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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00423
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 08-23-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00423
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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn spite of the controversy surrounding the expansion of the Wakulla County Airport, the Wakulla County Commission voted to move forward with making the improvements. The commission voted four to one abstention … Commissioner Jerry Moore owns property in Tarpine and was recommended to abstain from the vote … in favor of the expansion. Currently, the airport is out of compliance with the Florida Department of Transportation because of obstructions to the ” ight path and encroachments to the runway protection zone. In order to come into compliance, several trees would need to be removed and the airport would need to be shifted slightly to the west because of a hangar parcel that is too close to the protection zone, as well as the La Cantina Grille building and other property located within the Tarpine subdivision. If the county doesnt meet the requirements, it will lose its funding and ultimately lose the airport, said county consultant Jon Sewell of Kimley-Horn and Associates. The “ rst step towards making these improvements includes amending the current Joint Participation Agreement of $78,391. The county was awarded this grant from the FDOT and the money was intended to be used for runway lighting. However, the county is looking at shifting the runway to the west which would make installing the lighting pointless. Instead, the county will use the money to perform an obstruction survey and analysis, remove trees that are obstructing the ” ight path, update the Airport Layout Plan, perform property appraisals and airport strategic planning. The county commission agreed to have Kimley-Horn perform these tasks. Those in opposition of the airport questioned the order of the tasks that will be performed and asked the commission to look at updating its Airport Master Plan before anything else is done. The master plan is 23 years old, said Surf Road resident Dana Peck. She added that not having a master plan is like having the cart before the horse. Your horse is dead. Its been dead for 3 years,Ž she said. County Administrator David Edwards said the Airport Layout Plan is the master plan and FDOT only requires them to update the layout plan. The controversy surrounding the airport started after a portion of private property on Surf Road next to the airport was cleared, which served as a buffer for the residents, and a sign stating that it was the future site of the airport expansion was placed there. Many residents in the area became concerned about a possible expansion and their properties being impacted. And several of their properties along Surf Road were included in the land acquisitions. The county has said those properties will be taken out when the ALP is updated. Continued on Page 13ABoard approves new septic system standards. Page 2A. Back to School Back to School Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 32nd Issue Thursday, August 23, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Weekly Roundup .............................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 12A News Extra! .....................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 3B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 6B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7B Just a Pinch Recipes .......................................................Page 10B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B INDEX By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netL. James Parham says that the decision to run for property appraiser came almost as an epiphany. He was deeply involved in the Wakulla Airport expansion issue, joining with other neighbors concerned about the impact, and he discovered what he believed were some questionable appraisals for land around the airport … including property that had been improved with a hangar but the taxable value didnt reflect the new building because the owner had never got a Certi“ cate of Occupancy from the county and so the issue had fallen through the cracks. Parham, who is an appraiser by trade, decided he should run for Wakulla County Property Appraiser. Parham will face incumbent Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman in the November election. Parham was born and raised in Tallahassee, though he says he played, explored, hunted, “ shedŽ in the woods of Wakulla and surrounding counties. After graduating from Florida State University in 1973 with a degree in Marketing Management, he worked for the Florida Department of Transportation in eminent domain, and moved to the Tampa Bay area in 1976 where he was an appraiser for St. Petersburg Savings & Loan, becoming chief appraiser after a few years and eventually purchasing the banks appraisal department to start the L. James Parham Company. Parham was successful there, saying that areas boom in growth came after the Tampa International Airport was enlarged. Hillsborough and Pinellas counties started working together … and the area became attractive for development. Wakulla County is positioned to grab a good chunk of growth as the area comes out of economic recession, says Parham. Wakulla has unique characteristics, such as its unspoiled environment, while also being part of the Tallahassee metropolitan area, which gives it a good quality of life. He does anticipate that the next boom cycle is several years off, however … predicting it will be 2020 or 2025, which will be when Baby Boomer grandchildren are moving out on their own. The most exciting thing is the kind of transformational era Wakulla County is in right now,Ž he says. He notes that local growth is currently in the doldrums, with progress coming in “ ts and starts. Were not completely out of the recession.Ž Yet he is optimistic about Wakullas future. Parham says, as property appraiser, he would aid in economic development by bringing a private sector mentality to a public sector job.Ž For example, he offers a retail market analysis of the Crawfordville area that looks at the supply and demand of different industries within a “ ve, 10, and 15-minute radius. That analysis looks at whether theres a surplus or need for certain types of businesses based on whats already there … ranging from automobile dealers to restaurants.Continued on Page 2AJames Parham is a candidate for property appraiser James Parham is running for property appraiser.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLand donated by Ben Boynton to create historic Heritage VillageCommission approves airport expansionBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netLocal historian Betty Greens dream of having a place to keep the history of Wakulla alive and feature the historic homes of the late 1800s is slowly becoming a reality. Green, along with other members of the Wakulla County Historical Society, community leaders and residents celebrated on Aug. 17 the donation of 40 acres of land off Zion Hill Road for the Heritage Village Park. Its something weve been praying about for a long time,Ž Green said as tears “ lled her eyes. Its just a blessing.Ž Local developer Ben Bonyton and his family donated the land, which was originally part of the natural state of his planned subdivision, Bloxham Plantation. His wife, Anne, signed over the land to historical society president Cathy Frank at the ceremony, and said both she and her husband are interested in history and were excited to have a small part in Wakullas. Were grateful,Ž Frank said. She added that she was grateful Green, Heritage Village Park Committee Chariman Murray McLaughlin, Cal Jamison and others had the vision for this park. And were glad he had the vision also,Ž Frank said of the Boynton family. Continued on Page 2A JENNIFER JENSENBen Boynton at the ceremony on FridayJENNIFER JENSENWakulla students returned to class on Thursday, Aug. 16. These students at Shadeville Elementary played follow-the-leader to the school bus after the “ rst day, which was reported as very smooth by Superintendent David Miller. Enrollment is down slightly in Wakulla, but Miller expected the district would meet projections. More photos in News Extra! on Page 1B. St. Marks streetscape work will begin soon. Page 5A. Community Center Advisory Committee meets. Page 5A. More local government news inside:Recent rains bring mushrooms to Wakulla lawnsSee Page 14A

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Continued from Page 1A Members of the historical society appeared before the Wakulla County Commission in early 2011 and presented their vision for the park and the need for land. Boynton was at the commission meeting and approached McLaughlin after the meeting about the possible donation. Boynton was looking to create larger lots in the subdivision and in creating larger lots, the natural state would be lowered and not meet the state requirement of 45 percent. The gift to the society would help him meet requirements for conservation easements and the natural state requirement. A portion of the natural state will now be used for the Heritage Village. The land use revision for the change was approved at the July meeting of the county commission. This is a 500-year donation,Ž said County Commissioner Jerry Moore. This is the history of your county.Ž The 40-acre site will be the “ nal resting place for the 12 historic homes that were donated by local families. These homes, along with an old school house, will be restored and on display for visitors to see how people lived in the late 1800s. There will also be education kiosks, exhibits and walking trails. There is also an idea of an amphitheater to perform educational programs and plays to share the local history, said McLaughlin. There is also an idea to have a farmstead, which would include demonstrations of the sugar cane and turpentine industries. Those things that are indigenous to Wakulla County,Ž McLaughlin said. He added that they will probably incorporate something for the “ shing industry as well. One aspect that the society feels is very important is to have an African American community at the park also, similar to Hyde Park, McLaughlin said. One house has been donated to them and they are hoping to get more. There was also an idea to have a Native American site on the property. You get a vision and go with it,Ž Frank said. The “ rst step was acquiring the land, she said. The society has a lot of ideas, but needs to come to a consensus and “ gure out exactly what they want at the site, he said. The conceptual plan is being “ nalized. After that, there will be engineered drawings then infrastructure. In the meantime, McLaughlin said the society is looking at raising money for the site through grants and fundraising. The cost to move each one of the old homes could be $5,000 each or more, he said. It could take years for the park to open, but members of the community and historical society were excited at the possibilities. We hope it will be one of the top attractions of Wakulla County,Ž Frank said. For more information, call 926-3931, email 24research@gmail.com or visit http://wakullahistory.org.James Parham is running for property appraiser Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1AIt is this type of information and experience that Parham says makes him a strong candidate: his ability to identify studies of the local market and then report what the strongest demand is. Appraisal is a study of human behavior in the real estate market,Ž he says. For two years in the 1990s, Parham took a sabbatical. He had worked all his adult life and decided he needed to do something different. He bought a travel-trailer and drove the Oregon Trail. Not a mid-life crisis, he says, but a mid-life adjustment. Those two years shifted some priorities, he adds, I live a far less consumptive life than before … a simpler life.Ž He has since started Red Hills Land Company, and while he makes less money now, thats because I only work for who I want to, doing work that I love.Ž New jobs in Wakulla County depend on a reputation of fair play for all,Ž he says. Im an independent. I dont owe anybody any allegiance. Im funding my campaign myself because I dont want to owe anybody.Ž He says he will accept campaign donations, but makes potential donors acknowledge that it doesnt imply any future favors. Hes married to Ramsay Carsell Parham and has two stepdaughters and four grandchildren. His wifes grandfather was Jack Simmons, who owned Simmons Lodge on Ochlockonee Bay as well as Elberta Crate, and who originally owned the property where they currently live. Of his candidacy, Parham says, I want to do this for, with and about Wakulla County.ŽLand donated by Ben Boynton to create historic Heritage Village PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENNIFER JENSEN LAND FOR A HERITAGE VILLAGE: The historical societys Museum Director Cal Jamison, above, gives a tour of the property, showing off sinkholes and other features that will be incorporated into the village. Cathy Frank, the historical society president, at right, is all smiles as Anne Boynton signs the paperwork to transfer ownership of the land to the group. In addition to the 12 donated houses, the village may also have a farmstead with demonstrations of the sugar cane and turpentine industries, and possibly something of the “ shing industry as well. LETS DO THIS TOGETHER! DO YOU WANT IT?Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN GET YOU MOTIVATED! GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netCurrently, all new developments within Wakulla County are required to install a performance based septic system, however, effective Oct. 1, these systems will only be required within the Wakulla Springs Special Planning Area for properties that are smaller than 5 contiguous acres. It will also be required for properties where the total acreage is less than 0.229 acres and those where the system will be installed within 150 feet of the high water level of any surface water, wet sink, swallet or within 300 feet of a “ rst of second magnitude spring. This change was approved by the Wakulla County Commission at its Aug. 20 meeting with a vote of four to one, with Commissioner Lynn Artz opposing. Artz felt the Wakulla Springs Special Planning Area did not include all the sensitive areas of the county. We are not being responsible stewards of our environment,Ž Artz said. The area mirrors the Wakulla Springs contributing area, said Commissioner Randy Merritt. Previously, there were areas not included that were of concern to Artz and Commissioner Alan Brock, including Spring Creek. Artz and Brock both voted against sending the amendments to the Department of Environmental Protection. DEP also had some concerns about the area proposed and recommended including the entire Wakulla Spring contributing area. So, the staff proposed using the Wakulla Spring Special Planning Area map, which has already been in existence and encompasses a larger area than the previous one, according to County Planner Melissa Corbett. Resident and Planning Commissioner Chuck Hess said the current proposed area is better than the original, but still needs to be broader. The whole purpose is protecting the groundwater and those sensitive areas need to be included, he said. Another change would be for the requirement that nitrogen levels must be reduced by 90 percent to the state standards of 50 percent. Also, repairs and modi“ cations to existing septic systems are allowed without requiring an upgrade to performance based septic systems. The group, a 1,000 Friends of Florida endorsed the proposed change, Merritt said. That letter proves that we can protect the environment, but still have common sense.Ž Merritt brought the amendment forward because he felt requiring the entire county to have performance based septic systems was not necessary. Previously, the commission was looking at taking out the specific septic tank language in the comprehensive plan and incorporating general protection language. The more speci“ c requirements would be made in the land Development code. However, the Florida Legislature adopted House Bill 1263 which repealed the requirement for septic tank inspections and limited the area where performance based systems can be required. The countys comprehensive plan provisions are grandfathered in and to ensure that the county is in the best legal position, County Attorney Heather Encinosa suggested instead to propose a separate policy that includes these revisions and narrows the policy already in the comprehensive plan. Artz said she didnt feel comfortable with passing the amendments because of the possibility of losing the countys grandfathered status. Its a risk,Ž Artz said.Board approves new septic system standards GRAPHIC: WAKULLA COUNTY GOVERNMENTOn Oct. 1, performance-based septic systems will only be required in the Wakulla Springs Special Planning Area, which is roughly from the county line south to Shadeville Road.We can protect the environment, but still have common sense, one county commissioner says of reducing the area where advanced waste treatment is required, while another, on the losing side of a 4-1 vote, contends the change means We are not being responsible stewards of our environment. COUNTY COMMISSION The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, September 10, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, October 1, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.AUGUST 23, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSCopies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.AUGUST 23, 2012The Wakulla County Planning Commission and the Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, September 10 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, October 1, 2012 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be holding two public hearings on Ordinance 2012-02.An Ordinance of the City of Sopchoppy adopting the operating budgets for the City of Sopchoppy for the 2012-2013 “scal year. The “rst public hearing, followed by the “rst reading of Ordinance 2012-02, will be held Tuesday, August 30 2012 at a special called meeting of the Council. The second public hearing on the budget and adoption of Ordinance, 2012-02 will be September 10 2012 during the regular monthly meeting of the City Council. Both meetings will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, Florida. A copy of the Budget may be viewed at City Hall from 8:00 a.m. … 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Thursday and from 8:00 a.m. … 3:00 p.m. Friday. If special assistance is needed to attend this meeting, please call the Clerks of“ce at 962-4611 at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting.PUBLIC MEETINGS TO ADOPT THE BUDGET OF THE CITY OF SOPCHOPPYAUGUST 23, 30, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:•Langston not prohibited from running for sheriff •Lucinda ‘Cindy’ Norman obituary •Teachers vote overwhelmingly for contract •Lucinda ‘Cindy’ Norman obituary • Coast Guard Auxiliary for Aug. 23, 2012 • From the Dock for Aug. 16, 2012 • People You Should Know: Jimmie Doyle, NAMI Wakulla • Big Hearted Angels visit Wakullathewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Editor, The News: The League of Women Voters of Wakullas “ rst forum moderated by the Tallahassee Democrats former Capital Bureau reporter Bill Cotterell, will be held Thursday, Aug. 23. It will start at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library, 4330 Crawfordville Highway. Our first office will be Superintendent of Schools which is an open seat. The next of“ ce, at 8 p.m. will be Property Appraiser. This will be Wakulla citizens opportunity to meet the candidates and hear their positions on various topics pertaining to their of“ ce. This is the “ rst of three forums the League of Woman Voter of Wakulla will be sponsoring. We hope this letter will serve to encourage Wakullans to attend. The League of Women voters is a nonpartisan political organization encouraging the informed and active participation of all citizens in the political process. We encourage all citizens to vote „ and vote early! Mary Cortese President LWV WakullaEditor, The News: I planned to wait a bit after the primary election to write another political letter but recent events have prompted me to cut the wait short. A few weeks ago I noticed that electioneering communication focused on the County Commission Seat 3 race had started to appear. Print ads, Facebook pages and websites had appeared … some focused on the candidacy of former County Commissioner Howard Kessler and others focused on current Commissioner Mike Stewart. As of now, the Wakulla Democratic Party has not endorsed a candidate in this race. We may not do so at all since there is no Democratic candidate in the race. However, as a voting citizen of this county, I personally have an interest in the outcome of this race. Previously, I have voted for both Mike Stewart and Howard Kessler … albeit for different races. I have never had to choose between them on a ballot before. Their campaigns in this cycle will in” uence how I cast my vote this November. Over the weekend, I saw an electioneering site on Facebook take a very negative turn. Previously, the Facebook page and the website, www.tellthetruthmikestewart.com critiqued Commissioner Stewarts record in of“ ce. However, on Saturday, a post from the Facebook page administrator posed questions about Commissioner Stewarts ties to a group called Floridians for Accountability engaged in electioneering communication against Dr. Howard Kessler. The posting suggested that the group supported marriage equality, but referred to the issue as gay marriageŽ and questioned Commissioner Stewarts family values. I was disturbed by this negative turn. No human rights ordinance has been proposed in Wakulla County. There has been no referendum on marriage of any kind in this community. Why say this and why attack someones family values for something that would be a state or federal issue rather than a county commission issue? Furthermore, there doesnt seem to be a link between Commissioner Stewart and this electioneering communications organization. On my own Facebook page, I linked to the electioneering page and spoke out against negative campaigning. I also called for Dr. Kessler to take a stand against the page. Both Commissioner Stewart and Dr. Kessler responded to my posts. Other community members participated in the thread as well. The Facebook page has since been taken down or perhaps I have been blocked from viewing it but the address and name was www.facebook.com/pages/Tell-the-TruthMike-Stewart/372675729469564?ref=ts. The thread on my own Facebook page disappeared with it. The page still shows up in search engines but can no longer be accessed. I felt compelled to write this letter because Dr. Kessler stated that he did not approve of negative campaigning and that he had no connection to the Facebook page or to the website www.tellthetruthmikestewart.com/. Both were listed as paid electioneering communication paid for by FLQOL, 3019 Spirea Street, Sarasota FL 34231. This group is the Florida Quality of Life Council, Inc. It is a registered electioneering communications organization. The only source of income for this group are a series of inkind donations for accounting made by the BATTLEGROUND GROUP, INC. An inquiry into the actual IP address of the website www.tellthetruthmikestewart. com shows that it is registered to Republican political strategist Chris Akins. I believe there is a place in politics for electioneering communication. However, I think such groups need to stick to actual issues that are relevant to the race. I think it is important that candidates are honest with citizens about efforts undertaken on their behalf. To say, this is terrible and I didnt authorize it nor do I condone itŽ is one thing. Candidates cant always control what their supporters do. However, in this instance, the connecting lines between Dr. Kessler, Chris Akins, FQOL, the Battleground Group and the negative electioneering communication sites beg for scrutiny. Im calling for a clean, honest race for County Commission Seat 3 in which the candidates stick to the issues and campaign on their own merits. Candidates, please keep it clean. Rachel Sutz Pienta Chair Wakulla Democratic Party Ive written so many columns about the dif“ culties of growing older … not that I am getting older, Nurse Judy, my vain alter ego, is quick to add … but now I feel I should give a positive message. It is true that ones memory isnt as sharp as when one was younger, but even that isnt all bad. Let me explain. I am a nurse, not a home economics major, so I have never been good at sewing. That never stopped me from trying in my younger days, and my children suffered through all the homemade matching out“ ts I made them until the day my son rebelled, reminding me that he was the only boy in school whose pants didnt have a ” y. I had no idea how to make pants except to cut out two halves, sew them together and put elastic in the waist, so his complaint left me with no alternative but to give up my seamstress career. The family was pleased. My sewing machine was not. Going into retirement, except for some mending chores, was demeaning for a machine of this caliber. It knew its abilities were being severely underutilized. After all, it could stitch forward or backward, wide or thin, embroider, buttonhole, hem, cross-stitch, pleat, tuck and smock. It had every kind of bell and whistle on it, which I never had any idea how to use. Im sure if I had ever learned how to direct it, it could have done the entire job by itself and make me a cup of coffee while I waited for it to accomplish the task. Alas, I have never been good at technical non-medical equipment, although I did marvel at its underused talents. I believe if I put wheels on it, and I was smart enough, I could have driven it to work. Anyhow, this machine stayed with me wherever I went for the next x&*# years (forgive the typo), and a curious thing happened to it. It was supposedly a portable number and in my younger day I could sling it out of the cupboard and onto a table with no problem. As time went on that machine began to put on weight. I could understand this as the same thing had happened to me. Still, it became more and more dif“ cult for me to man-handle it to a useable platform, so the mending would pile up for months going on years. A few weeks ago the mending basket was so high that Bee Bee, the kitten, couldnt “ nd his way out. I ate a hearty breakfast, drank an energy drink, put on an abdominal brace and reluctantly made my way to the cupboard to try and wrestle the behemoth of a sewing machine out and up onto the table. I opened the door and couldnt believe my eyes. A brand new lightweight machine was sitting in the old guys place. Where had it come from? I racked my brain for quite a while trying to “ gure this gift out. Little bits of information began to “ lter in. I remembered that when WalMart stopped selling yard goods they had a sewing machine sale. I vaguely remembered looking at them. I must have bought one. How delightful! So memory lapses arent all that bad. If you buy something and put it away for later use, you can get a wonderful gift from time to time. There is one slight problem. Where did that old machine go? Do you suppose it got wheels and drove away? More later.Judy Conlin is a nurse in Wakulla and Gadsden counties. Her website is www.nursejudyinfo.comEditor, The News: When Obama took of“ ce the national debt was $10 trillion. The difference from what he delivered and promised is $11 trillion ($16 trillion minus $5 trillion): Too surreal a miscalculation to be other than deliberate. Obama is using the debt to attain the power of the moral equivalent of war. Debt is the excuse to concentrate power: the masses must submit. Witness Greece. Soon, the interest on the debt cant be paid, or massive in” ation begins, or buyers of treasury notes will dry up, or interest rates will rise on our debt, or further downgrades will occur: Any number of dire consequences from a grotesquely purposeful, unsustainable “ scal policy. Climate change having failed to deliver this moral equivalent, Obama knows his foot on the spending pedal is the best chance remaining. Third world progressives use the police or military to stay in control, but Obama will use taxes, class warfare and the IRS. Obamas reelection portends the Cassandra TV commercial: You are beautiful, but you are about to loose everything.Ž Joel Thornton Joelthornton91@yahoo.com Editor, The News: Attention, 2nd Infantry Division Veterans: The Florida Branch of the Second (Indianhead) Division Association will have its annual reunion in Titusville on Oct. 12-14 at the Best Western Space Shuttle Inn. For reservations, call the hotel at (321) 2699100 and say you are with the Second Division. For more information, call the branch secretarytreasurer, Donald Calnan, at (561) 742-5379 or send an email to 2ida.mail@ charter.net. Mike Davino Vice President Olivia, N.C. It’s not always a bad thing growing older Judy Conlin Nurse Judy’s Nook READERS WRITE:Speaking out on negative campaigning Obamas “ scal policy is purposeful Leagues “ rst forum is ursday 2nd Infantry to hold reunionA news item in last weeks News, Sheriffs Of“ ce to host sporting clays tournament as bene“ t for youth ranch,Ž had a date for the event that was apparently changed after the information was sent out. The event is now set for Sept. 22. An updated article appears on page 13A of this issue.CorrectionBy SLIM RANDLES When the world is hot and my skin is fried, scratching from the constant dry, let the clouds boil up, boil up high, and then shade the earth with the darkening sky and bring the secrets and the smell of rain. The coolness and the blessed rain again. Our land is brown but blessed, stressed in the heat, the shiny heat of day. The slender green of rivers slide along, striving to continue, to feed its own along the banks, the banks where the dust rises. Rises, powdery clomp by clomp as we walk, walk the shady way. And though the heat, the dryness of heat, pushes down our weary feet, we plod along. When the heat falls hard, on many days, unquenched by the dark of night, we ask, in quiet times, we ask. Bring us the clouds, the black-bellied clouds, the clouds that softly hold the heads of gods in their moistening grasp. Let them come, with their silver tops and their bellies black as night and cool as forgiveness. The clouds, the rain, the respite from the toil. To soak the thirsty soil. Fill our pores, smooth our skin, wash us free of dirt and sin, with the rain, the cleansing, blessing rain. Sink the water to the core of the earth and push it through the dust, making it heavy and loath to leave the ground. When its done, when its over, when weve had our treasure and the clouds have gone, when its over, please, bring it again another day. Another day of clouds, of life, of rain, of supreme love and comfort, of one more treat for man and his animal friends. Wait until its right, but then, bring the big rollers in from the west, and let us watch the world get its “ ery drink, and drink in the noise and think about cooler times, but knowƒlet us know that there is nothing better than this. Brought to you by the new book Home Country,Žat www.slimrandles.com. Home country: e blessing of rain

