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Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00425
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 09-06-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00425
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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netFormer county commissioner Howard Kessler is running for a seat on the county commission in district 3. He will face incumbent Mike Stewart in November. Kessler previously served two terms as commissioner in district 4 before losing the seat to Jerry Moore in 2010. He said he decided to run for county commissioner now, instead of waiting another two years, because of what he called an overburden of taxation on the citizens. The deciding factor was the implementation of several new taxes and increases in others in the last year, he said. Many in this county cant handle all the taxes that have been placed upon them, he said. This increasing tax burden is a very onerous and dif cult burden to carry, he added. And this doesnt just apply to those senior citizens on a xed income, but also to the families who are lucky if they still have one income in the household, he said. Everyone realizes that we need taxes to run the government, Kessler said. But the level of taxation must be affordable for the citizens. If elected to the commission, he said he would look at eliminating some of these taxes. The new taxes he is referring to include the Public Services Tax and solid waste assessment. Tax increases include the assessment for re protection and Communications Services Tax. Before these taxes, he said, people were struggling and sometimes having to make the choice between paying for food or medications. Kessler said he understands that the millage rate was lowered, but the increases in taxes far outweigh this reduction. He added that he would go after eliminating the Public Services Tax rst. The Public Services tax is a 7-percent tax on the purchase of electricity, metered or bottle gas, fuel oils and water. Its a tax on essentials, Kessler said. He added that this tax has a major effect on people who are struggling to make ends meet. In order to reduce the tax burden, Kessler said he would suggest the commission come together and set a list of priorities of services and then rank them. The health and safety of the citizens would come rst and would include law enforcement, re rescue and emergency medical services. After those top services, Kessler said the commission would rank the importance of each service and decide how much money is reasonable to fund these services. We certainly need to provide essentials, Kessler said. And we want to provide extras, but we may not be able to. Kessler said the commission would eventually get to a point when the money runs out and the county is not be able to provide all of the things they want and the community wants. But when the economy gets better and more revenue comes in, those things can be looked at again. He said would not look at eliminating any services, but would look at how departments are staffed. The board needs to make the hard decisions, he said. The commission needs to prioritize and become as ef cient as possible, he added. And once the priorities are set, the commission cant allow itself to deviate and must continue to follow the plan, he said. The county government must also be open and transparent, he said. Theres never too much information a citizen should have. The county government has come a long way in this area, but Kessler said it still has a long way to go. Continued on Page 3A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 34th Issue Thursday, September 6, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 CentsIn The Huddle A look at college football bowls in the Sunshine State k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Taking Care of Business ................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 3B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 6B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 10B Comics ...........................................................................Page 12BINDEX OBITUARIES Margaret Bartley Donley Austin Fleetwood Jack Carmel Phelps Sr. Larry J. Smith Vernell Tindel Weldon Mike Vowell Jr. Howard Kessler is running for county commission No to cave divingBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netTALLAHASSEE Fishermen in the audience had the look of vindication throughout the daylong trial here at the Leon County Courthouse. Comments and questions by Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford in a bench trial on Thursday, Aug. 30, showed that she at least understood the claim theyve made for years. Namely, that the goal of the 1994 constitutional amendment to limit net fishing the so-called net ban was to limit overfishing and waste of marine resources. It did that by outlawing gill nets. The biggest effect of the amendment was reducing the maximum size of nets from the thousands of yards of net that were used before the amendment to two 500 square foot pieces of net. Continued on Page 15AJudge Fulford hears net shing caseBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter nearly eight months of deliberating, the Florida Park Service has decided to maintain its 26 year-long decision to not allow technical recreational cave diving at Wakulla Springs. We believe this is the best decision, said Florida Park Service Director Donald Forgione. The park service met with experts on both sides of the issue and also received comments from the public. We feel very con dent that we talked and listened to everyone, Forgione said. The months of research, along with opinions from the experts and citizens, really con rmed that our decision in the past is a sound and good decision, he said. The park service, along with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, was approached by members of the Wakulla County Dive Club who pushed for the state to change its policy. The divers, who have called Wakulla Springs the crown jewel of Florida springs, contended that opening the facility to recreational cave diving would bring much needed revenue to the area. Those in opposition argue that the fact that Wakulla Springs is the crown jewel is the same reason recreational cave diving should be prohibited. They also pointed out concerns with the allowance, including interference with other activities, wildlife, ongoing research and artifacts. The state held a public hearing in January to obtain comments from the community. A crowd of about 250 people packed the livestock pavilion at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce and opinions were split nearly right down the middle. There was not an overwhelmingly favored side, Forgione said. Following that meeting, the park service decided to move forward and develop a draft plan of what the inclusion of recreational cave diving might look like. The plan was to address all the concerns expressed by those in opposition and propose a way to manage those situations. Another meeting was held in March with key stakeholders and experts from both sides of the issue. There were three major concerns that were addressed during the process. These included the safety of the visitors, protecting the artifacts and other cultural resources located within the caves and also protecting the natural environment, Forgione said. Wakulla Springs is unlike most springs in Florida, Forgione said. The spring is very deep and would only be accessible to a highly trained, highly certi ed diver. Through their research, Forgione said they determined only a small amount of the population of cave divers could even dive at Wakulla Springs. Its a very technical dive. Its very dangerous to dive there. He also pointed out the other three areas that allow cave diving, Emerald Sink, Cherokee Sink and Clear Cut Sink. Ron Piasecki, president of the Friends of the Wakulla Springs and the Wakulla Springs Alliance and Hydrogeology Consortium, both of which voiced their opposition to allowing recreational cave diving at Wakulla Springs, said his groups would be more than willing to work with the diving community to improve the facilities at these three sinks. Neither groups are against cave diving, but were against where the diving was going to take place, he said. Were happy with the way the decision came out, Piasecki said. Forgione added that while they know about some artifacts that are located within the springs, they do not know everything that is there. The bone room of Wakulla Springs is 13,500 years old, one of the oldest sites in the United States. The park service plans to allow research and scienti c diving to continue so they can discover even more. He called the springs an environmental classroom.Continued on Page 2A State rejects technical recreational diving at Wakulla SpringsPHOTO BY GUEA cave diver at the Wakulla Springs main vent in a research dive. The state park service decided not to allow recreational cave divers access to Wakulla Springs. We believe this is the best decision. Donald Forgione,director of Florida Park ServiceSPECIAL TO THE NEWSCounty commission candidate Howard Kessler. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford See Page 4B See Page 1BWar Eagles pound Mosley

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Staff report In response to the crisis surrounding the need to feed those in the community who are without, local churches have been working hard to collect and distribute donations of food to those in need. Many have established pantries to meet these needs. Non-perishables have been provided to these food pantries as a result of donations from families, individuals and youth in the community in coordination with the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. As an outreach of Operation Santa, volunteers in the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth (WCCY), have met multiple times with faith leaders to discuss strategies to provide assistance in addressing this crisis. The WCCY has decided to take a more active role in providing solutions. From creating awareness that has resulted in a signi cant increase in the volume of donated food at the Extension Of ce, to submitting a grant to a major corporation for much needed funds. Additionally, there have been generous donations made to a Wakulla Coalition fund dedicated to the provision of food. However, there is more to do and the following are a couple of opportunities to get involved. Currently there are two large fundraisers underway in Wakulla with the goal of raising more than $6,000 to buy food. Last year during Operation Santa, a mother donated a $400 mini-John Deere Tractor, 2 speed, with reverse and AM/FM radio the perfect size for a 3 to 5 year old. Operation Santa kept that expensive donation knowing there was a bigger purpose. This year, 300 raf e tickets have been printed and are now being sold for $5 each throughout the county. The winning ticket will be drawn on Saturday, Nov. 3, at 11a.m. in Hudson Park during the Empty Bowls event. Tickets will be available at The Wakulla News of ce or call 926-3526. The sale of these tickets will generate $1,500 for the purchase of food. The second fundraiser is called Empty Bowls Wakulla. This effort is being organized through the Healing Arts of Wakulla County (HAWC), a new organization operating under the umbrella of the WCCY in coordination with the Arts in Medicine program at UF Shands. Empty Bowls is an international grassroots effort to ght hunger. The basic premise is simple, people in the community make and paint bowls. Once all the bowls are painted, an event will be held inviting people in the community to purchase a bowl. Those who purchase a bowl will then be able to ll it with homemade soup prepared by Shelley Swenson, Madeleine Carr and Elma Gillette. They will also be served homemade breads and tea. Those who participate are then allowed to keep their bowl as a reminder of all the empty bowls in the world, and right here in Wakulla County. The money raised is used to buy food for the areas food pantries. HAWC is looking to raise $4,000 to $5,000 in additional funds for food through this fundraiser. Haydee Jackley of Ribits Ceramic Studio is the chair of the fundraiser. She is looking for individuals and groups to donate $10 per person in exchange for the painting of a soup bowl. It will be signed by the painter, red and used at the Empty Bowls event on Nov. 3 at Hudson Park from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Several businesses and churches have donated to the cause. One mother is hosting her daughters birthday party where children will paint and sign the bowls. A couple of civic organizations are hosting painting parties where members will pay the $10 per bowl fee, paint and sign their bowls. Several individuals have simply stopped into Ribits, donated $10 and painted and signed a bowl then and there. There is also help needed with the second part of this fundraiser, which will be selling tickets to the event. Tickets are $15 each. Those who purchase a ticket will be able to select a handpainted bowl out of 300. The bowl can then be lled with soup. There will also be a bake sale organized by Charlean Lanier, a silent auction of other donated art and a keepsake Wakulla Empty Bowls 2012 recipe card with the three soups prepared especially for the event. The event will also feature music and a performance of a play, Stone Soup by children in the community. There will also be a craft show, just in time for holiday gifts. If anyone is interested in being a craft or art vendor, call Haydee Jackley at (850) 567-4212, or email her at ribitsceramic@yahoo.com. Finally, as with all events like this, it takes lots of time and many volunteers. If anyone is interested in helping with tractor ticket sales, or bowl painting sales, or presales of tickets to the lunch event on Nov. 3, or nd it in their heart to donate, call (850) 926-3526 or (850) 567-4212. Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1AAlong with artifacts, there is also scientific equipment located in the springs. Divers with the Woodville Karst Plain Project have been working with scientists, local, state and federal agencies, as well as landowners and resource mangers for the last 20 years gathering data to understand the sources and pathways of the water feeding Wakulla Springs. Scientific studies are being performed on the water quality and quantity. The whole goal of the park service is to provide proper recreation while still protecting the natural and cultural resources and not deplete those resources, Forgione said. Its a delicate balance. Which Forgione said they maintain with this decision. Im greatly disappointed that half of the population that showed up at the meeting and the signi cant amount of money they would spend [cave diving at Wakulla Springs] is now being ignored, said Gregg Stanton, owner of Wakulla Diving Center and member of the Wakulla County Dive Club. Stanton added that he would continue to try and get access. I remain committed to the notion that the community deserves access to this facility, Stanton said. Although there is always the possibility of the issue being brought up again, Forgione said it would take something signi cant for the decision to be overturned.No to cave diving at Wakulla SpringsTwo fundraisers underway to buy food for local needy SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA mini John Deere tractor for a young child will be raf ed off to raise money for feeding the hungry. Tickets will be sold for $5 each, and the drawing will be held on Nov. 3 during the Empty Bowls event. SPECIAL PURCHASE39978-Gal. 3HP Wet/Dry Vac Includes accessories and onboard tool storage. 6' power cord. R 154 358 1 While supplies last. 5972-Pk. 8' x 10' TarpsIdeal for covering furniture and equipment. In blue or green/brown.P 154 255, 256 B10 SPECIAL PURCHASE! SPECIAL PURCHASE!797Project Select Paint Brush Set brushes. Use with all interior/exterior paints and stains. P 154 225 B6 SPECIAL PURCHASE!119720-Lb. 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Lumber & Supply Lumber & Supply Inc. Inc. 3361 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville 926-5559 Mon Fri 7am 6pm Sat 7:30am 5pm 9141 Woodville Hwy Woodville 421-5295 Mon Fri 6am 6pm Sat 6am 5pmBuy now and save! Complete fall projects & get ready for winter.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A He added that when citizens feel they have all the information and the reasons are explained, they are more willing to accept the decisions that are being made. When they feel things are being done behind closed doors, thats when they get upset, he said. Another issue he feels is important is having place for the youth of the county. He feels there is need for a community center because currently there is very little wholesome activities for the youth. He added that there are aspects of the current community center idea that concern him. Although he has no real position on whether an outside entity should manage the facility, he didnt want to see if competing with private businesses. He also wanted to see more than one bid to manage the community center. The Capital Area YMCA was the only group to bid on the project. He was also confused as to why the county did not pursue the idea of the Parks and Recreation Department running the facility. Other areas of importance are the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center. It is not run by the county, but the county supports it nancially and he felt that should continue. Another area he feels strongly about is preserving the countys natural resources, especially its water. Leon County and Tallahassee represent a large population that has contributed to significant impacts to Wakulla Countys environment and Wakulla Springs, Kessler said. Wakulla Springs is very important for us to preserve as best we can, he said. Not only does it provide a beautiful place to visit, but it provides a great economic bene t to our county. It is important to recognize the limits the spring has to keep it as pristine as possible, he said. And he added that the quality is important, as well as quantity. The county need to continue to take a leadership and prominent role in protecting the springs, Kessler said. He felt the current board has made some positive steps in preserving the countys natural resources, but has also taken some negative steps. While off the commission, he has been serving on the Wakulla Springs Alliance and the Hydrogeology Consortium and the FSU Coastal Marine Lab Board of Trustees. He added that the commission must take an active role and not rely on the state or federal government to do whats right for Wakulla County. Kessler is also in support of the Capital City to Sea Loop bicycle and pedestrian trail, which would go from Tallahassee to parts of Wakulla and Franklin counties and then back to Tallahassee. This project would allow the county to protect and preserve its natural resources and still utilize them, he said. It would attract people to the area and in turn generate revenue for the county and create jobs and a wholesome activity for people, he added. Kessler said if citizens watched his activity on the commission before, he hopes they would have seen someone that cared about the people of the county and someone who resisted overspending, voting against seven of the eight budgets. He added that he gives citizens a voice, realizes how precious their tax dollars are and will be readily accessible to them. When a person votes for me, they will know that they have a commissioner who cares about Wakulla County, its natural resources and its citizens, Kessler said. Kessler moved to Wakulla County in 1999 from Sarasota to retire. He is originally from Freeport, N.Y. on Long Island. He is a board certi- ed orthopedic surgeon and volunteers at two clinics in Tallahassee. He has known his wife, Anne, who he calls the backbone of his campaign, for 15 years. He is involved with the Friends of the Library, Iris Garden Club, Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society, Capital Medical Society and is on the board of FSUs School of Theatre Patrons Association. For more information or to reach Kessler, visit www. howardkessler.com, email howard@howardkessler. com or call 228-9641.Howard Kessler running for county commission Fran Councill retires with partyFire Chief Mike Morgan presents a plaque to EMS Director Fran Councill at her retirement party. Fran Councill with EMS crews at her party. A cake in the shape of an ambulance.Staff ReportEMS Director Fran Councill was feted with a retirement party on Friday, Aug. 31, to mark her service to the county. County employees, elected of cials and members of the community stopped by the event, held in the commission chambers, to wish Councill well. Councill was longtime EMS director for Wakulla County and began her career as a volunteer when the countys ambulance service was in its beginning stages.Staff ReportResidents of Wakulla Gardens can share their vision about the future of the neighborhood at two community meetings to gather input. The American Planning Associations Community Planning Assistance Team will be available to listen to input on Saturday, Sept. 8, from 4 to 6 p.m. and on Sunday, Sept. 9, from 3 to 5 p.m. Both meetings will be held at Pioneer Baptist Church, located at the corner of Spring Creek Highway and Beechwood Drive. The team will then present their recommendations to the Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday, Sept. 11 at 5 p.m in the commission chambers. On Dec. 13, the Board submitted an application to the American Planning Associations Community Planning Assistance Team (APA-CPAT) program titled Wakulla Gardens: Retro t Challenge. On March 5, the Board accepted the award for technical assistance for Wakulla Gardens. Over May 21-22, the CPAT team leader and APA project manager made an initial visit to Wakulla County and Wakulla Gardens. After the initial visit, the remaining CPAT team members were selected. The team includes: Stephanie Monroe Tillerson, AICP, city manager, City of Woodruff, S.C. Darren J. Asper, PP, AICP, senior vice president, Community & Economic Development, Delta Development Group, Inc., from Mechanicsburg, Penn. David Berg, AICP, senior environmental analyst, Cameron Engineering, from Huntington, N.Y. Douglas Martin, AICP, deputy city administrator, City of McHenry, Ill. Thomas Bassett, senior program associate, American Planning Association, Washington, D.C. The full team arrives in Tallahassee on Friday, Sept. 7. The visit will conclude with a presentation of the teams recommendations to the county commission, administrative staff and the public at 5 p.m. on the evening of Tuesday, Sept. 11. A written report will follow.Community meeting scheduled for input on Wakulla Gardens SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be holding two public hearings on Ordinance 2012-02.An Ordinance of the City of Sopchoppy adopting the operating budgets for the City of Sopchoppy for the 2012-2013 scal year. The rst public hearing, followed by the rst reading of Ordinance 2012-02, will be held Tuesday, August 30 2012 at a special called meeting of the Council. The second public hearing on the budget and adoption of Ordinance, 2012-02 will be September 10, 2012 during the regular monthly meeting of the City Council. Both meetings will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, Florida. A copy of the Budget may be viewed at City Hall from 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Thursday and from 8:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Friday. If special assistance is needed to attend this meeting, please call the Clerks ofce at 962-4611 at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting.PUBLIC MEETINGS TO ADOPT THE BUDGET OF THE CITY OF SOPCHOPPYAUGUST 23, 30, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on September 12, 2012, at 5:30pm SEPTEMBER 6, 2012

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:Coast Guard Auxiliary for Sept. 6 Questions raised about forum Longtime EMS Director Fran Councill is retiring Former lieutenant files notice to sue WCSO County sets new park and recreational fees Louis Andrew Louie Sutton Sr. obituary Emergency Management is monitoring Tropical Storm Isaac Isaac turns west thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. John Shu will make a good commissioner Howard Kessler is dedicated to community Wild owers add to value of public land In Wakulla, its who you know Goodbye message from Joanna Johnson Endorsing Langston for sheri Ralph omas advocates for lower taxesEditor, The News:It is with high privilege that I endorse the candidacy of Major Maurice Langston for the of ce of sheriff in Wakulla County. I am privileged to have known Major Langston for many years and I can personally attest to his outstanding personal character, integrity, professional experience and professional quali cations that are so vital to the of ce of sheriff. Major Langstons professional demeanor and his friendship throughout my long career in State law enforcement, sustained, encouraged and assisted me in the understanding of local law enforcement needs and requirements. I always knew that I was welcome to call on him at any time. The past decade has brought about unprecedented challenges to law enforcement. The challenges are certainly expected to increase in the next decade and beyond. Some of the challenges include unprecedented funding (budgeting) issues, recruiting and retaining quali ed law enforcement personnel, acquiring and utilizing advanced technology, bringing focus and action to old and new crime trends, managing pre-trial, post-trial and transit jail operations, and a host of other 21st Century law enforcement issues. The challenges require a high level of professional knowledge, skills and abilities in order to ensure citizens safety and cost ef cient law enforcement operations. Major Maurice Langstons education, training, and experience meets and exceeds the quali cations necessary to meet the current and future challenges for the 21st Century policing management. The citizens of Wakulla County and the law enforcement profession will be well served with the election of Major Maurice Langston to the of ce of sheriff in Wakulla County. Lt. Col. (Ret) Billy Dickson Florida Highway Patrol (Retired)Editor, The News: I rst met Dr. Howard Kessler in 2001 at the old health department under Dr. Keen. He was volunteering as an orthopedic surgeon. After retiring, he moved here and began doing community service. He still volunteers as a doctor in the Big Bend area. Due to his love for Wakulla, he entered politics and ran for commissioner. He believed that he could make good decisions for the betterment of Wakulla County. I am writing to express my support for Dr. Kessler as commissioner. He has always been there for the county asking the hard questions. By asking these questions, he got into trouble more than once for his honesty. We need people in government who are there for the good of all. Dr. Kessler was in his of ce every day to help citizens. Other commissioners only go to their of ce on occasion. Dr. Kessler returns all phone calls and emails. He will come to your home if asked. I like the fact that he made a full time job out of the position, yet continues to serve the community in many other areas, such as Friends of Wakulla Springs and Concerned Citizens of Wakulla. The citizens of this county need him. He does not favor any one group. He treats everyone the same. I appreciate his volunteer work at the free childrens clinics and for school physicals. He shows up at all county functions and is always involved in some way. Please get behind him and get out to vote for him. Kathryn Wilson Crawfordville Editor, The News: The world economy is struggling as is the American economy. Floridas economy is struggling with falling property prices and high unemployment. Even California, once the prime example of the American dream, is in serious trouble. Why should I be surprised that Wakulla County is saddling itself with future spending and promises that cannot and should not be ful lled? Our commissioners seem to be living in a world of economic fantasy. Wakulla County continues toward nancial ruin. The math being used by our commissioners just doesnt add up. If California, a state with huge pro ts from almost every sector of the economy, ranging from agriculture to movie production, cannot support its runaway government spending, who believes Wakulla County with practically no manufacturing can afford new spending. Like liberal California and liberal thinking out of Washington, our politicians have corrected our budgets with new taxes. Now they resume the spending. They hope we believe them when they say, Hey voter, vote for me, I love children! See, I voted for a community center. How are we going to operate or maintain it? Who knows, but dont worry. We will nd the funds somewhere. We will raise taxes again. Parents (and kids) may lose their home but kids will have a place to play after school. How about this one. Hey voter, vote for me, I voted to expand the Wakulla County Airport. What, you dont fly or own an airplane? Dont complain, we will do something for you sometime in the future. Plus, we are getting a grant and an airport is an economic engine. This is great! Free money (your money). Just ask Washington, D.C. about Amtrak; or California about economic stimulus spending, or even Tallahassee about their municipal airport. Anyway, governments raise taxes to maintain these things and so will we. Okay, one more. Hey voter, vote for me. I just voted to accept a private road and agreed to bring it up to county standards and begin maintaining it. We dont care that this action is a precedent unseen and resisted in the past. The current owners of property on this road paid less for their property due to the poorly maintained road while most citizens paid more for their home if the road was well maintained. Why not do this? We will pass the cost to all the other land-owners in the county. Eighteen months ago Wakulla County was facing a state takeover due to nancial mismanagement. The sitting commissioners solution? Raise property tax rates and implement new taxes to close the gap. Then increase spending on things like an airport, community center and public services. The airport will support a very small number of private pilots who can afford airplanes and might help a few businesses sell a seafood platter or two. It will not pay for itself. County workers were red in the last couple of years and now the commissioners commit to a community center that will require several new employees and will not pay for itself. A precedent was made to accept private roads for county maintenance but they wont x Wakulla Gardens roads. I wonder why commissioners agreed to maintain this private road with taxpayers dollars and then told the folks in Wakulla Gardens they would have to pay more fees if they wanted to improve their already county-owned roads. There are hundreds of miles of privately maintained roads in the county including the road I live on. I cant wait for county dump trucks to begin hauling dirt to fix my road (sarcasm intended). Much like Washington, D.C. math Solyndra, solar, stimulus, so-called TARP the math being used in Wakulla County wont work either. Commissioners, quit pandering for votes. Hold people responsible for their own decisions, quit expanding the scope of government, and lower our taxes. Citizens, vote for Ralph Thomas who has a history of advocating for lower taxes and responsible government. Ed Brimner CrawfordvilleREADERS WRITE:Editor, The News: For those of you who know me, you will know that I usually speak my mind, and I want to do just that about one of our local candidates running for county commission, District 5, John Shuff. I first met John a few years ago while volunteering with his wife Petra at CHAT [Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment]. When Petra was CHAT president I spent a lot of time at their house. During that time, and up to now, I have had the pleasure of engaging in lots of lively political discussions with John. Now, while I dont agree with anyone on everything, especially when it comes to politics, I like talking to intelligent people. John makes a lot of sense when discussing local issues, is well informed, and argues his points well. He has business experience from running his own company locally for more than 30 years, and has recently retired. He has been actively involved in local politics and issues, and has served on several commission appointed committees over the last few years. John was active in applying for the historical grants that renovated and preserved our historic courthouse, hiring local craftsmen whenever possible to do the work, and managed the project himself when other contractors came in over budget. I know John to be a thrifty person who does not waste money. I know John will be dedicated to the job, has plenty of time to research the issues, and will vote in our best interests. This is the kind of person I want to see as our county commissioner. Join me in voting for John Shuff for County Commission District 5. Heide Clifton Crawfordville Editor, The News: Beautiful! Wonderful! Wakulla wild owers! Residents and community leaders are discovering what visitors and tourists have always found. Wakulla County is one of the best places to experience and enjoy the diversity and beauty of Florida native wild owers. Few places on earth have as many colorful species.... blooming seasonally all year long. Here, in this Eden, is one of the richest places to live, work, and play. Les Harrisons article (Wild owers provide benefits besides spectacular scenery, Aug. 30) describes many of the economic and ecologic bene ts yielded by these precious natural and cultural resources. Enlightened residents and business and government leaders in Wakulla County do not underestimate the value, or the impact of decisions about the care and management of their private and public land. Five hundred years ago in the spring of 1513, Juan Ponce de Leon arrived here from Spain. His rst impression inspired the name, La Florida, Land of Flowers. Commemorate this historic legacy by learning and teaching the names and nature of Wakullas most common wild owers; our long time neighbors. Pictures and helpful information can be found on the free Eastern Panhandle Wild ower Map and Field Guide. You can pick up a copy from Les at the Extension Of ce or the Wakulla County Public Library. Additional information and additional copies can be found at www. awild owers.org, the encyclopedic website of the Florida Wild ower Foundation. Jeff Caster Tallahassee Editor, The News: I read with interest the article, Former Lieutenant les notice to sue WCSO in the Aug. 30 edition of The Wakulla News. As a retired social worker with Floridas child welfare agency, I was interested in what happened to cause Mr. Ganey to le such a notice. In recent TV news segments, allegations of child abuse had been mentioned. In reading through the article I could see the position of both sides in this potential litigation and certainly I wondered like many others, what really happened there. I was sympathetic to Mr. Ganeys pleas and I admire his fortitude in having the courage to le an intent to sue the WCSO. I can also see where Mr. Ganey could harbor animosity due to the incident, But, it was not until I read the very last sentence of the article that this situation became much more clear to me. In Wakulla County, it is all about who you know, who you grew up with or who you are related to. What a shame for such a beautiful place. Sincerely, Susan Sentman Crawfordville Editor, The News: As of Sept. 15, I will no longer be providing services to Wakulla County and the surrounding counties. I am relocating to Longview, Texas, to pursue a new employment opportunity as the director of a dual diagnosed Native American program with Oglethorpe Inc. Avalon Treatment Centers will be continuing to service Wakulla and the surrounding counties under the leadership of Dr. Jerry Burghout. I hope you continue to use Avalon, which will continue to use my manual, Stepping on the Stones, and providing the excellent services we have been known for. I would like to take this time to thank all of my referral sources and those who have supported my time with Avalon Treatment Centers. I would especially like to thank the honorable judges Walker, Sauls, Fulford and Dodson. Your hard work and dedication to your positions and support of treatment should be commended. Also, the wonderful women at Wakulla County Probation for their dedication, support and hard work, the brilliant minds in the of ces of the state attorney and public defender and the expertise and professionalism of state probation. In addition, I would like to thank all of the amazing private attorneys that have sent clients in need of treatment and supported them and this program throughout the process. Finally, I would like to thank all the families who gave me their trust and allowed me to work with their loved ones, it was a sheer pleasure. Joanna Johnson Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 5Areaders speak out More OpinionsEditor, The News: First, Id like to thank everyone who attended the League of Women Voters of Wakulla forum, Thursday night Aug. 23. It is refreshing to see so many citizens eager to meet and hear the candidates views on the issues of our community. The Leagues role is to in uence public policy by advocacy and education of the citizens in the voting and election process hence the forum. The community had the opportunity to submit questions. At the forum, the League provided sheets of paper for the citizens to write down their question on the back. The front page clearly stated: Questions may not be addressed to an individual candidate, 2. Questions submitted will be reviewed by the forum committee for appropriateness, and 3. The forum committee does not guarantee that all question will be used. This same format was used by the League in the 2010 election cycle and no criticism was received. The League of Women Voters anticipated a different audience for our forum hence the questions were repeated and pertinent to the position of superintendent of schools. The questions asked were about the educational background and quali cations of the candidates, the schools curriculum, the role of charter schools, relationship of the community with the school system, etc, and these questions would be pertinent in any forum. The League of Women Voters is open to all citizens (men included). The League has had other public informational meetings in the last few years over many issues including the history of LWV, elections issues with the supervisor of elections and the HBO movie Hacking Democracy, as well as a Sunshine Law-Public Records presentation by First Amendment Foundation President Barbara Petersen, to name a few. Should I be saying shame on you to Ms. Savary for not getting involved in politics, by providing information to citizens through forums? But I wont say that! I have chosen to be a part of an organization that has a history of openness, transparency and education to the voters. The League of Women Voters of Wakulla is sponsoring two additional forums: on Sept. 27 for county commission candidates in the District 1, 3 and 5 races, and Oct. 18 for candidates of Wakulla County sheriffs race. Both forums will be held at the Wakulla County Public Library. Come meet the candidates hear their views on Wakulla issues and Vote in November! Mary Cortese LWV Wakulla Editor, The News: After the uproar about the League of Women Voters forum in last weeks paper, I would like to address Ms. Donna Savarys concerns about the organization. First, let me say that the public was given the opportunity to ask questions of the candidates through advertising in The Wakulla News and at the forum itself. The instructions for those questions included the following: Questions may not be addressed to an individual candidate. All questions submitted will be reviewed by the forum committee for appropriateness. Here were actual questions submitted to the League. Have you ever been arrested or have a criminal record? and How have you addressed the learning needs of low socio-economic students and what was the outcome? My question to Ms. Savary and the public at large is this: Which is a more appropriate question to be asked in a public forum for school superintendent? It was the Leagues stance that the second question was more appropriate for a public forum. Both candidates had experience with the issue and it was felt that the audience would bene t from hearing responses. My personal opinion is that the citizens who are interested in gossip and innuendo can nd out the answer to the rst question on their own simply by sitting down at their computer. There are numerous websites with that information. Ms. Mary Corteses position was that all questions that hint at improprieties must be veri ed and substantiated before being presented in a public forum. Because she did not have the time during the forum to substantiate the claims, she did not ask the question and was personally attacked at the forum for standing her ground. I applaud her for standing up to the bullies present at the forum. The League of Women Voters (Wakulla Members at Large) would welcome Ms. Savary and any other interested citizens to join the group especially if she would like to volunteer her time with screening questions or all the other work involved with hosting forums. Most of the members of the Wakulla group are working women, some with children at home and some like me working, with children at home and commuting and we would welcome the extra help as we present pertinent information on all sides of an issue to our fellow citizens. If Ms. Savary is involved in another civic organization or group, I strongly encourage her organization to host their own forum and we would be delighted to attend. Ms. Savary also inquired about the League endorsing candidates. The League does not endorse candidates, but they can hardly impose on the free speech rights of their members who are not in leadership positions. Gail Hickman is a member but not in a leadership position; hence she may endorse whomever she so chooses. While we are speaking about free speech rights, I would like to address the personal attacks on Mary Cortese and Hugh Taylor. They have done more to defend the free speech rights of citizens than any two people I know. Ms. Cortese felt that there was a civic void in presenting both sides of every issue in Wakulla County. Rather than complaining and moaning about the dearth of available public outlets to disseminate both sides of an issue, she did something positive by joining the League. As for Mr. Taylor, few know that he is a member of the First Amendments Foundations Sunshine Brigade an honor bestowed on less than 50 people in a state with more than 18 million citizens. Mr. Taylor could spend his days enjoying his retirement and taking care of his health issues but he has chosen to involve himself because of his great love and concern for Wakulla County, her resources and her people. And that includes protecting Ms. Savarys right to speak her mind in this paper. Sincerely,Anne Woodward AhrendtCrawfordvilleAppropriateness of questions considered League welcomes volunteers Teacher evaluations must changeEditor, The News: On Aug. 22, in a rule challenge brought by the Florida Education Association, Judge John G. Van Laningham invalidated the Florida Department of Education rule on teacher evaluations. This rule incorporated numerous requirements into the evaluation process, including a complex mathematical formula. The formula would be used to calculate the effect of FCAT scores on teacher evaluations. Judge Van Laninghams decision gives our state education leaders an opportunity to get this rule right. Parents and teachers were already concerned about past DOE errors. In fact, the FEA legal challenge uncovered more problems in the states approach to implementing reform. Our students cant afford to lose any more time waiting for the Governor and state policymakers to gure out their best approach to teaching and learning, and teachers need an accountability system that is valid, fair and easy to understand. Please take a moment to contact Gov. Scott. Tell him that no teacher is afraid of accountability, and that we want to improve educational outcomes with a proven system of evaluation that works for students, teachers and parents. Tell him that we need the state to be fully transparent and openly accountable for the system it implements. You can email the Governor at www.flgov.com/ contact-gov-scott/email-thegovernor/ or write to him at Governor Rick Scott, State of Florida, The Capitol, 400 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001. My sincere thanks for contacting Gov. Scott. Please know that the FEA is working to restore sensible education reform and to place teaching and learning on a more reasonable path. Missy Rudd President WCTA the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringBob DonawayJuly 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromMy wife and I have been entering in the Off the Eatin Path since the program rst began. She has won once and now I am a winner too! Thank You! 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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Church BriefsMy humble efforts to stimulate the economy OUT TO PASTORREV. JAMES L. SNYDER All we hear these days are complaining about the economy and nobody seems to be doing anything about it. Politicians talk about it all the time and yet do nothing creative in the area of improving our economy. If you could put all the political speeches end to end, there would positively be no end to it. What we need to stimulate our economy is some kind of stimulation that does not come from the government. They stimulate me, all right, but not in the right way. This is where I step in. I assure you I am not running for any of ce. If the truth were known, I am running away from every of ce I can think of, especially my church of ce. I have no political agenda or aspirations; I am just a plain ordinary American citizen. I understand such creatures are an endangered species in todays economy. I am proud to be just a plain ordinary American. I am not middle-class, lower-class and certainly not high class. In fact, I have no class at all, and I am glad to leave it like that. I couldnt pass the test anyway. But I am doing my part in stimulating the economy. The secret plan I have can be boiled down to one word: vacation. This past week I have bravely gone where I have not been for a long time and that is on vacation. There is nothing like a vacation to stimulate many things, including the economy. It takes me a whole year to scrimp and save so the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I can go on a vacation. But in the end, it is well worth it. After a weeklong vacation, I am highly stimulated to return home where I can recuperate from all that stimulation. My wallet is still vibrating. I must confess that the primary stimulation in a vacation has to do with my credit card. If the government does not have enough money in its coffers to balance the budget, it is not because I have not done my part. Every time I turned around there was a tax on something. The conspiracy, as I found it, focuses in on the airlines. I know this may sound like a far-fetched idea but I can only give my observation. The airlines are in a conspiracy with the United States government to take as much money from me as they possibly can. Not that I have a lot of money, I just would like to keep as much of it as possible for those occasions when I would like to take my wife out to a restaurant and just have a relaxing evening. That takes money. It began with checking in our luggage. Two bags for me and two bags for my wife equals too much luggage. We put our luggage on the conveyor belt and then were informed by the check-in clerk that each bag cost an extra $50. She swiped my credit card and even though I am not a mathematical wizard, I believe it was in the neighborhood of $200. I do not like that neighborhood. Later on, I sat down to gure it out and discovered it would be far cheaper not to take any luggage and then when arriving at my destination buy a new set of clothes. My entire wardrobe does not equal $100. Of course, on my wifes side of the closet it is a different story. We got our boarding pass and then the young woman behind the counter looked at me and asked a strange question. Sir, how tall are you? It has been a long time since anybody asked me that kind of a question. Why she wanted to know how tall I was could not be found in the corridors of my empty mind. I then informed her that I was 6. I see, she said as she stared at her computer screen. Then she explained. The average height of a male passenger on our plane is 51. You exceed that limit by 4 inches. I looked at my wife and we both shared a wonderful laugh. Then I look back at her behind the counter, but she was not laughing. There will be an extra charge for your exceeding our height limit. Lets see, she said as she studied the computer screen, thats 4 inches times $15 per inch which equals $60. She then swiped my credit card, again, and charged it with the $60 extra fee. That was just the beginning of the swiping by the airlines. By the time our vacation was over, I was totally swiped out. When I got home I meditated a little bit on what Jesus said, Render therefore unto Caesar the things which be Caesars, and unto God the things which be Gods (Luke 20:25 KJV). I really do not mind rendering to Caesar but I just wish he wasnt so greedy.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. Sopchoppy UMC to offer new childrens ministry The Sopchoppy United Methodist Church is excited to announce the introduction of a new childrens adventure ministry to Wakulla County, Johnny Rogers. The Johnny Rogers Program is a Biblically based ministry which introduces children grade to the principles of the Christian faith and how to put that faith into action. This program celebrates the diversity of the body, and embraces the unique and vivid ways in which God inspires His people to worship Him. It uses videos, games and group participation to spark a childs imagination and bring them into a closer relationship with the Father. The Johnny Rogers Program will begin Sunday, Sept. 9 and is open to all children from kindergarten through 5th grade. Registration begins at 4:45 p.m. and activities run from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. A light dinner will be served. Parents are welcome to participate in our evening alternative service from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sopchoppy United Methodist Church is located 10 Faith Avenue downtown Sopchoppy. For more information call us at 962-2511 or visit the churchs website at http://sopchoppyumc.org. Prophetic Word Gospel Explosion set in Carrabelle Anointed Word Ministries of Carrabelle presents Prophetic Word Gospel Explosion hosted by Bishop C.M. Lockhart of Hattiesburg, Miss., and Carrabelle, the founder of Anointed Word Ministries, appearing Sept. 4 through Sept. 7 at 7 p.m. nightly. The church is located at 804 West Hwy. 98 in Carrabelle. Guest speakers from Hattiesburg, Magee, Miss., and Columbia, Miss., will be delivering the word of God. Come with expectancy in your heart strongholds will be broken, hearts will be mended, sinners will be saved. Pastor anniversary to be held at Rocky Mount Church Rocky Mount Church of Christ in Crawfordville will be having a pre-program for their Pastors Anniversary on Wednesday, Sept. 5, at 7:30 p.m. Elder Fredrick Bell and Thessalonia Missionary Baptist Church of Crawfordville will render service. Everyone is invited to attend. Upcoming events at Wakulla United Methodist Church Wakulla United Methodist Church in Wakulla Station will hold the following events this week: Chancel Choir Practice will be held Monday, Sept. 10, at 4:30 p.m. Praise Team Practice will be held Tuesday, Sept. 11, at 6 p.m. Mens Bible Study will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 12, at 6 a.m. Breakfast following at 8 a.m. at Savannahs. Quilting group meets Thursday, Sept. 13 at 9 a.m. The church is located at1584 Old Woodville Road in Wakulla Station. Call (850) 421-5741 for information. All are welcome. Chaires UMC to host craft show-baked goods sale Craft show baked goods cook out, sponsored by the United Methodist Women of Chaires, will be held at Chaires UMC on Saturday, Sept. 8, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Vendors are welcome. The church is located at 9243 Parkhill Road in Tallahassee. For more information, call (850) 2199361.Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce will host the 11th Annual Sept. 11 Memorial Service at the WCSO parking area on the anniversary of the terrorist attack. The event will be held at 15 Oak Street in Crawfordville and the public is invited to attend. The ceremony will begin at 8:45 a.m., the time of the rst terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. Sheriff Donnie Crum invites everyone to come to the parking lot a little early. Refreshments will be served.Sept. 11 memorial is planned

