boys team is really young, with only one senior currently in the top nine, but they are a pretty dedicated group and we have three or four rst year runners that might turn out to be pretty good. We should be competitive and might turn out to be pretty good, Hoover said.Cross country season opens at Lions Roar(ARA) In a perfect world, youd develop a workout schedule for the next six months, stick to it awlessly and nd yourself at the level of tness you hoped to achieve. But as many know all too well, life sometimes gets in the way, be it in the form of an injury, lack of motivation or simply running out of time. While sticking to a regular workout schedule is a challenge, there are a number of ways to keep you moving both physically and mentally. Making your workouts fun, getting creative with both your routine and schedule, and taking a few simple steps to stay healthy are all great steps toward sticking to your fitness goals. Ryan Sutter, a former professional football player who also happened to be the top choice on The Bachelorette in 2003, now nds himself in the role as a full-time re ghter and family man. Yet he still enjoys amateur athletic pursuits to keep himself in shape, such as mountain bike races and marathons. Sutter offers six tips to fellow weekend warriors looking to stay in shape: Set successive shortterm goals to keep you going. For example, schedule a 5k one month and a mountain bike race for the next. The feeling of accomplishment you get from ful lling each goal will help you achieve the next. You can even set weekly goals with rewards, such as allowing yourself to order a pizza after sticking to your schedule for that week. Use peer pressure in a positive way. Enrolling in team sports or group activity can help provide the motivation for sticking to your plan. When others are depending on you, youre less likely to skip out. Vary your activity. Run one day, play basketball another and hit the weight room the next. One bene t to a varied routine is keeping you interested, but its also great for your body. Different activities use different muscle groups, meaning a varied workout helps you become more comprehensively fit and can help you avoid overuse injuries. Focus on being an athlete rather than a specialist, says Sutter. Listen to your body. Youre likely to have some aches and pains, but those can be reduced with the proper treatment. Always take time to warm up before and stretch after workouts, and ice sore areas after your workout. To make icing easier, keep an ACE Brand Reusable Cold Compress in your freezer at both home and work. More injury prevention tips can be found at www.acebrand.com. Get creative with your scheduling. Look for ways to make workouts a part of your daily routine. I really enjoy yoga in the morning with my kids, says Sutter. Rather than heading out to dinner to catch up with your friend, see if he wants to hit the racquetball court instead. Or maybe you can occasionally bike to work instead of driving, spending the minutes you normally would be sitting in the car working out. Always keep your gym bag stocked and with you. This way, you cant back out of your workout because you werent prepared. There are three essentials I keep in my gym bag: food for energy, hydration to keep me going and clean clothes to change into when Im done with my workout, says Sutter. The most important thing is to have fun, says Sutter. Otherwise, its easy to lose sight of why youre working out in the first place.Six ways to keep your workouts regular, fun and injury-free SPECIAL TO THE NEWS LindysChicken Since19687locations SPECIALS SPECIALS TENDERS 3 Large Chicken Tenders w/ Fries .......... $4.89 HOT WINGS 5 Piece w/ Fries ....................................... $4.89 2 Whole Wings w/ Fries & Biscuit .................................... $4.89 Includes Side & Small Drink Chicken Fillet combo .................................. $6.99 3 Tenders special ........................................ $6.39 5 Hot Wings ................................................. $6.39 Chicken Salad or BBQ Sandwich ............... $5.99 Pork Chop Sandwich .................................. $6.99 2 Whole Wings ............................................ $6.39 2 PC Dark with only Mashed Potatoes ....... $5.19 COMBO MEALS COMBO MEALS MW 10-5 T & F 10-6 Sat. 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850)926-6241SALE 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926685 or 510Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH The Wakulla News Turn account receivables into CASH!!! Tired of wai ng 30, 60, 90 days? Meet payroll. Increase pro ts. Great for startups, bankruptcies, tax liens, bad credit & more. $20k to $10M+ www.jpcapitalsolu ons.com 863 589 6587 jpcapitalsolu ons@gmail.com Call: 866-673-2729Visit: www.StudyForArthritis.com Local doctors need volunteers for a research study c omparing FDA-approved arthritis medications. .No-cost study-related care and study medications for up to 42 months. .Compensation up to $50.00 per visit .No health insurance or referrals are required. Do you from ARTHRITIS?

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Account Acts Ally Asked Axis Brushing Coins Considering Craft Crush Data Ears Eats Egypt Elements Else Ends Ever Fern Flat Fond Halt Hats Into Island Knew Lasts Late Lens Mass Mate Navy Neck Need Newly Nicest Nylon Open Paws Pile Planes Poem Point Quiz Reply Ri e Rise Root This page sponsored in part by: Seize Skate Snack Snap Sneak Spelled Stay Stem Study Sunk Taxi Teams Teas Toad Toys Trip Twos Vacant Vain Virus Want Yield

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Page 7BSTATE NEWS By DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 7, This time four years ago, there was a lot of talk of hope and change. This week, President Obama exhorted Americans to continue to hope rather than to make a change. And a Florida politician had his own kind of change on display. Charlie Crists change of heart, from Ronald Reagan and Jeb Bush Republican to an Obamabacking speaker at the Democratic National Convention, brought the expected calls of derision from his former Republican brethren who said he really hasnt changed and is just the same old opportunistic Charlie. And while he may be once again embracing the president, at least in spirit, Democrats werent necessarily buying Crists full-on man hug of their party. A number of them this week said cautiously something to the effect of Come on in if you wish, but were skeptical of your motives and bona des. But those who were saying so were the Democratic Party activists at the DNC in Charlotte, N.C. For them many of whom have eyes on running for, or working for someone running for, the governors of ce Crist may represent a rival, though hes of cially not a member of their party, at least not yet. With his appearance on stage at the convention just a short time before Obama, rumors have resurfaced that the chameleonlike Crist may also be looking for a return to the state political stage. And theres more than a little bit of envy of Crist who seems to have some things Democrats havent had much of in this state in recent years: name recognition, likeability and fundraising prowess. In short, electability. Florida Democratic Party Chairman Rod Smith said in his Baptist upbringing he was taught to welcome people from other faiths into the church. That doesnt necessarily mean Im going to make you a preacher, said Smith, who could be one of those mulling a run for governor in 2014. Crist tried to sell his backing of Obama as both pragmatism and ideology, saying that from a pragmatic standpoint Florida was only able to balance its budget the state was saved in Crists words by Obamas stimulus spending. From an ideological standpoint, Crist said the GOP has drifted too far to the right and isnt amenable to compromise. My friend Jeb Bush recently noted Reagan himself would have been too moderate, too reasonable for todays GOP, Crist said. Later, he said Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan were allergic to the very idea of compromise. The Cristo-Chango of the former governor was kind of the way it has gone for a Democratic Party that has had few wins in Florida lately even their big convention week was partly overshadowed by the longtime Republican. For those who remain in the state Republican Party it was a quiet week, coming right after the GOPs Tampa convention. They mostly watched and sniped from the sidelines as the Democrats did the week before. State Party Chairman Lenny Curry was in Charlotte to do counterpoints but Crist botched things up for him too. Instead of getting to go on national TV to shoot off zingers about Obama and to praise Romney, Curry had to use his time in the spotlight to answer questions about Crist. The Democratic convention hardly went off hitch-less for the party as a whole. Rank-and-file Democrats changed the platform and omitted previous language that included the word God-given, leading to allegations the party was going Godless. Democrats also failed to keep in language about Jerusalem being the rightful capital of Israel, a point of interest to the Jewish voting bloc. Both changes chalked up as oversights were quickly changed back, but the Republicans got a couple of days of talking points out of the blunders. GOVERNMENT GOES ON While Democrats and Crist got all hopey and changey again in North Carolina, the business of actual government continued in Florida. Florida education of cials were weighing the possible impact of a federal-court opinion handed down late last week that may require in-state tuition for the American-born children of illegal immigrants. Even though theyre U.S. citizens by virtue of American birth, tuition is based on residency, and residency is based on where your parents live if youre a minor. But U.S. District Judge K. Michael Moores ruling found that an unconstitutional violation of the rights of those students. And in another issue related to the federal courts, the U.S. Department of Justice said this week that it wont oppose a new plan for early voting in ve Florida counties that must get prior approval for electoral changes under the Voting Rights Act. Lawmakers last year reduced the number of early voting days in all Florida counties, but the change was rejected for the ve counties Collier, Hardee, Hendry, Hillsborough and Monroe. A new plan would reduce early voting from 14 days to just eight in those counties, but expand the hours to 12 per day. The DOJ notified a federal court that it wont oppose the plan, putting the Obama Administration, the Scott administration and the counties mostly on the same page. One county, Monroe, isnt totally in agreement its supervisor of elections, Republican Harry Sawyer, said the extra hours of early voting amount to an unfunded mandate. Also, Sawyer said its not clear whether the plan might reduce minority turnout, which is the objection to cutting back on early voting. But he said hed go along with whatever the court decides. COMINGS AND GOINGS Gov. Rick Scott 2.0 continues to take shape. This week those who watch the governors of ce learned that Scotts communications director, Brian Burgess, is leaving to go to the Republican Party of Florida. Burgess was a lightning rod, with a more confrontational approach with the media than predecessors. But he has to be credited for helping Scott get to the office in the rst place, helping craft the campaign messaging that propelled the previously obscure Scott from health care executive to the states chief executive. Burgess will be replaced by Melissa Sellers, previously spokeswoman for Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal. STORY OF THE WEEK: Hoping to rekindle the spirit of hope he ignited four years ago while wanting Americans to not change to a different vision, President Barack Obama asked the country this week to give him a little more time to achieve the vision they bought into in 2008. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Im one of those believers that if you want to join our church youre always welcome in the congregation. That doesnt necessarily mean Im going to make you a preacher.... I think he would have to take some Desi Arnaz lessons. Hed have some splainin to do. Florida Democratic Party Chairman Rod Smith on Charlie Crists ongoing irtation with the Democratic Party.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Democrats sell hope, but say no change is needed By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 10 Former Republican lawmaker Nancy Argenziano was foiled this year in her attempt to run for Congress as a Democrat. But now running as an independent for a state House seat in Citrus and Hernando counties, the outspoken --and often controversial --Argenziano has received the backing of the Florida Democratic Party as it tries to knock out a Republican incumbent. The partys somewhat-unusual support of Argenziano came after Democrat Lynn Thomas Dostal withdrew from the House District 34 race just days after winning the Aug. 14 primary. Dostals move cleared the way for a one-on-one race between Argenziano and Rep. Jimmie Smith, R-Inverness, and eliminated the possibility that Smith would face a divided opposition that could help him more easily win re-election. Argenziano said Monday she is very grateful and proud to have the support and said it shows the Democratic Party knows she would be fair if elected. She said she has always been independent, including sometimes crossing Republican leaders while serving in the House and Senate from 1996 to 2007, when former Gov. Charlie Crist appointed her to the state Public Service Commission. I dont want the extremes of either party, Argenziano said. Thats why Im an independent. Dostal, a Homosassa resident who won nearly 72 percent of the vote in the Democratic primary, noti- ed the state Aug. 17 that he was withdrawing from the race. The Tampa Bay Times reported that Dostal said Argenziano needs a clear eld to beat Mr. Smith. The Democratic Party did not replace Dostal on the ballot and supported Argenziano. Nancy Argenziano has been a strong, independent voice for consumers and Floridas middle-class families, while her opponent is a Tea Party extremist who supports the same failed policies which have moved our state in the wrong direction, party executive director Scott Arceneaux said in a prepared statement. Smith, who did not immediately return a phone message left at his of ce Monday, was elected to the House in 2010 and became best known for sponsoring legislation aimed at requiring drug testing for state employees and welfare recipients. His campaign website gives a glimpse of his conservative positions on other issues. As always, I will continue to ght against higher taxes and job-killing regulations, Smith, a retired member of the U.S. Army, says on the site. Argenziano, who represented the Citrus and Hernando areas in the House and Senate, tried to run this year as a Democrat for a U.S. House seat in North Florida held by Republican Steve Southerland. But she dropped her bid after a judge ruled that she did not change her party registration early enough to run as a Democrat. While she is well known in the legislative district, Argenziano faces a huge financial disadvantage as she runs against Smith. As of Aug. 9, the latest gures available, Smith had raised $100,722, while Argenziano had raised $5,395. Argenziano said she has not received nancial support from the Democratic Party. By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 7, With hundreds of millions of dollars a year hinging on their decision, Florida Supreme Court justices Friday began deliberating about whether to uphold a 2011 law that requires government workers to chip in 3 percent of their pay to the state retirement system. A Leon County circuit judge this year found that the contribution requirement violated the rights of state and local workers who had been hired before the law took effect on July 1, 2011. But some justices appeared skeptical about one of the key underpinnings of the lower-court decision that a 1974 law created contractual rights shielding such workers from the retirementsystem changes. Justice Charles Canady said government workers can lose their jobs and questioned why they also cant be forced to pay into the pension system. I have a hard time understanding how when someone does not have a continuing right to employment, (how) they have a continuing right to a particular bene t of employment, he said. That strikes me as anomalous. Similarly, Justice Barbara Pariente questioned why the Legislature would bind itself forever, no matter what the budget crisis to a law that would only allow increased bene ts and prevent bene t cuts or mandatory employee contributions. But Justice James E.C. Perry appeared to agree with opponents of the 2011 law who contend that lawmakers could only require the contributions from workers hired on or after July 1, 2011. You can prospectively change it, but not to those employees that were there, Perry said. Despite erce political opposition from unions and government workers, the Republican-dominated Legislature and Gov. Rick Scott pushed through the pension changes as they dealt with a $3.6 billion budget shortfall. The mandatory contributions apply to far more than state workers, as school districts, county governments and many cities also are part of the Florida Retirement System. The Florida Education Association and other groups led the lawsuit last summer, but that did not prevent the state from starting to collect the contributions a fact that could force it to refund money if it ultimately loses the case. Ron Meyer, an FEA attorney who argued before the court Friday, said the state could face giving back roughly $900 million. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford struck down the pension law in March, and the states appeal was fast-tracked to the Supreme Court without having to be heard in the 1st District Court of Appeal. As a sign of the stakes involved in the case, a crowd lled the Supreme Court chambers Friday to hear the arguments. The audience included representatives of state and local unions, the Florida Association of Counties and the Florida Chamber of Commerce, which has been an outspoken supporter of the decision to require pension contributions. Justices typically do not rule in such cases for months. Scott did not attend the hearing but released a statement saying the case was about maintaining a responsible and sustainable state budget. In 2011, the Legislature passed, and I signed, common-sense public pension reform, which requires public employees like private-sector employees throughout Florida to contribute to their retirement plans, Scott said. Prior to this reform, Florida was one of only three states that did not require public employees to contribute to their pensions. The Supreme Court arguments centered, in part, on the 1974 pension law and a 1981 court opinion that the state contends allowed it to require contributions from employees, regardless of when they were hired. Raoul Cantero, a former Supreme Court justice who represented the state, said the 1981 opinion made clear the Legislature needs to have exibility to react to changing nancial circumstances. Responding to questions from justices, Cantero said the state could even eliminate the pension system, so long as it didnt retroactively affect bene ts that had been accrued before such a change took effect. But Meyer said the 1974 law set up a system in which employees would not be required to contribute to their pensions. Meyer said Fulford, the circuit judge, found a very clear contractual right for workers hired before July 1, 2011. You cant change the game in the middle of the game, Meyer said. Another issue in the case focuses on whether the law violated workers collective-bargaining rights, with Meyer arguing lawmakers passed the 2011 changes without allowing employees to negotiate them. The facial problem with this statute is, there is no room for any collective bargaining, he said. But Cantero said it would have been unworkable to negotiate the changes because workers in the retirement system are in hundreds of state and local bargaining units.Supreme Court ponders high-stakes pension caseDemocrats back independent Argenziano in House race Montford offers help to Franklin County oystermenCommercial oystermen, their families, and other Franklin County residents hardhit by the oyster harvesting crisis will get some much needed help navigating government assistance programs, Sen. Bill Montford (D-Tallahassee) announced Friday, Sept. 7. In an effort to connect those economically impacted by the oyster harvest calamity with federal and state programs available to help bridge the economic crisis, Montford is broadening his Apalachicola district of ce hours, weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and after hours if necessary. As weve seen with other disasters that have hit Florida, those impacted often need some assistance understanding or applying for the various federal and local programs that are there to help them in the recovery process, said Montford. My goal is to get the government help to Franklin County residents and Franklin County residents to the government help as quickly as possible. Court: Stealing husbands emails not domestic violenceA woman who used her husbands email password to read all his emails and then changed the password so he couldnt get into his account isnt guilty of cyberstalking, the 1st District Court of Appeal said Tuesday. A court issued a domestic violence injunction against Cheryl Young of Alachua County and the lower court judge in the case suggested her actions amounted to cyberstalking. But the appeal court, in reversing the injunction, noted that cyberstalking is de ned in law as communication of words, images, or language by or through the use of electronic mail or electronic communication, directed at a speci c person, causing substantial emotional distress to that person and serving no legitimate purpose. The court found her acts improper but didnt constitute domestic violence by stalking, because they were not electronic communications by her of words, images, or language.State briefs

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Telephone Number of Clerk of Court: 262-335-4400 Courtroom/Room Number: 3204 Address: 432 E. Washington Street West Bend, WI 53095 on September 24, 2012 at 1:30 p.m. If you do not attend the hearing, the court may enter a judgment against you in favor of the person(s) suing you. Acopy of the claim has been sent to you at your address as stated in the caption above. Ajudgment may be enforced as provided by law. Ajudgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You may have the option to answer without appearing in court on the court date by filing a written answer with the clerk of court before the court date. You must send a copy of your answer to the Plaintiff(s) named above at their address. You may contact the clerk of court at the telephone number above to determine if there are other methods to answer a Small Claims complaint in that county. By:/s/Quintin A. Sullivan on 9/4/12 Schober Schober & Mitchell, S.C. 2835 S. Moorland Road New Berlin, WI 53151 State Bar Number 1081427 September 13, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5364-0920 TWN Vs. Dibona, Anthony Case No. 11000158CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case No.: 11000158CADivision: FLAGSTAR ABANK, FSB Plaintiff, v. ANTHONYA. DIBONAA/K/AANTHONYDIBONA, ETAL, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated June 21, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 11000158CA, DIVISION:, of the Circuit Court of theSecond Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and ANTHONYA. DIBONAA/K/AANTHONYDIBONA; WENDYM. DIBONAA/K/A WENDYDIBONA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANTHONYA. DIBONAA/K/AANTHONY DIBONA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WENDYM. DIBONAA/K/AWENDYDIBONA; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTYOWN UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2 are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 1 1:00 a.m. at front door of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327 on the 4th day of October, 2012 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, BLOCK F, OF SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 88, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 58 Gold Finch Way, Crawfordville, FL32327 If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. 5365-0920 TWN Vs.Serai, Kanwaljit Case No. 2009-250-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2009-250-CA HERITAGE COMMUNITYBANK d/b/a AMERIS BANK, Plaintiff, v. KANWALJIT SINGH SERAI a/k/a K.S. SERAI, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: Commence at an old concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North along the East boundary of the Southwest quarter of said Section 25 a distance of 667.78 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261) marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Southwest quarter of said Section 25, thence run North 89 degrees 04 minutes 30 seconds West 315.00 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 89 degrees 04 minutes 30 seconds West 547.05 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 00 degrees 23 minutes 26 seconds East 999.46 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run South 88 degrees 33 minutes 08 seconds East 116.83 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run North 00 degrees 32 minutes 13 seconds East 28.57 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 88 degrees 37 minutes 25 seconds East 419.88 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 11 minutes 14 seconds East 1023.81 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 12.68 acres, more or less. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein after, at public sale on September 27, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 7, at the W akulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, Florida 32327 If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Timothy D. Padgett, ESQ.,Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Counsel for Plaintiff September 13 & 20, 2012 5366-0920 TWN Estate: Crowson, Madelyn File No. 2012-80CPNotice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION FILE # 2012-80CP IN RE: ESTATE OF MADELYN JOYCE CROWSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS 5367-0920 TWN Vs. OGrady, Michael Case No. 652007CA000021FCXXXX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652007CA000021FCXXXX NATIONALCITYBANK OF INDIANA, ANATIONALBANKING ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. MICHAELJ OGRADY; KARIN S. OGRADY; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 14, 2007, and entered in Case No. 652007CA000021FCXXXX of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein NATIONALCITYBANK OF INDIANA, ANATIONALBANKING ASSOCIATION,is the Plaintiff and Michael J. OGrady; and Karin S. OGrady, are the Defendant(s). The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, on the 11th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 32, BLOCK K, MAGNOLIAGARDENS, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINNG FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida, this 30th day of August, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk, Wakulla County, Florida By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 WWR #10057686 5368-0920 TWN vs. Highwoods II Case No. 2012-CA-40 Notice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-CA-40 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. HIGHWOODS II, LLC, ET AL., CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 21, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse on September 27, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described parcels of property located in Wakulla County, Florida: PHASE II, PARCELA COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK A OF HIGHWOODS PLACE PHASE 1, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 65 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST, 180.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST, 169.69 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON ACURVE CONCAVE EASTERLY; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLYALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 361.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 13 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 55 SECONDS FOR ADISTANCE OF 84.46 FEET (CHORD BEARS SOUTH 25 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, 84.26 FEET); THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST, 197.41 FEET; THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST, 246.77 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE NORTH 70 5369-0920 TWN vs. Barry, Joseph Case No. 11-355-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY CASE NO.: 11-355-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH C. BARRY, a/k/a JOSEPH C. BARRY, JR., BETTYG. BARRY, SUE ANN SMITH, CENTENNIALBANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, WAKULLABUSINESS CENTER PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, and UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION 1 and UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on October 4, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Begin at the intersection of Easterly right of way of U.S. Highway 319 and the Westerly boundary line of Lot 89 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING and said point being the point of curve to the right having a radius of 5679.67 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve and said right of way for 38.66 feet thru a central angle of 00 degrees 23 minutes 24 seconds, chord of said arc being North 28 degrees 07 minutes 16 seconds East 38.66 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving said right of way run South 62 degrees 51 minutes 25 seconds East 55.18 feet to a concrete monument; thence South 02 degrees 00 minutes 50 seconds West 151.83 feet to rod and cap lying on the Northerly right of way of Council Moore Road; thence run along said right of way North 87 degrees 59 minutes 10 seconds West 132.90 feet to a concrete monument marking the intersection of said right of way with the Easterly right of way of U.S. Highway Number 319; thence leaving said Northerly right of way run along said Easterly right of way North 27 degrees 08 minutes 35 seconds East 155.24 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any Person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. This Notice dated this 22nd day of August, 2012. Clerk, of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST, 181.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PHASE II, PARCELB COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK A OF HIGHWOODS PLACE PHASE 1, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 65 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WESTERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 1, ADISTANCE OF 134.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID LOT LINE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 45.87 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 1; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 1, ADISTANCE OF 30.08 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID BOUNDARYLINE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST, 189.45 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST, 138.82 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON ACURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY; THENCE NORTHWESTERLYALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 277.13 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 19 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 09 SECONDS FOR ADISTANCE OF 95.38 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 26 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST, 94.91 FEET) TO APOINT OF REVERSE CURVE; THENCE NORTHWESTERLYALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 321.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 18 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 29 SECONDS FOR ADISTANCE OF 101.59 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 27 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST, 101.17 FEET); THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST, 10.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST, 40.87 FEET; THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST, 131.73 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS, DRAINAGE AND UTILITIES OVER, UNDER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK A OF HIGHWOODS PLACE PHASE 1, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 65 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST, 140.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY, 40.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST, 169.69 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING ARADIUS OF 361.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 49 SECONDS FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 100.31 FEET (CHORD BEARS SOUTH 26 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST, 99.99 FEET); THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST, 42.10 FEET TO APOINT ON ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST; THENCE NORTHWESTERLYALONG SAID CURVE HAVING ARADIUS OF 321.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 18 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 31 SECONDS FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 101.60 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 27 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST, 101.17 FEET; THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST, 170.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Date: September 5, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By:/s/Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices The administration of the estate of MADELYN JOYCE CROWSON, deceased, whose date of death was December 8, 2011, and the last four digits of whose social security number are 0644, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLACounty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is SEPTEMBER 13, 2012. Personal Representative: Brenda Joy Wilson 181 Avenue G, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 Attorney For Personal Representative: Kristy Branch Banks, Florida Bar Number: 517143 Attorney for Brenda Wilson P.O. Box 176, Apalachicola, FL32329 Telephone: (850) 670-1255 Fax: (850) 670-1256 EMail: info@kbblawfl.com Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Page 9B We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!2323 Surf Rd. 3BR/2BA Bayfront road on Ochlockonee Bay, Screened Porch, Deck and Dock. No Smoking. No Pets. $1,150 per month. 112 Captain James St. 4BR/2BA 2,280 sq. ft. MH on 9 acres. Located in North Wakulla near Woodville. Complete with replace, workshop and dishwasher. No Smoking. No Pets. $775 per month.Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Commercial building 4,300 square foot heated and cooled building on 1 acre of land Rents out for $1,800.00. Building is in excellent condition. RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 22 Coral Way 3BR./2BA with 1 car garage and fenced in yard on 1/2 acre. Pets okay with $250. fee, $950.mo/$950 Deposit. 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available, all utilities included. 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./$900 Deposit 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of ofce space, fenced 82 Mimosa 3BR/1.5BA $650Mo./$650 Deposit 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA Available Sept. 1, $900Mo./$900 Deposit 14 Cutchin Ct. 3BR/2BA $650 mo/$650 Deposit. 140 Duane St: 3BR/2BA $875 mo and $875 Security deposit. No smoking pets ok with owner approval and $250 pet fee. Available Oct. 1. Susan Jones, GRIRealtor 566-7584148 Longleaf 3BD/2BA home on 1.74 acres with screened in-ground pool. Spacious oor-plan with large screened in porch with hot tub, fenced in yard, relaxing rocking chair front porch and a peaceful yard... Price reduced to $140,000 Call for more details or to preview!! PRICE REDUCED Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on August 28, 2012 (COURTSEAL) BRENTX. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT By; /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintif f: Liana Hall, Esquire Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544 Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 at least 7 working days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 13 & 20, 2012 3524-28474 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5358-0913 TWN V. Tina Marie Quick Case No. 65-2011-CA-000221 Notice of Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF THE STATE OF 5359-0920 TWN vs. Barry, Joseph Case No. 11-355-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY CASE NO.: 11-355-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First 5360-0920 vs. Irwin, William Case No. 652009CA000445CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 652009CA000445CA BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONALASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM M. IRWIN; LISAD. IRWIN; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANTS(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 4th day of October, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lots 30 and 31, Block 53, of WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT V, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 56, of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 22nd day of August, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904)926-0905, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (SEAL) BY: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 5349-0913 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 005 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that GULF GROUPHOLDINGS AQUISITIONS & APPLICATIONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2418 Year of Issuance 2008 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-121-155-12084-D14 SHELLPOINTBEACH UNIT5 BLOCK D LOT14 OR 231 P594 OR 260 P828 Name in which assessed PIERRE LAWRENCE OLIVAREZ said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 3rd day of October, 2012, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 2nd day of August, 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida August 23, 30 and September 6, 13, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH C. BARRY, a/k/a JOSEPH C. BARRY, JR., BETTYG. BARRY, SUE ANN SMITH, CENTENNIALBANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, WAKULLABUSINESS CENTER PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, and UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on October 4, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Commence at the Southwest corner of Lot 81 (also being the Southeast corner of Lot 86) of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North 72 degrees 31 minutes 32 seconds East along the South boundary of said Lot 81 and along the centerline of survey of State Road No. 30 (US Highway No. 98) a distance of 1162.00 feet; thence run North 17 degrees 45 minutes West 1453.00 feet, thence run North 72 degrees 30 minutes East 445.00 feet, thence run North 22 degrees 15 minutes West 937.00 feet to an old concrete monument on the approximate edge of Swirl Swamp, thence run South 77 degrees 30 minutes West along said swamps edge 1047.38 feet, thence continue South 77 degrees 30 minutes West 52.62 feet, thence run North 47 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 238.96 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 47 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 407.40 feet, thence run North 36 degrees 34 minutes 31 seconds East 27.26 feet, thence run North 22 degrees 13 minutes 54 seconds East 60.87 feet, thence run North 24 degrees 01 minutes 40 seconds East 45.54 feet, thence run North 19 degrees 34 minutes 40 seconds East 38.59 feet, thence run North 43 degrees 30 minutes 59 seconds East 35.04 feet, thence run North 27 degrees 00 minutes 05 seconds East 36.64 feet, thence run North 18 degrees 09 minutes 28 seconds West 43.34 feet, thence run North 01 degrees 01 minutes 34 seconds East 41.65 feet, thence run North 53 degrees 19 minutes 03 seconds East 40.02 feet, thence run North 86 degrees 01 minutes 13 seconds East 54.31 feet, thence run North 49 degrees 11 minutes 17 seconds East 48.95 feet, thence run North 76 degrees 10 minutes 44 seconds East 32.77 feet, thence run South 62 degrees 21 minutes 32 seconds East 43.16 feet, thence run South 24 degrees 35 minutes 12 seconds East 78.88 feet, thence run South 14 degrees 17 minutes 20 seconds West 54.71 feet, thence run South 04 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds West 47.01 feet, thence run South 07 degrees 13 minutes 11 seconds East 59.89 feet, thence run South 18 degrees 10 minutes 20 seconds East 37.95 feet, thence run South 34 degrees 37 minutes 59 seconds East 29.50 feet, thence run South 02 degrees 40 minutes 21 seconds West 20.31 feet, thence run South 45 degrees 15 minutes 53 seconds East 29.53 feet, thence run South 32 degrees 59 minutes 42 seconds East 30.59 feet, thence run South 04 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds East 35.07 feet, thence run South 32 degrees 18 minutes 21 seconds West 36.93 feet, thence run South 25 degrees 00 minutes 20 seconds West 40.47 feet, thence run South 29 degrees 09 minutes 27 seconds West 51.83 feet, thence run South 07 degrees 17 minutes 07 seconds West 36.95 feet, thence run South 47 degrees 05 minutes 20 seconds West 25.89 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 44 minutes 43 seconds East 26.47 feet, thence run South 08 degrees 50 minutes 25 seconds West 31.15 feet, thence run South 47 degrees 41 minutes 59 seconds West 11.80 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any Person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. This Notice dated this 22nd day of August, 2012. Clerk, of Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000221 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TINAMARIE QUICK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TINAMARIE QUICK; JODYQUICK; UNKNOWNSPOUSE OF JODYQUICK; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: Lot 27 and the East 1/2 of Lot 26, block 14 GREINERS ADDITION TO CRAWFORDVILLE, according tot he plat thereof,as recorded in Plat Book 1, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 at 11:00 oclock A.M., on September 27, 2012. DATED THIS 22nd DAYOF ,AUGUST, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 22nd day of August 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (SEAL) THIS INSTRUMENTPREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL33619-1328 ,Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis,Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225,Tallahassee, FL32303 850.577.4401at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Spetember 6 & 13, 2012 5358-0913 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 34 37 43 48 54 64 67 70 2 27 55 3 28 56 4 23 38 52 5 24 35 44 18 21 39 49 57 65 68 71 6 15 29 50 7 30 45 58 8 25 40 59 9 41 53 26 36 46 66 69 72 10 16 19 22 42 51 60 11 31 47 61 12 32 62 13 33 63 ACROSS 1. Stallone macho man 6. Baseball's Dizzy or Daffy 10. Guitarist Atkins 14. WWII sea menace 15. Choir voice 16. Blood: Prefix 17. Crayon color, up in smoke? 19. Came to rest 20. Editor's "let it be" 21. Golf's "Slammin' Sammy" 22. Doing nothing 23. Attendance fig., often 25. Communicate silently 27. Business attire, up in smoke? 34. Everyday article 35. MTV target viewer 36. Mediterranean nation 37. Leprechaun's land 39. Chefs' protectors 42. Figure skater Katarina 43. Thorny bunch 45. Ready to pluck 47. Churchillian gesture 48. Postal message, up in smoke? 52. Piece of cake? 53. Nutritional initials 54. Mock 57. Drive recklessly 60. Beatitudes heirs, with "the" 64. Height: Prefix 65. Biblical beast, up in smoke? 67. Utah's __ National Park 68. Emphatic type: Abbr. 69. __ nova 70. Original Stoic 71. Bront's Jane 72. Chekhov or BrucknerDOWN1. Chafes 2. Touch on 3. "Encore!" 4. Playful talk 5. Mel in Cooperstown 6. Rhett Butler's last word 7. Hamburg's river 8. "Relax, soldiers!" 9. From Scandinavia 10. Feller in t he woods 11. Committed a grid infraction 12. Jannings or Gilels 13. Mall bag 18. Have great respect for 24. Several reps, in the weight room 26. __ State (Idaho) 27. Severe spasm 28. Bank job 29. Architect I. M. 30. Emcee's task 31. Cooking oil source 32. Riverbank romper 33. Sharon of "Valley of the Dolls" 34. Guam, e.g.: Abbr. 38. Elementary particle 40. Habitual spasm 41. Rose family shrub 44. __ Lanka 46. Wrap up 49. Online novice 50. Hostilities ender 51. Plum variety 54. Brubeck's music 55. Nobelist Wiesel 56. School on the Thames 58. Controversial apple spray 59. Low-lying area 61. Sunrise direction 62. Sinclair competitor, once 63. Kublai __ 66. Dubya's deg.American Prole Hometown Content 9/9/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 1 2 3 45671 839 3 458 91 1392 8 14 58931 627 2009 HometownContent 197 2846 3 5 435967218 628513794 372 451986 549628173 816739542 283 175469 754896321 961342857 R U B S T E R R J A Z Z A B U T T H R O E E L I E M O R E H E I S T E T O N B A N T E R N E U T R I N O O T T S E T S R I E S T E E M N E W B I E D A M N P E I T R E A T Y E L B E I N T R O A L A R A T E A S E T I C V A L E N O R D I C S P I R E A G E M E N D M B A C H A I N S A W D A M S O N H E L D O L I V E E A S T E M I L O T T E R E S S O T O T E T A T E K H A N Looking for Looking for the latest the latest Local News? Local News? LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 Page 11B 1. MOVIES: What was the name of Rockys boxing nemesis in Rocky? 2. MUSIC: Which 1980s rock band had a hit with the title Roxanne? 3. HISTORY: Where did the Battle of Waterloo take place? 4. SCIENCE: What does a mycologist study? 5. TELEVISION: What was the name of the boyfriend in the Gidget surfing series? 6. COMPUTERS: What does it mean when you get the message Error 404 on a computer? 7. LANGUAGE: What does the acronym radar stand for? 8. LITERATURE: When was The Cat in the Hat first published? 9. TEAM SPORTS: How many members does a cricket team have? 10. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capital of Trinidad and Tobago? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Apollo Creed 2. The Police 3. Belgium 4. Fungi 5. Moondoggie 6. Webpage not found 7. Radio detecting and ranging 8. 1957 9. Eleven 10. Port of Spain YOUR AD HERE