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 – Page 5A The Wak u lla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com M a n a t ee T i m e s Adver sing Networks of Florida Statewide advertising—one low price Reach a wide audience (866)742-1373 all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ An independent for independent appraisals in 35 counties for 38 years (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser •Interior Remodeling •Doors •Floors •Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling •Decks/Barns/Fences • Portable, Private, Outdoor Showers FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS NEW! (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain By JEFF HUGO Summer afternoons are hot. But early mornings are gorgeous. Nowhere is that statement more evident than on an early morning river cruise on the Wakulla River at Wakulla Springs State Park. One of the best views of the river greets the observer at the “ rst bend. The suns golden light “ lters through the silvery strands of Spanish moss dangling from the chartreuse leaves of giant bald cypress trees. Not far distant, the silhouetted form of an anhinga perches upon a heaven-ward pointing cypress knee. Its elegant form embodying the quintessence of an ancient and wild Florida. The snort of a manatee directs attention to its massive yet graceful form as it breaks the still surface for a needed breath. This Wakulla whaleŽ embodies the antithesis of a marine mammal. It does not eat ” esh. It is rarely in a hurry. And it abhors water temperatures below 67 degrees. Bathed in the peacefulness of early morning, the manatee must truly believe it has found a spaŽ at Wakulla Springs. The drone of a bullfrog, the cackling of a moorhen, or the gentle splash of a mullet occasionally punctuates the rivers ambiance. These are all sounds now audible thanks to electric engines installed on two of the parks river boats. The advancement is courtesy of the generosity of park guests and the efforts of the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park. One last opportunity to experience the glory of early morning on the Wakulla River in 2012 presents itself on Saturday, Aug. 25. At 8 a.m., the boat departs the dock. Interested parties can call (850) 5617286 to reserve space. Tickets may be purchased at the Waterfront Visitors Center at Wakulla Springs State Park beginning at 7:45 a.m. Prices are $10 for everyone 13 years old and up while children ages 3-12 are $7. Following the tour, further enhance the morning with a satisfying breakfast in the Wakulla Springs Lodge. Peruse the breakfast menu at www.wakullaspringslodge.com. Enjoy golden griddle cakes or French toast, or Southern classics like country biscuits with sausage gravy or fried chicken with eggs and grits. Round out your morning in a beautiful setting overlooking the worlds largest and deepestŽ freshwater spring.Jeff Hugo is a ranger at Wakulla Springs State Park.By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter a bumpy start, the Wakulla County Community Center Advisory Committee met again on Aug. 14 to establish its purpose. The committee was created by the Wakulla County Commission and included a broad range of representation from members in the community. After those first meetings, it became clear that some of the members did not fully support the idea of a community center. Following that meeting, county commissioners expressed their disappointment in the community and one called the group dysfunctional.Ž Commissioner Lynn Artz was present at the advisory committee meeting said she felt bad that the “ rst few meetings were frustrating. She added that those on the committee should be advocates of the community center. Committee member and Sopchoppy City Commissioner Aginita Rosier said the community center has already been established and a site has been chosen. Were not here to argue or debate that,Ž Rosier said. Their purpose is to provide guidance to the commission, she added. County Administrator David Edwards said the group needed to refocus what it is doing. We need to refocus the energy,Ž Edwards said. Two areas where the group needs to focus is programs offered at the community center, what the YMCA can offer and those outside of the YMCA, and starting to fundraise to help bring money to the scholarship program of the YMCA, Edwards said. He added that the third area is on funding for infrastructure, but it was not needed at the moment. They also discussed restructuring the committee. Two members, Billy Jones and Bill Versiga, have resigned and others have not been supportive of the community center. The members include Steve Brown, Senior Center Director R.H. Carter, retired art teacher Diane Perez, School Board appointee Louis Hernandez, YMCA representative Ken Franklin, WHS Assistant Principal Simeon Nelson, Sopchoppy City Commissioner Aginita Rosier, Charlotte Cobb and youth representative Natalie Crum. Those in attendance at the meeting included Rosier, Cobb, Franklin and an alternate for Carter. Edwards said they either need to correct members and “ ll vacancies or they can start small. Artz agreed to reach out to the other members that were not in attendance and see if they are still willing to serve on the committee. No formal business was discussed because the committee did not have a quorum. But all those in attendance agreed the community center was a huge need for the county. We dont want our children to go to Tallahassee,Ž Rosier said. The county acquired the 22-acre property that was previously home to New Life Church on May 24, 2010, with plans to turn it into a community center. The current plan for the community center site is to use a legislative appropriation to renovate the former sanctuary building to include free weight and cardio room, fitness class room, kid zone and restrooms and showers. The other building would remain as it is, with several of“ ces. Also include in the plans is the addition of an open floor gymnasium, which would have high school and college regulation size basketball court. The former sanctuary building would be utilized by the YMCA, which has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the county to manage the community center. A request for proposals was sent out and the YMCA was the lone responder. There is now discussion needed to determine what kinds of programs the YMCA will offer.Community Center Advisory Committee meets again WAKULLA SPRINGS NEWS & NOTESTake an early morning river cruise By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netConstruction on the city streetscape in St. Marks is expected to start any day. The rain has prevented the company from beginning work on the project, which was anticipated to start on Monday, Aug. 20. The contract was awarded to Hale Contracting on July 9. It will be paid for by a $600,000 Community Development Block Grant for downtown revitalization. City Manager Zoe Mans“ eld said the contractor has promised to have the project completed by the Stone Crab Festival on Oct. 20. They have 90 days to “ nish, but have said they will do it in 45 days, she said. Hale Contractings bid was $398,123 and includes the addition of a sidewalk on both sides of Port Leon Drive from Pine Street to Riverside Drive, an imprint of a lighthouse in the center of the road at the end of Riverside Drive, benches, trash cans, period lighting and landscaping improvements. The landscaping improvements include a 4-foot median in certain points of the road, which would have ” owers and other plants to help with the beauti“ cation of the road. Engineer Joe Hope, with Hydro Engineering, developed the plans and the grant is being administered by Fred Fox. In other news: € The city commission approved setting the two public hearings on the proposed budget for 2012-13 for Sept. 5 and Sept. 18. The proposed budget includes the same millage rate as the previous two years of 5.0327 per $1,000 of assessed property value, Mans“ eld said. Not much has changed from the previous year, she added. € All the tanks on the St. Marks Refinery Site, now known as St. Marks Innovation Park, have been removed. Mayor Chuck Shields said now the city will look at other funding to improve the dock and other improvements at the site. The dock could serve as an off-loading facility, ship building yard or seafood processing plant area, he said. The city commission asked St. Marks Waterfronts Florida Partnership to help pursue grants for that project. Billy Bishop, of Waterfronts, said a Florida Recreational Developmental Assistance Program grant he came across might work for that site. The next meeting will be a special called budget meeting on Sept. 5. The regular commission meeting will be Sept. 13.CITY OF ST. MARKSStreetscape construction begins soonSPECIAL TO THE NEWSPassengers look out on the spectacular view of the Wakulla River on an early morning cruise.

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Some things I will do as a parent: € I will take my child to school. € I will meet my childs teacher. € My child will learn. € My child will graduate. € My child will do his/ her best. € I will exchange phone numbers with my childs teacher. € I will meet with the teacher when my child has problems. € I will not let my child spend hours on TV and games, etc. € I will see that my child goes to bed on time. € I will see that my child is not late for school. € I will see that my child starts his or her school day with a good spirit. The Church of Christ Written in Heaven will hold a Sunday School Convention at the Tabernacle Church of Christ W.I.H. in Gretna on Aug. 21 through Aug. 26 beginning at 8 p.m. nightly. On Sunday will be Sunday School at 10:30 a.m. At noon, worship service. Host pastor Diocese Mother Maylis Harrison. Churches attending the convention will be from Sopchoppy, Marianna, Gretna, Blountstown, Wewahitchka, Hardaway, Two Egg, Tallahassee, Woodville, St. Rose, Quincy, Panama City and elsewhere. You are welcome to come and fellowship. We invite you to come fellowship with us at Skipper Temple Church of Christ on Surf Road in Sopchoppy. On Tuesday, Bible teaching and prayer at 7 p.m. Sunday School is Sunday morning at 10, followed by worship service at 11 a.m. Everyone is welcome. Happy birthday to Isiah Hines Jr. and Shanequa Hines. Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments WEDNESDAY: and Adults 10:30am 11:00am Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Churchreligious views and events New Testament Bible ChurchBible-believing Church meets at Wakulla County Public Library, large conference room. Songs, prayer and Bible teaching/preaching. The Lord Jesus described the basic meaning of a church in a very simple and yet profound way:For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.ŽCome take part in our study of Gods Word.4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Church BriefsResolutions for a parent of school-age children Buckhorn News By Ethel SkipperThe simple things in life OUT TO PASTORREV. JAMES L. SNYDER And I must say I do not get very much help on this part, especially from the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Her idea of keeping it simple is not telling me everything. This past week I think she went a little too far. It was Saturday night and I was preparing for my weekly bath. I had assembled all the necessary equipment: my rubber ducky, my reading glasses and the book I was reading at the time. There is nothing more relaxing to me than a hot bubble bath with a good book. Eventually, I put my book up and began the ritual of taking a bath. I reached for the bar of soap and it felt a little different then I had remembered from the week before. It felt as though it had been rolled in gravelly dirt. Wanting to know what the problem was, I called to my wife. Whats wrong with the soap?Ž She then came into the bathroom and said, Theres nothing wrong with the soap.Ž But it feels different,Ž I complained. Thats because its oatmeal soap,Ž she explained. Oatmeal soap? What do you mean, oatmeal soap?Ž Its a new soap I found at the Bath and Body store. Its something new. Its good for you, use it.Ž I immediately began to search my mind (I almost got lost in the process) for information concerning oatmeal. I knew, for example, that oatmeal was a food. I like a bowl of hot oatmeal in the morning with sliced bananas. And oatmeal raisin cookies go perfect with a nice hot cup of coffee. However, I could not “ nd any information in my brain collaborating the fact that you can wash with oatmeal. I looked at the bar of oatmeal soap and did not know if I should wash with it or eat it. And, where do you put the sliced bananas? To make matters worse, if that could be possible, I discovered in the bathtub a new bottle of shampoo. It was called Sweet Apple Shampoo. There is nothing like a fruity-tooty bubble bath to bring out the manly spirit in a person. This incident only illustrated to me the fact that we live in a very complicated world. Somebody comes up with some simple idea that is a good idea. However, the real money goes to the person who can take that simple idea and complicate it beyond all recognition. There aint nothing simple anymore,Ž my grandfather used to say. And hes been dead for 30 years. What would he say today? For example, take your common everyday telephone. The telephone is no longer a phone but rather a full communication system. You can do everything on your cell phone. I tried to buy a new cell phone recently and found it rather dif“ cult. All I want is to be able to phone my wife when Im away from the house.Ž Do you know I could not “ nd a cell phone that just was a phone. I remember the days when the telephone was a party system. What parties we used to have. Each person on that party phone line had a certain ring. I still remember ours. It was two rings. Of course, whenever the phone rang everybody on the party line knew who was getting a call and felt complete liberty in joining in. Not just telephones but also everything else has been complicated for us. A watch is no longer a watch, but rather a timepiece that does everything but tell time. I saw one that was also a cell phone. Now, I need a cell phone to “ nd out what time it is and I need a watch to make a phone call. While Im on the subject, try to “ nd a phone booth in the neighborhood. The absence of the neighborhood phone booth may explain the rise in crime. Where in the world does Clark Kent change into his Superman suit? Then there is coffee. On a recent trip, I had to use the services of our friendly airline service, which necessitated spending time in airports, which is as close to purgatory as a person can get without dying. I tried to “ nd a plain cup of coffee. Everywhere I went they had everything but plain coffee. The coffee had been ” avored with everything from vanilla to pineapples and a few ingredients I could not pronounce. No wonder so many elderly people go senile. Its the only sane thing to do in such a complicated world. Where, oh where have the simple things in life gone? Only one place remains simple for me. That is the Bible. It is not hard understanding what Jesus meant. Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.Ž John 14:6 (KJV). As far as Im concerned, nothing is complicated about trusting Jesus.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net.  It’s REVOLUTION time at First Baptist in Crawfordville From Aug. 22 through Aug. 25, First Baptist Church of Crawfordville (FBCC) will host its annual, county-wide youth revival REVOLUTION. Everyone is invited to attend this exciting four-night event with this year’s speaker, Pastor Sterling Lynn from Blackshear Place Baptist Church. Come and hear what Jesus’ death has accomplished for humanity and where you t into God’s plan for the world. Teenagers – bring your questions and your friends. Music worship will be led by Chaotic Resemblance, and you can check them out in advance at www.facebook.com/pages/ Chaotic-Resemblance/153396921344744. REVOLUTION runs nightly from 7 to 9 p.m., and dinner is provided Wednesday through Friday at 6 p.m. Don’t miss the Friday night concert by Chaotic Resemblance from 9:30 to 10:30 p.m., and the Saturday night ice cream party from 9 to 10 p.m. Adults are invited to attend all events, and are encouraged to come to an informative talk Saturday morning from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. covering basic areas of concern and providing conversation starters for dif cult topics. For more information, call the FBCC ofce at 926-7896. Family of Ruth McCaliister High says thank you for support The family of Ruth McCallister High would like to thank all their friends and relatives for all the support, food, owers, help and for being by our side, and Ruth’s, during this time. God Bless everyone! Thank you. Judy Pat Larson and family