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Special to The NewsFor the rst time, a new poll shows more Americans strongly support same-sex marriage than strongly oppose it, a nding that could be attributed to changes occurring within organized religions, says a Presbyterian elder and lay preacher. For 2,000 years, religion has been the genesis of antipathy toward homosexuals, but now, three major American denominations have approved ordination of openly gay clergy, says Paul Hartman, a retired PBS/NPR station executive and author of The Kairos (www.CarpeKairos.com), a novel. Gay has become the civil rights issue of the 21st century, he says. The May survey of more than 1,000 adults found a dramatic reversal from earlier surveys: more adults now strongly support same-sex marriage rights (39 percent) than strongly oppose them (32 percent). Overall, Langer Research Associates says, 53 percent of Americans believe samesex marriages should be legalized up from only 36 percent just six years ago. Episcopalian, Lutheran and Presbyterian denominations have overturned centuries of tradition in welcoming openly gay clergy, Hartman says. Theres a growing realization that religion can and should help lead us all toward a more mature understanding and acceptance of minority sexual orientations. In 2012, he says, there is a new human rights landscape in the United States. He cites these additional recent developments: The U.S. military joined 43 other countries when it repealed Dont ask, dont tell and allowed openlygay service members. Same-sex marriages are now legal in six states and the District of Columbia. Three other states -Washington, Maryland and California -have same-sex marriage under active consideration. Eleven more offer civil union-type status for same-sex couples. A federal appeals court in Boston recently struck down the Defense of Marriage Act (which defines marriage as one man, one woman), making consideration by the U.S. Supreme Court almost certain. Dr. Robert Spitzer, one of the last nationallyrespected scholars whose studies lent credence to gay reparative therapies, recently offered a retraction and apology to the gay community. Unfortunately, the occasionally hateful crowd still resonates with a very small group of people, including those headed by preacher Fred Phelps and congregants, who continue to make news as they picket the funerals of soldiers and celebrities, Hartman says. Western cultures condemnation of same-sex love appears to have originated from Judeo-Christian scriptures, but contemporary biblical scholarship amends old interpretations, he says. Hartman is a retired PBS/ NPR station executive with a passion for biblical history. He is a Presbyterian elder, a lay preacher and a Dead Sea Scrolls a cionado. Hartman, a father and grandfather, confesses he is a lifelong fear- ghter. Jack Carmel Phelps Sr., 82, passed away Monday, Sept. 3, in Tallahassee. He is survived by his wife of 39 years, Glenda McAllister Phelps. He was born in Abingdon, Va., and had lived in this area for 39 years. He attended Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church and was an avid sherman. He was a sales manager in the lumber industry. He served in the United States Navy. Memorial services will be held Friday, Sept. 7, at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church at 11 a.m. A memorial gathering will be held prior to the service from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the church.In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church, 117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy FL 32358. In addition to his wife, he is survived by three sons and their families, Jackie Phelps (wife Eva) and Josh and Shawn Phelps, Abingdon, Va.; Douglas Blackman (wife Teri) and Evan Blackman, Jacksonville; David Blackman (companion Linda) and Kristie Blackman, White Springs; brother-in-law, Shelton (Sonny) McAllister (companion Shellee) of Tallahassee; and many special cousins; a best friend, Jay Harrell; his special poodle, Pierre; and his many friends in Sopchoppy. He was predeceased by his rst wife, Ruby Luchini Phelps; and best friend, Bully Edwards. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville, is assisting with arrangements (850-926-3333) or www.bevisfh.com. Vernell Tindel, 88, of Graceville died Sunday, Sept. 2, at Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan, Ala., from heart and kidney complications. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 5, at the Graceville First Baptist Church with the Revs. Joe Wood and Tim Folds of ciating. Burial followed in Marvin Chapel Cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family will receive friends at the church on Wednesday at 1 p.m. until time of service. She was born in Madrid, Ala., on July 25, 1924, to the late Warren Franklin Davis and Winnie Lee Naramore Davis. On Jan. 10, 1940, she married the love of her life, Melton Tindel. An active member of the Graceville First Baptist Church, sheretired from Graceville Elementary School following 16 years as a para-professional. Survivors include her children, Cecil & Kaye Tindel of Sarasota; Jenny and Jim Brock of Crawfordville, Joyce and Gharrett Driskell, and Janice & Vic Peel all of Dothan, Ala.; six grandchildren, David and Karin Williams, Scott, Justin, Demoy, Sophia Tindel; two great-grandchildren, Bode and Ever Williams; and many beloved nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her parents; her husband; and grandson, Jay Brock. Expressions of sympathy can be made at http://www.jamesandlipford.com. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 7AObituaries Margaret Bartley Donley Austin Fleetwood Jack Carmel Phelps Sr. Larry J. Smith Vernell Tindel Weldon Mike Vowell Jr.Margaret Bartley Donley, 78, of Tallahassee, died on Aug. 29. She was retired from the Leon County School Transportation Department. She was a member of the Four Square Full Gospel Church. The visitation was held Saturday, Sept. 1, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. The service immediately followed in the Chapel at 1 p.m. The celebrant was Mrs. Sue Ella Donley. Internment followed the service at Woodville Cemetery. Survivors include her husband of 60 years, Edward Cooper Donley Sr.; her childrenn, Edward Cooper Donley Jr. (Sue), Susan Donley Huhn (David), Harvey, Chris Bennett Donley; 12 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. In loving memory of Valerie Diane Donley. The family wishes to extend a special thanks to Big Bend Hospice. Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee (850-385-2193 www.bevisfh.com) is assisting the Donley family. Austin Fleetwood, 17, went to be with the Lord on Monday, Sept. 3, in Crawfordville, where he was born and raised. Austin touched many lives with his optimism and contagious smiles during his illness. Team Fleetwood was based on Faith, Hope, Strength. His passion was Hockey, FSU Football and Baseball. His love was his family and friends. He was a member of Wakulla Springs Baptist Church. Services will be Saturday, Sept. 8, at Wakulla Springs Baptist Church, 1391 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville FL. Visitation will be from 10 a.m. to noon with funeral services following at noon. The family requests NO owers. Austin would want to give back to the places that helped him and his family: Hospice; Ronald McDonald House Charities of Jacksonville Inc., 824 Childrens Way, Jacksonville FL 32207; Nemours Childrens Clinic, 807 Childrens Way, Jacksonville FL 32207; and Wolfson Childrens Hospital, 800 Prudential Drive, Jacksonville FL 32207. He is survived by his parents, James A. Tony Fleetwood Jr. and Tammy Fleetwood; a sister, Lauren St. Hillier; maternal grandparents, Walter and Paula Piland; maternal greatgrandmother, Evelyn Bryan; maternal great-grandmother, Alpha Piland; paternal grandparents, James and Joan Fleetwood. Many loving aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins and a host of loving friends. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, Florida is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) Larry J. Smith, 68, of Pinetta, passed away Friday, Aug. 31, at his home. A native of Moultrie, Ga., he served in the U.S. Army and was a veteran of the Vietnam War. He was a retired civil servant with the U.S. government. The funeral service was held at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 4, at Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Interment followed in Arran Cemetery, also in Crawfordville. The family received friends one hour prior to the service at the funeral home. Memorial donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include his wife of 49 years, Nancy Lawhon Smith; his son, Todd Smith (Lisa) of Crawfordville; and his daughter, Robin Smith of Pinetta. He was predeceased by his parents, Frank and Lillian Tillman Smith. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel (850/926-3333 or www. bevisfh.com) assisted the Smith family. Weldon Mike Vowell Jr., 65, of Sopchoppy, died on Saturday, Sept. 1, at the VA Hospital in Gainesville. He was a very proud veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. His ashes will be spread on her grave in Garland, Texas, at a later date. Donations, in his name may be made to the Lake City VA Medical Center, 619 S. Marion Ave., Lake City FL 32025, Attn. TOPC. Survivors include a son, Weldon C. Vowell III; and a daughter, Heather Marie Bruce; and one grandchild; and a sister, Janice Montalto of Crawfordville; as well as many nieces, nephews, cousins and tons of friends. He was predeceased by a daughter, Kathryn Louise Vowell; and sister, Barbara Vowell who died at birth.Larry J. Smith Weldon Mike Vowell Jr. Austin Fleetwood Jack Carmel Phelps Sr. Vernell Tindel Margaret Bartley Donley Religious embrace helping fuel support for gay marriage, says minister Stop by the Coast Guard Auxiliary Station Stop by the Coast Guard Auxiliary Station1557 Shell Point Road Crawfordville(in Shell Point, at the southern end of Shell Point Road) Tell Charlie Creel whats on your mind! Friday, September 7th 6:00pm to 8:00pmLight refreshments will be served. Fresh Start with a Full-Time Sheriff, Elect Charlie Creel for Sheriff (850) 926-4712 Post Ofce Box 482, Crawfordville, FL 32326 charlieforsheriff@gmail.comwww.charliecreel.com Political advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Afliation, for sheriff. Funeral Home, Inc. 551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Dignied Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY NIGHT SERVICES6:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study3086 Crawfordville Highway (One block south of Courthouse)850-926-7896www.crawfordvillefbc.com of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief Support850-878-5310

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings CommunitySpecial to The NewsThe Jake Pigott Memorial American Legion Post and Auxiliary 114 sent three students to the annual Boys and Girls State Session to represent Wakulla County held in July in Tallahassee. The students, who are seniors at Wakulla High School, took part in a mock legislative session similar to the session held by the Florida Legislature. Participants elect members to serve as governor and other state, county and city positions. They propose bills and pass legislation. Kaylyn Suzanne Thigpen attended the girls state and Blake Bonts and Hunter James Wheatcraft attended the boys state. Thigpen is the daughter of Christine Thornton of Crawfordville. Bonts is the son of Jeff and Ashley Bonts of Crawfordville. Wheatcraft is the son of Dan Wheatcraft of Crawfordville. Barrie Glover of the American Legion Post 114 has served 32 years as a counselor for the boys state program.3 students attend mock state session Kaylyn Suzanne Thigpen Blake BontsHunter James Wheatcraft Marissa D. Brown and Eric T. Davis, both of Crawfordville, were married on June 9 at 5 p.m. at Wakulla Springs Lodge. The of ciant was Pastor Lewis Pollard. The bride is the daughter of Morris and Jennifer Brown of Crawfordville. The groom is the son of Earl and Teresa Davis, also of Crawfordville. The bride was given in marriage by her father. Her matron of honor was Jessica Brown Mattson, sister of the bride, of Hampstead, N.C. Her bridesmaids were Amanda Davis, sister of the groom; Shannon Mills, friend of the bride; Meagan Thurmond, friend of the bride; Sarah Thurmond, friend of the bride; and Cataia Ives, all of Crawfordville. The ower girl was Claire Forrester, of Dothan, Ala., cousin of the bride. The ringbearer was Caleb Mattson, of Hampstead, N.C., nephew of the bride and son of the matron of honor. The best man was Earl Davis, father of the groom. The ushers/groomsmen were Seth Bledsoe of Kingsport, Tenn., brother-in-law of the groom; Colby Johnson of Crawfordville, friend of the groom; Jeffrey Yarbrough of Crawfordville, friend of the groom; Ben Hudson of Crawfordville, friend of the groom; Joseph Lane, honorary, of Crawfordville and friend of the groom. The reception was held at Wakulla Springs Lodge The honeymoon was in Big Sur, Calif. The couple will live in Roxboro, N.C. The bride has a bachelors degree in Middle Eastern Studies from Florida State University and is a refugee resettlement case manager with World Relief in Durham, N.C., and is a choir director. The groom received his bachelors degree in Christian Ministry from the Baptist College of Florida, and is pursuing his Masters of Divinity at the Southeastern Baptist Seminary. He is a youth pastor at Ca-Vel Baptist Church in Roxboro, N.C.Eric Davis marries Marissa Brown Mr. and Mrs. Marissa and Eric Davis Special to The NewsWakulla County residents are invited to attend an open house to view updated preliminary ood maps and learn more about their ood risk on Thursday, Sept. 13, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Road Crawfordville. Residents are encouraged to stop by at their convenience to meet with representatives from the Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other state and federal agencies. These specialists will be available to talk about the preliminary ood maps, ood insurance, engineering and more. Local government officials will also be available to assist citizens. Up-to-date flood hazard maps are an important tool that can help Floridians understand and prepare for ood risks. These maps are still preliminary and will become effective after a public comment period. The preliminary maps are also available online at http://portal.nwfwmd oodmaps.com. Please contact Elaine McKinnon at the NWFWMD at (850) 539-5999 ext. 221 for more information. By DOUG JONESTreasurer of the Friends of the LibraryThe Friends of the Wakulla County Public Library extend an invitation to everyone to come out to their second Annual Silent Auction on Friday, Sept. 14. The doors open at 6 p.m. for this free event which will include a buffet table with food and refreshments. Friends President Sue Belford and other volunteers have accumulated an excellent range of items from the generous donations made by individuals and businesses in the community. We have a fantastic array of items and gift baskets this year said Belford. I think it is much better than last year and there will be something there for everyone who comes out. More than 130 items will be up for grabs during the evening. The Friends goal is to raise $5,000 to help meet the $25,000 the Friends contribute to the library every year. This past year, the Friends purchased 12 new library computers for the public to use in addition to fully funding the librarys popular Summer Reading Program and other library services not supported by the librarys operating budget. The Friends are very proud of the support they provide the library as 100 percent of the funds raised go towards library support. Those dollars also count as matching funds for the State Aid to Libraries grant the library receives every year. Without the support of the Friends of the Library, the library would not be able to serve the citizens of Wakulla County, providing the services, which they so richly deserve, free of charge, said Library Director Scott Joyner. For those who want to get a head start on the bidding process, a binder notebook containing bid sheets and descriptions of the more than 130 items donated is in the lobby of the library near the Circulation Desk. Those who want to bid on items can register for a bidding number, and bid on any items in the binder any time prior to the event and need not be present at the event to be the winning bidder. Items donated include a large number of bottles of wine, baking and cooking items, camping and boating items, sleeping bags, FSU Tshirts, ags, and other Seminole support items, and numerous gift certi cates and other merchandise. Many of the items will be displayed in theme baskets and all will be on display during the event. Bidders will be asked to register and receive a bidding number when they enter the event. The nal bid time will be staggered with bidding on gift certi cate items ending at 7:30 p.m.; Art and Gift Baskets at 7:45 p.m.; and all other items at 8 p.m. Winning bidders will be able to pick up and pay for their items at the end of the event or at the library the following morning beginning at 9:30 a.m. Membership Chair Cathy Cameron encouraged the public to come and support this event. You do not have to be a member of the Friends to participate in this event. We hope though that you will consider joining the Friends if you are not a member, it is a very inexpensive and valuable way to support our wonderful public library, she said. Everyone is invited to this event to help support the library. See everyone on Sept. 14. A scene from last years silent auction fundraiser held by the Friends of the Wakulla County Library. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLibrary silent auction set for Sept. 14 Residents invited to open house to view preliminary ood maps on Sept. 13 WAKULLA COUNTY IS AT A CROSSROADS1. VOTE FOR MIKE STEWART AND SEE THE COUNTY CONTINUE TO PROSPER AND GROW RESPONSIBLY. 2. VOTE FOR HOWARD KESSLER AND I BELIEVE THE COUNTY WILL GO BACK INTO DEBT AND ALL GROWTH WILL STOP.ITS YOUR CHOICE... BUT I LIKE MIKE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3 I LIKEMIKEREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 C www.mikestewart2012.comPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MIKE STEWART, REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3facebook.com/ mike.stewart.3363 MW 10-5 T & F 10-6 Sat. 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850)926-6241SALE Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts Color F acial Waxings Specialty Cuts F lat T ops F eather Locks Color P erms Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. c e H a i r S a l o e H l o H a i a l o i r S a c e c e o n o o o n o o n Tues -S at 54 529 05 & t. t. . . . . STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 9Aeducation news SchoolFlorida Astronaut Challenge registration is now open Special to The NewsStudent team registration for the second annual Florida Astronaut Challenge is now open to high-school students across the state (grades 9 through 12). The 2013 competition follows the successful 2012 Florida Astronaut Challenge that took place on May 19 in Tallahassee. Floridas Astronaut Challenge is an opportunity for students to showcase their knowledge of Science, Technology, Mathematics, and Engineering (STEM), through a series of team-oriented experiments and challenges. The application deadline for the regional qualifier exam is Friday, Sept. 28. Seven ve-person teams will be selected from the top scorers of the regional qualifier competition. The regional quali er exam will be given at three locations in southern, central and northern Florida. During the quali er exam, students will be asked to respond to 100 multiple-choice questions based on the Student Astronaut Challenge Manual. Students will compete as a ve-person team, taking a different version of the test individually and then one composite score will be produced from the average scores of team members. Teams that qualify will be invited to contend for rst place at the state-level competition on March 8-10, 2013, in Tallahassee, where students will bring their experiments to life using a Mobile NASA Space Shuttle Flight simulator developed and constructed by Florida State University Lab School. For additional dates and information about the 2013 Astronaut Challenge and to register with your team, visit Floridas Astronaut Challenge website. Updates may also be found on the Departments Just for Teachers website. About the Florida Department of Education: The departments mission is to increase the pro ciency of all students within one seamless, efficient education system by providing them the chance to expand their knowledge and skills through world-class learning opportunities. Serving more than 3.5 million students, 4,200 public schools, 28 colleges, 188,000 teachers, 47,000 college professors and administrators, and 318,000 full-time staff throughout the state, the department enhances the economic self-suf ciency of Floridians through programs and services geared toward college, workforce education, job-speci c skills and career development. Florida ranks rst in the nation for teacher quality, first in the nation in advanced placement participation and rst in the southern region for graduation rate and degrees awarded by the Florida College System. For more information, visit www. doe.org.Special to The NewsThe Shadeville Elementary Schools 29th Annual Fall Festival will be held Oct. 6. Come join the fun, The coronation will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. in the lunchroom. Booths will open following the coronation at 3 p.m. and will close at 7 p.m. Only tickets are accepted at all booths, including purchasing food. There will be bingo held in the library. There is a new booth called the Slime Machine. There will also be booth prizes, hamburgers, hotdogs, sausage dogs, a sweet shoppe, nachos and cheese and popcorn. There will also be entertainment by The Polynesian Fire Knife Dancers, Say On! and more. Shadeville announces its 29th annual fall festival SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA photo of last years coronation ceremony held at Shadeville Elementary during the annual fall festival. LETS DO THIS TOGETHER! DO YOU WANT IT?Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN GET YOU MOTIVATED!850.224.4960www.fsucu.org MW 10-5 T & F 10-6 Sat. 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850)926-6241SALE TCCs Wakulla Center 2932 Crawfordville HighwayFor more information call (850) 922-6290 TCCs WAKULLA CENTER Tallahassee Community College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, genetic informat ion, national origin, religion, gender, marital status, disability, or age in its programs and activities. Inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies may be directed to: Renae Tolson, Equity Officer | Room 146 Administration Building | 444 Appleyard Drive | Tallahassee, FL 32304-2895 | (850) 201-8510 | tolsonr@tcc.fl.edu Come learn about our local services, programs and classes. We are open from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday FridayStop by and explore TCC at the new location GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWhose fault is it anyway?By MARJ LAW Youve got your red dot on your pistol and you arent hitting the bulls-eye? Is the reason youre not hitting the center of the target because your hand shakes? Because your site picture is off? Or is it because you need to adjust the red dot site? Red dots can be a lot of fun when youre shooting a pistol. A red dot is a thingie you mount on top of your pistol. When you look through its lens, you see a red dot. You match the dot up with the bulls-eye of your target. Then you shoot. Theoretically, the bullet should pierce that bullseye. Well, theory doesnt always work. So why is your expensive red dot not helping you to hit the target? First, I usually gure that the problem is something in the way I shoot. Holding your grip absolutely steady can be very dif cult. Everybody trembles a little bit. Once your hands shake, you miss your alignment. Then who knows where the bullet will go? You can try to do better by leaning your arms on the table in front of you as you steady your grip. This helps keep down any natural shaking. Try shooting again. If that doesnt work, have you checked your sight picture? Make sure that dot is directly on the center of the target. Finally, if the problem is not your wobbly arms or your sight picture, get your hands on a pistol vise. Here is how it works: Place your gun on the V of a shooting rest to prevent arm wobble. Aim carefully and shoot three times at the bulls-eye. See where the bullets land on your target. Now, lock your pistol into a vise. Notice the location of your red dot. With your trusty screwdriver, adjust the red dot so that it locates in the center of your three-shot grouping. Take the gun out of the vise and shoot again. This little trick ought to work. Well, it ought to. The last time I put my Ruger in a vise and adjusted the red dot, I then took the gun out and red three shots. All hit in a bunch below the bulls-eye. Darn. Theory isnt everything. But then Joe took the Ruger and shot three times. Great first time alignment! he says enthusiastically. Every one of his shots got the bulls-eye. So not fair.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid gunner in her retirement. HOME ON THE RANGE h eor y w a y s is v e o t to t t t t t ? s u al l l l ly ly ly l l l l l g ure bl em is so me me m m m m m m w a y I s h oot. r r r r r r grip abso y ca a n c c u l t. r em b it. a nd s miss m e nt k n o ws or your sight pi cture, g e t y our ha h h n ds o n a a pi s tol three sh ot t T a k e t h h h h h h h vi se an d s li tt t le le le le le le le le le e e e e e t rick We W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W ll, it Th Th Th h h h h h h h h h e l a st t t t t t ge g r in in in in i a v v v the red t he th h h h h h h h h h h i n t h D e v ti me me me e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e sa s y s ent h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h Payton Usina, 9, left, and Gavin Mott-Smith, 12, right, enjoyed Labor Day in Paradise at Shell Point with grand parents Richard and Sally Musgrove. A trip to Paradise has to include catching sh, so Major Alan Lamarche of Plantation Security Inc., volunteered to captain his boat while grandfather Richard and Gavins father Ian, baited hooks and released sh for the boys. Payton and Gavin used Gulps and squid on light tackle to catch about 50 Sea Bass. They released most but kept a mess of the big fat ones to have a Labor Day sh fry. Brag Book:SPECIAL TO THE NEWSKeepers for a sh fryFrom FWC NewsA Panama City man faces a host of charges after a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officer saw him run over and kill a brown pelican in St. Andrew Bay, then ee when the of cer tried to stop him. Brian R. Robinson, 31, of 2005 Drummond Ave., Panama City, is charged with killing a brown pelican, which is a protected species; eeing to elude a law enforcement of cer; boating under the influence; and violation of an idle-speed zone in Grand Lagoon. According to the arrest report, FWC Of cer Dennis Palmer was patrolling St. Andrew Bay on Aug. 17 at 6:15 p.m. and approaching Carl Gray Park when he saw someone in black swim trunks on a yellow and black personal watercraft (PWC) circling a pelican on the water, then running over and killing the bird. Palmer got within 30 yards of the person, later identi ed as Robinson, and ordered him to stop. Robinson, however, had other plans. He looked at me and took off for Hathaway Bridge and toward the Panama City Pass, Palmer said. As other FWC officers responded by boat and vehicles on Thomas Drive, Palmer pursued Robinson to Grand Lagoon, where Robinson abandoned the PWC at Treasure Island Marina and attempted to hide in the facilitys mens room. Palmers report notes that Robinson consented to a breath test, where he measured .153, well over the legal impairment limit. Robinson was transported to the Bay County Jail. His PWC was seized as evidence. The dead pelican was later collected.From FWC NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety internet-completion course in Wakulla County. The course is at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ces Otter Creek Range, 65 Qualify Lane, Crawfordville, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sept. 15. To gain admittance, students must complete the Internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the final report from the online portion of the course. The final report form does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under 16 years of age at all times. Students should bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satis- es hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling Hunter Safety Coordinator George Warthen at the FWCs regional of ce in Panama City at (850) 265-3676.Free hunter safety course in Wakulla County Panama City man charged with killing pelican The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.comHave something on your mind?Send it to The Wakulla NewsWilliam Snowden, Editoreditor@thewakullanews.net SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for qualied applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and oor rate of 2.5% Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 P.O. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 11AI hope those who were able to enjoy Monday with family and friends enjoyed the extra rest and relaxation. However, not everyone was able. There are many who do not have the benefit to take full advantage of the Labor Day Holiday. A quick search on the Department of Labors website and it is easy to find the meaning and history of Labor Day. Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country. The first Labor Day was celebrated in New York City on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 1882, and was the efforts of the Central Labor Union. This workingmens holiday became the first Monday of September two years later in 1884 and was celebrated in most major industrial cities in 1885. The first Monday in September became a legal holiday in 1894. Times have certainly changed since 1894 and many in the workforce are managing more than one job as well as other civic commitments. For the men and women in the Coast Guard Auxiliary, our jobs range from college students to professionals, such as doctors and professors and government employees. We are quite a unique group where so many come together from such diverse areas for a common goal. It has been said that if you love what you are doing then it is not work. I feel it is safe to say that for those of us in the Auxiliary, we have chosen to join this organization because we love what it stands for and love the work we do. While times have been trying for many, we have continued to maintain our membership and work toward accomplishing our goals of promoting boating safety through public education, free vessel exams, safety patrols and fellowship. In addition to those in the Auxiliary, it is also important to remember those in the reserves and their families. They not only have a commitment to their employment, but have also made the continued commitment to be on call when needed to serve and protect all of us. Recent storms are a good reminder that things can change quickly and we can all be called to be laborers to help improve the quality of life for others. A look at the news or internet demonstrates the spirit our county was founded on, that through hard work we as laborers add to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country. Flotilla 12 will have our monthly meeting Saturday, Sept. 8, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the fire station in Crawfordville. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident a little extra labor can make the difference in your level of enjoyment out on the water.a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChuck Hickman preparing his facility. Mark Rosen and Bill Wannall. Oxygen. The princess of gases and a requirement for life as we know it, oxygen is carefully managed by divers. Most everyone takes this plentiful breathing gas for granted, since oxygen in the atmosphere surrounds us most of the time. We simply breathe it into our lungs, transport it to our cells through the blood and metabolism it to get energy with which to live. Because water is 800 times denser than the air in our atmosphere, when we are underwater, the oxygen we breath is also denser. In other words, there is more of it per breath. Most folks appreciate that more of a good thing is bene cial to a point. Oxygen is often provided in the hospital to encourage recovery from many injuries. Air is no longer the same underwater. Air in the atmosphere at sea level has 21 percent oxygen or .21 of the complete mixture (most of the rest is nitrogen). But underwater, the added pressure increases the number of oxygen molecules per breath the deeper we go. At a relatively shallow depth of 132 feet ( ve times the pressure of the surface atmosphere), the diver is breathing the equivalent of 100 percent oxygen at the surface. At a hospital that would be called oxygen therapy! Under pressure that is called Hyperbaric Oxygen (HBO). Many hospitals provide HBO therapy using a hyperbaric chamber in which to compress patients to treatment depths. Capital Regional Medical Center in Tallahassee has such a chamber under the direction of Dr. William Kepper. Patients with injuries, carbon monoxide poisoning and other maladies are prescribed HBO treatments. An excess of oxygen becomes toxic to our body. Underwater as divers, we can expose ourselves to greater concentrations of oxygen than on land, making management of the gas much more critical. Air does not reach that critical oxygen dose (a PO2 of 1.6) until 218 feet (not likely seen by recreational divers). But a Nitrox blend of 40 percent reaches the same critical dose at a depth of 99 feet in the ocean. Divers manage their oxygen by selecting an appropriate blend that is safe at their intended depth. We call this depth the Maximum Operating Depth or MOD. The therapeutic bene t however, is seldom the reason divers select an oxygen blend. We are most often interested in diluting the nitrogen in the breathing medium by using oxygen. Our decompression stress created by the greater concentration of nitrogen at depth, limits our dive time. The lower the nitrogen in the breathing mixture, the more time we can spend underwater. We balance the need to reduce nitrogen against an excess of oxygen. A more traditional use of oxygen on or near the surface post dive works to improve the elimination of the excess nitrogen still left in the body. The application of higher oxygen concentrations improves the safe removal of nitrogen during decompression, that period of 24 hours after the dive. So we use oxygen to minimize the nitrogen we absorb during the dive and then later, during decompression, we use oxygen to increase the elimination of nitrogen. Oxygen is the key to a safer dive when carefully managed underwater, and has the unintended bene t of hyperbaric therapy. Ever wonder why diving can be so addictive? Some events the FWC handled during the week of Aug. 24-30. ESCAMBIA COUNTY: O n Aug. 28, Lt. Brian Lambert received a call from USCG Pensacola of a missing and overdue boater. The family reported arriving home on the evening of Aug. 27 to nd the man, his vehicle, and personal watercraft missing. A search located the mans vehicle and empty PWC trailer at Pensacola NAS boat ramp (Sherman Cove). As all vessels from the USCG and FWC had been moved inland due to approaching Hurricane Isaac and sea conditions were 1215 feet, only the USCGs aircraft was available for search. The USCG reported a ping from the missing mans cell phone late on the night of Aug. 27 coming from offshore, south of Perdido Pass. The USCG resumed aircraft search operations on Aug. 29 and FWC of cers continued to search along the coastline. The case is ongoing. SANTA ROSA COUNTY: During the night of Aug. 28 during Hurricane Isaac, Officer Ben Pineda observed two vehicles operating within Eglin WMA in violation of usage hours. The vehicles had been mudbogging within the WMA. One of the vehicles ed the scene while the other was stopped. The driver did not possess an Eglin use permit, had prior offenses on Eglin WMA, and had provided alcoholic beverages to a 20year-old female. The driver repeatedly provided false information during the stop and was subsequently arrested and transported to the Santa Rosa County Jail. The female passenger was issued a citation for possession of alcoholic beverages by a person under 21. Evidence and testimony from the scene, together with an ongoing investigation, should assist in identifying the second vehicle. Information is being provided to Eglin Range Patrol for additional charges.FWC Law Enforcement operations Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday p Thu Sep 6, 12 Fri Sep 7, 12 Sat Sep 8, 12 Sun Sep 9, 12 Mon Sep 10, 12 Tue Sep 11, 12 Wed Sep 12, 12 Date 3.6 ft. 5:16 AM 3.5 ft. 5:48 AM 2.9 ft. 12:10 AM 3.2 ft. 12:51 AM High 0.9 ft. 12:24 PM 1.1 ft. 1:22 PM 1.9 ft. 12:42 AM 2.1 ft. 1:49 AM 2.2 ft. 3:27 AM 2.1 ft. 5:00 AM 1.8 ft. 6:06 AM Low 3.0 ft. 6:47 PM 2.7 ft. 7:55 PM 3.3 ft. 6:29 AM 3.1 ft. 7:32 AM 3.1 ft. 9:25 AM 3.2 ft. 11:08 AM 3.5 ft. 12:11 PM High 1.7 ft. 11:59 PM 1.2 ft. 2:47 PM 1.1 ft. 4:23 PM 1.0 ft. 5:35 PM 0.7 ft. 6:26 PM 0.6 ft. 7:06 PM Low 2.6 ft. 9:34 PM 2.7 ft. 11:09 PM High Thu Sep 6, 12 Fri Sep 7, 12 Sat Sep 8, 12 Sun Sep 9, 12 Mon Sep 10, 12 Tue Sep 11, 12 Wed Sep 12, 12 Date 3.7 ft. 5:13 AM 3.6 ft. 5:45 AM 3.0 ft. 12:07 AM 3.2 ft. 12:48 AM High 0.9 ft. 12:21 PM 1.2 ft. 1:19 PM 2.1 ft. 12:39 AM 2.3 ft. 1:46 AM 2.4 ft. 3:24 AM 2.2 ft. 4:57 AM 1.9 ft. 6:03 AM Low 3.0 ft. 6:44 PM 2.8 ft. 7:52 PM 3.4 ft. 6:26 AM 3.2 ft. 7:29 AM 3.1 ft. 9:22 AM 3.3 ft. 11:05 AM 3.6 ft. 12:08 PM High 1.8 ft. 11:56 PM 1.3 ft. 2:44 PM 1.2 ft. 4:20 PM 1.0 ft. 5:32 PM 0.8 ft. 6:23 PM 0.6 ft. 7:03 PM Low 2.7 ft. 9:31 PM 2.8 ft. 11:06 PM High Thu Sep 6, 12 Fri Sep 7, 12 Sat Sep 8, 12 Sun Sep 9, 12 Mon Sep 10, 12 Tue Sep 11, 12 Wed Se p 12, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 12:46 AM 3.0 ft. 1:27 AM High 1.3 ft. 12:29 AM 1.5 ft. 1:03 AM 1.8 ft. 1:46 AM 1.9 ft. 2:53 AM 2.0 ft. 4:31 AM 1.9 ft. 6:04 AM 1.6 ft. 7:10 AM Low 3.4 ft. 5:52 AM 3.2 ft. 6:24 AM 3.1 ft. 7:05 AM 2.9 ft. 8:08 AM 2.8 ft. 10:01 AM 3.0 ft. 11:44 AM 3.2 ft. 12:47 PM High 0.8 ft. 1:28 PM 1.0 ft. 2:26 PM 1.1 ft. 3:51 PM 1.0 ft. 5:27 PM 0.9 ft. 6:39 PM 0.7 ft. 7:30 PM 0.5 ft. 8:10 PM Low 2.7 ft. 7:23 PM 2.5 ft. 8:31 PM 2.4 ft. 10:10 PM 2.5 ft. 11:45 PM High Thu Sep 6, 12 Fri Sep 7, 12 Sat Sep 8, 12 Sun Sep 9, 12 Mon Sep 10, 12 Tue Sep 11, 12 Wed Sep 12, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 5:08 AM 2.2 ft. 12:02 AM 2.4 ft. 12:43 AM High 0.6 ft. 12:35 PM 1.2 ft. 12:10 AM 1.4 ft. 12:53 AM 1.6 ft. 2:00 AM 1.6 ft. 3:38 AM 1.5 ft. 5:11 AM 1.3 ft. 6:17 AM Low 2.2 ft. 6:39 PM 2.6 ft. 5:40 AM 2.5 ft. 6:21 AM 2.3 ft. 7:24 AM 2.3 ft. 9:17 AM 2.4 ft. 11:00 AM 2.6 ft. 12:03 PM High 0.8 ft. 1:33 PM 0.9 ft. 2:58 PM 0.8 ft. 4:34 PM 0.7 ft. 5:46 PM 0.5 ft. 6:37 PM 0.4 ft. 7:17 PM Low 2.0 ft. 7:47 PM 2.0 ft. 9:26 PM 2.0 ft. 11:01 PM High Thu Sep 6, 12 Fri Sep 7, 12 Sat Sep 8, 12 Sun Sep 9, 12 Mon Sep 10, 12 Tue Sep 11, 12 Wed Sep 12, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 5:00 AM 2.7 ft. 5:32 AM 2.5 ft. 12:35 AM High 0.9 ft. 12:03 PM 1.1 ft. 1:01 PM 1.9 ft. 12:21 AM 2.1 ft. 1:28 AM 2.2 ft. 3:06 AM 2.0 ft. 4:39 AM 1.7 ft. 5:45 AM Low 2.3 ft. 6:31 PM 2.1 ft. 7:39 PM 2.6 ft. 6:13 AM 2.4 ft. 7:16 AM 2.4 ft. 9:09 AM 2.5 ft. 10:52 AM 2.7 ft. 11:55 AM High 1.7 ft. 11:38 PM 1.2 ft. 2:26 PM 1.1 ft. 4:02 PM 0.9 ft. 5:14 PM 0.7 ft. 6:05 PM 0.6 ft. 6:45 PM Low 2.0 ft. 9:18 PM 2.1 ft. 10:53 PM 2.3 ft. 11:54 PM High Thu Sep 6, 12 Fri Sep 7, 12 Sat Sep 8, 12 Sun Sep 9, 12 Mon Sep 10, 12 Tue Sep 11, 12 Wed Sep 12, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 5:01 AM 3.2 ft. 5:38 AM 3.2 ft. 6:24 AM 2.6 ft. 12:12 AM 2.7 ft. 12:51 AM 2.8 ft. 1:21 AM High 0.7 ft. 12:10 PM 0.7 ft. 1:21 PM 0.7 ft. 2:42 PM 2.0 ft. 12:59 AM 2.0 ft. 2:55 AM 1.9 ft. 4:23 AM 1.8 ft. 5:25 AM Low 2.5 ft. 7:59 PM 2.5 ft. 9:29 PM 2.5 ft. 11:07 PM 3.1 ft. 7:22 AM 3.0 ft. 8:35 AM 3.0 ft. 9:56 AM 3.1 ft. 11:12 AM High 1.8 ft. 10:57 PM 1.9 ft. 11:40 PM 0.6 ft. 3:56 PM 0.6 ft. 4:56 PM 0.5 ft. 5:44 PM 0.5 ft. 6:26 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 6 Sept. 12First Sept. 22 Full Aug. 31 Last Sept. 8 New Sept. 15Major Times 5:47 AM 7:47 AM 6:11 PM 8:11 PM Minor Times 12:45 PM 1:45 PM 11:32 PM 12:32 AM Major Times 6:34 AM 8:34 AM 6:58 PM 8:58 PM Minor Times --:---:-1:37 PM 2:37 PM Major Times 7:23 AM 9:23 AM 7:47 PM 9:47 PM Minor Times 12:16 AM 1:16 AM 2:27 PM 3:27 PM Major Times 8:12 AM 10:12 AM 8:36 PM 10:36 PM Minor Times 1:05 AM 2:05 AM 3:15 PM 4:15 PM Major Times 9:01 AM 11:01 AM 9:25 PM 11:25 PM Minor Times 1:57 AM 2:57 AM 4:00 PM 5:00 PM Major Times 9:50 AM 11:50 AM 10:14 PM 12:14 AM Minor Times 2:52 AM 3:52 AM 4:42 PM 5:42 PM Major Times 10:39 AM 12:39 PM 11:03 PM 1:03 AM Minor Times 3:49 AM 4:49 AM 5:22 PM 6:22 PM Average Average Average Average++ Average Average Average7:17 am 7:53 pm 11:33 pm 12:47 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:17 am 7:51 pm --:-1:38 pm 7:18 am 7:50 pm 12:18 am 2:28 pm 7:18 am 7:49 pm 1:06 am 3:16 pm 7:19 am 7:48 pm 1:58 am 4:01 pm 7:19 am 7:46 pm 2:53 am 4:43 pm 7:20 am 7:45 pm 3:50 am 5:23 pm64% 58% 52% 46% 39% 33% 27% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy AMY GEIGER Dear Chamber Members: Summer break has ended, vacations are over, the students are back in school and Focus Wakulla is back in action. After a very successful inaugural event at Poseys Dockside Cafe in Panacea, we are pleased to announce our second event, Speed Networking, to be held Sept. 25 from 6:15 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Best Western PLUS. Speed Networking will give young professionals in the area a chance to meet at least 20 other young professionals in less than 45 minutes. At this event, attendees will be provided with tips on how to network and mingle in a crowd to begin great conversations. The Importance of Networking for Young Professionals Networking for young professionals is an integral part of the business world today. Networking offers another avenue to reach vendors, customers and future business partners. It allows you to present yourself and your networking objective in a much more personal way than an advertisement, promotion or an online resume. By nurturing and growing a strong business and support network, up-andcoming professionals can often have access to information about new innovations in the industry and who is and is not hiring. Making use of those relationships to make lateral or upward moves can have a positive impact on the ability to make money and achieve career goals. Networking is also helpful in terms of being able to exchange ideas and strategies with others who have dealt with similar issues and situations. The ability to share experiences and potential solutions can often inspire creativity in everyone involved, leading to the development of new solutions that gain praise from employers and help to advance individual careers. With the right type of networking young professionals can establish connections that will serve them well for many years to come. (For more on networking successfully, go to www.wisegeek.com/whatare-young-professionals. htm.) This event will ll up fast as it is limited to only 40 attendees. To register, visit the Focus Wakulla page on the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce website. Focus Wakulla will also join the Political Forum in October to hear the views, ideas and platforms of the candidates running in this years election. Yours in Service, Amy GeigerAmy Geiger is president of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce. The chamber can be reached at 926-1848. Taking Care of Business Taking Care of BusinessBusiness News from Business News from Focus Wakulla o ers networking for young professionals Presidents Message New members: Tallahassee Leon Federal CU Stix Grill, Inc ReNu U Rejuvination Spa Serendipity Salon Tallahassee Lenders ConsortiumBy PETRA SHUFFof the ChamberThe distance did not keep the crowd away from our August luncheon at Dickeys Barbecue No. 535 in Woodville. Mary was happy to announce a record crowd of 60 before introducing our hosts, Debra and John Lewis, who have been in the restaurant business for three generations. Dickeys started in Dallas 70 years ago, and is the fastest growing barbecue chain in the U.S. Dickeys served up a choice of Texas-style chopped beef brisket or southern pulled pork and creamy cole slaw, green beans with bacon, baked potato casserole, barbecue beans, yeast roll, dessert, tea, and a special order salad for our vegetarians. We thank the Lewises and staff for hosting our luncheon. We were happy to announce members that joined earlier in the year and did not have a chance to join one of our gatherings before: UPS Store No. 6044, Harry C. Bosman, owner of the UPS Store branch on Crawfordville Highway and Capital Circle SW. This family owned business has been in the shipping-printing and mailing business for 22 years. AFLAC agent Willie Mae Peterkin Musgray talked about services, and accident insurance through Aflac. For more information call Willie Mae (850) 688-4419. Since we missed the luncheon in July, we had lots of new members to announce for July and August. Our July members were William Bull Financial Professional Associate, Prudential, Strategic Bene ts Group LLC., and American Red Cross Capital Area Chapter. Dan Sanborn, CEO American Red Cross, Capital Area Chapter was also happy to join us. Dan has been getting familiar with Wakulla County during tropical storm Debby, lending us a hand by arranging much needed shelter, and survival kits, water etc. Our August members were Tallahassee-Leon Federal Credit Union, Stix Grill Inc., ReNu U Rejuvenation Spa, and newly joined at the luncheon Serendipity Salon. As Mary always suggests bringing a friend, several of our members do just that. Zoe Mans eld, city manager of St. Marks introduced City Commissioner Gail Gilman. Pam Allbritton introduced Michael Eurich and Connie Palmer with Big Bend Hospice. New to our crowd was Kortney Rudd, the new volunteer service manager for Covenant Hospice. Charlean Lanier with Harvest Fellowship introduced her guest Haydee Jackley, who filled us in about the Empty Bowl project, taken on by Wakulla County Coalition for Youth and HAWC, otherwise known as Healing Arts of Wakulla. The Empty Bowl project sounds like a fun way to raise money for the local food pantries. For a $10 donation, you get to paint a bowl which will be sold Nov. 3 at Hudson Park, lled with soup and bread for a donation of $15. A business or employees can participate and paint bowls as a group, or make the donation, and high school students will be happy to take that task off your hands. Charlean Lanier is helping with this project by heading the bake sale committee, and she also stressed the importance of donating food boxes for needy families for the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. Part of the proceeds from the food boxes will purchase food for Eden Springs. Deirdre Farrington announced the move of her law of ce to 3038 Crawfordville Highway, and is now also certified as a court mediator. Susan Schatzman shared sad news about Thelma Gaupin, local real estate broker for decades, and past Chamber president. Thelma recently suffered a massive stroke. Once released from the hospital, she will be transferred to Eden Springs for rehabilitation. Please keep Thelma and her husband in your thoughts and prayers. Louis Garcia, CEO Big Brothers Big Sisters was happy to share the news of receiving a grant. BBBS will now be able to add a part-time position, and hire a mentor recruiter for Wakulla. Continued on Page 11ADickeys Barbecue hosts luncheon PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe networking luncheon at Dickeys set an attendance record with 60 Chamber members and guests. Zoe Mans eld won the cash pot. Hosts John and Debra Lewis of Dickeys.Chamber Chatter Upcoming after hours networking: Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Sept. 20, details to be announced. September Luncheon: Riverside Caf on Sept. 26 from noon to 1:15 p.m. RSVP to Chamber of ce, 926-1848. Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Clubs2012 ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZA Wildwood Country Club Thursday October 11 2012 6:30pm Social 7:00pm Dinner, Auction, & Show please join us for Maurices Way Out West Carrolls Boot Country Crums Mini MallTICKETS $30.00 eachall proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County students