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(ARA) Having guests over to your house doesnt necessarily mean you have to keep everyone contained inside. Open the doors of your home to your backyard to provide a relaxed ambiance for your guests. To prepare your backyard for such a gathering, make certain you have the following so guests will be comfortable the entire evening: Seating: No matter if youre hosting a casual gathering, or something a bit more formal, guests will want to sit down to socialize. Make certain your patio, deck or grassy area has small groupings of chairs and benches within a short distance of food and drink tables, allowing guests to group together to share stories about friends and family. Tables: Place small tables throughout the backyard on which guests can easily rest plates and drinks. You can rent counter-high small tables at a party rental store, or place traditionalheight tables near the gatherings of chairs to help make your guests more comfortable. During the evening, check the tables to pick up used plates and cups to keep the backyard looking refreshed. Lighting: Having the proper lighting is crucial for providing the right ambiance and to keep your gathering going well after the sun goes down. Chase away the darkness with recessed, low voltage accent lighting from Deckorators in stairways, railings and pathways so guests can easily negotiate these walkways, and provide a soft glow over the gathering with illuminated balusters and post caps, allowing guests to see and interact with other guests. Instead of ooding your deck with unflattering, harsh incandescence, create a dramatic, show-stopping outdoor living area with subtle illumination that calls you to relax and enjoy your outdoor retreat long past sunset. Music: Playing music during the gathering is always a nice element to a party, and can greatly enhance the theme. Consider installing speakers throughout your backyard to provide a surround-sound experience. But also be certain to check your community noise ordinances on nighttime volume restrictions, and let your neighbors know that you will follow those regulations so your party will be sure to end on a good note with them and the authorities. With these plans in place, your next gathering of family and friends will be a magical event, not just during the daylight hours, but well into the evening. Be prepared for encore requests after you successfully pull off an outdoor party encompassing your entire backyard. Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet Open up parties outdoorsSpecial to The NewsProvided it is not smothered in butter or oil-based flavorings, popcorn is a relatively healthy treat to enjoy. Dieters have long relied on plain popcorn to staunch hunger pangs. But recent research has also indicated that popcorn is much more than a uff snack; it is a heathy one as well. In March 2012, researchers from the University of Scranton reported to the American Chemical Society that popcorn may contain high levels of healthful antioxidants levels that may be equal to or higher than some fruits and vegetables. Per unit weight, Professor Joseph Vinsons team found, popcorn contained more polyphenols than fruits like pears and apples, with most of the health bene ts packed into the hulls, not the uffy white part. Although this is not license to skip produce in lieu of popcorn, including undressed popcorn in your diet can provide needed ber and antioxidants. Want to learn more about popcorn facts? Test your knowledge with this quiz. Popcorn Quiz 1. What type of plain popcorn offers the fewest number of calories? a. microwave b. air-popped c. movie theater popcorn 2. How many calories are in a small order of unbuttered popcorn at the movies? a. 400 b. 650 c. 1,000 3. What causes corn kernels to turn into popcorn? a. magic b. salt c. water 4. About 3 or 4 cups of popcorn equals one serving of which food group? a. grain b. vegetable c. dairy 5. About how many kernels are in one cup of popped popcorn? a. 800 b. 1,000 c. 1,600 Answers: 1 b, 2 c, 3 c. 4 a, 5 c.Popcorn is a healthy treat At HealthSouth, we understand that recovering from a stroke can be challenging. But no matter where a patient is in his/her recovery process, or how long ago the stroke occurred, our Second Chance Stroke Program could help maximize functional ability, increase independence and improve quality of life. This includes areas of mobility, speech or written communication, swallowing, cognitive functions and activities of daily living. Our program oers: Physical/occupational/speech therapy Certied rehabilitation nurses Therapist trained in neuro developmental treatment Patient/family education Support groups Admission is by referral for a free in-home evaluation. For more information contact us.YOU DESERVE A SECOND CHANCE:HealthSouth Corporation:551344 !!" 2012 Go to www.bigbendhospice.org to Sign-up Today! 11:30am Registration and Lunch 12:30pm Tee-o October 26, 2012Wildwood Country ClubSAVE THE DATE!For more information, call Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308Wakulla County Big Bend Hospice 2012 Coastal Cleanup9 AM Arrive at the cleanup site of your choiceWoolley ParkPanacea (Headquarters) at the visitors center beach parking lot near the pavilion boat ramp9:00-10:30 Pick up litter 10:30 Place bags of trash at proper points and head to Woolley Park in Panacea 11:00 Meet at Woolley Park for complimentary lunch (hosted by Wal-Mart) and prize giveaways 2012 2012 Go to KWCB.org for pre-registration and more information. Call (850) 745-7111 or email us at helpkwcb.com Sponsored by: Keep Wakulla County Beautiful & the International CC Comfortable Clothing, Hat, Closed toed shoes (tennis shoes are best), Glovessite captains will have some extra cotton gloves, Sunscreen and insect repellant Please Recycle



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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 35th Issue Thursday, September 13, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices ..............................................................Page 2,3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Green Scene .................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 6B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B INDEX OBITUARIES John Wayne Brim Evelyn Carraway Gowdy Doye Dean Hudson Sam McKinney Jackson Betty Rae Smith-Nix Weldon ‘Mike’ Vowell Jr. Alta A. WoodsonSee Page 12A By JACKIE LAWHONSpecial to The NewsWilliam Boyd Stephens Sr. was hired by the City of Sopchoppy on June 28, 1973. He was hired to perform city maintenance and run the small city water system that only had about 60 customers. Sopchoppy was immediately impacted and forever changed by Bills outgoing, dynamic personality and he quickly earned the title of Mr. Sopchoppy.Ž Making the move from Polk County with his wife, Bobbie, and four young children, Bill didnt let something like a major move slow him down, he jumped right into organizing the “ rst Sopchoppy Fourth of July Celebration two days after starting his new job. Even though this “ rst celebration consisted of a few cars parading through town with a small group gathering at the school to eat, it was the beginning of a celebration that has gone on for 39 years and has become one of the best known and most popular Fourth of July Celebrations in the area. Bill was responsible for putting Sopchoppy on the Nashville radar with his booking of many well-known country stars. Continued on Page 15A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netOral arguments for the “ rst appeal by convicted killer Gary Michael Hilton for the 2011 death sentence for the kidnapping and “ rst-degree murder of Cheryl Dunlap were held on Sept. 6 before the Florida Supreme Court. Hilton, 65, was found guilty on Feb. 15, 2011, by a 12-person jury of killing Dunlap. Dunlap disappeared from the Leon Sinks Geological Area in December 2007 and her body was found two weeks later in the Apalachicola National Forest. On April 21, 2011, Hilton was sentenced to death by the trial judge who agreed with the unanimous decision of the jury. Hilton was also convicted of the murder of hiker Meredith Emerson in Georgia in January 2008, for which he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to life in prison. In March, Hilton pleaded guilty to murdering a North Carolina couple, John and Irene Bryant, in October 2007. Continued on Page 15A‘Mr. Sopchoppy’ Bill Stephens is dead at 72 High court hears appeal of Hilton death sentenceRemembering Sept. 11 Bill Stephens at Worm Gruntin Festival in 2011 By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netPeople gathered at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce early Tuesday morning to pay their respects and remember the day that many Americans have vowed to never forget. A memorial service was held on Sept. 11 at 8:45 a.m., the time the “ rst World Trade Center tower was struck during the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. A moment of silence was held for the nearly 3,000 people who lost their lives on that tragic day 11 years ago, in New York, at the Pentagon and in a “ eld in Shanksville, Pa. Major Maurice Langston spoke of that day and how Americans came together and were different than they had been the day before the attacks. Hands went out, knees were bent and heads were bowed,Ž Langston said. We were different on Tuesday than Monday.Ž Chaplain Billy Berry agreed, saying, I remember the weeks after and the unity of this nation.Ž Members of several law enforcement agencies, Wakulla County Fire Rescue, emergency medical services, county employees, veterans and citizens attended the event. The sheriffs of“ ce has held the event every year since the attacks. Those in attendance heard Bobbie Jo Crouch and Becky Cook sing patriotic anthems and watched as members of the Wakulla High School NJROTC raised the ” ag while David Miller played Taps.Ž JENNIFER JENSENDavid Miller, above center, plays Taps as the ” ag is lower half-staff, during somber memorial ceremony. A salute, below.A promise to KISS A FROGBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netMolly Jones, a fourth-grade student at Medart Elementary School, made a promise last school year while running for sergeant-at-arms that she intended to keep. While writing her campaign speech with her father, Kyle, she decided to do something a little different to capture the students attention. Her idea was to have thenschool Principal Bobby Pearce kiss either a frog or a pig if the school received its 11th consecutive AŽ rating. I thought it would be something cool for all the kids to see him kiss it,Ž Molly Jones says. Kyle Jones says along with it being something unique, It was good motivation for the kids to do well on the FCAT.Ž While brainstorming, Molly Jones says she ultimately decided a frog was the better choice over the pig. I thought a frog would be easier to catch,Ž she says. During her campaign speech, she promised to do all she could to make it happen. And in the end, she won the race. Jones and her father caught the large bullfrog in a pond the day before an assembly was held at Medart on Sept. 10 to recognize the high performing school and the students for their performance on the FCAT. The “ nale of the assembly was Pearce and Jones both keeping the promise they had made last year. After catching the frog, she says she was scared of it, but eventually got used to it. During the assembly, she even showed the frog some love by kissing it on the head. Continued on Page 8A JENNIFER JENSENFourth-grader Molly Jones ran for sergeant-at-arms at Medart Elementary promising the principal would kiss a frog if the school was an AŽ school. It was. On Monday, he did. SEEK students visit

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARINGSEPTEMBER 13, 2012 The City of St. Marks has tentatively adopted a budget for “scal year 2012-2013. A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will be held on Tuesday, September 18, 2012 at 5:15 P.M. at 788 Port Leon Drive St. Marks, Florida PUBLIC NOTICECity of St. Marks Regular Meeting September 13, 2012 At 7:00 pm has been canceledThe City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of“ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 COUNTY COMMI(SSIONBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe “ rst public hearing on the Wakulla County budget for the upcoming fiscal year, 2012-13, was held on Sept. 4 The $41.9 million-budget includes no new tax increases and the same millage rate from the previous year of 8.5 mills. The most notable change this year is creation and elimination of some county departments. County Administrator David Edwards said it was done to improve ef“ ciency and put tasks and divisions in the proper departments. The re-organization includes eliminating the deputy county administrator position … Tim Barden is leaving the county at the end of the year … and the Of“ ce of Management and Budget and transferring budget management back to the clerk of the court. The transfer includes relocating a vacant Of“ ce of Management and Budget analyst position to the clerks of“ ce. The Public Information Of“ ce has also been renamed to the Communication and Public Services Office. That office will be responsible for special projects, agenda management, public records requests, recreation services, veteran services and library services. Previously, recreation, veterans services and the library were under the deputy county administrator. The county administrator will also now oversee the airport and probation services, which were under the deputy county administrator as well. The Office of Intergovernmental Affairs has been created and will be responsible for grants administration, contract management, legislative, economic development and the RESTORE Act. The Parks and Recreation Department has been split and renamed the Parks and Facilities Management. This department will be in charge of the maintenance of the parks and county buildings. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he felt this was a good idea. And like the idea of the recreation and organization aspect being split from the management of the facilities. Recreation will now fall under the Communications and Public Services Of“ ce. Commissioner Lynn Artz agreed and said it was important to increase the budget and staf“ ng in the facilities management department. Edwards said the county will also be hiring a parks and facilities management director and will look for someone with contracting experience. Other changes include having the Building Department be responsible for building inspections and code enforcement. Fire Rescue will include fire services, emergency medical services, animal control and the liaison with the emergency management department. Also included in the changes is hiring an of“ ce assistant. The current administrative coordinator will move to the of“ ce of Fire Rescue. The county will also hire a grants coordinator. Another change is the creation of the Sheriffs Fine and Forfeiture Fund which is dedicated to capturing all of the sheriffs of“ ces related costs into one fund. This will help the county move away from relying on the Jail Bed Revenue, Edwards said. That can go away with the stroke of a pen from the president,Ž he said. Upcoming capital improvements include a new “ re and EMS station using money from the MSBU and one-cent sales tax; construction of the sheriffs annex using impact fees and one-cent sales tax; community center renovation using the legislative appropriation; and improvements to Hudson and Azalea parks. Other projects include capping the Lower Bridge Road land“ ll, “ xing nine different roofs on county buildings, restriping roads and replacing some equipment. This is the most comprehensive budget I think we have ever put together,Ž said County Commissioner Mike Stewart. Stewart has been a proponent of lowering the millage rate, but said he felt it was not the right time. He added that building back reserves was crucial. Four years ago, we had no reserves,Ž he said. We “ nally got the train back on the tracks.Ž Merritt said two years ago, tough decisions had to be made and the reserves had been depleted. Weve got a plan to get us out of the hole,Ž he said. And he added that the commission must stick with the plan. Commissioner Jerry Moore agreed that it was a good budget and added that Edwards has helped put them back on track. Weve got a new sheriff in town,Ž he said. Commissioner Alan Brock liked the consistency of the budget and keeping the millage rate at the same amount instead of decreasing it then increasing it the next year and so on. He added that it makes the county more attractive to businesses. The “ nal budget hearing will be held on Sept. 17.Budget unveiled with no new taxes, 8.5 millage rateBeginning Sept. 4, the Wakulla Clerks Court Divisions resumed normal business hours of 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, Wakulla Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond announced last week. State funding for court service was cut for the year starting July 1st, said Thurmond. After a meeting of the Legislative Budget Commission last month, the budget cut was largely restored to clerks of“ ces across Florida. The Clerks Of“ ce is thankful for the decision of state leaders and is looking forward to getting back to business of providing the best service possible that our resources allow for the citizens of Wakulla County. By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 11 … After months of political and legal wrangling, counties and the state have put on hold a lawsuit about the constitutionality of a new law that would cost counties tens of millions of dollars in disputed Medicaid charges. A document “ led Monday in Leon County circuit court calls for an abatementŽ of the case until later this year, as counties and the state Agency for Health Care Administration continue talks about how to carry out the law. Also, the document says some counties could notify the state this week that they are dropping out of the lawsuit. The case stems from a dispute about whether counties have paid their full shares of required Medicaid costs going back to 2001. Legislative leaders, arguing that counties owed money, passed a law in March aimed at recouping back payments and collecting money in future years --while counties argued the states billing system was riddled with problems. An initial estimate indicated counties could owe as much as $325 million in back payments. But that number was cut by about half after AHCA officials visited each county to go through billing issues. A coalition of counties “ led the lawsuit in April, arguing in part that the new law violated a state constitutional ban on what are known as unfunded mandatesŽ imposed on local governments. The abatement of the lawsuit does not change those allegations or another claim by the counties that the state is legally barred from trying to recoup money from 2001 to 2008. But the document “ led Monday indicates that counties and AHCA of“ cials have been working closely on the complicated billing issues, including a statement that says counties have had unprecedented access to agency staff for collaboration in seeking solutions.Ž The document, known as a stipulation, lists 54 of the 67 counties as plaintiffs in the lawsuit … including Wakulla County … along with the Florida Association of Counties. It was not clear late Tuesday afternoon how many counties might choose a settlement option that is outlined in the document. But if counties withdraw from the case, they would be able to avoid a controversial part of the law that allows the state to withhold what are known as revenue sharingŽ payments to recoup Medicaid money from the past. Counties are adamantly opposed to losing the revenue-sharing payments, arguing they often have pledged that state money to cover speci“ c expenses. Medicaid case put on hold for nowClerk restores o ce hours

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Proposed Millage Levy General Fund 8.5000 Estimated Revenues: General FundSpecial RevenueCapital ProjectsEnterprise FundTotal All Funds Taxes:Millage Per$1000 95% Ad Valorem Taxes8.50001,117,398 $ 8,566,138 $ 2,247,826 $ 11,931,362 $ Sales, Use & Fuel Taxes1,780,326 $ 1,281,978 $ 1,840,860 $ $ 4,903,164 $ Charges For Services1,482,320 $ 2,889,482 $ $ 1,924,399 $ 6,296,201 $ Fines and Foreitures132,500 $ 188,050 $ $ $ 320,550 $ Intergovernmental Revenue4,519,846 $ 4,968,363 $ 2,693,548 $ 70,588 $ 12,252,345 $ Licenses and Permits62,300 $ 20,000 $ $ $ 82,300 $ Miscellaneous Revenues101,698 $ 1,000,000 $ 1,000,150 $ 2,101,848 $ Total Sources9,196,388 $ 18,914,011 $ 4,534,408 $ 5,242,963 $ 37,887,770 $ Transfers In68,392 $ 49,438 $ $ 34,104 $ 151,934 $ Fund Balances102,506 $ 1,062,349 $ 2,072,545 $ 716,402 $ 3,953,802 $ 9,367,286 $ 20,025,798 $ 6,606,953 $ 5,993,469 $ 41,993,506 $ Expenditures: General Government6,500,608 $ $ $ $ 6,500,608 $ Public Safety1,841,578 $ 13,457,811 $ 443,047 $ $ 15,742,436 $ Physical Environment$ $ 4,859,856 $ 4,859,856 $ Transportation1,689,078 $ 1,821,125 $ $ 3,510,203 $ Economic Environment$ $ $ $ Human Services1,308,150 $ $ $ 1,308,150 $ Culture / Recreation534,858 $ 2,092,653 $ 1,553,841 $ $ 4,181,352 $ Court-Related Expenses500,626 $ 118,500 $ $ 619,126 $ Debt Service$ 281,331 $ 971,529 $ 559,108 $ 1,811,968 $ Total Expenditures8,877,044 $ 19,329,649 $ 4,908,042 $ 5,418,964 $ 38,533,699 $ Transfers Out90,242 $ 53,392 $ 8,300 $ $ 151,934 $ Fund Balances / Reserves400,000 $ 642,757 $ 1,690,611 $ 574,505 $ 3,307,873 $ 9,367,286 $ 20,025,798 $ 6,606,953 $ 5,993,469 $ 41,993,506 $ Total Revenues, Transfers, Reserves and Fund Balances Total Expenditures, Transfers, Reserves and Fund BalancesBudget SummaryWakulla County, Florida Fiscal Year 2012/2013 September 13, 2012 The County of Wakulla has tentatively adopted a budget for Fiscal Year 2012/2013. A public hearing to make the FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will be held on: Monday, September 17, 2012 at 5:01 p.m. at Wakulla County Commission Chambers 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARINGSEPTEMBER 13, 2012 The Wakulla County Housing Authority is required by 24 CFR 903.17 to prepare a Five-Year Plan and an Annual Plan. The purpose of these plans is to provide a comprehensive guide to PHA policies, programs, operations, and strategies for meeting local housing needs and goals. The Five-Year Plan describes the mission of the PHA and the PHAs long-range goals and objectives for achieving its mission over the subsequent “ve years. The Annual Plan provides details about the PHAs immediate operations, program participants, programs, and services, and the PHAs strategy of handling operational concerns, residents concerns and needs, programs and services for the upcoming “scal year. As required, the Wakulla County Housing Authority is making a draft of the Annual Plan for Fiscal Year 2012 2013, along with required attachments and documents related to the plans, available to the public at least 45 days prior to the public hearing which will be held to receive input on the plan (date and location of hearing listed below). The Annual Plan for Fiscal Year 2012-2013 will be available for review, inspection and comment from Thursday, September 13, 2012 through October 30, 2012, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. … 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday at: Wakulla County Administration Building 3093 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, Florida 32327 The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing regarding the FY 20122013 Annual Plan on Monday, November 5, 2012 at its regularly scheduled Board of County Commissioners meeting commencing at 5:00 p.m. at: Wakulla County Commissioner Chambers 29 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Members of the public are invited to attend this meeting. To obtain further information about the Annual PHA Plan, please contact Wallisa Cobb, Housing Administrator, at (850) 877-1908. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITYA FAIR HOUSING/ EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/ HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTIONSEPTEMBER 13, 2012 Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Sopchoppy City Commission voted four to one to adopt the citys 201213 budget at its meeting on Sept. 10. The total budget is $1.47 million, which includes the water budget and general fund. There were no major changes in this years budget, said City Clerk Jackie Lawhon. The only significant change was a 3-percent raise across the board for employees. During the meeting, there was some confusion among commissioners as to what was voted on at the “ rst public hearing. Lawhon had recommended the commission give a 2-percent raise across the board, as well as a 3-percent raise to those employees affected by the law passed in 2011 that imposed a 3-percent tax on government employees to offset the states investment into the Florida Retirement System. The commission decided instead to give a 3-percent raise to all employees. However, Commissioner Martha Evans, who voted against the budget, said she did not realize that Lawhon was not affected by the law and would be getting a raise while the other employees broke even. Lawhon is in the deferred option retirement plan (DROP). I want to make sure all the employees bene“ t,Ž Evans said. Commissioner Aginita Rosier said she understood that it was 3 percent to all employees, it was not simply intended to offset the 3-percent that will be taken for retirement. Mayor Colleen Skipper felt Lawhon shouldnt be treated differently and singled out because she has worked more than 30 years. Commissioner Lara Edwards agreed with Evans and said she too thought the 3-percent was meant as a reimbursement. Commissioner Richard Harden said either way, all employees were getting a bene“ t. Skipper felt the commission need to re-vote on the idea. Her and Evans felt they should increase the amount of the raise. They all work hard,Ž Evans said. They all deserve whatever we give them.Ž Edwards agreed but felt a Christmas bonus, helping with the retirement contribution and a raise was too much. More money needs to go into the city of Sopchoppy,Ž Edwards said. Both Rosier and Harden agreed it should remain at 3 percent. The commission ended up voting four to one, with Evans opposing, to adopt the budget. In other news: € County Administrator David Edwards appeared before the commission to give them an update on the Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail. The trail will go from Mashes Sands to Sopchoppy. A trailhead will be constructed in Sopchoppy on property that was donated to the city across from city hall. Edwards said the county will have around $250,000 for each trailhead, one at Mashes Sands and one in Sopchoppy. That can do a lot,Ž he said. He asked the commission to begin brainstorming about what it would like to see at the trailhead. € The commission also voted to send a resolution to the county to do striping on Rose Street from the gas station to both bridges. Lara Edwards brought up the idea and said she was told that a resolution would help push the project forward. € Edwards also brought up the possibility of getting a more historic welcome sign for the city. She suggested the city contact St. Marks City Manager Zoe Mansfield and see who designed their sign. CITY OF SOPCHOPPY$1.47 M budget includes 3-percent raise for employees