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From News ServicesThere was a slight increase in Wakullas unemployment rate, up to 7.5 percent from 7.3 percent in June. But the “ gures showed a decrease overall in Wakullas jobless rate over the past year from 8.9 percent … a full 1.4 percent reduction. The unemployment rate for the state reversed course last month, edging up to 8.8 percent, 0.2 percent higher than in June, but was still nearly two percentage points below where it was a year ago, the government said Friday. The states total number of jobs in July decreased by 3,300 from June, the state Department of Economic Opportunity said. But Gov. Rick Scott said the overall picture when looking at several months is positive, and noted the state has high numbers of online job ads. While the unemployment rate can vary from month to month, Florida continues to see positive private sector job growth,Ž Scott said in a statement put out by his of“ ce. My goal remains the same, to make Florida the number one business destination in the world by improving the states economic climate, highlighting our talented and skilled workforce and getting Floridians back to work.Ž Neighboring Leon County saw a slight increase moving from 7.6 percent to 8.1 percent over the month but had a 1.0 percent decrease over the year from 9.1 percent. In the local area, Gadsden County saw a 1.1 percent increase from the June 2012 rate, moving from 8.7 percent to 9.8 percent. However, over the year, there was a decrease of 1.5 percent from 11.3 percent. Even with the slight increases seen locally, the Tallahassee MSA maintained the “ fth lowest unemployment in the state at 8.2 percent and fell below the national rate of 8.6 percet and the state rate of 9.3 percent. Local rates reported are not seasonally adjusted, meaning that seasonality (regularly occurring yearly events such as summer break for schools) plays a signi“ cant role for the over-the-month increase in the unemployment rate. Declines in trade, transportation and utilities, retail trade and government, made up the largest job losses seen locally. DEO said there were 816,000 jobless Floridians in July out of a labor force of 9.2 million. Nationally, the unemployment rate in July was 8.3 percent, essentially unchanged from June. Floridas big employment problem remained the construction industry. There were still nearly 17,000 fewer construction jobs in July than in the same month of 2011, a 5.2 percent year-over-year decline. Counties with relatively high proportions of government employment remained among those with the lowest unemployment rates. Monroe County at 5.3 percent was best in the state, followed by Walton and Okaloosa, the only other counties under 6.5 percent. The highest unemployment was in Hendry County, where 16.1 percent of the workforce is jobless. Flagler, St. Lucie, and Indian River counties all have unemployment over 12 percent. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 – Page 7ABy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 17 … Floridas political parties this week named their respective teams for the upcoming general election as primaries separated the no longer hopefuls from the standard bearers. Like any All-Star team, Democrats and Republicans alike will recognize many familiar faces as incumbents and heirs apparent swept into of“ ce during Tuesdays primary from both camps. But each party had a few surprises as incumbents fell and newcomers emerged. Eyes now turn toward the general election, less than 12 weeks away. To that end, election of“ cials said they will once again begin culling through the names of potentially ineligible voters after striking a deal to access a federal database following months of legal wrangling over its use. The states economics were also part of the political fray this week as Gov. Rick Scott and GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney took different views of the latest jobless “ gures released for July. Scott said he sees blue skies ahead despite a small uptick in the states unemployment rate as Florida continues to claw its way back. Romney, meanwhile, sees that same sky, but its not so blue. Also, it is falling. PRIMARY COLORS Voters from across the state cast ballots Tuesday on host of races from U.S. Senate to local precinct committeemen. Much speculation surrounded the Republicans and how the partys conservative wing would fare. The results were mixed. In one race for Congress, 10-term incumbent John Mica survived a challenge from Sandy Adams, who had been ushered into Congress as part of the tea party push in 2010. Mica easily defeated Adams in what he called a battle for the soul of the Republican Party.Ž Im happy to report the heart and soul of the party endures,Ž Mica said this week. Tea party supporters, however, had better luck in other parts of the state. In north central Florida, Gainesville veterinarian Ted Yoho unseated 12-term Congressman Cliff Stearns, who had moved north to run in the sprawling District 3. And in southwest Florida, conservative talk show host Trey Radel defeated a slate of political veterans and household names as he took the GOP primary in Congressional District 19 in Lee and Collier Counties. We had a message that resonated with the common man,Ž Yoho said after polls closed and it appeared he would defeat Stearns. ƒ It was the feeling that career politicians had created this mess or they failed to prevent it. Neither was acceptable.Ž Despite the throw-thebumsout messages, most incumbents won on Tuesday. In state legislative elections, a handful of competitive primaries may set the direction of the chambers in the years ahead. Former Rep. Aaron Bean and Rep. Jeff Brandes easily won their bids for GOP Senate nominations. Both candidates … Bean in Duval and Nassau counties and Brandes in the Tampa Bay region -are aligned with Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart. Negron is running against Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, for Senate president in 2016-18. Not surprisingly both Negron and Latvala were sanguine over Tuesdays results, each saying they are still on track to lead the 40-member chamber when the opportunity arrives. Meanwhile, the Senate is guaranteed to lose one incumbent as Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale and Sen. Maria Sachs, DBoca Raton, battle it out in November. Florida voters sent three incumbent House members packing, rejuvenated the political careers of a few old names --and likely elected the states “ rst openly gay lawmaker. Miami-Dade voters chose Rep. Jose Felix Diaz over fellow Rep. Ana Rivas Logan in a Republican primary in House District 116, and Rep. Barbara Watson held a narrow lead late Tuesday over Rep. John Patrick Julien in a Democratic primary in District 107, a race that was headed to a recount on Friday. Rep. Steve Perman was also ousted in the primary. Meanwhile, Miami-Dade Democrats in District 113 chose David Richardson over three other candidates, electing likely the “ rst openly gay member of the Legislature. Farther north, Palm Beach County voters gave former Rep. Kevin Rader, DDelray Beach, a big primary win over Perman of Boca Raton. Rader joined former lawmakers such as Alex Diaz de la Portilla, R-Miami, in winning primaries as they seek to return to Tallahassee. In addition to the Watson-Julien recount, one other House race and one Senate primary were being re-checked. The Senate District 27 battle between Reps. Jeff Clemens, D-Lake Worth, and Mack Bernard, D-West Palm Beach; and a House District 55 race between former Rep. Randy Johnson, R-Sebring, and Cary Pigman, R-Avon Park; were the others. CITIZENS FACES SOME UNHAPPINESS Citizens Property Insurance Corp., the states largest property insurer, announced this week it will revisit its highly controversial program to take away discounts for hurricane hardening efforts the insurer says were improperly applied. The Miami Herald and Palm Beach Post have recently reported that reinspections have increased Citizens premiums by more than $130 million, with more than 75 percent of property owners paying more after the inspections are completed. Citizens has completed about 255,000 reinspections and has 88,000 more to go. Citizens Board chairman Carlos Lacasa, a former Miami-Dade County lawmaker, said one of the problems facing homeowners is that standards for receiving the credits have changed in recent years. The newer standards are more stringent, which has led to people losing credits during reinspections. FLORIDA ECONOMY INK BLOT TO GOP Floridas economy is either doing well or it is not, depending on which Republican leader you talk to. Floridas jobless rate in July rose 0.2 points to settle at 8.8 percent, the state reported Friday. Gov. Rick Scott issued a statement saying the economy is chugging along. The governors message has been consistent: Florida is creating jobs and returning to prosperity. While the unemployment rate can vary from month to month, Florida continues to see positive private sector job growth,Ž Scott said in a statement put out by his of“ ce Not so, says Romney, whose campaign is targeting the nations lack of economic recovery as a reason to replace his Democratic opponent. More than 800,000 Floridians remain jobless, 42 months after Barack Obama and Charlie Crist stood on stage in Fort Myers and promised spending money we could not afford would lower the unemployment rate, the Romney campaign said in response to the same results. STORY OF THE WEEK: Party members went to the polls this week to determine who would represent them in the general election in the fall. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Who Is Ted Yoho?Ž Headlines from a handful of media publications including Politico, the Miami Herald and the Huf“ ngton Post on the tea party candidates Republican primary victory over incumbent U.S. Rep. Cliff Stearns.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)With the teams picked, all eyes turn to NovemberUnemployment edges back up in July One Click. Job Resources. Real Results. The Employ Florida network helped me to improve my professional skills and connected me with a training opportunity.Ž THE RESULT: Elizabeth Matthews was trained and hired by Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point. Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disa bilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. T THE RESUL T : T T Elizabeth Matthews w w as tra i ne d an d hi re d b y R e gi ona l M M edical Center Bayonet Point.ELIZABETH MATTHEWS Monitor Technician and Unit Secretary Hudson, FL R R R R R R e e a a a l l l R R R e e e s s s s u u u u l l l t t t s s s . HIRED EmployFlorida.com1-866-FLA-2345 MANAGING EDITOR Citrus Publishing is seeking a versatile candidate with the ability to write news stories, design and layout news pages and develop strong internal and external relationships to be Managing Editor for the Gadsden County Times, a weekly newspaper with a circulation of 3,000 in Quincy. This person will be responsible for the weekly page design and layout of the entire newspaper. This person will be responsible for writing accurate, compelling and balanced stories on deadline and covering local events, meetings and other activities. The managing editor will be responsible for managing reporters and correspondents. This person will also develop beat sources within the community and gain a thorough knowledge and understanding of community issues. Stong initiative, news judgement, time management, organizational and communication skills are are must. A bachelors degree in journalism, with 3 5 years editing and management experience is required. Quali“ed candidates should be pro“cient in layout and design using Quark Express. Interested persons should send cover letter and resume to: Mike Arnold, HR Director, Citrus Publishing by e-mail at marnold@chronicleonline. com LANDMARKCOMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS, LLC. PUBLISHER/ADVERTISING SALES MANAGERApplications are being accepted for the position of Publisher/ Advertising Sales Manager for the Wakulla News and the Gadsden County Times. The papers are located in Wakulla County and Gadsden County both contiguous to the state capital in Tallahassee. A quali“ed, motivated and organized self-starter is needed to direct the staff in sales, circulation and growth in both markets. Separate staffs operate each of these county-seat weekly newspapers and would report directly to the publisher/ advertising sales manager. The successful manager will act as advertising sales leader of both staffs and will also deal directly with key advertisers in the market. Two years newspaper management experience to include bottom line responsibility and previous advertising sales management is preferred. The candidate should have high ethical conduct and standards. This person will need leadership skills and ability to lead a staff of “ve and also demonstrate strong team-building, delegation and administrative skills. The candidate should demonstrate high ethical conduct and standards and have a commitment to exceptional quality in all aspects of the operation. The publisher/ad manager provides vision, skill development direction, coaching and leadership to newspaper staff to accomplish strategic and business objectives of the company. This person will personally grow advertising account base revenues in order to meet and exceed “nancial targets of the company. They will prepare, implement and operate within an annual operating budget to accelerate pro“t growth. This person will actively participate in various community functions and events and also take a leadership role in the community. The publisher/ad manager will oversee business, marketing and growth development of all products published. Interested persons should apply to: Gerry Mulligan, Publisher, Citrus Publishing/Landmark Community Newspapers, LLC, c/o Mike Arnold, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL 34429 or by e-mail to marnold@chronicleonline.com LANDMARKCOMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS, LLC. Qualifications o 4th generation Floridian o Professional designations; highest standards and ethics o Held offices in professional associations, local & statewide (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community Community omas excels at UCFSpecial to The NewsHolly Thomas, a 2009 Wakulla High School graduate, was inducted into the Professional Selling Track at the University of Central Florida, College of Business Administration. She is a senior at UCF and is the daughter of Ralph and Cynthia Thomas of Crawfordville. The Professional Selling Track is a prestigious, specialized program offered by the Department of Marketing in the UCF College of Business Administration. The competitive program accepts no more than 35 exceptional students each year that show potential and promise in the fascinating and lucrative “ eld of sales. One of only approximately 50 specialized sales undergraduate programs in the nation, the Professional Selling Track is at the forefront in preparing students for successful careers in the competitive job market of today. Admitted students will partake in rigorous sales training and preparation during the programs one-year duration. Students in the Professional Selling Track consistently excel in the National Collegiate Sales Competition, judged by industry professionals and recruiters. This program is supported by over 50, top local and national companies and has a 98-percent placement rate for graduates in companies such as Oprah Magazine, Google, Wells Fargo, Orlando Magic, Edward Jones, Tom James, and Cox Media Group. Dustin and Jade Grubbs of Crawfordville announce the birth of their son, Bradley Thomas Grubbs, on May 24 at 9:43 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 7 pounds, 10 ounces, and was 19.9 inches. His maternal grandparents are Mark Oliver and Andy and Lynn Williams-Lynn of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are arry and Eleanor Grubbs and Kirk and Kathy Gordon, all of Crawfordville. His great-grandparents are Fred and Rachel Oliver of Crawfordville, Dave and Peggy Williams of Crawfordville and Clyde Grubbs of Tampa. Holly Thomas Grubbs welcome baby boy Sopchoppy Lions Club are quiet dogoodersBy MARJ LAWSpecial to The NewsIf a lion roared in Sopchoppy, would you hear it? Probably not. The Sopchoppy Lions Club is full of quiet dogooders.Ž Come September, Sopchoppy Lions will celebrate 60 years of service to Wakulla County citizens. I visited the Sopchoppy Lions on Monday, Aug. 6. The Sopchoppy Lions, like Lions Clubs around the world, “ ght to prevent blindness and to promote sight restoration to people of all ages here in Wakulla County. Beginning with the challenge from Helen Keller, to hasten the day when there would be no preventable blindness,Ž our Lions are one of the worlds leading international groups dedicated to help people see and see better. Zone Chairman Anne Davis, at Sopchoppys recent zone meeting, said that Lions Clubs give service from the heart.Ž In order to do this, each Lions Club provides fundraisers; some of which are found in Lions Clubs around the states, and some are unique to our local clubs. Jessie Quigg, who chairs the fundraising committee at the Sopchoppy Club, said that their club receives donations from their brooms and mops, an annual “ sh fry, the Birthday Calendar and from recycling computer printer toner cartridges. These are just a few of their projects to raise money. Of these funds, 80 percent raised goes straight to sight conservation and preservation,Ž said Fundraising Chairman Jessie Quigg. Other monies assist with a local food bank, scholarships and local charities. One Lions Club assists another. Sal Martocci sponsored the Carrabelle Club. Also, as head of the Public Service Committee, he worked with middle school students and art teacher Carole Benancik to devise a peace poster contest promoting world peace. The Sopchoppy Lions Club has picked up trash from Rose Street for about 20 years. As the then Executive Director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, we worked together in the Adopt A Road program. The Sopchoppy Lions Club people agreed to pick up trash on a quarterly basis from many miles of Rose Street. I knew they worked faithfully, even devising special buckets to carry as they cleaned the litter from the street. So, for almost two decades, Ive heard a gentle roar emanating from Sopchoppy. Its from the men and women of the Sopchoppy Lions Club: your neighbors, doing good deeds for our community. SAL MARTOCCI/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSZone Chairwoman Anne Davis addresses the club at a recent meeting. Last day to apply for FEMA assistance is Sept. 4Special to The NewsTropical Storm Debby survivors have two weeks remaining to register for federal disaster assistance. Applications must be received by Tuesday, Sept. 4, to be considered for disaster assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Small Business Administration. All survivors who had storm-related damage to their home, vehicle, personal property, business or its inventory between June 23 and July 26 should register for assistance. Federal disaster assistance helps eligible applicants with temporary housing, uninsured personal property losses and medical, dental and funeral expenses caused by the disaster, along with other disaster-related expenses and serious needs. Anyone who has not registered with FEMA for disaster aid, has questions about their application or needs more information about recovery programs should call FEMAs toll-free helpline at 800-621-FEMA (3362). People who are deaf or hard of hearing can call(TTY) 800-462-7585. Lines are open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. and assistance is available in many languages. Online registration is available at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or through a smartphone or tablet at m.fema.gov. Survivors must register with FEMA to be considered for federal disaster assistance even if they have contacted the state, their local emergency management agency, the American Red Cross or other charitable organizations. Low-interest disaster loans from the SBA are also available to help with residential and business losses not covered by insurance. Survivors and businesses may obtain information on SBA disaster loan applications by calling 800659-2955 (800-877-8339 for people who are deaf or hard of hearing) or online at www.SBA.gov. They may also apply for disaster loans at https:// disasterloan.sba.gov/ela. Applications are due Sept. 4. Sign up for Tropical Storm Debby recovery updates via email by going to www.FEMA.gov/Disaster/4068 and clicking the subscription link. Its a simple process that only requires a valid email address. During signup, subscribers can choose to receive updates immediately, daily or weekly.Bene“ t fundraiser for Commy Ta on Sunday Special to The NewsA bene“ t for Commy Taff to help pay for his medical bills due to cancer will be held at Hudson Park at 8 a.m. There will be food, drinks, yard sale and bake sale. Donations are greatly appreciated. Taff has been a lifetime resident of Wakulla county and is having complications with chemotherapy. He has been out of work since January and he and his family are struggling. Email community announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space becomes available. Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe WakuulanewsYou’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Tallahassees Champagne Party -Bene“ting Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend-Dust o your dancing shoes and get ready for a smashing good time cuz the 3rd Annual BIG Champagne Bash is just around the corner. Save the date for this spectacular evening of dancing, dinner by-the-bite, free-owing bubbly, and unforgettable fun. Were celebrating the Roaring 20s once again an era of silent lm, speakeasies, and sensational parties !Who: 300+, community-minded, fun-loving Fellas and Flappers from across the Big Bend come together for the event of the season to make a BIG, positive, and lasting impact in the lives of children in our area. Why: Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend believes all children have the ability to achieve success in life. When: Friday, August 24, 8:00 p.m. … 12:00 a.m. Venue: Hotel Duval, 415 North Monroe Street (Reserve your special $99 BIG Bash hotel guest rate by calling 850.224.6000 with the code BBSBBSIŽ by Friday, August 10th.) Attire: Get all dolled-upŽ for the 1920s silent movie theme Hosted by: Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bends BIG Alliance ( www.bbbs.org/ bigalliance ) Ticket Info: INCLUDES UNLIMITED CHAMPAGNE! Pre-Sale (expires August 17): $70/single, $130/couple, $600/group rate-10 tickets Standard Rate (August 18 Sold-Out): $75/single, $150/couple Purchase tickets at www.bbbs.org/bigbash. Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO

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By CASSIE TUCKERWHS Art TeacherWhat did you do this summer? Travel to Europe will be the reply from the 10 of us who went to London, Paris, Florence, Rome and Sorrento on the Wakulla 2012 Eurotrip. I had the pleasure of leading my group of seven fantastic, young ladies and two tremendously helpful parents on this educational journey through Explorica. Much of our enjoyment came from our friendly and amusing Oxford/Cambridge graduate/ guide, Thomas who ” uently spoke French and Italian besides his BritishŽ English. We joined four other small, high school groups from Houston, Kansas City, Salt Lake City and San Francisco at the National Gallery … with its stupendous collection of Old Master paintings … in Trafalgar Square. There was time to walk through Leicester Square, China Town and Soho before “ sh and chips for dinner. Our next day in London included a sightseeing tour of the city that lead to a special treat: the rehearsals for the trooping of the Queens Household Guard at the parade ground near Buckingham Palace. Free time in the afternoon allowed my group to wander through the Tower of London, stroll across London Bridge and along the Thames to Shakespeares Globe. After we navigated the tube to West Minister Abbey, we joined our big group for dinner at The Albert. Our evening excitement expanded as we braved the London Eye. We tagged along with our Salt Lake City pals, switching tube connections until we came to Kings Cross Station, also Platform 9 . Having explored this mysterious entry to Hogworts, we proceeded to navigate our way back to our hotel. We got to Paris on the Eurostar train the next afternoon and headed straight into town. Even with the damp, drizzle Notre Dame Cathedral was breathtaking, the Latin Quarter inquisitive and dinner at the Hippopotamus lively. And then a super boat cruise on the Seine at dusk. We passed the Concierge where Marie Antoinette was imprisoned prior to being executed, seeing the Eiffel Tower light up and catching a glimpse of our sister Statue of Liberty. Other highlights in Paris, included a self-guided tour through the Louvre, a climb up to Sacre Coeur in Montmartre, and the Opera Garnier. Our last day in Paris ended with free time after lunch to stroll on the Champs Elysees, through the Arc de Triomphe and do some “ nal Parisian shopping. Our group wandered around the monumental Duomo, past the Gates of Paradise, up to the Ponte Vecchio and enjoyed the open markets. That night a small group of us ventured to the Space Disco for a little karaoke. We drove down to Rome day 8 via Assisi, the beautiful hill town that is also one of the most important pilgrimages in the Catholic church. The Basilica of St. Francis is full of artistic treasures from the medieval period. Final day began in the morning in the Sistine Chapel and Saint Peters Basilica with local guide Carla, and continuing in the afternoon in ancient Rome, where we went inside the Colosseum and walked through the evocative ruins of the forum. Then Tom took us to Piazza Navona and the Pantheon. We were one of three groups that took the extension to Sorrento. On our way we explored the ancient city Pompeii, buried and destroyed by Mount Vesuvius, 79AD. Sorrento provided us a cool, refreshing splash into the aqua blue Mediterranean … after we descended dozens of steps to Hotel Il Faro. Our journey concluded with an early morning ferry boat ride across sky blue water to the lovely island of Capri. We visited one of the caves, the so called blue grotto by climbing into row boats that slipped through an opening; quite exhilarating. Sorrento, Italy, was again the top favorite and will be in the program planned for the next Wakulla Eurotrip. Participants this summer included: Kristie Hodges, Ashley Roberts, Caitlyn Wagner, Megan Waller, Kat Wilson, Ashlyne and Marc Sandberg and Emily and Mary Katherine Westmark. If interested in the next Wakulla Eurotrip, the first information meeting will be on Thursday, Aug. 30 at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Library. Anyone interested in traveling to Great Britain, France and Italy is welcome to attend. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools School The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers … if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bar“eld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year. YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible. For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program. Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor ofƒ Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for quali“ed applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and ”oor rate of 2.5% Students travel to Europe over the summer SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe group visits the Louvre while in Paris during the trip. By BETH ODONNELLAssistant SuperintendentWakulla High School has several Career and Technical Education (CTE) opportunities for its students. These programs, formerly termed as Vocational, offer students the chance to learn many skills that can lead directly to employment after high school graduation; to certi“ cate programs in postsecondary schools like Lively Technical Center; and/or on to college degrees. For the “ rst time, in the 2012-2013 school year both Riversprings Middle School and Wakulla Middle School technology teachers Scott Rossow and Jessica Mapes are teaching a high school credit CTE course. It is the “ rst course in a series called Computing for College and Careers. It will articulate to several programs at WHS should students choose to continue in the areas of Digital Design, Web Design or Accounting. It will also meet their vocational credit requirement for high school graduation. In the newly established Engineering Academy starting this year in 2012-2013, students will be able to earn college dual enrollment credits that lead to certi“ cates in areas of manufacturing engineering before they even graduate from high school. Other CTE programs of study include Culinary Operations, Accounting, Web Design, Digital Design, Carpentry, and TV Production. Students can also take other CTE classes at Lively Technical Center at no cost while in high school. Students who complete a program or who are close to completing one can also work in their area while in high school and get paid for their On the Job Training (OJT) experience. Courses are open to all students in general education and in exceptional education classes who are seeking a standard diploma. There are no prerequisites to the initial CTE classes, and anyone may apply. The Engineering Academy does have a prerequisite of passing Algebra I in middle school. There are specialized career preparation programs for students with disabilities seeking a special diploma. They also have OJT work experience opportunities in which they are paid. Schedule requests are made during the second semester of the school year with the help of a high school administrator or guidance counselor. Parents are encouraged to be involved in the process. We want all of our students prepared for careers and college so they can make informed decisions about their futures. With todays advanced technology, all careers will need advanced reading and math skills,Ž stated Superintendent David Miller. For more information, WHS Career Specialist Sarabeth Jones or WHS Assistant Principal Sunny Chancy can answer questions about the CTE programs at 9267125. Administrators at the Wakulla County School District of“ ce at 926-0065 can answer questions about Title IX … Sue Anderson; 504 compliance … Tanya English,; and high school and postsecondary CTE courses … Beth ODonnell.CTE classes o ered at WHS and both middle schools