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 13AContinued from Page 10AIn addition, BBBS asks to place clothing bins at business locations. The clothing will be sold at their new second-hand store in Tallahassee, and the dollars earned will be returned to Wakulla to help our local families. Speaking of raising money for local families, Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla is presenting their second Annual Drive for the Build Golf Tournament Oct. 19 to help fund the building of yet another home for a quali ed family. For more information, contact Jo Anne Strickland 850.556.1828. Big Bend Hospice will also be holding their annual golf tournament Friday, Oct. 26 to help local families. The highlight of the luncheons is always the cash drawing and giveaways. Zoe Mansfield was the lucky winner of the $60 cash pot. We thank the following for their donations to the drawing: Centennial Bank VISA $25 gift card, Cook Insurance for the ashlight, Big Brothers Big Sisters for the T-shirts and bottle of champagne, Oliver Construction for the gift basket, The Wakulla News for the ad, Rainbow International for the lucky bamboo plant, Edwin Brown for two insulated glasses with candy, Petra Shuff for the pepper jelly and umbrella, Charlean Lanier for the best home baked cheesecake, Marianne and Lionel Dazevedo for the decorative vase, Revell Electric and Shepard Accounting for the orchid plant. Our next luncheon will be held at Riverside Caf in St. Marks on Wednesday, Sept. 26. Details to be announced.Dickeys Barbecue hosts luncheon Spotlight on Business Spotlight on BusinessBusiness News from Business News from Founded in 1941, Dickeys Barbecue restaurants began in Dallas by the Dickey family and is now the worlds largest barbecue chain, located in 42 states with more than 230 locations nationwide. The Woodville Dickeys is the fth to open in Florida offering eight hickory smoked meats (with Johns own wood), cooked slow and served fast. Owned by local residents John and Debra Lewis, Dickeys is located in Lewiswood Center, 8159 Woodville Highway in Woodville. Debra and John are deeply rooted in the area. Besides their two sons, Jeremy and Jesse, they both have large extended families in the area as well. Dickeys offers free kids meals every Sunday (with purchase of an adult meal) and affordable family packs designed to bring the whole family together for dinner or your tailgate party. And they cater events large and small, or drop in for one of their daily specials for $7.99. Tell us about your business (include unique facts and history): We are a family owned business and have been serving Wakulla and the surrounding counties for more than 20 years. What services, products do you offer? We service, maintain and install all types of heating and air conditioning equipment. What sets your business apart from the competition? We pride ourselves on being honest with our customers and doing superb work. We also think you will nd that our pricing is more reasonable than others. How long have you been a Chamber member? We have been a member of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce since 2010. Why did you join the Chamber? We joined the Chamber to network with individuals and other small business owners in the community. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? We feel the Chamber has a lot of opportunities for small business owners to become more involved in the local community. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? One of the most important ways to support our local community is to Shop Local. We must support the local businesses who support the area where we live, work and play. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? For all your heating and air conditioning needs, please contact our of ce at 926-3546. Business: Keith Key Heating & Air Inc. Owner: Keith Key Ribbon Cutting:Dickeys BarbecueBy JASON ALDERMAN If youve got a recent high school graduate whos getting ready to head off to college or join the workforce, let me share a few lessons I learned the hard way about managing personal nances that you can pass along to your kids. Young adults are just starting to build their credit history. In the coming months theyll probably encounter many unfamiliar expenses and many nancial temptations. If theyre not careful, a few ill-thought decisions made now could damage their credit for years to come. Here are several actions your kids can take to build good nancial habits and strong credit and a few minefields to watch out for: Probably the most fundamental tool to for young adults to help manage their nances is a basic checking account and debit card. A few tips to pass along: Look for a bank/credit union that charges no monthly usage fee, doesnt require minimum balances and has conveniently located ATMs so you dont rack up out-of-network ATM charges. Enter all transactions in the check register and review your account online regularly to know when deposits, checks, purchases and automatic payments have cleared. Dont write checks or make debit card purchases unless the current balance will cover them many transactions now clear instantaneously. Banks must ask whether you want overdraft protection. If you opt for coverage, understand that overdrafts can be expensive up to $35 or more per transaction. Request text or email alerts when your balance drops below a certain level, checks or deposits clear, or payments are due. Credit cards for young adults can be a useful tool, but they must be used responsibly. By law, people under 21 must have a parent or other responsible adult cosign credit card accounts unless they can prove suf- cient income to repay the debt. If you allow your child to become an authorized user or joint account holder on one of your accounts, remember that any account activity, good or bad, goes on both your credit reports, so careful monitoring is critical. Another way to build credit history is to start out with a secured credit card a card linked to an account into which you deposit money. Typically you can charge up to the amount youve deposited and then replenish the account with more funds. After theyve made several on-time payments, have your kid ask the lender to convert it to an unsecured card, or to at least add an unsecured amount to the account. Just make sure that the lender agrees to report your payment history to at least one of the three credit bureaus; otherwise, the account does nothing to improve your credit. If they qualify for an unsecured credit card, have your kids follow these guidelines: Always make at least the minimum payment on time each month. Strive to pay off the full balance each month; otherwise, the accumulated interest will add signi cantly to your repayment amount. Avoid using credit cards for cash advances, which often incur upfront fees and begin accruing interest immediately. Look for a card with no annual fee and also compare cash advance, late payment, balance transfer, over-thelimit and other fees. For more tips on building and maintaining strong credit, visit Whats My Score, a nancial literacy program for young adults run by Visa Inc. (www.whatsmyscore. org).Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs.High School grads need to understand credit LindysChicken Since19687locations SPECIALS SPECIALS TENDERS 3 Large Chicken Tenders w/ Fries .......... $4.89 HOT WINGS 5 Piece w/ Fries ....................................... $4.89 2 Whole Wings w/ Fries & Biscuit .................................... $4.89 Includes Side & Small Drink Chicken Fillet combo .................................. $6.99 3 Tenders special ........................................ $6.39 5 Hot Wings ................................................. $6.39 Chicken Salad or BBQ Sandwich ............... $5.99 Pork Chop Sandwich .................................. $6.99 2 Whole Wings ............................................ $6.39 2 PC Dark with only Mashed Potatoes ....... $5.19 COMBO MEALS COMBO MEALS all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Experience o 38 years broad-based o Public & private sectors in 35 counties of Florida o $3+ billion appraised, one-by-one and in person (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Aug. 23, Deputy Nick Gray responded to a traf c complaint of a possible intoxicated driver on U.S. Highway 98 in Panacea. Deputy Gray observed the suspect vehicle swerve into the northbound lane from the southbound lane and head back onto the southbound lane shoulder. He conducted a traf c stop and smelled a strong odor of marijuana from inside the vehicle. A plastic baggy of marijuana was observed inside the vehicle in plain view. The driver, Fredrick Hall Dekay, 61, of Tallahassee was arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked and possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Passenger Tripper P. Pesce, 40, of Tallahassee was issued a traf c citation for having an open container while in operation. The marijuana was seized and weighed at one gram. It was placed into the Evidence Division. Detectives Lorne Whaley, Derek Lawhon and Nick Boutwell also assisted at the scene. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On Aug. 23, Benjamin Millership of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to purchase a vehicle from a suspect who later requested the vehicle back. The victim had a bill of sale and signed title in his possession. The victim also discovered that the suspect had the vehicle title transferred to an undetermined female. The case was turned over to Detective Matt Helms to contact the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On Aug. 23, Ryan Travis Perez, 19, of Crawfordville was arrested for knowingly driving while license is suspended or revoked. Detective Lorne Whaley observed Perez tailgating his unmarked agency vehicle. After backing off from the detectives vehicle, Perez began to tailgate him a second time. Detective Whaley conducted a traf c stop and determined that Perez did not possess a driver license. Perez was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. On Aug. 23, Eduardo Avila of Palm Bay, Fla. and Stone Creek Pizza reported a grand theft. A delivery driver stole money from the company by altering the transaction amounts. Thirty transactions resulted in $856 in losses for the company. Avila requested the suspect, who has been identi ed, be prosecuted. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On Aug. 23, Ryan Langston of Panacea reported a residential burglary. An electronic game and unit, valued at $238, was stolen from the victims home. Suspects have been identi ed. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. AUGUST 24 On Aug. 24, Detective Nick Boutwell observed a 37-year-old Crawfordville resident illegally driving a motor vehicle. Detective Boutwell knows the suspect personally and knows he does not possess a valid driver license. The driver has been classified as a habitual driving offender since 2009. A warrant was requested for his arrest. AUGUST 25 On Aug. 25, Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated a juvenile drinking party in Crawfordville. While investigating, Kyle Almeda, 19, of Crawfordville allegedly made a move towards Lt. Sessor and had to be secured in handcuffs. Deputy Cole Wells discovered a 12-year-old juvenile unresponsive and intoxicated in a closet. The juvenile was awakened and admitted drinking alcoholic beverages provided by Michael Ray Marks, 25, of Crawfordville. Marks was arrested for contributing to the delinquency of a minor. Kyle Almeda was arrested for disorderly intoxication and resisting an of cer without violence. Three other males, ages 18 to 21, were required to leave the residence. On Aug. 25, Andrew Carter of Crawfordville recovered a lost cell phone. The phone was found on Danley Grade Road. The phone was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division for further investigation. The phone is valued at $50. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On Aug. 25, Steve Walker of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered the victims shed and removed $5,000 worth of miscellaneous tools and property. The case was turned over to property theft detectives. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On Aug. 25, Deputy Randy Phillips reported responding to a call for service near Coastal Highway 98 and Tower Road in Panacea when a wild hog got into the road and was struck by the deputy. The animal changed course and got back in the path of Deputy Phillips as he attempted an evasive maneuver. The crash created some minor damage to the patrol vehicle. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. AUGUST 26 On Aug. 26, a 17-yearold Crawfordville juvenile was arrested for two counts of battery on a law enforcement of cer and one count of resisting an of cer with violence. Lt. Jimmy Sessor responded to a ght on U.S. Highway 319. One of the suspects was observed running down the road. The juvenile rushed Lt. Sessor on two occasions and Lt. Sessor deployed his Taser to subdue the juvenile. Deputy Will Hudson was kicked by the juvenile as he attempted to assist Lt. Sessor in placing the male suspect in the patrol vehicle. The juvenile also resisted efforts of Wakulla EMS to remove the Taser probes. The juvenile was eventually released to his mother. On Aug. 26, Deputy Cole Wells investigated a report of an intoxicated Tallahassee male at the U.S. Highway 98 boat ramp on the Wakulla River. Deputy Wells and individuals at the boat ramp attempted to move the male subject out of the way of moving vehicles around him. The suspect began cursing loudly and a female adult removed her children from the scene. The subject was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. He complained of an ankle injury and told law enforcement he consumed a large amount of alcohol and smoked Spice during the day. The male was treated by Wakulla EMS and transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. AUGUST 27 On Aug. 27, Deputy Cole Wells investigated a disturbance call in Crawfordville. During the course of his investigation, Deputy Wells allegedly observed marijuana and a smoking pipe on Jon Michael Rowan, 28, of Crawfordville. Deputy Wells concluded his disturbance investigation and arrested Rowan for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. The marijuana weighed 3.5 grams. Deputy Randy Phillips also investigated. On Aug. 27, Virginia Myers of Dollar General in St. Marks reported a retail theft. Two females were observed with purses that appeared to be full of unpaid for store items. One of the females became aggressive and threw a bakery item back on a shelf after being observed taking the item and placing it in her purse. The vehicle left the area northbound on Woodville Highway. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. AUGUST 28 On Aug. 28, a concerned citizen from Crawfordville reported nding an application for a commercial driver license with a date on it from 2005. The name on the application is that of a Wakulla resident who died in 1976. A suspect has been identi ed and the investigation continues. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On Aug. 28, Wal-Mart in Crawfordville reported a retail theft. Store employees allegedly observed Tiffany Alane Thompson, 30, of Crawfordville conceal cosmetics and jewelry in her purse and on her person. She left the store without paying for them. The 28 different items were valued at $188. Thompson was arrested and tr ansported to the Wakulla County Jail. Brenda Carol Thomas, 31, of Crawfordville was with Thompson at the time of the incident but did not possess any stolen property. Thomas was issued a trespass warning for the store. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. On Aug. 28, a Wakulla School District bus driver was at her home when she observed a young girl walk by her home and crouch behind her school bus. It was determined that the female was a runaway from Woodville. The 13-year-old girls mother reported her as missing to the Leon County Sheriffs Of ce earlier in the day. The mother picked up the child and transported her away from the scene. Prior to leaving, the teenager described some alleged criminal activity within her family that may have occurred in Leon County. The Leon Sheriffs Of ce was informed of the activity and the recovery of the child. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. On Aug. 28, Glenna Bradford of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim discovered four unauthorized transactions on her bank card. The transactions were valued at $383. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. On Aug. 28, Christine Deland of Tallahassee reported the theft of a roofing ladder. The ladder was never returned by a former employee who has been identi ed. The ladder is valued at $12,000. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. On Aug. 28, Erica Wilder of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Someone used her bank card to create $153 worth of unauthorized expenses. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. AUGUST 29 On Aug. 29, Deputy Nick Gray responded to a domestic complaint. As he was attempting to investigate the complaint, Deputy Gray attempted to discuss the matter with Dustin James Pope, 32, of Crawfordville. Pope cursed the deputy and refused to cooperate with the investigation. Deputy Gray arrested Pope for obstructing an officer without violence. Once informed he was under arrest, Pope ed the scene on foot. The deputy chased Pope on foot for 100 yards before Pope complied with commands to stop. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell and Deputy Mike Zimba also investigated. On Aug. 29, Vikas Kapoor of Crawfordville reported the theft of an air conditioning unit from his property. The unit is valued at $300 and a suspect has been identified. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On Aug. 29, Kim Pastor of Huddle House reported a theft. Lisa Ann Dean, 43, of Tallahassee was reportedly observed removing cash from the restaurant cash register. The restaurant reported the loss of $139 and Dean was arrested for petit theft. She was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. During the course of the investigation, it was discovered that the suspect also removed money from the register in April. The suspect was unable to remember how much money was taken during that incident. Deputy Will Hudson and Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. On Aug. 29, Eric Lee Allred of Crawfordville was arrested and charged with cultivation of marijuana after the WCSO Narcotics Unit discovered 37 marijuana plants at Allreds Crawfordville home. Investigators received information that plants were growing at the home and they were given consent to search the home by the homeowner. Plants were discovered in a shed tied upside down to a shing line. A bag of potting soil was also observed nearby. More plants were discovered in the back yard growing in pots. The suspects potted marijuana plants that were in the yard ranged in height from one foot to ve feet tall. The plants were uprooted and placed into the Evidence Division at the sheriffs of ce. The value of the plants is $37,000. On Aug. 29, Wal-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft. A suspect was allegedly observed taking items from the general merchandise aisle and concealing the items on his person. The suspect purchased a grocery item but failed to pay for $30 worth of merchandise. A decision was made not to pursue charges against the suspect due to diminished mental status. However, Wal-Mart requested a trespass warning be issued against the Crawfordville man. Lt. Jimmy Sessor and Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On Aug. 29 Kathryn Lambert of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Two suspicious charges were observed on the victims bank card. The charges totaled $147 and were created in Mission, Texas. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. On Aug. 29, Wal-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft. Aeisha Laquida Reddick, 32, of Tallahassee attempted to leave the store without paying for $65 worth of merchandise. During the investigation, the suspect repoprtedly gave deputies a false name and could not provide a valid driver license despite admitting driving to Wal-Mart. She was charged with retail theft, giving a false name to law enforcement of cers and driving with a suspended or revoked driver license with knowledge. Deputy Randy Phillips, Detective Lorne Whaley and Deputy Bill Poole investigated. On Aug. 29, Debra Blount of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Three unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank card, totaling $271. The charges were created in Texas. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. On Aug. 29, Ricky Perkins of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Three unauthorized charges were observed on his bank card from Colorado. The charges totaled $375. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,070 calls for service during the past week including 14 re alarms; 19 business and residential alarms; 80 citizen contacts; 21 disturbances; 18 abandoned E-911 cell calls; 11 regular abandoned E-911 calls; 25 regular E-911 calls; 10 information contacts; 45 investigations; 50 medical emergencies; 357 business and residential security checks; 26 special details; 28 subpoena services; 11 suspicious people; 10 thefts; 58 traf c enforcements; 109 traffic stops; 12 disabled vehicles; and 11 reckless vehicles. Find us on (850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.com LubeXpert.us$6.00 $6.00 OFF OFFExp. 9/30/2012Mon. Fri. 8am 6pm Sat. 8am 4pm 2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327TEXT LUBEEX TO 55678 FOR INSTANT SAVINGS!FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGE FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGEFull services include: New Oil (5qts. Mobil) New Filter Brake Fluid Check Power Steering Fluid Check Battery Check Transmission Fluid Check Fill Washer Fluid Inspect Belts & Hoses Check All Exterior Lights Lube Chasis Vacuum Interior$3399 less $6 = $2799 + tax HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 15ASpecial to The NewsOn Aug. 29, Eric Lee Allred, 28 of Crawfordville was arrested and charged with cultivation of marijuana after the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office Narcotics Unit discovered 37 marijuana plants at Allreds Crawfordville home, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Investigators received information that plants were growing at the home and they were given consent to search the home by the homeowner. Plants were discovered in a shed tied upside down to a shing line. A bag of potting soil was also observed nearby. More plants were discovered in the back yard growing in pots. The suspects potted marijuana plants ranged in height from one foot to ve feet tall. The plants were uprooted and placed into the Evidence Division at the sheriffs of ce. The value of the plants is $37,000.Crawfordville man busted growing pot Eric Lee Allred Continued from Page 1A To implement the amendment, the state Marine Fisheries Commission and, later, the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, had to de ne what a gill net is. Basically, the agencys de nition comes down to how big the meshes in the net are. Two inch stretch mesh is legal, but three-inch mesh is an illegal gill net. But shermen claim the smaller mesh nets result in wasteful hauls of bycatch up to 98 percent of whats in their nets is juvenile sh that die from being caught and they cant sell. So some members of Wakulla Fishermens Association Ronald Fred Crum, Jonas Porter and Keith Ward led a lawsuit in Wakulla Circuit Court claiming the small mesh nets are violating the constitutional amendment. Attorney Ron Mowrey, who represents the fishermen, has argued that the goal of the constitution takes precedence over the states rules created to implement and enforce the amendment. Assistant Attorney General Jonathan Glogau contended that issues shermen are bringing up in this case are nothing new and have been litigated over and over since the passage of the amendment. The First District Court of Appeal has repeatedly upheld the two-inch mesh requirement as a valid exercise in rulemaking. But Judge Fulford, who at one point described herself as knowing absolutely nothing about nets, never having touched one in her life, has been a quick study. In her effort to learn more about how the nets are used, Fulford wants to go watch shermen haul their nets. Glogau strenuously objected to that. On Tuesday, Sept. 4, Glogau led his objection to the judges proposed viewing of nets being hauled, contending it is improper and outside the controlled environment of the courtroom. Fulford will hear motions on that matter at a hearing on Monday, Sept. 10, at 7:30 a.m. After a full day of testimony last week, both sides agreed it would take three weeks to get the court transcript, and they would then submit their proposed findings of fact and proposed order 10 days after that meaning it will be at least a month, and very likely longer, before the court rules. Fishermen contend that they arranged to work with the FWC in 2005 on a study to compare the shing ef- cacy of two inch vs. three inch nets. They claim that state biologist Brent Winner refused to participate in the study anymore after seeing the results of the catch that the smaller, legal gear caught 98 percent bycatch and only a few legal mullet, while the larger net caught legal-size mullet and no bycatch. On the stand, Winner disputed that the 2005 incident was a study. Rather, he said he had been requested by FWC to work with Crum on what he said was alternative shing gear. Winner said he didnt participate after seeing that shermen were using the nets like gill nets. On direct examination by Glogau, Winner showed charts and gures indicating that the majority of the mullet caught in Florida is by cast net 98 percent of the catch on the east coast, while about 20 percent of shers on the Gulf Coast use the two-inch seines. Winner also said that mullet stocks have shown a slight increase over the past 20 years, certainly since the passage of the net limitation. He disputed the fishermens contention that mullet stocks are being negatively affected by the smaller mesh nets. I dont believe the nets are having a detrimental effect, he said. I dont like seeing dead juvenile sh either, or bycatch. But, he said, theres no evidence that the stocks of mullet are being effected by the nets. On cross examination, Mowrey got Winner to admit that the state has never really done any testing on what effects the smaller nets have, and that he had never used a net that size. Winner also acknowledged that he doesnt believe its really possible to catch mullet with a seine net. Back on re-direct, Glogau focused his questions on there not being any indication of problems with mullet stocks. Judge Fulford then asked Winner to de ne over shing, waste and unnecessary killing terms used in the amendment as its goal.Judge Fulford hears net shing case The Wakulla NewsNotice for another suit led at WCSOStafff Report A former lieutenant with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office filed a charge of discrimination with the department, claiming she was dismissed after receiving different treatment than other employees with medical conditions. Lisa Spears, a white female, worked for the sheriffs of ce in the jail beginning in September 2004 and was dismissed April 2012. According to the charges on file with the WCSO, Spears claims she was dismissed because of medical disability. Spears noti ed the WCSO in September 2011 that she had a serious medical condition and had surgery in March 8 and reported back to work on March 12. On March 16, she was given a notice of termination effective April 9. Spears claims she was given notice of termination due to her disability. The sheriffs of- ce contended the job duty was being replaced. Spears requested an accommodation to another job duty that would allow her to receive her post surgery medical treatments. In response, she claims she was offered a demotion with a pay cut and a job duty that would not allow her to receive her medical treatments. Spears took medical leave for her post surgery treatment starting on March 22, 2012. While on medical leave, she claims she was presented with falsified Family Medical Leave Act documents and was harassed with constant surveillance at her home with deputies driving by. Spears was terminated on July 13. She claims other employees were treated differently with respect to medical accommodation, including Sheriff Donnie Crum. Spears is represented by Tallahassee attorney Marie Mattox. The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bareld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of 4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida To make a donation to the auction or for more information about the event, please contact: Sue Belford at 850-926-4244 or e-mail FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com Friends of Wakulla County Public Library Bring your family & friends Bid on great items Support your Library Programs The Silent Auction includes Gift Certi cates, Health and Beauty Products, Auto Detailing Supplies, Baby Items, Fishing Charter, Gifts, Artwork, Dinners, Wine and Lots More!Food & Drinks will be provided. SECOND ANNUAL is proud to announce that Dr. Chukwuma M. Okoroji is now providing Obstetrics and Gynecology services 1st & 3rd Thursday of each month CRMC Medical Group Building, 2382 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite-D, Crawfordville FL. We accept most insurance, including BCBS, CHP, Medicaid and more. To schedule your appointment or for more information Call 850-320-6054NatureCoastWomensCare.com

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LES HARRISONWakulla Extension DirectorAnyone taking an early evening walk in north Florida during the late summer/ early autumn has experienced the near deafening calls of cicadas (Magicicada spp.). More commonly identi- ed as locust or Katydids in the south, their nearmechanical buzzing usually originates from trees during the day or twilight hours. These seldom seen or captured insects known for their raucous, sometimes undulating, chorus do leave strategically placed souvenirs for the sharp-eyed observer. This discarded residue of their early life is a highly valued tool for many elementary school boys with a prank in mind. Their nymph skeletons are often seen on the trunks of trees or on shrubs. These opaque brown shells are left behind when the cicada outgrows it. The process is similar in other species with an exterior having limited expansion potential. In some states cicadas are famous for their periodic appearance in colossal numbers, sometimes as many as 1.5 million per acre. These once every 13 to 17 year swarms do not occur in Florida. The 19 Florida cicada species fall into three groups based on overall size measured by the length of the forewings. They produce their songs with timbals, paired drumlike structures on the sides of the abdominal segments. A muscle attached to the timbal plate causes the timbal ribs to pop inward and pop outward when relaxed. In Florida, only males have timbals and the females are mute. Most sounds made by males are calling songs which serve to attract females. Cicada nymphs live in underground burrows where they feed on xylem sap from roots of grasses or woody plants. Because xylem sap is low in nutrients, nymph development takes several years. All cicadas molt four times underground. When the cicada nymph is ready for its fth and nal molt, it makes its way to the surface. It climbs a short distance up a tree trunk or stem, anchors itself and molts for the last time, becoming an adult. Contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u .edu/ to learn more about cicadas and other area insects.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u edu or at (850) 926-3931.The love song of our Florida cicadas A series of photos showing a cicada escaping its nymphal skeleton. The cast skeleton will remain attached to the foliage and the adult will expand its wings, darken, and y away. PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Ofce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m. (850) 877-55892770 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 110, Tallahassee, FL 32308 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.com Stephanie Lee, MDDr. Lee is joining Dr. Michael Douso and Dr. Kathrine Lupo at Capital Regional Womens Health. As an FSU School of Medicine graduate, she is happy to return to Tallahassee.Capital Regional Womens Health accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers.Next Day Appointments AvailableCapital Regional Medical Center Welcomes Dr. Stephanie Lee Specializing in Gynecology & Obstetrics Expert physicians.Quality obstetrical & gynecological care. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GET READY FOR HUNTING !!" 2012 Go to www.bigbendhospice.org to Sign-up Today! 11:30am Registration and Lunch 12:30pm Tee-o October 26, 2012Wildwood Country ClubSAVE THE DATE!For more information, call Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308Wakulla County Big Bend Hospice

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Concussion training for school coachesStory, Page 5BWar Eagle cheerleaders Varsity and JV Photos, Page 5BWakulla-Mosley game photosPage 3Bsports news and team views SportsWar Eagles pound MosleyWakulla looks sharp in opening game, rolling to 44-10 winSpecial to The NewsIt will be a special football season this year as David Miller kicks off his nal months as Superintendent of Schools. Miller is as much a part of high school football in Wakulla County as are the Friday night lights. He said this is the rst time the rst game of the season has brought such a mix of emotions as his November retirement approaches. Its a different feeling. Im really going to miss it, he said. But at the same time, I believe its time for someone else to step in and take over. Over the years, Miller has earned respect as a leader. Forty-five years ago Wakulla football was born. The year was 1967 and Miller was a starting strong side offensive tackle and the punt team kicker. From the very beginning, Wakulla was strong, nishing with a 9-1 record and District Championship in its inaugural year. The same year, Miller was the Wakulla baseball teams starting catcher when the team finished in the State Final Four. He has been involved from the ground up. Wakulla football has been led by Ron Hinson [1967-1969], Jerry Reynolds [1970-1971], Clayton Wooten [1972-1974], Rick Smith [1975-1976], JD Jones [1977-2006] and Scott Klees [2007-present]. Miller was hired to coach at his almamater in 1973. Continued on Page 5B By JOEY JACOBSRMS CoachThe Riversprings Middle School 2011 football season was one for the ages. It was a season of rsts. The Bears had their games broadcast on the radio, captured a conference championship, and posted an undefeated season. De nitely a hard act to follow, said RMS head football coach Joey Jacobs. A lot of folks are expecting us to be down this year, because we lost a lot of eighth graders. They are guys that have immediately contributed to the high schools JV and varsity program. Two of our players from last season started on offense Friday night against Mosely. It is obvious that RMS will miss playmakers Keith Gavin, Monterious Loggins, Antonio Morris, and Feleip Franks, as well as defensive stalwarts Isaiah Youmas, Kyle Weaver, and Josh Strickland. We lost a lot, but the cupboards are far from bare, said Coach Jacobs. Although the Bears return only two starters on offense and three on defense, the coaching staff is excited about some of the younger talent poised to step up, both on the offensive and defensive sides of the ball. On offense, Mr. Everything Demarcus Lindsey returns for his 8th grade campaign, along with fellow eighth grade standout Jacob Austin. Everybody pretty much knows about Demarcus and Jacob, so they arent taking anybody by surprise, but Jake McCarl, Justin Davis, Matt Bowyer, and Kam Rosier will step right in and contribute in a major way, Jacobs said. Continued on Page 5BIts David Millers last football season as Wakullas superintendent of schools PHOTO BY BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSuperintendent of Schools David Miller on the sidelines for the War Eagles home opener against Moseley, giving a pat on the back to Wakulla Athletic Director Mike Smith. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netFor a rst game, we looked really good, said Head Coach Scott Klees after his War Eagles opened their season at home with a 44-10 win over Mosley-Lynn Haven. Our young guys and special teams were clicking, Coach Klees said. You dont usually see that in the rst game... I was very pleased with the outcome. The things he was most pleased with, Klees said, were No. 1, we didnt turn the ball over with the rst group. And No. 2, how physical we were and we were very physical with some of the squib kicks. In Wakullas rst offensive possession, Klees was visibly upset with quarterback Caleb Stephens. He explained later that he felt Stephens hadnt made the proper read on a pass play, and Klees pulled him for a series. On Wakullas next possession, with the ball at the Mosley 18 yard line and facing a third down and 12, freshman quarterback Feleipe Franks connected with his brother, receiver Jordan Franks, a junior, on a slant pass over the middle for a touchdown. The extra point was good and the War Eagles were up 7-0. Stephens later returned to the game and played well including ripping off a 55-yard touchdown run of his own in the third quarter. Klees was obviously proud of Stephens, noting that run of his was named the No. 1 Play of the Week on WCTV. Quarterback is a tough position to play, Klees said, and added that its especially tough to play quarterback for him because his expectations are high. In the second quarter, the Dolphins scored on fourth down and 2 when Mosley running back fumbled in the end zone and it was recovered. The game was tied at 7-7. Speedster Demetrius Lindsey took the kickoff and returned it to the Dolphin 33 yard line. Monterious Loggins broke a run to the 7 yard line. And Jordan Franks caught his second TD pass of the evening. The point after was missed, and the War Eagles were up 13-0. A hard-hit on the squib kickoff caused a fumble that was recovered by Wakulla at the Dolphins 45. From there Demetrius Lindsey broke a long run to score. The War Eagles went for two and kicker Dillon Norman, a speedy back himself, scored on a sweep to the right side to put the War Eagles up 21-7. On the Dolphins next possession, they converted a fourth down to keep the drive alive, and were also helped by a facemask penalty that gave them a rst-and-goal at the 6. Unable to push it in, Mosley settled for a eld goal to make it 21-10. Continued on Page 3BRIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLCupboards arent bare, coach says War Eagle quarterback Caleb Stephens takes off on a 55-yard run for score. NEXT OPPONENT: Taylor County Bulldogs in Perry on Friday, Sept. 7, at 7:30 p.m. Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111 Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Sept. 6 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Sept. 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Sept. 8 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. Sunday, Sept. 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. Monday, Sept. 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Sept. 11 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will hold its monthly program at 7 p.m. at the library. The guest speaker is local historian Betty Green. She will be talking about the old schools and classrooms. Wednesday, Sept. 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.Special EventsThursday, Sept. 6 HOUSTON TAFF MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held at Wildwood Country Club. Entrance fee for the tournament is $500 per team or $125 per player. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m. with a 12:30 p.m. Shotgun Start. The tournament format will be Select a Shot.There will be three contests, including Closest to the Pin, Longest Drive, and Putting Contest. The total fee for all three is $20 per player. For more information, contact Steve Brown at 570-3910 or Tara C. Sanders at 926-5211 or 566-8272. CONVENTION WATCH PARTY will be held by the Wakulla County Democratic Party beginning at 7:30 p.m. at their headquarters at 1626 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. Gather with them to watch President Obama accept the nomination at the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte. Volunteers are encouraged to attend. Call 745-6169 for more information. Saturday, Sept. 8 ST. MARKS YACHT CLUB will host Dr. Felicia Coleman, director of the FSU Coastal and Marine Laboratory, as its featured guest at the Clubs Up Close and Personal Spotlight Event at 7:30 p.m. The Club is located at 36 Yacht Club Lane. The public is invited to attend. Seating is limited, so reservations should be made by calling (850) 925-6606. In a conversational-style interview led by Dr. Betty Ann Korzenny, adjunct professor, Florida State University, School of Communication, she and Coleman will discuss what in uenced Coleman to pursue her study of sea life, and the local and international impact of the Laboratorys research. WAKULLA GARDENS COMMUNITY MEETING will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. at Pioneer Baptist Church at the corner of Spring Creek Highway and Beachwood. They will be reviewing improvement ideas. A SWIFT NIGHT OUT will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Park rangers will host the event which offer guests an opportunity to witness the roosting of the chimney swifts. The small twittering birds assemble in great numbers in both the spring and the fall of the year. At dusk they begin circling the Wakulla Springs Lodge. As darkness begins to descend upon the lodge, the chimney swifts begin their descent into one of its unused chimneys. The program is free with park admission. Call 850-561-7286 to let park staff know youre coming. YARD SALE will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. by the Wakulla County Historical Society at the museum, 24 High Drive, right behind the Courthouse. The museum will also be open during these hours. BLUE RIBBON REUNION will be held at the Wakulla Democratic Party Headquarters located in the North Pointe Center, 1626 Crawfordville Highway, Unit B, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The free event will recognize the core group of volunteers that helped elect President Obama in 2008 and will be the kickoff for volunteer efforts this fall, and will feature a barbecue picnic dinner. The Blue Ribbon Reunion is dedicated to the memory of Ralph Lewis and Annie Spivey. Lewis was instrumental in getting the 2008 campaign organized and Spivey, with help from her family, was the rst person to vote in Wakulla in 2008. Ralphs wife, Anna, and daughter will be attending. For more information or to RSVP, contact Kim Kramer at 445-8733 or email wakullaforobama@hotmail.com. Sunday, Sept. 9 WAKULLA GARDENS COMMUNITY MEETING will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. at Pioneer Baptist Church at the corner of Spring Creek Highway and Beachwood. They will be reviewing improvement ideas. Monday, Sept. 10 COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PROJECT will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Wakulla County Health Department. This event was re-scheduled and was originally planned for Aug. 28. The WCHD needs your assistance identifying health issues facing our community. All are invited to attend. RSVP to Tonya Hobby at 926-0401 ext. 217. Lunch will be provided. WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will meet at 1:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, call (850) 997-7400. Tuesday, Sept. 11 SEPT. 11 MEMORIAL SERVICE will be held at 8:45 a.m. at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. APALACHEE REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL will hold a public meeting of the Wakulla County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board at 10 a.m. at the library. In addition to its regular business, the agenda will include the adoption of the bylaws, the complaint/grievance procedures and the annual operating report. A public hearing will follow the meeting to which all persons are invited. Thursday, Sept. 13 NATIONAL MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SOCIETY FUNDRAISER LUNCHEON will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. at the University Center Club at FSU Doak Campbell Stadium. This event will raise awareness about MS and raise money to bene t those living with MS in North Florida. For more information, call (850)386-4843 or email MSluncheon@earthlink.net. Friday, Sept. 14 SILENT AUCTION will be held to bene t the Wakulla County Public Library from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. Items include gift certi cates, vacations, marine supplies, art, school supplies and more. Refreshments will be provided. Sign up to be a bidder, browse through a book of all the items and start bidding on Sept. 1 at the library. Call 9264244 or email FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com for more information. CAMPAIGN PARTY for County Commissioner Candidate Howard Kessler will be held at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, at 7:30 p.m. There will be music by Randall Big Daddy Webster. Desserts and refreshments will be served. Call 228-9641 for more information. Saturday, Sept. 15 A FAMILY NIGHT OUT will be held at the Senior Center at 7 p.m. Comedian and impressionist Michael Kelley will perform his show Voices That Change using his favorite singers, actors, and politicians. All is done in a way that delivers the Gospel message. Tickets are $10 each and can be purchased at the door or in advance by calling 210-1276. All proceeds go to the Wakulla Pregnancy Center. TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet from 10 a.m. to noon at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road. The group will have a special guest, Lee Nettles, who will introduce basic skateboarding for autistic children to the group. All safety equipment is provided, and it will be one on one with each child. All spectrum children and their children are invited. Call 274-9474 for more information. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Houston Taff Memorial Golf Tournament at Wildwood at 11:30 a.m. Yard Sale at the Historical Society Museum and Archives. from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Health Improvement Project at the health department at 10 a.m. Sept. 11 Memorial Service at 8:45 a.m. at the sheriffs of ce. ThursdaySaturdayMondayTuesday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Government Meetings Monday Sept. 10 SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold its nal budget hearing at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. WAKULLA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, Sept. 11 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop at 5 p.m. regarding Wakulla Gardens APAs Community Planning Assistance Team. Wednesday, Sept. 12 WAKULLA COUNTY CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD will hold a public hearing at 5:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, Sept. 13 OPEN HOUSE to view the updated ood maps and learn more about ood risks in Wakulla County will be held by the Northwest Florida Water Management District and the Federal Emergency Management Agency from 4 to 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Visit http://portal.nwfwmd oodmaps.com to view the maps. WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway. Call(850) 544-6133 for more information.By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorFriday Night Movie Our Friday night movie this week will be an acclaimed independent dark comedy starring Jack Black, Shirley McClaine and Mathew McConaughey. This PG-13 rated lm (for brief violence and language), tells the true story of Bernie Tiede (Black), who is an assistant funeral director in a small east Texas town and well liked by all. Bernie befriends, Ms. Nugent (McClaine), who not only is the richest lady in town but also the meanest. After becoming her personal assistant for more than two years, Bernie gets fed up with Ms. Nugents treatment of him and shoots her. He then keeps this fact from the town for 9 months while using her money to bene t the community and himself. He is so popular and she is so hated, that after the murder becomes public many say they wont convict if put on the jury. With the town saying what is illegal may actually be justice, the publicity seeking district attorney (McConaughey) must make a radical decision in order to prosecute Bernie. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for this 7 p.m. lm. Friends of Library Silent Auction Wed like to give everyone another reminder to join us at 6 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 14 for the second Annual Silent Auction to benefit the Friends of the Library. Over the past three years the Friends have saved the taxpayers of Wakulla County almost more than $75,000 with their donations to the library. Nearly 150 items will be on hand for your bidding pleasure and you can even place bids early by coming into the library and perusing the bid book. Many local businesses and library supporters have donated items, money and time to make this a success. So we hope that we get a huge crowd on the Sept. 14. Please contact me with any questions and I hope to see you there! New Computer Class Schedule The schedule of computer classes for September and October is now available on our website and at the front desk of the library. Once again Deanna Ramsey, our instructor, has a wide range of classes for our patrons. Everything from getting started with computers, to genealogy, to using a digital camera, and much more is offered. All classes are free to the public but must be signed up for ahead of time as seating is limited. Please take this chance to learn skills for work or pleasure! Library News... Political EventsThursday, September 27 POLITICAL FORUM for County Commission seats 1, 3, 5. Seat 1 will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Seat 3 at 7:30 p.m. and Seat 5 at 8:30 p.m.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 3BWar Eagles pound MosleyContinued from Page 1B After that, the War Eagle defense pretty much shut down the Dolphins. Klees credited Defensive Coach Grady Guest with making the right adjustment. The teams exchanged a couple of punts, then Loggins rumbled in for a 40 yard TD run. The point after was good, and with only a minute left in the half, Wakulla was up 28-10. On Mosleys next possession, defensive back Mikal Cromartie intercepted a pass and almost took in, but was tripped up on the 10. An over-the shoulder toss to the much-taller receiver Keith Gavin, a freshman who had a great game, was caught in the end zone but was called back on an illegal procedure penalty. With only a few ticks left on the clock for the half, Norman came in to kick a 25-yard eld goal to put the War Eagles up 31-10. In the third quarter, Stephens broke his long touchdown run showing some speed of his own, which put the War Eagles up 38-10. Later in the third, running back Sheldon Johnson had a long run for an apparent TD called back on a block in the back. With the ball rst and 10 at the War Eagles own 17, Dequon Simmons showed some explosive speed, breaking a long run for a touchdown. The extra point was missed, and the score was 44-10. In the fourth quarter, Klees gave some second time players some playing time. There were a couple of fumbles, but the Dolphins offense couldnt overcome the War Eagle defense to capitalize. We just wore them down, Klees said. Were a different type of team this year than last year, he said. Last year we had four or ve guys who were just extremely fast. We have one or two this year with that same speed but, as a team, were faster this year. I mean, overall. KNOCK EM BACK In addition to Players of the Week, Klees named Knock Em Back Players. This weeks players are: Offense: John Cole. Defense: Keith Gavin. Special Teams: Dalton Nichols. UP NEXT: TAYLOR COUNTY Theyre extremely good, Klees said of upcoming opponent Taylor County, which will host in Perry. They beat Trinity Christian-Ocala 42-37, and theyre a good team. They beat Dixie County 20-19. Theyre a very physical team a lot like us. Same tough kids. The game will go to who takes care of the ball, Klees predicted. And who plays the best special teams. JV KEEPS ON WINNING Klees also noted proudly that the junior varsity continued its winning streak, beating Madison County on Thursday. The JV has a 15-game winning streak going. Players of the Week JORDAN FRANKS 4 catches for 52 yards including 2 TDs MIKAL CROMARTIE Interception return for 78 yards, 9 tackles, 88% DILLON NORMAN 3 for 4 PAT, 1 for 1 FG, recovered pooch kickO ense Defense Special Teams PHOTO BY BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN Keith Gavin forced out of bounds after a catch and run. Wakulla students cheer on the War Eagles. Speedster Demetrius Lindsey breaks open a run for a touchdown. Dalton Norman brings down the Mosley runner. Dequon Simmons shows his speed on a TD run. The War Eagles come onto the eld to open their season against the Mosley Dolphins.BILL ROLLINS BILL ROLLINS BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS More photos online at thewakullanews.com

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By TIM LINAFELT Osceola.com Staff WriterThe skeptics will say that it was only Murray State. And, well, theyll be right. But remove for a moment the lenses colored by Florida States Football Championship Subdivision opponent and consider the staggering numbers put up by the Seminoles rushing attack Saturday night. Florida State ran for a total of 285 yards while not losing a single yard from scrimmage and punched in seven rushing touchdowns for the rst time in more than 20 years. Six players reached double-digits in rushing yardage. Five averaged at least 5.3 yards per carry. Three scored at least two touchdowns and one sophomore James Wilder Jr. became FSUs rst 100-yard rusher in its last six games. Meanwhile, senior Lonnie Pryor made the most of his ve carries, rushing for three touchdowns and 28 yards. Pryors three scores Saturday night matched his total output for the 2011 season. (Weve got) different kinds of backs and they all kind of bring something different to the table, FSU coachJimbo Fisher said. I think Lonnies playing extremely well, blocking and mixing his runs I thought the offensive line did a really nice job and we kept pounding that ball and pounding that ball. Sophomore Devonta Freeman contributed 64 yards on 10 carries, Debrale Smily added two touchdowns and 14 yards and senior Chris Thompson ran for a tough 32 yards in his rst action since breaking his back midway through last season. Thompson had an especially encouraging performance, starting at running back and breaking a handful of tackles for some tough yardage in the rst half. It felt amazing, man, Thompson said of his rst game back. Theres nothing like running out of that tunnel, just seeing Chief Osceola, Renegade, all of those things, man, it just had me excited I was just happy to be out there. Florida State also broke in a new offensive line that featured two new tackles, a pair of sophomore guards and a junior center. Theyll face tougher challenges this season, but that was true of last years offensive line, which struggled to get much push against Louisiana-Monroe and FCS opponent Charleston Southern in last seasons early matchups. Against ULM, FSU stumbled to a pedestrian 3.3 yards per carry and no back had more than 33 yards. A week later against Charleston Southern, the Seminoles improved to 4.6 yards per carry, but that gure is in- ated by a 41-yard run by Wilder that wouldve been negated by a penalty had CSU not declined the infraction to end the game. Quarterback EJ Manuel, who had a ne view of the action in the trenches, said he could tell an obvious difference between this group and last years even when just compared to the Charleston Southern game. De nitely. Even in short yardage, we had a push, Manuel said. It wasnt like guys were getting pushed back in the running backs lap. They were getting pushes and the running backs were just following those boys. We were just trying to not screw it up, left tackle Cam Erving said. Mission accomplished, at least for one night. Theyll face tougher challenges this season, but that was true of last years offensive line, which struggled to get much push against Louisiana-Monroe and FCS opponent Charleston Southern in last seasons early matchups. Against ULM, FSU stumbled to a pedestrian 3.3 yards per carry and no back had more than 33 yards. A week later against Charleston Southern, the Seminoles improved to 4.6 yards per carry, but that gure is in- ated by a 41-yard run by Wilder that wouldve been negated by a penalty had CSU not declined the infraction to end the game. Quarterback EJ Manuel, who had a ne view of the action in the trenches, said he could tell an obvious difference between this group and last years even when just compared to the Charleston Southern game. De nitely. Even in short yardage, we had a push, Manuel said. It wasnt like guys were getting pushed back in the running backs lap. They were getting pushes and the running backs were just following those boys. There will be bigger tests and bigger defensive lines to contend with as the season progresses. But the Seminoles saw enough Saturday night to take plenty of con dence into the remainder of their schedule. I think one thing people need to do is just wait for us to play a D-1 team if they want to talk about us versus a D-1 team, Manuel said. Just wait until we play one Wake Forest in two weeks. I thought they did a great job. I felt extremely protected in the pocket, as far as throwing, and the running lanes were there. Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MARTY COHEN GatorBait.net EditorWill Muschamp called it window dressing, which in the sweatstained, testosteronefueled football universe, has to qualify as a term of derision, right? If a team is resorting to some form of camouflage or subterfuge (that sounds at least a bit more football tough, doesnt it?), then it must be attempting to disguise some sort of weakness. Well, yes and no. Sure football is still basically the de nitive man-on-man game, where ultimately it comes down to beating the man in front of you, and the old bromides of blocking and tackling, all those Vince Lombardi-speak deals. But on a coaching level, its also a cerebral chess match on game day, trying to create mismatches, keeping the other side of the ball off-balance and guessing. We hear it all the time, if a player is thinking instead of reacting, hes already a step or two behind. Therein lies the bene t of Muschamps window dressing reference. Particularly in college football, when the weekly preparation time is so limited, and offenses can be so varied in approach (lets face it, all teams in the staid, afraid-to-try-anythingdifferent NFL basically run the same deal), subtle and not-so-subtle changes can cause sleepless nights for defensive coordinators. Its why there are so many more gimmick offenses in college football. With maybe four days of restricted practice and lm room time, it can be awfully thorny to prepare for a unique style of offense. Its one of the reasons why Oregons fast-break attack under coach Chip Kelly is a nightmare for defenses in the Pac-10, or -12, or whatever. Trying to get a handle on the combination of breakneck pace and athleticism on the eld is a near-impossible task. Its also a primary reason why Auburn in the 2010 BCS title game and LSU in the 2011 season opener were able to shut down the Ducks six weeks, or six months, of preparation time is a bit more effective than four days. And its why under-manned service academies like Navy and Air Force run the option and wishbone stuff, because opposing defenses dont see it on a weekly basis and dont really envy having to prepare for it once a season. Which brings us back to Muschamps window dressing, a term of endearment, if you will, for what were going to see from new offensive coordinator Brent Peases Florida offense in 2012. Pease utilizes a ton of pre-snap shifts and motion, sort of a lost art in todays no-huddle, fast-tempo, spread offensive approach. Its all about pace, wearing down the defense and preventing the normal ow of substitutions. In the copycat world of football, this is whats in vogue. The faster the pace, the more snaps, the bigger advantage for the offense. At least in theory, because teams adjust to what they see most often, and soon the unexpected becomes the norm. Its how Steve Spurrier turned the SEC on its ear in 1990, only to have buttoned-down Alabama running vereceiver sets by the end of the decade thats how football works. Its part of the reason why Muschamp is enamored with the idea of Floridas window dressing causing problems for the opposing defenses. And if its one thing a longtime defensive coordinator like Muschamp knows about the other side of the ball, its what gives defenses trouble in preparation and execution. Were going to (have) a little bit more imagination with formations, shifts, motions that create issues for a defense, Muschamp said. When youre getting ready for something that you dont see a lot in our league, honestly, because of no-huddle, people dont (use) motion anymore. They want to get on the ball and snap it as fast as they can, so you become pretty good at what youre accustomed to seeing a lot. So we see a lot of no-huddle and a lot tempo and a lot of what I would say, pro-style quarterback-under-center, in our league. We dont see a lot of multiple motions and shifts. In a four day period in game week and getting ready for that, especially when you have to adjust to some different motions and shifts each week, it creates issues defensively. Those are (some) things that are different that certainly will complement our players, our scheme and our system very well. FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M at #5 OklahomaSaturday, 7 p.m.The game can be seen on famuathletics.com. #24 Florida at Texas A&MSaturday, 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. Savannah State at #6 Florida StateSaturday, 6 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3. James Wilder Jr. vaults over a Murray State defender during second half action.O ensive Operation O ensive Operation Gets Dressed Up Gets Dressed Up\002btnfrfnfnbtbb Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Lonnie Pryor skips into the end zone for his rst of three touchdowns on the day PHOTOS BY Colin Hackley Osceola