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Longtime EMS Director Fran Councill is retiring • Howard Kessler is running for county commission • Former lieutenant files notice to sue WCSO • Notice for another suit filed at WCSO • Why more taxes and fees? • Endorsing Langston for sheriff • Ralph Thomas advocates for lower taxes • Wildflowers add to value of public land thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. READERS WRITE:By DAVID EDWARDSCounty AdministratorGreetings, everyone. Id like to bring you up to speed on some recent activities in county government. By the time you read this, we will have adopted the FY2012-13 Tentative budget and millage rate. This budget provided staff with many challenges including balancing a budget in times of declining revenues while at the same time maintaining service levels for the citizens of Wakulla County. This budget has several structural changes including establishing a Fines and Forfeiture Fund to transfer the sheriffs general fund expenditures into, which will allow for more transparency in expenditures as it relates to public safety and the sheriffs of“ ce. Additionally, we have eliminated the Office of Management and Budget and are transferring the budget and “ nance duties to the clerk of court. We are separating Parks and Recreation and creating a Parks and Facilities Department. The “ nal budget will be presented to the board for adoption on Sept. 17. Im excited about this budget as it adds transparency, as well as further stabilizes your governmental operations. Also with the creation of the “ ve-year plan it has allowed us to look at the future as it relates to the effects of economic conditions and assessment needs so we can better manage and avert past “ nancial issues that we are now coming out of. Some community center news: the board has approved the floor plan which includes a kid zone, day camp, group fitness rooms, etc. We are also constructing an entire new building to serve as an multi-use gymnasium. Its anticipated that construction and renovation bids will go out soon and construction should begin in November-December. Other next steps are to negotiate a contract with YMCA. You should also be aware that we continue to stay involved with the RESTORE Act. The RESTORE Act takes 80 percent of the fines, ranging from $5 billion to $20 billion, that will be paid by companies responsible for the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and directs a portion back to the “ ve states that were affected by the spill. The “ ve states are Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. This money is then allocated to each state, and then broken down further. According to the level of “ nes that are assessed by the federal government, Wakulla could receive from $8 million to $40 million. Some areas where this funding may possibly be used is the TCC Environmental Institute, wastewater system, beach restoration, tourist development, park development, canal dredging, restoration at Port Leon, aqua culture and oyster relay, “ sheries, etc. Your county staff continues to be proactive to make sure we receive the maximum amount of funding. We have started a projects book and will continue to keep you informed through Board meetings, workshops, etc. If I can be of any assistance to you, please contact me. I think everyone knows that I have an open door policy, feel free to come see me, call me (926-0919 ext. 402), or send me an email at dedwards@ mywakulla.com. David Edwards is county administrator for Wakulla County.FROM THE COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR’S DESK:A view of whats happening in county governmentEditor, The News: Charlie Creel has been my friend for over 35 years. We worked together closely as Florida State troopers and that is where I really got to know Charlie. He was an outstanding trooper who treated people fairly and with respect. Later our careers separated us but we maintained contact over the years. Charlie is a professional law enforcement officer who has served the people of Florida with dignity. He is admired and respected. He also is a dedicated and devoted peace of“ cer who is committed to assuring that justice is served. I can assure the citizens of Wakulla County that Charlie Creel will be a great sheriff and that he will be relentless in his efforts to keep you safe. Charlie will bring his experience and knowledge to the sheriffs office to “ ght crime and protect the citizens. His creativity, innovation and fresh ideas will be welcomed by those seeking new law enforcement approaches. I am proud to endorse Charlie Creel for Wakulla County Sheriff. He is a good friend, an upright man and a solid police of“ cer. Sheriff Charlie Wells (ret) Manatee County Sheriff 1985-2007 Past President,Florida Sheriffs AssociationShort letters received from readers: € Thank you for making the correct decision regarding cave diving at Wakulla Springs. Aaron BinnsInstructor, Tallahassee Community CollegeTallahassee € Thank you to Dave and Jess at Apocalyptic Tattoo for the great customer party. The food, music and wonderful friends and family made for a fantastic night. Love you,MaŽ (Peg Attridge), Kelli and RandyPanaceaSHORT AND SWEET:Editor, The News: In response to the article, Religious embrace helping fuel support for gay marriage, says ministerŽ (Sept. 6 Wakulla News, obituary page): The article talks of support for gay marriage and clergy by several religious denominations, a preacher and a scholar. The scholar, Dr. Spitzer says that Western cultures condemnation of same sex love appears to have originated from Judeo-Christian scriptures, but contemporary biblical scholarship amends old interpretations.Ž The liberal scholars call it contemporary biblical scholarship, I would call it the term used for changing known truth of scripture to “ t the culture or to satisfy the desires of the peoples hearts who are not comfortable with Gods law and the consequences of sin. The Bible is clear on what is sin. We either believe that God inspired this book and told us what he wanted us to know when it was written, or we choose to believe that God really didnt mean what he said and these previously mentioned scholars know better. Not surprisingly God foresaw these things and warned us about it. In 2 Timothy 4:1-5 Paul instructed Timothy to preach the wordŽ (meaning the entire written Word of God) because, (quoting verse 3-4NKJV); FOR THE TIME WILL COME when they will not endure sound doctrine, but according to their own desires, because they have itching ears, they will heap up for themselves teachers; and they will turn their ears away from the truth, and be turned aside to fables.Ž When we read an article like this, look around at the changing attitudes in our culture or see that from the White House to political party platforms all the way to the town square, God and his word are being pushed aside in order to pursue mans wisdom, I think it is safe to say that the time Paul wrote of has come. By the way, standing up for and believing that the Bible is true as written and a guide for life does not make you a hater, quite the opposite. These articles like to lump together groups (label all who disagree as a hate group) in order to advance their cause. Fred Phelps and the Westboro Baptist Church will have to answer to God for their actions. Speaking for myself as a follower of Christ and a retired veteran I would have nothing to do with them. Dave Anderson bucanderson@yahoo.com e time Paul wrote of has come Dunking candidates at barbecue is planned State parks cant be all things to all people Richard Harden is an experienced leader Charlie Creel will be a great sheri Editor, The News: It is fall and politics and fundraisers are in full swing. For the third year, the “ re“ ghters in the county will be doing the Smoke and Fire barbecue contest and fundraiser. You may remember that we do this event for children who have suffered crippling or dis“ guring burns. We support the Camp Amigo project that sends these kids for a worry-free week at Rish State Park. The kids play with other kids with the same scars as them and they are attended to by “ re“ ghters. The other use of our funds is to send “ re“ ghters and Emergency Medical Service workers to train and further their education. We do this through the Richard Rhea Foundation and grants to people already in the emergency “ eld. The “ re explorers at the high school also bene“ t from our work. We try to have some entertainment at our event and this year we have added something everyone can enjoy, dunking your favorite (or least favorite) political candidate. We have invited all of the local candidates to spend some time in our dunking booth. We have several candidates who have accepted the invitation and are hoping the rest will join us. This will be near the end of the campaign trail so a little wet fun will be great. Our event will be Saturday, Oct. 27, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Hudson Park. Last year we served 750 dinners and are hoping to serve 1,000 this year. We have VFDs from Wakulla County, Tallahassee, Blountstown, Telogia, Franklin and Taylor counties. If you are a local business person, we can use more sponsors. If you are a local candidate your opponent is probably participating in this, so you should also. We will have more news as the time approaches. Mark your calendar for Oct. 27 to eat some award winning barbecue. We have held the price down and you can buy a plate with chicken, pulled pork, ribs and sides for $8. That is the best deal in town! If you have any questions, please contact me. Bill Russell 984-0148 Editor, The News: The Florida Park Service has a very dif“ cult job trying to balance visitor use and protection of the resources. With over 20 million visitors per year, many parks are in danger of being loved to death. The unique natural and cultural resources for which a park was acquired can easily be degraded to a point they are no longer exceptional. Whether to allow recreational diving at the ever popular Wakulla Springs is a perfect example of the con” ict between use and protection. The recently announced decision to continue a 26-year policy of not allowing diving at the main spring of Wakulla Springs State Park demonstrates the strong leadership enjoyed within the Florida Park Service. Wakulla Springs State Park is among an elite few parks designated as a National Natural Landmark and on the National Register of Historic Places. We are lucky to have such a special park in our own back yard. The Division of Recreation and Parks got it right in this case by making the tough, but correct decision on the side of protection. Wakulla Springs is a national treasure deserving of this protection. George Apthorp Crawfordville Editor, The News: I would like to take this opportunity to support Richard Harden for county commissioner. I have known and worked with Richard Harden for six years at Franklin Correctional Institution and have witnessed his integrity, ethics and devotion to whatever he sets out to do. At work, in addition to being a correctional sergeant, he manages the facility safety program ensuring compliance with local, state, and federal regulations. He is familiar and pro“ cient in matters of insurance and workers compensation. He also supervises and operates the Emergency Operations Center during times of emergency. He is a certi“ ed instructor and for the past “ ve years has instructed new of“ cer recruits at the Training Academy located at Wakulla Correctional Institution. As a Wakulla county citizen, I have also been impressed by the leadership he has provided as a Sopchoppy city commissioner. He has proven himself to be a skilled and effective public servant we can depend on to always do what is best for the people he serves. The citizens of Sopchoppy have elected him four consecutive times and if you ride around Sopchoppy and see the new tennis courts, new city hall, restored depot, veterans monument, paved streets and city park then you can see why. The same leadership he has displayed in his job he has also displayed as an elected of“ cial. He is the only candidate is his commission race who has had any experience as an elected official and I think it is important that we elect leaders that are experienced and knowledgeable about our county and local government. Please join me in voting for Richard Harden for Wakulla County Commissioner District 5. Harold Hoover Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 – Page 5Areaders speak out More OpinionsEditor, The News: My late husband, Tom, and I met John Shuff in December 1973, when a power company clearcut a 20-foot swath, 350 feet long of 100 foot tall trees, to install our power lines. We had granted an easement without fully understanding the power companys intentions and were morti“ ed at the result. Although we were upset at the destruction, the damage was done. Having struck up a quick friendship, we decided to plant a row of cedar trees together to replace our loss. Those cedars are still there. John Shuff built my beautiful home in Beechwood Estates. He took what Tom had started, and built in every detail, just as I designed it. He meticulously went over my budget, explaining every detail and what it cost. He and his carpenters were master craftsmen. Interestingly, John builds intricate furniture as one of his hobbies and “ nished his building career managing a $9.5 million hospital project. For many years, John Shuff has had to deal with planning and zoning issues and local county governments in the Big Bend of Florida, as most of his construction career involved publicly funded projects. I have discussed many issues with John over the years, with him always analyzing both sides of the issue. He usually leaves me thinking: That is a new way of looking at it.Ž John Shuff is a HARD worker. He has done well in life because of his dedication to whatever he is working on at the moment. Look at his record with the renovation of our historic courthouse and as president of the Chamber of Commerce last year. I always appreciated the monthly articles he wrote informing us of the current local government events and how it affected our businesses. Please vote for John Shuff on Nov. 6 for County Commissioner! Carol Ann Williams Real Estate Broker Editor, The News: I have worked alongside Mike Stewart for more than 16 years, 12 of which he has been a county commissioner. I know Mike to be an honorable man who only wants the best for Wakulla County. He routinely uses me as a sounding board for budget-related ideas knowing that I dont want to pay any more taxes than are legitimately needed. Consequently, I am fully aware that Mike always anguishes over the budgets looking for ways to provide essential services without raising taxes. He then exercises leadership within the board to offer workable solutions to responsibly tax citizens. When he returned to of“ ce in 2008, he and the other sitting commissioners were faced with a bloated budget and hundreds of thousands of dollars in lawsuits. Not until the current board was in place in 2010 could restorative actions be taken to address this mounting problem. Through Mikes efforts, the overall budget was reduced by almost $1.5 million (7.4 percent) from FY2010-11 to FY2011-12. This allowed for a quarter-point reduction in the millage rate. As chairman, Mike also led the way to reduce the number of employees in the bloated budget he had inherited. Without adversely affecting services, he and the current board painstakingly eliminated seven general fund positions, 3.5 building department positions, seven sheriffs of“ ce positions and 9.5 housing department positions. Mike has worked very closely with the Board to keep your and my ad valorem taxes at their lowest possible levels. This has been accomplished using the Public Service Tax (PST) and the garbage assessment. Recognizing that because of lower property values and homestead exemptions many citizens were paying little or nothing while receiving all the bene“ ts, the PST was developed so that all citizens could contribute. The majority of the board wanted to set the PST at 10 percent of electric and water bills. Mike could have easily just voted NOŽ to the issue, and it would have passed with little opposition at 10 percent and no kilowatt reduction. But he demonstrated real leadership and got us the 7-percent rate and the 500-kilowatt reduction instead. This is the kind of leadership I want to keep on the Board. This PST is a flat tax that everyone pays into to supplement ad valorem taxes which are paid strictly by homeowners. Regarding the $196 garbage assessment, this is not only “ scally sound but in my opinion is the most environmentally friendly action this board has ever taken. Cost of operations at the land“ ll had exceeded collected revenues for many years with losses paid out of our general fund. Additionally, substantial (and costly) improvements had to be made quickly or signi“ cant DEP “ nes were threatened. Action had to be taken, and the current Board manned up and did the right thing. Many people are recycling for the “ rst time in their lives, and we are helping the environment. We have been told that we have seen a 50 percent reduction in illegal dumping as a result of the garbage assessment. Further, the 50 percent of the countys homeowners who were paying for garbage pickup service before the mandatory pickup are saving money. They were paying $25 or more monthly and now pay just over $16 monthly. More so, Mike even insisted that low income families be exempted and set up an application process for them. In conclusion, I know without a doubt that Mike Stewart is the right man for this job, and if we lose him, we will lose a valuable asset for this county at a time when we can least afford it. Ron Huddleston Crawfordville Editor, The News: I am submitting this letter to you in support of my friend and former shipmate in the U.S. Navy, Ralph Thomas, who is running for County Commissioner District 1. If the people lead, then the leaders will follow.Ž Ralph Thomas was the “ rst friend that I met when I joined the U.S. Navy in 1985. I can honestly say that Ralph has shown impeccable integrity and character for the 27 years that I have known him. I believe that his work ethic, loyalty, and attention to detail make him a great candidate for county commissioner. Thanks Ralph for continually honoring our friendship through the good times and bad with unwavering loyalty. I believe in you shipmate and wish you the best of luck. Dan Pope U.S. Navy veteran Editor, The News: James T. TimŽ Moore, the former commissioner of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, has endorsed T.W. Maurice Langston for the of“ ce of Sheriff in Wakulla County. In 1988, Moore was appointed by Gov. Bob Martinez to serve as the executive director of FDLE. He was active in state government for over 30 years. I am proud to back Maurice Langston for sheriff because of his honorable dedication and tireless service to this community,Ž said Moore. As someone who has worked in literally every facet of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce, he knows “ rst-hand what the job entails and, more importantly, what it takes to run a successful operation. The “ rst few critical weeks will not be spent learning the job because he already knows it.Ž Last week, Lt. Col. (Ret.) Billy Dickson of the Florida Highway Patrol announced his endorsement of Langstons bid for sheriff. A lifelong resident of Wakulla County, Langston has over 32 years of experience with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. Langston sits on numerous committees and boards including the Board of Directors of the Senior Citizens Center, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, and the Youth Recreation Board. I am very thankful for Tims help over the years and his endorsement of our campaign,Ž said Langston. I look forward to working with him and learning from his lifelong experience in law enforcement how to better serve the people of Wakulla County.Ž Maurice LangstonJohn Shu will be a good commissioner Ralph omas is unwaveringly loyal Ralph omas is a giving family man Mike Stewart wants the best for Wakulla FDLEs Tim Moore endorses LangstonMORE READERS WRITE:Editor, The News: I am David Whetstone and I have lived in Wakulla County for years. My parents were part of the “ rst graduating class of WHS. Ralph Thomas, is one of the most giving family men I know. He loves people and has done a great deal to help me with an orphanage that I have in Africa. He has also helped me a lot in the Wakulla area to reach our youth. I just strongly feel as though I need to recommend him to lead our community as he is willing to serve our people. David Whetstone Crawfordville 5:30 pm Social Time • 6:00 pm Forum Wakuula County Senior Citizens Center 33 Michael Dr., Crawfordville Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce presents 2012 Candidates Forum Tuesday, October 9th, 2012At the SHERIFF Maurice Langston … REP Charlie Creel NPA PROPERTY APPRAISER Donnie Sparkman DEM Jim Parham NPA SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Robert BobbyŽ Pearce DEM Kimball KimŽ Thomas NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 Alan Brock DEM Ralph Thomas REP Jenny Brock NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 Mike Stewart REP Howard Kessler NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 5 Richard Harden REP John Shuff … DEM Emily T. Smith NPA Refreshments provided by Wakulla County Rotary Club Seating is limited SHERIFF Maurice Langston … REP Charlie Creel NPA PROPERTY APPRAISER Donnie Sparkman DEM Jim Parham NPA SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Robert BobbyŽ Pearce DEM Kimball KimŽ Thomas NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 Alan Brock DEM Ralph Thomas REP Jenny Brock NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 Mike Stewart REP Howard Kessler NPA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 5 Richard Harden REP John Shuff … DEM Emily T. Smith NPA The following candidates from local races have been invited to participate: JUSTDESSERTS! HOWARD KESSLER Please join us for a Campaign Party HOWARD KESSLERPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Howard Kessler, NPA, for County Commissioner. Howard@HowardKessler.com • 850-228-9641 FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER Bring your family and friends Lower taxes, open and accountable government, protection of our environment. “I look forward to seeing you there.” I C E C REAM & H OME MADE DESSERTS~ S P E C IAL S P EA K ERS ~ TELL YOUR FRIENDS! THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT!WWW .H OWARD K ESSLER .C OM

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Church BriefsWho says the IRS is a meany?REV. JAMES L. SNYDER I often hear derogatory remarks directed towards the IRS. I must admit that many of these critical remarks originated with me. Not that I do not like my good old Uncle Sam, it is that he is a little demanding When it comes to tax time. Every year I complain about “ ling my income tax and paying out gobs and gobs of dollars to the United States government. I know it is important to pay taxes, and, I pay my fair share even though it may be grudgingly. Throughout the years, I have complained that dear old Uncle Sam never writes me a letter. I will have to amend that complaint because I recently received a personalized letter from the IRS. Well, you can imagine my surprise at getting this letter. With trembling hands, I opened the letter, anxious to know what was going on in the world of Uncle Sam. I expected a detailed letter of what he was doing and how he was getting along and how the kids were and all that sort of thing. Imagine my surprise when none of that information was contained in the letter. From the contents of the letter, and I must say a lot of it was goobly glop, I had fallen far short of my share of income tax this past year. According to the letter, I was a gazillion dollars short of what he had expected from me and quite frankly, he was disappointed in this behavior on my part. Do not ask me how many zeros a gazillion dollars have because I do not know. I do not have that many “ ngers or toes. Although I read the letter several times it was not quite clear how much I actually owed and what plans there were in place for me to pay it back. From what I could understand from the letter, I owed good old Uncle Sam an arm and a leg, and he was highly expecting that I would come through for him. Well, that kind of letter did not set well with me. I was tempted to leave the country, then sneak back as an illegal alien, and not have to worry about all this nasty stuff. But, I did not have that much energy available. There was a phone number I was to call if I had any personal questions. Boy, did I have some personal questions. I was fully expecting not to get a real human voice when I called. But, again, I was pleasantly surprised. Within 30 minutes and after dozens of pushing this button and pushing that button I had on the other end of the phone a very pleasant and cheerful voice, a representative of the IRS. After we exchanged some personal niceties and followed up on the weather report from each of our locations, we “ nally got down to the real business of the phone call. I must confess I was not expecting such pleasantries from an IRS agent. I assumed she had the telephone in one hand and a loaded, fully cocked revolver in the other. If she did, she concealed it most admirably. Then we got down to the nitty-gritty of what the IRS is all about: collecting taxes from potentially delinquent taxpayers, like myself. The thought that I deliberately was delinquent was rather humiliating for me. Simply put, I just did not pay enough in, but this telephone call was going to rectify all of that. After she crunched all the “ gures and as I waited patiently on my end of the phone, she was able to determine I owed the government an arm and a leg. It was then that the negotiations began in earnest. I must confess she could not have been any nicer had she been my grandmother. She then began to query as to which arm and which leg I was going to give to the government. This presented a real dif“ cult decision on my part. Throughout the years, I have grown quite fond of both arms and both legs. Then I asked her if I could counter a proposal. She replied in the af“ rmative. Would you consider,Ž I began rather slowly, an arm OR a leg?Ž There was a pause on the other and of the phone when I could tell she was thinking. Whenever you get a government employee to think, watch out. I could hear the old wheels grinding and grinding. Finally, she said, I think that would be acceptable. And, Ill even allow you to select either arm or leg. We like to work with people.Ž Now the burden was on me. I now owed the government an arm OR a leg and I just had to select which one. I “ rst considered my arms. In thinking about them, I use both of my arms although the left one less than the right one every day. What with writing and eating my arms are rather busy throughout the day. Then I considered my legs. I like my right leg and so the choice became rather easy for me. Now, the United States government has at least one leg to stand on, thanks to Yours Truly. I have something greater to stand on. Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondageŽ (Galatians 5:1 KJV). Jesus Christ trumps Uncle Sam when it comes to liberty.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net.  Call for vocalists to perform in Handel’s Messiah The Community Choir is calling for vocalists and singers for the holiday musical program Handel’s Messiah, to be performed on Sunday, Dec. 9, at the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church in Sopchoppy at 3 p.m. The opportunity to be a part of this production is available to anyone in the Wakulla County area so new participants are encouraged to participate. Please join us at practice beginning Oct. 28 at 2:30 p.m. at the church. Reba Mason will be directing. Light refreshments will be served. Mark your calendars. Please call Reba Mason at (850) 9623804 for additional information.  Big Bend Hospice to host Bereavement Conference Big Bend Hospice will hold its eighth annual Bereavement Conference on Friday, Sept. 28, at Tallahassee Community College. The event is billed as “Tapestries: Stories of Love, Loss and Hope.” To register, go to bigbendhospice,org and click on the link. For more information, contact Lisa Baggett at (850) 878-5310 or email lisa@ bigbendhospice.org. OUT TO PASTORBy CYNTHIA WEBSTERSpecial to The NewsTotal separation of church and state is impossible since the very same people make up both institutions. However, over the past several decades there has been an attempt by one to deny the rights of the other. Even people of Faith have accepted many of these dictates, i.e. prayer being removed from public school. In recent years, however, the lawsuits against where and how one can pray and the constant chipping away at basic religious rights has turned at times into a full ” edged assault. For example, in recent months alone the mayor of Boston … the very seat of Freedom of Religion in our country … told a successful, private business that it would be unwelcome in hisŽ city and the reason … because the companys owner daredŽ to state publicly the tenants of his Christian faith. Not only did Christians but people everywhere understood the inherent wrong in this attempt to hurt one of Americas great small businesses. Chick-Fil-A appreciation day became one of the most successful spontaneous displays of people decrying a wrong in recorded history. Also, people rose up in protest when families of wounded military men and women were told they could not take the Bible into hospital rooms. The decision was reversed. Catholic Institutions across the country recently brought a joint lawsuit against the federal government as a result of the government mandating them to provide health insurance coverage for procedures the Church does not recognize, i.e. abortion inducing drugs. People know that faith is under attack … some are pleased but the majority of Americans know it is wrong. And people also know that our Nation is in deep trouble both economically and morally. Most importantly, people are deciding that in this journey of church and state, Christians need to stand together and pray for the nation, for its leaders and for guidance and wisdom. The 40 days before the 2012 election has been designated by National Clergy as a time of prayer. Come join the Footsteps For Faith and Freedom 40 day prayer walk. Each day, Monday thru Saturday, from Sept. 27 to Nov. 5, houses of worship, clergy and people from across the county will meet, pray and walk for about an hour. There is no commitment to a second walk or even to complete the “ rst, but we urge you to make that decision after experiencing for yourself the power of collective voice raised in prayer and fellowship. People unable to walk but who know their voice counts are encouraged to join the walk by bringing a chair or sharing a bench with another Christian. A schedule will be published in churches throughout the county and in The Wakulla News prior to Sept. 27. For more information contact either your home church or call 926-9254.Prayer walk planned on Sept. 27