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBy MARJ LAWBlack powder guns, percussion guns, muzzle-loading guns: these are generic terms for old 1800s era guns. To load them, they require basically the same ingredients. First, you need the chargeŽ which is the black powder. You pour a measured amount of black powder from this flask directly into the barrel of the gun. I tap the gun lightly to make sure the charge has slid all the way down. Second, you need the projectile and a patch. The projectile ball is a soft piece of lead. Take an oily patch and place it on the barrel with the ball on top. With a pusher, called a ball starter, push the ball into the barrel. Third, with a longer pusher, a ramrod, shove it all the way down the barrel so it rests on top of the charge. Finally, place a percussion cap over the nippleŽ which is a protrusion located above and near the trigger. The spark from the cap sets off the charge which explodes the ball out of the gun. These two handguns are the Philadelphia Derringer and, my favorite, the Kentucky Pistol. When you shoot them, it feels like shooting a bit of history.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid gunner in her retirement.Loading 101 for black powder guns HOME ON THE RANGEBrag book: SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JARROD RICHARDSONBernard Brooks, Kyle Jones, and Josh Lawhon successfully harpooned and landed a TROPHY 12-foot, 2-inch alligator on Aug. 17. The locals “ lled both of their tags in one hunt harvesting a 10-foot alligator the same night. Jarrod Richardson submitted this photo of “ ve deer, including a pretty good size buck, in his yard.Gator gigging Herding deer 1. 2. 3. 4.Black powder in. Patch and ball. Push in with rod. Place cap on nipple. At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75¢.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) Fall Baseball and So ball SeasonJ. Lewis Hall Park, Woodville, FL 7500 Old Woodville Rd. Registra on dates: Friday, August 24, 2012 from 6-8PM Saturday, August 25, 2012 from 10-1PM Sunday, August 26, 2012 from 1-3PM Registra on Fee: $30BASEBALLAges: 7-13Machine Pitch, Minors, Majors, and 50/70SOFTBALLAges: 7-12Minors and MajorsNO WEEKEND GAMESFor more informa on contact: Andy Miller – 274-9955 April Johnson – 459-0083 or Kim Gilley – 510-0498 s s s s s s s 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org You’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A A A A A A A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe Wakuulanews