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 5BContinued from Page 5B Riversprings will also eld an entirely revamped offensive line, with zero returners. The line will be anchored by eighth graders, center Jacob Marin, guard R.J. Kinard and guard Marlon Ng. Coach Jacobs is impressed with the progress made at the quarterback position by eighth grader Zach Norman. Zach is playing lights out right now, and he is vindicating my belief in him. He has been being groomed since 6th grade to step up this season and he has done just that. According to the coaches, the offense is progressing nicely, but its the defense that is making the giant strides. Coach Louis Hernandez said, As hard as it is to fathom, this years defensive line may be better than last years. The D-line consists of Tyrone Williams and Cody Zanco, with Adrian Morris and R.J. Kinard manning one of the DT spots. The linebacker corps is solid and athletic. As a unit, they could pick up where last seasons Lights Out defense left off. The Bears will begin their 2012 season on Thursday, Sept. 6 in Live Oak against the Suwannee Bulldogs. They will return home the following Tuesday, Sept. 11 to face the Marianna Bulldogs at J.D. Jones Stadium. Both games begin at 6 p.m.Cupboards arent bareContinued from Page 1B Miller has played for Hinson, coached with Reynolds, Wooten, Smith and Jones and hired Klees. The opportunity to participate in a football program, as a player, a coach, athletic director, press box coach and commentator (also known as fence jockey), at a school that I love, in my hometown, has been one of the highlights of my career, said Miller. To be a part of a high-performing academic and athletic legacy is invigorating. Precious few programs across the state have the combination of academic and athletic excellence as does Wakulla. As I reminisce over the years, the special place the Wakulla High School holds for me will be one of my favorite memories. After 17 plus years as the Superintendent of Wakulla County Schools, Miller said, Its been a great ride. Thank you all for your love and support. Millers last season By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA training seminar on concussions was held recently for coaches of all sports at the middle school and high schools in Wakulla County. The training was given in August, prior to school starting, by members of the Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic Foundation. The focus of the training was on preventing and treating concussions, or traumatic brain injuries. Coaches and administrators were there to learn the cause, signs and symptoms, recognition and care of a concussion. The main thing is the prevention of an initial concussion and long term care after one happens, said Rick Williams, director of Sports Medicine Outreach for the TOC. The hope is to treat the initial concussion promptly to prevent additional damage, he said. This additional damage can be anything that contributes to brain function. Some side effects are mood changes, loss of sleep, depression, irrational behavior and many others, he said. Gov. Rick Scott signed the youth concussion law on April 27, which went into effect on July 1. It requires schools to adopt guidelines to educate coaches and of cials about youth concussions; the removal of a youth athlete who appears to have suffered a concussion from play or practice at the time of the suspected concussion; and requires a youth athlete to be cleared by a licensed health care professional trained the evaluation and management of concussions before returning to play or practice. Wakulla County School Board has held these similar training and education programs from TOC for the last four years thanks to Human Resources Director Karen Wells, William said. Wakulla County was having us talk about the risk factors in concussions long before it was an en vogue topic. TOC has been offering the Concussion Management Program for the last three years, which includes training and Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) of athletes. This test provides preseason neurocognitive baseline testing and post injury testing of athletes. It is the same assessment used for college and professional athletes, said Dr. Andrew Wong, orthopedic surgeon with TOC and the person who proposed the idea. ImPact helps us get beyond what we can see, said Wong. ImPact allows an athletic trainer to compare the athletes current test to their baseline following a head injury. It is a tool to determine if the athlete is ready to go back into the game, he said. It is not a substitute for a medical evaluation. Wong attended a conference four years ago where he learned about the ImPACT from a doctor in Jacksonville. Following that conference he proposed that TOC begin offering the testing. It began in 2009 and has grown to 36 high schools. The program is offered to public schools throughout North Florida in connection with the Panhandle Area Education Consortium. Wong decided to propose the idea of implementing ImPACT in area high schools firstly because he is a parent and wanted to ensure his children were protected, he said, and secondly, because not much was being done for young athletes and dealing with and preventing concussions. Its so important, Wong said. This potentially has lifelong consequences. When an athlete sustains a head injury, the risk for a second injury is even greater, especially when it wasnt properly managed or treated in the rst place, Williams said. When an athlete gets back into the game after a head injury and gets hit again, there is the potential for second impact syndrome, which is the big thing doctors worry about, Wong said. High school athletes are more vulnerable because they are not fully developed yet. When this syndrome occurs, death occurs 50 percent of the time, he said. This is what we are trying to prevent, Wong said. Were trying to save lives. Williams said they also stress the need for proper instruction on hitting and tackling and an emphasis on strength and conditioning of the neck and upper body. Following this training, another education program will be held with the parents. Then the athletic trainers will perform the baseline testing on student athletes, which is not limited to football, but is offered to all sports and anyone who wants to be tested, Wong said. TOC will serve a resource for the school and provide medical assistance. Were happy that we will lessen injuries and make sports safer, Wong said.Concussion training is held for school coaches Wakulla school coaches and personnel, above, gather for training on the prevention and treatment of concussions recently. Dr. Edward Wong, right, who designed the ImPACT test for athletes.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENVARSITY SQUAD: Bottom: Haley Hurst, Crystal Posey, Leah Kennedy, Macy Allen, Brianna Gubala, Ashley Stevens, Sara Mathis, Corban Scott, Kala Picket, Jacey Todd, Sydney Russ. Top: Alana Townsend, Erica Harrell, Charity Wilson, Brittany Herold, Maddie Champany, Coach Lori Sandgren, Brandon Dawkins, Cary Mathers, Makayla Payne, Baylee Baze, Tyler Kinard. JV SQUAD: Bottom: Nikki Barnes, Breanna Yates, Taylor Seber, Laurelee Holcomb, Carson Strickland, Kasey James, Sarah Marie Russell, Back: Brooke Allen, Katelynn Underwood, Tori Crum, Harley Arrington, Kirsten ParrishCaptain, Coach Bethany Evans, Madison Edwards Co-Captain, Emily Newsome, Kaitlyn Panzarino, Saranne Beal, Cassie Doyle. Wakulla War Eagle cheerleadersPHOTOS PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS J.P. King Auction Company, Inc., licensed Florida Real Estate Broker #1011371; J. Scott King, Broker #BK359106; J.P. King Auction Company, Inc., AB1199; James S. King, #AU358; Lanny G. Thomas, #AU3589; Buyers Premium 10%800.558.5464 THIRD QUARTER 2012 BANK AUCTIONOVER 200 PROPERTIES MANY SELLING ABSOLUTE!To the Highest Bidder No Minimums, No Reserves!Single Family Residences, Townhomes, Commercial Buildings, Residential & Commercial Land and More!4 AUCTION EVENTS! PENSACOLA TALLAHASSEE JACKSONVILLE ORLANDO Properties located throughout South Alabama, Northern and Central Florida.These auction events will provide unique opportunities to purchase prime real estate consisting of permanent residences or vacation homes as well as residential and commercial development land and lots. 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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Bromna Bykovo Croydon Dulles Dumont Dyce Elmdon Ezeiza Fornebu Gatwick Hamburg Hurn Idlewild JFK Kai Tak Kastrup Kennedy Kerkyra Lod Logan Maplin Nadi Narita OHare Orly Oslo Prestwick Rhoose Roissy Santa Maria This page sponsored in part by: Schipol Shannon Speke St Paul Tacoma Tegel

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SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEmploymentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements 000CHV9 BOXER RETAIL CRYSTAL RIVER MALL Good Things to Eat Raker FarmsWere Still Here Blanched & Frozen Peas, Okra. And we process Beef, Hogs & Deer850-926-7561 Lost 4 month old male boxer, fawn(red), black face w/white stripe, Last seen in Wakulla station area (850) 597-5064 lost 16 year old Shih Tzu .. I am desperate to find him. His name is Smutely, male/ neutered/ blind/ deaf/and not use to being outside LOST Sunday 5pm from 198 Edgar Poole Road Crawfordville 850 363 2351 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Medical MEDICAL CAREERS begin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEVcertified. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com Medical MEDICALOFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED Become a Medical Office Assistant at SC Train!! No Experience needed! Online training gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 NURSING CAREERS BEGIN HERE -GETTRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENTASSISTANCE. CALLCENTURA INSTITUTE (877)206-6559 Professional AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Trades/ Skills ATTN DRIVERS:Apply Now, 13 Driver Positions Top 5% Pay. 401K, Great Insurance, New KWConventionals, Need CDLClass ADriving Exp (877)258-8782 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDLTraining. Job ready in just 15 days! (888)368-1964 Trades/ Skills DRIVERSAnnual Salary $45K to $60K. Quarterly Bonus. Flexible hometime. Refrigerated and Dry Van Freight. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com DRIVERS/ Class AFlatbed.GETHOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport Trades/ Skills Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com. EOE Trades/ Skills GIGANTIC AUCTIONSeptember12-13, 2012, 3475 Ashley Rd., Montgomery, Alabama. Crawler tractors & loaders, hydraulic excavators, articulating dumps, roll-offs and trucktractors, motor scrapers & graders, loader backhoes, wheel loaders, forklifts, trenchers, skid steers, paving & compaction, rollers, tri-tandem & single axle dumps, lowboys, skidders, feller bunchers, log loaders & trailers, farm tractors, travel trailers. Over 800 items will be sold! For details visit www.jmwood.com. J.M. Wood Auction Co., Inc. (334)264-3265. Bryant Wood Al lic#1137 Schools/ Instruction MEDICALBILLING TRAINING!Train for Medical Billing Careers at SCTrain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placement assistance after training! HS/GED/PC Needed (888)872-4677 General DOUBLE-WIDE MOBILE HOME 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Family Room w/ fireplace; large kitchen w/ island and pantry; master bath has shower & garden tub; walk-in closets; office and large utility room. $38,000 Call Jennifer at 850-519-5113 General For SaleKimball upright Piano with Bench and Music $1000.00 Treadmill $500.00 Sleeper Sofa $200.00Call 524-6182 anytime Promotional prices start at $19.99 a month for DISH for 12 months. Call Today and ask about Next Day Installation. (800)336-7043 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Near Lake Ellen 32 Merwyn Drive Nice and well kept, close to great schools $550 mo. (850) 443-3300 MOBILE HOME FOR RENT 1, 2,3 BEDROOMS (850) 251-1468 SusanCounciI @earthlink.net Apartments Furnished SHELLPOINTFantastic view from 3rd floor wrap deck. Studio apartment has full size kitchen, huge bath, W/D, and king Murphy bed. Furnished. $650/month plus utilities, 6-month lease 850-591-3306 Rental Houses PANACEACottage, for Rent 2/1, Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Rennovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, covered front proch & open back deck, Small pets acceptable Excellent fishing! $585/month 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $750/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1937 CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Br/2 Ba, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 Vacant Property 06261 W OAKLAWN HOMOSASSA, FL2.5 ACRES VACANT $35,000/BESTOFFER WILLING TO TRADE. CALLTODAY! 786-298-7825 Boats CANOE16FT. Aluminum Two Paddles $375. (850) 445-5386 Fictitious Name Notices 5362-0906 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, EricJoy Hartsfield Doing business as: Joy & Company at 38 Reservation Court with a mailing address of 38 Reservation Court desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 29th day of August 2012, Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News September 6, 2012 Self Storage Notices 5356-0906 TWN Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage 9/15 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Sabrina Brinkley David Moss Marilyn Mitchell Scott Hutchison Before the sale date of Saturday, September 15, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. August 30 & September 6, 2012 5356-0906 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 7B 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $830mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $825mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $700mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $625mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. INDOOR YARD SALE in CrawfordvilleSAT, SEPT 8 8:30am til 1pm HOUSEHOLD AND OUTDOOR ITEMS, SOME CLOTHES and SPORTING GOODS. 19 Shadeville Rd. (former Home Respiratory Solutions bldg.) 000CHV9 Store Fronts AvailableLowest Leasing Rates Ever! Busy Hwy 19 Crystal River location Anchored by national retail stores Newly refurbished Kiosks also available352-795-2585 www.thecrystalrivermall.com 1801 NE Hwy 19 Crystal River, FL 34428 AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432we sell and service most makes and models Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net SDKLFJLK LSDFOSat. Sept. 8, 8AM-Noonish. 2-Families cleaning houses!LOTS OF STUFF! No. of Library on 319. Cancel if rain. Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe WakuulanewsYouve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 5340-0906 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTYANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING: EVENT:Regular School Board Meeting at 5:45 p.m. Final Public Hearing on 2012-13 Budget at 6:00 p.m. DATE: Monday, September 10, 2012 TIME: Regular Meeting 5:45 p.m. Final Public Hearing 6:00 p.m. PLACE : School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting, Final Public Hearing on Budget For further information please contact: Superintendents Office Wakulla County School P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL32326, 850-926-0065 Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News September 6, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5361-0906 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075((2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: PAULA. STOKLEY Last known address of 244 CASORADR., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 The above individual is notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5341-0906 TWN vs. KEVIN R. GABYCase No. 4:12-CV-00053-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:12-CV-00053-RH-WCS CENTENNIALBANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN R GABYa/k/a KEVIN RILEYGABY; KERRYR. GABY; and WILDWOOD COUNTRYCLUB PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in the above-styled case on June 5, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, and the Amendment to Judgment of Foreclosure entered July 10, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 10th day of September 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Eastern T ime), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County and Franklin County, Florida: SEE EXHIBITS A, B AND C ATTACHED HERETO. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshal, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated: August 8, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL32591-3010 EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND ALSO MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 82 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER AND THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 1575.73 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARYOF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 480.95 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AND AN EXTENSION THEREOF 386.57 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF U.S. HIGHWAYNO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY225.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 385.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 225.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams lo5351-0906 TWN Estate of Ernest Theurer Case No. 12-79-CPNotice To Creditors IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case N.: 12-79-CP IN RE: The Estate of Ernest Edward Theurer, III Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Ernest Edward Theurer III, deceased, whose date of death was July 13, 2012, and the last four digits of whose social security number are 8403, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 0337. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 30, 2012 Attorney for Personal Representative:Personal Representative: Jean Theurer 281 SW 129th Terrace Newberry, Florida 32669-2783 Michelle L. Farkas Attorney for Jean Theurer Florida Bar Number: 25952 HOWARD M ROSENBLATT, P.A. 2830 NW 41 Street, Suite I Gainesville, Florida 32606 Telephone: (352) 373 7100 Fax: (352) 373 7320 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 30 & September 6, 2012 5354-0906 TWN vs. Advanced Builders Case No. 2011 CA707 Amended Notice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LEON COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO: 2011 CA707 DIVISION: CIRCUIT CIVIL CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff. v. ADVANCED BUILDERS & REMODELERS, INC. a Florida corporation; CAMELOT III, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; TRIM FAN, LLC a Florida limited liability company; JIMMYR. BENNETT; SHARYN R. BENNETT; COMMODORE COMMONS OF WAKULLA COUNTYPROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a dissolved Florida non-profit corporation; CAMELOT TOWNHOME OWNERSASSOCIATION, INC ., a Florida non-profit corporation; PEBBLE BROOKE SUBDIVISION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. a Florida non-profit corporation; TALLAHASSEE STATE BANK; and CITYOF TALLAHASSEE, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 11, 2012, an Order Cancelling and Rescheduling Sale dated July 10, 2012 and an Amended Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 10, 2012, in Case No.2011 CA707, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Leon County, Florida, in which Cadence Bank, N.A. is the Plaintiff and Advanced Builders & Remodelers, Inc., Camelot III, LLC, Trim Fan, LLC Jimmy R. Bennett, Sharyn R. Bennett, Commodore Commons of Wakulla County Property Owners Association, Inc., Camelot Townhome OwnersAssociation, Inc., Pebble Brooke Subdivision Homeowners Association, Inc., Tallahassee State Bank and City of Tallahassee are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Suite 100 of the Leon County Courthouse, in Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on September 27, 2012, the property, in the order as set forth in the Amended Final Judgment of Foreclosure, including property located in both Leon County, Florida and Wakulla County, Florida, and more particularly described as follows: Leon County (Lot 6-G Pebble Brooke) Loan #60608315 LOT6, BLOCK G IN PEBBLE BROOKE, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 17, PAGE(S) 44 -48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. (Lot 7-G Pebble Brooke) Loan #60608323 LOT7, BLOCK G IN PEBBLE BROOKE, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 17, PAGE(S) 44 -48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. (Lot 8-G Pebble Brooke) Loan #60608331 LOT8, BLOCK G IN PEBBLE BROOKE, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 17, PAGE(S) 44 -48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. (Pebble Brooke Lots) Loan #60723319 THE FOLLOWING LOTS IN PEBBLE BROOKE, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 17, PAGE(S) 44 -48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA: BLOCK B: LOTS 13-22 BLOCK H: LOTS 1-2, 6-9 AND W akulla County (Camelot Lots) Loan #60723319 LOTS 11-41, CAMELOTPHASE III, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 4, PAGE(S) 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: August 20, 2012 BOBINZER,Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/ Tesha DeMuth, Deputy Clerk (SEAL) Michael P. Bist Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia, & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Drive Tallahassee, Florida 32308 August 30 & September 6, 2012 5358-0913 TWN V. Tina Marie Quick Case No. 65-2011-CA-000221 Notice of Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000221 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TINAMARIE QUICK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TINAMARIE QUICK; JODYQUICK; UNKNOWNSPOUSE OF JODYQUICK; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: Lot 27 and the East 1/2 of Lot 26, block 14 GREINERS ADDITION TO CRAWFORDVILLE, according tot he plat thereof,as recorded in Plat Book 1, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 at 11:00 oclock A.M., on September 27, 2012. DATED THIS 22nd DAYOF ,AUGUST, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 22nd day of August 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (SEAL) THIS INSTRUMENTPREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL33619-1328 ,Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis,Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225,Tallahassee, FL32303 850.577.4401at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Spetember 6 & 13, 2012 5358-0913 cated on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. EXHIBIT B Parcel 1: Lot 21 of Wildwood Country Club, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 35, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 10, Block E of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 3: Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Less and Except: that part of Lots 1 and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, deeded to the State of Florida, recorded 12/19/1973 in Official Records Book 39, Page 784, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 4: Lots 26 and 27, Block O of Lanark Beach Unit No. 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, all water and riparian rights, ditches, and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, and replacements that may now, or at any time the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). EXHIBIT C BEGIN AT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 13 ADISTANCE OF 726.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EDGE OF SWIRL SWAMP, THENCE RUN ALONG THE EDGE OF SAID SWIRLSWAMPAS FOLLOWS: NORTH 70 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 282.08 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 213.59 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 107.30 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 97.25 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 125.54 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 243.65 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 190.70 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 152.83 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 285.84 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 133.29 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID SWAMPS EDGE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 3340.12 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1530.27 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE ON THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 13, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY834.01 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 1560.24 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOTS 86 AND 87 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 131.30 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 660.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 528.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS OVER AND ACROSS THAT CERTAIN EASEMENT RECORDED OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 191, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News August 16, 23, 30 and September 6 2012 A1135183.DOC 5341-0906 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 22 Coral Way 3BR./2BA with 1 car garage and fenced in yard on 1/2 acre. Pets okay with $250. fee, $950.mo/$950 Deposit. 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available, all utilities included. 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./$900 Deposit 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of ofce space, fenced 82 Mimosa 3BR/1.5BA $650Mo./$650 Deposit 56 Myers Woods 3BR/2BA $1,000Mo./$1,000 Deposit Pets ok w/$250 pet fee 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA Available Sept. 1, $900Mo./$900 Deposit 14 Cutchin Ct. 3BR/2BA $650 mo/$650 Deposit. 145 Rochelsie: 2BR/2BA $700 mo and $700 security deposit. small pet ok with $250 pet fee 140 Duane St: 3BR/2BA $875 mo and $875 Security deposit. No smoking pets ok with owner approval and $250 pet fee Available Oct. 1. We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!2323 Surf Rd. 3BR/2BA Bayfront road on Ochlockonee Bay, Screened Porch, Deck and Dock. No Smoking. No Pets. $1,150 per month. 112 Captain James St. 4BR/2BA 2,280 sq. ft. MH on 9 acres. Located in North Wakulla near Woodville. Complete with replace, workshop and dishwasher. No Smoking. No Pets. $775 per month.Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Commercial building 4,300 square foot heated and cooled building on 1 acre of land Rents out for $1,800.00. Building is in excellent condition.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 9B 5352-0906 TWN vs. Smith, John W. Case NO.: 652008FC000259 Foreclosure IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2008-FC-000259 DIVISION: INDYMAC FEDERALBANK FSB, Plaintiff, vs. : JOHN W. SMITH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 14, 2012 and entered in Case NO. 65-2008-FC-000259 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein INDYMAC FEDERALBANK, FSB, is the Plaintiff and JOHN W. SMITH; BOBBYRAYSMITH, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN W. SMITH A/K/AJOHN WESLEYSMITH DECEASED; HERBERTLAMAR SMITH, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN W. SMITH A/K/AJOHN WESLEYSMITH DECEASED; WESLEYSMITH, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN W. SMITH A/K/AJOHN WESLEYSMITH DECEASED; STACYSMITH, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN W. SMITH A/K/AJOHN WESLEYSMITH DECEASED; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT LOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE AT11:00AM, on the 4th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 3 COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 18, T3S, R1W, AS MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT NO.1254, AND ACCEPTED BYCERTIFIED CORNER RECORD NO. 32915, AND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SECTION LINE 653.09 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 874.57 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 119, PAGE 984 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY377.09 FEET THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYRUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 552.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 60.76 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST 20.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 315.08 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE EASTERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 119, PAGE 984, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLYBOUNDARY 570.45 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE EASTERLYAND SOUTHERLY40.00 THEREOF BEING SUBJECT TO AROADWAY EASEMENT. RESERVING UNTO THE GRANTOR HEREIN AROADWAYEASEMENT OVER THE EASTERLYAND SOUTHERLY40.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHERLY40 FEET OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: COMMENCE AT A4 INCH BY4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1254) MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 18, ADISTANCE OF 653.04 FEET TO A4 INCH BY4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 26 SEC5353-0906 TWN vs. Harrell, Tracy N. Case No. 65-2010-CA-000282 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000282 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. TRACYN. HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELLAND BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES, et. al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in 65-2010-CA-000282 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP F/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and TRACYN HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELL; BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE; AMYDENISE LALONDE; BRYAN DOLPHIS LALONDE; WAKULLABANK are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front lobby Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. on September 13, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22, WALKERS CROSSING COMMENCING AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 360.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 198.19 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT ; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 212.39 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLYALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU A CENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 31 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.19 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST, 229.82 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 330.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. THE ABOVE LEGALDESCRIPTION BEING MORE RECENTLYSURVEYED BYTHURMAN RODDENBERRYAND ASSOCIATES, DATED APRIL4, 2002, UNDER JOB NO. 01-034, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST, 360.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 200.49 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF CHANCE COURT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE ADISTANCE OF 212.88 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET, THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 38 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 61.66 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 11 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 61.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 232.20 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919); THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 330.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1998 OR 1999 HOMES OF LEGEND SINGLE -WIDE VIN #HL9774AL. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 31st day of July, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 30 & September 6, 2012 11-05421 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices ONDS WEST 874.64 FEET TO A1 INCH IRON PIPE MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 735.81 FEET TO A1 INCH IRON PIPE LYING ON THE EASTERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAYOF REVADEE SPEARS ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY576.08 FEET TO A5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #7 160), THENCE LEAVING SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAYRUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 765.19 FEET TO A4 INCH BY4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 569.92 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/AARIANACOVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on August 16, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 30 & September 6, 2012 G10080266 5349-0913 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 005 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that GULF GROUPHOLDINGS AQUISITIONS & APPLICATIONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2418 Year of Issuance 2008 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-121-155-12084-D14 SHELLPOINTBEACH UNIT5 BLOCK D LOT14 OR 231 P594 OR 260 P828 Name in which assessed PIERRE LAWRENCE OLIVAREZ said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 3rd day of October, 2012, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 2nd day of August, 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida August 23, 30 and September 6, 13, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON AUGUST 20, 2012SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 The Wakulla County Clerk is looking for applicants for the position of Finance Clerk. The person lling this position will be expected to possess the technical skills necessary to perform payroll duties, other accounting functions, and working knowledge of Excel and Word. Background in HR a plus. Must be a team member sharing other ofce responsibilities. Desired Qualications: Associates degree from an accredited college or university w/emphasis in Accounting, Business, or Public Administration or equivalent combination of training, education, and experience that provides the required knowledge, skills and abilities. By Florida Law all applications for employment are open for public inspection. Background check & drug screening are required. Closes 9-14-12. EOE. Visit www.wakullaclerk.com for application and submit applications by mail or in person: Finance Director Wakulla County Clerk of Court 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327; by email: shawkins@wakullaclerk.com; or by fax: 850-926-0056.Finance Clerk The Wakulla NewsLook Us Up Online for Classi ed ads from The Wakulla News.www.thewakullanews.comAlso check out your Community Calendar Tear oExperts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905.Little Tupper Lake in New Yorks Adirondack State Park. LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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By JIM SAUNDERS and MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 31 Republican Mitt Romney came to Tampa this week to celebrate his long-sought presidential nomination, even getting help albeit unusual help from actor Clint Eastwood. Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Isaac posed an uncomfortable question for Floridians and thousands of convention-goers: Do you feel lucky? Thankfully, they were lucky. But the same cant be said for folks in Louisiana who got blasted by Isaac after it spun up the gulf and turned into a hurricane. REPUBLICANS TAKE AIM AT OBAMA By the time Romney took the stage Thursday night at the Republican National Convention, his supporters had already spent three days making argument after argument about why President Obama should be ousted from the White House. Romney, however, took a somewhat different tack. He expressed disappointment that Obama had been unable to do a better job with the economy after getting elected for years ago as a sign of Americas promise. Americas been patient, Romney said. Americans have supported this president in good faith. But today, the time has come to turn the page. Today the time has come for us to put the disappointments of the last four years behind us, and put aside the divisiveness and the recriminations to forget about what might have been and to look ahead to what can be. Now is a time to restore the promise of America. But Romney wasnt above taking shots at the president drawing applause from the Republican faithful gathered at the Tampa Bay Times Forum. President Obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans and to heal the planet, Romney said mockingly. My promise is to help you and your family. The Romney campaign also used the convention to try to better introduce the former Massachusetts governor to voters, after months of attacks by the Obama campaign and Democrats about issues such as the Republicans business record. Romneys wife, Ann, drew widespread praise for a speech she gave about the nominee, and the crowd heard emotional addresses Thursday night from people who received help from Romney while he served as a lay leader of his church. Be tting the site of the convention and Floridas crucial role in the November election some of the states most-prominent Republicans also got a chance to share the limelight. U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, for example, introduced Romney on Thursday night and criticized Obamas handling of the presidency. Our problem is not that hes a bad person, Rubio said. Our problem is that hes a bad president. Also given a speaking slot Thursday night was former Gov. Jeb Bush, who detoured from a prepared education address to defend his brother, former President George W. Bush. He challenged Obama for continuing to remind voters about inheriting a deeply troubled economy from George W. Bush in 2009. So Mr. President, it is time to stop blaming your predecessor for your failed economic policies, Jeb Bush said. You were dealt a tough hand, but your policies have not worked. But one of the most-discussed parts of the convention was an odd some would say downright bizarre appearance Thursday night by Eastwood. The actor had a dialogue with an empty chair that he said represented Obama. ISAAC ON THE MOVE With Tropical Storm Isaac threatening the state, Mondays opening-day events at the Republican convention were largely called off. But in the end, the storm churned past Tampa and left the state relatively unscathed. The storm caused ooding in portions of Palm Beach County but saved its worst for Louisiana, as it revisited New Orleans on the seventh anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. This time, the levies held. Gov. Rick Scott missed most of the convention as he became commander-in-chief of Floridas preparation efforts. Meeting daily with reporters and a wider television audience, Scott gave up his speaking spot at the convention. But arguably, he spent more time on national TV as he became a morning xture discussing the storm. My job is to make sure that the 19 million people who live in our state are safe along with all our visitors, including the delegates to the RNC, Scott said. Everybody here (is) focused on the safety of everybody in our state. Isaac spent much of the week as a tropical storm, reaching hurricane strength shortly before landfall in southeast Louisiana. In typical Scott fashion, the governor didnt waste valuable TV time. He put on his tourism hat and urged folks to spend their Labor Day weekend on Floridas Isaac-free shores. STORY OF THE WEEK: Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney accepted the Republican nomination for president at the partys convention in Tampa. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: When somebody does not do the job, you got to let them go, actor Clint Eastwood said of President Obama. Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comWEEKLY ROUND UP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Mitt, Isaac and a guy named ClintBy DAVID ROYSE THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDAPALM HARBOR, Fla., Aug. 29 Veterinarian Ted Yoho introduced himself to thousands of parade-goers and barbecue eaters during a campaign for Congress in which he ran hard against the establishment. On Wednesday, he introduced himself to that establishment. Yoho scored a stunning primary upset victory in August over three-decade veteran of Congress Cliff Stearns, and even many in the Republican Party were caught off guard. Yoho said Wednesday in a speech to GOP delegates at the Republican National Convention that career politicians created the problems the country faces and Washington is to blame for the stagnant economy. Ive had enough of Washington standing in the way of job creation, Yoho said, using a line he repeated often on the campaign trail in the Third Congressional District, which sprawls across rural north Florida from the Gulf Coast to the Georgia line and the outer suburbs of Jacksonville. Yoho is still largely unknown to many of the Republicans in the partys rank and le outside of that district. But his win over Stearns, who was elected in 1988, has made him a bit of a star. Yoho is the only GOP congressional candidate so far to get a speaking spot at the breakfast for top Republican activists in the delegation at the convention. On Wednesday, he was interviewed by Politico in a video that was seen by political junkies around the country. Hes been endorsed by Sarah Palin. His campaign platform mainly revolves around removing what Yoho sees as barriers to job growth, though he typically isnt speci c in his stump speeches about what federal regulations need to be repealed. One speci c law he does talk about is the federal health care law. Repeal, defund and bury Obamacare, Yoho said, describing his priorities. Second, we need to take a scalpel to burdensome rules, regulations and mandates. Finally, we need to simplify our tax code. Yoho recently sold his veterinary practice, but said his long tenure running it gave him an eye toward what local business owners deal with. Ive been in the trenches for the last 35 years on a daily business, Yoho said. He also said the nation needs to have a strong national security, but that the biggest threat to national security doesnt come from a foreign shore it comes from the halls of Congress. Its called debt. Yoho faces Democrat J.R. Gaillot and independent Phil Dodds. Yo-who? Surprise nominee Yoho introduces himself to GOP NEWS SERVCE OF FLORIDAThe RNC at the Tampa Bay Times Forum. Brain Teaser 1 13 16 19 24 31 37 40 46 50 57 60 63 2 25 47 3 26 48 4 27 43 5 22 44 17 38 41 51 58 61 64 6 14 32 59 7 28 52 8 29 49 9 20 30 45 21 23 42 62 65 15 18 33 39 53 10 34 54 11 35 55 12 36 56 ACROSS 1. Guy, informally 6. Rights gp. 10. Midpoint: Abbr. 13. Israel's Sharon 14. Votes against 15. Hightail it 16. Homebuyer's expense 18. Inner Hebrides island 19. Jellyfish dangler 20. In need of body work 22. __ Tom 23. Ashen 24. Showy flower 28. One of a bevy 31. Sam Houston was its president 32. Fling the horsehide 33. Toss in one's hand 37. Assayers assay them 38. Talk big 39. Role for Ronny 40. Shed one's skin 41. It may be all around you 42. "I could care less!" 43. __ naked 45. Potato sack material 46. Barbecue feature 49. Wall St. figure 50. Baby-sitter's handful 52. Acts the cutup? 57. Moffo or Pavlova 58. Assembly-line output, perhaps 60. Rabbit dish 61. Walk like a tosspot 62. Take care of 63. Ltr. addenda 64. Partner of Peter and Paul 65. Ancient moralistDOWN1. Almanac tidbit 2. Perry and Della's creator 3. Simba or Nala 4. "__ we forget ..." 5. Made-up monikers 6. __-Saxon 7. Spot for espresso 8. Caustic stuff 9. No longer mint 10. Heparin prevents them 11. Basic prin ciple 12. Word to a marksman 15. 17-Down contenders 17. "March Madness" hoops org. 21. Prefix with glottis 24. Energy source 25. Goose egg 26. Ice skater's leap 27. Backbreaker? 28. Elementary particle 29. Bear in the air 30. Cockpit dial abbr. 32. Little-hand indication 34. Autobahn auto 35. City founded by Pizarro 36. Like a basso's voice 38. Call to Bo Peep 42. In secret 44. Afternoon gathering 45. Harris's __ Rabbit 46. Get a grip on 47. Pipsqueaks 48. Moorehead of "Bewitched" 49. Try for a job 51. Kind of life insurance 52. Baltic feeder 53. "Z ip-__-Doo-Dah" 54. Mardi Gras, e.g.: Abbr. 55. Opposite of endo56. Pull the plug on 59. Teachers' org.American Prole Hometown Content 9/2/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 12 34 451 6758 1 76 8496 582 5 627 348 2349 2009 HometownContent 152 8936 7 4 398647512 647251893 519 726348 823419756 476538921 985 164237 734982165 261375489 F A C T A T O M G R A S P E R L E Z E R O R U N T S L I O N A X E L A G N E S L E S T L A S T S T R A W A L I A S E S T E A N C A A B A A T E R M A N G L O H O U R N E A C A F E Q U A R K O D E R L Y E U R S A A P P L Y U S E D A L T B R E R E P I S U B R O S A F I N A L F O U R A D E E C L O T S O P E L T U E S T E N E T L I M A E C T O R E A D Y D E E P S T O P

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 11B 1. MUSIC: Who composed the opera Swan Lake? 2. LANGUAGE: What is the meaning of the Latin phrase Ars gratia artis? 3. GEOGRAPHY: The island of Corsica belongs to what country? 4. MYTHOLOGY: What is the name for the three Greek goddesses of vengeance: Alecto, Megaera and Tisiphone? 5. LITERATURE: Who wrote a semiautobiographical travel book called Roughing It? 6. TELEVISION: What detective series featured the theme song Keep Your Eye on the Sparrow? 7. CHEMISTRY: What is the chemical symbol for bromine? 8. AD SLOGANS: What was billed as The Greatest Show on Earth? 9. FAMOUS QUOTATIONS: Who once said, Do not take life too seriously. You will never get out of it alive.? 10. MOVIES: Which Disney movie featured the hit song A Whole New World? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Peter Tchaikovsky 2. Art for arts sake 3. France 4. The Furies 5. Mark Twain 6. Baretta 7. Br 8. Barnum & Bailey Circus 9. Elbert Hubbard 10. Aladdin YOUR AD HERE

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet By DAVID WHITERestaurant wine programs are better than ever before. Once upon a time, high-end restaurants felt obligated to employ snooty sommeliers, most of whom pushed expensive, predictable wines that were easily found at your local liquor store. Today, though, high-end restaurants are staffed with hip sommeliers who are better described as wine educators, eager to discuss the interaction of wine with food and share their recent discoveries. Most traditions associated with wine service remain, however. When dining virtually anywhere, your server will formally present you with the bottle youve ordered, making sure the label is facing upwards. After opening the wine, shell present you with the cork. Finally, shell pour you a small taste of the wine and wait for your approval. Knowing what to do and when its appropriate to reject a wine can be nerve-wracking. But it neednt be. Heres all you need to know. Checking the label is easy. Its presented simply to con rm that the server has pulled the bottle you ordered so check the producer, variety, and vintage. Mistakes can and do happen, especially when restaurants are busy. Inspecting the cork is almost as simple. For starters, theres no need to smell it. Instead, check to see if its streaked or drenched with wine. If it is, the wine might be heat-damaged, as heat causes wine to expand and push against the cork. But youll need to smell the wine to make sure, as it could also mean that the bottle was over lled. Also check to see if the cork is crumbly. If the wine is relatively young, this could be a sign of improper storage and the wine could be oxidized. Again, youll need to smell the wine to make sure. Note that if a cork is covered in little white crystals that look like sugar, theres nothing to worry about. Its simply tartaric acid, a natural byproduct of wine, and those crystals are tasteless, odorless, and harmless. Analyzing the wine comes next. So give the wine a swirl to help release its aromas and stick your nose in the glass. Most aws can be detected by your nose alone, but dont hesitate to also taste the wine. If the wine is affected by TCA, or cork taint, the fruit will be masked by aromas reminiscent of wet cardboard or a damp basement. A 2005 study by Wine Spectator found that this aw impacts about one in 15 bottles. If the wine has been exposed to high temperatures or is oxidized from poor storage, it will likely seem at, with muted aromas and minimal avor. Sometimes, oxidized wine can give off aromas of caramel, candied almonds, and dried fruits. If you think your wine might be awed, give your glass to the server and solicit her opinion. If shes familiar with the wine, shell be able to let you know if something is off. And if shes not familiar with it, shell probably trust your judgment or have someone with more expertise come to the table. If the wine is in good condition, tell your server. Shell then pour it for everyone at the table. Keep in mind that the taste isnt poured to nd out if you like the wine. If its simply not to your liking, theres a good chance the restaurant wont take it back. That said, restaurants value customer service. So dont hesitate to explain to your server why you dislike the wine. The restaurant might replace the bottle. Of course, the best way to avoid ordering a wine you wont like is to chat with the sommelier or server beforehand, to get a sense of what you should expect. Alternatively, you could nd a wine thats available by the glass and ask your server for a small sample. Ordering wine at a restaurant is fun its an opportunity to try unique wines and elevate your meal. So dont let the pomp and circumstance of wine service intimidate you. David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the internet. WHITES WINESDemystifying the pomp and circumstance of wine service Where the little things Make a Difference! Where the little things Make a Difference! 2504 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32304 2504 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32304 850 765-0042 07 Nissan Altima SL CLEAN!! $13,900 2000 Ford MustangCONVERTABLE! $4,900 06 Jeep Commander Sp7 PASSENGER $11,900 09 Chevrolet Impala LT GREAT ON GAS!! $11,900 02 Nissan Maxima SE VERY NICE! $6,500 05 Pontiac Grand AM SE SHARP! $6,900 07 Nissan Sentra GAS SAVER! $10,800 08 Dodge Avenger SXTSPORTY!! 08 Kia Sorento LX NICE RIDE! $11,900 02 Chevy Monte Carlo LOADED! $9,400 850576-LOAN ( 5626 )WE HAVE THE ANSWER TO YOUR USED CAR NEEDS! 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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netFormer county commissioner Howard Kessler is running for a seat on the county commission in district 3. He will face incumbent Mike Stewart in November. Kessler previously served two terms as commissioner in district 4 before losing the seat to Jerry Moore in 2010. He said he decided to run for county commissioner now, instead of waiting another two years, because of what he called an overburden of taxation on the citizens.Ž The deciding factor was the implementation of several new taxes and increases in others in the last year, he said. Many in this county cant handle all the taxes that have been placed upon them, he said. This increasing tax burden is a very onerous and dif“ cult burden to carry,Ž he added. And this doesnt just apply to those senior citizens on a “ xed income, but also to the families who are lucky if they still have one income in the household, he said. Everyone realizes that we need taxes to run the government,Ž Kessler said. But the level of taxation must be affordable for the citizens.Ž If elected to the commission, he said he would look at eliminating some of these taxes. The new taxes he is referring to include the Public Services Tax and solid waste assessment. Tax increases include the assessment for “ re protection and Communications Services Tax. Before these taxes, he said, people were struggling and sometimes having to make the choice between paying for food or medications. Kessler said he understands that the millage rate was lowered, but the increases in taxes far outweigh this reduction. He added that he would go after eliminating the Public Services Tax “ rst. The Public Services tax is a 7-percent tax on the purchase of electricity, metered or bottle gas, fuel oils and water. Its a tax on essentials,Ž Kessler said. He added that this tax has a major effect on people who are struggling to make ends meet. In order to reduce the tax burden, Kessler said he would suggest the commission come together and set a list of priorities of services and then rank them. The health and safety of the citizens would come “ rst and would include law enforcement, “ re rescue and emergency medical services. After those top services, Kessler said the commission would rank the importance of each service and decide how much money is reasonable to fund these services. We certainly need to provide essentials,Ž Kessler said. And we want to provide extras, but we may not be able to.Ž Kessler said the commission would eventually get to a point when the money runs out and the county is not be able to provide all of the things they want and the community wants. But when the economy gets better and more revenue comes in, those things can be looked at again. He said would not look at eliminating any services, but would look at how departments are staffed. The board needs to make the hard decisions,Ž he said. The commission needs to prioritize and become as ef“ cient as possible, he added. And once the priorities are set, the commission cant allow itself to deviate and must continue to follow the plan, he said. The county government must also be open and transparent, he said. Theres never too much information a citizen should have.Ž The county government has come a long way in this area, but Kessler said it still has a long way to go. Continued on Page 3A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 34th Issue Thursday, September 6, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 CentsIn The Huddle A look at college football bowls in the Sunshine State k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Taking Care of Business ................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 3B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 6B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 10B Comics ...........................................................................Page 12B INDEX OBITUARIES Margaret Bartley Donley Austin Fleetwood Jack Carmel Phelps Sr. Larry J. Smith Vernell Tindel Weldon ‘Mike’ Vowell Jr. Howard Kessler is running for county commission No to cave divingBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netTALLAHASSEE … Fishermen in the audience had the look of vindication throughout the daylong trial here at the Leon County Courthouse. Comments and questions by Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford in a bench trial on Thursday, Aug. 30, showed that she at least understood the claim theyve made for years. Namely, that the goal of the 1994 constitutional amendment to limit net fishing … the so-called net ban … was to limit overfishing and waste of marine resources. It did that by outlawing gill nets. The biggest effect of the amendment was reducing the maximum size of nets from the thousands of yards of net that were used before the amendment to two 500 square foot pieces of net. Continued on Page 15AJudge Fulford hears net shing caseBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter nearly eight months of deliberating, the Florida Park Service has decided to maintain its 26 year-long decision to not allow technical recreational cave diving at Wakulla Springs. We believe this is the best decision,Ž said Florida Park Service Director Donald Forgione. The park service met with experts on both sides of the issue and also received comments from the public. We feel very con“ dent that we talked and listened to everyone,Ž Forgione said. The months of research, along with opinions from the experts and citizens, really con“ rmed that our decision in the past is a sound and good decision,Ž he said. The park service, along with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, was approached by members of the Wakulla County Dive Club who pushed for the state to change its policy. The divers, who have called Wakulla Springs the crown jewel of Florida springs, contended that opening the facility to recreational cave diving would bring much needed revenue to the area. Those in opposition argue that the fact that Wakulla Springs is the crown jewel is the same reason recreational cave diving should be prohibited. They also pointed out concerns with the allowance, including interference with other activities, wildlife, ongoing research and artifacts. The state held a public hearing in January to obtain comments from the community. A crowd of about 250 people packed the livestock pavilion at the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce and opinions were split nearly right down the middle. There was not an overwhelmingly favored side,Ž Forgione said. Following that meeting, the park service decided to move forward and develop a draft plan of what the inclusion of recreational cave diving might look like. The plan was to address all the concerns expressed by those in opposition and propose a way to manage those situations. Another meeting was held in March with key stakeholders and experts from both sides of the issue. There were three major concerns that were addressed during the process. These included the safety of the visitors, protecting the artifacts and other cultural resources located within the caves and also protecting the natural environment, Forgione said. Wakulla Springs is unlike most springs in Florida,Ž Forgione said. The spring is very deep and would only be accessible to a highly trained, highly certi“ ed diver. Through their research, Forgione said they determined only a small amount of the population of cave divers could even dive at Wakulla Springs. Its a very technical dive. Its very dangerous to dive there.Ž He also pointed out the other three areas that allow cave diving, Emerald Sink, Cherokee Sink and Clear Cut Sink. Ron Piasecki, president of the Friends of the Wakulla Springs and the Wakulla Springs Alliance and Hydrogeology Consortium, both of which voiced their opposition to allowing recreational cave diving at Wakulla Springs, said his groups would be more than willing to work with the diving community to improve the facilities at these three sinks. Neither groups are against cave diving, but were against where the diving was going to take place, he said. Were happy with the way the decision came out,Ž Piasecki said. Forgione added that while they know about some artifacts that are located within the springs, they do not know everything that is there. The bone room of Wakulla Springs is 13,500 years old, one of the oldest sites in the United States. The park service plans to allow research and scienti“ c diving to continue so they can discover even more. He called the springs an environmental classroom.ŽContinued on Page 2A State rejects technical recreational diving at Wakulla SpringsPHOTO BY GUEA cave diver at the Wakulla Springs main vent in a research dive. The state park service decided not to allow recreational cave divers access to Wakulla Springs. We believe this is the best decision.– Donald Forgione,director of Florida Park Service  SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCounty commission candidate Howard Kessler. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford See Page 4B See Page 1BWar Eagles pound Mosley