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Special to The News My Hope Chest, a Florida-based non-profit, is proud to introduce the Breast Reconstruction Awareness Ribbon, the “ rst ribbon to support uninsured and underinsured breast cancer survivors. This new ribbon speaks to the restoration, transformation and the completion from the cancer journey that many survivors seek through reconstructive surgery after mastectomy. For those who desire, breast reconstruction provides closure and a new wholeness allowing a woman to put the disease behind her at last. The traditional pink ribbon has branded breast cancer awareness, education and research but overlooks a huge population of underserved survivors that live with scars and a constant reminder of the disease,Ž founder Alisa Savoretti said. There are hundreds of breast cancer groups in America focused on prevention and “ nding a cure, while the need for breast reconstruction has ” own under the radar of the pink ribbon.Ž The colors in the breast reconstruction ribbon transition and transform, just like the survivors My Hope Chest helps to become whole again. The ribbon goes from pink … the original breast cancer color, to white … known as the lightŽ or the power of healing. The white blends to yellow, the color of hope, sunshine and new beginnings. The Breast Reconstruction Awareness Ribbon symbolizes transformation and closure from the disease. My Hope Chest hopes this new symbol will help others recognize this need and shine the light on this epidemic for thousands who have sacri“ ced a piece of themselves to save their life. Founded in 2003 by Savoretti, My Hope Chest services pick up where other breast cancer organizations leave off providing “ nal step of breast cancer treatmentŽ and helping women become whole again. Savoretti knows from “ rst-hand experience how breast reconstruction after cancer helps restore not only the body but also transforms and heals the mind and spirit. She founded the organization after her own struggle with breast cancer. My Hope Chest is a national non-pro“ t organization that provides breast reconstruction for uninsured and underprivileged breast cancer survivors. For more information on My Hope Chest, visit their website at www.myhopechest.org/. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 – Page 7AObituaries John Wayne Brim Evelyn Carraway Gowdy Doye Dean Hudson Sam McKinney Jackson Betty Rae Smith-Nix Weldon ‘Mike’ Vowell Jr. Alta A. WoodsonDoye Dean Hudson, 71, of Crawfordville, died on Tuesday, Sept. 4. He was a native of Holmes County, living most of his life in Tallahassee and the Crawfordville area. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 8, at New Light Church with burial at New Light Church Cemetery. Family received friends on Friday, Sept. 7, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Beggs Funeral Home on Apalachee Parkway. In lieu of flowers, at Doyes request, donations may be made to his daughter and son-in-laws Missionary work in reaching the youth of America, the Ministry of Mike and Stacy Reason, through Gospel Light Church, 3415 Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee FL 32311. Survivors include his wife of 48 years, Sherry Hudson; sons, John W. Hudson (Lori) of Crawfordville and Paul W. Hudson (Charity) of Woodville; daughters, Stacy H. Reason (Mike) of Crawfordville, Dena Hudson of Tallahassee and Jan Hudson of Crawfordville; a brother, Billy Hudson (Betty); four sisters, Edna Beagles, Barbara Bratcher, Virginia Pauline Youree (Delbert) and Hazel Allen (Bob), all of Tallahassee; eight grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Beggs Funeral Home, 3322 Apalachee Parkway in Tallahassee (850)942-2929 was in charge of arrangements. Alta A. Woodson, 102, of Bethalto, Ill., died on Aug. 24 at Villa Rose Senior Living Community in Bethalto. She was born in Sampsel, Mo., to Henry and Lura Mae (Knox) Isenberg on June 13, 1910. She married Claude C. JackŽ Woodson on Oct. 28, 1929, in Alton, Ill. A celebration of life was held at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 8, at River Bend Calvary Chapel in East Alton, Ill. In lieu of ” owers, memorials may be made to River Bend Calvary Chapel, or The National Kidney Foundation. Survivors include her grandchildren, Susan and Brian Irvine of Godfrey, Ill., and Steven and Robin Woodson of Moro, Ill.; great-grandchildren, Josh Woodson of Bethalto, Emily Irvine of St. Louis, Grant Irvine of St. Louis, and Mike and Kelsie (Woodson) Chavez of Apple Valley, Calif.; and two great-great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband; son; and siblings, Marvin Isenberg, Alma Fears, Uel Isenberg, Mae Crank and Reatha Neumann. Sam McKinney Jackson, 85, of Climax, Ga., died on Thursday, Sept. 6, at his home. The funeral service was held at 11 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 10, at Ivey Funeral Home Chapel in Bainbridge, Ga. Graveside Masonic Rites will follow at Cedar Grove Cemetery near Climax. The family received friends from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 10, prior to the funeral service at Ivey Funeral Home. Survivors include his wife of 62 years, Martha Blanche Mitchell Jackson of Climax; his sons, Harold Jackson (Susan) of Camilla, Ga., and Edwin Jackson (Melanie) of McDonough, Ga.; his daughters, Beverly Read (Don) of Lexington Park, Md., and Peggy Taff (Scott) of Crawfordville; his sister, Jean Chisson of Dupo, Ill.; six grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Online visitors may sign the guest register at www. iveyfuneral.com. Evelyn Carraway Gowdy, 81, passed away Thursday, Sept. 6, in Crawfordville. She retired from the U.S. Postal Service and as secretary of First Baptist Church of Tallahassee. She was a lifelong member of First Baptist Church of Crawfordville. Visitation was held Saturday, Sept. 8, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Crawfordville. Services were held Sunday, Sept. 9, at First Baptist Church of Crawfordville at 2:30 p.m. Burial followed at Whiddon Lake Cemetery. Survivors include her husband of 63 years, Gilbert Gowdy; two sons, Duane and Craig Gowdy; and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She is also survived by one sister. She was predeceased by one brother and two sisters. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville, was in charge of arrangements (850-9263333) or www.bevisfh.com. Bettie Rae Smith-Nix, 66, of Cartersville, Ga., passed away Saturday, Sept. 1, at her residence. Born Dec. 3, 1945, in Tallahassee, she was the daughter of the late Harvey Smith and Daisy Whit“ ed Smith. She was also preceded in death by her brothers, Alvin and Thomas Smith. Bettie was a homemaker and of the Baptist faith. She was the life of the family. Bettie loved to laugh, travel and shop for antiques, but most of all she loved her family. Survivors include her husband of 45 years, James Earl Nix; her daughter, Tina Marie Knickerbocker and her son, Kenneth Thomas Nix of Cartersville, Ga.; her granddaughters, Sherri Wade and Lori Beth Knickerbocker of Cartersville; her brothers and sistersin-law, Harvey and Linda Smith of Cleveland, Ohio, Ira and Gertie Smith of Woodville, and Trixie Lee (Bo) and Connie Smith of Woodville; her sisters and brothers-in-law, Ellen and Harold Nix of Jasper, Ga., Faye and Mark Crago of Tallahassee, Margie Smith-Hardin and Bill of Tallahassee; and many nieces and nephews. Memorial services were conducted on Tuesday, Sept. 4, in the Chapel of Parnick Jennings Funeral Home and Cremation Services. Burial services will be conducted on Friday, Sept. 14, at 5:30 p.m. at Woodville Cemetery in Woodville. Immediately following the services please join the family for a memorial celebration at 75 Bert Thomas Lane in Woodville. (850) 933-2903. Evelyn Carraway Gowdy Betty Rae Smith-Nix Doye Dean Hudson Alta A. Woodson Sam McKinney JacksonJohn Wayne Brim, 59, of Crawfordville, died on Saturday, Sept. 8, in Tallahassee from injuries sustained in a traf“ c accident while trying to save the life of the other driver. He was born Sept. 14, 1952, in Bainbridge, Ga. He was a truck driver with Freehold Cartage Inc. He was a son of the late Benjamin Joe Brim, and Betty Brooks Brim, who survives. The funeral will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 13, at Abbey Funeral Home, with interment at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. The family will receive friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 12, at the funeral home. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to the Shriners Club. He is survived by his wife of almost 41 years, Martha Hollingsworth Brim; sons, William (Tracy) Brim and Jason Brim; grandchildren, Jessica, Joshua, Justin and Jayda Brim; brothers, Ronnie (Becky) Brim and Sidney Brim; sisters, Susie (Eddie) Hernandez and Teresa (Ed) Self; numerous aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins. Online condolences at www.abbeyfh.com.John Wayne BrimWeldon MikeŽ Vowell Jr., 65, of Sopchoppy, died on Saturday, Sept. 1, at the VA Hospital in Gainesville. He was a very proud veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. His ashes will be spread on the grave of his daughter, Katherine Louise Vowell in Garland, Texas, at a later date. Donations, in his name may be made to the Lake City VA Medical Center, 619 S. Marion Ave., Lake City FL 32025, Attn. TOPC. Survivors include a son, Weldon C. Vowell III; and a daughter, Heather Marie Bruce; and one grandchild; and a sister, Janice Montalto of Crawfordville; as well as many nieces, nephews, cousins and tons of friends. Besides a daughter, he was predeceased by a sister, Barbara Vowell who died at birth.Weldon ‘Mike’ Vowell Jr.New ribbon supports breast reconstruction after cancer 1 1 8 6 6 7 4 2 1 3 7 3 w w w A d N e t w o r k s F l o r i d a c o m T h e k e y t o a d v e r t i s i n g s u c c e s s Classified • Display • Metro Daily • Online LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief Support850-878-5310 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE

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Continued from Page 1AWhen the grades initially came out, Medart had received a B.Ž The scores were re-evaluated and it turned out Medart had in fact received an A.Ž Susan Jones says they contacted Pearce following the announcement to remind him of his promise and see if he was agreeable to it. He was. We want to instill in our daughter, if you make promises, you try and keep them,Ž she says She jokes that it would be nice if more politicians followed through with their campaign promises. Kyle Jones adds that during election season, this kind of takes a less serious approach.Ž Molly Jones says she was a little surprised Pearce agreed to kiss the frog, but was excited to see it happen. Pearce says its easy to come back to Medart and participate in these types of events and he too wanted to keep the promise he made. Although he did mention that he hates frogs. They have consistently outdone themselves,Ž Pearce says of Medart. Medarts a special place.Ž During the assembly, Molly Jones held the frog while Pearce planted a kiss on his lips, but not before applying lip balm to the frogs lips. Susan Jones was prepared with wipes and offered them to Pearce following the liplock. Molly Jones says she is running for vice president this school year, but didnt mention whether she plans to make any unique promises during her speech. Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityTillman and Evans announce weddingMargaret Alison Evans, of Williston, and Jered M. Tillman, of Gainesville, announce their engagement. She is the daughter of Margaret Case of Crawfordville and Waldon and Trica Evans of Sopchoppy. He is the son of Dave and Kathleen Truax of Iron Mountain Mich., and Roger and Vicky Tillman of Grays Lake, Ill. The wedding is planned for May 4, 2013, at 3 p.m. at Newnans Lake in Gainesville. An alternate location, in case of inclement weather, is Morriston Baptist Church. Margaret Alison Evans and Jered M. Tillman Roedy Caedem Wells celebrated his “ rst birthday on Sept. 6. His parents are Chase and Jessica Wells of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are Bobby and Karen Wells. His maternal grandparents are Wendy Riggs and Danny Riggs. His uncle is Cole Wells. Roedy Wells, at rightHappy “ rst birthday, Roedy A promise to kiss a frogJENNIFER JENSENMolly Jones holds the frog for former Medart principal Bobby Pearce to kiss.Molly Jones says she is running for vice president this school year, but didnt mention whether she plans to make any unique promises during her speech. 4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida To make a donation to the auction or for more information about the event, please contact: Sue Belford at 850-926-4244 or e-mail FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com “Friends of Wakulla County Public Library” Bring your family & friends Bid on great items Support your Library Programs The Silent Auction includes Gift Certi cates, Health and Beauty Products, Auto Detailing Supplies, Baby Items, Fishing Charter, Gifts, Artwork, Dinners, Wine and Lots More!Food & Drinks will be provided. SECOND ANNUAL MW 10-5 • T & F 10-6 • Sat. 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850)926-6241SALE Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts • Color • F acial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • F lat T ops F eather Locks • Color • P erms • Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. c e H a i r S a l o e H l o H a i a l o i r S a c e c e o n o o o n o o n Tues -S at 54 529 05 & t. t. . . . STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Club’s2012 ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZAWildwood Country Club Thursday • October 11 • 2012 6:30pm Social 7:00pm Dinner, Auction, & Show please join us forBeall’s Maurice’s Way Out West Carroll’s Boot Country Crum’s Mini MallTICKETS $30.00 eachall proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County students Young competes in mustang competition Special to The NewsWakullas own, Trey Young, attended the Extreme Mustang Makeover Team Roping held at the Wild“ re Ranch Arena in Salado, Texas, Aug. 31 through Sept. 1. Twenty trainers entered the competition and competed in pattern, heeling, steer stopping and team roping classes. All competing mustangs were available for adoption. This event is an effort to train wild horses so they can be adopted. Young received his 4-yearold mustang, Monster, from Twin Peaks, Calif. He had just four months to break and train his horse. He won first place in team roping and reining and third in steer stopping, taking home $5,700. He had the highest point horse, as well as the highest selling horse when it came time for adoption. His TV show, The American HorsemanŽ airs on HRTV on Tuesdays at 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. For more information, visit www.treyyoung. com. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTrey Young

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsSeptember Teachers of the Month are Shadeville Elementary Schools Mandy Gerrell and Wakulla High Schools Tom Graham. They are recognized with Food Service Department employee of the month Amanda Leach. Superintendent David Miller and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the dependability and dedication these employees bring to the district, as well as the positive attitude they display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. Gerrell started her career in education as a pre-K paraprofessional and was later hired as a “ rst grade teacher at Shadeville. Gerrell hit the ground running in August 2008 and has earned the respect of her peers in short order as an energetic, creative and focused educator. A product of the Wakulla County School District, Gerrell re” ects on the positive experiences she had as a young girl in school. Gerrell shares one of her favorite quotes from the great Dr. Seuss, A person is a person no matter how small.Ž Gerrell adds, The students are small, cute and say the darndest things but are capable of so much. Helping them become successful students academically and socially is my goal and just one of the many, many things I love about my job.Ž Gerrell attended Shadeville, Wakulla Middle and graduated from Wakulla High School. She then attended and graduated from Flagler College with a bachelors degree in Elementary Education. Gerrell contributes as a school advisory council member and the calendar committee representative. Shadeville Principal Susan Brazier applauds Gerrells instructional skills and ability to create excitement in the classroom. Brazier notes, Mandy Gerrell creates a positive relationship with her students by offering a warm and inviting atmosphere for them to learn which in turn increases student achievement. Sometimes you just know a person was meant to teach. That is true for Mandy Gerrell. She is a marvelous teacher.Ž Also recognized as a September Teacher of the Month is Wakulla High Schools PE teacher and coach, Graham. Graham has dedicated 14 years of service to Wakulla High School. Prior to working at WHS, he was a teacher and coach in Franklin County at Carrabelle High School. Graham has coached or is currently coaching JV football, girls golf, softball and girls basketball. Whether contributing as a teacher or a coach, Graham sites the common goal as, to help students reach a certain goal.Ž Graham adds, Both the time and intensity of interacting with students as a coach is extended and ampli“ ed.Ž Originally from Greensburg, Penn., Graham attended the University of Kentucky and graduated from Southern Illinois University with a bachelors degree in physical education. Before he started teaching, he served four years in the U.S. Air Force and then worked as a juvenile investigator and probation of“ cer in St. Louis, Mo. He moved to Wakulla County in 1984. WHS Principal Mike Crouch notes, Tom Graham is a dedicated coach and a team player. He maintains a positive attitude about his students and his colleagues. He has led our Girls Softball team to 10 straight District titles. It is obvious he cares about his students.Ž The September Employee of the Month is Food Service Department baker and cashier, Leach. Leach has been dedicated to the students at Riversprings Middle School the past six years. Leach grew up in Tallahassee and graduated from Rickards High School. She is grateful to Barbara Spears who told her about an opening in Wakulla County and helped her complete an application for employment. I really enjoy the kids because you never know whats going to happen next. Also, I enjoy the ladies in the kitchen. We have fun at work, which makes coming to work each day that much better,Ž shares Leach. Finding little pleasures in each day is easy for Leach. She smiles when she remembers the day Mrs. Debbie cut the end off of a cucumber and it looked like a smiling face. Leach said, It put a smile on all of our faces and reenergized us all.Ž Riversprings Middle School Cafeteria Manager Ingrid Funderburke shares, Amanda is a great worker. She is happy, dependable, works hard and is willing to do whatever it takes to get the job done.Ž Food Service Director Gail Mathers recognizes her positive traits as well. She notes, Amanda takes her job and serving the children to heart. She excels in her position as casher in both managing student lunch accounts and getting the students through the line quickly on a daily basis. When not cashiering, Amanda can be found baking or assisting with any other task that needs attention in order for lunch to be ready. It has been a pleasure to have her as a part of the Food Service team these past six years.ŽTeachers and employee of the month announced Mandy GerrellTom GrahamAmanda Leach Annual 4-H Youth Science Day is almost hereSpecial to The NewsFor the fifth annual 4-H National Youth Science Day (NYSD), The Ohio State University Extension has designed the 4-H Eco-Bot Challenge: the 2012 National Science Experiment. The experiment will introduce youth to robotic engineering concepts as they program an autonomous robot to clean up a simulated environmental spill. On Oct. 10, young people across the nation will become scientists for the day during 4-H National Youth Science Day. In this years experiment, the 4-H Eco-Bot Challenge, youth will enhance their engineering skills by assembling their own Eco-Bots and surface controls to manage an environmental clean-up. Youth will then test the interaction between the Eco-Bots design features and various surface control con“ gurations to determine the most effective clean-up solution for the simulated spill. This exciting hands-on activity involves students making eco-botsŽ using toothbrush motors to simulate cleaning up spills using robots. This is designed to target grades 4 … 12, so everyone can do this at some level if they are interested. 4-H Agent Sherri Kraeft has 10 kits available and would like to schedule times to meet with groups or classrooms to perform the experiment together. Teachers are also welcome to purchase or download any of the materials from the website to use on their own, but Kraeft would ask that if a classroom does the experiment, to let her know so that she can document it. She will be registering Wakulla Countys school system, so there is no need to replicate this individually. Throughout the year, 4-H Science programming … researched and developed by the 111 land-grant colleges and universities across the nation that oversee 4-H youth development programs in every state …provides youth with an opportunity to take on science challenges and understand the impact of the top issues that face their region. By connecting important scienti“ c lessons to civic engagement, 4-H youth become a living, breathing, culturechanging movement for doing the right thing, breaking through obstacles and pushing the country forward to successfully face the challenges of the future. One Million New Scientists. One Million New Ideas. For more than 100 years, 4-H has been at the forefront of teaching youth about science, engineering and technology. 4-H National Youth Science Day is an important annual part of 4-Hs One Million New Scientists, with a bold goal of attracting one million new youth to science, engineering and technology programs by the year 2013. Now entering its “ fth year, 4-H National Youth Science Day seeks to spark an early youth interest and leadership in science. Currently, more than “ ve million young people across the nation participate in 4-H science, engineering and technology programming in topics as varied as robotics, rocketry, wind power, GPS mapping, agricultural science, water quality and biofuels. For more information about 4-H National Youth Science Day, visit www.4-H.org/NYSD. SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for quali“ed applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and ”oor rate of 2.5% Let us help you focus on the future today! www.savaryacademy.com After-School Homework Center Grades 3rd … 6th Pre-Register your child today for special Introductory rate COMING SOON! New jobs in Wakulla depend upon a reputation of fair t reatment for all "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILStop by a State Farm agents oce, or call me today to “nd out how much you can save. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL ME TODAY. Auto rates just got lower. 1001010.1 Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com YARD SALESFRI & SAT SEPT 14 & 15 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS!TWO BIG

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-7 Closed Sun. & Wed. www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Bonnet Creek Fall Retreat From $179 per night Includes a $50 daily Resort Credit and daily self-parking For reservations call 888-208-7440. Ask for promotion code BCFT. Visit HiltonBonnetCreek.com/fall From FWC News Bottlenose dolphins are beautiful marine mammals. Tourists who travel to the Gulf Coast love to see them. But dolphins should never be fed. Sometimes, unfortunately, they are. Thats the assessment of of“ cials with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and NOAAs National Marine Fisheries Service. However, it is illegal to feed dolphins under the Marine Mammal Protection Act, a federal law thats been in effect since 1972. On July 16, the FWC received a call about a dolphin biting a female swimmer at the Panama City Pass. The unidenti“ ed swimmer was reportedly part of a dolphin tour but was not feeding dolphins when she was bitten on the leg. Her injuries were minor and did not require medical treatment, according to a report. Dolphins are large, powerful creatures, and its illegal to feed them for several reasons,Ž said Elsa Haubold, section leader in the FWCs Species Conservation Planning Section. They have sharp teeth, and anyone who offers them food is subject to being bitten and injured. Not only that, when you teach dolphins to associate people with “ sh or other food items, the dolphins teach this behavior to their young and you perpetuate a vicious cycle. Its really up to people to help us break this cycle.Ž Haubold said dolphins that are fed are also raising the ire of anglers by snatching “ sh off their lines. She said in some instances, the dolphins themselves end up being hooked and injured. Seeing dolphins up close and personalŽ has become so popular that a number of dolphin-tour businesses in Panama City cater to tourists. We recognize tourism is important, but when it comes to dolphins, we encourage people to view them from a distance,Ž Haubold said. Pam Anderson, operations manager at Capt. Andersons Marina on Panama City Beach, said they take tourists out to see dolphins but follow the no feedingŽ rule. We do not allow dolphin feeding on our boats. We dont need to,Ž she said. When the captain stops the boat, dolphins usually come around.Ž FWC Maj. Bruce Cooper oversees law enforcement efforts in the Florida Panhandle. He said anyone who feeds dolphins is violating the law. Cooper said that during a recent plainclothes operation by FWC of“ cers, two Panama City dolphintour boat operators were identi“ ed feeding dolphins during a dolphin-viewing trip. The investigation is continuing, with possible charges forthcoming. We want people to enjoy themselves when they are out recreationally or on a commercial vessel to see dolphins, but the law is in place for a reason,Ž he said.Of cials say never feed dolphinsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety Internet-completion course in Wakulla County. The course is at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ces Otter Creek Range, 65 Qualify Lane, Crawfordville, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 15. To gain admittance, students must complete the Internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the “ nal report from the online portion of the course. The “ nal report form does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under 16 years of age at all times. Students should bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satis“ es hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling Hunter Safety Coordinator George Warthen at the FWCs regional of“ ce in Panama City at (850) 265-3676.Free hunter safety course o ered in Wakulla on Sept. 15 FALL CAMPINGThere are many benefits to camping when the leaves change color, the crowds leave the park and the temperature drops. Most insects have died off or have reduced their activity. Fewer people means that perfect campsite is going to be easier to find. Crisp air, crystal clear skies, and changing plant life offer new experiences and sights. If you are going to be camping at altitude be very aware of the weather forecast. A chance of rain may mean dangerous conditions at higher elevations. Dont underestimate the power of hypothermia. With daytime highs reaching only into the 50s and 60s in most parts of the country, treat getting wet as an emergency. Larry Whiteley is Host of the award-winning Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World Radio For more tips, log onto basspro.comSEEING DEERThis may sound funny to someone who has never hunted deer, but one of the hardest things in deer hunting may be simply to see a deer thats there to be seen. Mature bucks are seldom caught standing in the open in broad daylight. Instead, learn to look into and through bushes instead of at them. Try to pick bits and pieces of a deer out of the bush. With your eyes and binoculars, look not for a deer but for something different; a shape, color, line, shadow, reflection, or mass that doesnt quite fit into the scene. The clue may be nothing more than a few inches of antler, a white horizontal belly, or the shiny blackness of an eye, and then all of a sudden the whole animal takes shape. Bob Foulkrod is Co-Host of 100% Real Hunting on Versus Network For more tips, log onto basspro.comTURKEY WITH A BOWIf you enjoy challenges then try taking a turkey with a bow this fall. Since turkeys are programmed to look up because thats where hawks and owls come from, you wont have much luck trying to take one from a treestand. From the ground you can use your ears to locate them, your eyes to tell you where they are going, and your legs to get yourself between where they are and where they want to be. Then wait for them to get there, draw when theyre not looking, and pick a spot. Now doesnt that sound easy? Dont kid yourself. The turkeys defenses are extremely keen and I can almost guarantee you that if they could smell, you would never shoot one with a bow. Jerry Martin is a Member of the RedHead Pro Hunting Team For more tips, log onto basspro.com Editors Note: Capt. Jody Campbells “ shing column, From the Dock, which appears every other week on this page, will resume next week. Campbell was out-of-town last week and wasnt able to “ sh, nor was he able to get up with his usual sources of “ shing information. He promises lots of “ shing info when his column resumes next week.From the Dock will resume