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD As the summer winds down and the school year starts, we see less and less traffic out on the water. Many boats are being prepared for a season of inactivity and may be sitting for longer times between use. There are several things that you can do to help make sure your boat is in decent condition when you are ready to enjoy the water once again. One of the most important things to do is remove the bilge plug so that any water that may get inside has a way to get out. A gallon of water weighs 8 pounds. That can add a great deal of excess weight to your lift or trailer very quickly. To help prevent moisture from getting inside in the “ rst place, a good cover is essential. Covers help not only keep out moisture, but also protect your boat from dirt, grime and the scorching sun. It is a good idea to take all valuables off your boat as well as anything that can be damaged by the elements such as “ shing gear and tools. Even on your own property, it is a good idea to use a trailer lock for safety. A little WD40 or similar lubricant can make it a lot easier to get the lock off after sitting for a while. If you are keeping your boat on a trailer, be sure to check the tire pressure and use wheel chocks. To prevent ” at spots on the tires, it is wise to move them periodically. Wheel covers are also bene“ cial for longer-term storage. To prevent the batteries from losing their charge, remove the negative connections or disconnect completely and store in a safe place. It is important to keep the batteries charged and run the motor at least once a month for about 15 minutes to ensure that all is in good working order and prevent buildup in the engine. Depending on your engine, this may or may not be an easy task. Just be sure that there is an adequate water supply to the engine while running it. Fuel stabilizer is also recommended for longer-term storage. After “ lling the fuel tank, follow the directions to add stabilizer. A partially empty fuel tank can build up moisture adding water to your gas. There are several good ones out on the market today. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident … You can never be too prepared. The Intern. Over 20 years ago, I was teaching our introductory class in compressed gas diving at FSU and was frustrated that the staff assisting me was poorly trained in the mechanics of diving. We had a leadership program to train enthusiastic students in Assistant Instructor, Dive Master and Instructor, but many who applied could not explain how our life support technology worked, let alone “ x it. What to do? I had just hired Michael Dunning, a man from the Isle of Man, to become our dive engineer, to be sure our life support equipment worked. He needed a lot of help and there was no money to hire additional staff. After many late night deliberations, he and I realized that we had a solution to several challenges. I soon had a semester curriculum for a Dive Locker Technician that included training on nearly everything I saw missing in my Leadership Program. Students bought books but paid for training with volunteer labor. And because training required pro“ ciency to become bene“ cial, Michael got his much needed help. Michael “ lled in the considerable details and then assisted me through several classes, ultimately taking over, where I became the guest speaker. Students “ rst learned workplace safety procedures, then eased in to “ ll station operations. Filling high pressure cylinders can be challenging if you are not taught correctly. Every week another topic, such as cylinder inspections, regulator repair, hydrostatic testing, gas blending, exposure suit repair, and the list went on for 15 weeks. The “ nal exam was a room full of stations, each with a question or problem technology to repair. Those who passed got a certi“ cation in Dive Locker Technology and a list of speci“ c credentials from national agencies that went a long way toward future employment at dive shops around the country. And I now had a prerequisite for my Leadership Program! In the space of one year, the quality of our growing dive locker, and our Leadership Program improved dramatically, enabling us to take on many more ambitious challenges in the decades to follow. I carried the entire package to Panama City in 2000 to teach the Scientist in the Sea Program at the Naval Coastal Systems Center, followed by the Advanced Science Diving Program and ultimately the Underwater Crime Scene Investigations Project. None were possible without what we now call the Diving Intern. I retired a few years ago. I was soon asked to provide the Diving Internship training privately. When we opened Wakulla Diving Center in Medart, we incorporated the class much as it was taught at FSU. Travis Kersting now serves as my Dive Engineer and coordinated the interns. Justin Heath, the latest graduate of our internship this summer, is from the University of Texas in Austin where he has returned to continue classes. He is the 12th intern to graduate since my retirement from FSU. But I cannot begin to explain the vitality these folks bring to our table. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Some activities reported in the Northwest Region by FWC during the week of Aug. 3 through Aug. 9: OKALOOSA COUNTY: Officers Pete Rockwell, Henry Rockwell, and Investigator Drew Nelson responded to a boating accident involving a collision between a 38-foot vessel and a personal watercraft (PWC). The operator of the PWC, a 17-year-old male on vacation from Oklahoma, received a complete amputation of his left foot during the collision. Investigator Eddie Gatlin is conducting the boating accident investigation. € Lt. Mark Hollinhead and Investigator Eddie Gatlin responded to a single vessel boating accident on the Yellow River. Two occupants were ejected when their vessel struck a submerged log. The vessel capsized leaving the subjects stranded along the riverbank. The subjects were not injured and were transported back to their vehicle at the Rivers Edge Boat Ramp. Investigator Eddie Gatlin and Of“ cers Alan Kirchinger and Sulin Schafer later assisted the owner of the vessel recover the submerged vessel. Some activities reported during the week of Aug. 10 through Aug. 16: ESCAMBIA COUNTY: Of“ cers Randy Webb and Gary Ridaught responded to a complaint concerning two individuals suspected of stealing crabs from a commercial trap in Pensacola Bay. The officers responded to the area and located the vessel described in the complaint. Of“ cers Webb and Ridaught discovered two individuals onboard with recreational traps deployed. The traps were not properly marked and the individuals were checking and harvesting the recreational traps at night, which is prohibited. Both individuals were cited for the violations. SANTA ROSA COUNTY: Of“ cers Steve Hoomes and Nick Barnard responded to a complaint that an individual was “ shing with a gill net in Escambia Bay near the Floridatown Boat Ramp. The of“ cers arrived and observed the individual retrieving a set gill net. The individual was approached and he explained he did not realize it was illegal. Of“ cer Barnard seized the net and cited the individual for the violation. € Of“ cers Randy Webb and Gary Ridaught observed a personal watercraft being operated at night near Oriole Beach. The PWC operator performed poorly during “ eld sobriety exercises and was arrested for boating under the in” uence. Before the subject was transported to jail, he slipped and scraped his leg. The subject claimed he was injured and officers requested EMS. While checking the subjects knee, the paramedics noticed his blood pressure was very high, so the individual was transported to the hospital for further evaluation. Later, he was taken to the Santa Rosa Jail and booked for BUI, and cited for operating a PWC at night. € A 31-foot powerboat was leaving the Crab Island no wake zone in the north Destin Pass when the operator lost control of the vessel and ejected the crew of four. Good Samaritan vessels responded and reported the incident via VHF radio and advised that one male occupant had not resurfaced or been rescued. Of“ cers responded within minutes and eventually four FWC vessels with two U.S. Coast Guard vessels performed medical evacuation for two injured occupants and began a search for the missing male. An FWC 29-foot patrol asset using side scan sonar detected a possible sonar echo within 30 minutes with moderate surface conditions and a strong outgoing tide. The Okaloosa County Sheriffs dive team arrived and the deceased victim was recovered within two hours of the initial call. The investigation is ongoing and charges are pending. € Of“ cers working the Crab Island area responded to a similar accident in the north Destin Pass. A 24-foot Louisiana-registered powerboat operator lost control exiting the no wake zone. The operator attempted to cross the wake of a northbound yacht, became airborne and landed stern down, ” ooding and sinking the vessel. Good Samaritan vessels rescued the operator. Further investigation at the U.S. Coast Guard Destin resulted in the arrest of the operator for BUI. A citation was issued for violation of inland navigation rule #6, safe speed, resulting in an accident without injuries.FWC Law Enforcement operations Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday g Thu Aug 23, 12 Fri Aug 24, 12 Sat Aug 25, 12 Sun Aug 26, 12 Mon Aug 27, 12 Tue Aug 28, 12 Wed Aug 29, 12 Date 4.0 ft. 5:56 AM 3.1 ft. 12:54 AM 3.3 ft. 1:36 AM High 0.4 ft. 1:12 PM 1.6 ft. 12:34 AM 1.9 ft. 1:29 AM 2.1 ft. 2:51 AM 2.1 ft. 4:32 AM 1.8 ft. 5:59 AM 1.5 ft. 7:02 AM Low 3.1 ft. 7:29 PM 3.9 ft. 6:41 AM 3.7 ft. 7:45 AM 3.6 ft. 9:23 AM 3.7 ft. 11:08 AM 3.9 ft. 12:23 PM 4.0 ft. 1:20 PM High 0.5 ft. 2:28 PM 0.5 ft. 3:58 PM 0.4 ft. 5:22 PM 0.2 ft. 6:28 PM 0.2 ft. 7:20 PM 0.2 ft. 8:03 PM Low 2.8 ft. 8:56 PM 2.7 ft. 10:38 PM 2.9 ft. 11:59 PM High Thu Aug 23, 12 Fri Aug 24, 12 Sat Aug 25, 12 Sun Aug 26, 12 Mon Aug 27, 12 Tue Aug 28, 12 Wed Aug 29, 12 Date 4.1 ft. 5:53 AM 3.2 ft. 12:51 AM 3.4 ft. 1:33 AM High 0.4 ft. 1:09 PM 1.7 ft. 12:31 AM 2.1 ft. 1:26 AM 2.3 ft. 2:48 AM 2.3 ft. 4:29 AM 2.0 ft. 5:56 AM 1.6 ft. 6:59 AM Low 3.1 ft. 7:26 PM 4.0 ft. 6:38 AM 3.8 ft. 7:42 AM 3.7 ft. 9:20 AM 3.7 ft. 11:05 AM 3.9 ft. 12:20 PM 4.1 ft. 1:17 PM High 0.5 ft. 2:25 PM 0.5 ft. 3:55 PM 0.4 ft. 5:19 PM 0.3 ft. 6:25 PM 0.2 ft. 7:17 PM 0.2 ft. 8:00 PM Low 2.8 ft. 8:53 PM 2.8 ft. 10:35 PM 2.9 ft. 11:56 PM High Thu Aug 23, 12 Fri Aug 24, 12 Sat Aug 25, 12 Sun Aug 26, 12 Mon Aug 27, 12 Tue Aug 28, 12 Wed Au g 29, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 12:35 AM 2.9 ft. 1:30 AM 3.1 ft. 2:12 AM High 1.2 ft. 12:56 AM 1.5 ft. 1:38 AM 1.8 ft. 2:33 AM 1.9 ft. 3:55 AM 1.9 ft. 5:36 AM 1.7 ft. 7:03 AM 1.3 ft. 8:06 AM Low 3.7 ft. 6:32 AM 3.6 ft. 7:17 AM 3.4 ft. 8:21 AM 3.3 ft. 9:59 AM 3.4 ft. 11:44 AM 3.6 ft. 12:59 PM 3.7 ft. 1:56 PM High 0.3 ft. 2:16 PM 0.4 ft. 3:32 PM 0.5 ft. 5:02 PM 0.4 ft. 6:26 PM 0.2 ft. 7:32 PM 0.1 ft. 8:24 PM 0.2 ft. 9:07 PM Low 2.8 ft. 8:05 PM 2.6 ft. 9:32 PM 2.5 ft. 11:14 PM High Thu Aug 23, 12 Fri Aug 24, 12 Sat Aug 25, 12 Sun Aug 26, 12 Mon Aug 27, 12 Tue Aug 28, 12 Wed Aug 29, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 5:48 AM 2.3 ft. 12:46 AM 2.5 ft. 1:28 AM High 0.3 ft. 1:23 PM 1.2 ft. 12:45 AM 1.4 ft. 1:40 AM 1.5 ft. 3:02 AM 1.5 ft. 4:43 AM 1.3 ft. 6:10 AM 1.1 ft. 7:13 AM Low 2.3 ft. 7:21 PM 2.9 ft. 6:33 AM 2.8 ft. 7:37 AM 2.7 ft. 9:15 AM 2.7 ft. 11:00 AM 2.9 ft. 12:15 PM 3.0 ft. 1:12 PM High 0.4 ft. 2:39 PM 0.4 ft. 4:09 PM 0.3 ft. 5:33 PM 0.2 ft. 6:39 PM 0.1 ft. 7:31 PM 0.1 ft. 8:14 PM Low 2.1 ft. 8:48 PM 2.0 ft. 10:30 PM 2.2 ft. 11:51 PM High Thu Aug 23, 12 Fri Aug 24, 12 Sat Aug 25, 12 Sun Aug 26, 12 Mon Aug 27, 12 Tue Aug 28, 12 Wed Aug 29, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 5:40 AM 2.4 ft. 12:38 AM 2.6 ft. 1:20 AM High 0.4 ft. 12:51 PM 1.6 ft. 12:13 AM 1.9 ft. 1:08 AM 2.1 ft. 2:30 AM 2.0 ft. 4:11 AM 1.8 ft. 5:38 AM 1.5 ft. 6:41 AM Low 2.4 ft. 7:13 PM 3.0 ft. 6:25 AM 2.9 ft. 7:29 AM 2.8 ft. 9:07 AM 2.9 ft. 10:52 AM 3.0 ft. 12:07 PM 3.1 ft. 1:04 PM High 0.5 ft. 2:07 PM 0.5 ft. 3:37 PM 0.4 ft. 5:01 PM 0.2 ft. 6:07 PM 0.2 ft. 6:59 PM 0.2 ft. 7:42 PM Low 2.2 ft. 8:40 PM 2.1 ft. 10:22 PM 2.3 ft. 11:43 PM High Thu Aug 23, 12 Fri Aug 24, 12 Sat Aug 25, 12 Sun Aug 26, 12 Mon Aug 27, 12 Tue Aug 28, 12 Wed Au g 29, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 5:41 AM 3.4 ft. 6:22 AM 3.3 ft. 7:15 AM 3.3 ft. 8:25 AM 2.6 ft. 1:59 AM 2.7 ft. 2:15 AM 2.7 ft. 2:35 AM High 0.5 ft. 1:01 PM 0.5 ft. 2:36 PM 0.4 ft. 4:04 PM 0.3 ft. 5:15 PM 2.1 ft. 3:53 AM 1.9 ft. 5:21 AM 1.7 ft. 6:22 AM Low 2.3 ft. 8:55 PM 3.2 ft. 9:51 AM 3.2 ft. 11:18 AM 3.2 ft. 12:33 PM High 1.8 ft. 11:12 PM 0.2 ft. 6:12 PM 0.3 ft. 7:00 PM 0.4 ft. 7:41 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacAug. 23 Aug. 29First Aug. 24 Full Aug. 31 Last Sept. 8 New Sept. 15Major Times 6:20 AM 8:20 AM 6:48 PM 8:48 PM Minor Times --:---:-1:21 PM 2:21 PM Major Times 7:17 AM 9:17 AM 7:46 PM 9:46 PM Minor Times 12:11 AM 1:11 AM 2:24 PM 3:24 PM Major Times 8:16 AM 10:16 AM 8:45 PM 10:45 PM Minor Times 1:05 AM 2:05 AM 3:25 PM 4:25 PM Major Times 9:15 AM 11:15 AM 9:44 PM 11:44 PM Minor Times 2:04 AM 3:04 AM 4:21 PM 5:21 PM Major Times 10:12 AM 12:12 PM 10:40 PM 12:40 AM Minor Times 3:06 AM 4:06 AM 5:13 PM 6:13 PM Major Times 11:07 AM 1:07 PM 11:34 PM 1:34 AM Minor Times 4:09 AM 5:09 AM 5:58 PM 6:58 PM Major Times --:---:-12:00 PM 2:00 PM Minor Times 5:12 AM 6:12 AM 6:39 PM 7:39 PM Average Average Average+ Average Average Average Better7:09 am 8:09 pm 1:21 pm --:--Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:09 am 8:08 pm 2:25 pm 12:12 am 7:10 am 8:07 pm 3:26 pm 1:06 am 7:11 am 8:06 pm 4:22 pm 2:05 am 7:11 am 8:04 pm 5:13 pm 3:07 am 7:12 am 8:03 pm 5:59 pm 4:10 am 7:12 am 8:02 pm 6:40 pm 5:13 am41% 48% 55% 63% 70% 77% 84% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn Aug. 9, Homer Harvey of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief on Crawfordville Highway where several vintage motor vehicles are stored. Three female suspects were observed at the scene. A vintage vehicle windshield was damaged, but the suspects left the scene before law enforcement arrived. Damage was estimated at $300. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On Aug. 9, Tawanna Maxwell of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone cut a 10 foot section of the victims chain link fence. Damage was estimated at $50. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On Aug. 9, James Rackley of Crawfordville reported a lost wallet. It has not been determined exactly where the wallet was lost. It contained the victims driver license, credit cards and cash. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € On Aug. 9, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a concern by an Animal Control Of“ cer over a Crawfordville juvenile pointing a gun in his direction while he was carrying out his duties. Deputy Zimba determined that the juvenile was unaware he had pointed his BB gun at the ACO. The deputy counseled the juvenile and his mother about having the gun in the yard where passing traf“ c can observe him. No charges were “ led. € On Aug. 9, Brandi Mayfield of Crawfordville reported hitting a deer with her vehicle on U.S. Highway 98 just west of Rehwinkel Road. Damage to her vehicle was estimated at $1,500. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € On Aug. 10, Maura Jeanne Evans, 27, of Sopchoppy was cited for careless driving after a traf“ c crash was reported at 225 Rehwinkel Road. The vehicle ran through a fence and crashed into a tree. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On Aug. 10, Leah McManus of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. The victim discovered two unauthorized charges on her bank account. The charges totaled $813 and were created at a pharmacy in San Francisco. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On Aug. 12, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) joined forces to bring overdue boaters safely back to shore. At approximately 9 p.m., a Tallahassee woman reported that a boat with three adults and “ ve juveniles on board was stranded in the water approximately one mile off the coast of the St. Marks Lighthouse. The complainant told Deputy Randy Phillips that she received a text message from her friends onboard stating that they required assistance. Deputy Taff Stokley retrieved and launched the WCSO Search and Rescue vessel and Deputy Phillips set up a command post at the St. Marks Lighthouse boat ramp. FWC also launched a boat and helicopter. The helicopter located the boat paddling back toward the lighthouse and Deputy Stokley towed the vessel and passengers back to the lighthouse boat ramp. There were no injuries. The operation concluded at 11:58 p.m. € On Aug. 10, Michael Monteith of Crawfordville reported the loss of a “ rearm. The “ rearm and magazines are valued at $340 and may have been taken by an acquaintance. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € On Aug. 10, Rebecca Padowitz of Carrabelle reported the theft of her vehicle from Franklin County. On Aug. 11, the vehicle was observed at Highway 267 and Sandy Acres Circle. The keys were still in the ignition. The vehicle was turned over to the owner. The vehicle was originally entered in the FCIC/NCIC data base by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of“ ce. It was removed from the data base. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. € On Aug. 11, Joseph Brown of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims camping cabin was vandalized. A window was broken out; a television was damaged along with window framing. Total damage at the cabin was $400. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € On Aug. 11, Teresa Hunter of Tallahassee was involved in a traf“ c crash at Promise Land Ministries thrift store. The driver, Hunter, was backing out of a parking spot when she backed into the wooden walkway in front of the store which destroyed the walkway. Damage was estimated at $3,000. There were no injuries, but the vehicle was towed from the scene. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On Aug. 12, William Pascoe of Panacea reported the theft of gasoline from his crab boat. The victim observed an oily sheen on the ” oor of the boat. The gasoline/oil mixture theft was valued at $50. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € On Aug. 12, Charles Shields of Shields Marina in St. Marks reported a forged check. Someone forged a business check and cashed the $1,600 check at a Crawfordville bank. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € On Aug. 12, Kenneth Smith of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Tire tracks were observed in the back yard. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Removed from the home were household products, a microwave oven, coins, food and other items, valued at $349. A warrant for arrest of the suspect has been requested. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € On Aug. 12, Kerry Brandon Mulford, 29, of Tallahassee received a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Deputy Cole Wells received intelligence that possible drug activity was occurring at a gas station in Crawfordville. Deputy Wells asked the suspect if there was any illegal narcotic inside the vehicle and he produced a marijuana cigar. The cigar was seized as evidence. € On Aug. 13, Kenneth Redding of Crawfordville reported a vehicle crash on U.S. Highway 98 and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Road. The victim was involved in a single vehicle accident caused by a deer. There were no injuries. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. € On Aug. 13, Kara Vathis of Crawfordville was involved in a single vehicle accident. The driver drove off the road and struck a fence along Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Road. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € On Aug. 13, Joseph Trice reported “ nding miscellaneous property at U.S. Highway 319 and Cedar Avenue. Two boxes of tools, valued at $450, were recovered and turned over to the Property and Evidence Division for storage until the owner can be located. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On Aug. 13, Robert Thompson of Crawfordville reported a hit-and-run traf“ c crash at the intersection of U.S. Highway 319 and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road. The victim was slowing down for the traf“ c signal when he was struck from behind by another vehicle which quickly left the area heading northbound. vehicle suffered some damage, but the victim was not injured. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell, Lt. Dale Evans and Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On Aug. 13, Stephen Balchuck of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief as someone destroyed his mailbox. The mailbox was damaged and discovered on the ground. It was valued at $20. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € On Aug. 13, Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated a fight at a Medart convenience store. Two male juveniles, ages 15 and 17, were attempting to leave the scene when they were detained. One of the juveniles suffered a minor injury to his lip. Deputy Mitchell issued the two juveniles notices to appear in court for Public Affray. € On Aug. 14, a con-cerned citizen from Crawfordville reported “ nding a 3-year-old female walking by herself in the citizens driveway. The child was unable to tell where she lived. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell and Deputy Nick Gray used the childs barefoot tracks to locate her home. Other children at the home woke the father up from sleeping. The lost child was uninjured but did have dirt and bug bites on her legs. The Florida Department of Children and Families was noti“ ed and made aware of the incident. No charges have been “ led. € On Aug. 13, a gasoline drive-off was reported by a clerk at a convenience store at 2616 Crawfordville Highway. A motorist pumped $8 more gas than they paid for. Suspect information was passed along to other members of the Road Patrol Unit. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On Aug. 14, John Kane of Panacea reported a fraud on his credit card account. The victim and his spouse purchased gasoline from a Crawfordville convenience store but were charged for approximately double what they actually spent on gas. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. € On Aug. 14, Kyley Smith of Crawfordville reported a trespass at her home. Someone attempted to enter her home, but nothing was reported missing. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € On Aug. 15, Deputy Nick Gray was attempting to locate a missing 16-year-old male. The deputy discovered the juvenile in the back of a vehicle consuming alcoholic beverages. A Juvenile Civil Citation was issued for disorderly intoxication, but additional criminal activity was discovered and the juvenile was taken to the juvenile detention center. A notice to appear in court was issued for the intoxication charge. Deputy Ian Dohme also investigated. € On Aug. 15, Cody Wayne Nolin, 27, of Crawfordville was arrested for disorderly intoxication for causing a disturbance at Dux Liquors. The suspect attempted to get away from law enforcement by running into U.S. Highway 319 and he was detained for his own safety. After an interview with a witness, Nolin was arrested and transported to the Wakulla County Jail where he refused to get out of the patrol vehicle, laid on the ” oor of the jail sally port and resisted efforts by the corrections staff to place him in the holding cell. Deputies Clint Beam and Ian Dohme investigated. € On Aug. 15, Deputy Randy Phillips was working a potential Baker Act mental health case in Crawfordville when marijuana and drug paraphernalia was discovered at the subjects home. Wakulla EMS of“ cials were also on the scene performing a medical evaluation. The marijuana and smoking pipe were seized and the narcotics weighed 18 grams. No charges were “ led. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 973 calls for service during the past week including: 22 business and residential alarms; 12 assists to other agencies; 83 citizen contacts; 16 disturbances; 11 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 27 regular E-911 calls; 42 investigations; 43 medical emergencies; 278 business and residential security checks; 23 special details; 51 subpoena services; 11 suspicious people; 17 suspicious vehicles; 33 traf“ c enforcements; 87 traf“ c stops; and 10 wanted people.Sheri s Report As a young man getting ready to register to vote for the “rst time, I was told by many that I should register as a Democrat because, back then, as a Republican, I would not have been able to vote in Floridas primary elections. I didnt understand that reasoning then and I dont support it now. Voters should be able to cast their vote in a primary election, as in a general election, for the person they think is best for the job, regardless of political party af“liation. This belief is one of the reasons I registered to run for sheriff of Wakulla County as a No Party Af“liation candidate, even though I am a registered Democrat. My reasoning is simple: A sheriffs duty is to work with everyone equally, fairly and with no partiality. Politics is politics; “ghting crime and making our communities safe is law enforcement. Politics and law enforcement do not belong together. Now let me go one step further. I also believe a candidate who is campaigning while working as a supervisor at a sheriffs of“ce should refuse political contributions from their staff and vendors doing business with the sheriffs office. Asking support from staff or vendors is wrong. As far as Im concerned, candidates for sheriff have a special duty to show citizens that they answer to the law, the citizens and their own conscience, not party politics. Sheriffs, above all others, must be respected if they want to effectively enforce the law. This is my belief, and it will be the way I do my job as sheriff of Wakulla County. For a FRESH START with a FULL-TIME Sheriff I ask for your support and vote on November 6.Please contact me at(850) 926-4712 Post Of“ce Box 482, Crawfordville, FL 32326 charlieforsheriff@gmail.comwww.charliecreel.com ADVERTISEMENTPolitics and law enforcement do not belong together.Ž ADVERTISEMENTPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Af“liation, for sheriff.Charlie Creel: Politics has no place in the Sheris Oce FEATURED ITEMS Musical Instruments and Equipment, Egyptian furniture, Gold and Sterling Silver Jewelry and lots more! Conveniently Located In Downtown Crawfordville 12 Towles Rd, Crawfordville, FL (Across from the School Board – inside the old Post Office bldg.) AUCTION!DON’T MISS OUT! ALLERY 50%BRING THIS AD AND SAVE 50% ON BUYERS PREMIUM!Preview & Pre-bidding begin at 5 pm850-926-73556:00 pm Sat., Aug. 25thView our full catalog online at www.Gallery 319.biz Did you know... We Buy and Sell Gold & Silver? Coins & Jewelry? 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 – Page 13ASpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce detectives have made two arrests in connection with an Aug. 14 armed robbery following an attempted marijuana sale that went bad, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Gary Angelo Simmons Jr., 22, of Crawfordville was charged with robbery with a “ rearm and grand theft. Lyntonio Ivan Bowdry, 19, of Crawfordville was charged with robbery with a firearm. An 18-year-old Crawfordville victim originally reported the case as a residential burglary, but later admitted to investigators that he lost the “ rearm, currency and personal property during the armed robbery incident which involved the sale of marijuana. The victim met the suspects in the Bethel section of Crawfordville at which time Simmons allegedly pointed a handgun at the victim and a second suspect grabbed the victims gun and backpack. Simmons allegedly put a gun to the head of the victim and threatened to kill him. Simmons and another suspect, later identi“ ed as Jacob Heath Hemp, 21, of Crawfordville, ran to Bowdrys vehicle and left the scene. The victim followed Bowdrys vehicle back to Crawfordville where the two vehicles stopped on Wakulla Arran Road and Simmons pointed a “ rearm at the victim again. The victim stopped following the suspects for fear of being shot and reported the theft of 17 grams of marijuana, $205, his driver license and a .32 caliber semi-automatic handgun. On Aug. 15, detectives interviewed Bowdry and charged him with one count of robbery with a “ rearm for his involvement in the case. A search warrant was served at the home of Simmons on Aug. 15 and detectives located a plastic bag containing 10 grams of marijuana and two separate pistols allegedly used in the crime. Simmons and Bowdry were transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Detectives with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and members of the U.S. Marshals Fugitive Task Force were searching for Kemp on Thursday, Aug. 16, when he was reportedly spotted late in the afternoon on the east side of Sam Smith Circle in northeast Wakulla County. Of“ cers reportedly chased Kemp on foot for approximately one-half mile before he was caught on nearby Field Loop. Kemp was arrested and charged with armed robbery with a “ rearm, grand theft of a “ rearm and aggravated assault in the case. Simmons, Bowdry and Kemp are all being held in the Wakulla County Jail with no bond.Three arrests in robbery case Gary Angelo Simmons Jr. Lyntonio Ivan Bowdry Jacob Heath Kemp Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICEƒ EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree)HAIR SALON ALL STUDENTS 10% OFFAll Hair ServicesFULL SERVICE FAMILY SALON We offer ”exible hours starting at 10AM (TUE-FRI) and at 9AM on SAT of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief SupportCOST FREE 850-878-5310 Of WakullaHeat i ng & A i rServ i ng Wakulla & Frankl i n Count i es850-926-5592Sales & Serv i ce All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Bob DonawayJuly 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromMy wife and I have been entering in the Off the Eatin Path since the program “rst began. She has won once and now I am a winner too! Thank You!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l a t nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! Continued from Page 1A Those in support of the airport have argued that the expansion is needed for safety reasons and if improvements continue, revenue could be generated for the county. The future plans for the airport could include the addition of several hangars and a service fuel farm. Commissioner Mike Stewart wanted to see the buffer restored, no property taken from homeowners who do not want to sell, and the runway moved just enough to the west to satisfy the minimum requirements. He did not want to see the runway paved, which was included in the future plan of the airport. Its a win-win,Ž Stewart said for all involved. For the ALP, Sewell said their main objective is making the runway protection zones as clear as possible. The obstruction analysis will drive the end points of the runway, he said. They will also look at what will impact property owners the least. Once the JPA is amended, the survey is completed and the ALP is updated, the county would look at appraising property or simply asking those property owners if they intend to sell. The land that was cleared next to the airport is included in the land acquisitions of the airport expansion and requires wetland mitigation. During the timbering, they entered a wetland buffer. If the county acquires that property, they will be required to perform the mitigation. Sewell said they will look into those costs as well. The advising portion of the consulting will deal with operating costs, Sewell said. They will also look at possible expansion of services, pros and cons and long term bene“ ts. He added that there are several funding options available to the county that they have been unable to tap into because the county has not made a “ rm stand on the airport. They need to know what you want to do,Ž Sewell said. Commissioner Lynn Artz said she also wanted to see the data for fees collected from those who use the airport. She also wanted to make sure those Tarpine residents are contributing their share. Some fees are not being collected and will have to be in order to run the airport, Edwards said. The fees charged will be used to maintain the airport, he said. The county commission also voted to dissolve the Airport Advisory Committee.Board approves airport expansionSpecial to The NewsTALLAHASSEE, Aug. 17 … The Florida Department of Education today announced the conclusion of an investigation into test anomalies on the 2011 administration of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. The investigation was focused on an unusually high number of erasures at four schools in Broward (Charter School of Excellence), Duval (Chaffee Trail Elementary), Gadsden (Greensboro Elementary), and Jefferson (Jefferson Elementary) counties. The investigation by the departments Of“ ce of Inspector General revealed that although the number of erasures on test answer documents was above the conservative threshold of one in a trillion when tests are taken under standardized conditions, a determination could not be made about the cause of the high number of wrong-to-right erasures at three of the four schools (Charter School of Excellence, Chaffee Trail Elementary, and Jefferson Elementary). Although evidence does not support that teachers at Greensboro Elementary altered student documents, statements taken during the investigation revealed they did coach or interfere with student responses during the administration of the FCAT. Through its contract with Pearson, the 2011 spring administration of the FCAT and FCAT 2.0 was the “ rst year the Department of Education utilized a sophisticated analysis of test answer documents by Caveon Data Forensics to identify atypical testing results. In May 2011, Caveon identi“ ed 25 instances of excessive erasures at 21 schools throughout the state and asked school districts to conduct internal investigations at the ” agged schools to determine the cause. As a result of these school district investigations, all but the four schools mentioned above were cleared of any wrongdoing.FCAT investigation concludesThe Department of Education looked at four schools with high erasures, but cleared all four of wrongdoing Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Office will host a Sporting Clays Tournament as a fundraiser for the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches. The event begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 22 with three relays at 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. This is a new date as the fundraiser was originally scheduled in August but had to be pushed back to September. Refreshments and lunch will be available at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Range and Training Center where the fundraiser will take place. The tournament will be $50 per person with a “ ve person team. Winners of each relay will receive a 12 gauge shotgun. A Firearm Side Match will also be held during the event. The weapons of choice for the side match are ri” e, pistol and shotgun. The cost of the match is $20 per person with a 50-50 payout. A money ball giveaway will be held for $10 and a chance to win half of the lucky jackpot. Pre-register for your choice of relays. Contact Lt. Fred Nichols at (850) 251-1676 or call the Wakulla Range at (850) 7457290 to register. The Wakulla Range accepts Visa/MasterCard, cash or checks as payment to enter the event. You may also go to www.wcso.org and look at the bottom of the left hand side menu for an opportunity to download the registration forms. The Southeastern Community Blood Center will be at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce parking area Friday, Aug. 24 from 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. to accept donations of blood. By giving blood, donors are automatically entered to win a new Honda Civic. Donors will receive a beach tote gift for giving blood. You may register to give blood by contacting Lt. Billy Jones at 728-6835 or 745-7108. You need to have identification to donate blood and your must weigh at least 110 pounds. The Get into the Civic Spirit-Honda for the Holidays giveaway is sponsored by Flowers Automotive Group.New date for shooting tournamentWCSO Blood drive set

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LES HARRISONWakulla Extension Director The current explosion of mushroom growth in lawns and landscapes is a byproduct of the hot humid weather that is delivering the much appreciated daily rains. Grass and shrubs are growing, but mushrooms are taking advantage of these conditions too. Technically, a mushroom could be described as a ” eshy to leathery Basidiomycota with normally umbrella-shaped sporulating structures, usually possessing a stalk topped by a cap or pileus. The underside of the cap bears either gills or pores, which forms spores insides. Because of their size, shape, bright color variations, and ephemeral nature, mushrooms have long been a fascination to mankind, and the subject of legends and lore. In childrens stories, countless faeries, gnomes and leprechauns have lived in or around these fungi. Many an unsuspecting youth has been granted a special wish for not destroying the mushroom abode of a forest sprite. The reality is most homeowners and landscape managers consider them a blemish, special wishes notwithstanding, on the otherwise perfect and highly manicured turf. Making them disappear as fast as the seemingly appeared is the only supernatural or mystic qualities of interest Other than the cosmetic issue, mushrooms rarely cause a landscape any substantial damage. The appearance of mushrooms in a lawn can mean conditions are right for the growth of fungal diseases which can damage a landscape. Most lawn mushrooms feed on damp, decomposing grass clippings. Collecting grass clipping and mulching away from the lawn will reduce the prospect of mushrooms or some other fungi. Rather than attempting to control mushrooms with fungicides, enjoy their delicate beauty. When they are past their prime remove them to a compost pile. Mowing will remove them from the landscape, but they will return as the spores are easily spread. When environmental conditions are right they will sprout again. There is an interest by some in the culinary aspects of wild mushrooms. Extreme caution should be uses to correctly identify any before consuming. There are toxic mushrooms which grow in the area. Consumption by humans, pets or other mammals will result in very unpleasant symptoms. To learn more about lawn and landscape fungi, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce at (850) 926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u” .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Recent rains bring mushrooms to Wakulla lawns PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/Special to The NewsA wide variety of mushrooms are sprouting in Wakulla County lawns. Where the little things Make a Difference! Where the little things Make a Difference! 2504 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32304 2504 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32304 850 765-0042 07 Nissan Altima SL LEATHER, SUNROOF $14,400 2000 Ford MustangCONVERTABLE, COLD A/C $5,500 05 GMC Envoy XL-SLT7 PASSENGER, LEATHER $11,900 09 Chevrolet Impala LT FULL SIZE $12,900 04 Chrysler Cross“re LOW MILES $11,250 05 Cadillac STS LUXURY THROUGHOUT $10,900 07 Nissan Sentra GREAT GAS MILEAGE! $10,900 11 Chevy Impala LTONLY $14,900! 08 Kia Sorento LX ALL THE COMFORTS! $11,900 02 Chevy Monte Carlo LOADED! $9,400 850576-LOAN ( 5626 )WE HAVE THE ANSWER TO YOUR USED CAR NEEDS! OUR CREDIT SPECIALIST HOTLINE OUR CREDIT SPECIALIST HOTLINEANSWERONEMOTORS.COM 09 Dodge CaliberGREAT MPG!, 5 PASSENGER $10,900 06 Chevy Monte Carlo LT GORGEOUS COUPE $8,900 98 Dodge RAM 1500 COLD A/C, 4x4 $5,000 $31,000 $6,500 $14,900 05 Mercedes Benz C230 LEATHER / SUNROOF $11,900 02 Nissan Maxima SE CLEAN CAR, COLD A/C 08 In“nity QX56 BEAUTIFUL!We Offer Financing That Others CantŽPRICESDONOTINCLUDETAX, TAG, TITLEORDEALERFEES. Special to The NewsThe August Blue MoonŽ Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Friday, Aug. 31. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:02 p.m. and the moon will rise at 7:56 p.m. on Aug. 31. Although there are several de“ nitions of a blue moon,Ž the term commonly refers to the second full moon in a month. The moon was also full on August 2. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at (850) 9277744 or toll free at (888) 927-7744. At right, the St. George Lighthouse. PHOTO BY JIM KEMP SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Blue Moon Climb will be held at St. George Lighthouse