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Staff report In response to the crisis surrounding the need to feed those in the community who are without, local churches have been working hard to collect and distribute donations of food to those in need. Many have established pantries to meet these needs. Non-perishables have been provided to these food pantries as a result of donations from families, individuals and youth in the community in coordination with the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce. As an outreach of Operation Santa, volunteers in the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth (WCCY), have met multiple times with faith leaders to discuss strategies to provide assistance in addressing this crisis. The WCCY has decided to take a more active role in providing solutions. From creating awareness that has resulted in a signi“ cant increase in the volume of donated food at the Extension Of“ ce, to submitting a grant to a major corporation for much needed funds. Additionally, there have been generous donations made to a Wakulla Coalition fund dedicated to the provision of food. However, there is more to do and the following are a couple of opportunities to get involved. Currently there are two large fundraisers underway in Wakulla with the goal of raising more than $6,000 to buy food. Last year during Operation Santa, a mother donated a $400 mini-John Deere Tractor, 2 speed, with reverse and AM/FM radio the perfect size for a 3 to 5 year old. Operation Santa kept that expensive donation knowing there was a bigger purpose. This year, 300 raf” e tickets have been printed and are now being sold for $5 each throughout the county. The winning ticket will be drawn on Saturday, Nov. 3, at 11a.m. in Hudson Park during the Empty Bowls event. Tickets will be available at The Wakulla News of“ ce or call 926-3526. The sale of these tickets will generate $1,500 for the purchase of food. The second fundraiser is called Empty Bowls Wakulla. This effort is being organized through the Healing Arts of Wakulla County (HAWC), a new organization operating under the umbrella of the WCCY in coordination with the Arts in Medicine program at UF Shands. Empty Bowls is an international grassroots effort to “ ght hunger. The basic premise is simple, people in the community make and paint bowls. Once all the bowls are painted, an event will be held inviting people in the community to purchase a bowl. Those who purchase a bowl will then be able to “ ll it with homemade soup prepared by Shelley Swenson, Madeleine Carr and Elma Gillette. They will also be served homemade breads and tea. Those who participate are then allowed to keep their bowl as a reminder of all the empty bowls in the world, and right here in Wakulla County. The money raised is used to buy food for the areas food pantries. HAWC is looking to raise $4,000 to $5,000 in additional funds for food through this fundraiser. Haydee Jackley of Ribits Ceramic Studio is the chair of the fundraiser. She is looking for individuals and groups to donate $10 per person in exchange for the painting of a soup bowl. It will be signed by the painter, “ red and used at the Empty Bowls event on Nov. 3 at Hudson Park from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Several businesses and churches have donated to the cause. One mother is hosting her daughters birthday party where children will paint and sign the bowls. A couple of civic organizations are hosting painting parties where members will pay the $10 per bowl fee, paint and sign their bowls. Several individuals have simply stopped into Ribits, donated $10 and painted and signed a bowl then and there. There is also help needed with the second part of this fundraiser, which will be selling tickets to the event. Tickets are $15 each. Those who purchase a ticket will be able to select a handpainted bowl out of 300. The bowl can then be “ lled with soup. There will also be a bake sale organized by Charlean Lanier, a silent auction of other donated art and a keepsake Wakulla Empty Bowls 2012 recipe card with the three soups prepared especially for the event. The event will also feature music and a performance of a play, Stone SoupŽ by children in the community. There will also be a craft show, just in time for holiday gifts. If anyone is interested in being a craft or art vendor, call Haydee Jackley at (850) 567-4212, or email her at ribitsceramic@yahoo.com. Finally, as with all events like this, it takes lots of time and many volunteers. If anyone is interested in helping with tractor ticket sales, or bowl painting sales, or presales of tickets to the lunch event on Nov. 3, or “ nd it in their heart to donate, call (850) 926-3526 or (850) 567-4212. Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1AAlong with artifacts, there is also scientific equipment located in the springs. Divers with the Woodville Karst Plain Project have been working with scientists, local, state and federal agencies, as well as landowners and resource mangers for the last 20 years gathering data to understand the sources and pathways of the water feeding Wakulla Springs. Scientific studies are being performed on the water quality and quantity. The whole goal of the park service is to provide proper recreation while still protecting the natural and cultural resources and not deplete those resources, Forgione said. Its a delicate balance.Ž Which Forgione said they maintain with this decision. Im greatly disappointed that half of the population that showed up at the meeting and the signi“ cant amount of money they would spend [cave diving at Wakulla Springs] is now being ignored,Ž said Gregg Stanton, owner of Wakulla Diving Center and member of the Wakulla County Dive Club. Stanton added that he would continue to try and get access. I remain committed to the notion that the community deserves access to this facility,Ž Stanton said. Although there is always the possibility of the issue being brought up again, Forgione said it would take something signi“ cant for the decision to be overturned.No to cave diving at Wakulla SpringsTwo fundraisers underway to buy food for local needy SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA mini John Deere tractor for a young child will be raf” ed off to raise money for feeding the hungry. Tickets will be sold for $5 each, and the drawing will be held on Nov. 3 during the Empty Bowls event. SPECIAL PURCHASE 39978-Gal. 3HP Wet/Dry Vac Includes accessories and onboard tool storage. 6' power cord. R 154 358 1 While supplies last. 5972-Pk. 8' x 10' TarpsIdeal for covering furniture and equipment. In blue or green/brown.P 154 255, 256 B10 SPECIAL PURCHASE! SPECIAL PURCHASE! 797Project Select Paint Brush Set brushes. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A He added that when citizens feel they have all the information and the reasons are explained, they are more willing to accept the decisions that are being made. When they feel things are being done behind closed doors, thats when they get upset,Ž he said. Another issue he feels is important is having place for the youth of the county. He feels there is need for a community center because currently there is very little wholesome activities for the youth. He added that there are aspects of the current community center idea that concern him. Although he has no real position on whether an outside entity should manage the facility, he didnt want to see if competing with private businesses. He also wanted to see more than one bid to manage the community center. The Capital Area YMCA was the only group to bid on the project. He was also confused as to why the county did not pursue the idea of the Parks and Recreation Department running the facility. Other areas of importance are the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center. It is not run by the county, but the county supports it “ nancially and he felt that should continue. Another area he feels strongly about is preserving the countys natural resources, especially its water. Leon County and Tallahassee represent a large population that has contributed to significant impacts to Wakulla Countys environment and Wakulla Springs, Kessler said. Wakulla Springs is very important for us to preserve as best we can,Ž he said. Not only does it provide a beautiful place to visit, but it provides a great economic bene“ t to our county.Ž It is important to recognize the limits the spring has to keep it as pristine as possible, he said. And he added that the quality is important, as well as quantity. The county need to continue to take a leadership and prominent role in protecting the springs,Ž Kessler said. He felt the current board has made some positive steps in preserving the countys natural resources, but has also taken some negative steps. While off the commission, he has been serving on the Wakulla Springs Alliance and the Hydrogeology Consortium and the FSU Coastal Marine Lab Board of Trustees. He added that the commission must take an active role and not rely on the state or federal government to do whats right for Wakulla County. Kessler is also in support of the Capital City to Sea Loop bicycle and pedestrian trail, which would go from Tallahassee to parts of Wakulla and Franklin counties and then back to Tallahassee. This project would allow the county to protect and preserve its natural resources and still utilize them, he said. It would attract people to the area and in turn generate revenue for the county and create jobs and a wholesome activity for people, he added. Kessler said if citizens watched his activity on the commission before, he hopes they would have seen someone that cared about the people of the county and someone who resisted overspending, voting against seven of the eight budgets. He added that he gives citizens a voice, realizes how precious their tax dollars are and will be readily accessible to them. When a person votes for me, they will know that they have a commissioner who cares about Wakulla County, its natural resources and its citizens,Ž Kessler said. Kessler moved to Wakulla County in 1999 from Sarasota to retire. He is originally from Freeport, N.Y. on Long Island. He is a board certi“ ed orthopedic surgeon and volunteers at two clinics in Tallahassee. He has known his wife, Anne, who he calls the backboneŽ of his campaign, for 15 years. He is involved with the Friends of the Library, Iris Garden Club, Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society, Capital Medical Society and is on the board of FSUs School of Theatre Patrons Association. For more information or to reach Kessler, visit www. howardkessler.com, email howard@howardkessler. com or call 228-9641.Howard Kessler running for county commission Fran Councill retires with partyFire Chief Mike Morgan presents a plaque to EMS Director Fran Councill at her retirement party. Fran Councill with EMS crews at her party. A cake in the shape of an ambulance.Staff ReportEMS Director Fran Councill was feted with a retirement party on Friday, Aug. 31, to mark her service to the county. County employees, elected of“ cials and members of the community stopped by the event, held in the commission chambers, to wish Councill well. Councill was longtime EMS director for Wakulla County and began her career as a volunteer when the countys ambulance service was in its beginning stages.Staff ReportResidents of Wakulla Gardens can share their vision about the future of the neighborhood at two community meetings to gather input. The American Planning Associations Community Planning Assistance Team will be available to listen to input on Saturday, Sept. 8, from 4 to 6 p.m. and on Sunday, Sept. 9, from 3 to 5 p.m. Both meetings will be held at Pioneer Baptist Church, located at the corner of Spring Creek Highway and Beechwood Drive. The team will then present their recommendations to the Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday, Sept. 11 at 5 p.m in the commission chambers. On Dec. 13, the Board submitted an application to the American Planning Associations Community Planning Assistance Team (APA-CPAT) program titled Wakulla Gardens: Retro“ t Challenge.Ž On March 5, the Board accepted the award for technical assistance for Wakulla Gardens. Over May 21-22, the CPAT team leader and APA project manager made an initial visit to Wakulla County and Wakulla Gardens. After the initial visit, the remaining CPAT team members were selected. The team includes: € Stephanie Monroe Tillerson, AICP, city manager, City of Woodruff, S.C. € Darren J. Asper, PP, AICP, senior vice president, Community & Economic Development, Delta Development Group, Inc., from Mechanicsburg, Penn. € David Berg, AICP, senior environmental analyst, Cameron Engineering, from Huntington, N.Y. € Douglas Martin, AICP, deputy city administrator, City of McHenry, Ill. € Thomas Bassett, senior program associate, American Planning Association, Washington, D.C. The full team arrives in Tallahassee on Friday, Sept. 7. The visit will conclude with a presentation of the teams recommendations to the county commission, administrative staff and the public at 5 p.m. on the evening of Tuesday, Sept. 11. A written report will follow.Community meeting scheduled for input on Wakulla Gardens SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be holding two public hearings on Ordinance 2012-02.An Ordinance of the City of Sopchoppy adopting the operating budgets for the City of Sopchoppy for the 2012-2013 “scal year. The “rst public hearing, followed by the “rst reading of Ordinance 2012-02, will be held Tuesday, August 30 2012 at a special called meeting of the Council. The second public hearing on the budget and adoption of Ordinance, 2012-02 will be September 10 2012 during the regular monthly meeting of the City Council. Both meetings will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, Florida. A copy of the Budget may be viewed at City Hall from 8:00 a.m. … 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Thursday and from 8:00 a.m. … 3:00 p.m. Friday. If special assistance is needed to attend this meeting, please call the Clerks of“ce at 962-4611 at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting.PUBLIC MEETINGS TO ADOPT THE BUDGET OF THE CITY OF SOPCHOPPYAUGUST 23, 30, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on September 12, 2012, at 5:30pm SEPTEMBER 6, 2012

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:•Coast Guard Auxiliary for Sept. 6 • Questions raised about forum • Longtime EMS Director Fran Councill is retiring •Former lieutenant files notice to sue WCSO • County sets new park and recreational fees • Louis Andrew ‘Louie’ Sutton Sr. obituary • Emergency Management is monitoring Tropical Storm Isaac • Isaac turns west thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. John Shu will make a good commissioner Howard Kessler is dedicated to community Wild” owers add to value of public land In Wakulla, its who you know Goodbye message from Joanna Johnson Endorsing Langston for sheri Ralph omas advocates for lower taxesEditor, The News:It is with high privilege that I endorse the candidacy of Major Maurice Langston for the of“ ce of sheriff in Wakulla County. I am privileged to have known Major Langston for many years and I can personally attest to his outstanding personal character, integrity, professional experience and professional quali“ cations that are so vital to the of“ ce of sheriff. Major Langstons professional demeanor and his friendship throughout my long career in State law enforcement, sustained, encouraged and assisted me in the understanding of local law enforcement needs and requirements. I always knew that I was welcome to call on him at any time. The past decade has brought about unprecedented challenges to law enforcement. The challenges are certainly expected to increase in the next decade and beyond. Some of the challenges include unprecedented funding (budgeting) issues, recruiting and retaining quali“ ed law enforcement personnel, acquiring and utilizing advanced technology, bringing focus and action to old and new crime trends, managing pre-trial, post-trial and transit jail operations, and a host of other 21st Century law enforcement issues. The challenges require a high level of professional knowledge, skills and abilities in order to ensure citizens safety and cost ef“ cient law enforcement operations. Major Maurice Langstons education, training, and experience meets and exceeds the quali“ cations necessary to meet the current and future challenges for the 21st Century policing management. The citizens of Wakulla County and the law enforcement profession will be well served with the election of Major Maurice Langston to the of“ ce of sheriff in Wakulla County. Lt. Col. (Ret) Billy Dickson Florida Highway Patrol (Retired)Editor, The News: I “ rst met Dr. Howard Kessler in 2001 at the old health department under Dr. Keen. He was volunteering as an orthopedic surgeon. After retiring, he moved here and began doing community service. He still volunteers as a doctor in the Big Bend area. Due to his love for Wakulla, he entered politics and ran for commissioner. He believed that he could make good decisions for the betterment of Wakulla County. I am writing to express my support for Dr. Kessler as commissioner. He has always been there for the county asking the hard questions. By asking these questions, he got into trouble more than once for his honesty. We need people in government who are there for the good of all. Dr. Kessler was in his of“ ce every day to help citizens. Other commissioners only go to their of“ ce on occasion. Dr. Kessler returns all phone calls and emails. He will come to your home if asked. I like the fact that he made a full time job out of the position, yet continues to serve the community in many other areas, such as Friends of Wakulla Springs and Concerned Citizens of Wakulla. The citizens of this county need him. He does not favor any one group. He treats everyone the same. I appreciate his volunteer work at the free childrens clinics and for school physicals. He shows up at all county functions and is always involved in some way. Please get behind him and get out to vote for him. Kathryn Wilson Crawfordville Editor, The News: The world economy is struggling as is the American economy. Floridas economy is struggling with falling property prices and high unemployment. Even California, once the prime example of the American dream, is in serious trouble. Why should I be surprised that Wakulla County is saddling itself with future spending and promises that cannot and should not be ful“ lled? Our commissioners seem to be living in a world of economic fantasy. Wakulla County continues toward “ nancial ruin. The math being used by our commissioners just doesnt add up. If California, a state with huge pro“ ts from almost every sector of the economy, ranging from agriculture to movie production, cannot support its runaway government spending, who believes Wakulla County with practically no manufacturing can afford new spending. Like liberal California and liberal thinking out of Washington, our politicians have correctedŽ our budgets with new taxes. Now they resume the spending. They hope we believe them when they say, Hey voter, vote for me, I love children! See, I voted for a community center. How are we going to operate or maintain it? Who knows, but dont worry. We will “ nd the funds somewhere. We will raise taxes again. Parents (and kids) may lose their home but kids will have a place to play after school.Ž How about this one. Hey voter, vote for me, I voted to expand the Wakulla County Airport. What, you dont fly or own an airplane? Dont complain, we will do something for you sometime in the future. Plus, we are getting a grant and an airport is an economic engine. This is great! Free money (your money). Just ask Washington, D.C. about Amtrak; or California about economic stimulus spending, or even Tallahassee about their municipal airport. Anyway, governments raise taxes to maintain these things and so will we.Ž Okay, one more. Hey voter, vote for me. I just voted to accept a private road and agreed to bring it up to county standards and begin maintaining it. We dont care that this action is a precedent unseen and resisted in the past. The current owners of property on this road paid less for their property due to the poorly maintained road while most citizens paid more for their home if the road was well maintained. Why not do this? We will pass the cost to all the other land-owners in the county.Ž Eighteen months ago Wakulla County was facing a state takeover due to “ nancial mismanagement. The sitting commissioners solution? Raise property tax rates and implement new taxes to close the gap. Then increase spending on things like an airport, community center and public services. The airport will support a very small number of private pilots who can afford airplanes and might help a few businesses sell a seafood platter or two. It will not pay for itself. County workers were “ red in the last couple of years and now the commissioners commit to a community center that will require several new employees and will not pay for itself. A precedent was made to accept private roads for county maintenance but they wont “ x Wakulla Gardens roads. I wonder why commissioners agreed to maintain this private road with taxpayers dollars and then told the folks in Wakulla Gardens they would have to pay more feesŽ if they wanted to improve their already county-owned roads. There are hundreds of miles of privately maintained roads in the county „ including the road I live on. I cant wait for county dump trucks to begin hauling dirt to fix my road (sarcasm intended). Much like Washington, D.C. math „ Solyndra, solar, stimulus, so-called TARP „ the math being used in Wakulla County wont work either. Commissioners, quit pandering for votes. Hold people responsible for their own decisions, quit expanding the scope of government, and lower our taxes. Citizens, vote for Ralph Thomas who has a history of advocating for lower taxes and responsible government. Ed Brimner CrawfordvilleREADERS WRITE:Editor, The News: For those of you who know me, you will know that I usually speak my mind, and I want to do just that about one of our local candidates running for county commission, District 5, John Shuff. I first met John a few years ago while volunteering with his wife Petra at CHAT [Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment]. When Petra was CHAT president I spent a lot of time at their house. During that time, and up to now, I have had the pleasure of engaging in lots of lively political discussions with John. Now, while I dont agree with anyone on everything, especially when it comes to politics, I like talking to intelligent people. John makes a lot of sense when discussing local issues, is well informed, and argues his points well. He has business experience from running his own company locally for more than 30 years, and has recently retired. He has been actively involved in local politics and issues, and has served on several commission appointed committees over the last few years. John was active in applying for the historical grants that renovated and preserved our historic courthouse, hiring local craftsmen whenever possible to do the work, and managed the project himself when other contractors came in over budget. I know John to be a thrifty person who does not waste money. I know John will be dedicated to the job, has plenty of time to research the issues, and will vote in our best interests. This is the kind of person I want to see as our county commissioner. Join me in voting for John Shuff for County Commission District 5. Heide Clifton Crawfordville Editor, The News: Beautiful! Wonderful! Wakulla wild” owers! Residents and community leaders are discovering what visitors and tourists have always found. Wakulla County is one of the best places to experience and enjoy the diversity and beauty of Florida native wild” owers. Few places on earth have as many colorful species.... blooming seasonally all year long. Here, in this Eden, is one of the richest places to live, work, and play. Les Harrisons article (Wild” owers provide benefits besides spectacular scenery,Ž Aug. 30) describes many of the economic and ecologic bene“ ts yielded by these precious natural and cultural resources. Enlightened residents and business and government leaders in Wakulla County do not underestimate the value, or the impact of decisions about the care and management of their private and public land. Five hundred years ago in the spring of 1513, Juan Ponce de Leon arrived here from Spain. His “ rst impression inspired the name, La Florida, Land of Flowers. Commemorate this historic legacy by learning and teaching the names and nature of Wakullas most common wild” owers; our long time neighbors. Pictures and helpful information can be found on the free Eastern Panhandle Wild” ower Map and Field Guide. You can pick up a copy from Les at the Extension Of“ ce or the Wakulla County Public Library. Additional information and additional copies can be found at www.” awild” owers.org, the encyclopedic website of the Florida Wild” ower Foundation. Jeff Caster Tallahassee Editor, The News: I read with interest the article, Former Lieutenant “ les notice to sue WCSOŽ in the Aug. 30 edition of The Wakulla News. As a retired social worker with Floridas child welfare agency, I was interested in what happened to cause Mr. Ganey to “ le such a notice. In recent TV news segments, allegations of child abuse had been mentioned. In reading through the article I could see the position of both sides in this potential litigation and certainly I wondered like many others, what really happened there. I was sympathetic to Mr. Ganeys pleas and I admire his fortitude in having the courage to “ le an intent to sue the WCSO. I can also see where Mr. Ganey could harbor animosity due to the incident, But, it was not until I read the very last sentence of the article that this situation became much more clear to me. In Wakulla County, it is all about who you know, who you grew up with or who you are related to. What a shame for such a beautiful place. Sincerely, Susan Sentman Crawfordville Editor, The News: As of Sept. 15, I will no longer be providing services to Wakulla County and the surrounding counties. I am relocating to Longview, Texas, to pursue a new employment opportunity as the director of a dual diagnosed Native American program with Oglethorpe Inc. Avalon Treatment Centers will be continuing to service Wakulla and the surrounding counties under the leadership of Dr. Jerry Burghout. I hope you continue to use Avalon, which will continue to use my manual, Stepping on the Stones,Ž and providing the excellent services we have been known for. I would like to take this time to thank all of my referral sources and those who have supported my time with Avalon Treatment Centers. I would especially like to thank the honorable judges Walker, Sauls, Fulford and Dodson. Your hard work and dedication to your positions and support of treatment should be commended. Also, the wonderful women at Wakulla County Probation for their dedication, support and hard work, the brilliant minds in the of“ ces of the state attorney and public defender and the expertise and professionalism of state probation. In addition, I would like to thank all of the amazing private attorneys that have sent clients in need of treatment and supported them and this program throughout the process. Finally, I would like to thank all the families who gave me their trust and allowed me to work with their loved ones, it was a sheer pleasure. Joanna Johnson Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 – Page 5Areaders speak out More OpinionsEditor, The News: First, Id like to thank everyone who attended the League of Women Voters of Wakulla forum, Thursday night Aug. 23. It is refreshing to see so many citizens eager to meet and hear the candidates views on the issues of our community. The Leagues role is toŽ in” uence public policy by advocacy and educationŽ of the citizens in the voting and election process … hence the forum. The community had the opportunity to submit questions. At the forum, the League provided sheets of paper for the citizens to write down their question on the back. The front page clearly stated: 1. Questions may not be addressed to an individual candidate, 2. Questions submitted will be reviewed by the forum committee for appropriateness, and 3. The forum committee does not guarantee that all question will be used.Ž This same format was used by the League in the 2010 election cycle … and no criticism was received. The League of Women Voters anticipated a different audience for our forum … hence the questions were repeated and pertinent to the position of superintendent of schools. The questions asked were about the educational background and quali“ cations of the candidates, the schools curriculum, the role of charter schools, relationship of the community with the school system, etc, and these questions would be pertinent in any forum. The League of Women Voters is open to all citizens (men included). The League has had other public informational meetings in the last few years over many issues including the history of LWV, elections issues with the supervisor of elections and the HBO movie Hacking Democracy,Ž as well as a Sunshine Law-Public Records presentation by First Amendment Foundation President Barbara Petersen, to name a few. Should I be saying shame on you to Ms. Savary for not getting involved in politics, by providing information to citizens through forums? But I wont say that! I have chosen to be a part of an organization that has a history of openness, transparency and education to the voters. The League of Women Voters of Wakulla is sponsoring two additional forums: on Sept. 27 for county commission candidates in the District 1, 3 and 5 races, and Oct. 18 for candidates of Wakulla County sheriffs race. Both forums will be held at the Wakulla County Public Library. Come meet the candidates … hear their views on Wakulla issues and Vote in November! Mary Cortese LWV Wakulla Editor, The News: After the uproar about the League of Women Voters forum in last weeks paper, I would like to address Ms. Donna Savarys concerns about the organization. First, let me say that the public was given the opportunity to ask questions of the candidates through advertising in The Wakulla News and at the forum itself. The instructions for those questions included the following: Questions may not be addressed to an individual candidate. All questions submitted will be reviewed by the forum committee for appropriateness.Ž Here were actual questions submitted to the League. Have you ever been arrested or have a criminal record? and How have you addressed the learning needs of low socio-economic students and what was the outcome?Ž My question to Ms. Savary and the public at large is this: Which is a more appropriate question to be asked in a public forum for school superintendent? It was the Leagues stance that the second question was more appropriateŽ for a public forum. Both candidates had experience with the issue and it was felt that the audience would bene“ t from hearing responses. My personal opinion is that the citizens who are interested in gossip and innuendo can “ nd out the answer to the “ rst question on their own simply by sitting down at their computer. There are numerous websites with that information. Ms. Mary Corteses position was that all questions that hint at improprieties must be veri“ ed and substantiated before being presented in a public forum. Because she did not have the time during the forum to substantiate the claims, she did not ask the question and was personally attacked at the forum for standing her ground. I applaud her for standing up to the bullies present at the forum. The League of Women Voters (Wakulla Members at Large) would welcome Ms. Savary and any other interested citizens to join the group especially if she would like to volunteer her time with screening questions or all the other work involved with hosting forums. Most of the members of the Wakulla group are working women, some with children at home and some like me … working, with children at home and commuting … and we would welcome the extra help as we present pertinent information on all sides of an issue to our fellow citizens. If Ms. Savary is involved in another civic organization or group, I strongly encourage her organization to host their own forum and we would be delighted to attend. Ms. Savary also inquired about the League endorsing candidates. The League does not endorse candidates, but they can hardly impose on the free speech rights of their members who are not in leadership positions.Ž Gail Hickman is a member but not in a leadership position; hence she may endorse whomever she so chooses. While we are speaking about free speech rights, I would like to address the personal attacks on Mary Cortese and Hugh Taylor. They have done more to defend the free speech rights of citizens than any two people I know. Ms. Cortese felt that there was a civic void in presenting both sides of every issue in Wakulla County. Rather than complaining and moaning about the dearth of available public outlets to disseminate both sides of an issue, she did something positive by joining the League. As for Mr. Taylor, few know that he is a member of the First Amendments Foundations Sunshine BrigadeŽ an honor bestowed on less than 50 people in a state with more than 18 million citizens. Mr. Taylor could spend his days enjoying his retirement and taking care of his health issues but he has chosen to involve himself because of his great love and concern for Wakulla County, her resources and her people. And that includes protecting Ms. Savarys right to speak her mind in this paper. Sincerely,Anne Woodward AhrendtCrawfordvilleAppropriateness of questions considered League welcomes volunteers Teacher evaluations must changeEditor, The News: On Aug. 22, in a rule challenge brought by the Florida Education Association, Judge John G. Van Laningham invalidated the Florida Department of Education rule on teacher evaluations. This rule incorporated numerous requirements into the evaluation process, including a complex mathematical formula. The formula would be used to calculate the effect of FCAT scores on teacher evaluations. Judge Van Laninghams decision gives our state education leaders an opportunity to get this rule right. Parents and teachers were already concerned about past DOE errors. In fact, the FEA legal challenge uncovered more problems in the states approach to implementing reform. Our students cant afford to lose any more time waiting for the Governor and state policymakers to “ gure out their best approach to teaching and learning, and teachers need an accountability system that is valid, fair and easy to understand. Please take a moment to contact Gov. Scott. Tell him that no teacher is afraid of accountability, and that we want to improve educational outcomes with a proven system of evaluation that works for students, teachers and parents. Tell him that we need the state to be fully transparent and openly accountable for the system it implements. You can email the Governor at www.flgov.com/ contact-gov-scott/email-thegovernor/ or write to him at Governor Rick Scott, State of Florida, The Capitol, 400 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001. My sincere thanks for contacting Gov. Scott. Please know that the FEA is working to restore sensible education reform and to place teaching and learning on a more reasonable path. Missy Rudd President WCTA the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Bob DonawayJuly 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromMy wife and I have been entering in the Off the Eatin Path since the program “rst began. She has won once and now I am a winner too! Thank You!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l a t nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! Allegiance to none fairness for each and all "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... 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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Church BriefsMy humble efforts to stimulate the economy OUT TO PASTORREV. JAMES L. SNYDER All we hear these days are complaining about the economy and nobody seems to be doing anything about it. Politicians talk about it all the time and yet do nothing creative in the area of improving our economy. If you could put all the political speeches end to end, there would positively be no end to it. What we need to stimulate our economy is some kind of stimulation that does not come from the government. They stimulate me, all right, but not in the right way. This is where I step in. I assure you I am not running for any of“ ce. If the truth were known, I am running away from every of“ ce I can think of, especially my church of“ ce. I have no political agenda or aspirations; I am just a plain ordinary American citizen. I understand such creatures are an endangered species in todays economy. I am proud to be just a plain ordinary American. I am not middle-class, lower-class and certainly not high class. In fact, I have no class at all, and I am glad to leave it like that. I couldnt pass the test anyway. But I am doing my part in stimulating the economy. The secret plan I have can be boiled down to one word: vacation. This past week I have bravely gone where I have not been for a long time and that is on vacation. There is nothing like a vacation to stimulate many things, including the economy. It takes me a whole year to scrimp and save so the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I can go on a vacation. But in the end, it is well worth it. After a weeklong vacation, I am highly stimulated to return home where I can recuperate from all that stimulation. My wallet is still vibrating. I must confess that the primary stimulation in a vacation has to do with my credit card. If the government does not have enough money in its coffers to balance the budget, it is not because I have not done my part. Every time I turned around there was a tax on something. The conspiracy, as I found it, focuses in on the airlines. I know this may sound like a far-fetched idea but I can only give my observation. The airlines are in a conspiracy with the United States government to take as much money from me as they possibly can. Not that I have a lot of money, I just would like to keep as much of it as possible for those occasions when I would like to take my wife out to a restaurant and just have a relaxing evening. That takes money. It began with checking in our luggage. Two bags for me and two bags for my wife equals too much luggage. We put our luggage on the conveyor belt and then were informed by the check-in clerk that each bag cost an extra $50. She swiped my credit card and even though I am not a mathematical wizard, I believe it was in the neighborhood of $200. I do not like that neighborhood. Later on, I sat down to “ gure it out and discovered it would be far cheaper not to take any luggage and then when arriving at my destination buy a new set of clothes. My entire wardrobe does not equal $100. Of course, on my wifes side of the closet it is a different story. We got our boarding pass and then the young woman behind the counter looked at me and asked a strange question. Sir, how tall are you?Ž It has been a long time since anybody asked me that kind of a question. Why she wanted to know how tall I was could not be found in the corridors of my empty mind. I then informed her that I was 63Ž. I see,Ž she said as she stared at her computer screen. Then she explained. The average height of a male passenger on our plane is 511Ž. You exceed that limit by 4 inches.Ž I looked at my wife and we both shared a wonderful laugh. Then I look back at her behind the counter, but she was not laughing. There will be an extra charge for your exceeding our height limit.Ž Lets see,Ž she said as she studied the computer screen, thats 4 inches times $15 per inch which equals $60.Ž She then swiped my credit card, again, and charged it with the $60 extra fee. That was just the beginning of the swipingŽ by the airlines. By the time our vacation was over, I was totally swiped out. When I got home I meditated a little bit on what Jesus said, Render therefore unto Caesar the things which be Caesars, and unto God the things which be GodsŽ (Luke 20:25 KJV). I really do not mind rendering to Caesar but I just wish he wasnt so greedy.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net.  Sopchoppy UMC to offer new children’s ministry The Sopchoppy United Methodist Church is excited to announce the introduction of a new children’s adventure ministry to Wakulla County, Johnny Rogers. The Johnny Rogers Program is a Biblically based ministry which introduces children grade to the principles of the Christian faith and how to put that faith into action. This program celebrates the diversity of the body, and embraces the unique and vivid ways in which God inspires His people to worship Him. It uses videos, games and group participation to spark a child’s imagination and bring them into a closer relationship with the Father. The Johnny Rogers Program will begin Sunday, Sept. 9 and is open to all children from kindergarten through 5th grade. Registration begins at 4:45 p.m. and activities run from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. A light dinner will be served. Parents are welcome to participate in our evening “alternative” service from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sopchoppy United Methodist Church is located 10 Faith Avenue downtown Sopchoppy. For more information call us at 962-2511 or visit the church’s website at http://sopchoppyumc.org. ‘Prophetic Word Gospel Explosion’ set in Carrabelle Anointed Word Ministries of Carrabelle presents “Prophetic Word Gospel Explosion” hosted by Bishop C.M. Lockhart of Hattiesburg, Miss., and Carrabelle, the founder of Anointed Word Ministries, appearing Sept. 4 through Sept. 7 at 7 p.m. nightly. The church is located at 804 West Hwy. 98 in Carrabelle. Guest speakers from Hattiesburg, Magee, Miss., and Columbia, Miss., will be delivering the word of God. Come with expectancy in your heart – strongholds will be broken, hearts will be mended, sinners will be saved. Pastor anniversary to be held at Rocky Mount Church Rocky Mount Church of Christ in Crawfordville will be having a pre-program for their Pastor’s Anniversary on Wednesday, Sept. 5, at 7:30 p.m. Elder Fredrick Bell and Thessalonia Missionary Baptist Church of Crawfordville will render service. Everyone is invited to attend. Upcoming events at Wakulla United Methodist Church Wakulla United Methodist Church in Wakulla Station will hold the following events this week: Chancel Choir Practice will be held Monday, Sept. 10, at 4:30 p.m. Praise Team Practice will be held Tuesday, Sept. 11, at 6 p.m. Men’s Bible Study will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 12, at 6 a.m. Breakfast following at 8 a.m. at Savannah’s. Quilting group meets Thursday, Sept. 13 at 9 a.m. The church is located at1584 Old Woodville Road in Wakulla Station. Call (850) 421-5741 for information. All are welcome. Chaires UMC to host craft show-baked goods sale Craft show baked goods cook out, sponsored by the United Methodist Women of Chaires, will be held at Chaires UMC on Saturday, Sept. 8, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Vendors are welcome. The church is located at 9243 Parkhill Road in Tallahassee. For more information, call (850) 2199361.Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m.Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce will host the 11th Annual Sept. 11 Memorial Service at the WCSO parking area on the anniversary of the terrorist attack. The event will be held at 15 Oak Street in Crawfordville and the public is invited to attend. The ceremony will begin at 8:45 a.m., the time of the “ rst terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. Sheriff Donnie Crum invites everyone to come to the parking lot a little early. Refreshments will be served.Sept. 11 memorial is planned