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMark Rosen, Norma Hill and Fran Keating.Chuck Hickman, Fran Keating, Norma Kill, Raye Crews.Members during a meeting. Bill Wannall, Bob Asxtalos, Ray Willis. Some events the FWC handled during the week of Aug. 31-Sept. 6: ESCAMBIA COUNTY: Of“ cer Matt Cushing checked individuals fishing from a vessel near the Pensacola Pass. While speaking to them, Officer Cushing learned a third subject was scuba diving but observed there was no divers down ” ag displayed. Of“ cer Cushing waited in the area for the diver to surface. When the diver surfaced, Of“ cer Cushing found the subject to be in possession of an undersized gag grouper. Citations were issued for the two violations. WALTON COUNTY: Of“ cers Randall Brooks and Ken White responded to Santa Rosa Beach to assist a dolphin rescue team with a beached whale. The rescue team transported the whale to Gulf World in Panama City for treatment. BAY COUNTY : Officer Mike Nobles was checking “ shermen when he found one to be nervous and very evasive during conversation. Of“ cer Nobles determined that the fisherman had outstanding warrants as a felony traffic offender. The subject was arrested and transported to the Bay County Jail. € Lt. Jay Chesser, and Of“ cers Neal Goss and Mike Nobles responded to a boating accident on Deer Point Lake involving two personal watercrafts (PWCs) that collided head on. Both operators were transported to local trauma centers. Of“ cers assisted in transporting the injured to shore, securing and recovering the damaged vessels, and working the crime scene gathering statements and other information. The investigation is ongoing.FWC Law EnforcementA change in the season. The cooler weather is a welcome change that marks more than just the end of our summer. The beginning of the school year also marks a change in the rhythm of our culture. Parents, now distracted by the demands of a new school year, are no longer thinking about going to the beach, diving or “ shing. By the end of August, customer traf“ c at Wakulla Diving Center has dropped from 20 to 4 a day. By the end of September, our cave diving community will have replaced the ocean focus folks, especially this year with the much anticipated opening of the springs of Wakulla Springs State Park. This enthusiasm brought Steve Cushman from Texas to open Cave Connections, a dedicated cave diving store just to the west of Indian Springs on Rt 267. The National Speleological Societys Cave Diving Section scheduled their national conference at Wakulla High School this year! Folks from across Europe have been planning their diving vacations in anticipation of this great opportunity. Only, one small detail was omitted. The State of Florida said no, go away, we dont want your business in Wakulla County. So, we will continue to truck our customers out of the county to spend their funds in Jackson, Lafayette, Suwannee, and counties to the south who have recognized the value of this community. I dont know what the new dive store will do. I suspect the NSS-CDS may reschedule their conference of 300 people elsewhere in the state. We are now digging in for a series of in-house projects to expand alternative diving opportunities, such as travel to other counties, off shore ventures, and even more rebreather stuff. The national diving front is an alternate arena we are now free to pursue. Next summer will come soon enough. And please dont talk to me about jobs or the economic needs of our county. I just dont think we care. Saturday morning, members of Flotilla 12 were planning to conduct a quali“ cation mission for new crew members to reach full qualification status. This was going to be a big event for us, because not only were we going to have to do our best for Division examiner, we were also going to be under the watchful eye of the gold side. However, as many of you may have noticed Saturday was a day full of rain, winds and waves. We hope to get the mission rescheduled for later this fall so that we are all prepared when needed. Saturday night we held our monthly business meeting at the Crawfordville Fire Station. We had a very good turnout in spite of the weather and football games, 16 members, 2 members in process, and one guest. We discussed many items that are up and coming for us to participate in providing safe boating information as well as increase the visibility of the Coast Guard and Coast Guard Auxiliary. The month of October will keep us on our toes and very busy. Following our “ rst Saturday monthly meeting, we will have a Division Meeting the second weekend. The weekend of 20 October will be stone Crab Festival followed by the 6th annual FSU Coast Guard Fly Over. Also in the mix are the Crooked River Festival and the North Florida Fair. As our meeting concluded, Norma Hill and Raye Crews presented Diversity training as part of our continuing member training. Sunday morning, not to be dismayed by Saturdays rain, a facility and crew met dockside while a second crew met at the communications trailer to provide communications support for our patrol. Getting the communications back on line has been a labor of love and one that could not have happened without the support of Station Panama City. After 7 trips and the hard work of 3 very dedicated Coast Guard personnel and several auxiliarists, we are operational! Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos was the Coxswain of the day and sent in the following report on the patrol: Today, for the “ rst time in years, Flotilla 12 conducted a patrol while simultaneously operating the communications station in St Marks. We had 2 radio watchers, Tim Ashley and Mike Harrison as well as a trainee, Geoff Gonzales, at the comms trailer from 9:00 until 3:30. Phil Hill also stopped in to assist. We were able to communicate clearly with our own facility as well as Station Panama City. Throughout the day, the facility positions were marked on the navigation chart. On patrol we had a Coxswain Bob Asztalos and 4 crewmembers: Raye Crews, Chuck Hickman, Norma Hill and Fran Keating, who conducted red tide testing, practiced search patterns and person overboard drills. We tested a new sling for hoisting a person in the water onboard the facility. The sling did make it easier to lift the simulated person but we will need to continue practicing to become comfortable in the event we need to use this for a real person. It was a beautiful day, everyone received lots of training and performed in an outstanding manner both on the water and over the radio. Many thinks also to Tim Ashley and Norma Hill for contributing information as well. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident … Today made us proud to be a part of the Auxiliary and our drive to be Semper Paratus, always ready. Are you ready? Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday p Thu Sep 13, 12 Fri Sep 14, 12 Sat Sep 15, 12 Sun Sep 16, 12 Mon Sep 17, 12 Tue Sep 18, 12 Wed Sep 19, 12 Date 3.4 ft. 1:25 AM 3.6 ft. 1:55 AM 3.7 ft. 2:22 AM 3.9 ft. 2:48 AM 4.0 ft. 3:14 AM 4.1 ft. 3:42 AM 4.2 ft. 4:12 AM High 1.4 ft. 6:54 AM 1.0 ft. 7:37 AM 0.7 ft. 8:17 AM 0.3 ft. 8:56 AM 0.0 ft. 9:37 AM -0.1 ft. 10:19 AM -0.1 ft. 11:05 AM Low 3.8 ft. 1:00 PM 4.0 ft. 1:44 PM 4.1 ft. 2:27 PM 4.2 ft. 3:10 PM 4.2 ft. 3:54 PM 4.0 ft. 4:39 PM 3.7 ft. 5:27 PM High 0.5 ft. 7:40 PM 0.5 ft. 8:12 PM 0.5 ft. 8:43 PM 0.7 ft. 9:13 PM 0.9 ft. 9:44 PM 1.1 ft. 10:16 PM 1.4 ft. 10:50 PM Low Thu Sep 13, 12 Fri Sep 14, 12 Sat Sep 15, 12 Sun Sep 16, 12 Mon Sep 17, 12 Tue Sep 18, 12 Wed Sep 19, 12 Date 3.5 ft. 1:22 AM 3.6 ft. 1:52 AM 3.8 ft. 2:19 AM 4.0 ft. 2:45 AM 4.1 ft. 3:11 AM 4.2 ft. 3:39 AM 4.3 ft. 4:09 AM High 1.5 ft. 6:51 AM 1.1 ft. 7:34 AM 0.7 ft. 8:14 AM 0.3 ft. 8:53 AM 0.0 ft. 9:34 AM -0.1 ft. 10:16 AM -0.2 ft. 11:02 AM Low 3.8 ft. 12:57 PM 4.1 ft. 1:41 PM 4.2 ft. 2:24 PM 4.3 ft. 3:07 PM 4.2 ft. 3:51 PM 4.1 ft. 4:36 PM 3.8 ft. 5:24 PM High 0.5 ft. 7:37 PM 0.5 ft. 8:09 PM 0.6 ft. 8:40 PM 0.8 ft. 9:10 PM 1.0 ft. 9:41 PM 1.2 ft. 10:13 PM 1.5 ft. 10:47 PM Low Thu Sep 13, 12 Fri Sep 14, 12 Sat Sep 15, 12 Sun Sep 16, 12 Mon Sep 17, 12 Tue Sep 18, 12 Wed Se p 19, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 2:01 AM 3.3 ft. 2:31 AM 3.5 ft. 2:58 AM 3.6 ft. 3:24 AM 3.7 ft. 3:50 AM 3.8 ft. 4:18 AM 3.9 ft. 4:48 AM High 1.3 ft. 7:58 AM 0.9 ft. 8:41 AM 0.6 ft. 9:21 AM 0.3 ft. 10:00 AM 0.0 ft. 10:41 AM -0.1 ft. 11:23 AM -0.1 ft. 12:09 PM Low 3.5 ft. 1:36 PM 3.7 ft. 2:20 PM 3.9 ft. 3:03 PM 3.9 ft. 3:46 PM 3.9 ft. 4:30 PM 3.7 ft. 5:15 PM 3.4 ft. 6:03 PM High 0.4 ft. 8:44 PM 0.4 ft. 9:16 PM 0.5 ft. 9:47 PM 0.6 ft. 10:17 PM 0.8 ft. 10:48 PM 1.0 ft. 11:20 PM 1.3 ft. 11:54 PM Low Thu Sep 13, 12 Fri Sep 14, 12 Sat Sep 15, 12 Sun Sep 16, 12 Mon Sep 17, 12 Tue Sep 18, 12 Wed Sep 19, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 1:17 AM 2.7 ft. 1:47 AM 2.8 ft. 2:14 AM 2.9 ft. 2:40 AM 3.0 ft. 3:06 AM 3.1 ft. 3:34 AM 3.1 ft. 4:04 AM High 1.0 ft. 7:05 AM 0.8 ft. 7:48 AM 0.5 ft. 8:28 AM 0.2 ft. 9:07 AM 0.0 ft. 9:48 AM -0.1 ft. 10:30 AM -0.1 ft. 11:16 AM Low 2.8 ft. 12:52 PM 3.0 ft. 1:36 PM 3.1 ft. 2:19 PM 3.2 ft. 3:02 PM 3.1 ft. 3:46 PM 3.0 ft. 4:31 PM 2.8 ft. 5:19 PM High 0.3 ft. 7:51 PM 0.3 ft. 8:23 PM 0.4 ft. 8:54 PM 0.5 ft. 9:24 PM 0.7 ft. 9:55 PM 0.8 ft. 10:27 PM 1.0 ft. 11:01 PM Low Thu Sep 13, 12 Fri Sep 14, 12 Sat Sep 15, 12 Sun Sep 16, 12 Mon Sep 17, 12 Tue Sep 18, 12 Wed Sep 19, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 1:09 AM 2.8 ft. 1:39 AM 2.9 ft. 2:06 AM 3.0 ft. 2:32 AM 3.1 ft. 2:58 AM 3.2 ft. 3:26 AM 3.3 ft. 3:56 AM High 1.4 ft. 6:33 AM 1.0 ft. 7:16 AM 0.6 ft. 7:56 AM 0.3 ft. 8:35 AM 0.0 ft. 9:16 AM -0.1 ft. 9:58 AM -0.1 ft. 10:44 AM Low 2.9 ft. 12:44 PM 3.1 ft. 1:28 PM 3.2 ft. 2:11 PM 3.3 ft. 2:54 PM 3.2 ft. 3:38 PM 3.1 ft. 4:23 PM 2.9 ft. 5:11 PM High 0.5 ft. 7:19 PM 0.5 ft. 7:51 PM 0.5 ft. 8:22 PM 0.7 ft. 8:52 PM 0.9 ft. 9:23 PM 1.1 ft. 9:55 PM 1.4 ft. 10:29 PM Low Thu Sep 13, 12 Fri Sep 14, 12 Sat Sep 15, 12 Sun Sep 16, 12 Mon Sep 17, 12 Tue Sep 18, 12 Wed Sep 19, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 1:44 AM 2.9 ft. 2:03 AM 2.9 ft. 2:20 AM 3.0 ft. 2:36 AM 3.1 ft. 2:55 AM 3.2 ft. 3:17 AM 3.4 ft. 3:44 AM High 1.6 ft. 6:13 AM 1.4 ft. 6:54 AM 1.1 ft. 7:33 AM 0.9 ft. 8:11 AM 0.6 ft. 8:51 AM 0.5 ft. 9:35 AM 0.4 ft. 10:26 AM Low 3.1 ft. 12:18 PM 3.2 ft. 1:18 PM 3.2 ft. 2:14 PM 3.2 ft. 3:10 PM 3.1 ft. 4:07 PM 3.0 ft. 5:08 PM 2.8 ft. 6:16 PM High 0.6 ft. 7:02 PM 0.7 ft. 7:35 PM 0.9 ft. 8:06 PM 1.1 ft. 8:34 PM 1.4 ft. 9:02 PM 1.6 ft. 9:30 PM 1.8 ft. 9:58 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 13 Sept. 19First Sept. 22 Full Sept. 29 Last Oct. 7 New Sept. 15Major Times --:---:-11:28 AM 1:28 PM Minor Times 4:48 AM 5:48 AM 6:00 PM 7:00 PM Major Times --:---:-12:17 PM 2:17 PM Minor Times 5:48 AM 6:48 AM 6:37 PM 7:37 PM Major Times 12:41 AM 2:41 AM 1:06 PM 3:06 PM Minor Times 6:50 AM 7:50 AM 7:15 PM 8:15 PM Major Times 1:32 AM 3:32 AM 1:57 PM 3:57 PM Minor Times 7:53 AM 8:53 AM 7:54 PM 8:54 PM Major Times 2:23 AM 4:23 AM 2:50 PM 4:50 PM Minor Times 8:58 AM 9:58 AM 8:34 PM 9:34 PM Major Times 3:17 AM 5:17 AM 3:45 PM 5:45 PM Minor Times 10:04 AM 11:04 AM 9:19 PM 10:19 PM Major Times 4:13 AM 6:13 AM 4:42 PM 6:42 PM Minor Times 11:11 AM 12:11 PM 10:08 PM 11:08 PM Good Better Best Best++ Better++ Good Average7:20 am 7:44 pm 4:49 am 6:01 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:21 am 7:43 pm 5:49 am 6:38 pm 7:22 am 7:41 pm 6:51 am 7:16 pm 7:22 am 7:40 pm 7:54 am 7:55 pm 7:23 am 7:39 pm 8:59 am 8:36 pm 7:23 am 7:38 pm 10:05 am 9:20 pm 7:24 am 7:36 pm 11:12 am 10:09 pm20% 13% 6% 1% 9% 16% 24% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

PAGE 12

Green Scene Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Wow, how my life has changed since I moved to Wakulla County. Surrounding myself with so many environmentally conscious people and having sustainable living as one of the key issues being addressed by UF/IFAS, I have become a real believer. Making the choice to live more sustainably for monetary and environmental reasons has involved taking many small steps. I think of my mother who was a real conservative long before it was fashionable. I consider my mom when I see my daughter roll her eyes with some of my practices. Someday I hope that she will think of me in a positive way as she remembers some of the practices I instilled into my life just as I remember my mother. UF/IFAS has so many materials to assist consumers with making sustainable living changes. The website www.livinggreen.ifas.u” .edu is where I turn for researchbased materials to keep me primed on this aspect of my work. Recently UF/IFAS posted a wonderful collection of sustainable living ideas called Sustainable Living Handbook: A Citizens Guide to Thoughtful ActionŽ from the University of Oregon. Through it I was reminded of a good de“ nition of what sustainable living can mean: ŽSustainable living is a lifestyle that is deeply satisfying, ful“ lling, and appealing because it is socially, environmentally, and economically responsible.Ž Sustainable living is about making informed choices, even small ones that improve both the quality of our lives and that of the planet for future generations. Sustainable living is to many people the ongoing decision-making process based on ones individual de“ nition of quality of life. It is about making decisions that make sense to each of us, given our needs and values. It is about living with intention, making deliberate choices and being actively involved with saving money and the environment. BARRIERS TO SUSTAINABLE LIVING One of the identi“ ed barriers that many face when trying to live and act sustainably is just too much stuff. We are a population that is bombarded by strong messages that to be happy, respected among our friends, and considered successful, we must acquire certain things or live a certain way. American consumption far exceeds consumption in any other country. According to authors Peter Menzel, Charles Mann and Paul Kennedy in their book The Material World: A Global Family Portrait,Ž if everyone in the world lived an American lifestyle, it would require four Earths to sustain that level of consumption. Consider these facts: € The average American family has 9,918 pounds of belongings, according to the American Moving and Storage Association. € The self-storage industry is one of the fastest growing new business sectors. One in 10 America households rents a storage locker. € In 1950, the average American house size was 983 square feet. In 2005, its 2,414 square feet and we still need to rent storage units for our extras. € About 43 percent of American families spend more than they earn each year. Recently many families in Wakulla County lost their home and/or belongings through ” ood waters. I am sure those individuals continue to struggle with their losses and now have a different attitude towards their home and its contents. We must continue to remember them as they put their lives back together again. I am con“ dent they have reexamined what ultimately is most important to them. Perhaps we can learn through their experience. I encourage you to ask these questions as you picture your homes favorite room. € If there was a “ re or a ” ood, what items would you want to save? € What items would be most helpful in an emergency? € What items bring you the great pleasure or truly make your life easier? And as we examine our homes with all of the extras we have accumulated, ask yourself: What about all the other items in this room? Why do I have them? Everyone knows the three Rs: Reduce, reuse, and recycle. Try adding two more: Repair. Can you “ x it? And “ nally, the most important: Refuse! Refuse to take something or buy something you really dont need or want. Separating our wants from our needs is where the making intentional choices enter the picture. Think carefully about each purchase to ultimately make good choices. When we make wise choices based on our needs, we will have to do less reducing, reusing, repairing and or recycling! And “ nally, consider this Kenyan proverb, Treat the world well. It was not given to you by your parents; it was lent to you by your children.Ž Shelley Swenson is UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Agent II for Family, Youth, & Community Sciences/ Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program Agent. She can be reached at (850) 926-3931.Sustainable living through small steps By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING By LYNN ARTZSpecial to The News Teenagers from across Florida made their way to Wakulla County to attend the 2012 SEEK environmental conference. Nearly 60 high school students (sent by dozens of garden clubs) attended one of two 4-day conference sessions based at Wakulla Springs Lodge in July. Both conference sessions included the activities that have made this an outstanding, life-changing experience for students in previous years. The students explored the salt marshes of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, swam and canoed in the waters of Wakulla Springs (a “ rst magnitude spring), and visited the Apalachicola National Forest to learn about the longleaf pine ecosystem that once dominated the southeast. Wildlife were abundant and often very close, including manatees, turtles, alligators, osprey, a stingray, and a shark. The National Forest “ eld trip included the banding of a red-cockaded woodpecker and the unexpected capture of a water moccasin. A presentation on Floridas owls included live examples of each species. A presentation on Florida black bears included entertaining videos of bear behavior. The touch tanks and fascinating critters at Gulf Specimen Marine Lab delighted the students as always. Conference participants calculated their carbon footprints, visited FSUs LEED Platinum off-grid, zero emissions building (OGZEB), and toured Marpan Recycling, the only Class 3 recycling facility in the state. As a service project, both groups of students uprooted dog fennel and ragweed … and collected litter and recyclables … from Wakulla Countys Roadside Wild” ower Preservation Project along the Coastal Highway (98). Members of the Iris Garden Club assisted in this effort. SEEK (Save the Earths Environment through Knowledge) is an annual statewide conference sponsored by the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs and coordinated by Lynn Artz. For more information, please visit SEEKs webpage at ww.ffgc.org.In addition to coordinating the SEEK Conference, Lynn Artz is a member of the local Iris Garden Club and is a Wakulla County commissioner.SEEK students visit PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents at the SEEK (Save the Earths Environment through Knowledge) Conference at Wakulla Springs in July. Students canoeing, above, and walking through a “ eld of pitcher plants in the Apalchicola National Forest, left. Biologist Chuck Hess, at right, holding a water moccasin that he wrangled for the students to look at.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 – Page 13A the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Bob DonawayJuly 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromMy wife and I have been entering in the Off the Eatin Path since the program “rst began. She has won once and now I am a winner too! Thank You!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l a t nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta For Your Home Improvment NeedsInterior & Exterior Together We Are Providing Employment for Local Craftsman FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Dear EarthTalk: How energy efficient (and comfortable) is underfloor heating, sometimes known as radiant heating? Marcy Dell Boston Under” oor radiant heating involves under laying the ” oor with a hot element or tubing that transfers heat into the room via infrared radiation and convection, obviating the need for forced or blowing air. According to the U.S. Department of Energys Energy Savers website, radiant heating has a number of advantages over other forms of heat distribution: It is more efficient than baseboard heating and usually more efficient than forced-air heating because no energy is lost through ducts.Ž It is also ” exible as it can run off of a variety of energy sources: Gas, oil, wood, solar and other sources or combinations thereof can feed radiant systems. And radiant heating is a good choice for those with severe allergies as no potentially irritating particles get blown around the room. Several aspects of radiant heating make it more energy ef“ cient. For starters, the uniform heat distribution over the entire surface of a ” oor heats the lower half of the room, enveloping inhabitants in warmth at a lower overall temperature „ in some cases up to “ ve degrees Fahrenheit cooler „ than a conventional heating system. Radiators and other forms of point heating circulate heat inef“ ciently and hence need to run for longer periods to obtain comfort levels,Ž reports the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNet). They draw cold air across the floor and send warm air up to the ceiling, where it then falls, heating the room from the top down, creating drafts and circulating dust and allergens.Ž RESNet adds that radiant systems transmit heat on average some 15 percent more ef“ ciently than conventional radiators. The ef“ ciency gains can be magni“ ed signi“ cantly with good insulation and a well-designed system. While tearing out old heating systems and/or replacing decent existing ” ooring might be overkill for the sake of moving to radiant heat, those embarking on new building projects or contemplating major renovations should certainly consider it. According to TLC Networks Green Living Guide, there are two main types of radiant heating, electric and hydronic. In the former, heated wires installed in the floor radiate heat upward. This type of radiant heat is most commonly used to retrofit a single room „ especially a bathroom or kitchen „ in an older house or building. Meanwhile, hydronic radiant heating, whereby heated water is forced through tubes under the floor, is more often designed into a new structure from the get-go, and is more energy ef“ cient overall. TLC points out that while radiant heat is definitely more ef“ cient in smaller, snug homes with lower roofs, it might not always be the greenest solution in homes with bigger rooms: In some scenarios it can be less energy ef“ cient than forced-air heating.Ž TLC recommends consulting with a reputable heating contractor to see if radiant heating is a sensible way to go. Of course, pairing a radiant heating system with an energy efficient EnergySTAR-approved programmable thermostat can indeed save households hundreds of dollars a year on home heating bills while keeping inhabitants warmer all year long. Many states offer “ nancial incentives to upgrade home and commercial heating systems in ways that boost energy efficiency. Check out the free Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy (DSIRE) to “ nd out what kinds of tax rebates or other incentives might be available in your neck of the woods. Dear EarthTalk: Are there certain brands or retail stores where sustainable furniture options can be had? And what should I look for when shopping for greener furniture? W. Cary Trenton, NJ While we now opt often for greener cars, appliances, household cleaners and food to up the sustainability quotient of our lifestyles, the furniture we spend all day and night in close contact with is often far from eco-friendly. The vast majority of sofas, chairs, beds and other upholstered furniture we love to lounge on contain potentially carcinogenic formaldehyde and/or toxic ” ame retardants and stain resistors that have been linked to developmental and hormonal maladies. And much of the wood used in desks, chairs, tables and the like (as well as in the frames of upholstered furniture) comes from unsustainably harvested lumber which contributes to the deforestation of tropical rainforests. But today, thanks to increased consumer awareness and demand, there are more greenŽ choices in furniture available than ever before. A good place to start the search for that perfect couch or chair is the website of the Sustainable Furniture Council (SFC), a non-pro“ t formed in 2006 to help develop solid standards and certi“ cation processes within the home furnishings industry. The organization has become a leading information source and network of some 400 greenŽ furniture makers and related retailers, suppliers and designers as well as other non-pro“ ts. Consumers looking for greener furniture can browse SFCs membership list which features contact information and website links accordingly. Buyers beware: Just because a furniture maker is listed with SFC doesnt mean it eschews all chemicals or unsustainably harvested wood entirely, but only that it is making strides in that direction. Consumers should still be knowledgeable about which green features they are looking for and/or which kinds of materials to avoid. Of course, with some-thing like furniture you really need to see and feel it in order to decide whether it will work in your space. Eco-conscious consumers making the rounds at local furniture stores should keep a few key questions in mind for salespersons. Does the piece in question contain formaldehyde, flame retardants or stain resistant sprays? Is the fabric used certified under the Global Organic Textile Standard program (GOTS, which mandates that at least 70 percent of “ bers are derived from organic sources and do not contain chemical dyes or other additives)? Is the wood used certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) as sustainably harvested? Does the piece contain any parts or pieces that come from bamboo or reclaimed wood or recycled metal or plastic? And is it easy to disassemble into reusable or recyclable parts if it needs to be replaced down the line? If the salesperson doesnt know the answers, chances are the piece does not pass environmental muster. Limiting your search to brick-and-mortar and Internet-based retailers that specialize in green products is one way to reduce the amount of research and self-education needed, especially because salespersons in such stores are usually up-to-speed on the latest and greatest in sustainable furnishings. Some leading national furniture chains that carry a sizeable inventory of sustainable goods include Crate and Barrel, Room and Board and West Elm, but many more single store eco-friendly furniture stores exist across the country. Some leading online green furniture retailers include Eco-Friendly Modern Living, Furnature, InMod, Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, SmartDeco, Southcone and Viesso. Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Subscribe www.emagazine. com/subscribe. How energy ef cient is radiant heating? Thanks to increased consumer awareness and demand, there are more greenŽ choices in furniture available than ever before. Pictured: A Savvy Rest organic crib mattress distributed by Furnature. Radiant under” oor heating is more ef“ cient than baseboard or forced-air heating and can run off of a variety of energy sources. It is also a good choice for those with allergies as no potentially irritating particles get blown around the room. Pictured: an installation in progress. PHOTO FROM SAVVY REST GREEN SCENE

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Aug. 31, the sheriffs of“ ce received a complaint of a reckless driver on U.S. Highway 319 at McDonalds restaurant. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston and Deputy Stephen Simmons responded and observed the suspect vehicle leaving the establishment northbound at a high rate of speed. Sgt. Johnston observed the suspects vehicle tires cross the center line for approximately 200 yards. A traf“ c stop was initiated at 2605 Crawfordville Highway. Field sobriety exercises were conducted on the driver, James Lee McIntyre, 22, of Crawfordville. McIntyre was charged with DUI and operating a motor vehicle while license was suspended or revoked with knowledge. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce this week: AUGUST 30 € On Aug. 30, Wakulla High School administrators and Deputy Joe Page discovered marijuana inside a students vehicle parked in the WHS parking lot. The 15-year-old male student confessed to owning the baggy of marijuana which contained 2.3 grams. Deputy Scott Rojas issued the student a civil citation and the baggy of marijuana was turned in to the Evidence Division. € On Aug. 30, Wal-Mart asset protection team members reported a retail theft. Amanda Lea Brown, 21, of Crawfordville was observed concealing items in her purse. Cosmetics and other items, valued at $44, were turned over the Wal-Mart staff after Brown attempted to leave the store without paying for the items. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. SEPTEMBER 2 € On Sept. 2, Michael Monteith of Captain Seaniles in Crawfordville reported a retail theft and aggravated battery. Michelle Lynn Cholmondeley, 53, of Crawfordville was allegedly observed taking $216 worth of alcohol from the establishment without paying for it. A Seaniles employee attempted to stop the suspect and was allegedly struck on the leg by Cholmondeleys vehicle as she attempted to leave the parking area. Deputy Scott Powell made the arrest and warned the suspect about taking any illegal narcotics or contraband into the jail facility. As a female detention deputy searched the suspect, she discovered generic pills on the suspect. In addition to retail theft and aggravated battery, Cholmondeley was charged with possession of a controlled substance and introduction of contraband into a detention facility. € On Sept. 2, Linda Good of Crawfordville reported the theft of a mailbox. The victims mailbox and post are valued at $40. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € On Sept. 2, Louis Williford of Crawfordville reported the theft of a mailbox. The mailbox was valued at $40 and was recovered and returned to the victim. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € On Sept. 2, Jessie Davis of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his vehicle. A vehicle window was broken. The vehicle is owned by the victims employer. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € On Sept. 2, Pamela Sapp of Crawfordville reported the theft of a mailbox and post, valued at $40. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € On Sept. 2, Michael Flowers of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A suspect stole six gallons worth of gasoline from his boat. The gas was valued at approximately $20. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On Sept. 2, a residential burglary was reported at Radical Restoration Ministries in Panacea. One of the residents of the ministry reported the theft of cash and checks from the home. The exact amount of property taken is still to be determined. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. A criminal mischief was also reported at the location as a window was discovered broken. € On Sept. 2, an 18-yearold Crawfordville woman was shot in the knee while attempting to rescue a cat from a dog on her property. EMS treated the victim at her home and transported her to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Investigators determined that the victims father shot at the dog in an attempt to rescue the woman and the cat … and his daughter was accidentally shot. Evidence was collected at the scene and the investigation was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. The dead dog was turned over to the Animal Control Unit. Deputy Nick Gray, Detective Matt Helms, Lt. Bruce Ashley, Lt. Brent Sanders, Deputy Bill Poole and Reserve Deputy Roy Gunnarsson investigated. € On Sept. 2, Gary Hames of Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief. The victim was driving his vehicle on Spring Creek Highway near StephensDonaldson Road when juveniles, ages 11 and 12, shot out the window of his vehicle with a BB gun. Damage to the vehicle and window was estimated at $1,500. The victim agreed not to prosecute the juveniles if their parents paid for the damage. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. SEPTEMBER 3 € On Sept. 3, Ernest Kilpatrick of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from his porch. The bike is valued at $80. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On Sept. 3, Terry Brown of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at her home. A concrete eagle yard decoration was tampered with. The decoration is valued at $500. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € On Sept. 3, Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated a disturbance call in Panacea when he discovered a mobile home on “ re. A fuel can was observed nearby and the state Fire Marshal was contacted. A suspect was identi“ ed. Wakulla “ re“ ghters were called to the scene to put out the blaze which occurred at an unoccupied dwelling. A suspect was discovered on the ground several hours later just off Coastal Highway 98. The suspect was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital on a Marchman Act. Detective Matt Helms and Sgt. Jeremy Johnston also investigated. SEPTEMBER 4 € On Sept. 4, Gregory Bowyer of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim reported that his credit card number was used 12 times in South Florida. The charges totaled $1,012. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. € On Sept. 4, Christopher Thomas of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of his vehicle. The vehicle was stolen from the victims home and is valued at $5,000. It was entered in the FCIC/NCIC data base. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. SEPTEMBER 5 € On Sept. 5, Jeconiah Spillane of Crawfordville reported the theft of tire rims from his home. The rims are valued at $250 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € On Sept. 5, Cheri Kempf of Crawfordville reported a credit fraud. The victim was noti“ ed about being approved for a loan she did not seek. The fraud occurred over the internet. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On Sept. 5, Gloria Turner of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Suspects contacted the victim and informed her that she had won a large amount of money through a lottery. The suspects asked the victim to send money to cover taxes and for her winnings to be released. The victim lost $461 through the scam. Suspects have been identified. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On Sept. 5, Donna Sherling of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Entry was made into the victims home, but the only item missing was a luggage carrier valued at $150. Damage to the property was estimated at $180. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On Sept. 5, Charles Connon of Crawfordville reported recovering a purse on Crawfordville Highway. The purse contained personal property owned by Terra Tyre of Tallahassee. Contact was made with a relative of the purse owner to collect the purse. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,011 calls for service during the past week including 21 business and residential alarms; 13 disturbances; 38 investigations; 44 medical emergencies; 13 thefts; 52 traffic enforcements; 132 traffic stops; 17 reckless vehicles; 18 wanted people; and 14 welfare checks. I LIKEMIKEREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 C WAKULLA COUNTY VOTERS HAVE TWO CHOICES IN THE DISTRICT 3 COUNTY COMMISSION RACE: 1. VOTE FOR MIKE STEWART AND HARMONY WILL CONTINUE ON THE BOARD. 2. VOTE FOR HOWARD KESSLER AND I BELIEVE DISSENSION WILL RETURN TO THE BOARD. ITS YOUR CHOICE... ƒ BUT I LIKE MIKE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3www.mikestewart2012.comPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MIKE STEWART, REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3facebook.com/ mike.stewart.3363 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com If Wakulla is to become greater it would be good to hire a property appraiser who has worked in and understands the dynamics of greater markets (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Office has embraced new technology to keep motorists on Wakulla roadways safe. The WCSO has acquired Speed Spies through the Florida Department of Transportation to keep an eye on motorists. The equipment was acquired through DOT points that were amassed when the sheriffs office won a recent state Law Enforcement Challenge. WCSO was awarded a first place trophy and points redeemable for the purchase of traffic safety related equipment after placing “ rst in the DOT and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration state contest. The technology was deployed this week to analyze speed problems on Lonnie Raker Lane and East Ivan Road. The equipment counted 202 vehicles that were 10 miles per hour or more over the 45 mile per hour speed limit on East Ivan Road and 201 vehicles traveling 10 miles per hour or more over the speed limit on Lonnie Raker Lane. The Speed Spies record and inform the WCSO of the times when the violations occur to effectively target traf“ c enforcement on the roads. The Speed Spies will be deployed at locations all over the county in an effort to crack down on the speeding issues. Traf“ c enforcement will be directed in those areas immediately. The highest speed recorded in the 45 mile per hour zone on Lonnie Raker Lane was 92 miles per hour and the highest speed recorded on East Ivan Road (45 MPH zone) was 82 miles per hour.Speed Spies technology watches roads