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012The Wakulla news EXTRA! Preacher cake Just a Pinch, Page 10B Camp visits refuge Photos, Page 4B Christmas in July was a successR.H. Carter, Page 3B Wakulla Students go Back to School Students returned to public schools in Wakulla on Thursday, Aug. 16. Reporter Jennifer Jensen visited Shadeville Elementary on the “ rst day and snapped these photos. More photos online at thewakullanews.com

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Aug. 23  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. Friday, Aug. 24  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Aug. 25  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. Sunday, Aug. 26  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. Monday, Aug. 27  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Aug. 28  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant. Wednesday, Aug. 29  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Aug. 30  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsFriday, Aug. 24  THIRD ANNUAL BIG CHAMPAGNE BASH for Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend will be held from 8 p.m. to midnight at Hotel Duval in Tallahassee. All proceeds bene t Big Brothers Big Sisters. The theme is the Roaring 20s. Costumes are encouraged. Enjoy music, dancing appetizers and unlimited champagne. Tickets are $75 per person, $150 per couple. To purchase tickets, visit www.bbbs.org/bigbash or call 386-6002.  BLOOD DRIVE will be held by the Southeastern Community Blood Center at the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce parking area from 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. By giving blood, donors are automatically entered to win a new Honda Civic. Donors will receive a beach tote gift for giving blood. Register by contacting Lt. Billy Jones at 728-6835 or 745-7108. Identi cation is required to donate blood and one must weigh at least 110 pounds. The Get into the Civic Spirit-Honda for the Holidays giveaway is sponsored by Flowers Automotive Group. Saturday, Aug. 25  SOPCHOPPY ECO-HERITAGE TOUR will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. starting with a historic walking tour, followed by a river scenic cruise. Take a stroll back in time when dogs lazed in the dusty street, men sat on the corner bench and the train pulled into the depot loaded with goods. Then cruise on the winding Sopchoppy River where sturgeon were once so plentiful, they were harvested for their caviar and bass shing was a local way of life. Tickets are $30 for adults, $15 for children (12 and under), free (3 and under). Visit www.PalmettoExpeditions.com or call 850-926-3376 to purchase tickets.  MEET AND GREET FOR LOCAL DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES will be held by the Wakulla County Democratic Party from 4 to 7 p.m. at the home of Al Pasini in The Farm, 24 Carriage Drive. Invited candidates include Congressional District 2 Democratic nominee Al Lawson, House District 7 Democratic nominee Robert Hill, and all of the local Wakulla Democratic candidates and elected of cials. There is a suggested minimum donation of $10. The event is a barbecue picnic and pool party and side dishes are welcome. Please RSVP to Joan Hendrix at granpetunia@comcast.net or the Wakulla Democratic Party on Facebook. Sunday, Aug. 26  BENEFIT FOR COMMY TAFF to help pay for his medical bills due to cancer will be held at Hudson Park at 8 a.m. There will be food, drinks, yard sale and bake sale. Donations are greatly appreciated. Tuesday, Aug. 28  55 ALIVE SAFETY DRIVER CLASS will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the library. To register call Ernie Conte at 926-4605.  WAKULLA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT WORKSHOP will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the health department, 48 Oak Street, Crawfordville. They are in the nal stages of our Community Health Improvement Project, and need assistance in the next phase of the process where we identify the most important issues facing the community and develop goals to address these priority issues. During this session, they will review all the data and reports generated in the Community Health Improvement process, identify health priorities which impact Wakulla County residents, and develop goals and strategies for each priority. A working lunch will be provided during this workshop. Please email your RSVP to Tonya Hobby (850)926-0401 ext. 217 by Aug. 23.  CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for its newest member, Stix Grill, Inc., at 11:30 a.m. at the Chamber of ce, 23 High Drive, Crawfordville.Upcoming EventsSunday, September 2  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Loran Anderson as he presents “Floral Strategies in Plants” at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Anderson is a retired FSU professor and volunteer refuge botanist whose plant hikes and presentations are always a treat. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, “Nature’s Classroom” at St. Marks Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850-925-6121 for information. Thursday, Sept. 6  HOUSTON TAFF MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held at Wildwood Country Club. Entrance fee for the tournament is $500 per team or $125 per player. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m. with a 12:30 p.m. Shotgun Start. The tournament format will be Select a Shot, and prizes will be awarded to the top 3 teams, in 3 ights. Mulligans will be available at $20 per player (4 mulligans). There will be 3 contests, including Closest to the Pin, Longest Drive, and Putting Contest. The total entrance fee for all three is $20 per player. For more information, contact Steve Brown at 570-3910 or Tara C. Sanders at 926-5211 or 566-8272. Saturday, Sept. 8  ST. MARKS YACHT CLUB will host Dr. Felicia Coleman, director of the FSU Coastal and Marine Laboratory, as its featured guest at the Club’s Up Close and Personal Spotlight Event at 7:30 p.m. The Club is located at 36 Yacht Club Lane, St. Marks, Florida, 32355. Seating is limited, so reservations should be made by calling (850) 925-6606. In a conversational-style interview led by Dr. Betty Ann Korzenny, adjunct professor, Florida State University, School of Communication, she and Coleman will discuss what in uenced Coleman to pursue her study of sea life, and the local and international impact of the Laboratory’s research. Friday, Sept. 14  SILENT AUCTION will be held to bene t the Wakulla County Public Library from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. Items include gift certi cates, vacations, marine supplies, art, school supplies and more. Refreshments will be provided. Sign up to be a bidder, browse through a book of all the items and start bidding on Sept. 1 at the Friends table in the lobby of the library. Call (850) 926-4244 or FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com for more information.  CAMPAIGN PARTY for County Commission Candidate Howard Kessler will be held at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, at 7:30 p.m. There will be music by Big Daddy Randall Webster. Desserts and refreshments will be served. Saturday, Sept. 15  A FAMILY NIGHT OUT will be held at the Senior Center at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. All proceeds bene t the center. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Political forum at 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. at the library. Big Champagne Bash from 8 p.m. to midnight at Hotel Duval. Sopchoppy Ecoheritage Tour from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Bene t for Commy Taff at 8 a.m. at Hudson Park. ThursdayFridaySaturdayWednesday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Government Meetings Thursday, Aug. 30  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold a special meeting on the budget at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. By SCOTT JOYNER Library DirectorStarting the “ rst week of September, the library is doing some community outreach by reading to the child patients at the Wakulla County Health Department each Wednesday morning. Were taking donations of any gently used childrens books that you may have so that we can give them out to the kids or leave them at the health department for families to pass the time while they wait for their appointment. You can drop off the donations at the front desk at the library and we thank you in advance for your generosity. This is only the “ rst step in our plan to begin doing more community outreach so please keep an eye out for us around town! Friday Night Movie On Friday, Aug. 24 at 7 p.m., we are showing the “ lm based upon the “ rst book in the global phenomenon Hunger GamesŽ series. Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson and Liam Hemsworth, the “ lm tells of a dystopian world where after a uprising against the government was put down decades past, two teenage tributes from each district are forced each year to join in the Hunger Games where they “ ght to the death as entertainmentŽ for the masses and as an example of the control the Capitol has over their lives. When Katniss younger sister is chosen as a tribute, she volunteers to take her sisters place and must make some very adult decisions while becoming a symbol for resisting the Capitol. We are expecting a large crowd for this PG13 (for violence and suspense) “ lm and seating will be limited so please arrive early. The doors open at 6:45 p.m. Refreshments will be provided by Capital City Bank for small donations to the library. Community Meetings at WCPL With the summer ending, many of the great community groups begin their new cycle of public meetings next month. For those interested, some of the groups that meet at the library are the Wakulla County Historical Society, the Iris Garden Club, Native Plant Society, NAMI Wakulla, and of course the Friends of the Library. These are only a few of the groups that meet here which allow you to get involved in the Wakulla County community. For more information please see the events calendar on our website www.wakullalibrary.org, and give us a call about any group youre interested in and we will be more than happy to give you contact info. Or you can just stop by for one on the meetings as all meetings held at the library are free of charge and open to the public. Library News... Political EventsThursday, Aug. 23  POLITICAL FORUM for the superintendent of schools candidates will be held at 7 p.m. at the library.  POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for property appraiser will be held at 8 p.m. at the library. Thursday, September 27 POLITICAL FORUM for County Commission seats 1, 3, 5. Seat 1 will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Seat 3 at 7:30 p.m. and Seat 5 at 8:30 p.m.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 – Page 3B W a k u l l a C o u n t y S e n i o r C i t i z e n s C e l e b r a t e L i f e Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Christmas In July was a huge “ nancial success. The sponsors, fundraising committee, other volunteers, Board of Directors and staff did a wonderful job preparing for this event and ensuring its success. We have expressed our appreciation through our local news publications and recognized them during the event. Lamar Advertising provided their portable sign parked north of Crawfordville that also expresses our appreciation for the sponsors. Its easy to recognize an event and discuss its details. But we have to explore the actual results of such an event to gain appreciation of how our community supports our senior citizens services. In the Senior Center our clients receive lunches, exercise, entertainment and education for health and aging successfully. They interact in social groups, men and women meet and enjoy the companionship and some just hang out. In-home services to clients unable to attend the center receive meals, homemaking, personal care, home improvements such as bathroom safety and wheelchair ramps, pest control, emergency alert response systems, telephone reassurances and other needed services. Every client who quali“ es for a service is served. We are able to provide services far beyond available state and federal funding. The most visible service is daily lunch. The Older Americans Act provides about 20 meals per day. Some days you will find over 100 eating lunch. Quarterly, you will “ nd Donnie Sparkman and several of his friends such as Jerrell Metcalf providing a fish fry. Sometimes they catch and dress the “ sh. On those days there is often more than 125 in for lunch. Working with our older citizens has a strong impact on our lives. Its an emotional rollercoaster. One day you are meeting with a new client who is so proud of the center and they feel alive again. The next day you learn of close friends that have passed away. Every individual relationship in the center is special. You learn how temporary life is. You learn the value of enjoying each day. You gain understanding of how each day could be your last. Most of all you learn the value of daily interaction with people that are facing end of life issues. I keep a few pictures from years past. One has several seniors sitting at a table in the park at one of our “ sh fries in the 1990s. None of them are alive now, but I sit and smile at things I remember them saying to me and the compassion they shared with others. On one occasion I asked a lady if there was anything we could do that would be special for her. I knew that her illness was bringing her to the end of life. She smiled and said, I love coconut cakes and I have not had any at the center. This was on a Tuesday and she came in only on Tuesday. I con“ rmed that we would have a coconut cake the next Tuesday. She smiled and was happy for that plan. The next day I learned that she had passed away over night. I did not mention to any one as to why we were having coconut cake on the following Tuesday until after we had eaten. As the seniors “ nished lunch and learned of its purpose they were happy. They did not grieve for the loss of a friend, they rejoiced for the time they shared. Writing articles about a senior reveals so much value in their life that we often overlook. One lady could not understand why anyone would write about her because her life was so mediocre. My conclusion of her life was that she had gained a level of peace and satisfaction that many seek for a lifetime and never “ nd. These experiences in the Senior Center are written to let our community know the results of their support. Without your support, many of the seniors that attend the Senior Center would be excluded. Margo Anderson will be in the Senor Center on Friday, Sept. 28th to present A Tribute to Patsy Cline.Ž Tickets can be purchased by calling 926-7145 ext. 221. You may also call this number to sponsor this event. Some have already paid $250 and one paid $1,000 to sponsor this program. You are invited to call my cell phone 273-2242 to discuss your sponsorship. Sponsors will add so much to the “ nancial success of this event. Financial success is a direct bene“ t to our Senior Citizens. You too, can participate in these successes. R.H. Carter is executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizen Center. R.H. Carter Wakulla County Senior Center Christmas in July was a huge successJuly was celebrated with red, white and blue, ags and music at the Senior Center plus moreBy TAMARA BYRNES and DIANE LANTER Red, white and blue along with Stars and Stripes were the theme for July. We celebrated our holiday with the Pickin n Grinnin Band playing the familiar patriotic songs of the day. All of the seniors received a small ” ag to wave and a ribbon to wear. Chef Mary “ xed a typical picnic lunch of hot dogs, potato salad, baked beans and apple pie. We are all so very grateful for our freedom and having the Senior Center open “ ve days a week. We appreciate everyone who donates their time and money to keep the activities available for everyone to enjoy. Our “ nal projects from our Pottery Program sponsored by HAWC, Healing Arts of Wakulla County, turned out so beautiful. The seniors had so much fun with Nancy Jefferson and piles of clay. They wound snail shapes and applied them to their bowls then pressed leaves into the center. This has been such a wonderful program and has reached so many people. We want to thank HAWC for their generous donations to programs like this. We also celebrated our annual Christmas in JulyŽ Event on the 25th. This fundraiser was very successful and thanks goes out to all of the creative volunteers who helped us. The room sparkled with lights and the tables were decorated with Christmas in mind. We had many lovely gifts for the silent auction and for the raf” e that was held during lunch. These items come from board, staff and community donations. This event provides for the meal programs here at the center. We rely on donated items for our arts and crafts classes and wish to thank all who think about us when you clean out that craft room or closet! We also accept donations for the local food bank. You may bring canned or boxed foods and leave them in the container at the center. For more information, please call 926-7145. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCelebrating the Fourth of July at the Senior Center. Getting crafty with seashells. Lunch featuring turkey and dressing at Christmas in July. Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 000ARKA The Wakulla News

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Special to The News Another summer is about to come to an end. School will be starting and our children will get back to their routines. So too ends the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Summer Program … taking care of children ages Pre-K to 5th grade. What a time we have had this year. Everything from going to the beach at Carrabelle to movies, skating, crafts, Fun Days at the Center to our trip to Gulf World, but our best time was St. Marks Wildlife Refuge. The refuge took our children to new levels of education, teaching them that every living creature has a purpose, from the tiniest of creepy crawlers to the biggest reptile in Florida. The “ rst day of the four week program the children missed so many things because they didnt know what or how to look for them. By the end of the program the children were “ nding animal tracks and butter” y cocoons. They had fun making bug jars, bird feeders, and plaster casts of animal tracks to bird houses. These experiences will be a life time of memories. Whether it was a hike through the refuge or wading in the coastal waters around the Lighthouse, fun was had by all. Our junior rangers came away with an experience they will never forget, and the teachers had the satisfaction of knowing the future of Floridas wildlife can be preserved. As Ranger Lori says, All life has a purpose, and deserves a chance.Ž Its in the hands of our children to keep it safe. Thank you St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and thank you to the great group of Rangers and Volunteers. See you next Summer! Ms. Sam, Ms. Judy, Ms. Sarah, Ms. Megan.Senior Citizens Summer Program included visiting the refuge ALL PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 – Page 5B Readers Choice Contest! Heres your chance to participate in Readers Choice Contest! is asking our readers to participate in the Readers Choice Contest to identify Wakulla Countys most popular local businesses! Tell us your favorite Readers ChoicesŽ by “lling out the of“cial entry ballot below. Your name will then be registered in a random drawing for $100 in Cash. One entry per person. Please follow these guidelines: All ballots should be clearly printed. The business name must be clearly identi“ed. Your nominations must “t the appropriate category. Use the of“cial entry ballot. All ballots must be received at The Wakulla News of“ce by 4:00 p.m., Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. Ballots may be mailed to: The Wakulla News, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326, or you may drop off the ballot at The Wakulla News of“ce at 3119-A Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. Send your nominations today. Then watch for results in the Sept. 27, 2012 edition of !Animal Care: Pet Care, Grooming & Supplies ________Automotive: Auto Engine Repair __________ Auto Body Shops ____________Used Car Dealer ____________ Financial Services: Bank _____________________ Credit Union _______________ Mortgage Company _________ Food and Beverage Liquor Store _______________ Grocery __________________Ice Cream/Snacks __________ Bakery ___________________ Health and Fitness Gym _____________________ Massage Therapist __________Chiropractor _______________ Fitness Instructor/Trainer _____ Homes and Land Builder ___________________ Real Estate Company _______ Title Company _____________ Surveyor _________________Lawn Care/Landscaping _____ Nursery/Garden Center ______ Flooring __________________ Plumbing _________________ Electrician ________________ A/C-Heating ______________ Painter ___________________ Tree Service ______________ Pool Care ________________ Home Cleaning Service _____ Miscellaneous: Childcare __________________Clothing and Gifts ____________ Storage Centers _____________ Dance Studio _______________Photographer _______________Hotel ______________________Hardware __________________ Personal Services: Barber Shop ________________ Hair Salon __________________Nail Care __________________ Tanning ____________________Professional Services: Accountant _________________Attorney ___________________ Doctor _____________________Dentist ____________________ Recreation: Marina ____________________Fishing Charter _____________ Bait & Tackle _______________ Boat and Motor Repair _______________ Canoe/Kayak Rental _________Scuba ____________________ Restaurant: Atmosphere ________________Breakfast __________________ Lunch _____________________Dinner ____________________ Service ___________________Entertainment ______________Readers Choice Categories:Name______________________ Address_____________________________ City_____________________________ State_________ Zip______________ Phone____________________ Email________________________ Age____ Are you a current subscriber to ? _____Yes ______No*Entries must be handwritten on of“cial entry ballot from Sorry, no computer generated ballots, mechanical reproductions, photocopies, carbon copies, illegible entries or ballots with answers that are not true and/or relevant will be accepted. *At least 25% of the categories must be “lled out. *Only one entry per person. Ballots not meeting these requirements will be voided. *All ballots must be received by by 4:00 p.m. on Aug. 31, 2012. Send entire ballot to Readers Choice ContestŽ, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326 or bring it to our of“ce at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville. (No purchase required.) *Winning entry will be drawn by a representative of *All entrants agree to publication of their name, home town, and photograph without additional compensation. Announcement of the winner will appear in the Readers ChoiceŽ special section to be published in the Sept. 27, 2012 edition of *Employees of and their families are not eligible to win. Not intended for residents of states where prohibited by law. Winner must be 18 years of age or older. *All ballots that do not meet this criteria will not be counted.THIS AD IS YOUR OFFICIAL BALLOT & ENTRY FORM.Please complete and return to by 4:00 p.m. Aug. 31, 2012. Use the area beside each category to list your favorite business. Mail your of“cial entry form and completed ballot to: WIN $100Submit your completed entry form and be entered in the drawing to win $100 in Cash ENTRY FORM: The News Wakulla Th e T h e Readers’ Choice 2012 eaders Choice Categories: S S S S S u b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b m i i i t t t t t t t t t t t t t y y y y y y y y y y e e e e e e e e e e n t t t t t t e r e e e d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d Register Today for your chance toƒc/o Readers Choice Contest P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326OR drop it off at of“ce: 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville.