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Special to The NewsFor the “ rst time, a new poll shows more Americans strongly supportŽ same-sex marriage than strongly opposeŽ it, a “ nding that could be attributed to changes occurring within organized religions, says a Presbyterian elder and lay preacher. For 2,000 years, religion has been the genesis of antipathy toward homosexuals, but now, three major American denominations have approved ordination of openly gay clergy,Ž says Paul Hartman, a retired PBS/NPR station executive and author of The Kairos (www.CarpeKairos.com), a novel. Gay has become the civil rights issue of the 21st century,Ž he says. The May survey of more than 1,000 adults found a dramatic reversal from earlier surveys: more adults now strongly supportŽ same-sex marriage rights (39 percent) than strongly opposeŽ them (32 percent). Overall, Langer Research Associates says, 53 percent of Americans believe samesex marriages should be legalized … up from only 36 percent just six years ago. Episcopalian, Lutheran and Presbyterian denominations have overturned centuries of tradition in welcoming openly gay clergy,Ž Hartman says. Theres a growing realization that religion can and should help lead us all toward a more mature understanding and acceptance of minority sexual orientations.Ž In 2012, he says, there is a new human rights landscape in the United States. He cites these additional recent developments: € The U.S. military joined 43 other countries when it repealed Dont ask, dont tellŽ and allowed openlygay service members. € Same-sex marriages are now legal in six states and the District of Columbia. Three other states -Washington, Maryland and California -have same-sex marriage under active consideration. Eleven more offer civil unionŽ-type status for same-sex couples. € A federal appeals court in Boston recently struck down the Defense of Marriage Act (which defines marriage as one man, one womanŽ), making consideration by the U.S. Supreme Court almost certain. € Dr. Robert Spitzer, one of the last nationallyrespected scholars whose studies lent credence to gay reparativeŽ therapies, recently offered a retraction and apology to the gay community. Unfortunately, the occasionally hateful crowd still resonates with a very small group of people, including those headed by preacher Fred Phelps and congregants, who continue to make news as they picket the funerals of soldiers and celebrities,Ž Hartman says. Western cultures condemnation of same-sex love appears to have originated from Judeo-Christian scriptures, but contemporary biblical scholarship amends old interpretations, he says. Hartman is a retired PBS/ NPR station executive with a passion for biblical history. He is a Presbyterian elder, a lay preacher and a Dead Sea Scrolls a“ cionado. Hartman, a father and grandfather, confesses he is a lifelong fear-“ ghter. Jack Carmel Phelps Sr., 82, passed away Monday, Sept. 3, in Tallahassee. He is survived by his wife of 39 years, Glenda McAllister Phelps. He was born in Abingdon, Va., and had lived in this area for 39 years. He attended Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church and was an avid “ sherman. He was a sales manager in the lumber industry. He served in the United States Navy. Memorial services will be held Friday, Sept. 7, at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church at 11 a.m. A memorial gathering will be held prior to the service from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the church.In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church, 117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy FL 32358. In addition to his wife, he is survived by three sons and their families, Jackie Phelps (wife Eva) and Josh and Shawn Phelps, Abingdon, Va.; Douglas Blackman (wife Teri) and Evan Blackman, Jacksonville; David Blackman (companion Linda) and Kristie Blackman, White Springs; brother-in-law, Shelton (Sonny) McAllister (companion Shellee) of Tallahassee; and many special cousins; a best friend, Jay Harrell; his special poodle, Pierre; and his many friends in Sopchoppy. He was predeceased by his “ rst wife, Ruby Luchini Phelps; and best friend, Bully Edwards. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville, is assisting with arrangements (850-926-3333) or www.bevisfh.com. Vernell Tindel, 88, of Graceville died Sunday, Sept. 2, at Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan, Ala., from heart and kidney complications. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 5, at the Graceville First Baptist Church with the Revs. Joe Wood and Tim Folds of“ ciating. Burial followed in Marvin Chapel Cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family will receive friends at the church on Wednesday at 1 p.m. until time of service. She was born in Madrid, Ala., on July 25, 1924, to the late Warren Franklin Davis and Winnie Lee Naramore Davis. On Jan. 10, 1940, she married the love of her life, Melton Tindel. An active member of the Graceville First Baptist Church, sheretired from Graceville Elementary School following 16 years as a para-professional. Survivors include her children, Cecil & Kaye Tindel of Sarasota; Jenny and Jim Brock of Crawfordville, Joyce and Gharrett Driskell, and Janice & Vic Peel all of Dothan, Ala.; six grandchildren, David and Karin Williams, Scott, Justin, Demoy, Sophia Tindel; two great-grandchildren, Bode and Ever Williams; and many beloved nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her parents; her husband; and grandson, Jay Brock. Expressions of sympathy can be made at http://www.jamesandlipford.com. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 – Page 7AObituaries Margaret Bartley Donley Austin Fleetwood Jack Carmel Phelps Sr. Larry J. Smith Vernell Tindel Weldon ‘Mike’ Vowell Jr.Margaret Bartley Donley, 78, of Tallahassee, died on Aug. 29. She was retired from the Leon County School Transportation Department. She was a member of the Four Square Full Gospel Church. The visitation was held Saturday, Sept. 1, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. The service immediately followed in the Chapel at 1 p.m. The celebrant was Mrs. Sue Ella Donley. Internment followed the service at Woodville Cemetery. Survivors include her husband of 60 years, Edward Cooper Donley Sr.; her childrenn, Edward Cooper Donley Jr. (Sue), Susan Donley Huhn (David), Harvey, ChrisŽ Bennett Donley; 12 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. In loving memory of Valerie Diane Donley. The family wishes to extend a special thanksŽ to Big Bend Hospice. Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee (850-385-2193 www.bevisfh.com) is assisting the Donley family. Austin Fleetwood, 17, went to be with the Lord on Monday, Sept. 3, in Crawfordville, where he was born and raised. Austin touched many lives with his optimism and contagious smiles during his illness. Team Fleetwood was based on Faith, Hope, Strength. His passion was Hockey, FSU Football and Baseball. His love was his family and friends. He was a member of Wakulla Springs Baptist Church. Services will be Saturday, Sept. 8, at Wakulla Springs Baptist Church, 1391 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville FL. Visitation will be from 10 a.m. to noon with funeral services following at noon. The family requests NO ” owers. Austin would want to give back to the places that helped him and his family: Hospice; Ronald McDonald House Charities of Jacksonville Inc., 824 Childrens Way, Jacksonville FL 32207; Nemours Childrens Clinic, 807 Childrens Way, Jacksonville FL 32207; and Wolfson Childrens Hospital, 800 Prudential Drive, Jacksonville FL 32207. He is survived by his parents, James A. TonyŽ Fleetwood Jr. and Tammy Fleetwood; a sister, Lauren St. Hillier; maternal grandparents, Walter and Paula Piland; maternal greatgrandmother, Evelyn Bryan; maternal great-grandmother, Alpha Piland; paternal grandparents, James and Joan Fleetwood. Many loving aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins and a host of loving friends. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, Florida is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) Larry J. Smith, 68, of Pinetta, passed away Friday, Aug. 31, at his home. A native of Moultrie, Ga., he served in the U.S. Army and was a veteran of the Vietnam War. He was a retired civil servant with the U.S. government. The funeral service was held at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 4, at Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Interment followed in Arran Cemetery, also in Crawfordville. The family received friends one hour prior to the service at the funeral home. Memorial donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include his wife of 49 years, Nancy Lawhon Smith; his son, Todd Smith (Lisa) of Crawfordville; and his daughter, Robin Smith of Pinetta. He was predeceased by his parents, Frank and Lillian Tillman Smith. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel (850/926-3333 or www. bevisfh.com) assisted the Smith family. Weldon MikeŽ Vowell Jr., 65, of Sopchoppy, died on Saturday, Sept. 1, at the VA Hospital in Gainesville. He was a very proud veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. His ashes will be spread on her grave in Garland, Texas, at a later date. Donations, in his name may be made to the Lake City VA Medical Center, 619 S. Marion Ave., Lake City FL 32025, Attn. TOPC. Survivors include a son, Weldon C. Vowell III; and a daughter, Heather Marie Bruce; and one grandchild; and a sister, Janice Montalto of Crawfordville; as well as many nieces, nephews, cousins and tons of friends. He was predeceased by a daughter, Kathryn Louise Vowell; and sister, Barbara Vowell who died at birth.Larry J. Smith Weldon ‘Mike’ Vowell Jr. Austin Fleetwood Jack Carmel Phelps Sr. Vernell Tindel Margaret Bartley Donley Religious embrace helping fuel support for gay marriage, says minister Stop by the Coast Guard Auxiliary Station Stop by the Coast Guard Auxiliary Station 1557 Shell Point Road Crawfordville(in Shell Point, at the southern end of Shell Point Road) Tell Charlie Creel whats on your mind!Ž Friday, September 7th 6:00pm to 8:00pmLight refreshments will be served. Fresh Start with a Full-Time Sheriff, Elect Charlie Creel for Sheriff (850) 926-4712 Post Of“ce Box 482, Crawfordville, FL 32326 charlieforsheriff@gmail.comwww.charliecreel.com Political advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Af“liation, for sheriff. Funeral Home, Inc. 551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Digni“ed Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY NIGHT SERVICES6:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study3086 Crawfordville Highway (One block south of Courthouse)850-926-7896www.crawfordvillefbc.com of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief Support850-878-5310

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings CommunitySpecial to The NewsThe Jake Pigott Memorial American Legion Post and Auxiliary 114 sent three students to the annual Boys and Girls State Session to represent Wakulla County held in July in Tallahassee. The students, who are seniors at Wakulla High School, took part in a mock legislative session similar to the session held by the Florida Legislature. Participants elect members to serve as governor and other state, county and city positions. They propose bills and pass legislation. Kaylyn Suzanne Thigpen attended the girls state and Blake Bonts and Hunter James Wheatcraft attended the boys state. Thigpen is the daughter of Christine Thornton of Crawfordville. Bonts is the son of Jeff and Ashley Bonts of Crawfordville. Wheatcraft is the son of Dan Wheatcraft of Crawfordville. Barrie Glover of the American Legion Post 114 has served 32 years as a counselor for the boys state program.3 students attend mock state session Kaylyn Suzanne Thigpen Blake BontsHunter James Wheatcraft Marissa D. Brown and Eric T. Davis, both of Crawfordville, were married on June 9 at 5 p.m. at Wakulla Springs Lodge. The of“ ciant was Pastor Lewis Pollard. The bride is the daughter of Morris and Jennifer Brown of Crawfordville. The groom is the son of Earl and Teresa Davis, also of Crawfordville. The bride was given in marriage by her father. Her matron of honor was Jessica Brown Mattson, sister of the bride, of Hampstead, N.C. Her bridesmaids were Amanda Davis, sister of the groom; Shannon Mills, friend of the bride; Meagan Thurmond, friend of the bride; Sarah Thurmond, friend of the bride; and Cataia Ives, all of Crawfordville. The ” ower girl was Claire Forrester, of Dothan, Ala., cousin of the bride. The ringbearer was Caleb Mattson, of Hampstead, N.C., nephew of the bride and son of the matron of honor. The best man was Earl Davis, father of the groom. The ushers/groomsmen were Seth Bledsoe of Kingsport, Tenn., brother-in-law of the groom; Colby Johnson of Crawfordville, friend of the groom; Jeffrey Yarbrough of Crawfordville, friend of the groom; Ben Hudson of Crawfordville, friend of the groom; Joseph Lane, honorary, of Crawfordville and friend of the groom. The reception was held at Wakulla Springs Lodge The honeymoon was in Big Sur, Calif. The couple will live in Roxboro, N.C. The bride has a bachelors degree in Middle Eastern Studies from Florida State University and is a refugee resettlement case manager with World Relief in Durham, N.C., and is a choir director. The groom received his bachelors degree in Christian Ministry from the Baptist College of Florida, and is pursuing his Masters of Divinity at the Southeastern Baptist Seminary. He is a youth pastor at Ca-Vel Baptist Church in Roxboro, N.C.Eric Davis marries Marissa Brown Mr. and Mrs. Marissa and Eric Davis Special to The NewsWakulla County residents are invited to attend an open house to view updated preliminary ” ood maps and learn more about their ” ood risk on Thursday, Sept. 13, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Road Crawfordville. Residents are encouraged to stop by at their convenience to meet with representatives from the Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other state and federal agencies. These specialists will be available to talk about the preliminary ” ood maps, ” ood insurance, engineering and more. Local government officials will also be available to assist citizens. Up-to-date flood hazard maps are an important tool that can help Floridians understand and prepare for ” ood risks. These maps are still preliminary and will become effective after a public comment period. The preliminary maps are also available online at http://portal.nwfwmd” oodmaps.com. Please contact Elaine McKinnon at the NWFWMD at (850) 539-5999 ext. 221 for more information. By DOUG JONESTreasurer of the Friends of the LibraryThe Friends of the Wakulla County Public Library extend an invitation to everyone to come out to their second Annual Silent Auction on Friday, Sept. 14. The doors open at 6 p.m. for this free event which will include a buffet table with food and refreshments. Friends President Sue Belford and other volunteers have accumulated an excellent range of items from the generous donations made by individuals and businesses in the community. We have a fantastic array of items and gift baskets this yearŽ said Belford. I think it is much better than last year and there will be something there for everyone who comes out.Ž More than 130 items will be up for grabs during the evening. The Friends goal is to raise $5,000 to help meet the $25,000 the Friends contribute to the library every year. This past year, the Friends purchased 12 new library computers for the public to use in addition to fully funding the librarys popular Summer Reading Program and other library services not supported by the librarys operating budget. The Friends are very proud of the support they provide the library as 100 percent of the funds raised go towards library support. Those dollars also count as matching funds for the State Aid to Libraries grant the library receives every year. Without the support of the Friends of the Library, the library would not be able to serve the citizens of Wakulla County, providing the services, which they so richly deserve, free of charge,Ž said Library Director Scott Joyner. For those who want to get a head start on the bidding process, a binder notebook containing bid sheets and descriptions of the more than 130 items donated is in the lobby of the library near the Circulation Desk. Those who want to bid on items can register for a bidding number, and bid on any items in the binder any time prior to the event and need not be present at the event to be the winning bidder. Items donated include a large number of bottles of wine, baking and cooking items, camping and boating items, sleeping bags, FSU Tshirts, ” ags, and other Seminole support items, and numerous gift certi“ cates and other merchandise. Many of the items will be displayed in theme baskets and all will be on display during the event. Bidders will be asked to register and receive a bidding number when they enter the event. The “ nal bid time will be staggered with bidding on gift certi“ cate items ending at 7:30 p.m.; Art and Gift Baskets at 7:45 p.m.; and all other items at 8 p.m. Winning bidders will be able to pick up and pay for their items at the end of the event or at the library the following morning beginning at 9:30 a.m. Membership Chair Cathy Cameron encouraged the public to come and support this event. You do not have to be a member of the Friends to participate in this event. We hope though that you will consider joining the Friends if you are not a member, it is a very inexpensive and valuable way to support our wonderful public library,Ž she said. Everyone is invited to this event to help support the library. See everyone on Sept. 14. A scene from last years silent auction fundraiser held by the Friends of the Wakulla County Library. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLibrary silent auction set for Sept. 14 Residents invited to open house to view preliminary ” ood maps on Sept. 13 WAKULLA COUNTY IS AT A CROSSROADS1. VOTE FOR MIKE STEWART AND SEE THE COUNTY CONTINUE TO PROSPER AND GROW RESPONSIBLY. 2. VOTE FOR HOWARD KESSLER AND I BELIEVE THE COUNTY WILL GO BACK INTO DEBT AND ALL GROWTH WILL STOP .ITS YOUR CHOICE... ƒ BUT I LIKE MIKE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3 I LIKEMIKEREElectforCounty CommissionerRep. Dist. 3 C www.mikestewart2012.comPOLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MIKE STEWART, REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3facebook.com/ mike.stewart.3363 MW 10-5 • T & F 10-6 • Sat. 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850)926-6241SALE Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts • Color • F acial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • F lat T ops F eather Locks • Color • P erms • Highlights RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MirandaTues-Sat545-2905&Mavis to return in Oct. c e H a i r S a l o e H l o H a i a l o i r S a c e c e o n o o o n o o n Tues -S at 54 529 05 & t. t. . . . . STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 – Page 9Aeducation news SchoolFlorida Astronaut Challenge registration is now open Special to The NewsStudent team registration for the second annual Florida Astronaut Challenge is now open to high-school students across the state (grades 9 through 12). The 2013 competition follows the successful 2012 Florida Astronaut Challenge that took place on May 19 in Tallahassee. Floridas Astronaut Challenge is an opportunity for students to showcase their knowledge of Science, Technology, Mathematics, and Engineering (STEM), through a series of team-oriented experiments and challenges. The application deadline for the regional qualifier exam is Friday, Sept. 28. Seven “ ve-person teams will be selected from the top scorers of the regional qualifier competition. The regional quali“ er exam will be given at three locations in southern, central and northern Florida. During the quali“ er exam, students will be asked to respond to 100 multiple-choice questions based on the Student Astronaut Challenge Manual. Students will compete as a “ ve-person team, taking a different version of the test individually and then one composite score will be produced from the average scores of team members. Teams that qualify will be invited to contend for “ rst place at the state-level competition on March 8-10, 2013, in Tallahassee, where students will bring their experiments to life using a Mobile NASA Space Shuttle Flight simulator developed and constructed by Florida State University Lab School. For additional dates and information about the 2013 Astronaut Challenge and to register with your team, visit Floridas Astronaut Challenge website. Updates may also be found on the Departments Just for Teachers website. About the Florida Department of Education: The departments mission is to increase the pro“ ciency of all students within one seamless, efficient education system by providing them the chance to expand their knowledge and skills through world-class learning opportunities. Serving more than 3.5 million students, 4,200 public schools, 28 colleges, 188,000 teachers, 47,000 college professors and administrators, and 318,000 full-time staff throughout the state, the department enhances the economic self-suf“ ciency of Floridians through programs and services geared toward college, workforce education, job-speci“ c skills and career development. Florida ranks “ rst in the nation for teacher quality, first in the nation in advanced placement participation and “ rst in the southern region for graduation rate and degrees awarded by the Florida College System. For more information, visit www.” doe.org.Special to The NewsThe Shadeville Elementary Schools 29th Annual Fall Festival will be held Oct. 6. Come join the fun, The coronation will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. in the lunchroom. Booths will open following the coronation at 3 p.m. and will close at 7 p.m. Only tickets are accepted at all booths, including purchasing food. There will be bingo held in the library. There is a new booth called the Slime Machine.Ž There will also be booth prizes, hamburgers, hotdogs, sausage dogs, a sweet shoppe, nachos and cheese and popcorn. There will also be entertainment by The Polynesian Fire Knife Dancers, Say On!Ž and more. Shadeville announces its 29th annual fall festival SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA photo of last years coronation ceremony held at Shadeville Elementary during the annual fall festival. LETS DO THIS TOGETHER! DO YOU WANT IT?Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN GET YOU MOTIVATED!850.224.4960www.fsucu.org MW 10-5 • T & F 10-6 • Sat. 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850)926-6241SALE TCCs Wakulla Center 2932 Crawfordville HighwayFor more information call (850) 922-6290 TCCs WAKULLA CENTER Tallahassee Community College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, genetic informat ion, national origin, religion, gender, marital status, disability, or age in its programs and activities. Inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies may be d irected to: Renae Tolson, Equity Officer | Room 146 Administration Building | 444 Appleyard Drive | Tallahassee, FL 32304-2895 | (8 50) 201-8510 | tolsonr@tcc.fl.edu Come learn about our local services, programs and classes. We are open from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday FridayStop by and explore TCC at the new location GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWhose fault is it anyway?By MARJ LAW Youve got your red dotŽ on your pistol and you arent hitting the bulls-eye? Is the reason youre not hitting the center of the target because your hand shakes? Because your site picture is off? Or is it because you need to adjust the red dot site? Red dots can be a lot of fun when youre shooting a pistol. A red dot is a thingie you mount on top of your pistol. When you look through its lens, you see a red dot. You match the dot up with the bulls-eye of your target. Then you shoot. Theoretically, the bullet should pierce that bullseye. Well, theory doesnt always work. So why is your expensive red dot not helping you to hit the target? First, I usually “ gure that the problem is something in the way I shoot. Holding your grip absolutely steady can be very dif“ cult. Everybody trembles a little bit. Once your hands shake, you miss your alignment. Then who knows where the bullet will go? You can try to do better by leaning your arms on the table in front of you as you steady your grip. This helps keep down any natural shaking. Try shooting again. If that doesnt work, have you checked your sight picture? Make sure that dot is directly on the center of the target. Finally, if the problem is not your wobbly arms or your sight picture, get your hands on a pistol vise. Here is how it works: Place your gun on the VŽ of a shooting rest to prevent arm wobble. Aim carefully and shoot three times at the bulls-eye. See where the bullets land on your target. Now, lock your pistol into a vise. Notice the location of your red dot. With your trusty screwdriver, adjust the red dot so that it locates in the center of your three-shot grouping. Take the gun out of the vise and shoot again. This little trick ought to work. Well, it ought to. The last time I put my Ruger in a vise and adjusted the red dot, I then took the gun out and “ red three shots. All hit in a bunch below the bulls-eye. Darn. Theory isnt everything. But then Joe took the Ruger and shot three times. Great first time alignment!Ž he says enthusiastically. Every one of his shots got the bulls-eye. So not fair.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid gunner in her retirement. HOME ON THE RANGE h eor y w a y s is v e o t to t t t t t ? s u al l l l ly ly ly l l l l l “ g ure bl em is so me me m m m m m m w a y I s h oot. r r r r r r grip abso y ca a n “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ c c u l t. r em b it. a nd s miss m e nt k n o ws or your sight pi cture, g e t y our ha h h n ds o n a a pi s tol three sh ot t T a k e t h h h h h h h vi se an d s li tt t le le le le le le le le le e e e e e t rick We W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W ll, it Th Th Th h h h h h h h h h e l a st t t t t t ge g r in in in in i a v v v the red t he th h h h h h h h h h h i n t h D e v ti me me me e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e sa s y s ent h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h Payton Usina, 9, left, and Gavin Mott-Smith, 12, right, enjoyed Labor Day in ParadiseŽ at Shell Point with grand parents Richard and Sally Musgrove. A trip to ParadiseŽ has to include catching “ sh, so Major Alan Lamarche of Plantation Security Inc., volunteered to captain his boat while grandfather Richard and Gavins father Ian, baited hooks and released “ sh for the boys. Payton and Gavin used Gulps and squid on light tackle to catch about 50 Sea Bass. They released most but kept a mess of the big fat ones to have a Labor Day “ sh fry. Brag Book:SPECIAL TO THE NEWSKeepers for a “ sh fryFrom FWC NewsA Panama City man faces a host of charges after a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officer saw him run over and kill a brown pelican in St. Andrew Bay, then ” ee when the of“ cer tried to stop him. Brian R. Robinson, 31, of 2005 Drummond Ave., Panama City, is charged with killing a brown pelican, which is a protected species; ” eeing to elude a law enforcement of“ cer; boating under the influence; and violation of an idle-speed zone in Grand Lagoon. According to the arrest report, FWC Of“ cer Dennis Palmer was patrolling St. Andrew Bay on Aug. 17 at 6:15 p.m. and approaching Carl Gray Park when he saw someone in black swim trunks on a yellow and black personal watercraft (PWC) circling a pelican on the water, then running over and killing the bird. Palmer got within 30 yards of the person, later identi“ ed as Robinson, and ordered him to stop. Robinson, however, had other plans. He looked at me and took off for Hathaway Bridge and toward the Panama City Pass,Ž Palmer said. As other FWC officers responded by boat and vehicles on Thomas Drive, Palmer pursued Robinson to Grand Lagoon, where Robinson abandoned the PWC at Treasure Island Marina and attempted to hide in the facilitys mens room. Palmers report notes that Robinson consented to a breath test, where he measured .153, well over the legal impairment limit. Robinson was transported to the Bay County Jail. His PWC was seized as evidence. The dead pelican was later collected.From FWC NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety internet-completion course in Wakulla County. The course is at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ces Otter Creek Range, 65 Qualify Lane, Crawfordville, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sept. 15. To gain admittance, students must complete the Internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the final report from the online portion of the course. The final report form does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under 16 years of age at all times. Students should bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satis“ es hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling Hunter Safety Coordinator George Warthen at the FWCs regional of“ ce in Panama City at (850) 265-3676.Free hunter safety course in Wakulla County Panama City man charged with killing pelican The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Have something on your mind?Send it to The Wakulla NewsWilliam Snowden, Editoreditor@thewakullanews.net SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for quali“ed applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and ”oor rate of 2.5% Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 ASHLEY FEED STORE 8056 WAKULLA SPRINGS ROAD for more info call (850) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FROM 9 A.M. 6 P.M.Professional Veterinary Services for Dogs and Horses offered by Dr. Wallace Randell, DVMVET DAY & RABIES CLINICRabies shots and other vaccinations available for Horses, Dogs and Cats plus other services LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 – Page 11AI hope those who were able to enjoy Monday with family and friends enjoyed the extra rest and relaxation. However, not everyone was able. There are many who do not have the benefit to take full advantage of the Labor Day Holiday. A quick search on the Department of Labors website and it is easy to find the meaning and history of Labor Day. Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.Ž The first Labor Day was celebrated in New York City on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 1882, and was the efforts of the Central Labor Union. This workingmens holidayŽ became the first Monday of September two years later in 1884 and was celebrated in most major industrial cities in 1885. The first Monday in September became a legal holiday in 1894. Times have certainly changed since 1894 and many in the workforce are managing more than one job as well as other civic commitments. For the men and women in the Coast Guard Auxiliary, our jobs range from college students to professionals, such as doctors and professors and government employees. We are quite a unique group where so many come together from such diverse areas for a common goal. It has been said that if you love what you are doing then it is not work. I feel it is safe to say that for those of us in the Auxiliary, we have chosen to join this organization because we love what it stands for and love the work we do. While times have been trying for many, we have continued to maintain our membership and work toward accomplishing our goals of promoting boating safety through public education, free vessel exams, safety patrols and fellowship. In addition to those in the Auxiliary, it is also important to remember those in the reserves and their families. They not only have a commitment to their employment, but have also made the continued commitment to be on call when needed to serve and protect all of us. Recent storms are a good reminder that things can change quickly and we can all be called to be laborers to help improve the quality of life for others. A look at the news or internet demonstrates the spirit our county was founded on, that through hard work we as laborers add to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country. Flotilla 12 will have our monthly meeting Saturday, Sept. 8, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the fire station in Crawfordville. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident … a little extra labor can make the difference in your level of enjoyment out on the water.a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChuck Hickman preparing his facility. Mark Rosen and Bill Wannall. Oxygen. The princess of gases and a requirement for life as we know it, oxygen is carefully managed by divers. Most everyone takes this plentiful breathing gas for granted, since oxygen in the atmosphere surrounds us most of the time. We simply breathe it into our lungs, transport it to our cells through the blood and metabolism it to get energy with which to live. Because water is 800 times denser than the air in our atmosphere, when we are underwater, the oxygen we breath is also denser. In other words, there is more of it per breath. Most folks appreciate that more of a good thing is bene“ cial to a point. Oxygen is often provided in the hospital to encourage recovery from many injuries. Air is no longer the same underwater. Air in the atmosphere at sea level has 21 percent oxygen or .21 of the complete mixture (most of the rest is nitrogen). But underwater, the added pressure increases the number of oxygen molecules per breath the deeper we go. At a relatively shallow depth of 132 feet (“ ve times the pressure of the surface atmosphere), the diver is breathing the equivalent of 100 percent oxygen at the surface. At a hospital that would be called oxygen therapy! Under pressure that is called Hyperbaric Oxygen (HBO). Many hospitals provide HBO therapy using a hyperbaric chamber in which to compress patients to treatment depths. Capital Regional Medical Center in Tallahassee has such a chamber under the direction of Dr. William Kepper. Patients with injuries, carbon monoxide poisoning and other maladies are prescribed HBO treatments. An excess of oxygen becomes toxic to our body. Underwater as divers, we can expose ourselves to greater concentrations of oxygen than on land, making management of the gas much more critical. Air does not reach that critical oxygen dose (a PO2 of 1.6) until 218 feet (not likely seen by recreational divers). But a Nitrox blend of 40 percent reaches the same critical dose at a depth of 99 feet in the ocean. Divers manage their oxygen by selecting an appropriate blend that is safe at their intended depth. We call this depth the Maximum Operating Depth or MOD. The therapeutic bene“ t however, is seldom the reason divers select an oxygen blend. We are most often interested in diluting the nitrogen in the breathing medium by using oxygen. Our decompression stress created by the greater concentration of nitrogen at depth, limits our dive time. The lower the nitrogen in the breathing mixture, the more time we can spend underwater. We balance the need to reduce nitrogen against an excess of oxygen. A more traditional use of oxygen on or near the surface post dive works to improve the elimination of the excess nitrogen still left in the body. The application of higher oxygen concentrations improves the safe removal of nitrogen during decompression, that period of 24 hours after the dive. So we use oxygen to minimize the nitrogen we absorb during the dive and then later, during decompression, we use oxygen to increase the elimination of nitrogen. Oxygen is the key to a safer dive when carefully managed underwater, and has the unintended bene“ t of hyperbaric therapy. Ever wonder why diving can be so addictive? Some events the FWC handled during the week of Aug. 24-30. ESCAMBIA COUNTY: O n Aug. 28, Lt. Brian Lambert received a call from USCG Pensacola of a missing and overdue boater. The family reported arriving home on the evening of Aug. 27 to “ nd the man, his vehicle, and personal watercraft missing. A search located the mans vehicle and empty PWC trailer at Pensacola NAS boat ramp (Sherman Cove). As all vessels from the USCG and FWC had been moved inland due to approaching Hurricane Isaac and sea conditions were 1215 feet, only the USCGs aircraft was available for search. The USCG reported a ping from the missing mans cell phone late on the night of Aug. 27 coming from offshore, south of Perdido Pass. The USCG resumed aircraft search operations on Aug. 29 and FWC of“ cers continued to search along the coastline. The case is ongoing. SANTA ROSA COUNTY: During the night of Aug. 28 during Hurricane Isaac, Officer Ben Pineda observed two vehicles operating within Eglin WMA in violation of usage hours. The vehicles had been mudbogging within the WMA. One of the vehicles ” ed the scene while the other was stopped. The driver did not possess an Eglin use permit, had prior offenses on Eglin WMA, and had provided alcoholic beverages to a 20year-old female. The driver repeatedly provided false information during the stop and was subsequently arrested and transported to the Santa Rosa County Jail. The female passenger was issued a citation for possession of alcoholic beverages by a person under 21. Evidence and testimony from the scene, together with an ongoing investigation, should assist in identifying the second vehicle. Information is being provided to Eglin Range Patrol for additional charges.FWC Law Enforcement operations Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday p Thu Sep 6, 12 Fri Sep 7, 12 Sat Sep 8, 12 Sun Sep 9, 12 Mon Sep 10, 12 Tue Sep 11, 12 Wed Sep 12, 12 Date 3.6 ft. 5:16 AM 3.5 ft. 5:48 AM 2.9 ft. 12:10 AM 3.2 ft. 12:51 AM High 0.9 ft. 12:24 PM 1.1 ft. 1:22 PM 1.9 ft. 12:42 AM 2.1 ft. 1:49 AM 2.2 ft. 3:27 AM 2.1 ft. 5:00 AM 1.8 ft. 6:06 AM Low 3.0 ft. 6:47 PM 2.7 ft. 7:55 PM 3.3 ft. 6:29 AM 3.1 ft. 7:32 AM 3.1 ft. 9:25 AM 3.2 ft. 11:08 AM 3.5 ft. 12:11 PM High 1.7 ft. 11:59 PM 1.2 ft. 2:47 PM 1.1 ft. 4:23 PM 1.0 ft. 5:35 PM 0.7 ft. 6:26 PM 0.6 ft. 7:06 PM Low 2.6 ft. 9:34 PM 2.7 ft. 11:09 PM High Thu Sep 6, 12 Fri Sep 7, 12 Sat Sep 8, 12 Sun Sep 9, 12 Mon Sep 10, 12 Tue Sep 11, 12 Wed Sep 12, 12 Date 3.7 ft. 5:13 AM 3.6 ft. 5:45 AM 3.0 ft. 12:07 AM 3.2 ft. 12:48 AM High 0.9 ft. 12:21 PM 1.2 ft. 1:19 PM 2.1 ft. 12:39 AM 2.3 ft. 1:46 AM 2.4 ft. 3:24 AM 2.2 ft. 4:57 AM 1.9 ft. 6:03 AM Low 3.0 ft. 6:44 PM 2.8 ft. 7:52 PM 3.4 ft. 6:26 AM 3.2 ft. 7:29 AM 3.1 ft. 9:22 AM 3.3 ft. 11:05 AM 3.6 ft. 12:08 PM High 1.8 ft. 11:56 PM 1.3 ft. 2:44 PM 1.2 ft. 4:20 PM 1.0 ft. 5:32 PM 0.8 ft. 6:23 PM 0.6 ft. 7:03 PM Low 2.7 ft. 9:31 PM 2.8 ft. 11:06 PM High Thu Sep 6, 12 Fri Sep 7, 12 Sat Sep 8, 12 Sun Sep 9, 12 Mon Sep 10, 12 Tue Sep 11, 12 Wed Se p 12, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 12:46 AM 3.0 ft. 1:27 AM High 1.3 ft. 12:29 AM 1.5 ft. 1:03 AM 1.8 ft. 1:46 AM 1.9 ft. 2:53 AM 2.0 ft. 4:31 AM 1.9 ft. 6:04 AM 1.6 ft. 7:10 AM Low 3.4 ft. 5:52 AM 3.2 ft. 6:24 AM 3.1 ft. 7:05 AM 2.9 ft. 8:08 AM 2.8 ft. 10:01 AM 3.0 ft. 11:44 AM 3.2 ft. 12:47 PM High 0.8 ft. 1:28 PM 1.0 ft. 2:26 PM 1.1 ft. 3:51 PM 1.0 ft. 5:27 PM 0.9 ft. 6:39 PM 0.7 ft. 7:30 PM 0.5 ft. 8:10 PM Low 2.7 ft. 7:23 PM 2.5 ft. 8:31 PM 2.4 ft. 10:10 PM 2.5 ft. 11:45 PM High Thu Sep 6, 12 Fri Sep 7, 12 Sat Sep 8, 12 Sun Sep 9, 12 Mon Sep 10, 12 Tue Sep 11, 12 Wed Sep 12, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 5:08 AM 2.2 ft. 12:02 AM 2.4 ft. 12:43 AM High 0.6 ft. 12:35 PM 1.2 ft. 12:10 AM 1.4 ft. 12:53 AM 1.6 ft. 2:00 AM 1.6 ft. 3:38 AM 1.5 ft. 5:11 AM 1.3 ft. 6:17 AM Low 2.2 ft. 6:39 PM 2.6 ft. 5:40 AM 2.5 ft. 6:21 AM 2.3 ft. 7:24 AM 2.3 ft. 9:17 AM 2.4 ft. 11:00 AM 2.6 ft. 12:03 PM High 0.8 ft. 1:33 PM 0.9 ft. 2:58 PM 0.8 ft. 4:34 PM 0.7 ft. 5:46 PM 0.5 ft. 6:37 PM 0.4 ft. 7:17 PM Low 2.0 ft. 7:47 PM 2.0 ft. 9:26 PM 2.0 ft. 11:01 PM High Thu Sep 6, 12 Fri Sep 7, 12 Sat Sep 8, 12 Sun Sep 9, 12 Mon Sep 10, 12 Tue Sep 11, 12 Wed Sep 12, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 5:00 AM 2.7 ft. 5:32 AM 2.5 ft. 12:35 AM High 0.9 ft. 12:03 PM 1.1 ft. 1:01 PM 1.9 ft. 12:21 AM 2.1 ft. 1:28 AM 2.2 ft. 3:06 AM 2.0 ft. 4:39 AM 1.7 ft. 5:45 AM Low 2.3 ft. 6:31 PM 2.1 ft. 7:39 PM 2.6 ft. 6:13 AM 2.4 ft. 7:16 AM 2.4 ft. 9:09 AM 2.5 ft. 10:52 AM 2.7 ft. 11:55 AM High 1.7 ft. 11:38 PM 1.2 ft. 2:26 PM 1.1 ft. 4:02 PM 0.9 ft. 5:14 PM 0.7 ft. 6:05 PM 0.6 ft. 6:45 PM Low 2.0 ft. 9:18 PM 2.1 ft. 10:53 PM 2.3 ft. 11:54 PM High Thu Sep 6, 12 Fri Sep 7, 12 Sat Sep 8, 12 Sun Sep 9, 12 Mon Sep 10, 12 Tue Sep 11, 12 Wed Sep 12, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 5:01 AM 3.2 ft. 5:38 AM 3.2 ft. 6:24 AM 2.6 ft. 12:12 AM 2.7 ft. 12:51 AM 2.8 ft. 1:21 AM High 0.7 ft. 12:10 PM 0.7 ft. 1:21 PM 0.7 ft. 2:42 PM 2.0 ft. 12:59 AM 2.0 ft. 2:55 AM 1.9 ft. 4:23 AM 1.8 ft. 5:25 AM Low 2.5 ft. 7:59 PM 2.5 ft. 9:29 PM 2.5 ft. 11:07 PM 3.1 ft. 7:22 AM 3.0 ft. 8:35 AM 3.0 ft. 9:56 AM 3.1 ft. 11:12 AM High 1.8 ft. 10:57 PM 1.9 ft. 11:40 PM 0.6 ft. 3:56 PM 0.6 ft. 4:56 PM 0.5 ft. 5:44 PM 0.5 ft. 6:26 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 6 Sept. 12First Sept. 22 Full Aug. 31 Last Sept. 8 New Sept. 15Major Times 5:47 AM 7:47 AM 6:11 PM 8:11 PM Minor Times 12:45 PM 1:45 PM 11:32 PM 12:32 AM Major Times 6:34 AM 8:34 AM 6:58 PM 8:58 PM Minor Times --:---:-1:37 PM 2:37 PM Major Times 7:23 AM 9:23 AM 7:47 PM 9:47 PM Minor Times 12:16 AM 1:16 AM 2:27 PM 3:27 PM Major Times 8:12 AM 10:12 AM 8:36 PM 10:36 PM Minor Times 1:05 AM 2:05 AM 3:15 PM 4:15 PM Major Times 9:01 AM 11:01 AM 9:25 PM 11:25 PM Minor Times 1:57 AM 2:57 AM 4:00 PM 5:00 PM Major Times 9:50 AM 11:50 AM 10:14 PM 12:14 AM Minor Times 2:52 AM 3:52 AM 4:42 PM 5:42 PM Major Times 10:39 AM 12:39 PM 11:03 PM 1:03 AM Minor Times 3:49 AM 4:49 AM 5:22 PM 6:22 PM Average Average Average Average++ Average Average Average7:17 am 7:53 pm 11:33 pm 12:47 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:17 am 7:51 pm --:-1:38 pm 7:18 am 7:50 pm 12:18 am 2:28 pm 7:18 am 7:49 pm 1:06 am 3:16 pm 7:19 am 7:48 pm 1:58 am 4:01 pm 7:19 am 7:46 pm 2:53 am 4:43 pm 7:20 am 7:45 pm 3:50 am 5:23 pm64% 58% 52% 46% 39% 33% 27% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy AMY GEIGER Dear Chamber Members: Summer break has ended, vacations are over, the students are back in school and Focus Wakulla is back in action. After a very successful inaugural event at Poseys Dockside Cafe in Panacea, we are pleased to announce our second event, Speed Networking, to be held Sept. 25 from 6:15 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Best Western PLUS. Speed Networking will give young professionals in the area a chance to meet at least 20 other young professionals in less than 45 minutes. At this event, attendees will be provided with tips on how to network and mingle in a crowd to begin great conversations. The Importance of Networking for Young Professionals Networking for young professionals is an integral part of the business world today. Networking offers another avenue to reach vendors, customers and future business partners. It allows you to present yourself and your networking objective in a much more personal way than an advertisement, promotion or an online resume. By nurturing and growing a strong business and support network, up-andcoming professionals can often have access to information about new innovations in the industry and who is and is not hiring. Making use of those relationships to make lateral or upward moves can have a positive impact on the ability to make money and achieve career goals. Networking is also helpful in terms of being able to exchange ideas and strategies with others who have dealt with similar issues and situations. The ability to share experiences and potential solutions can often inspire creativity in everyone involved, leading to the development of new solutions that gain praise from employers and help to advance individual careers. With the right type of networking young professionals can establish connections that will serve them well for many years to come. (For more on networking successfully, go to www.wisegeek.com/whatare-young-professionals. htm.) This event will “ ll up fast as it is limited to only 40 attendees. To register, visit the Focus Wakulla page on the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce website. Focus Wakulla will also join the Political Forum in October to hear the views, ideas and platforms of the candidates running in this years election. Yours in Service, Amy GeigerAmy Geiger is president of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce. The chamber can be reached at 926-1848. T a k i n g C a r e o f B u s i n e s s Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Focus Wakulla o ers networking for young professionals Presidents Message New members: Tallahassee Leon Federal CU Stix Grill, Inc ReNu U Rejuvination Spa Serendipity Salon Tallahassee Lender’s ConsortiumBy PETRA SHUFFof the ChamberThe distance did not keep the crowd away from our August luncheon at Dickeys Barbecue No. 535 in Woodville. Mary was happy to announce a record crowd of 60 before introducing our hosts, Debra and John Lewis, who have been in the restaurant business for three generations. Dickeys started in Dallas 70 years ago, and is the fastest growing barbecue chain in the U.S. Dickeys served up a choice of Texas-style chopped beef brisket or southern pulled pork and creamy cole slaw, green beans with bacon, baked potato casserole, barbecue beans, yeast roll, dessert, tea, and a special order salad for our vegetarians. We thank the Lewises and staff for hosting our luncheon. We were happy to announce members that joined earlier in the year and did not have a chance to join one of our gatherings before: € UPS Store No. 6044, Harry C. Bosman, owner of the UPS Store branch on Crawfordville Highway and Capital Circle SW. This family owned business has been in the shipping-printing and mailing business for 22 years. € AFLAC agent Willie Mae Peterkin Musgray talked about services, and accident insurance through Aflac. For more information call Willie Mae (850) 688-4419. Since we missed the luncheon in July, we had lots of new members to announce for July and August. Our July members were William Bull Financial Professional Associate, Prudential, Strategic Bene“ ts Group LLC., and American Red Cross Capital Area Chapter. Dan Sanborn, CEO American Red Cross, Capital Area Chapter was also happy to join us. Dan has been getting familiar with Wakulla County during tropical storm Debby, lending us a hand by arranging much needed shelter, and survival kits, water etc. Our August members were Tallahassee-Leon Federal Credit Union, Stix Grill Inc., ReNu U Rejuvenation Spa, and newly joined at the luncheon Serendipity Salon. As Mary always suggests bringing a friend, several of our members do just that. Zoe Mans“ eld, city manager of St. Marks introduced City Commissioner Gail Gilman. Pam Allbritton introduced Michael Eurich and Connie Palmer with Big Bend Hospice. New to our crowd was Kortney Rudd, the new volunteer service manager for Covenant Hospice. Charlean Lanier with Harvest Fellowship introduced her guest Haydee Jackley, who filled us in about the Empty Bowl project, taken on by Wakulla County Coalition for Youth and HAWC, otherwise known as Healing Arts of Wakulla. The Empty Bowl project sounds like a fun way to raise money for the local food pantries. For a $10 donation, you get to paint a bowl which will be sold Nov. 3 at Hudson Park, “ lled with soup and bread for a donation of $15. A business or employees can participate and paint bowls as a group, or make the donation, and high school students will be happy to take that task off your hands. Charlean Lanier is helping with this project by heading the bake sale committee, and she also stressed the importance of donating food boxes for needy families for the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. Part of the proceeds from the food boxes will purchase food for Eden Springs. Deirdre Farrington announced the move of her law of“ ce to 3038 Crawfordville Highway, and is now also certified as a court mediator. Susan Schatzman shared sad news about Thelma Gaupin, local real estate broker for decades, and past Chamber president. Thelma recently suffered a massive stroke. Once released from the hospital, she will be transferred to Eden Springs for rehabilitation. Please keep Thelma and her husband in your thoughts and prayers. Louis Garcia, CEO Big Brothers Big Sisters was happy to share the news of receiving a grant. BBBS will now be able to add a part-time position, and hire a mentor recruiter for Wakulla. Continued on Page 11ADickey’s Barbecue hosts luncheon PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe networking luncheon at Dickeys set an attendance record with 60 Chamber members and guests. Zoe Mans“ eld won the cash pot. Hosts John and Debra Lewis of Dickeys.Chamber Chatter€ Upcoming after hours networking: Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Sept. 20, details to be announced. € September Luncheon: Riverside Caf on Sept. 26 from noon to 1:15 p.m. RSVP to Chamber of“ ce, 926-1848. Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Club’s2012 ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZA Wildwood Country Club Thursday • October 11 • 2012 6:30pm Social 7:00pm Dinner, Auction, & Show please join us for Maurice’s Way Out West Carroll’s Boot Country Crum’s Mini MallTICKETS $30.00 eachall proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County students