PAGE 15

Continued from Page 1A In the ever-popular Mr. LegsŽ contest held annually at the 4th of July Celebration, Bill was the man to beat and was crowned Mr. LegsŽ many years in a row. He could also be seen participating in sack races and egg toss contest. Never one to shy away from entertaining, Bill absolutely loved performing in local square dance and clogging groups. Within a few months of coming to Sopchoppy, Bill was instrumental in activating the Sopchoppy Volunteer Fire Department which was the “ rst organized volunteer “ re department in Wakulla County, STATION #1. He asked the Sopchoppy City Commission to purchase four complete fire suits, new hoses and upgrade the equipment. Upon his request, the Sopchoppy City Council agreed to pay any volunteer who attended a meeting 50 cents per meeting. In thinking about this, Bill might have also been responsible for the “ rst paid “ re department in the county, just a thought! In 1975 the City Commission bought 40 acres of land on the Sopchoppy River to develop a City Park. No doubt that Bills influence on the council went a long way in their decision to purchase this land and his leadership and ability to see things through to completion are certainly the reason that many people still enjoy the use of the Sopchoppy City Park today. I met Bill when he “ rst came to Sopchoppy, but I was a young stay-at-home mom and really didnt get to know Bill until I was hired in 1979 as the Sopchoppy City Clerk. Working beside Bill for the next 27 years he became not just a co-worker but a good and dependable friend. Together we re-modeled City Hall, fought “ res, read meters, responded to sick neighbors, celebrated new lives and good times and cried together and supported each other in death and bad times. Bill was always the “ rst to offer help to neighbors in time of trouble. Many times he organized fish fries and other means of raising money for those in need. Bills willingness to help others often went over the top. His favorite place to shop for the city was the state surplus in Starke. He would often come back to the City with ideas of buying used campers for the homeless or a Boston Whaler boat to put in the Sopchoppy River to rescue people during ” oods. Even though the city council vetoed many of these requests, he did manage to buy an army truck or two. His trips to Starke brought much laughter and jokes at council meetings and “ nally I was assigned to accompany him on these buying trips to hold him backŽ … probably the hardest assignment I was ever given. People gravitated to Bill. He loved people and people loved Bill. There were many days working side by side in a 12-by-12 of“ ce that getting any work done was impossible because many of the elderly gentlemen in town along with a few of our commissioners would gather at the office and together they would laugh and tell stories or play a spelling game which usually resorted in the loser pushing a potato around the ” oor with their nose. Bill had a vision for the Sopchoppy Water System and as chances for expansion came to the city he was always excited to meet the challenge and encourage the city to purchase and install new wells and expand. When Bill began working for the city in 1973, there were fewer than 100 water customers and one well. By the time he retired in 2006, the water system had expanded to Mike Stewart Drive in Crawfordville with a customer base of 3,000 and seven wells. He built a system that the residents of Sopchoppy should be proud of and one that has provided the resources for the City of Sopchoppy to accomplish many things. We the people of Sopchoppy and Wakulla County owe Bill a debt of gratitude. He will be missed.Jackie Lawhon is the city clerk of Sopchoppy. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 – Page 15ASpecial to The NewsSgt. Ronald BoonieŽ Mitchell and his partner K-9 Gunny of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce were honored as the winner of the 2011-12 Florida Missing Childrens Day Jimmy Ryce K-9 Trailing Team of the Year. The award was sponsored by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement Missing Endangered Persons Information Clearinghouse and recognizes exceptional or extraordinary efforts in a missing child investigation.Ž Sgt. Mitchell and Gunny were honored at the State Capitol in Tallahassee on Monday, Sept. 10 during a formal ceremony. Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum said he is pleased with the outstanding work of the WCSO K-9 Unit. I think it is great that one of our of“ cers has been recognized for the outstanding work that he does,Ž said Sheriff Crum. Too often the work of law enforcement goes unnoticed.Ž On Oct. 4, 2011, Mitchell was dispatched to Obediah Triplett Road and Wakulla Beach Road in Crawfordville to locate a missing 4-yearold boy. Barefoot tracks were observed on Wakulla Beach Road and K-9 Gunny was “ tted for his tracking lead. Gunny made several loops in the dirt road as he began his tracking activities. Working against the clock as the sun was beginning to go down, Gunny began to track in a wooded area with no tracks or visible signs of the child traveling in the direction. After jogging through the wooded area for several minutes, Mitchell observed a child running in the woods in the distance. Unable to get the child to stop at “ rst, Mitchell put Gunny in the down stayŽ position and asked the child if he wanted to pet the dog. The child stopped and walked back toward Mitchell. The of“ cer put the child on his back as Gunny retraced the route back out of the woods. The child was returned to his mother unharmed. The total track by Gunny was approximately one mile through thick briars and thorny plants and lasted approximately one hour. Im stunned,Ž said Mitchell when he found out about the award. The award is for the entire state?Ž Mitchell added that it means so much to be able to help locate missing children. Its great to be able to catch a felon, but it is 100 times better to “ nd a child because the child could die,Ž he said. Mitchell and Gunny share a unique bond because Gunny was injured in the line of duty in December 2010 and Mitchell, with the assistance of Crawfordville veterinarian Dr. Norm Griggs, nursed Gunny back to health after multiple surgeries and got the dog back to where he could work again. Dr. Griggs was able to attend the ceremony. 000CFG4 Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Importers of Mexican Arts and Crafts WWW.ARTEMEXICOFLORIDA.COM***********************************presenting a special show at the Crawfordville Woman’s Club behind Hudson Park Beautiful new merchandise from Baja, Oaxaca & South Central Mexico MW 10-5 • T & F 10-6 • Sat. 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850)926-6241SALE Mr. Sopchoppy Bill Stephens is dead Appeal of Hilton death sentence heardContined from Page 1AA notice of appeal of the death sentence was “ led on May 4, 2011. In his appeal, his attorney lists six issues where they feel the trial court erred. The “ rst was admitting recorded statements Hilton made to law enforcement of“ cers because they referenced inadmissible collateral crimes. Assistant Public Defender William McLain said this statement was Hilton saying, I didnt start hunting until September.Ž McLain said, It suggested other crimes besides the ones occurring in December and January.Ž However, during the oral arguments, several of the justices stated that this particular statement was ambiguous. Assistant Attorney General Meredith Charbula argued that the trial judge found that it did not imply he committed other crimes. However, she stated that it is reasonable to conclude that he started hunting for Cheryl Dunlap.Ž Another issue McLain brought forward was the court allowing the states witness, Dr. Gregory Prichard, testify about allegations of Hiltons past criminal conduct, which included a police interview of Hiltons ex-wife who spoke about Hiltons fraudulent activity and that he had sexually molested her children. Thats certainly going to in” ame the jury,Ž McLain said. These were arrests and allegations, not convictions, he said. Prichard was an expert for the state and testi“ ed that he disagreed with the defenses experts about Hiltons mental state and believed Hilton was a psychopath. In Prichards testimony, he also spoke about Hiltons statement about hunting,Ž as well as the allegation that Hilton came up with the idea for a horror movie, Deadly Run,Ž which involved turning pretty girls loose and hunting them like pretty, McLain said. Dr. Prichards testimony clearly linked the Deadly RunŽ movie and Hilton,Ž McLain said. He added that Hitlon being involved in the movie was never proven. He used it as a character attack even though there was no proof he was even involved in it.Ž Hiltons attorney also stated in the initial brief that the court relied on the facts surrounding the murder of Emerson and Hiltons statements to justify the heinous, atrocious or cruel (HAC) and the cold, calculated and premeditated (CCP) aggravating circumstances. With no facts suf“ cient to prove HAC or CCP aggravating circumstances, the court improperly relied on assumptions from collateral crimes in attempt to show proof of the aggravators,Ž it stated. Charbula argued that the claim that Hilton molested children was never mentioned by the prosecutor and the movie was barely mentioned. She added that making a movie such as this one, pales in comparison to killing Meredith Emerson.Ž Given the strong aggravators in this case and including the prior murder of Meredith Emerson, its clearly harmless beyond a reasonable doubt,Ž Charbula said.Sgt. Mitchell and Gunny are Trailing Team of the Year SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSgt. Ronald BoonieŽ Mitchell and Gunny, center, with Lt. Dale Evans, Sheriff Donnie Crum, Major Maurice Langston, and Capt. Chris Savary. Funeral services setStephens obituary was received too late for this issue. The full obituary is online. Visitation for family and friends will be Wednesday, Sept. 12, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. Services will be Thursday, Sept. 13, at 3 p.m. at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. Burial will follow at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32308. Hilton at his murder trial in 2011FILE PHOTO

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LES HARRISONWakulla Extension DirectorThey have been the subject of countless irritated conversations, undeleted expletives, and even a conspiracy theory involving a maniacal university researchers desire to unleash an insect plague on Floridas burgeoning vehicle population. The Lovebug, Plecia nearctica, is the focus of exasperation, urban legend and general misunderstanding. In the 1970s an anonymous practical joker fabricated the myth of a University of Florida entomologist who developed a slow ” ying insect which would populate the roadways and cover cars with goo as a punishment for a variety of societal transgressions. Over time some of the details morphed to suit the tellers perspective. One version of the tale had the professors brother owning an auto-body paint shop and the bugs were part of a get-rich-quick scheme. The truth has no real intrigue, just the chronicle of a prolific insect that took advantage of environmental factors to expand its range. Lovebugs originated in Central America, but migrated to Galveston, Texas, by 1940 where they were “ rst reported in the United States. By 1949 they had reached Escambia County and today are found in every Florida county and all Gulf coast states. Lovebugs are most infamous for decorating automobile and trucks. They have a justi“ able reputation for etching vehicle paint at the point of impact, but it is not really their fault. While it is true their body ” uids are slightly acid, the damage to the “ nish occurs with time. If the lovebugs residue remains on the vehicle for several days, bacterial action increases the acidity and etches the paint. These creatures have an unfortunate craving for diesel and gasoline exhaust fumes. Hot engines and vehicle vibrations may also contribute to their interest in highways, and the ultimate demise of some unlucky pairs. Post-appearance chemical control of lovebugs is pointless. Adult males live for two to three days or a bit longer and females may live for a week or a little longer. A spraying program would need to be daily to achieve any level of control. About four weeks in April through May and August through September have the largest populations of lovebugs. In addition to the two large emergences, this species has been collected in Florida every month of the year except November. The females lay approximately 350 gray, irregularly shaped eggs in or on the soil surface under partially decayed vegetable matter which is used for food and shelter. Slate-gray larvae are often found in groups where moisture under the decaying vegetation is constantly present. One of the positive byproducts of the heavy rains and standing waters currently being experienced in Wakulla County is many of the larvae will drown. Unfortunately, standing water does encourage mosquito reproduction with all its associated problems. The reduction of the annual forest burning cycle and development of improved pastures may have contributed to the presence of larger populations of lovebugs by minimizing egg and larva loss. Pastures with ample livestock manure are also attractive larva incubation sites. Biological controls may prove to be the ultimate answer to the lovebugs excesses. There are 16 native fungi UF/IFAS Extension Entomologist have identi“ ed as potentially lethal to these pests. Research is ongoing. To learn more about lovebugs, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u” .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” edu or at (850) 926-3931.Lovebugs: exasperation, urban legend, misunderstanding PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLOVEBUGS: The insects were “ rst seen in the U.S. in Galveston, Texas, in 1940 and have since migrated to Florida. Expert physicians.Quality medical care.Of“ce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. … 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comFamily Practice Accepting new patients X-Ray Services Pediatric patients 2 yrs. & older Offering specialty care: Capital Regional Cardiology Associates 850-877-0216 Capital Regional Medical Group Podiatry Services 850-878-8235 Capital Regional Surgical Associates 850-219-2306 Robert Frable, DO Aida Torres, ARNPCRAWFORDVILLE

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 FSU beats Savannah State in rain-shortened game In The Huddle, Page 4B Dolly Moody on how to love your feet Yoga For life, Page 5B Wakulla-Taylor game photos Page 3B sports news and team views SportsBy ELIZABETH ANDREWS Special to The NewsThe Wakulla High Schools Varsity volleyball team played four games last week making their current record 2-3. € The “ rst game was at Lincoln on Wednesday, Sept. 5. Despite Breighly Boltons seven kills and Haley Browns four, the team lost all three matches with scores of 20-25, 12-20 and 12-20. The team was led in blocks by junior Shannan Wood with eight. € The second game was against Rickards at home on Thursday, Sept. 6. Varsity took home three straight match wins with the help of Shannan Wood with nine kills, Haley Brown with eight and Marina Petrandis and Breighly Bolton with four each. Chelsea Carroll had an amazing 13 assists followed by Caylee Cox with seven. The Lady Eagles had 19 unreturned serves, or aces, seven by Haley Brown, four by Chelsea Carroll and three by Albrey Sorrell € The third game was against Chiles on Friday, Sept. 7 at home. The girls fought hard in the “ rst match, with a score of 2325, but fell short in the end with matches two and three by a score of 13-25 and 18-25. Jordan Pryor had an outstanding 12 digs followed by Albrey Sorell with seven and Chelsea Carroll served up three aces. Breighly Bolton led the team in kills with “ ve and blocks with four. Followed by Shannan Wood with four kills and three blocks. Chelsea Carroll had nine assists and Caylee Cox had six. € The fourth game was at Franklin on Monday, Sept. 10, the girls lost the “ rst match 22-25, but came back and won the next three matches with scores of 25-9, 25-12 and 25-10. Haley Brown lead the team in kills with 15, followed by Shannan Wood with 13. Marina Petrandis and Breighly Bolton both had eight kills. Jordan Pryor had 10 digs and two aces, Chelsea Carroll had 24 assists and six aces and Caylee Cox had 14 assists. The next game is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 13, against Suwannee at home at 6 p.m. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach The 2012 WHS cross country teams opened their 2012 campaign at the Lions Roar Meet held on Saturday, Sept. 8, at the newly improved Apalachee Regional Park, which is also the site of this years State Finals Meet. Representatives from about 20 teams from Florida and Georgia were in attendance, many coming to get a preliminary look at the new State Course.Ž As is typical for this time of year, the runners were greeted with high temperatures and humidity, which somewhat slowed the times, but not the competitiveness of the “ eld. The local teams performed solidly for the first meet of the year, with the girls “ nishing in fourth place and the boys in ninth. The local girls were paced by junior Margaret Wiedeman who “ nished in 16th place in 23:16. Rounding out the top “ ve for WHS were Kasey James (18th, 23:40), Raychel Gray (19th, 23:46), Lydia Wiedeman (21, 23:53) and new comer Kayla Webbe (29, 24:56) who just transferred in from Moultrie, Ga. The meet was won by Fort Walton Beach High School, with Lowndes High School (Georgia) “ nishing in second and Leon High School third … and the only local team to “ nish ahead of the WHS squad.VOLLEYBALL CROSS COUNTRYLady War Eagles go 2-3Season opens at Lions RoarFOOTBALLWar Eagles soar over Bulldogs, 41-20 PHOTO BY WILLIAM SNOWDENDemetrius Lindsey celebrates with linemen Jonathan Chunn, 70, and John Cole, 57, after powering into the end zone for a touchdown that sealed the game for Wakulla. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles continued their winning ways with a tough road victory over the hard-playing Taylor County Bulldogs on Friday night in Perry. The Bulldogs put eight men in the box to take away the run … and the War Eagles responded by passing the ball. That loosened up the defense for the running game, and the War Eagles dominated in the second half. It was two good football teams playing extremely hard,Ž said Head Coach Scott Klees of the game. Im proud of our team … we needed a game where we needed to play all four quarters.Ž But Klees said he also saw his team wasnt in the type of conditioning they needed … and blamed himself for it. Weve got to get in better shape,Ž he said. Quarterback Caleb Stephens was 13 for 23 for 205 yards and two touchdowns and two interceptions. Stephens also has become a rushing threat, running the ball three times for 33 yards and a touchdown. Receiver Jordan Franks had a big night, catching six passes for 91 yards and two touchdowns. Freshman Keith Gavin also had five catches for 72 yards. After the Bulldog defense was softened up by the air attack, running back Demetrius Lindsey started tearing off runs, gaining 128 yards on 9 rushes and scoring a touchdown. He was named Offensive Player of the Week. In total, the War Eagle offense generated more than 400 yards, with the ground attack rolling up 233 yards and three touchdowns. The War Eagle defense played tough, and Dequon Simmons won the Knock Em Back Award with 14 tackles … two of which were bone-jarring hits on Bulldog receivers trying to come over the middle. He was ” agged for unsportsmanlike conduct for one, with referees claiming he was taunting the receiver by standing over him. After the penalty yardage was marked off, the Bulldogs ran the same pass play and Simmons unleashed another hit on a different receiver. Briceton Beverly was Defensive Player of the Week with 7 tackles and 3 sacks. Putting in an incredible performance on both sides of the ball was Mikal Cromartie. On defense, he had six tackles, an interception he returned 55 yards for a touchdown, plus three pass breakups … two of which were on the goal line and looked like touchdowns for the Bulldogs until he knocked the ball loose. On the offensive side of the ball, Cromartie carried the ball twice for 18 yards and caught a pass for a 38 yard gain. As punt returner, Cromartie had two for 40 yards. One downside … offensive lineman Chris Grif“ n was dinged up near the end of the game with ice on his shoulder. The 6-6, 270pound senior who has already committed to play at Georgia Tech, may have bruised his shoulder. Klees said on Monday that he wasnt sure about Grif“ ns condition. GAME RECAP The Bulldogs got on the board “ rst, moving the ball well with rushing and then a one-yard slant pass at the goal line with just over 4 minutes left in the “ rst quarter. The extra point was blocked by Wakulla. Continued on Page 3BUP NEXT: North Florida Christian in Tallahassee on Friday, Sept. 14, at 7:30 p.m. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle G E T READY FOR HUN T IN G GIANT YARD SALE Dedicated to the rescue & rehabliltation of injured and orphaned wild mammals and birds Thurs. Sept. 20 • 8am 3pm Fri. Sept. 21 • 8am 3pm Sat. Sept. 22 • 8am 1pm At Townsend s Nads Mini Storage, 59 Shadeville Rd., CrawfordvilleDonations can be dropped at Unit 43 (thru August) or brought to the yard sale For more information about FWMA visit our website: www.wakullawildlife.org 100% of contributors are retained by FWMA for use in pursing our mission. ALL DONATIONS GREATLY APPRECIATED ALL DONATIONS GREATLY APPRECIATED GIANT YARD SALE (setup) Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator MOLD? ALLERGIES? HURRICANE SEASON is HEREAnyone in need of a certi“ed building contractor with a mold certi“cation please feel free to contact me.WE ALSO WORK WITH YOUR EMERGENCY AND INSURANCE COVERAGEMIKE PECKHAM 850-980-2821Always remember a workers comp. exempt card does not protect the homeowner. lic. no cbc1253204

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Sept. 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla ofce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Sept. 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Sept. 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. Sunday, Sept. 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. Monday, Sept. 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Sept. 18  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant. Wednesday, Sept. 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Sept. 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla ofce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a las 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Highway. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 9266050. Special EventsThursday, Sept. 13  WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE will meet at the library at 7 p.m. House District 7 Candidate Robert Hill is the guest speaker. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call Doug Jones at 926-1177. Friday, Sept. 14  SILENT AUCTION will be held to bene t the Wakulla County Public Library from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. Items include gift certi cates, vacations, marine supplies, art, school supplies and more. Refreshments will be provided. Sign up to be a bidder, browse through a book of all the items and start bidding on Sept. 1 at the library. Call (850) 926-4244 or FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail. com for more information.  CAMPAIGN PARTY for County Commissioner Candidate Howard Kessler will be held at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, at 7:30 p.m. There will be music by Randall “Big Daddy” Webster. Desserts and refreshments will be served. Call 228-9641 for more information. Saturday, Sept. 15  A FAMILY NIGHT OUT will be held at the Senior Center at 7 p.m. Comedian and impressionist Michael Kelley weaves humor and encouragement through his show “Voices That Change” using his favorite singers, actors, and politicians. All is done in a way that delivers the Gospel message. Tickets are $10 each and can be purchased at the door or in advance by calling 210-1276. All proceeds go to the Wakulla Pregnancy Center.  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet from 10 a.m. to noon at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road. The group will have a special guest, Lee Nettles, who will introduce basic skateboarding for autistic children to the group. All safety equipment is provided. All spectrum children and their children are invited. Call 274-9474 for more information.  2012 COASTAL CLEANUP hosted by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will start at 9 a.m. at Woolley Park in Panacea. Trash and debris pickup will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. A free lunch and prize giveaway will be held from 11 a.m. to noon for participants. For more information, call 745-7111 or email helpkwcb@gmail.com or visit their website at kwcb.org.  STEVE STERNBERG will perform at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com. Seats are $10. Posh Java is located on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. in downtown Sopchoppy. Monday, Sept. 17  WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC WOMEN’S CLUB will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the Democratic Headquarters in the North Pointe Center, 1626 Crawfordville Highway, Unit B, to discuss the upcoming election. The meeting is open to both men and women and the public is invited to attend. For more information, contact Joan Hendrix at granpetunia@ comcast.net. Tuesday, Sept. 18  SARRACENIA CHAPTER of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. The feature is “An Evening of Old Botanists,” to be presented by author Gail Fishman, on the basis of her book “Journeys Through Paradise: Pioneering Naturalists in the Southeast.” Wednesday, Sept. 19  FREE BUSINESS CONSULTING will be held by Christine S. Urban, business analyst, MBA from the Small Business Development Center at the Wakulla County Extension Service, 84 Cedar Avenue, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call and make an appointment at 5612041 or send an email to Christine.urban@ famu.edu. Thursday, Sept. 20  BUSINESS MIXER will be hosted by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. It will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Nature’s Classroom at the refuge. It is located at 1255 Lighthouse Road. Call 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@embarqmail.com to RSVP by Sept. 17. Friday, Sept. 21  FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATION YARD SALE will take place from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Townsends Nad’s Mini-Storage, 59 Shadeville Road. Donated items can be dropped off at Townsends Nad’s Mini-Storage in Storage Unit 34 before the yard sale, or can be brought to the yard sale during setup on Thursday, Sept. 20, between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. For more information, visit www. wakullawildlife.org. The yard sale will also take place on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22  SPORTING CLAYS TOURNAMENT will be held starting at 9 a.m. at the Wakulla Sheriff’s Of ce Range and Training Center. This is a fundraiser for the Florida Sheriff’s Youth Ranches. There are three relays at 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Refreshments and lunch will be available. The tournament will be $50 per person with a ve person team. Winners of each relay will receive a 12-gauge shotgun. Contact Lt. Fred Nichols at (850) 251-1676, call the Wakulla Range at (850) 745-7290 or visit www.wcso.org.  FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATION YARD SALE will take place from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Townsends Nad’s Mini-Storage, 59 Shadeville Road. For more information, visit www.wakullawildlife.org. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Open house to view updated ood maps in commission chambers. Library silent auction from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. KWCB Coastal Cleanup starting at 9 a.m. at Woolley Park in Panacea. A Family Night Out at the Senior Center at 7 p.m. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySaturday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Government Meetings Thursday, Sept. 13  OPEN HOUSE to view the updated ood maps and learn more about ood risks in the county will be held by the Northwest Florida Water Management District and the Federal Emergency Management Agency from 4 to 7 p.m. in the commission chambers.  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway. Monday, Sept. 17  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. T uesday, Sept. 18  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold a nal public hearing on the budget and millage rate at 5:15 p.m. at city hall. Wednesday, Sept. 19  WAKULLA ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 10:30 a.m. in the Wakulla County Administration Conference Room.By JO ANN PALMERKWCB DirectorIts that time of year again when Wakulla County will be visited by residents from our surrounding counties with one common purpose, cleaning our shorelines and waterways. On Saturday, Sept. 15, KWCB will host the 27th Annual Ocean Conservancy International Coastal Cleanup. We will be part of the global effort participated with over 52 countries worldwide, cleaning 22,000 miles of shoreline and riding the ocean, lakes and streams of 9,800,000 pounds of debris. The four major sites for the 2012 cleanup will be St. Marks Refuge, Shell Point, Mashes Sands and Bottoms Road. Volunteers can either proceed directly to the site of their choice or come directly to Woolley Park in Panacea. At any site, you will sign in, and be directed to an area to clean. You can sign up in Panacea and “ nd out more information on all the sites. You do not have to be familiar with the sites to participate. Many volunteers go from Woolley Park to other areas where needed. Volunteers can sign up early by going to our website at kwcb.org and download the pre-registration form. Following the cleanup, all participants are invited to come to the headquarters at Woolley Park in Panacea for a free lunch hosted by Wal-Mart. Manager Richard Russell, NJROTC cadets from Wakulla High School, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce staff, and the Board of Directors of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will be serving hotdogs, chips and drinks from Refreshment Services Pepsi as a thank you. Participants will also receive a complimentary T-shirt featuring the new KWCB logo and the names of our 2012-13 sponsors. We will once again present the $100 cash prize for the most cigarette butts collected on Saturday by a group, and will be handing out door prizes generously donated by our local businesses. Even though this is hard, hot work, we know it is so important and we appreciate everyone coming out to support this great effort. Trash doesnt fall from the sky, it falls from human hands, and human hands have the power to stop it. You and your friends, neighbors, family and colleagues can truly make a difference through this remarkable experience and internationally. We challenge you to get your group together, get registered and come prepared on Saturday. You should wear comfortable shoes, tennis shoes are ideal, bring a hat, gloves, sunscreen and insect repellent. Bags are provided. If you have any questions, call the office of KWCB at (850) 745-7111. Visit our Facebook page at Keep Wakulla County Beautiful for updates. Remember, reuse where possible, recycle, and reduce your trash. Its good for everyone. Keep Wakulla County Beautiful... Political EventsThursday, September 27 POLITICAL FORUM for County Commission seats 1, 3, 5. Seat 1 will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Seat 3 at 7:30 p.m. and Seat 5 at 8:30 p.m.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSVolunteers help clean Mashes Sands during the Coastal Cleanup.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 – Page 3BContinued from Page 1B The War Eagles came back with strong kickoff return by Brandon Nichols to the 45. Stephens hit a long pass to Franks. With a “ rst-and-goal at the 6, Stephens hit Franks on a fade route for a touchdown. The extra point by Dillon Norman was good, and the War Eagles were up 7-6 with 3:45 in the “ rst. On the Bulldogs next possession, Cromartie jumped the pass route, intercepting the ball and taking it in for a touchdown. Extra point was good, and the War Eagles were up 14-6 with 2:09. In the second period, the Bulldogs were unable to move the ball, and Cromartie had a punt return that set the War Eagles up in good “ eld position. Stephens connected with Gavin on a 35-yard pass play, and then hit Franks on a fade route to go up 20-6. The extra point was no good. It was 20-6 at the half. The Bulldogs were trying to put a drive together on their “ rst series of the second half, and the quarterback was scrambling, breaking some tackles, and tossed the ball into the back of the end zone where his receiver caught it. The point after was good, and the Bulldogs were back in the game, 20-13. But the War Eagles responded with a drive down to the Taylor County 10 yard line, where Stephens scored on a run in which he reached over the goal line while going down to the ground, but before his knee touched. The extra point was good, and the War Eagles were up 27-13. The Bulldogs came right back with a long drive, scoring on a touchdown pass and adding the extra point to just be down 27-20. The War Eagles answered with a long, sustained drive that ate up the rest of the third quarter and ended with a touchdown to go up, 34-20. In the fourth quarter, the War Eagles stopped a Bulldog drive by recovering a fumble. Wakulla was unable to move the ball, though, and turned it over on downs. Taylor County couldnt do much either … they punted, and Cromartie returned the punt from the 30 to mid“ eld. Then Lindsey, Norman and Stephens all tore off runs to put the ball deep in Bulldog territory. On third and goal, with less than a minute remaining, Lindsey took the ball in with a twisting, spinning run. The extra point was good. The “ nal score, 41-20. UP NEXT: NORTH FLORIDA CHRISTIAN They beat us the last two times we played them,Ž Klees said of NFC. Theyre ranked No. 1 in the state in their division.Ž NFC won the state title last year in their division, while Wakulla was state runner up. Its gonna be a great high school football game,Ž he said. Its gonna be a very physical, hard-fought game … a game that comes down to the last second.Ž JV CONTINUES ROLLING The junior varsity kept its streak of 18 victories in a row going with a 30-20 victory over the Leon Lions JV on Thursday, Sept. 6, Klees praised the effort of Antonio Morris, who rushed for more than 100 yards and two TDs in the game. This week they face a challenge with the Lincoln JV. Theyll be tested,Ž Klees said.War Eagles soar over Bulldogs, 41-20Players of the WeekDEMETRIUS LINDSEY 9 rushes for 128 yards and a touchdown BRICETON BEVERLY 7 tackles and 3 sacks DALTON NICHOLS 3 punts for an average of 40 yardsO ense Defense Special Teams After a performance by the marching bands, members of the War Eagle and and Bulldog cheer squads competed in a throwing competition sponsored by the Optimist Clubs of Taylor and Wakulla county. At stake was $800 with $500 for the winner, with $300 for the other. The Bulldog cheerleaders won. Halftime showWILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla QB Caleb Stephens reaches over the goal line for a touchdown. Mikal Cromartie, right, picks off a pass and returns it 55 yards for a score. Players, cheerleaders, band members take the “ eld, link arms and sing the alma mater after the win. Band members watch the game.