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Am Arc Away Axle Bar Be Bug Buy By Cat Coral Dads Date Debt Deliver Far Fed Fly Form Fox Frown God Got Hay He Hi Home How Hunter In Is Leg Lid Male My Net No Nut Oaks Oar Of Onions Pegs Pet Pigeon Rent Run Sea See Send Slot So Style Tea Tended To Tug Up Vary Vase Wax We Why Wood Wounded Yawn Yoga Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com YOUR AD HERE This page sponsored in part by:

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SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements 5332-0830 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201202746 TO: Richard A. Greene ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. August 9, 16, 23 & 30 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Todays New Ads CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTSCNAs & HHAs for in-home & facility patient care. Part-time, full-time, 24/7. Background check required. Visit www.hopewellcare.com for an application or apply @ 2121 Killarney Way, Tallahassee. Good Things to Eat Raker FarmsWere Still Here Blanched & Frozen Peas, Okra. And we process Beef, Hogs & Deer850-926-7561 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Medical CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTSCNAs & HHAs for in-home & facility patient care. Part-time, full-time, 24/7. Background check required. Visit www.hopewellcare.com for an application or apply @ 2121 Killarney Way, Tallahassee. General Help HELPWANTED € PT Bus DriversCoast Charter School St. Marks, 850-925-6344 Garage/ Yard Sales CrawfordvilleFriday 24, 9a-5p Dresser w/ mirror, desk, TVs, Chest & misc. 61 Pine Lane CRAWFORDVILLEINDOOR YARD SALE IN CRAWFORDVILLE SAT AUG 25 8:30 a.m. til 1 p.m. HOUSEHOLD AND OUTDOOR ITEMS; SOME CLOTHES AND SPORTING GOODS. 19 SHADEVILLE RD (former Home Respiratory Solutions bldg.) Musical Instruments Upright PianoMendelssohn ivory keys $100 You Move (850) 962-3799 Mobile Homes For Rent Crawfordville2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Expando, Living room, bedroom, $400 mo. $300 deposit 850-766-0170 MOBILE HOME FOR RENT 1, 2,3 BEDROOMS (850) 251-1468 SusanCounciI @earthlink.net North Wa kulla2BR, 2BA, Central heat & Air, City water included $525. mo. $250 dep. (850) 926-5326 Apartments Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEWakula Trace Apartments Now Accepting Applications ForBeautiful 1 Bedroom Apartmentsfor persons 62 years of age or older Handycapped/ disabled regardless of age. Must meet income requirements. Rental assistance based on availability. Located at 3 Celebrity Lane Beside Senior Center (850) 926-0207 TDD 800-955-7771 Equal Housing Opportunity Rental Houses PANACEACottage, for Rent 2/1 Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Rennovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, covered front proch & open back deck, Small pets acceptable Excellent fishing! $585/month 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $750/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1935 Crawfordville3 Bedroom, 1 Bath 105 Ted Lot Lane $600. mo. $300 secuirty 850-766-0170 CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Br/2 Ba, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 CRAWFORDVILLEBeach Front at Shell Point Cute 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Screen porch, decks, great views, Avaialable furnished or unfurnished 1 yr. lease $1,200 month, (850) 926-8948 CRAWFORDVILLEWakulla Gardens Nice 3Bedroom 2 Bath Home with Garage Central heat and air, jacuzzi tub, $925. mo (850) 926-8948 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEConvient Locations 2 BEDROOM on 3 Acres, Nice Oak Trees $625 mo. 2 BEDROOM on 2 Fenced Acres $700. moBrenda Hicks Realy (850) 251-1253 IVAN3 Bedroom, 1 Bath 93 Stokley Road (850) 926-5336 Boats KEY LARGO2004, 18 foot, 115HP Yamaha, very few hrs. on boat and motor. Aluminum magic tilt trailer, bimini top. Great condition $9,500 obo (850) 421-2792 (850) 320-0455 5347-0830 TWN Vs. Parsons, William 65-2011-CA-000151 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000151 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANY Plaintiff(s) vs. WILLIAM J. PARSONS; et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000151 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANYis the Plaintiff and LAURAETTAGENTRYand WILLIAM J. PARSONS, JANE D. PARSON and UNKNOWN TENANTS n/k/a MATTGORE are the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 13th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 1 AND 2 AND 3, BLOCK FŽ, SOUTH TOWN OF PANACEA, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 7 AND 7AOF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA and commonly known as: 206 CLARK DR. P ANACEA, FL 32346 IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANYREMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida this 18th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk, County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, Wakulla County, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL, 32327 -County Phone 850-926-0905 EXT. 223, TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay ServiceŽ. August 23 & 30, 2012 864242.000234FMT 5348-0830 TWN vs. JOKI, KRISHNAKUMAR Case No.65-2012-CA-000178 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000178, DIVISION: Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. : KRISHNAKUMAR A. JOKI A/K/AJ. A. KRISHNAKUMAR, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: KRISHNAKUMAR, JOKI A/K/AJ.A. KRISHNAKUMAR LASTKNOWN ADDRESS:73 DOGWOOD FORESTROAD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-0589 CURRENTADDRESS : UNKNOWN HEMARANI R. KANTHALU A/K/AK. R. HEMARANI LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 73 DOGWOOD FORESTROAD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-0589 CURRENTADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENTADDRESS : UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLACounty, Florida: LOT 22, SPRINGBROOK FARMS, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 118-120 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates, P.L. Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in The W akulla News. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on this _____ day of __________, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: /s/ __________________, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News AUGUST23 & 30, 2012 F12007587 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 – Page 7B AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432“we sell and service most makes and models” Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $855mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $825mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $750mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $700mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $675mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $625mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. GARAGE SALESaturday 7AM 2PMTOOLS, Books, Lamps, Kitchenware and much more.2 Hines St. ( at the end of Taf inger )Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 5326-0830 TWN vs.Lundy, William 65-2009-CA-000440Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000440 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM E. LUNDY, et. al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, and entered in 65-2009-CA000440 of the Circuit Court of the second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., is the Plaintiff and WILLIAM E. LUNDY; CHASE BANK USA, NATIONALASSOCIATION are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Door, Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at 11:00 a.m. on September 20, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, WAKULLARANCHETTES, MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 50 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 147.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE NORTHERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYOF U. S. HIGHWAYNO 98 (STATE ROAD NO. 30), THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 16 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 1857.90 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID LOT 50, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTH HALF OF SAID LOT 50 ADISTANCE OF 1,311.59 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTH HALF OF SAID LOT 50 ADISTANCE OF 327.38 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 931.91 FEET TO THE CENTER POINT OF ACUL-DE-SAC (SAID CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A50.00 FOOT RADIUS) AND TO THE CENTER LINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTER LINE 327.37 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 931.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 7.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO AROADWAYEASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTH 30.00 FEET THEREOF. ALSO SUBJECT TO CUL-DE-SAC EASEMENT IN THE SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 50, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 1311.59 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 327.20 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 665.14 FEET TO AROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 327.17 FEET TO AROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 664.69 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS EASEMENT MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A15 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT LYING 15 FEET EAST OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LINE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 50, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 1311.59 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 664.69 FEET TO AROD AND CAPFOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 236.33 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYOF A60 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY, SAID POINT BEING THE POINT OF TERMINUS Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 18th day of July, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 23 & 30, 2012 11-04309 5341-0906 TWN vs. KEVIN R. GABYCase No. 4:12-CV-00053-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:12-CV-00053-RH-WCS CENTENNIALBANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN R GABYa/k/a KEVIN RILEYGABY; KERRYR. GABY; and WILDWOOD COUNTRYCLUB PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in the above-styled case on June 5, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, and the Amendment to Judgment of Foreclosure entered July 10, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 10th day of September 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Eastern T ime), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County and Franklin County, Florida: SEE EXHIBITS A, B AND C ATTACHED HERETO. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshal, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated: August 8, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL32591-3010 EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND ALSO MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 82 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER AND THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 1575.73 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARYOF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 480.95 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AND AN EXTENSION THEREOF 386.57 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF U.S. HIGHWAYNO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY225.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 385.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 225.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as PropertyŽ). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. EXHIBIT B Parcel 1: Lot 21 of Wildwood Country Club, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 35, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 10, Block E of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 3: Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Less and Except: that part of Lots 1 and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, deeded to the State of Florida, recorded 12/19/1973 in Official Records Book 39, Page 784, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 4: Lots 26 and 27, Block O of Lanark Beach Unit No. 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, all water and riparian rights, ditches, and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, and replacements that may now, or at any time the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as PropertyŽ). EXHIBIT C BEGIN AT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 13 ADISTANCE OF 726.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EDGE OF SWIRL SWAMP, THENCE RUN ALONG THE EDGE OF SAID SWIRLSWAMPAS FOLLOWS: 5343-0823 TWN Vs. Cesar, Markly 65-2009-CA-000427CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000427CA HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC. Plaintiff, vs. MARKLYCESAR AND HAYDEE CESAR, et al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 24, 2012, and entered in 65-2009-CA-000427CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES INC. is the Plaintiff and HAYDEE CESAR; MARKLYJ. CESAR; THE FARM HOMEOWNERSASSOCIATION, INC; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Craw5344-0830 TWN Vs. Shepherd, Cheryl and Mark 65-2012-CA-000142 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000142 FEDERALNATIONALMORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. CHERYLL. SHEPHERD, MARK SHEPHERD, UNKOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 and #2, et. al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MARK SHEPHERD (Last Known Address) 4 CHOCTAW ROAD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 873 BIRCH STREET ALCOA, TN 37701 1523 BERWYN DR. MARYVILLE, TN 37803 3630 STEEPLECHASE RD. WESLEYCHAPEL, FL33543 (Current Residence Unknown) if living, and ALLOTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named Defendant is deceased, the personal representatives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming, by, through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described Defendants YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 1 AND 68 OF BLOCK 15, OF WAKULLAGARDENS, AS SHOWN BYPLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, POPKIN & ROSALER, P.A., 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL33442., Attorney for Plaintiff, on or before September 21, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the Wakulla News and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISIONS OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTTHE CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTATTHE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327, TELEPHONE (850) 926-0905 WITHIN TWO (2) WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPTOF THIS NOTICE; IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL1-800-955-8771. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 20th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk August 23 & 30, 2012 12-33532 5344-0830 5345-0830 TWN Vs. Cruzado, Ricky 2008-CA-000224 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case No.: 2008-CA-000224 Division: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, v. RICKYCRUZADO; MAYRASANTIAGO; UNKNOWN TENANT#1, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated July 18, 2012 entered in Civil Case No.: 2008-CA-000224, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC is Plaintiff, and RICKYCRUZADO; MAYRASANTIAGO; UNKNOWN TENANT#1, are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 1 1:00 a.m. at front lobby of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327 on the 13th day of September, 2012the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, BLOCK T, HUDSON HEIGHTS, UNIT 4, ADDITION TO CRAWFORDVILLE ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 38, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 102 DOGWOOD DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on July 18, 2012 (COURTSEAL) BRENTX. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT By; /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintif f: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544,Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 at least 7 working days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News August 23 & 30, 2012 5345-0830 File No. 7992T-03963 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices fordville Hwy., the lobby of Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 AM on September 6, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 30, BLOCK F OF THE FARM, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE(S) 93-98, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 10th day of July, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, as Deputy Clerk. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less that 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 16 & 23, 2012. 12-01747 NORTH 70 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 282.08 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 213.59 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 107.30 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 97.25 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 125.54 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 243.65 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 190.70 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 152.83 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 285.84 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 133.29 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID SWAMPS EDGE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 3340.12 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1530.27 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE ON THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 13, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY834.01 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 1560.24 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOTS 86 AND 87 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 131.30 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 660.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 528.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS OVER AND ACROSS THAT CERTAIN EASEMENT RECORDED OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 191, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as PropertyŽ). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News August 16, 23, 30 and September 6 2012 A1135183.DOC 5341-0906 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available, all utilities included. • 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./$900 Deposit • 36 Stephen Donaldson 3BR/2BA MH on 1.33 Acres, $650 mo/$650 Security. Pets ok with $250 pet fee. • 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/ Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok • 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced • 82 Mimosa 3BR/1BA $650Mo./$650 Deposit • 56 Myers Woods 3BR/2BA $1,000Mo./$1,000 Deposit Pets ok w/$250 pet fee • 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA Available Sept. 1, $900Mo./$900 Deposit • 14 Cutchin Ct. 3BR/2BA $675 mo/$675 deposit. We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!2323 Surf Rd. 3BR/2BA Bayfront road on Ochlockonee Bay, Screened Porch, Deck and Dock. No Smoking. No Pets. $1,150 per month. 112 Captain James St. 4BR/2BA 2,280 sq. ft. MH on 9 acres. Located in North Wakulla near Woodville. Complete with replace, workshop and dishwasher. No Smoking. No Pets. $775 per month.Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets.

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 – Page 9B 5250-0823 TWN vs. Vaillancourt, Debra Case No:2012CA000083 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 2012CA000083 FEDERALNATIONALMORTGAGE ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, DEBRAVAILLANCOURT, et, al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAELT BRACKIN LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 30 CHICKATTRL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 ALSO ATTEMPTED AT: 2142 HIGHWAY98 E, CARRIABLLE, FL32322 AND 1349 BRANCH HILLCT, APOPKA, FL32712 CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOTS 63 AND 64, BLOCK 48Ž, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT V, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address i is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL33309 on or before September 14, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in The Wakulla Times and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. I f you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoo rdinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled Court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 25th day of May, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News August 16 & 23, 2012 5250-0823 : 5322-0823 TWN Vs. GERIN BRUMBAUGH Case No. 2010-CA000338 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000338 U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. GERIN D. BRUMBAUGH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GERIN D. BRUMBAUGH; JOHN DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE 5323-0823 TWN Vs. Joan Valerie Pound Case No. 12-0016-FC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 12-0016-FC, UCN: 652012CA000016XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. JOAN VALERIE POUND A/K/AVALERIE LANDER A/K/AVALERIE POUND et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 12-0016-FC. UCN: 652012CA000016XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.Ais Plaintiff and JOAN VALERIE POUND A/K/AVALERIE LANDER A/K/AVALERIE POUND; UNKNOWN TENANTNO.1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 at Wakulla County Florida, at 11:00a.m on the 6th dayof jDecember, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 19, WOODLAND HERITAGE COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 4, T3S, R1W, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 37 MINUTES AND 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 4, ADISTANCE OF 2074.85 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES, 23 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 669.88 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES, 23 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SAID CENTERLINE 669.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES, 36 MINUTES, 41 SECONDS WEST 399.96 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES, 23 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 669.92 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 36 MINUTES, 41 SECONDS EAST 399.57 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AROADWAYEASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS TJE EASTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on July18, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk SMITH, HIATT& DIAZ, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff P.O. Box 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 16 & 23, 2012 5323-0823 5324-0823 TWN Vs. Wesley D. Dukes Case #: 2009-CA-000236 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2009-CA-000432 Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, formerly known as Bankers Trust Company of California, N.A.., as Trustee for Asset Backed Securities Corporation Long Beach Home Equity Loan Trust 2000-LB1. Plaintiff, -vs.Wesley D. Dukes, Jr. a/k/a Wesley D. Dukes and Nancy E. Dukes, Husband and Wife; Summerwind Roadowners Maintenance Association, Inc.; JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as successor in interest to Provident National Bank Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000236 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Deutsche Bank National trust Company, formerly known as Bankers Trust Company of California, N.A., as Trustee for Asset Backed Securities Corporation Long Beach Home Equity Loan Trust 2000-LB1, Plaintiff and Wesley D. Dukes, Jr. a/k/a Wesley D. Dukes and Nancy E. Dukes, Husband and Wife are 5327-0830 TWN vs. Family Tides Case No. 2011-165CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2011-165 CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, v. FAMILYTIDES INVESTMENTS, LLC, BRADLEYR. WILL, BRIAN K. WILL, DOUGLAS A. WILL, RICHARD GENTRY, DOUGLAS MARK HOLLEY, and ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AGAINST, THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on September 20, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real properties situated in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 2, OF FIDDLERS COVE, PHASE I, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 84, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. LOT 19, OF FIDDLERS COVE, PHASE I, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 84, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327, (850) 926-0905 at least 7 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 19th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND Clerk of the Circuit Court [SEALOF THE COURT] By:/s/Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk August 23 & 30, 2012 5328-0830 TWN Vs. Beard, Earl Case No: 2012-FC-000068 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2012-FC-000068 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. EARLBEARD; DEBRADENISE BEARD A/K/ADEBRABEARD A/K/ADENISE BEARD A/K/ADEBRAD. BEARD; UNKNOWN TEANANTI; UNKNOWN TENANTII, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 20th day of September, 2012, at 11:00 oclock A.M. at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: TRACT 24, CASORAESTATES UNIT NO. 2 (UNRECORDED) COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 90 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 90 ADISTANCE OF 165.80 FEET TO THE EAST RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF CASORADRIVE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 47 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EAST RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY335.61 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 50 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY213.11 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF GLOVER DADDY ROAD 923.60 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY209.78 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 598.87 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 290.12 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 796.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 18th day of July, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904) 926-0905. not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk August 23 & 30, 2012 5328-0830 5336-0823 TWN vs. Maryvonne Ashley Case No: 12 CA13 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 12 CA13 ONEWESTBANK, FSB, Plaintiff, UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALLOTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTERESTIN THE ESTATAE OF MARYVONNE H. ASHLEY, et, al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALLOTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARYVONNE H. ASHLEY LASTADDRESS UNKNOWN CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN ALBERT ASHLEY LASTADDRESS UNKNOWN CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN NANCYCARTER LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 103 OAK AVE., HAVANA, FL32333 CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 35 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA AND PROCEED SOUTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 785.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 657.15 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 402.44 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 19 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 189.07 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 231.19 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 189.07 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 230.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO A30.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAYEASEMENT ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARYTHEREOF. SUBJECT TO A15.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAYEASEMENT ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARYTHEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A30.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAYEASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 35 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA AND PROCEED SOUTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 785.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 657.15 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 591.51 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 231.19 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 300.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 314.04 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 381.51 FEET TO THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD #365 SAID POINT BEING A POINT ON ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE WESTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYAND THE ARC OF SAID CURVE HAVING ARADIUS OF 5729.59 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 48 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 31.33 FEET THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 02 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 31.33 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 402.48 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 314.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 269.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 30.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A1993 BRENNER MOBILE HOME, IDENTIFICATION NOS. 10L23424U AND 10L23424X, FLORIDATITLE NOS. 65833078 AND 65833079 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address i is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL33309 on or before September 13, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in The Wakulla Times and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoo rdinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled Court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 6th day of August, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News August 16 & 23, 2012 : Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices defendants(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONTDOOR OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED ATCHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M. on September 9, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit; COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 32 ADISTANCE OF 2749.18 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 666.79 FEET TO AN IRON ROD SET IN THE CENTERLINE OF A60 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLYALONG ACURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 370.38 FEET FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 195.34 FEET (CHORD NORTH 75 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 193.09 FEET), THENCE RUN NORTH 59 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 455.31 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING ARADIUS OF 370.38 FEET, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE CURVE 195.18 FEET (CHORD NORTH 75 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 192.92 FEET), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 249.21 FEET TO THE WESTERLYRIGHT OF WAYFOR A POWERLINE TO THE CITYOF TALLAHASSEE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY338.77 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 412.28 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 666.79 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN YEAR: 1986, MAKE: CHANDLER, VIN#: AFLCW2AG240511628 AND VIN#: AFLCW2BG240511628, MANUFACTURED HOME, WHICH IS PERMANENTLYAFIXED TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS. AS SUCH IT IS DEEMED TO BE AFIXTURE AND APART OF THE REALESTATE. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEYFOR THE PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100, Tampa, FL33614 (813)880-8888, (813)880-8800 August 16 & 23, 2012. 09-139423 FC01 5338-0823 TWN Estate of Ann Denson Poucher CASE NO.: 12-63-CPNotice To Creditors IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 12-63-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ANN DENSON POUCHER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ANN DENSON POUCHER, deceased, File Number 12-63, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including un-matured, contingent or un-liquidated claims, on whom a copy of the notice is served must file their claims with the Court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTIONS 733.702 AND 733.710, OR BE FOREVER BARRED. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including un-matured, contingent or un-liquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTIONS 733.702 AND 733.710. ALLCLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 16, 2012. RAYMOND EARLPOUCHER Personal Representative 443 Seminole Lane Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 Steve M. Watkins, III Attorney for Personal Representative 41 Commerce Street, Apalachicola, FL32320 (850)653-1949 Fla Bar No. 0794996 August 16 & 23, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5334-0823 TWN Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGALNOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON AUGUST 31, 2012 at 1 1:00a.m AT2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONALPROPERTYOF: JENNIFER BABCOCK Before the sale date of AUGUST31, 2012, The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. TO RUN IN THE WALULLANEWS AUGUST16 & 23, 2012. 5334-0823 5342-0830 TWN Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida StatuesŽ, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Thursday, September 6, 2012 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Shara Harvey Before the sale date of September 6th, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the StowAway Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327 August 23, 2012 5342-0830 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5349-0913 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 005 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that GULF GROUPHOLDINGS AQUISITIONS & APPLICATIONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2418 Year of Issuance 2008 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-121-155-12084-D14 SHELLPOINTBEACH UNIT5 BLOCK D LOT14 OR 231 P594 OR 260 P828 Name in which assessed PIERRE LAWRENCE OLIVAREZ said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 3rd day of October, 2012, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 2nd day of August, 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida August 23, 30 and September 6, 13, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOT 54, BLOCK 20, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT THREE, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA a/k/a 5 POWHATAN ST, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, ON September 13, 2012 at eleven oclock a.m. ESTin the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 19th day of July, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTLETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1800-955-8771. August 16 & 23, 2012 665102518.