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 – Page 13AContinued from Page 10AIn addition, BBBS asks to place clothing bins at business locations. The clothing will be sold at their new second-hand store in Tallahassee, and the dollars earned will be returned to Wakulla to help our local families. Speaking of raising money for local families, Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla is presenting their second Annual Drive for the Build Golf Tournament Oct. 19 to help fund the building of yet another home for a quali“ ed family. For more information, contact Jo Anne Strickland 850.556.1828. Big Bend Hospice will also be holding their annual golf tournament Friday, Oct. 26 to help local families. The highlight of the luncheons is always the cash drawing and giveaways. Zoe Mansfield was the lucky winner of the $60 cash pot. We thank the following for their donations to the drawing: Centennial Bank VISA $25 gift card, Cook Insurance for the ” ashlight, Big Brothers Big Sisters for the T-shirts and bottle of champagne, Oliver Construction for the gift basket, The Wakulla News for the ad, Rainbow International for the lucky bamboo plant, Edwin Brown for two insulated glasses with candy, Petra Shuff for the pepper jelly and umbrella, Charlean Lanier for the best home baked cheesecake, Marianne and Lionel Dazevedo for the decorative vase, Revell Electric and Shepard Accounting for the orchid plant. Our next luncheon will be held at Riverside Caf in St. Marks on Wednesday, Sept. 26. Details to be announced.Dickeys Barbecue hosts luncheon S p o t l i g h t o n B u s i n e s s Spotlight on Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Founded in 1941, Dickeys Barbecue restaurants began in Dallas by the Dickey family and is now the worlds largest barbecue chain, located in 42 states with more than 230 locations nationwide. The Woodville Dickeys is the “ fth to open in Florida offering eight hickory smoked meats (with Johns own wood), cooked slow and served fast. Owned by local residents John and Debra Lewis, Dickeys is located in Lewiswood Center, 8159 Woodville Highway in Woodville. Debra and John are deeply rooted in the area. Besides their two sons, Jeremy and Jesse, they both have large extended families in the area as well. Dickeys offers free kids meals every Sunday (with purchase of an adult meal) and affordable family packs designed to bring the whole family together for dinner or your tailgate party. And they cater events large and small, or drop in for one of their daily specials for $7.99. Tell us about your business (include unique facts and history): We are a family owned business and have been serving Wakulla and the surrounding counties for more than 20 years. What services, products do you offer? We service, maintain and install all types of heating and air conditioning equipment. What sets your business apart from the competition? We pride ourselves on being honest with our customers and doing superb work. We also think you will “ nd that our pricing is more reasonable than others. How long have you been a Chamber member? We have been a member of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce since 2010. Why did you join the Chamber? We joined the Chamber to network with individuals and other small business owners in the community. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? We feel the Chamber has a lot of opportunities for small business owners to become more involved in the local community. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? One of the most important ways to support our local community is to Shop Local. We must support the local businesses who support the area where we live, work and play. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? For all your heating and air conditioning needs, please contact our of“ ce at 926-3546. Business: Keith Key Heating & Air Inc. Owner: Keith Key Ribbon Cutting:Dickeys BarbecueBy JASON ALDERMAN If youve got a recent high school graduate whos getting ready to head off to college or join the workforce, let me share a few lessons I learned the hard way about managing personal “ nances that you can pass along to your kids. Young adults are just starting to build their credit history. In the coming months theyll probably encounter many unfamiliar expenses … and many “ nancial temptations. If theyre not careful, a few ill-thought decisions made now could damage their credit for years to come. Here are several actions your kids can take to build good “ nancial habits and strong credit … and a few minefields to watch out for: Probably the most fundamental tool to for young adults to help manage their “ nances is a basic checking account and debit card. A few tips to pass along: Look for a bank/credit union that charges no monthly usage fee, doesnt require minimum balances and has conveniently located ATMs so you dont rack up out-of-network ATM charges. Enter all transactions in the check register and review your account online regularly to know when deposits, checks, purchases and automatic payments have cleared. Dont write checks or make debit card purchases unless the current balance will cover them … many transactions now clear instantaneously. Banks must ask whether you want overdraft protection. If you opt for coverage, understand that overdrafts can be expensive … up to $35 or more per transaction. Request text or email alerts when your balance drops below a certain level, checks or deposits clear, or payments are due. Credit cards for young adults can be a useful tool, but they must be used responsibly. By law, people under 21 must have a parent or other responsible adult cosign credit card accounts unless they can prove suf“ cient income to repay the debt. If you allow your child to become an authorized user or joint account holder on one of your accounts, remember that any account activity, good or bad, goes on both your credit reports, so careful monitoring is critical. Another way to build credit history is to start out with a securedŽ credit card … a card linked to an account into which you deposit money. Typically you can charge up to the amount youve deposited and then replenish the account with more funds. After theyve made several on-time payments, have your kid ask the lender to convert it to an unsecured card, or to at least add an unsecured amount to the account. Just make sure that the lender agrees to report your payment history to at least one of the three credit bureaus; otherwise, the account does nothing to improve your credit. If they qualify for an unsecured credit card, have your kids follow these guidelines: Always make at least the minimum payment … on time … each month. Strive to pay off the full balance each month; otherwise, the accumulated interest will add signi“ cantly to your repayment amount. Avoid using credit cards for cash advances, which often incur upfront fees and begin accruing interest immediately. Look for a card with no annual fee and also compare cash advance, late payment, balance transfer, over-thelimit and other fees. For more tips on building and maintaining strong credit, visit Whats My Score, a “ nancial literacy program for young adults run by Visa Inc. (www.whatsmyscore. org).Jason Alderman directs Visas “ nancial education programs.High School grads need to understand credit LindysChicken Since19687locations SPECIALS SPECIALS TENDERS 3 Large Chicken Tenders w/ Fries .......... $4.89 HOT WINGS 5 Piece w/ Fries ....................................... $4.89 2 Whole Wings w/ Fries & Biscuit .................................... $4.89 Includes Side & Small Drink Chicken Fillet combo .................................. $6.99 3 Tenders special ........................................ $6.39 5 Hot Wings ................................................. $6.39 Chicken Salad or BBQ Sandwich ............... $5.99 Pork Chop Sandwich .................................. $6.99 2 Whole Wings ............................................ $6.39 2 PC Dark with only Mashed Potatoes ....... $5.19 COMBO MEALS COMBO MEALS all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICEƒ EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Experience o 38 years broad-based o Public & private sectors in 35 counties of Florida o $3+ billion appraised, one-by-one and in person (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Aug. 23, Deputy Nick Gray responded to a traf“ c complaint of a possible intoxicated driver on U.S. Highway 98 in Panacea. Deputy Gray observed the suspect vehicle swerve into the northbound lane from the southbound lane and head back onto the southbound lane shoulder. He conducted a traf“ c stop and smelled a strong odor of marijuana from inside the vehicle. A plastic baggy of marijuana was observed inside the vehicle in plain view. The driver, Fredrick Hall Dekay, 61, of Tallahassee was arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked and possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Passenger Tripper P. Pesce, 40, of Tallahassee was issued a traf“ c citation for having an open container while in operation. The marijuana was seized and weighed at one gram. It was placed into the Evidence Division. Detectives Lorne Whaley, Derek Lawhon and Nick Boutwell also assisted at the scene. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On Aug. 23, Benjamin Millership of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to purchase a vehicle from a suspect who later requested the vehicle back. The victim had a bill of sale and signed title in his possession. The victim also discovered that the suspect had the vehicle title transferred to an undetermined female. The case was turned over to Detective Matt Helms to contact the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On Aug. 23, Ryan Travis Perez, 19, of Crawfordville was arrested for knowingly driving while license is suspended or revoked. Detective Lorne Whaley observed Perez tailgating his unmarked agency vehicle. After backing off from the detectives vehicle, Perez began to tailgate him a second time. Detective Whaley conducted a traf“ c stop and determined that Perez did not possess a driver license. Perez was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. € On Aug. 23, Eduardo Avila of Palm Bay, Fla. and Stone Creek Pizza reported a grand theft. A delivery driver stole money from the company by altering the transaction amounts. Thirty transactions resulted in $856 in losses for the company. Avila requested the suspect, who has been identi“ ed, be prosecuted. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On Aug. 23, Ryan Langston of Panacea reported a residential burglary. An electronic game and unit, valued at $238, was stolen from the victims home. Suspects have been identi“ ed. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. AUGUST 24 € On Aug. 24, Detective Nick Boutwell observed a 37-year-old Crawfordville resident illegally driving a motor vehicle. Detective Boutwell knows the suspect personally and knows he does not possess a valid driver license. The driver has been classified as a habitual driving offenderŽ since 2009. A warrant was requested for his arrest. AUGUST 25 € On Aug. 25, Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated a juvenile drinking party in Crawfordville. While investigating, Kyle Almeda, 19, of Crawfordville allegedly made a move towards Lt. Sessor and had to be secured in handcuffs. Deputy Cole Wells discovered a 12-year-old juvenile unresponsive and intoxicated in a closet. The juvenile was awakened and admitted drinking alcoholic beverages provided by Michael Ray Marks, 25, of Crawfordville. Marks was arrested for contributing to the delinquency of a minor. Kyle Almeda was arrested for disorderly intoxication and resisting an of“ cer without violence. Three other males, ages 18 to 21, were required to leave the residence. € On Aug. 25, Andrew Carter of Crawfordville recovered a lost cell phone. The phone was found on Danley Grade Road. The phone was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division for further investigation. The phone is valued at $50. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On Aug. 25, Steve Walker of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered the victims shed and removed $5,000 worth of miscellaneous tools and property. The case was turned over to property theft detectives. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On Aug. 25, Deputy Randy Phillips reported responding to a call for service near Coastal Highway 98 and Tower Road in Panacea when a wild hog got into the road and was struck by the deputy. The animal changed course and got back in the path of Deputy Phillips as he attempted an evasive maneuver. The crash created some minor damage to the patrol vehicle. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. AUGUST 26 € On Aug. 26, a 17-yearold Crawfordville juvenile was arrested for two counts of battery on a law enforcement of“ cer and one count of resisting an of“ cer with violence. Lt. Jimmy Sessor responded to a “ ght on U.S. Highway 319. One of the suspects was observed running down the road. The juvenile rushed Lt. Sessor on two occasions and Lt. Sessor deployed his Taser to subdue the juvenile. Deputy Will Hudson was kicked by the juvenile as he attempted to assist Lt. Sessor in placing the male suspect in the patrol vehicle. The juvenile also resisted efforts of Wakulla EMS to remove the Taser probes. The juvenile was eventually released to his mother. € On Aug. 26, Deputy Cole Wells investigated a report of an intoxicated Tallahassee male at the U.S. Highway 98 boat ramp on the Wakulla River. Deputy Wells and individuals at the boat ramp attempted to move the male subject out of the way of moving vehicles around him. The suspect began cursing loudly and a female adult removed her children from the scene. The subject was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. He complained of an ankle injury and told law enforcement he consumed a large amount of alcohol and smoked Spice during the day. The male was treated by Wakulla EMS and transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. AUGUST 27 € On Aug. 27, Deputy Cole Wells investigated a disturbance call in Crawfordville. During the course of his investigation, Deputy Wells allegedly observed marijuana and a smoking pipe on Jon Michael Rowan, 28, of Crawfordville. Deputy Wells concluded his disturbance investigation and arrested Rowan for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. The marijuana weighed 3.5 grams. Deputy Randy Phillips also investigated. € On Aug. 27, Virginia Myers of Dollar General in St. Marks reported a retail theft. Two females were observed with purses that appeared to be full of unpaid for store items. One of the females became aggressive and threw a bakery item back on a shelf after being observed taking the item and placing it in her purse. The vehicle left the area northbound on Woodville Highway. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. AUGUST 28 € On Aug. 28, a concerned citizen from Crawfordville reported “ nding an application for a commercial driver license with a date on it from 2005. The name on the application is that of a Wakulla resident who died in 1976. A suspect has been identi“ ed and the investigation continues. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On Aug. 28, Wal-Mart in Crawfordville reported a retail theft. Store employees allegedly observed Tiffany Alane Thompson, 30, of Crawfordville conceal cosmetics and jewelry in her purse and on her person. She left the store without paying for them. The 28 different items were valued at $188. Thomp-son was arrested and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Brenda Carol Thomas, 31, of Crawfordville was with Thompson at the time of the incident but did not possess any stolen property. Thomas was issued a trespass warning for the store. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € On Aug. 28, a Wakulla School District bus driver was at her home when she observed a young girl walk by her home and crouch behind her school bus. It was determined that the female was a runaway from Woodville. The 13-year-old girls mother reported her as missing to the Leon County Sheriffs Of“ ce earlier in the day. The mother picked up the child and transported her away from the scene. Prior to leaving, the teenager described some alleged criminal activity within her family that may have occurred in Leon County. The Leon Sheriffs Of“ ce was informed of the activity and the recovery of the child. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € On Aug. 28, Glenna Bradford of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim discovered four unauthorized transactions on her bank card. The transactions were valued at $383. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. € On Aug. 28, Christine Deland of Tallahassee reported the theft of a roofing ladder. The ladder was never returned by a former employee who has been identi“ ed. The ladder is valued at $12,000. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. € On Aug. 28, Erica Wilder of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Someone used her bank card to create $153 worth of unauthorized expenses. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. AUGUST 29 € On Aug. 29, Deputy Nick Gray responded to a domestic complaint. As he was attempting to investigate the complaint, Deputy Gray attempted to discuss the matter with Dustin James Pope, 32, of Crawfordville. Pope cursed the deputy and refused to cooperate with the investigation. Deputy Gray arrested Pope for obstructing an officer without violence. Once informed he was under arrest, Pope ” ed the scene on foot. The deputy chased Pope on foot for 100 yards before Pope complied with commands to stop. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell and Deputy Mike Zimba also investigated. € On Aug. 29, Vikas Kapoor of Crawfordville reported the theft of an air conditioning unit from his property. The unit is valued at $300 and a suspect has been identified. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On Aug. 29, Kim Pastor of Huddle House reported a theft. Lisa Ann Dean, 43, of Tallahassee was reportedly observed removing cash from the restaurant cash register. The restaurant reported the loss of $139 and Dean was arrested for petit theft. She was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. During the course of the investigation, it was discovered that the suspect also removed money from the register in April. The suspect was unable to remember how much money was taken during that incident. Deputy Will Hudson and Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. € On Aug. 29, Eric Lee Allred of Crawfordville was arrested and charged with cultivation of marijuana after the WCSO Narcotics Unit discovered 37 marijuana plants at Allreds Crawfordville home. Investigators received information that plants were growing at the home and they were given consent to search the home by the homeowner. Plants were discovered in a shed tied upside down to a “ shing line. A bag of potting soil was also observed nearby. More plants were discovered in the back yard growing in pots. The suspects potted marijuana plants that were in the yard ranged in height from one foot to “ ve feet tall. The plants were uprooted and placed into the Evidence Division at the sheriffs of“ ce. The value of the plants is $37,000. € On Aug. 29, Wal-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft. A suspect was allegedly observed taking items from the general merchandise aisle and concealing the items on his person. The suspect purchased a grocery item but failed to pay for $30 worth of merchandise. A decision was made not to pursue charges against the suspect due to diminished mental status. However, Wal-Mart requested a trespass warning be issued against the Crawfordville man. Lt. Jimmy Sessor and Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On Aug. 29 Kathryn Lambert of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Two suspicious charges were observed on the victims bank card. The charges totaled $147 and were created in Mission, Texas. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € On Aug. 29, Wal-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft. Aeisha Laquida Reddick, 32, of Tallahassee attempted to leave the store without paying for $65 worth of merchandise. During the investigation, the suspect repoprtedly gave deputies a false name and could not provide a valid driver license despite admitting driving to Wal-Mart. She was charged with retail theft, giving a false name to law enforcement of“ cers and driving with a suspended or revoked driver license with knowledge. Deputy Randy Phillips, Detective Lorne Whaley and Deputy Bill Poole investigated. € On Aug. 29, Debra Blount of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Three unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank card, totaling $271. The charges were created in Texas. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. € On Aug. 29, Ricky Perkins of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Three unauthorized charges were observed on his bank card from Colorado. The charges totaled $375. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,070 calls for service during the past week including 14 “ re alarms; 19 business and residential alarms; 80 citizen contacts; 21 disturbances; 18 abandoned E-911 cell calls; 11 regular abandoned E-911 calls; 25 regular E-911 calls; 10 information contacts; 45 investigations; 50 medical emergencies; 357 business and residential security checks; 26 special details; 28 subpoena services; 11 suspicious people; 10 thefts; 58 traf“ c enforcements; 109 traffic stops; 12 disabled vehicles; and 11 reckless vehicles. Find us on (850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.com LubeXpert.us$6.00 $6.00 OFF OFF Exp. 9/30/2012Mon. Fri. 8am 6pm • Sat. 8am 4pm 2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 TEXT LUBEEX TO 55678 FOR INSTANT SAVINGS!FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGE FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGE Full services include: • New Oil (5qts. Mobil) • New Filter • Brake Fluid Check • Power Steering Fluid Check • Battery Check • Transmission Fluid Check • Fill Washer Fluid • Inspect Belts & Hoses • Check All Exterior Lights • Lube Chasis • Vacuum Interior$3399 less $6 = $2799 + tax HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 – Page 15ASpecial to The NewsOn Aug. 29, Eric Lee Allred, 28 of Crawfordville was arrested and charged with cultivation of marijuana after the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office Narcotics Unit discovered 37 marijuana plants at Allreds Crawfordville home, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Investigators received information that plants were growing at the home and they were given consent to search the home by the homeowner. Plants were discovered in a shed tied upside down to a “ shing line. A bag of potting soil was also observed nearby. More plants were discovered in the back yard growing in pots. The suspects potted marijuana plants ranged in height from one foot to “ ve feet tall. The plants were uprooted and placed into the Evidence Division at the sheriffs of“ ce. The value of the plants is $37,000.Crawfordville man busted growing pot Eric Lee Allred Continued from Page 1A To implement the amendment, the state Marine Fisheries Commission and, later, the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, had to de“ ne what a gill net is. Basically, the agencys de“ nition comes down to how big the meshes in the net are. Two inch stretch mesh is legal, but three-inch mesh is an illegal gill net. But “ shermen claim the smaller mesh nets result in wasteful hauls of bycatch … up to 98 percent of whats in their nets is juvenile “ sh that die from being caught and they cant sell. So some members of Wakulla Fishermens Association … Ronald Fred Crum, Jonas Porter and Keith Ward … “ led a lawsuit in Wakulla Circuit Court claiming the small mesh nets are violating the constitutional amendment. Attorney Ron Mowrey, who represents the fishermen, has argued that the goal of the constitution takes precedence over the states rules created to implement and enforce the amendment. Assistant Attorney General Jonathan Glogau contended that issues “ shermen are bringing up in this case are nothing new and have been litigated over and over since the passage of the amendment. The First District Court of Appeal has repeatedly upheld the two-inch mesh requirement as a valid exercise in rulemaking. But Judge Fulford, who at one point described herself as knowing absolutely nothing about nets, never having touched one in her life, has been a quick study. In her effort to learn more about how the nets are used, Fulford wants to go watch “ shermen haul their nets. Glogau strenuously objected to that. On Tuesday, Sept. 4, Glogau “ led his objection to the judges proposed viewing of nets being hauled, contending it is improper and outside the controlled environment of the courtroom. Fulford will hear motions on that matter at a hearing on Monday, Sept. 10, at 7:30 a.m. After a full day of testimony last week, both sides agreed it would take three weeks to get the court transcript, and they would then submit their proposed findings of fact and proposed order 10 days after that … meaning it will be at least a month, and very likely longer, before the court rules. Fishermen contend that they arranged to work with the FWC in 2005 on a study to compare the “ shing ef“ cacy of two inch vs. three inch nets. They claim that state biologist Brent Winner refused to participate in the study anymore after seeing the results of the catch … that the smaller, legal gear caught 98 percent bycatch and only a few legal mullet, while the larger net caught legal-size mullet and no bycatch. On the stand, Winner disputed that the 2005 incident was a study.Ž Rather, he said he had been requested by FWC to work with Crum on what he said was alternative “ shing gear. Winner said he didnt participate after seeing that “ shermen were using the nets like gill nets. On direct examination by Glogau, Winner showed charts and “ gures indicating that the majority of the mullet caught in Florida is by cast net … 98 percent of the catch on the east coast, while about 20 percent of “ shers on the Gulf Coast use the two-inch seines. Winner also said that mullet stocks have shown a slight increase over the past 20 years, certainly since the passage of the net limitation. He disputed the fishermens contention that mullet stocks are being negatively affected by the smaller mesh nets. I dont believe the nets are having a detrimental effect,Ž he said. I dont like seeing dead juvenile “ sh either, or bycatch.Ž But, he said, theres no evidence that the stocks of mullet are being effected by the nets. On cross examination, Mowrey got Winner to admit that the state has never really done any testing on what effects the smaller nets have, and that he had never used a net that size. Winner also acknowledged that he doesnt believe its really possible to catch mullet with a seine net. Back on re-direct, Glogau focused his questions on there not being any indication of problems with mullet stocks. Judge Fulford then asked Winner to de“ ne over“ shing, waste and unnecessary killingŽ … terms used in the amendment as its goal.Judge Fulford hears net “ shing case The Wakulla News Notice for another suit led at WCSOStafff Report A former lieutenant with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office filed a charge of discrimination with the department, claiming she was dismissed after receiving different treatment than other employees with medical conditions. Lisa Spears, a white female, worked for the sheriffs of“ ce in the jail beginning in September 2004 and was dismissed April 2012. According to the charges on file with the WCSO, Spears claims she was dismissed because of medical disability. Spears noti“ ed the WCSO in September 2011 that she had a serious medical condition and had surgery in March 8 and reported back to work on March 12. On March 16, she was given a notice of termination effective April 9. Spears claims she was given notice of termination due to her disability. The sheriffs of“ ce contended the job duty was being replaced. Spears requested an accommodation to another job duty that would allow her to receive her post surgery medical treatments. In response, she claims she was offered a demotion with a pay cut and a job duty that would not allow her to receive her medical treatments. Spears took medical leave for her post surgery treatment starting on March 22, 2012. While on medical leave, she claims she was presented with falsified Family Medical Leave Act documents and was harassed with constant surveillance at her home with deputies driving by. Spears was terminated on July 13. She claims other employees were treated differently with respect to medical accommodation, including Sheriff Donnie Crum. Spears is represented by Tallahassee attorney Marie Mattox. The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers … if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bar“eld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year. YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible. For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program. Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor ofƒ 4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida To make a donation to the auction or for more information about the event, please contact: Sue Belford at 850-926-4244 or e-mail FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com “Friends of Wakulla County Public Library” Bring your family & friends Bid on great items Support your Library Programs The Silent Auction includes Gift Certi cates, Health and Beauty Products, Auto Detailing Supplies, Baby Items, Fishing Charter, Gifts, Artwork, Dinners, Wine and Lots More!Food & Drinks will be provided. SECOND ANNUAL is proud to announce that Dr. Chukwuma M. Okoroji is now providing Obstetrics and Gynecology services 1st & 3rd Thursday of each month CRMC Medical Group Building, 2382 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite-D, Crawfordville FL. We accept most insurance, including BCBS, CHP, Medicaid and more. To schedule your appointment or for more information Call 850-320-6054NatureCoastWomensCare.com

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LES HARRISONWakulla Extension DirectorAnyone taking an early evening walk in north Florida during the late summer/ early autumn has experienced the near deafening calls of cicadas (Magicicada spp.). More commonly identi“ ed as locust or Katydids in the south, their nearmechanical buzzing usually originates from trees during the day or twilight hours. These seldom seen or captured insects known for their raucous, sometimes undulating, chorus do leave strategically placed souvenirs for the sharp-eyed observer. This discarded residue of their early life is a highly valued tool for many elementary school boys with a prank in mind. Their nymph skeletons are often seen on the trunks of trees or on shrubs. These opaque brown shells are left behind when the cicada outgrows it. The process is similar in other species with an exterior having limited expansion potential. In some states cicadas are famous for their periodic appearance in colossal numbers, sometimes as many as 1.5 million per acre. These once every 13 to 17 year swarms do not occur in Florida. The 19 Florida cicada species fall into three groups based on overall size measured by the length of the forewings. They produce their songs with timbals, paired drumlike structures on the sides of the abdominal segments. A muscle attached to the timbal plate causes the timbal ribs to pop inward and pop outward when relaxed. In Florida, only males have timbals and the females are mute. Most sounds made by males are calling songs which serve to attract females. Cicada nymphs live in underground burrows where they feed on xylem sap from roots of grasses or woody plants. Because xylem sap is low in nutrients, nymph development takes several years. All cicadas molt four times underground. When the cicada nymph is ready for its “ fth and “ nal molt, it makes its way to the surface. It climbs a short distance up a tree trunk or stem, anchors itself and molts for the last time, becoming an adult. Contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u” .edu/ to learn more about cicadas and other area insects.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” edu or at (850) 926-3931.The love song of our Florida cicadas A series of photos showing a cicada escaping its nymphal skeleton. The cast skeleton will remain attached to the foliage and the adult will expand its wings, darken, and ” y away. PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Of“ce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. … 5 p.m. (850) 877-55892770 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 110, Tallahassee, FL 32308 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.com Stephanie Lee, MDDr. Lee is joining Dr. Michael Douso and Dr. Kathrine Lupo at Capital Regional Womens Health. As an FSU School of Medicine graduate, she is happy to return to Tallahassee.Capital Regional Womens Health accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers.Next Day Appointments AvailableCapital Regional Medical Center Welcomes Dr. Stephanie Lee Specializing in Gynecology & Obstetrics Expert physicians.Quality obstetrical & gynecological care. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GET READY FOR HUNTING !!" 2012 Go to www.bigbendhospice.org to Sign-up Today! 11:30am Registration and Lunch 12:30pm Tee-o October 26, 2012Wildwood Country ClubSAVE THE DATE!For more information, call Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308Wakulla County Big Bend Hospice

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 Concussion training for school coaches Story, Page 5B War Eagle cheerleaders Varsity and JV Photos, Page 5B Wakulla-Mosley game photos Page 3B sports news and team views SportsWar Eagles pound MosleyWakulla looks sharp in opening game, rolling to 44-10 winSpecial to The NewsIt will be a special football season this year as David Miller kicks off his “ nal months as Superintendent of Schools. Miller is as much a part of high school football in Wakulla County as are the Friday night lights. He said this is the “ rst time the “ rst game of the season has brought such a mix of emotions as his November retirement approaches. Its a different feeling. Im really going to miss it,Ž he said. But at the same time, I believe its time for someone else to step in and take over.Ž Over the years, Miller has earned respect as a leader. Forty-five years ago Wakulla football was born. The year was 1967 and Miller was a starting strong side offensive tackle and the punt team kicker. From the very beginning, Wakulla was strong, “ nishing with a 9-1 record and District Championship in its inaugural year. The same year, Miller was the Wakulla baseball teams starting catcher when the team finished in the State Final Four. He has been involved from the ground up. Wakulla football has been led by Ron Hinson [1967-1969], Jerry Reynolds [1970-1971], Clayton Wooten [1972-1974], Rick Smith [1975-1976], JD Jones [1977-2006] and Scott Klees [2007-present]. Miller was hired to coach at his almamater in 1973. Continued on Page 5B By JOEY JACOBSRMS CoachThe Riversprings Middle School 2011 football season was one for the ages. It was a season of “ rsts. The Bears had their games broadcast on the radio, captured a conference championship, and posted an undefeated season. De“ nitely a hard act to follow,Ž said RMS head football coach Joey Jacobs. A lot of folks are expecting us to be down this year, because we lost a lot of eighth graders. They are guys that have immediately contributed to the high schools JV and varsity program. Two of our players from last season started on offense Friday night against Mosely.Ž It is obvious that RMS will miss playmakers Keith Gavin, Monterious Loggins, Antonio Morris, and Feleip Franks, as well as defensive stalwarts Isaiah Youmas, Kyle Weaver, and Josh Strickland. We lost a lot, but the cupboards are far from bare,Ž said Coach Jacobs. Although the Bears return only two starters on offense and three on defense, the coaching staff is excited about some of the younger talent poised to step up, both on the offensive and defensive sides of the ball. On offense, Mr. Everything Demarcus Lindsey returns for his 8th grade campaign, along with fellow eighth grade standout Jacob Austin. Everybody pretty much knows about Demarcus and Jacob, so they arent taking anybody by surprise, but Jake McCarl, Justin Davis, Matt Bowyer, and Kam Rosier will step right in and contribute in a major way,Ž Jacobs said. Continued on Page 5BIts David Millers last football season as Wakullas superintendent of schools PHOTO BY BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSuperintendent of Schools David Miller on the sidelines for the War Eagles home opener against Moseley, giving a pat on the back to Wakulla Athletic Director Mike Smith. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netFor a “ rst game, we looked really good,Ž said Head Coach Scott Klees after his War Eagles opened their season at home with a 44-10 win over Mosley-Lynn Haven. Our young guys and special teams were clicking,Ž Coach Klees said. You dont usually see that in the “ rst game... I was very pleased with the outcome.Ž The things he was most pleased with, Klees said, were No. 1, we didnt turn the ball over with the “ rst group. And No. 2, how physical we were … and we were very physical with some of the squib kicks.Ž In Wakullas “ rst offensive possession, Klees was visibly upset with quarterback Caleb Stephens. He explained later that he felt Stephens hadnt made the proper read on a pass play, and Klees pulled him for a series. On Wakullas next possession, with the ball at the Mosley 18 yard line and facing a third down and 12, freshman quarterback Feleipe Franks connected with his brother, receiver Jordan Franks, a junior, on a slant pass over the middle for a touchdown. The extra point was good and the War Eagles were up 7-0. Stephens later returned to the game and played well … including ripping off a 55-yard touchdown run of his own in the third quarter. Klees was obviously proud of Stephens, noting that run of his was named the No. 1 Play of the Week on WCTV. Quarterback is a tough position to play,Ž Klees said, and added that its especially tough to play quarterback for him because his expectations are high. In the second quarter, the Dolphins scored on fourth down and 2 when Mosley running back fumbled in the end zone and it was recovered. The game was tied at 7-7. Speedster Demetrius Lindsey took the kickoff and returned it to the Dolphin 33 yard line. Monterious Loggins broke a run to the 7 yard line. And Jordan Franks caught his second TD pass of the evening. The point after was missed, and the War Eagles were up 13-0. A hard-hit on the squib kickoff caused a fumble that was recovered by Wakulla at the Dolphins 45. From there Demetrius Lindsey broke a long run to score. The War Eagles went for two and kicker Dillon Norman, a speedy back himself, scored on a sweep to the right side to put the War Eagles up 21-7. On the Dolphins next possession, they converted a fourth down to keep the drive alive, and were also helped by a facemask penalty that gave them a “ rst-and-goal at the 6. Unable to push it in, Mosley settled for a “ eld goal to make it 21-10. Continued on Page 3BRIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLCupboards aren’t bare, coach says War Eagle quarterback Caleb Stephens takes off on a 55-yard run for score. NEXT OPPONENT: Taylor County Bulldogs in Perry on Friday, Sept. 7, at 7:30 p.m. Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Sept. 6  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Sept. 7  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Sept. 8  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. Sunday, Sept. 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. Monday, Sept. 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Sept. 11  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will hold its monthly program at 7 p.m. at the library. The guest speaker is local historian Betty Green. She will be talking about the old schools and classrooms. Wednesday, Sept. 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.Special EventsThursday, Sept. 6  HOUSTON TAFF MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held at Wildwood Country Club. Entrance fee for the tournament is $500 per team or $125 per player. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m. with a 12:30 p.m. Shotgun Start. The tournament format will be Select a Shot.There will be three contests, including Closest to the Pin, Longest Drive, and Putting Contest. The total fee for all three is $20 per player. For more information, contact Steve Brown at 570-3910 or Tara C. Sanders at 926-5211 or 566-8272.  CONVENTION WATCH PARTY will be held by the Wakulla County Democratic Party beginning at 7:30 p.m. at their headquarters at 1626 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. Gather with them to watch President Obama accept the nomination at the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte. Volunteers are encouraged to attend. Call 745-6169 for more information. Saturday, Sept. 8  ST. MARKS YACHT CLUB will host Dr. Felicia Coleman, director of the FSU Coastal and Marine Laboratory, as its featured guest at the Club’s Up Close and Personal Spotlight Event at 7:30 p.m. The Club is located at 36 Yacht Club Lane. The public is invited to attend. Seating is limited, so reservations should be made by calling (850) 925-6606. In a conversational-style interview led by Dr. Betty Ann Korzenny, adjunct professor, Florida State University, School of Communication, she and Coleman will discuss what in uenced Coleman to pursue her study of sea life, and the local and international impact of the Laboratory’s research.  WAKULLA GARDENS COMMUNITY MEETING will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. at Pioneer Baptist Church at the corner of Spring Creek Highway and Beachwood. They will be reviewing improvement ideas.  A SWIFT NIGHT OUT will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Park rangers will host the event which offer guests an opportunity to witness the roosting of the chimney swifts. The small twittering birds assemble in great numbers in both the spring and the fall of the year. At dusk they begin circling the Wakulla Springs Lodge. As darkness begins to descend upon the lodge, the chimney swifts begin their descent into one of its unused chimneys. The program is free with park admission. Call 850-561-7286 to let park staff know you’re coming.  YARD SALE will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. by the Wakulla County Historical Society at the museum, 24 High Drive, right behind the Courthouse. The museum will also be open during these hours.  BLUE RIBBON REUNION will be held at the Wakulla Democratic Party Headquarters located in the North Pointe Center, 1626 Crawfordville Highway, Unit B, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The free event will recognize the core group of volunteers that helped elect President Obama in 2008 and will be the kickoff for volunteer efforts this fall, and will feature a barbecue picnic dinner. The Blue Ribbon Reunion is dedicated to the memory of Ralph Lewis and Annie Spivey. Lewis was instrumental in getting the 2008 campaign organized and Spivey, with help from her family, was the rst person to vote in Wakulla in 2008. Ralph’s wife, Anna, and daughter will be attending. For more information or to RSVP, contact Kim Kramer at 445-8733 or email wakullaforobama@hotmail.com. Sunday, Sept. 9  WAKULLA GARDENS COMMUNITY MEETING will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. at Pioneer Baptist Church at the corner of Spring Creek Highway and Beachwood. They will be reviewing improvement ideas. Monday, Sept. 10  COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PROJECT will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Wakulla County Health Department. This event was re-scheduled and was originally planned for Aug. 28. The WCHD needs your assistance identifying health issues facing our community. All are invited to attend. RSVP to Tonya Hobby at 926-0401 ext. 217. Lunch will be provided.  WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will meet at 1:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, call (850) 997-7400. Tuesday, Sept. 11  SEPT. 11 MEMORIAL SERVICE will be held at 8:45 a.m. at the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce.  APALACHEE REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL will hold a public meeting of the Wakulla County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board at 10 a.m. at the library. In addition to its regular business, the agenda will include the adoption of the bylaws, the complaint/grievance procedures and the annual operating report. A public hearing will follow the meeting to which all persons are invited. Thursday, Sept. 13  NATIONAL MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SOCIETY FUNDRAISER LUNCHEON will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. at the University Center Club at FSU Doak Campbell Stadium. This event will raise awareness about MS and raise money to bene t those living with MS in North Florida. For more information, call (850)386-4843 or email MSluncheon@earthlink.net. Friday, Sept. 14  SILENT AUCTION will be held to bene t the Wakulla County Public Library from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. Items include gift certi cates, vacations, marine supplies, art, school supplies and more. Refreshments will be provided. Sign up to be a bidder, browse through a book of all the items and start bidding on Sept. 1 at the library. Call 9264244 or email FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com for more information.  CAMPAIGN PARTY for County Commissioner Candidate Howard Kessler will be held at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, at 7:30 p.m. There will be music by Randall “Big Daddy” Webster. Desserts and refreshments will be served. Call 228-9641 for more information. Saturday, Sept. 15  A FAMILY NIGHT OUT will be held at the Senior Center at 7 p.m. Comedian and impressionist Michael Kelley will perform his show “Voices That Change” using his favorite singers, actors, and politicians. All is done in a way that delivers the Gospel message. Tickets are $10 each and can be purchased at the door or in advance by calling 210-1276. All proceeds go to the Wakulla Pregnancy Center.  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet from 10 a.m. to noon at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road. The group will have a special guest, Lee Nettles, who will introduce basic skateboarding for autistic children to the group. All safety equipment is provided, and it will be one on one with each child. All spectrum children and their children are invited. Call 274-9474 for more information. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Houston Taff Memorial Golf Tournament at Wildwood at 11:30 a.m. Yard Sale at the Historical Society Museum and Archives. from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Health Improvement Project at the health department at 10 a.m. Sept. 11 Memorial Service at 8:45 a.m. at the sheriff’s of ce. ThursdaySaturdayMondayTuesday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Government Meetings Monday Sept. 10  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold its nal budget hearing at 6:30 p.m. at city hall.  WAKULLA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, Sept. 11  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop at 5 p.m. regarding Wakulla Gardens APA’s Community Planning Assistance Team. Wednesday, Sept. 12  WAKULLA COUNTY CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD will hold a public hearing at 5:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, Sept. 13  OPEN HOUSE to view the updated ood maps and learn more about ood risks in Wakulla County will be held by the Northwest Florida Water Management District and the Federal Emergency Management Agency from 4 to 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Visit http://portal.nwfwmd oodmaps.com to view the maps.  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway. Call(850) 544-6133 for more information.By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorFriday Night Movie Our Friday night movie this week will be an acclaimed independent dark comedy starring Jack Black, Shirley McClaine and Mathew McConaughey. This PG-13 rated “ lm (for brief violence and language), tells the true story of Bernie Tiede (Black), who is an assistant funeral director in a small east Texas town and well liked by all. Bernie befriends, Ms. Nugent (McClaine), who not only is the richest lady in town but also the meanest. After becoming her personal assistant for more than two years, Bernie gets fed up with Ms. Nugents treatment of him and shoots her. He then keeps this fact from the town for 9 months while using her money to bene“ t the community and himself. He is so popular and she is so hated, that after the murder becomes public many say they wont convict if put on the jury. With the town saying what is illegal may actually be justice, the publicity seeking district attorney (McConaughey) must make a radical decision in order to prosecute Bernie. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for this 7 p.m. “ lm. Friends of Library Silent Auction Wed like to give everyone another reminder to join us at 6 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 14 for the second Annual Silent Auction to benefit the Friends of the Library. Over the past three years the Friends have saved the taxpayers of Wakulla County almost more than $75,000 with their donations to the library. Nearly 150 items will be on hand for your bidding pleasure and you can even place bids early by coming into the library and perusing the bid book. Many local businesses and library supporters have donated items, money and time to make this a success. So we hope that we get a huge crowd on the Sept. 14. Please contact me with any questions and I hope to see you there! New Computer Class Schedule The schedule of computer classes for September and October is now available on our website and at the front desk of the library. Once again Deanna Ramsey, our instructor, has a wide range of classes for our patrons. Everything from getting started with computers, to genealogy, to using a digital camera, and much more is offered. All classes are free to the public but must be signed up for ahead of time as seating is limited. Please take this chance to learn skills for work or pleasure! Library News... Political EventsThursday, September 27 POLITICAL FORUM for County Commission seats 1, 3, 5. Seat 1 will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Seat 3 at 7:30 p.m. and Seat 5 at 8:30 p.m.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 – Page 3BWar Eagles pound MosleyContinued from Page 1B After that, the War Eagle defense pretty much shut down the Dolphins. Klees credited Defensive Coach Grady Guest with making the right adjustment. The teams exchanged a couple of punts, then Loggins rumbled in for a 40 yard TD run. The point after was good, and with only a minute left in the half, Wakulla was up 28-10. On Mosleys next possession, defensive back Mikal Cromartie intercepted a pass and almost took in, but was tripped up on the 10. An over-the shoulder toss to the much-taller receiver Keith Gavin, a freshman who had a great game, was caught in the end zone but was called back on an illegal procedure penalty. With only a few ticks left on the clock for the half, Norman came in to kick a 25-yard “ eld goal to put the War Eagles up 31-10. In the third quarter, Stephens broke his long touchdown run … showing some speed of his own, which put the War Eagles up 38-10. Later in the third, running back Sheldon Johnson had a long run for an apparent TD called back on a block in the back. With the ball “ rst and 10 at the War Eagles own 17, Dequon Simmons showed some explosive speed, breaking a long run for a touchdown. The extra point was missed, and the score was 44-10. In the fourth quarter, Klees gave some second time players some playing time. There were a couple of fumbles, but the Dolphins offense couldnt overcome the War Eagle defense to capitalize. We just wore them down,Ž Klees said. Were a different type of team this year than last year,Ž he said. Last year we had four or “ ve guys who were just extremely fast. We have one or two this year with that same speed … but, as a team, were faster this year. I mean, overall.Ž KNOCK EM BACK In addition to Players of the Week, Klees named Knock Em Back Players. This weeks players are: Offense: John Cole. Defense: Keith Gavin. Special Teams: Dalton Nichols. UP NEXT: TAYLOR COUNTY Theyre extremely good,Ž Klees said of upcoming opponent Taylor County, which will host in Perry. They beat Trinity Christian-Ocala 42-37, and theyre a good team. They beat Dixie County 20-19. Theyre a very physical team … a lot like us. Same tough kids. The game will go to who takes care of the ball,Ž Klees predicted. And who plays the best special teams.Ž JV KEEPS ON WINNING Klees also noted proudly that the junior varsity continued its winning streak, beating Madison County on Thursday. The JV has a 15-game winning streak going. Players of the Week JORDAN FRANKS 4 catches for 52 yards including 2 TDs MIKAL CROMARTIE Interception return for 78 yards, 9 tackles, 88% DILLON NORMAN 3 for 4 PAT, 1 for 1 FG, recovered pooch kickO ense Defense Special Teams PHOTO BY BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN Keith Gavin forced out of bounds after a catch and run. Wakulla students cheer on the War Eagles. Speedster Demetrius Lindsey breaks open a run for a touchdown. Dalton Norman brings down the Mosley runner. Dequon Simmons shows his speed on a TD run. The War Eagles come onto the “ eld to open their season against the Mosley Dolphins.BILL ROLLINS BILL ROLLINS BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS More photos online at thewakullanews.com