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M at HamptonSaturday, 6 p.m.The game can be seen on famuathletics.com. #18 Florida at #23 TennesseeSaturday, 6 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. Wake Forest at #5 Florida StateSaturday, 12 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. e K e y s t o e Keys to S u c c e s s i n 2 0 1 2 Success in 2012 A bizarre night at Doak Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! by Bob Ferrante The expected was the Florida State would light up the scoreboard. The unexpected was that the game would be halted by two lightning delays, which did a far better job at stalling the Seminoles offense than Savannah State. With the Seminoles leading by seven touchdowns late in the second quarter, and with both teams in their locker rooms during a 56-minute lightning delay, coaches and game of“ cials came to an unusual but not unprecedented decision. They saw more bad weather on the radar coming toward Tallahassee, and FSU coach Jimbo Fisher, Savannah State coach Steve Davenport and the ACC crew agreed to a running clock for the “ nal 34 minutes of the game. But the weather didnt cooperate, contributing a second lightning delay midway through the third quarter. It took nearly 45 minutes for school administrators to con“ rm that they could cancel the remainder of the contest and ensure that the game would be considered of“ cial. And at that point, with No. 6 FSU leading 55-0, the game was halted with 8:59 left in the third quarter and of“ cially called at 9:35 p.m. Well, thats a first,Ž FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. Never had that occur in my career. ƒ Its easy for me to say I want to keep playing. But I understand the situation theyre in plus they have bad weather coming and (Savannah State has) a bus ride. But as a competitor, I want to keep playing because I want to see some of our young guys. But I totally understand. I dont have a problem with that.Ž The coaches, administrators and of“ cials tossed around scenarios as they combed through the NCAA rulebook. Among them, bizarrely, was the option that the game could have ended in a 0-0 tie … something nobody in the room wanted. There was a discussion there at the end after the weather delay of whether or not we were going to have to call it a 0-0 tie and that was obviously not fair to them,Ž Davenport said. We made a decision that it was going to end right where it was.Ž The Seminoles went into the game a 70.5-point favorite against Savannah State in what was the largest point spread ever in college football. And FSU was on pace to surpass the mark. FSU scored touchdowns on its “ rst seven “ rst-half possessions „ including touchdown grabs by Rodney Smith, Greg Dent and Kelvin Benjamin. Benjamin added another touchdown reception in the third quarter from third-string QB Jacob Coker as FSU put its “ nal points on the board with 11:24 left in the third quarter. FSU came up short of matching its school records for points (77) and margin of victory (74), but with clear weather and another 24 minutes of football the potential was there for more points. The Tigers finished with just nine passing yards and 19 rushing yards … less than a yard per play. They are who we thought they are,Ž Davenport said. People are talking national championship and I can understand that. They are tremendous in every facet of the game.ŽFlorida State players walk off the “ eld during a lightning delay. FSU beat Savannah State, 55-0, in a game that was suspended during the third quarter. Colin Hackley/OsceolaBy Marty Cohen Once the calendar ” ipped to August, Will Muschamp admitted he was done … talking that is. For the preceding seven months, Muschamp talked plenty about entering Year Two as the head coach at Florida, taking care of all his speaking obligations to booster clubs, media folks, whoever he was supposed to address concerning the direction of his program. But upon strolling to the podium for Floridas own Media Day on the eve of preseason camp, Muschamp let it be known, several times, that the time for talking was over. It didnt mean he planned to erect a Cone of Silence around the Florida program, although if he had his druthers, he probably would have approved the idea. What he meant was that it was time to get back on the “ eld and produce. He reiterated the theme several times, how the Gators needed to display signs of progress on the field, on Saturdays, rather than trying to simply convince us the program was headed in the right direction. Muschamp firmly believes the foundation has been laid and he often states he is building for the long haul, not simply a quick “ x. But he also knows the painful reality that the past two seasons have been well below the standard Florida has established over the past 20 years, “ rst under Steve Spurrier and then Urban Meyer. He doesnt need to be reminded of the gory numbers … a 15-11 mark the past two seasons including 7-6 in his initial foray in 2011. The Gators stumbled through last fall, particularly after starting senior quarterback John Brantley was sidelined right before halftime against eventual national champ Alabama in the “ fth game, leading to a freefall that produced just two wins in the “ nal eight regular-season contests. The Gators fashioned an unseemly 3-5 mark in the SEC, just the fourth time in the past 40 seasons they “ nished with a losing record in conference play. While Muschamp is eager to move past the struggles of last season, he also wants his players to remember the feelings that accompanied the defeats, and use that bitter taste as motivation for 2012. With a deeper, more experienced team … at most spots … and a bit more favorable schedule (any time it doesnt say Alabama on the slate, thats a positive these days), there is reason to believe that Muschamps optimistic talk since January will actually bear fruit this fall. But its time to put the rhetoric aside, and turn the words into results. Both South Carolina and Georgia have represented the SEC East in Atlanta the past two seasons, and are deemed the favorites to appear again in the SEC Championship Game. Muschamp stated ” atly that any Florida season that doesnt include a stop in Atlanta the “ rst Saturday in December should be deemed a failure.

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Our feet take a daily pounding from the shoes we wear, the way we walk, the activities we enjoy (e.g., running), or simply from inactivity. Most of us underestimate the effects tired, tight, misaligned, and in” exible feet, ankles, and toes can have on the rest of us. Arch, hip, and back pain are only some of the side effects of neglected feet. Those with tight leg muscles such as the calves and hamstrings might want to give some TLC to their tootsies too if they want to improve their ” exibility. Here are a few basic tips and moves you should do on a daily basis to help improve circulation and mobility in your feet. The rest of your body will thank you. Toe lifts: Sit or stand while you ground evenly through the four points of your feet: big toe mound, little toe mound, and inner and outer heel. Slowly lift your toes off the ground and spread them out. Bonus tips: lower the toes one at a time, working “ rst from the pinky inwards and then try it again by lowering the big toe “ rst. Or, try to lift only your big toes off the ” oor, then only your little toes. Will them to lift and watch that your hands and “ ngers dont try to help. Toe abduction: Ground in the feet as you did above and now gently work to move the big toe outwards away from the other toes. Bonus tip: If you can do so comfortably, while seated, bend over and place your hand along the inner arch of your foot. Feel the muscles along the arch contract as you gently work to abduct (move away) your big toe from the rest of the toes. When you touch the area you want to activate, you send a signal to your brain to get that area moving. Release ball: Using a tennis ball, gently and slowly roll out the undersides of your feet while standing. Use a chair or wall for balance. Keep your foot and toes relaxed throughout. Stop rolling and release the foot down onto the ball when you feel a tight or sore spot. Bonus tip: Once this feels easier, graduate up to a golf or tiny release ball. Toe separators: Why not release the muscles of your toes and feet while you do other things! Use corks or toe separators (think the things you use for a pedicure) between the toes to gradually realign the bones of your feet. Bonus tip: cut the corks in thirds or halves to start and then gradually increase the width of the corks as your feet release. Dont force large separators between your toes so you feel pain. By spending 10 minutes on the above every day, you will release the connective tissue in the feet that connects up the body to the legs, hips, and back, thus increasing your flexibility and reducing your pain throughout. You will enjoy a nice massage that stimulates blood ” ow in the feet and helps you de-stress. You will be able to treat bunions, plantar fasciitis, and other foot aliments. And “ nally, you will be well on your way to keeping your feet and toes healthy which in turn will have an effect in the entire rest of your body. Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140 or focusyoga@yahoo.com. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 – Page 5BHEALTH & FITNESS How to love your feet YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Continued from Page 1B Sophomore J.P. Piotrowski was the first WHS boy to “ nish in the boys race, running 19:20 and “ nishing in 46th place with Aaron Smith just 6 seconds behind in 19:26. Rounding out the top six for the War Eagles were Alan Pearson (73rd, 20:39), Travis Parks (75th, 20:43), Mitchell Atkinson (78th, 20:53) and Albert Smythe (83rd, 21:09). This wasnt a meet about time,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. This was a meet about beginning to get the kids into the racing mode, to give them some idea as to how they stack up against the other runners in the area and to give our new runners a chance to experience a high school meet. This time of year is really exciting,Ž said Hoover. We are “ nally able to get the kids into competition and we begin to see what well have for the year. We lost “ ve girls from last years top nine on a team that quali“ ed for the state meet, but we still have a real solid group that can be at least as good, if not better than last years team. We dont have the depth we did last year, so our girls will have to stay together and some of the other girls are going to have to step up. Our boys team is really young, with only one senior currently in the top nine, but they are a pretty dedicated group and we have three or four “ rst year runners that might turn out to be pretty good. We should be competitive and might turn out to be pretty good,Ž Hoover said.Cross country season opens at Lions Roar(ARA) In a perfect world, youd develop a workout schedule for the next six months, stick to it ” awlessly and “ nd yourself at the level of “ tness you hoped to achieve. But as many know all too well, life sometimes gets in the way, be it in the form of an injury, lack of motivation or simply running out of time. While sticking to a regular workout schedule is a challenge, there are a number of ways to keep you moving both physically and mentally. Making your workouts fun, getting creative with both your routine and schedule, and taking a few simple steps to stay healthy are all great steps toward sticking to your fitness goals. Ryan Sutter, a former professional football player who also happened to be the top choice on The BacheloretteŽ in 2003, now “ nds himself in the role as a full-time “ re“ ghter and family man. Yet he still enjoys amateur athletic pursuits to keep himself in shape, such as mountain bike races and marathons. Sutter offers six tips to fellow weekend warriors looking to stay in shape: € Set successive shortterm goals to keep you going. For example, schedule a 5k one month and a mountain bike race for the next. The feeling of accomplishment you get from ful“ lling each goal will help you achieve the next. You can even set weekly goals with rewards, such as allowing yourself to order a pizza after sticking to your schedule for that week. € Use peer pressure in a positive way. Enrolling in team sports or group activity can help provide the motivation for sticking to your plan. When others are depending on you, youre less likely to skip out. € Vary your activity. Run one day, play basketball another and hit the weight room the next. One bene“ t to a varied routine is keeping you interested, but its also great for your body. Different activities use different muscle groups, meaning a varied workout helps you become more comprehensively fit and can help you avoid overuse injuries. Focus on being an athlete rather than a specialist,Ž says Sutter. € Listen to your body. Youre likely to have some aches and pains, but those can be reduced with the proper treatment. Always take time to warm up before and stretch after workouts, and ice sore areas after your workout. To make icing easier, keep an ACE Brand Reusable Cold Compress in your freezer at both home and work. More injury prevention tips can be found at www.acebrand.com. € Get creative with your scheduling. Look for ways to make workouts a part of your daily routine. I really enjoy yoga in the morning with my kids,Ž says Sutter. Rather than heading out to dinner to catch up with your friend, see if he wants to hit the racquetball court instead. Or maybe you can occasionally bike to work instead of driving, spending the minutes you normally would be sitting in the car working out. € Always keep your gym bag stocked and with you. This way, you cant back out of your workout because you werent prepared. There are three essentials I keep in my gym bag: food for energy, hydration to keep me going and clean clothes to change into when Im done with my workout,Ž says Sutter. The most important thing is to have fun,Ž says Sutter. Otherwise, its easy to lose sight of why youre working out in the first place.ŽSix ways to keep your workouts regular, fun and injury-free SPECIAL TO THE NEWS LindysChicken Since19687locations SPECIALS SPECIALS TENDERS 3 Large Chicken Tenders w/ Fries .......... $4.89 HOT WINGS 5 Piece w/ Fries ....................................... $4.89 2 Whole Wings w/ Fries & Biscuit .................................... $4.89 Includes Side & Small Drink Chicken Fillet combo .................................. $6.99 3 Tenders special ........................................ $6.39 5 Hot Wings ................................................. $6.39 Chicken Salad or BBQ Sandwich ............... $5.99 Pork Chop Sandwich .................................. $6.99 2 Whole Wings ............................................ $6.39 2 PC Dark with only Mashed Potatoes ....... $5.19 COMBO MEALS COMBO MEALS MW 10-5 • T & F 10-6 • Sat. 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850)926-6241SALE 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH The Wakulla News Turn account receivables into CASH!!! Tired of wai ng 30, 60, 90 days? Meet payroll. Increase pro ts. Great for startups, bankruptcies, tax liens, bad credit & more. $20k to $10M+ www.jpcapitalsolu ons.com 863 589 6587 jpcapitalsolu ons@gmail.com Call: 866-673-2729Visit: www.StudyForArthritis.com Local doctors need volunteers for a research study comparing FDA-approved arthritis medications. .No-cost study-related care and study medications for up to 42 months. .Compensation up to $50.00 per visit .No health insurance or referrals are required. Do you from ARTHRITIS?

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Account Acts Ally Asked Axis Brushing Coins Considering Craft Crush Data Ears Eats Egypt Elements Else Ends Ever Fern Flat Fond Halt Hats Into Island Knew Lasts Late Lens Mass Mate Navy Neck Need Newly Nicest Nylon Open Paws Pile Planes Poem Point Quiz Reply Ri e Rise Root This page sponsored in part by: Seize Skate Snack Snap Sneak Spelled Stay Stem Study Sunk Taxi Teams Teas Toad Toys Trip Twos Vacant Vain Virus Want Yield

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 – Page 7BSTATE NEWS By DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 7, … This time four years ago, there was a lot of talk of hope and change.Ž This week, President Obama exhorted Americans to continue to hope … rather than to make a change. And a Florida politician had his own kind of change on display. Charlie Crists change of heart, from Ronald Reagan and Jeb Bush RepublicanŽ to an Obamabacking speaker at the Democratic National Convention, brought the expected calls of derision from his former Republican brethren … who said he really hasnt changed and is just the same old opportunistic Charlie. And while he may be once again embracing the president, at least in spirit, Democrats werent necessarily buying Crists full-on man hug of their party. A number of them this week said … cautiously … something to the effect of Come on in if you wish, but were skeptical of your motives and bona “ des. But those who were saying so were the Democratic Party activists at the DNC in Charlotte, N.C. For them … many of whom have eyes on running for, or working for someone running for, the governors of“ ce … Crist may represent a rival, though hes of“ cially not a member of their party, at least not yet. With his appearance on stage at the convention just a short time before Obama, rumors have resurfaced that the chameleonlike Crist may also be looking for a return to the state political stage. And theres more than a little bit of envy of Crist … who seems to have some things Democrats havent had much of in this state in recent years: name recognition, likeability and fundraising prowess. In short, electability. Florida Democratic Party Chairman Rod Smith said in his Baptist upbringing he was taught to welcome people from other faiths into the church. That doesnt necessarily mean Im going to make you a preacher,Ž said Smith, who could be one of those mulling a run for governor in 2014. Crist tried to sell his backing of Obama as both pragmatism and ideology, saying that from a pragmatic standpoint Florida was only able to balance its budget … the state was savedŽ in Crists words … by Obamas stimulus spending. From an ideological standpoint, Crist said the GOP has drifted too far to the right and isnt amenable to compromise. My friend Jeb Bush recently noted Reagan himself would have been too moderate, too reasonable for todays GOP,Ž Crist said. Later, he said Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan were allergic to the very idea of compromise.Ž The Cristo-Chango of the former governor was kind of the way it has gone for a Democratic Party that has had few wins in Florida lately … even their big convention week was partly overshadowed by the longtime Republican. For those who remain in the state Republican Party it was a quiet week, coming right after the GOPs Tampa convention. They mostly watched … and sniped … from the sidelines as the Democrats did the week before. State Party Chairman Lenny Curry was in Charlotte to do counterpoints … but Crist botched things up for him too. Instead of getting to go on national TV to shoot off zingers about Obama and to praise Romney, Curry had to use his time in the spotlight to answer questions about Crist. The Democratic convention hardly went off hitch-less for the party as a whole. Rank-and-file Democrats changed the platform and omitted previous language that included the word God-given, leading to allegations the party was going Godless. Democrats also failed to keep in language about Jerusalem being the rightful capital of Israel, a point of interest to the Jewish voting bloc. Both changes … chalked up as oversights … were quickly changed back, but the Republicans got a couple of days of talking points out of the blunders. GOVERNMENT GOES ON While Democrats and Crist got all hopey and changey again in North Carolina, the business of actual government continued in Florida. Florida education of“ cials were weighing the possible impact of a federal-court opinion handed down late last week that may require in-state tuition for the American-born children of illegal immigrants. Even though theyre U.S. citizens by virtue of American birth, tuition is based on residency, and residency is based on where your parents live if youre a minor. But U.S. District Judge K. Michael Moores ruling found that an unconstitutional violation of the rights of those students. And in another issue related to the federal courts, the U.S. Department of Justice said this week that it wont oppose a new plan for early voting in “ ve Florida counties that must get prior approval for electoral changes under the Voting Rights Act. Lawmakers last year reduced the number of early voting days in all Florida counties, but the change was rejected for the “ ve counties … Collier, Hardee, Hendry, Hillsborough and Monroe. A new plan would reduce early voting from 14 days to just eight in those counties, but expand the hours to 12 per day. The DOJ notified a federal court that it wont oppose the plan, putting the Obama Administration, the Scott administration and the counties mostly on the same page. One county, Monroe, isnt totally in agreement … its supervisor of elections, Republican Harry Sawyer, said the extra hours of early voting amount to an unfunded mandate.Ž Also, Sawyer said its not clear whether the plan might reduce minority turnout, which is the objection to cutting back on early voting. But he said hed go along with whatever the court decides. COMINGS AND GOINGS Gov. Rick Scott 2.0 continues to take shape. This week those who watch the governors of“ ce learned that Scotts communications director, Brian Burgess, is leaving to go to the Republican Party of Florida. Burgess was a lightning rod, with a more confrontational approach with the media than predecessors. But he has to be credited for helping Scott get to the office in the “ rst place, helping craft the campaign messaging that propelled the previously obscure Scott from health care executive to the states chief executive. Burgess will be replaced by Melissa Sellers, previously spokeswoman for Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal. STORY OF THE WEEK: Hoping to rekindle the spirit of hope he ignited four years ago while wanting Americans to not change to a different vision, President Barack Obama asked the country this week to give him a little more time to achieve the vision they bought into in 2008. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Im one of those believers that if you want to join our church youre always welcome in the congregation. That doesnt necessarily mean Im going to make you a preacherƒ.... I think he would have to take some Desi Arnaz lessons. Hed have some splainin to do.Ž Florida Democratic Party Chairman Rod Smith on Charlie Crists ongoing ” irtation with the Democratic Party.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Democrats sell hope, but say no change is needed By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 10 … Former Republican lawmaker Nancy Argenziano was foiled this year in her attempt to run for Congress as a Democrat. But now running as an independent for a state House seat in Citrus and Hernando counties, the outspoken --and often controversial --Argenziano has received the backing of the Florida Democratic Party as it tries to knock out a Republican incumbent. The partys somewhat-unusual support of Argenziano came after Democrat Lynn Thomas Dostal withdrew from the House District 34 race just days after winning the Aug. 14 primary. Dostals move cleared the way for a one-on-one race between Argenziano and Rep. Jimmie Smith, R-Inverness, and eliminated the possibility that Smith would face a divided opposition that could help him more easily win re-election. Argenziano said Monday she is very grateful and proudŽ to have the support and said it shows the Democratic Party knows she would be fair if elected. She said she has always been independent, including sometimes crossing Republican leaders while serving in the House and Senate from 1996 to 2007, when former Gov. Charlie Crist appointed her to the state Public Service Commission. I dont want the extremes of either party, Argenziano said. Thats why Im an independent.Ž Dostal, a Homosassa resident who won nearly 72 percent of the vote in the Democratic primary, noti“ ed the state Aug. 17 that he was withdrawing from the race. The Tampa Bay Times reported that Dostal said Argenziano needs a clear “ eld to beat Mr. Smith.Ž The Democratic Party did not replace Dostal on the ballot and supported Argenziano. Nancy Argenziano has been a strong, independent voice for consumers and Floridas middle-class families, while her opponent is a Tea Party extremist who supports the same failed policies which have moved our state in the wrong direction, party executive director Scott Arceneaux said in a prepared statement. Smith, who did not immediately return a phone message left at his of“ ce Monday, was elected to the House in 2010 and became best known for sponsoring legislation aimed at requiring drug testing for state employees and welfare recipients. His campaign website gives a glimpse of his conservative positions on other issues. As always, I will continue to “ ght against higher taxes and job-killing regulations, Smith, a retired member of the U.S. Army, says on the site. Argenziano, who represented the Citrus and Hernando areas in the House and Senate, tried to run this year as a Democrat for a U.S. House seat in North Florida held by Republican Steve Southerland. But she dropped her bid after a judge ruled that she did not change her party registration early enough to run as a Democrat. While she is well known in the legislative district, Argenziano faces a huge financial disadvantage as she runs against Smith. As of Aug. 9, the latest “ gures available, Smith had raised $100,722, while Argenziano had raised $5,395. Argenziano said she has not received “ nancial support from the Democratic Party. By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 7, … With hundreds of millions of dollars a year hinging on their decision, Florida Supreme Court justices Friday began deliberating about whether to uphold a 2011 law that requires government workers to chip in 3 percent of their pay to the state retirement system. A Leon County circuit judge this year found that the contribution requirement violated the rights of state and local workers who had been hired before the law took effect on July 1, 2011. But some justices appeared skeptical about one of the key underpinnings of the lower-court decision … that a 1974 law created contractual rights shielding such workers from the retirementsystem changes. Justice Charles Canady said government workers can lose their jobs and questioned why they also cant be forced to pay into the pension system. I have a hard time understanding how when someone does not have a continuing right to employment, (how) they have a continuing right to a particular bene“ t of employment, he said. That strikes me as anomalous.Ž Similarly, Justice Barbara Pariente questioned why the Legislature would bind itself forever, no matter what the budget crisisŽ to a law that would only allow increased bene“ ts and prevent bene“ t cuts or mandatory employee contributions. But Justice James E.C. Perry appeared to agree with opponents of the 2011 law who contend that lawmakers could only require the contributions from workers hired on or after July 1, 2011. You can prospectively change it, but not to those employees that were there,Ž Perry said. Despite “ erce political opposition from unions and government workers, the Republican-dominated Legislature and Gov. Rick Scott pushed through the pension changes as they dealt with a $3.6 billion budget shortfall. The mandatory contributions apply to far more than state workers, as school districts, county governments and many cities also are part of the Florida Retirement System. The Florida Education Association and other groups “ led the lawsuit last summer, but that did not prevent the state from starting to collect the contributions … a fact that could force it to refund money if it ultimately loses the case. Ron Meyer, an FEA attorney who argued before the court Friday, said the state could face giving back roughly $900 million. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford struck down the pension law in March, and the states appeal was fast-tracked to the Supreme Court without having to be heard in the 1st District Court of Appeal. As a sign of the stakes involved in the case, a crowd “ lled the Supreme Court chambers Friday to hear the arguments. The audience included representatives of state and local unions, the Florida Association of Counties and the Florida Chamber of Commerce, which has been an outspoken supporter of the decision to require pension contributions. Justices typically do not rule in such cases for months. Scott did not attend the hearing but released a statement saying the case was about maintaining a responsible and sustainableŽ state budget. In 2011, the Legislature passed, and I signed, common-sense public pension reform, which requires public employees … like private-sector employees throughout Florida … to contribute to their retirement plans, Scott said. Prior to this reform, Florida was one of only three states that did not require public employees to contribute to their pensions.Ž The Supreme Court arguments centered, in part, on the 1974 pension law and a 1981 court opinion that the state contends allowed it to require contributions from employees, regardless of when they were hired. Raoul Cantero, a former Supreme Court justice who represented the state, said the 1981 opinion made clear the Legislature needs to have ” exibility to react to changing “ nancial circumstances.Ž Responding to questions from justices, Cantero said the state could even eliminate the pension system, so long as it didnt retroactively affect bene“ ts that had been accrued before such a change took effect. But Meyer said the 1974 law set up a system in which employees would not be required to contribute to their pensions. Meyer said Fulford, the circuit judge, found a very clear contractual rightŽ for workers hired before July 1, 2011. You cant change the game in the middle of the game, Meyer said. Another issue in the case focuses on whether the law violated workers collective-bargaining rights, with Meyer arguing lawmakers passed the 2011 changes without allowing employees to negotiate them. The facial problem with this statute is, there is no room for any collective bargaining, he said. But Cantero said it would have been unworkable to negotiate the changes because workers in the retirement system are in hundreds of state and local bargaining units.Supreme Court ponders high-stakes pension caseDemocrats back independent Argenziano in House race Montford offers help to Franklin County oystermenCommercial oystermen, their families, and other Franklin County residents hardhit by the oyster harvesting crisis will get some much needed help navigating government assistance programs, Sen. Bill Montford (D-Tallahassee) announced Friday, Sept. 7. In an effort to connect those economically impacted by the oyster harvest calamity with federal and state programs available to help bridge the economic crisis, Montford is broadening his Apalachicola district of ce hours, weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and after hours if necessary. "As we've seen with other disasters that have hit Florida, those impacted often need some assistance understanding or applying for the various federal and local programs that are there to help them in the recovery process," said Montford. "My goal is to get the government help to Franklin County residents and Franklin County residents to the government help as quickly as possible." Court: Stealing husband’s emails not domestic violenceA woman who used her husband's email password to read all his emails and then changed the password so he couldn't get into his account isn't guilty of cyberstalking, the 1st District Court of Appeal said Tuesday. A court issued a domestic violence injunction against Cheryl Young of Alachua County and the lower court judge in the case suggested her actions amounted to cyberstalking. But the appeal court, in reversing the injunction, noted that cyberstalking is de ned in law as communication of "words, images, or language by or through the use of electronic mail or electronic communication, directed at a speci c person, causing substantial emotional distress to that person and serving no legitimate purpose." The court found her acts "improper" but didn't constitute domestic violence by stalking, "because they were not electronic communications by her of words, images, or language.'"State briefs