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By TIM LINAFELT Osceola.com Staff WriterThe skeptics will say that it was only Murray State. And, well, theyll be right. But remove for a moment the lenses colored by Florida States Football Championship Subdivision opponent and consider the staggering numbers put up by the Seminoles rushing attack Saturday night. Florida State ran for a total of 285 yards … while not losing a single yard from scrimmage … and punched in seven rushing touchdowns for the “ rst time in more than 20 years. Six players reached double-digits in rushing yardage. Five averaged at least 5.3 yards per carry. Three scored at least two touchdowns and one … sophomore James Wilder Jr. … became FSUs “ rst 100-yard rusher in its last six games. Meanwhile, senior Lonnie Pryor made the most of his “ ve carries, rushing for three touchdowns and 28 yards. Pryors three scores Saturday night matched his total output for the 2011 season. (Weve got) different kinds of backs and they all kind of bring something different to the table,Ž FSU coachJimbo Fisher said. I think Lonnies playing extremely well, blocking and mixing his runs ƒ I thought the offensive line did a really nice job ƒ and we kept pounding that ball and pounding that ball.Ž Sophomore Devonta Freeman contributed 64 yards on 10 carries, Debrale Smily added two touchdowns and 14 yards and senior Chris Thompson ran for a tough 32 yards in his “ rst action since breaking his back midway through last season. Thompson had an especially encouraging performance, starting at running back and breaking a handful of tackles for some tough yardage in the “ rst half. It felt amazing, man,Ž Thompson said of his “ rst game back. Theres nothing like running out of that tunnel, just seeing Chief Osceola, Renegade, all of those things, man, it just had me excited ƒ I was just happy to be out there.Ž Florida State also broke in a new offensive line that featured two new tackles, a pair of sophomore guards and a junior center. Theyll face tougher challenges this season, but that was true of last years offensive line, which struggled to get much push against Louisiana-Monroe and FCS opponent Charleston Southern in last seasons early matchups. Against ULM, FSU stumbled to a pedestrian 3.3 yards per carry and no back had more than 33 yards. A week later against Charleston Southern, the Seminoles improved to 4.6 yards per carry, but that “ gure is in” ated by a 41-yard run by Wilder that wouldve been negated by a penalty had CSU not declined the infraction to end the game. Quarterback EJ Manuel, who had a “ ne view of the action in the trenches, said he could tell an obvious difference between this group and last years … even when just compared to the Charleston Southern game. De“ nitely. Even in short yardage, we had a push,Ž Manuel said. It wasnt like guys were getting pushed back in the running backs lap. They were getting pushes and the running backs were just following those boys.Ž We were just trying to not screw it up,Ž left tackle Cam Erving said. Mission accomplished, at least for one night. Theyll face tougher challenges this season, but that was true of last years offensive line, which struggled to get much push against Louisiana-Monroe and FCS opponent Charleston Southern in last seasons early matchups. Against ULM, FSU stumbled to a pedestrian 3.3 yards per carry and no back had more than 33 yards. A week later against Charleston Southern, the Seminoles improved to 4.6 yards per carry, but that “ gure is in” ated by a 41-yard run by Wilder that wouldve been negated by a penalty had CSU not declined the infraction to end the game. Quarterback EJ Manuel, who had a “ ne view of the action in the trenches, said he could tell an obvious difference between this group and last years … even when just compared to the Charleston Southern game. De“ nitely. Even in short yardage, we had a push,Ž Manuel said. It wasnt like guys were getting pushed back in the running backs lap. They were getting pushes and the running backs were just following those boys.Ž There will be bigger tests „ and bigger defensive lines to contend with „ as the season progresses. But the Seminoles saw enough Saturday night to take plenty of con“ dence into the remainder of their schedule. I think one thing people need to do is just wait for us to play a D-1 team if they want to talk about us versus a D-1 team,Ž Manuel said. Just wait until we play one „ Wake Forest in two weeks. I thought they did a great job. I felt extremely protected in the pocket, as far as throwing, and the running lanes were there.Ž Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MARTY COHEN GatorBait.net EditorWill Muschamp called it window dressing,Ž which in the sweatstained, testosteronefueled football universe, has to qualify as a term of derision, right? If a team is resorting to some form of camouflage or subterfuge (that sounds at least a bit more football tough, doesnt it?), then it must be attempting to disguise some sort of weakness. Well, yes and no. Sure football is still basically the de“ nitive man-on-man game, where ultimately it comes down to beating the man in front of you, and the old bromides of blocking and tackling, all those Vince Lombardi-speak deals. But on a coaching level, its also a cerebral chess match on game day, trying to create mismatches, keeping the other side of the ball off-balance and guessing. We hear it all the time, if a player is thinking instead of reacting, hes already a step or two behind. Therein lies the bene“ t of Muschamps window dressingŽ reference. Particularly in college football, when the weekly preparation time is so limited, and offenses can be so varied in approach (lets face it, all teams in the staid, afraid-to-try-anythingdifferent NFL basically run the same deal), subtle and not-so-subtle changes can cause sleepless nights for defensive coordinators. Its why there are so many more gimmickŽ offenses in college football. With maybe four days of restricted practice and “ lm room time, it can be awfully thorny to prepare for a unique style of offense. Its one of the reasons why Oregons fast-break attack under coach Chip Kelly is a nightmare for defenses in the Pac-10, or -12, or whatever. Trying to get a handle on the combination of breakneck pace and athleticism on the “ eld is a near-impossible task. Its also a primary reason why Auburn in the 2010 BCS title game and LSU in the 2011 season opener were able to shut down the Ducks … six weeks, or six months, of preparation time is a bit more effective than four days. And its why under-manned service academies like Navy and Air Force run the option and wishbone stuff, because opposing defenses dont see it on a weekly basis and dont really envy having to prepare for it once a season. Which brings us back to Muschamps window dressing,Ž a term of endearment, if you will, for what were going to see from new offensive coordinator Brent Peases Florida offense in 2012. Pease utilizes a ton of pre-snap shifts and motion, sort of a lost art in todays no-huddle, fast-tempo, spread offensive approach. Its all about pace, wearing down the defense and preventing the normal ” ow of substitutions. In the copycat world of football, this is whats in vogue. The faster the pace, the more snaps, the bigger advantage for the offense. At least in theory, because teams adjust to what they see most often, and soon the unexpected becomes the norm. Its how Steve Spurrier turned the SEC on its ear in 1990, only to have buttoned-down Alabama running “ vereceiver sets by the end of the decade … thats how football works. Its part of the reason why Muschamp is enamored with the idea of Floridas window dressingŽ causing problems for the opposing defenses. And if its one thing a longtime defensive coordinator like Muschamp knows about the other side of the ball, its what gives defenses trouble in preparation and execution. Were going to (have) a little bit more imagination with formations, shifts, motions that create issues for a defense,Ž Muschamp said. When youre getting ready for something that you dont see a lot in our league, honestly, because of no-huddle, people dont (use) motion anymore. They want to get on the ball and snap it as fast as they can, so you become pretty good at what youre accustomed to seeing a lot. So we see a lot of no-huddle and a lot tempo and a lot of what I would say, pro-style quarterback-under-center, in our league. We dont see a lot of multiple motions and shifts. In a four day period in game week and getting ready for that, especially when you have to adjust to some different motions and shifts each week, it creates issues defensively. Those are (some) things that are different that certainly will complement our players, our scheme and our system very well.Ž F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M at #5 OklahomaSaturday, 7 p.m.The game can be seen on famuathletics.com. #24 Florida at Texas A&MSaturday, 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. Savannah State at #6 Florida StateSaturday, 6 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3. James Wilder Jr. vaults over a Murray State defender during second half action. O e n s i v e O p e r a t i o n O ensive Operation G e t s  D r e s s e d  U p Gets Dressed Up Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Lonnie Pryor skips into the end zone for his “ rst of three touchdowns on the day PHOTOS BY Colin Hackley Osceola

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 – Page 5BContinued from Page 5B Riversprings will also “ eld an entirely revamped offensive line, with zero returners. The line will be anchored by eighth graders, center Jacob Marin, guard R.J. Kinard and guard Marlon Ng. Coach Jacobs is impressed with the progress made at the quarterback position by eighth grader Zach Norman. Zach is playing lights out right now, and he is vindicating my belief in him. He has been being groomed since 6th grade to step up this season and he has done just that.Ž According to the coaches, the offense is progressing nicely, but its the defense that is making the giant strides. Coach Louis Hernandez said, As hard as it is to fathom, this years defensive line may be better than last years.Ž The D-line consists of Tyrone Williams and Cody Zanco, with Adrian Morris and R.J. Kinard manning one of the DT spots. The linebacker corps is solid and athletic. As a unit, they could pick up where last seasons Lights OutŽ defense left off. The Bears will begin their 2012 season on Thursday, Sept. 6 in Live Oak against the Suwannee Bulldogs. They will return home the following Tuesday, Sept. 11 to face the Marianna Bulldogs at J.D. Jones Stadium. Both games begin at 6 p.m.Cupboards arent bareContinued from Page 1B Miller has played for Hinson, coached with Reynolds, Wooten, Smith and Jones and hired Klees. The opportunity to participate in a football program, as a player, a coach, athletic director, press box coach and commentator (also known as fence jockey), at a school that I love, in my hometown, has been one of the highlights of my career,Ž said Miller. To be a part of a high-performing academic and athletic legacy is invigorating. Precious few programs across the state have the combination of academic and athletic excellence as does Wakulla. As I reminisce over the years, the special place the Wakulla High School holds for me will be one of my favorite memories.Ž After 17 plus years as the Superintendent of Wakulla County Schools, Miller said, Its been a great ride. Thank you all for your love and support.Ž Millers last season By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA training seminar on concussions was held recently for coaches of all sports at the middle school and high schools in Wakulla County. The training was given in August, prior to school starting, by members of the Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic Foundation. The focus of the training was on preventing and treating concussions, or traumatic brain injuries. Coaches and administrators were there to learn the cause, signs and symptoms, recognition and care of a concussion. The main thing is the prevention of an initial concussion and long term care after one happens,Ž said Rick Williams, director of Sports Medicine Outreach for the TOC. The hope is to treat the initial concussion promptly to prevent additional damage, he said. This additional damage can be anything that contributes to brain function. Some side effects are mood changes, loss of sleep, depression, irrational behavior and many others, he said. Gov. Rick Scott signed the youth concussion law on April 27, which went into effect on July 1. It requires schools to adopt guidelines to educate coaches and of“ cials about youth concussions; the removal of a youth athlete who appears to have suffered a concussion from play or practice at the time of the suspected concussion; and requires a youth athlete to be cleared by a licensed health care professional trained the evaluation and management of concussions before returning to play or practice. Wakulla County School Board has held these similar training and education programs from TOC for the last four years thanks to Human Resources Director Karen Wells, William said. Wakulla County was having us talk about the risk factors in concussions long before it was an en vogue topic.Ž TOC has been offering the Concussion Management Program for the last three years, which includes training and Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) of athletes. This test provides preseason neurocognitive baseline testing and post injury testing of athletes. It is the same assessment used for college and professional athletes, said Dr. Andrew Wong, orthopedic surgeon with TOC and the person who proposed the idea. ImPact helps us get beyond what we can see,Ž said Wong. ImPact allows an athletic trainer to compare the athletes current test to their baseline following a head injury. It is a tool to determine if the athlete is ready to go back into the game, he said. It is not a substitute for a medical evaluation.Ž Wong attended a conference four years ago where he learned about the ImPACT from a doctor in Jacksonville. Following that conference he proposed that TOC begin offering the testing. It began in 2009 and has grown to 36 high schools. The program is offered to public schools throughout North Florida in connection with the Panhandle Area Education Consortium. Wong decided to propose the idea of implementing ImPACT in area high schools firstly because he is a parent and wanted to ensure his children were protected, he said, and secondly, because not much was being done for young athletes and dealing with and preventing concussions. Its so important,Ž Wong said. This potentially has lifelong consequences.Ž When an athlete sustains a head injury, the risk for a second injury is even greater, especially when it wasnt properly managed or treated in the “ rst place, Williams said. When an athlete gets back into the game after a head injury and gets hit again, there is the potential for second impact syndrome, which is the big thing doctors worry about, Wong said. High school athletes are more vulnerable because they are not fully developed yet. When this syndrome occurs, death occurs 50 percent of the time, he said. This is what we are trying to prevent,Ž Wong said. Were trying to save lives.Ž Williams said they also stress the need for proper instruction on hitting and tackling and an emphasis on strength and conditioning of the neck and upper body. Following this training, another education program will be held with the parents. Then the athletic trainers will perform the baseline testing on student athletes, which is not limited to football, but is offered to all sports and anyone who wants to be tested, Wong said. TOC will serve a resource for the school and provide medical assistance. Were happy that we will lessen injuries and make sports safer,Ž Wong said.Concussion training is held for school coaches Wakulla school coaches and personnel, above, gather for training on the prevention and treatment of concussions recently. Dr. Edward Wong, right, who designed the ImPACT test for athletes.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENVARSITY SQUAD: Bottom: Haley Hurst, Crystal Posey, Leah Kennedy, Macy Allen, Brianna Gubala, Ashley Stevens, Sara Mathis, Corban Scott, Kala Picket, Jacey Todd, Sydney Russ. Top: Alana Townsend, Erica Harrell, Charity Wilson, Brittany Herold, Maddie Champany, Coach Lori Sandgren, Brandon Dawkins, Cary Mathers, Makayla Payne, Baylee Baze, Tyler Kinard. JV SQUAD: Bottom: Nikki Barnes, Breanna Yates, Taylor Seber, Laurelee Holcomb, Carson Strickland, Kasey James, Sarah Marie Russell, Back: Brooke Allen, Katelynn Underwood, Tori Crum, Harley Arrington, Kirsten Parrish…Captain, Coach Bethany Evans, Madison Edwards … Co-Captain, Emily Newsome, Kaitlyn Panzarino, Saranne Beal, Cassie Doyle. Wakulla War Eagle cheerleadersPHOTOS PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS J.P. King Auction Company, Inc., licensed Florida Real Estate Broker #1011371; J. Scott King, Broker #BK359106; J.P. King Aucti on Company, Inc., AB1199; James S. King, #AU358; Lanny G. Thomas, #AU3589; Buyers Premium 10%800.558.5464 THIRD QUARTER 2012 BANK AUCTION OVER 200 PROPERTIES … MANY SELLING ABSOLUTE!To the Highest Bidder … No Minimums, No Reserves!Single Family Residences, Townhomes, Commercial Buildings, Residential & Commercial Land and More!4 AUCTION EVENTS! PENSACOLA – TALLAHASSEE – JACKSONVILLE – ORLANDO Properties located throughout South Alabama, Northern and Central Florida.These auction events will provide unique opportunities to purchase prime real estate consisting of permanent residences or vacation homes as well as residential and commercial development land and lots. Great Investment Opportunities!Call or visit www.jpking.com for a complete list of properties, photos, bidder seminars, online bidding and auction documents, “nancing information, property preview information and auction locations.SEPTEMBER 24, 25, 26 & 27 – BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME! 1 1 8 6 6 7 4 2 1 3 7 3 w w w A d N e t w o r k s F l o r i d a c o m T h e k e y t o a d v e r t i s i n g s u c c e s s Classified • Display • Metro Daily • Online Turn account receivables into CASH!!! Tired of wai ng 30, 60, 90 days? Meet payroll. Increase pro ts. Great for startups, bankruptcies, tax liens, bad credit & more. $20k to $10M+ www.jpcapitalsolu ons.com 863 589 6587 jpcapitalsolu ons@gmail.com Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. 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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE Bromna Bykovo Croydon Dulles Dumont Dyce Elmdon Ezeiza Fornebu Gatwick Hamburg Hurn Idlewild JFK Kai Tak Kastrup Kennedy Kerkyra Lod Logan Maplin Nadi Narita O’Hare Orly Oslo Prestwick Rhoose Roissy Santa Maria This page sponsored in part by: Schipol Shannon Speke St Paul Tacoma Tegel

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SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements 000CHV9 BOXER RETAIL CRYSTAL RIVER MALL Good Things to Eat Raker FarmsWere Still Here Blanched & Frozen Peas, Okra. And we process Beef, Hogs & Deer850-926-7561 Lost 4 month old male boxer, fawn(red), black face w/white stripe, Last seen in Wakulla station area (850) 597-5064 lost 16 year old Shih Tzu .. I am desperate to find him. His name is Smutely, male/ neutered/ blind/ deaf/and not use to being outside LOST Sunday 5pm from 198 Edgar Poole Road Crawfordville 850 363 2351 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Medical MEDICAL CAREERS begin here „Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEVcertified. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com Medical MEDICALOFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED Become a Medical Office Assistant at SC Train!! No Experience needed! Online training gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 NURSING CAREERS BEGIN HERE -GETTRAINED IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENTASSISTANCE. CALLCENTURA INSTITUTE (877)206-6559 Professional AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Trades/ Skills ATTN DRIVERS:Apply Now, 13 Driver Positions Top 5% Pay. 401K, Great Insurance, New KWConventionals, Need CDLClass ADriving Exp (877)258-8782 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDLTraining. Job ready in just 15 days! (888)368-1964 Trades/ Skills DRIVERSAnnual Salary $45K to $60K. Quarterly Bonus. Flexible hometime. Refrigerated and Dry Van Freight. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com DRIVERS/ Class AFlatbed.GETHOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport Trades/ Skills Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com. EOE Trades/ Skills GIGANTIC AUCTIONSeptember12-13, 2012, 3475 Ashley Rd., Montgomery, Alabama. Crawler tractors & loaders, hydraulic excavators, articulating dumps, roll-offs and trucktractors, motor scrapers & graders, loader backhoes, wheel loaders, forklifts, trenchers, skid steers, paving & compaction, rollers, tri-tandem & single axle dumps, lowboys, skidders, feller bunchers, log loaders & trailers, farm tractors, travel trailers. Over 800 items will be sold! For details visit www.jmwood.com. J.M. Wood Auction Co., Inc. (334)264-3265. Bryant Wood Al lic#1137 Schools/ Instruction MEDICALBILLING TRAINING!Train for Medical Billing Careers at SCTrain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placement assistance after training! HS/GED/PC Needed (888)872-4677 General DOUBLE-WIDE MOBILE HOME 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Family Room w/ fireplace; large kitchen w/ island and pantry; master bath has shower & garden tub; walk-in closets; office and large utility room. $38,000 Call Jennifer at 850-519-5113 General For SaleKimball upright Piano with Bench and Music $1000.00 Treadmill $500.00 Sleeper Sofa $200.00Call 524-6182 anytime Promotional prices start at $19.99 a month for DISH for 12 months. Call Today and ask about Next Day Installation. (800)336-7043 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Near Lake Ellen 32 Merwyn Drive Nice and well kept, close to great schools $550 mo. (850) 443-3300 MOBILE HOME FOR RENT 1, 2,3 BEDROOMS (850) 251-1468 SusanCounciI @earthlink.net Apartments Furnished SHELLPOINTFantastic view from 3rd floor wrap deck. Studio apartment has full size kitchen, huge bath, W/D, and king Murphy bed. Furnished. $650/month plus utilities, 6-month lease 850-591-3306 Rental Houses PANACEACottage, for Rent 2/1 Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Rennovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, covered front proch & open back deck, Small pets acceptable Excellent fishing! $585/month 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $750/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1937 CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Br/2 Ba, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 Vacant Property 06261 W OAKLAWN HOMOSASSA, FL2.5 ACRES VACANT $35,000/BESTOFFER WILLING TO TRADE. CALLTODAY! 786-298-7825 Boats CANOE16FT. Aluminum Two Paddles $375. (850) 445-5386 Fictitious Name Notices 5362-0906 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, EricJoy Hartsfield Doing business as: Joy & Company at 38 Reservation Court with a mailing address of 38 Reservation Court desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 29th day of August 2012, Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News September 6, 2012 Self Storage Notices 5356-0906 TWN Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage 9/15 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Sabrina Brinkley David Moss Marilyn Mitchell Scott Hutchison Before the sale date of Saturday, September 15, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. August 30 & September 6, 2012 5356-0906 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 – Page 7B 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $830mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $825mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $700mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $625mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. INDOOR YARD SALE in CrawfordvilleSAT, SEPT 8 • 8:30am til 1pm HOUSEHOLD AND OUTDOOR ITEMS, SOME CLOTHES and SPORTING GOODS. 19 Shadeville Rd. (former Home Respiratory Solutions bldg.) 000CHV9 Store Fronts AvailableLowest Leasing Rates Ever!€ Busy Hwy 19 Crystal River location € Anchored by national retail stores € Newly refurbished € Kiosks also available352-795-2585 www.thecrystalrivermall.com 1801 NE Hwy 19 Crystal River, FL 34428 AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432“we sell and service most makes and models” Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net SDKLFJLK LSDFOSat. Sept. 8, 8AM-Noonish. 2-Families cleaning houses!LOTS OF STUFF! No. of Library on 319. Cancel if rain. Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe WakuulanewsYou’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 5340-0906 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTYANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING: EVENT:Regular School Board Meeting at 5:45 p.m. Final Public Hearing on 2012-13 Budget at 6:00 p.m DATE: Monday, September 10, 2012 TIME: Regular Meeting 5:45 p.m. Final Public Hearing 6:00 p.m. PLACE : School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting, Final Public Hearing on Budget For further information please contact: Superintendents Office Wakulla County School P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL32326, 850-926-0065 Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News September 6, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5361-0906 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075((2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: PAULA. STOKLEY Last known address of 244 CASORADR., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 The above individual is notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5341-0906 TWN vs. KEVIN R. GABYCase No. 4:12-CV-00053-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:12-CV-00053-RH-WCS CENTENNIALBANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN R GABYa/k/a KEVIN RILEYGABY; KERRYR. GABY; and WILDWOOD COUNTRYCLUB PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in the above-styled case on June 5, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, and the Amendment to Judgment of Foreclosure entered July 10, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 10th day of September 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Eastern T ime), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County and Franklin County, Florida: SEE EXHIBITS A, B AND C ATTACHED HERETO. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshal, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated: August 8, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL32591-3010 EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND ALSO MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 82 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER AND THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 1575.73 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARYOF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 480.95 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AND AN EXTENSION THEREOF 386.57 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF U.S. HIGHWAYNO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY225.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 385.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 225.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as PropertyŽ). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams lo5351-0906 TWN Estate of Ernest Theurer Case No. 12-79-CPNotice To Creditors IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case N.: 12-79-CP IN RE: The Estate of Ernest Edward Theurer, III Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Ernest Edward Theurer III, deceased, whose date of death was July 13, 2012, and the last four digits of whose social security number are 8403, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 0337. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 30, 2012 Attorney for Personal Representative:Personal Representative: Jean Theurer 281 SW 129th Terrace Newberry, Florida 32669-2783 Michelle L. Farkas Attorney for Jean Theurer Florida Bar Number: 25952 HOWARD M ROSENBLATT, P.A. 2830 NW 41 Street, Suite I Gainesville, Florida 32606 Telephone: (352) 373 7100 Fax: (352) 373 7320 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 30 & September 6, 2012 5354-0906 TWN vs. Advanced Builders Case No. 2011 CA707 Amended Notice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LEON COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO: 2011 CA707 DIVISION: CIRCUIT CIVIL CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff. v. ADVANCED BUILDERS & REMODELERS, INC. a Florida corporation; CAMELOT III, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; TRIM FAN, LLC a Florida limited liability company; JIMMYR. BENNETT; SHARYN R. BENNETT; COMMODORE COMMONS OF WAKULLA COUNTYPROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC ., a dissolved Florida non-profit corporation; CAMELOT TOWNHOME OWNERSASSOCIATION, INC ., a Florida non-profit corporation; PEBBLE BROOKE SUBDIVISION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. a Florida non-profit corporation; TALLAHASSEE STATE BANK; and CITYOF TALLAHASSEE, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 11, 2012, an Order Cancelling and Rescheduling Sale dated July 10, 2012 and an Amended Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 10, 2012, in Case No.2011 CA707, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Leon County, Florida, in which Cadence Bank, N.A is the Plaintiff and Advanced Builders & Remodelers, Inc., Camelot III, LLC, Trim Fan, LLC Jimmy R. Bennett, Sharyn R. Bennett, Commodore Commons of Wakulla County Property Owners Association, Inc., Camelot Townhome OwnersAssociation, Inc., Pebble Brooke Subdivision Homeowners Association, Inc., Tallahassee State Bank and City of Tallahassee are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Suite 100 of the Leon County Courthouse, in Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on September 27, 2012, the property, in the order as set forth in the Amended Final Judgment of Foreclosure, including property located in both Leon County, Florida and Wakulla County, Florida, and more particularly described as follows: Leon County (Lot 6-G Pebble Brooke) Loan #60608315 LOT6, BLOCK G IN PEBBLE BROOKE, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 17, PAGE(S) 44 -48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. (Lot 7-G Pebble Brooke) Loan #60608323 LOT7, BLOCK G IN PEBBLE BROOKE, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 17, PAGE(S) 44 -48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. (Lot 8-G Pebble Brooke) Loan #60608331 LOT8, BLOCK G IN PEBBLE BROOKE, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 17, PAGE(S) 44 -48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. (Pebble Brooke Lots) Loan #60723319 THE FOLLOWING LOTS IN PEBBLE BROOKE, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 17, PAGE(S) 44 -48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA: BLOCK B: LOTS 13-22 BLOCK H: LOTS 1-2, 6-9 AND W akulla County (Camelot Lots) Loan #60723319 LOTS 11-41, CAMELOTPHASE III, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 4, PAGE(S) 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: August 20, 2012 BOBINZER,Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/ Tesha DeMuth, Deputy Clerk (SEAL) Michael P. Bist Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia, & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Drive Tallahassee, Florida 32308 August 30 & September 6, 2012 5358-0913 TWN V. Tina Marie Quick Case No. 65-2011-CA-000221 Notice of Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000221 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TINAMARIE QUICK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TINAMARIE QUICK; JODYQUICK; UNKNOWNSPOUSE OF JODYQUICK; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: Lot 27 and the East 1/2 of Lot 26, block 14 GREINERS ADDITION TO CRAWFORDVILLE, according tot he plat thereof,as recorded in Plat Book 1, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 at 11:00 oclock A.M., on September 27, 2012. DATED THIS 22nd DAYOF ,AUGUST, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 22nd day of August 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (SEAL) THIS INSTRUMENTPREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL33619-1328 ,Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis,Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225,Tallahassee, FL32303 850.577.4401at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Spetember 6 & 13, 2012 5358-0913 cated on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. EXHIBIT B Parcel 1: Lot 21 of Wildwood Country Club, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 35, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 10, Block E of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 3: Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Less and Except: that part of Lots 1 and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, deeded to the State of Florida, recorded 12/19/1973 in Official Records Book 39, Page 784, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 4: Lots 26 and 27, Block O of Lanark Beach Unit No. 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, all water and riparian rights, ditches, and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, and replacements that may now, or at any time the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as PropertyŽ). EXHIBIT C BEGIN AT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 13 ADISTANCE OF 726.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EDGE OF SWIRL SWAMP, THENCE RUN ALONG THE EDGE OF SAID SWIRLSWAMPAS FOLLOWS: NORTH 70 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 282.08 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 213.59 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 107.30 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 97.25 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 125.54 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 243.65 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 190.70 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 152.83 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 285.84 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 133.29 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID SWAMPS EDGE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 3340.12 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1530.27 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE ON THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 13, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY834.01 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 1560.24 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOTS 86 AND 87 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 131.30 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 660.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 528.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS OVER AND ACROSS THAT CERTAIN EASEMENT RECORDED OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 191, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as PropertyŽ). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News August 16, 23, 30 and September 6 2012 A1135183.DOC 5341-0906 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 22 Coral Way 3BR./2BA with 1 car garage and fenced in yard on 1/2 acre. Pets okay with $250. fee, $950.mo/$950 Deposit. • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available, all utilities included. • 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./$900 Deposit • 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok • 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced • 82 Mimosa 3BR/1.5BA $650Mo./$650 Deposit • 56 Myers Woods 3BR/2BA $1,000Mo./$1,000 Deposit Pets ok w/$250 pet fee • 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA Available Sept. 1, $900Mo./$900 Deposit • 14 Cutchin Ct. 3BR/2BA $650 mo/$650 Deposit. • 145 Rochelsie: 2BR/2BA $700 mo and $700 security deposit. small pet ok with $250 pet fee • 140 Duane St: 3BR/2BA $875 mo and $875 Security deposit. No smoking pets ok with owner approval and $250 pet fee Available Oct. 1. We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!2323 Surf Rd. 3BR/2BA Bayfront road on Ochlockonee Bay, Screened Porch, Deck and Dock. No Smoking. No Pets. $1,150 per month. 112 Captain James St. 4BR/2BA 2,280 sq. ft. MH on 9 acres. Located in North Wakulla near Woodville. Complete with replace, workshop and dishwasher. No Smoking. No Pets. $775 per month.Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Commercial building 4,300 square foot heated and cooled building on 1 acre of land Rents out for $1,800.00. Building is in excellent condition.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 – Page 9B 5352-0906 TWN vs. Smith, John W. Case NO.: 652008FC000259 Foreclosure IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2008-FC-000259 DIVISION: INDYMAC FEDERALBANK FSB, Plaintiff, vs. : JOHN W. SMITH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 14, 2012 and entered in Case NO. 65-2008-FC-000259 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein INDYMAC FEDERALBANK, FSB, is the Plaintiff and JOHN W. SMITH; BOBBYRAYSMITH, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN W. SMITH A/K/AJOHN WESLEYSMITH DECEASED; HERBERTLAMAR SMITH, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN W. SMITH A/K/AJOHN WESLEYSMITH DECEASED; WESLEYSMITH, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN W. SMITH A/K/AJOHN WESLEYSMITH DECEASED; STACYSMITH, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN W. SMITH A/K/AJOHN WESLEYSMITH DECEASED; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT LOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE AT11:00AM, on the 4th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 3 COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 18, T3S, R1W, AS MARKED BYACONCRETE MONUMENT NO.1254, AND ACCEPTED BYCERTIFIED CORNER RECORD NO. 32915, AND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SECTION LINE 653.09 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 874.57 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 119, PAGE 984 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY377.09 FEET THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYRUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 552.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 60.76 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST 20.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 315.08 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE EASTERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 119, PAGE 984, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLYBOUNDARY 570.45 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE EASTERLYAND SOUTHERLY40.00 THEREOF BEING SUBJECT TO AROADWAY EASEMENT. RESERVING UNTO THE GRANTOR HEREIN AROADWAYEASEMENT OVER THE EASTERLYAND SOUTHERLY40.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHERLY40 FEET OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: COMMENCE AT A4 INCH BY4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1254) MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 18, ADISTANCE OF 653.04 FEET TO A4 INCH BY4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 26 SEC5353-0906 TWN vs. Harrell, Tracy N. Case No. 65-2010-CA-000282 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000282 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. TRACYN. HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELLAND BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES, et. al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in 65-2010-CA-000282 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP F/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and TRACYN HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELL; BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE; AMYDENISE LALONDE; BRYAN DOLPHIS LALONDE; WAKULLABANK are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front lobby Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. on September 13, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22, WALKERS CROSSING COMMENCING AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 360.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 198.19 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT ; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 212.39 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLYALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU A CENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 31 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.19 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST, 229.82 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 330.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. THE ABOVE LEGALDESCRIPTION BEING MORE RECENTLYSURVEYED BYTHURMAN RODDENBERRYAND ASSOCIATES, DATED APRIL4, 2002, UNDER JOB NO. 01-034, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST, 360.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 200.49 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF CHANCE COURT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE ADISTANCE OF 212.88 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET, THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 38 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 61.66 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 11 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 61.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 232.20 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919); THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 330.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1998 OR 1999 HOMES OF LEGEND SINGLE -WIDE VIN #HL9774AL. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 31st day of July, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 30 & September 6, 2012 11-05421 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices ONDS WEST 874.64 FEET TO A1 INCH IRON PIPE MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 735.81 FEET TO A1 INCH IRON PIPE LYING ON THE EASTERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAYOF REVADEE SPEARS ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY576.08 FEET TO A5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #7 160), THENCE LEAVING SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAYRUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 765.19 FEET TO A4 INCH BY4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 569.92 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/AARIANACOVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on August 16, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 30 & September 6, 2012 G10080266 5349-0913 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 005 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that GULF GROUPHOLDINGS AQUISITIONS & APPLICATIONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2418 Year of Issuance 2008 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-121-155-12084-D14 SHELLPOINTBEACH UNIT5 BLOCK D LOT14 OR 231 P594 OR 260 P828 Name in which assessed PIERRE LAWRENCE OLIVAREZ said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 3rd day of October, 2012, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 2nd day of August, 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida August 23, 30 and September 6, 13, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON AUGUST 20, 2012SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 The Wakulla County Clerk is looking for applicants for the position of Finance Clerk. The person “lling this position will be expected to possess the technical skills necessary to perform payroll duties, other accounting functions, and working knowledge of Excel and Word. Background in HR a plus. Must be a teamŽ member sharing other of“ce responsibilities. Desired Quali“cations: Associates degree from an accredited college or university w/emphasis in Accounting, Business, or Public Administration or equivalent combination of training, education, and experience that provides the required knowledge, skills and abilities. By Florida Law all applications for employment are open for public inspection. Background check & drug screening are required. Closes 9-14-12. EOE. Visit www.wakullaclerk.com for application and submit applications by mail or in person: Finance Director Wakulla County Clerk of Court 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327; by email: shawkins@wakullaclerk.com; or by fax: 850-926-0056.Finance Clerk The Wakulla NewsLook Us Up Online for Classi“ ed ads from The Wakulla News.www.thewakullanews.comAlso check out your Community Calendar Tear oExperts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905.Little Tupper Lake in New Yorks Adirondack State Park. LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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By JIM SAUNDERS and MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 31 … Republican Mitt Romney came to Tampa this week to celebrate his long-sought presidential nomination, even getting help … albeit unusual help … from actor Clint Eastwood. Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Isaac posed an uncomfortable question for Floridians and thousands of convention-goers: Do you feel lucky?Ž Thankfully, they were lucky. But the same cant be said for folks in Louisiana who got blasted by Isaac after it spun up the gulf and turned into a hurricane. REPUBLICANS TAKE AIM AT OBAMA By the time Romney took the stage Thursday night at the Republican National Convention, his supporters had already spent three days making argument after argument about why President Obama should be ousted from the White House. Romney, however, took a somewhat different tack. He expressed disappointment that Obama had been unable to do a better job with the economy after getting elected for years ago as a sign of Americas promise. Americas been patient,Ž Romney said. Americans have supported this president in good faith. But today, the time has come to turn the page. Today the time has come for us to put the disappointments of the last four years behind us, and put aside the divisiveness and the recriminations … to forget about what might have been and to look ahead to what can be. Now is a time to restore the promise of America.Ž But Romney wasnt above taking shots at the president … drawing applause from the Republican faithful gathered at the Tampa Bay Times Forum. President Obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans and to heal the planet,Ž Romney said mockingly. My promise is to help you and your family.Ž The Romney campaign also used the convention to try to better introduce the former Massachusetts governor to voters, after months of attacks by the Obama campaign and Democrats about issues such as the Republicans business record. Romneys wife, Ann, drew widespread praise for a speech she gave about the nominee, and the crowd heard emotional addresses Thursday night from people who received help from Romney while he served as a lay leader of his church. Be“ tting the site of the convention … and Floridas crucial role in the November election … some of the states most-prominent Republicans also got a chance to share the limelight. U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, for example, introduced Romney on Thursday night and criticized Obamas handling of the presidency. Our problem is not that hes a bad person,Ž Rubio said. Our problem is that hes a bad president.Ž Also given a speaking slot Thursday night was former Gov. Jeb Bush, who detoured from a prepared education address to defend his brother, former President George W. Bush. He challenged Obama for continuing to remind voters about inheriting a deeply troubled economy from George W. Bush in 2009. So Mr. President, it is time to stop blaming your predecessor for your failed economic policies, Jeb Bush said. You were dealt a tough hand, but your policies have not worked.Ž But one of the most-discussed parts of the convention was an odd … some would say downright bizarre … appearance Thursday night by Eastwood. The actor had a dialogue with an empty chair that he said represented Obama. ISAAC ON THE MOVE With Tropical Storm Isaac threatening the state, Mondays opening-day events at the Republican convention were largely called off. But in the end, the storm churned past Tampa and left the state relatively unscathed. The storm caused ” ooding in portions of Palm Beach County but saved its worst for Louisiana, as it revisited New Orleans on the seventh anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. This time, the levies held. Gov. Rick Scott missed most of the convention as he became commander-in-chief of Floridas preparation efforts. Meeting daily with reporters and a wider television audience, Scott gave up his speaking spot at the convention. But arguably, he spent more time on national TV as he became a morning “ xture discussing the storm. My job is to make sure that the 19 million people who live in our state are safe along with all our visitors, including the delegates to the RNC,Ž Scott said. Everybody here (is) focused on the safety of everybody in our state.Ž Isaac spent much of the week as a tropical storm, reaching hurricane strength shortly before landfall in southeast Louisiana. In typical Scott fashion, the governor didnt waste valuable TV time. He put on his tourism hat and urged folks to spend their Labor Day weekend on Floridas Isaac-free shores. STORY OF THE WEEK: Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney accepted the Republican nomination for president at the partys convention in Tampa. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: When somebody does not do the job, you got to let them go,Ž actor Clint Eastwood said of President Obama. Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comWEEKLY ROUND UP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Mitt, Isaac and a guy named ClintBy DAVID ROYSE THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDAPALM HARBOR, Fla., Aug. 29 – Veterinarian Ted Yoho introduced himself to thousands of parade-goers and barbecue eaters during a campaign for Congress in which he ran hard against the establishment. On Wednesday, he introduced himself to that establishment. Yoho scored a stunning primary upset victory in August over three-decade veteran of Congress Cliff Stearns, and even many in the Republican Party were caught off guard. Yoho said Wednesday in a speech to GOP delegates at the Republican National Convention that career politicians created the problems the country faces and Washington is to blame for the stagnant economy. “I’ve had enough of Washington standing in the way of job creation,” Yoho said, using a line he repeated often on the campaign trail in the Third Congressional District, which sprawls across rural north Florida from the Gulf Coast to the Georgia line and the outer suburbs of Jacksonville. Yoho is still largely unknown to many of the Republicans in the party’s rank and le outside of that district. But his win over Stearns, who was elected in 1988, has made him a bit of a star. Yoho is the only GOP congressional candidate so far to get a speaking spot at the breakfast for top Republican activists in the delegation at the convention. On Wednesday, he was interviewed by Politico in a video that was seen by political junkies around the country. He’s been endorsed by Sarah Palin. His campaign platform mainly revolves around removing what Yoho sees as barriers to job growth, though he typically isn’t speci c in his stump speeches about what federal regulations need to be repealed. One speci c law he does talk about is the federal health care law. “Repeal, defund and bury Obamacare,” Yoho said, describing his priorities. “Second, we need to take a scalpel to burdensome rules, regulations and mandates. Finally, we need to simplify our tax code.” Yoho recently sold his veterinary practice, but said his long tenure running it gave him an eye toward what local business owners deal with. “I’ve been in the trenches… for the last 35 years on a daily business,” Yoho said. He also said the nation needs to have a strong national security, but that the biggest threat to national security “doesn’t come from a foreign shore – it comes from the halls of Congress. It’s called debt.” Yoho faces Democrat J.R. Gaillot and independent Phil Dodds. Yo-who? Surprise nominee Yoho introduces himself to GOP NEWS SERVCE OF FLORIDAThe RNC at the Tampa Bay Times Forum. Brain Teaser 1 13 16 19 24 31 37 40 46 50 57 60 63 2 25 47 3 26 48 4 27 43 5 22 44 17 38 41 51 58 61 64 6 14 32 59 7 28 52 8 29 49 9 20 30 45 21 23 42 62 65 15 18 33 39 53 10 34 54 11 35 55 12 36 56 ACROSS 1. Guy, informally 6. Rights gp. 10. Midpoint: Abbr. 13. Israel's Sharon 14. Votes against 15. Hightail it 16. Homebuyer's expense 18. Inner Hebrides island 19. Jellyfish dangler 20. In need of body work 22. __ Tom 23. Ashen 24. Showy flower 28. One of a bevy 31. Sam Houston was its president 32. Fling the horsehide 33. Toss in one's hand 37. Assayers assay them 38. Talk big 39. Role for Ronny 40. Shed one's skin 41. It may be all around you 42. "I could care less!" 43. __ naked 45. Potato sack material 46. Barbecue feature 49. Wall St. figure 50. Baby-sitter's handful 52. Acts the cutup? 57. Moffo or Pavlova 58. Assembly-line output, perhaps 60. Rabbit dish 61. Walk like a tosspot 62. Take care of 63. Ltr. addenda 64. Partner of Peter and Paul 65. Ancient moralistDOWN1. Almanac tidbit 2. Perry and Della's creator 3. Simba or Nala 4. "__ we forget ..." 5. Made-up monikers 6. __-Saxon 7. Spot for espresso 8. Caustic stuff 9. No longer mint 10. Heparin prevents them 11. Basic prin ciple 12. Word to a marksman 15. 17-Down contenders 17. "March Madness" hoops org. 21. Prefix with glottis 24. Energy source 25. Goose egg 26. Ice skater's leap 27. Backbreaker? 28. Elementary particle 29. Bear in the air 30. Cockpit dial abbr. 32. Little-hand indication 34. Autobahn auto 35. City founded by Pizarro 36. Like a basso's voice 38. Call to Bo Peep 42. In secret 44. Afternoon gathering 45. Harris's __ Rabbit 46. Get a grip on 47. Pipsqueaks 48. Moorehead of "Bewitched" 49. Try for a job 51. Kind of life insurance 52. Baltic feeder 53. "Z ip-__-Doo-Dah" 54. Mardi Gras, e.g.: Abbr. 55. Opposite of endo56. Pull the plug on 59. Teachers' org. American Prole Hometown Content 9/2/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 12 34 451 6758 1 76 8496 582 5 627 348 2349 200 9 HometownContent 152 8936 7 4 398647512 647251893 519 726348 823419756 476538921 985 164237 734982165 261375489 F A C T A T O M G R A S P E R L E Z E R O R U N T S L I O N A X E L A G N E S L E S T L A S T S T R A W A L I A S E S T E A N C A A B A A T E R M A N G L O H O U R N E A C A F E Q U A R K O D E R L Y E U R S A A P P L Y U S E D A L T B R E R E P I S U B R O S A F I N A L F O U R A D E E C L O T S O P E L T U E S T E N E T L I M A E C T O R E A D Y D E E P S T O P

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 – Page 11B 1. MUSIC: Who composed the opera Swan LakeŽ? 2. LANGUAGE: What is the meaning of the Latin phrase Ars gratia artisŽ? 3. GEOGRAPHY: The island of Corsica belongs to what country? 4. MYTHOLOGY: What is the name for the three Greek goddesses of vengeance: Alecto, Megaera and Tisiphone? 5. LITERATURE: Who wrote a semiautobiographical travel book called Roughing ItŽ? 6. TELEVISION: What detective series featured the theme song Keep Your Eye on the SparrowŽ? 7. CHEMISTRY: What is the chemical symbol for bromine? 8. AD SLOGANS: What was billed as The Greatest Show on EarthŽ? 9. FAMOUS QUOTATIONS: Who once said, Do not take life too seriously. You will never get out of it alive.Ž? 10. MOVIES: Which Disney movie featured the hit song A Whole New WorldŽ? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Peter Tchaikovsky 2. Art for arts sake 3. France 4. The Furies 5. Mark Twain 6. BarettaŽ 7. Br 8. Barnum & Bailey Circus 9. Elbert Hubbard 10. AladdinŽ YOUR AD HERE

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 6, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet By DAVID WHITERestaurant wine programs are better than ever before. Once upon a time, high-end restaurants felt obligated to employ snooty sommeliers, most of whom pushed expensive, predictable wines that were easily found at your local liquor store. Today, though, high-end restaurants are staffed with hip sommeliers who are better described as wine educators, eager to discuss the interaction of wine with food and share their recent discoveries. Most traditions associated with wine service remain, however. When dining virtually anywhere, your server will formally present you with the bottle youve ordered, making sure the label is facing upwards. After opening the wine, shell present you with the cork. Finally, shell pour you a small taste of the wine and wait for your approval. Knowing what to do … and when its appropriate to reject a wine … can be nerve-wracking. But it neednt be. Heres all you need to know. Checking the label is easy. Its presented simply to con“ rm that the server has pulled the bottle you ordered … so check the producer, variety, and vintage. Mistakes can and do happen, especially when restaurants are busy. Inspecting the cork is almost as simple. For starters, theres no need to smell it. Instead, check to see if its streaked or drenched with wine. If it is, the wine might be heat-damaged, as heat causes wine to expand and push against the cork. But youll need to smell the wine to make sure, as it could also mean that the bottle was over“ lled. Also check to see if the cork is crumbly. If the wine is relatively young, this could be a sign of improper storage … and the wine could be oxidized. Again, youll need to smell the wine to make sure. Note that if a cork is covered in little white crystals that look like sugar, theres nothing to worry about. Its simply tartaric acid, a natural byproduct of wine, and those crystals are tasteless, odorless, and harmless. Analyzing the wine comes next. So give the wine a swirl to help release its aromas and stick your nose in the glass. Most ” aws can be detected by your nose alone, but dont hesitate to also taste the wine. If the wine is affected by TCA, or cork taint, the fruit will be masked by aromas reminiscent of wet cardboard or a damp basement. A 2005 study by Wine Spectator found that this ” aw impacts about one in 15 bottles. If the wine has been exposed to high temperatures or is oxidized from poor storage, it will likely seem ” at, with muted aromas and minimal ” avor. Sometimes, oxidized wine can give off aromas of caramel, candied almonds, and dried fruits. If you think your wine might be ” awed, give your glass to the server and solicit her opinion. If shes familiar with the wine, shell be able to let you know if something is off. And if shes not familiar with it, shell probably trust your judgment or have someone with more expertise come to the table. If the wine is in good condition, tell your server. Shell then pour it for everyone at the table. Keep in mind that the taste isnt poured to “ nd out if you like the wine. If its simply not to your liking, theres a good chance the restaurant wont take it back. That said, restaurants value customer service. So dont hesitate to explain to your server why you dislike the wine. The restaurant might replace the bottle. Of course, the best way to avoid ordering a wine you wont like is to chat with the sommelier or server beforehand, to get a sense of what you should expect. Alternatively, you could “ nd a wine thats available by the glass and ask your server for a small sample. Ordering wine at a restaurant is fun … its an opportunity to try unique wines and elevate your meal. So dont let the pomp and circumstance of wine service intimidate you. 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