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SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements 000CHV9 Store Fronts AvailableLowest Leasing Rates Ever!€ Busy Hwy 19 Crystal River location € Anchored by national retail stores € Newly refurbished € Kiosks also available352-795-2585 www.thecrystalrivermall.com 1801 NE Hwy 19 Crystal River, FL 34428 Todays New Ads 2005 KAWASAKI 650 BRUTE FORCE 4 wheeler, auto, 4 wheel drive, camo package, asking $4000 call @ 545-8214 DOUBLE-WIDE MOBILE HOME 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Family Room w/ fireplace; large kitchen w/ island and pantry; master bath has shower & garden tub; walk-in closets; office and large utility room. $38,000 Call Jennifer at 850-962-3884 Good Things to Eat Raker FarmsBlanched & Frozen Peas. Fresh Cut Okra. Green Peanut. And we process Beef, Hogs & Deer850-926-7561 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements Turn your art into cash! 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CALLTODAY! 786-298-7825 Boats OYSTER BOATS FOR RENT (850) 962-2000 5363-0913 TWN vs. Rack-Em Up Sales, LLC Case No. 12-SC-1475 Summons STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT SMALLCLAIMS WASHINGTON COUNTY SMALLCLAIMS PUBLICATION SUMMONS AND NOTICE Case No. 12-SC-1475 Case Code No. 31001, 31010 Warehouse Equipment Co., Inc., a Wisconsin corporation W132 N10424 Grant Drive Germantown, WI 53022 Plaintiff, vs. Rack-Em Up Sales LLC 46 Noah Ct. Crawfordville, FL32327 and Robert Tuzenew, 46 Noah Ct. Crawfordville, FL32327 Defendants, IF YOU NEED NELPIN THIS MATTER BECAUSE OF ADISABILITY, PLEASE CALL 262-335-4341 PUBLICATION SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING TO THE PERSON(S) NAMED ABOVE AS DEFENDANT(S): You are being sued by the person(s) named above as Plaintiff(s). Acopy of the claim has been sent to you at your address as stated in the caption above. The lawsuit will be heard in the following Small Claims court: Washington County Courthouse Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432“we sell and service most makes and models” Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. 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Telephone Number of Clerk of Court: 262-335-4400 Courtroom/Room Number: 3204 Address: 432 E. Washington Street West Bend, WI 53095 on September 24, 2012 at 1:30 p.m. If you do not attend the hearing, the court may enter a judgment against you in favor of the person(s) suing you. Acopy of the claim has been sent to you at your address as stated in the caption above. Ajudgment may be enforced as provided by law. Ajudgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You may have the option to answer without appearing in court on the court date by filing a written answer with the clerk of court before the court date. You must send a copy of your answer to the Plaintiff(s) named above at their address. You may contact the clerk of court at the telephone number above to determine if there are other methods to answer a Small Claims complaint in that county. By:/s/Quintin A. Sullivan on 9/4/12 Schober Schober & Mitchell, S.C. 2835 S. Moorland Road New Berlin, WI 53151 State Bar Number 1081427 September 13, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5364-0920 TWN Vs. Dibona, Anthony Case No. 11000158CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case No.: 11000158CADivision: FLAGSTAR ABANK, FSB Plaintiff, v. ANTHONYA. DIBONAA/K/AANTHONYDIBONA, ETAL, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated June 21, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 11000158CA, DIVISION:, of the Circuit Court of theSecond Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and ANTHONYA. DIBONAA/K/AANTHONYDIBONA; WENDYM. DIBONAA/K/A WENDYDIBONA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANTHONYA. DIBONAA/K/AANTHONY DIBONA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WENDYM. DIBONAA/K/AWENDYDIBONA; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTYOWN UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2 are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 1 1:00 a.m. at front door of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327 on the 4th day of October, 2012 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, BLOCK F, OF SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 88, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 58 Gold Finch Way, Crawfordville, FL32327 If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. 5365-0920 TWN Vs.Serai, Kanwaljit Case No. 2009-250-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2009-250-CA HERITAGE COMMUNITYBANK d/b/a AMERIS BANK, Plaintiff, v. KANWALJIT SINGH SERAI a/k/a K.S. SERAI, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: Commence at an old concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North along the East boundary of the Southwest quarter of said Section 25 a distance of 667.78 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261) marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Southwest quarter of said Section 25, thence run North 89 degrees 04 minutes 30 seconds West 315.00 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 89 degrees 04 minutes 30 seconds West 547.05 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 00 degrees 23 minutes 26 seconds East 999.46 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run South 88 degrees 33 minutes 08 seconds East 116.83 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run North 00 degrees 32 minutes 13 seconds East 28.57 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 88 degrees 37 minutes 25 seconds East 419.88 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 11 minutes 14 seconds East 1023.81 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 12.68 acres, more or less. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein after, at public sale on September 27, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 7, at the W akulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, Florida 32327 If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Timothy D. Padgett, ESQ.,Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Counsel for Plaintiff September 13 & 20, 2012 5366-0920 TWN Estate: Crowson, Madelyn File No. 2012-80CPNotice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION FILE # 2012-80CP IN RE: ESTATE OF MADELYN JOYCE CROWSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS 5367-0920 TWN Vs. OGrady, Michael Case No. 652007CA000021FCXXXX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652007CA000021FCXXXX NATIONALCITYBANK OF INDIANA, ANATIONALBANKING ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. MICHAELJ OGRADY; KARIN S. OGRADY; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 14, 2007, and entered in Case No. 652007CA000021FCXXXX of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein NATIONALCITYBANK OF INDIANA, ANATIONALBANKING ASSOCIATION,is the Plaintiff and Michael J. OGrady; and Karin S. OGrady, are the Defendant(s). The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, on the 11th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 32, BLOCK KŽ, MAGNOLIAGARDENS, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINNG FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida, this 30th day of August, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk, Wakulla County, Florida By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 WWR #10057686 5368-0920 TWN vs. Highwoods II Case No. 2012-CA-40 Notice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-CA-40 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. HIGHWOODS II, LLC, ET AL., CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 21, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse on September 27, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described parcels of property located in Wakulla County, Florida: PHASE II, PARCELA COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK AŽ OF HIGHWOODS PLACE PHASE 1, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 65 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST, 180.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST, 169.69 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON ACURVE CONCAVE EASTERLY; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLYALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 361.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 13 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 55 SECONDS FOR ADISTANCE OF 84.46 FEET (CHORD BEARS SOUTH 25 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, 84.26 FEET); THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST, 197.41 FEET; THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST, 246.77 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE NORTH 70 5369-0920 TWN vs. Barry, Joseph Case No. 11-355-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY CASE NO.: 11-355-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH C. BARRY, a/k/a JOSEPH C. BARRY, JR., BETTYG. BARRY, SUE ANN SMITH, CENTENNIALBANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, WAKULLABUSINESS CENTER PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, and UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION 1 and UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on October 4, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Begin at the intersection of Easterly right of way of U.S. Highway 319 and the Westerly boundary line of Lot 89 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING and said point being the point of curve to the right having a radius of 5679.67 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve and said right of way for 38.66 feet thru a central angle of 00 degrees 23 minutes 24 seconds, chord of said arc being North 28 degrees 07 minutes 16 seconds East 38.66 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving said right of way run South 62 degrees 51 minutes 25 seconds East 55.18 feet to a concrete monument; thence South 02 degrees 00 minutes 50 seconds West 151.83 feet to rod and cap lying on the Northerly right of way of Council Moore Road; thence run along said right of way North 87 degrees 59 minutes 10 seconds West 132.90 feet to a concrete monument marking the intersection of said right of way with the Easterly right of way of U.S. Highway Number 319; thence leaving said Northerly right of way run along said Easterly right of way North 27 degrees 08 minutes 35 seconds East 155.24 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any Person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. This Notice dated this 22nd day of August, 2012. Clerk, of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST, 181.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PHASE II, PARCELB COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK AŽ OF HIGHWOODS PLACE PHASE 1, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 65 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WESTERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 1, ADISTANCE OF 134.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID LOT LINE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 45.87 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 1; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 1, ADISTANCE OF 30.08 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID BOUNDARYLINE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST, 189.45 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST, 138.82 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON ACURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY; THENCE NORTHWESTERLYALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 277.13 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 19 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 09 SECONDS FOR ADISTANCE OF 95.38 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 26 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST, 94.91 FEET) TO APOINT OF REVERSE CURVE; THENCE NORTHWESTERLYALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 321.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 18 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 29 SECONDS FOR ADISTANCE OF 101.59 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 27 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST, 101.17 FEET); THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST, 10.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST, 40.87 FEET; THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST, 131.73 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS, DRAINAGE AND UTILITIES OVER, UNDER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK AŽ OF HIGHWOODS PLACE PHASE 1, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 65 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 61 (SHADEVILLE ROAD); THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST, 140.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY, 40.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST, 169.69 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING ARADIUS OF 361.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 49 SECONDS FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 100.31 FEET (CHORD BEARS SOUTH 26 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST, 99.99 FEET); THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST, 42.10 FEET TO APOINT ON ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST; THENCE NORTHWESTERLYALONG SAID CURVE HAVING ARADIUS OF 321.16 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 18 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 31 SECONDS FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 101.60 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 27 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST, 101.17 FEET; THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST, 170.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Date: September 5, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By:/s/Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices The administration of the estate of MADELYN JOYCE CROWSON, deceased, whose date of death was December 8, 2011, and the last four digits of whose social security number are 0644, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLACounty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is SEPTEMBER 13, 2012. Personal Representative: Brenda Joy Wilson 181 Avenue G, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 Attorney For Personal Representative: Kristy Branch Banks, Florida Bar Number: 517143 Attorney for Brenda Wilson P.O. Box 176, Apalachicola, FL32329 Telephone: (850) 670-1255 Fax: (850) 670-1256 EMail: info@kbblawfl.com Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 – Page 9B We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!2323 Surf Rd. 3BR/2BA Bayfront road on Ochlockonee Bay, Screened Porch, Deck and Dock. No Smoking. No Pets. $1,150 per month. 112 Captain James St. 4BR/2BA 2,280 sq. ft. MH on 9 acres. Located in North Wakulla near Woodville. Complete with replace, workshop and dishwasher. No Smoking. No Pets. $775 per month.Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Commercial building 4,300 square foot heated and cooled building on 1 acre of land Rents out for $1,800.00. Building is in excellent condition. RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 22 Coral Way 3BR./2BA with 1 car garage and fenced in yard on 1/2 acre. Pets okay with $250. fee, $950.mo/$950 Deposit. • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available, all utilities included. • 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./$900 Deposit • 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok • 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced • 82 Mimosa 3BR/1.5BA $650Mo./$650 Deposit • 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA Available Sept. 1, $900Mo./$900 Deposit • 14 Cutchin Ct. 3BR/2BA $650 mo/$650 Deposit. • 140 Duane St: 3BR/2BA $875 mo and $875 Security deposit. No smoking pets ok with owner approval and $250 pet fee. Available Oct. 1. Susan Jones, GRIRealtor 566-7584148 Longleaf 3BD/2BA home on 1.74 acres with screened in-ground pool. Spacious oor-plan with large screened in porch with hot tub, fenced in yard, relaxing rocking chair front porch and a peaceful yard... Price reduced to $140,000 Call for more details or to preview!! PRICE REDUCED Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on August 28, 2012 (COURTSEAL) BRENTX. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT By; /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintif f: Liana Hall, Esquire Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544 Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 at least 7 working days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 13 & 20, 2012 3524-28474 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5358-0913 TWN V. Tina Marie Quick Case No. 65-2011-CA-000221 Notice of Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF THE STATE OF 5359-0920 TWN vs. Barry, Joseph Case No. 11-355-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY CASE NO.: 11-355-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First 5360-0920 vs. Irwin, William Case No. 652009CA000445CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 652009CA000445CA BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONALASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM M. IRWIN; LISAD. IRWIN; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANTS(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 4th day of October, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lots 30 and 31, Block 53, of WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT V, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 56, of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 22nd day of August, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904)926-0905, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (SEAL) BY: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 5349-0913 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 005 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that GULF GROUPHOLDINGS AQUISITIONS & APPLICATIONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2418 Year of Issuance 2008 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-121-155-12084-D14 SHELLPOINTBEACH UNIT5 BLOCK D LOT14 OR 231 P594 OR 260 P828 Name in which assessed PIERRE LAWRENCE OLIVAREZ said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 3rd day of October, 2012, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 2nd day of August, 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida August 23, 30 and September 6, 13, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH C. BARRY, a/k/a JOSEPH C. BARRY, JR., BETTYG. BARRY, SUE ANN SMITH, CENTENNIALBANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, WAKULLABUSINESS CENTER PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, and UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on October 4, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Commence at the Southwest corner of Lot 81 (also being the Southeast corner of Lot 86) of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North 72 degrees 31 minutes 32 seconds East along the South boundary of said Lot 81 and along the centerline of survey of State Road No. 30 (US Highway No. 98) a distance of 1162.00 feet; thence run North 17 degrees 45 minutes West 1453.00 feet, thence run North 72 degrees 30 minutes East 445.00 feet, thence run North 22 degrees 15 minutes West 937.00 feet to an old concrete monument on the approximate edge of Swirl Swamp, thence run South 77 degrees 30 minutes West along said swamps edge 1047.38 feet, thence continue South 77 degrees 30 minutes West 52.62 feet, thence run North 47 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 238.96 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 47 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 407.40 feet, thence run North 36 degrees 34 minutes 31 seconds East 27.26 feet, thence run North 22 degrees 13 minutes 54 seconds East 60.87 feet, thence run North 24 degrees 01 minutes 40 seconds East 45.54 feet, thence run North 19 degrees 34 minutes 40 seconds East 38.59 feet, thence run North 43 degrees 30 minutes 59 seconds East 35.04 feet, thence run North 27 degrees 00 minutes 05 seconds East 36.64 feet, thence run North 18 degrees 09 minutes 28 seconds West 43.34 feet, thence run North 01 degrees 01 minutes 34 seconds East 41.65 feet, thence run North 53 degrees 19 minutes 03 seconds East 40.02 feet, thence run North 86 degrees 01 minutes 13 seconds East 54.31 feet, thence run North 49 degrees 11 minutes 17 seconds East 48.95 feet, thence run North 76 degrees 10 minutes 44 seconds East 32.77 feet, thence run South 62 degrees 21 minutes 32 seconds East 43.16 feet, thence run South 24 degrees 35 minutes 12 seconds East 78.88 feet, thence run South 14 degrees 17 minutes 20 seconds West 54.71 feet, thence run South 04 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds West 47.01 feet, thence run South 07 degrees 13 minutes 11 seconds East 59.89 feet, thence run South 18 degrees 10 minutes 20 seconds East 37.95 feet, thence run South 34 degrees 37 minutes 59 seconds East 29.50 feet, thence run South 02 degrees 40 minutes 21 seconds West 20.31 feet, thence run South 45 degrees 15 minutes 53 seconds East 29.53 feet, thence run South 32 degrees 59 minutes 42 seconds East 30.59 feet, thence run South 04 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds East 35.07 feet, thence run South 32 degrees 18 minutes 21 seconds West 36.93 feet, thence run South 25 degrees 00 minutes 20 seconds West 40.47 feet, thence run South 29 degrees 09 minutes 27 seconds West 51.83 feet, thence run South 07 degrees 17 minutes 07 seconds West 36.95 feet, thence run South 47 degrees 05 minutes 20 seconds West 25.89 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 44 minutes 43 seconds East 26.47 feet, thence run South 08 degrees 50 minutes 25 seconds West 31.15 feet, thence run South 47 degrees 41 minutes 59 seconds West 11.80 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any Person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. This Notice dated this 22nd day of August, 2012. Clerk, of Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk September 13 & 20, 2012 FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000221 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TINAMARIE QUICK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TINAMARIE QUICK; JODYQUICK; UNKNOWNSPOUSE OF JODYQUICK; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: Lot 27 and the East 1/2 of Lot 26, block 14 GREINERS ADDITION TO CRAWFORDVILLE, according tot he plat thereof,as recorded in Plat Book 1, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 at 11:00 oclock A.M., on September 27, 2012. DATED THIS 22nd DAYOF ,AUGUST, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 22nd day of August 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (SEAL) THIS INSTRUMENTPREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL33619-1328 ,Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis,Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225,Tallahassee, FL32303 850.577.4401at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Spetember 6 & 13, 2012 5358-0913 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 34 37 43 48 54 64 67 70 2 27 55 3 28 56 4 23 38 52 5 24 35 44 18 21 39 49 57 65 68 71 6 15 29 50 7 30 45 58 8 25 40 59 9 41 53 26 36 46 66 69 72 10 16 19 22 42 51 60 11 31 47 61 12 32 62 13 33 63 ACROSS 1. Stallone macho man 6. Baseball's Dizzy or Daffy 10. Guitarist Atkins 14. WWII sea menace 15. Choir voice 16. Blood: Prefix 17. Crayon color, up in smoke? 19. Came to rest 20. Editor's "let it be" 21. Golf's "Slammin' Sammy" 22. Doing nothing 23. Attendance fig., often 25. Communicate silently 27. Business attire, up in smoke? 34. Everyday article 35. MTV target viewer 36. Mediterranean nation 37. Leprechaun's land 39. Chefs' protectors 42. Figure skater Katarina 43. Thorny bunch 45. Ready to pluck 47. Churchillian gesture 48. Postal message, up in smoke? 52. Piece of cake? 53. Nutritional initials 54. Mock 57. Drive recklessly 60. Beatitudes heirs, with "the" 64. Height: Prefix 65. Biblical beast, up in smoke? 67. Utah's __ National Park 68. Emphatic type: Abbr. 69. __ nova 70. Original Stoic 71. Bront's Jane 72. Chekhov or BrucknerDOWN1. Chafes 2. Touch on 3. "Encore!" 4. Playful talk 5. Mel in Cooperstown 6. Rhett Butler's last word 7. Hamburg's river 8. "Relax, soldiers!" 9. From Scandinavia 10. Feller in t he woods 11. Committed a grid infraction 12. Jannings or Gilels 13. Mall bag 18. Have great respect for 24. Several reps, in the weight room 26. __ State (Idaho) 27. Severe spasm 28. Bank job 29. Architect I. M. 30. Emcee's task 31. Cooking oil source 32. Riverbank romper 33. Sharon of "Valley of the Dolls" 34. Guam, e.g.: Abbr. 38. Elementary particle 40. Habitual spasm 41. Rose family shrub 44. __ Lanka 46. Wrap up 49. Online novice 50. Hostilities ender 51. Plum variety 54. Brubeck's music 55. Nobelist Wiesel 56. School on the Thames 58. Controversial apple spray 59. Low-lying area 61. Sunrise direction 62. Sinclair competitor, once 63. Kublai __ 66. Dubya's deg. American Prole Hometown Content 9/9/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 2 3 45671 839 3 458 91 1392 8 14 58931 627 200 9 HometownContent 197 2846 3 5 435967218 628513794 372 451986 549628173 816739542 283 175469 754896321 961342857 R U B S T E R R J A Z Z A B U T T H R O E E L I E M O R E H E I S T E T O N B A N T E R N E U T R I N O O T T S E T S R I E S T E E M N E W B I E D A M N P E I T R E A T Y E L B E I N T R O A L A R A T E A S E T I C V A L E N O R D I C S P I R E A G E M E N D M B A C H A I N S A W D A M S O N H E L D O L I V E E A S T E M I L O T T E R E S S O T O T E T A T E K H A N L o o k i n g f o r Looking for t h e l a t e s t the latest L o c a l N e w s ? Local News? LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 – Page 11B 1. MOVIES: What was the name of Rockys boxing nemesis in RockyŽ? 2. MUSIC: Which 1980s rock band had a hit with the title RoxanneŽ? 3. HISTORY: Where did the Battle of Waterloo take place? 4. SCIENCE: What does a mycologist study? 5. TELEVISION: What was the name of the boyfriend in the GidgetŽ surfing series? 6. COMPUTERS: What does it mean when you get the message Error 404Ž on a computer? 7. LANGUAGE: What does the acronym radarŽ stand for? 8. LITERATURE: When was The Cat in the HatŽ first published? 9. TEAM SPORTS: How many members does a cricket team have? 10. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capital of Trinidad and Tobago? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Apollo Creed 2. The Police 3. Belgium 4. Fungi 5. Moondoggie 6. Webpage not found 7. Radio detecting and ranging 8. 1957 9. Eleven 10. Port of Spain YOUR AD HERE

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(ARA) Having guests over to your house doesnt necessarily mean you have to keep everyone contained inside. Open the doors of your home to your backyard to provide a relaxed ambiance for your guests. To prepare your backyard for such a gathering, make certain you have the following so guests will be comfortable the entire evening: € Seating: No matter if youre hosting a casual gathering, or something a bit more formal, guests will want to sit down to socialize. Make certain your patio, deck or grassy area has small groupings of chairs and benches within a short distance of food and drink tables, allowing guests to group together to share stories about friends and family. € Tables: Place small tables throughout the backyard on which guests can easily rest plates and drinks. You can rent counter-high small tables at a party rental store, or place traditionalheight tables near the gatherings of chairs to help make your guests more comfortable. During the evening, check the tables to pick up used plates and cups to keep the backyard looking refreshed. € Lighting: Having the proper lighting is crucial for providing the right ambiance and to keep your gathering going well after the sun goes down. Chase away the darkness with recessed, low voltage accent lighting from Deckorators in stairways, railings and pathways so guests can easily negotiate these walkways, and provide a soft glow over the gathering with illuminated balusters and post caps, allowing guests to see and interact with other guests. Instead of ” ooding your deck with unflattering, harsh incandescence, create a dramatic, show-stopping outdoor living area with subtle illumination that calls you to relax and enjoy your outdoor retreat long past sunset. € Music: Playing music during the gathering is always a nice element to a party, and can greatly enhance the theme. Consider installing speakers throughout your backyard to provide a surround-sound experience. But also be certain to check your community noise ordinances on nighttime volume restrictions, and let your neighbors know that you will follow those regulations so your party will be sure to end on a good note with them and the authorities. With these plans in place, your next gathering of family and friends will be a magical event, not just during the daylight hours, but well into the evening. Be prepared for encore requests after you successfully pull off an outdoor party encompassing your entire backyard. Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet Open up parties outdoorsSpecial to The NewsProvided it is not smothered in butter or oil-based flavorings, popcorn is a relatively healthy treat to enjoy. Dieters have long relied on plain popcorn to staunch hunger pangs. But recent research has also indicated that popcorn is much more than a ” uff snack; it is a heathy one as well. In March 2012, researchers from the University of Scranton reported to the American Chemical Society that popcorn may contain high levels of healthful antioxidants … levels that may be equal to or higher than some fruits and vegetables. Per unit weight, Professor Joseph Vinsons team found, popcorn contained more polyphenols than fruits like pears and apples, with most of the health bene“ ts packed into the hulls, not the ” uffy white part. Although this is not license to skip produce in lieu of popcorn, including undressed popcorn in your diet can provide needed “ ber and antioxidants. Want to learn more about popcorn facts? Test your knowledge with this quiz. Popcorn Quiz 1. What type of plain popcorn offers the fewest number of calories? a. microwave b. air-popped c. movie theater popcorn 2. How many calories are in a small order of unbuttered popcorn at the movies? a. 400 b. 650 c. 1,000 3. What causes corn kernels to turn into popcorn? a. magic b. salt c. water 4. About 3 or 4 cups of popcorn equals one serving of which food group? a. grain b. vegetable c. dairy 5. About how many kernels are in one cup of popped popcorn? a. 800 b. 1,000 c. 1,600 Answers: 1 b, 2 c, 3 c. 4 a, 5 c.Popcorn is a healthy treat At HealthSouth, we understand that recovering from a stroke can be challenging. But no matter where a patient is in his/her recovery process, or how long ago the stroke occurred, our Second Chance Stroke Program could help maximize functional ability, increase independence and improve quality of life. This includes areas of mobility, speech or written communication, swallowing, cognitive functions and activities of daily living. Our program oers: € Physical/occupational/speech therapy € Certi“ed rehabilitation nurses € Therapist trained in neuro developmental treatment € Patient/family education € Support groups Admission is by referral for a free in-home evaluation. For more information contact us. YOU DESERVE A SECOND CHANCE 2012:HealthSouth Corporation:551344 !!" 2012 Go to www.bigbendhospice.org to Sign-up Today! 11:30am Registration and Lunch 12:30pm Tee-o October 26, 2012Wildwood Country ClubSAVE THE DATE!For more information, call Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308Wakulla County Big Bend Hospice 2012 Coastal Cleanup 9 AM Arrive at the cleanup site of your choice Woolley Park Panacea (Headquarters) at the visitors center beach parking lot near the pavilion boat ramp9:00-10:30 Pick up litter 10:30 Place bags of trash at proper points and head to Woolley Park in Panacea 11:00 Meet at Woolley Park for complimentary lunch (hosted by Wal-Mart) and prize giveaways 2012 2012 Go to KWCB.org for pre-registration and more information. Call (850) 745-7111 or email us at helpkwcb.com Sponsored by: Keep Wakulla County Beautiful & the International CC Comfortable Clothing, Hat, Closed toed shoes (tennis shoes are best), Glovessite captains will have some extra cotton gloves, Sunscreen and insect repellant Please Recycle