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1 14 17 23 28 31 36 39 45 49 52 58 61 2 24 46 3 25 42 4 20 29 43 5 26 40 53 59 62 6 37 18 32 54 7 15 30 50 8 27 47 9 21 44 60 63 10 41 22 38 51 11 16 19 33 48 55 12 34 56 13 35 57 ACROSS 1. Ill will 7. "Ed Wood" star Johnny 11. Second-stringer 14. Fix, as a chair 15. Melville tale 16. Beehive State tribesman 17. Gun with a flaring muzzle 19. Rickey need 20. Overly sentimental 21. Istanbul's region 23. Special __ (movie enhancers) 26. President pro __ 27. Arboreal rodent 28. Made secure 30. Gives a leg up to 31. Felt sore 32. Mr. Chips player Robert 33. Stylish, in the '60s 36. Go sour 37. Blew it 38. Aesopian also-ran 39. Paul Anka's "__ Beso" 40. Pigs' digs 41. Bad habits 42. Ma y honoree 44. Holder of the "dead man's hand" 45. "Go ahead!" 47. Swabbie 48. Draft org. 49. Day to wear a bonnet 50. Israeli native 52. Debate side 53. 1934 Jackie Cooper film 58. Country singer McGraw 59. Disney dog 60. Perpetual, in poesy 61. Latish lunchtime 62. "If all __ fails ..." 63. Beethoven's "Moonlight __"DOWN1. Certain Wall Streeter, briefly 2. "__ blu, dipinto di ..." ("Volare" lyrics) 3. Post-OR place 4. Assigns workers to 5. Not listing year of creation 6. Flowed slowly 7. Larr y, the first black American Leaguer 8. Cassowary cousin 9. Mail carrier's route, once 10. Most swanky 11. Sweet cereal renamed in the '80s 12. City near Syracuse, NY 13. "John Brown's Body" poet 18. Turntable letters 22. Emeritus: Abbr. 23. Make jubilant 24. Adjust the lenses 25. Sex determinant 27. Shadings 29. Slugger Griffey Jr. 30. Hole-making bug 32. Like prunes or raisins 34. Stackable cookies 35. Cubicle fillers 37. Light and delicate 38. Sot's sound 40. Church topper 41. Amplifier effect 43. MLB playoffs mo. 44. Calvin's tiger 45. __-B ismol 46. __' to go (eager) 47. Krypton or radon 50. Terrier type 51. Yemeni port 54. DJ's assortment 55. Bikini piece 56. Toronto's prov. 57. Thumbs-up vote American Prole Hometown Content 8/19/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 12 3 4 53467 815 4 31 58 379 7 36 62174 9583 200 9 HometownContent 162 7853 4 9 539462187 478139265 854 396721 927518436 316247958 741 853692 683921574 295674813 A R B E L A T E P E P T O N E L F O C U S R A R I N I C U X C H R O M O S O M E M A N S K E N O C T U N D A T E D S T E E P L E S E E P E D E T H E R E A L R P M D R I E D C D S D O B Y B O R E R S K Y E E M U T O N E S G A S P O S T R O A D H O B B E S P O S H E S T V I B R A T O R E T H I C A D E N S U G A R S M A C K S B R A U T I C A O R E O S O N T B E N E T D E S K S Y E A -Janet By DAVID WHITE Last week, nearly 400 wine writers gathered in Portland, Ore., for the “ fth annual Wine Bloggers Conference. The event opened with a keynote speech from Randall Grahm, the legendary vintner behind Bonny Doon Vineyard, who urged attendees to support originality and strangeness, two features that the wine business, especially in the New World, desperately needs.Ž Itd be hard to ignore the fact that Grahm was urging the audience to embrace more winemakers like himself. Grahm rose to fame in the 1980s thanks to his originality … he was among the “ rst American winemakers to embrace Rhone varieties like Syrah and Grenache. And Grahm is proudly strange. For most of his career, he was best known for his ” amboyant and irreverent marketing campaigns. Six years ago, he famously decided to cast aside his three biggest wine brands in order to focus on smallproduction wines made with minimal intervention. Such originality and strangeness should be applauded. And fortunately, more and more winemakers are following in Grahms footsteps. For some, this means introducing Americans to obscure grapes. Consider Red Tail Ridge Winery on Seneca Lake in New York. Like most producers in the Finger Lakes, Red Tail Ridge makes a number of different Rieslings. But it also produces varieties like Teroldego, a red wine that hails from northeast Italy, and Blaufrankisch, Austrias signature red wine. Or look at Chateau OBrien in the Blue Ridge Mountains of northern Virginia. Its ” agship wine is a Tannat, a grape thats typically associated with Uruguay. On a recent visit to the winery, I was extremely impressed by its Petit Manseng, even though the variety is historically used in southwest France as an unremarkable blending grape. Chateau OBrien and Red Tail Ridge arent alone. Across the country, countless producers are introducing consumers to unfamiliar grapes. For other winemakers, originality and strangeness means jettisoning modern winemaking techniques and mimicking the producers of yesteryear. Just think about the arsenal of tools todays winemakers can employ. On the vineyard, viticulturists can ensure that their vines receive the perfect amount of water through irrigation. With chemical fertilizers, grape growers can maintain textbook levels of soil nutrients. By using pesticides and herbicides, growers can protect their grapes from fungi and invasive weeds. In the cellar, winemakers can manipulate their wines in a number of ways. Adding sugar just before fermentation can raise alcohol; using a specialized “ ltration system can lower it. Winemakers can make a wine seem fresher by adding tartaric acid. Aging wine in oak barrels is expensive; using oak chips saves money and time. Adding a small amount of grape juice concentrate to a wine can mask vegetal aromas. These practices arent necessarily bad … many are critical in the production of affordable, consistent, commercial wine. But they make it dif“ cult for a wine to express a sense of place. That sense of placeŽ … or terroir … is what makes wine special. Its why two wines made from adjacent vineyards can taste distinctively different from each other. The pursuit of terroir inspires numerous winemakers to produce wine as if theyre living in ancient times. For longtime California producer Steve Edmunds, who, like Randall Grahm, is known for his focus on Rhone varieties, this makes perfect sense. Winemaking isnt Rocket Science,Ž he explains on his website. Its an ancient, relatively straightforward process that should yield, in any wine, a precise expression of the vineyard and the season that produced it.Ž Even big wineries have started to move in this direction. Since 2007, Sonomas Benziger Family Winery has pursued the highest level of natural farming appropriateŽ for each of its vineyards, not solely because of environmental concerns, but because the Benziger family believes such practices help produce more honest, authentic wine. As Grahm “ nished his speech in Portland, he urged the audience to speak up on behalf . of those who are innovating new styles, or preserving something precious.Ž Every year, it seems as if an increasing number of American winemakers are doing just that. Its a development worth celebrating.David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet. WHITE’S WINESIn praise of originality and strangeness in wines

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 – Page 11B 1. FOOD & DRINK: What is French “pate de foie gras” made from? 2. GEOGRAPHY: The island of Madagascar lies in what body of water? 3. LANGUAGE: What is a similar way to describe a “ribald” joke? 4. AD SLOGANS: What movie was promoted with the slogan, “Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water”? 5. HUMAN ANATOMY: What is the most common type of blood? 6. POLITICS: What longtime Ohio senator was known as “Mr. Republican”? 7. LITERARY: What famous author used the pen name “Boz” in his early career? 8. MOVIES: Which three actors have starred in major roles as Inspector Clouseau in the Pink Panther movies? 9. CHEMISTRY: What does the “Ag” stand for in the chemical symbol for silver? 10. HISTORY: When did Queen Anne’s War (Third Indian War) begin in colonial America? Answers 1. Goose or duck liver 2. Indian Ocean 3. Vulgar 4. “Jaws II” 5. O positive 6. Robert A. Taft 7. Charles Dickens 8. Peter Sellers, Alan Arkin and Steve Martin 9. Argentum, the Latin word for silver 10. 1702 YOUR AD HERE

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear EarthTalk: What exactly is the federal governments Recreational Trails Program and is it true that its on the chopping block? Randy Caldwell Lyme, N.H. The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) is a federal assistance program that helps states pay for the development and maintenance of recreational trails and trail-related facilities for both nonmotorized and motorized recreational trail uses. The Congressionally mandated program was in jeopardy due to budget cuts, but its backers in Congress announced this past July that RTP would be retained to the tune of $85 million per year as part of the new surface transportation agreement law called MAP-21. Minnesota Democratic Senator Amy Klobuchar was instrumental in the retention of RTP by introducing it as an amendment to MAP-21 as a stand-alone program with its own dedicated funding. Overall, MAP-21 allocates $105 billion for “ scal years 2013 and 2014 to improve safety, reduce traf“ c congestion, maintain infrastructure and improve the overall ef“ ciency of highway transportation. RTP is one of several provisions of MAP-21 that bolster transit, bike and pedestrian programs across the country. Funding for the RTP portion of MAP-21 comes from a portion of the motor fuel excise tax collected across the country from non-highway recreational fuel use in snowmobiles, all-terrain vehicles, off-highway motorcycles and off-highway light trucks, and comes out of the Federal Highway Trust Fund. Half of the RTP funds are distributed equally among all 50 states, and half are distributed in proportion to the estimated amount of non-highway recreational fuel use in each state. Individual states are responsible for administering their own RTP monies and soliciting and selecting qualifying projects. That said, the use of RTP funding is restricted to maintenance and restoration of existing trails, development and rehabilitation of trailside and trailhead facilities and trail linkages, purchase and lease of trail construction and maintenance equipment, construction of new trails, acquisition of easements or property for trails, and assessment of trail conditions for accessibility and maintenance. RTP funding may not go toward property condemnation (eminent domain), construction of new trails for motorized use on federally managed public lands or for facilitating motorized access on otherwise nonmotorized trails. States must allocate 30 percent of their RTP funding for motorized trail use, 30 percent for non-motorized use, and the remaining 40 percent for so-called diverseŽ (motorized and non-motorized) trail use. Projects may satisfy two categories at the same time, giving states some flexibility in how to allocate their share of the RTP pie. States can use up to “ ve percent of their funds to disseminate related publications and operate educational programs to promote safety and environmental protection related to trails. Trail lovers across the country are thrilled that Congress extended RTP, which began in 2005 with a $60 million allocation and was increased each of the following years until it plateaued at $85 million in 2009. The continuation of the $85 million allocation was also good news to those who feared that if it wasnt cut entirely it would be scaled back signi“ cantly. With new funding for the next two years, Americans can look forward to the creation of many new trails and continued maintenance of existing ones. Dear EarthTalk: What is the Domestic Fuels Protection Act of 2012 and why are environmental groups opposing it? William Bledsoe Methuen, Mass. The Domestic Fuels Protection Act of 2012 (H.R. 4345) is a bill that was introduced in the House of Representatives in April 2012 by a bipartisan group of Congress members to protect domestic producers of ethanol, biodiesel and other green-friendly fuels from liability to end-users who put the wrong kind of fuel or fuel mix into their tanks and damage their engines and/or emit exaggerated amounts of pollution accordingly. The idea behind the bill is to ensure that domestic greenŽ fuel and related equipment producers arent forced into dire financial straits or put out of business due to crippling liability claims. But some feel that the fuel industry, whether its products are environmentally friendly or not, should be held accountable for damage its products may cause. Most recently, E15, a fuel blend containing 85 percent gasoline and 15 percent ethanol (a renewable crop-based fuel) came under “ re for causing engine damage in some older cars and trucks. The EPA approved the use of E15 in 2010 after lobbying from the ethanol industry, which seeks to up the ethanol content of gasoline from what had been the standard of 10 percent, which is much easier for gasoline engines to tolerate. The Auto Alliance, an industry group, recently released a study claiming that upwards of “ ve million cars on U.S. roads today could be damaged if owners pump in E15 instead of straight gasoline or even the milder E10 (10 percent ethanol, 90 percent gasoline). Problems included damaged valves and valve seats, which can lead to loss of compression and power, diminished vehicle performance, mis“ res, engine damage, as well as poor fuel economy and increased emissions,Ž reports the group, adding that the potential costs to consumers are signi“ cant. The most likely repair would be cylinder head replacement, which costs from $2,000-4,000 for single cylinder head engines and twice as much for V-type engines.Ž Environmental and consumer advocates say that H.R. 4345 is a bad deal for consumers who will be left footing the bill for these repairs. The non-pro“ t Environmental Working Group (EWG) bemoans the bill because it would exempt hugely pro“ table and already favored interestsŽ including fuel producers, engine makers and retailers of fuels and fuel additives from liability for damage caused by their products. H.R. 4345 is currently under committee review in the House, but analysts doubt it will ever make it to a ” oor vote given the contentious debate surrounding the fact that it puts the burden of repair costs on end consumers. Users on the govtrack.us website (which provides free and comprehensive legislative tracking for everyday citizens) give H.R. 4345 only a three percent chance of passing. Meanwhile, the Senate is considering a companion bill, the so-called Domestic Fuels Act (S. 2264). But unless the House passes its version first, the Senate bill is unlikely to gain much traction. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www. emagazine.com). Recreational Trails Program will continue to receive federal funding The Congressionally mandated Recreational Trails Program was in jeopardy due to budget cuts, but its backers in Congress announced this past July that it would be retained to the tune of $85 million in funding per year.iSTOCKPHOTOS Some green groups bemoan the recently-introduced Domestic Fuels Protection Act because it would exempt highly pro“ table producers of fuels and fuel additives from liability for damage caused by their products and push the burden of cost onto consumers.HEMERA COLLECTION is proud to announce that Dr. Chukwuma M. Okoroji is now providing Obstetrics and Gynecology services 1st & 3rd Thursday of each month CRMC Medical Group Building, 2382 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite-D, Crawfordville FL. We accept most insurance, including BCBS, CHP, Medicaid and more. To schedule your appointment or for more information Call 850-320-6054NatureCoastWomensCare.com 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator Like us on



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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn spite of the controversy surrounding the expansion of the Wakulla County Airport, the Wakulla County Commission voted to move forward with making the improvements. The commission voted four to one abstention Commissioner Jerry Moore owns property in Tarpine and was recommended to abstain from the vote in favor of the expansion. Currently, the airport is out of compliance with the Florida Department of Transportation because of obstructions to the ight path and encroachments to the runway protection zone. In order to come into compliance, several trees would need to be removed and the airport would need to be shifted slightly to the west because of a hangar parcel that is too close to the protection zone, as well as the La Cantina Grille building and other property located within the Tarpine subdivision. If the county doesnt meet the requirements, it will lose its funding and ultimately lose the airport, said county consultant Jon Sewell of Kimley-Horn and Associates. The rst step towards making these improvements includes amending the current Joint Participation Agreement of $78,391. The county was awarded this grant from the FDOT and the money was intended to be used for runway lighting. However, the county is looking at shifting the runway to the west which would make installing the lighting pointless. Instead, the county will use the money to perform an obstruction survey and analysis, remove trees that are obstructing the ight path, update the Airport Layout Plan, perform property appraisals and airport strategic planning. The county commission agreed to have Kimley-Horn perform these tasks. Those in opposition of the airport questioned the order of the tasks that will be performed and asked the commission to look at updating its Airport Master Plan before anything else is done. The master plan is 23 years old, said Surf Road resident Dana Peck. She added that not having a master plan is like having the cart before the horse. Your horse is dead. Its been dead for 3 years, she said. County Administrator David Edwards said the Airport Layout Plan is the master plan and FDOT only requires them to update the layout plan. The controversy surrounding the airport started after a portion of private property on Surf Road next to the airport was cleared, which served as a buffer for the residents, and a sign stating that it was the future site of the airport expansion was placed there. Many residents in the area became concerned about a possible expansion and their properties being impacted. And several of their properties along Surf Road were included in the land acquisitions. The county has said those properties will be taken out when the ALP is updated. Continued on Page 13ABoard approves new septic system standards. Page 2A. Back to School Back to School Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 32nd Issue Thursday, August 23, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Weekly Roundup .............................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 12A News Extra! .....................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 3B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 6B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7B Just a Pinch Recipes .......................................................Page 10B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11BINDEX By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netL. James Parham says that the decision to run for property appraiser came almost as an epiphany. He was deeply involved in the Wakulla Airport expansion issue, joining with other neighbors concerned about the impact, and he discovered what he believed were some questionable appraisals for land around the airport including property that had been improved with a hangar but the taxable value didnt reflect the new building because the owner had never got a Certi cate of Occupancy from the county and so the issue had fallen through the cracks. Parham, who is an appraiser by trade, decided he should run for Wakulla County Property Appraiser. Parham will face incumbent Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman in the November election. Parham was born and raised in Tallahassee, though he says he played, explored, hunted, shed in the woods of Wakulla and surrounding counties. After graduating from Florida State University in 1973 with a degree in Marketing Management, he worked for the Florida Department of Transportation in eminent domain, and moved to the Tampa Bay area in 1976 where he was an appraiser for St. Petersburg Savings & Loan, becoming chief appraiser after a few years and eventually purchasing the banks appraisal department to start the L. James Parham Company. Parham was successful there, saying that areas boom in growth came after the Tampa International Airport was enlarged. Hillsborough and Pinellas counties started working together and the area became attractive for development. Wakulla County is positioned to grab a good chunk of growth as the area comes out of economic recession, says Parham. Wakulla has unique characteristics, such as its unspoiled environment, while also being part of the Tallahassee metropolitan area, which gives it a good quality of life. He does anticipate that the next boom cycle is several years off, however predicting it will be 2020 or 2025, which will be when Baby Boomer grandchildren are moving out on their own. The most exciting thing is the kind of transformational era Wakulla County is in right now, he says. He notes that local growth is currently in the doldrums, with progress coming in ts and starts. Were not completely out of the recession. Yet he is optimistic about Wakullas future. Parham says, as property appraiser, he would aid in economic development by bringing a private sector mentality to a public sector job. For example, he offers a retail market analysis of the Crawfordville area that looks at the supply and demand of different industries within a ve, 10, and 15-minute radius. That analysis looks at whether theres a surplus or need for certain types of businesses based on whats already there ranging from automobile dealers to restaurants.Continued on Page 2AJames Parham is a candidate for property appraiser James Parham is running for property appraiser.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLand donated by Ben Boynton to create historic Heritage VillageCommission approves airport expansionBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netLocal historian Betty Greens dream of having a place to keep the history of Wakulla alive and feature the historic homes of the late 1800s is slowly becoming a reality. Green, along with other members of the Wakulla County Historical Society, community leaders and residents celebrated on Aug. 17 the donation of 40 acres of land off Zion Hill Road for the Heritage Village Park. Its something weve been praying about for a long time, Green said as tears lled her eyes. Its just a blessing. Local developer Ben Bonyton and his family donated the land, which was originally part of the natural state of his planned subdivision, Bloxham Plantation. His wife, Anne, signed over the land to historical society president Cathy Frank at the ceremony, and said both she and her husband are interested in history and were excited to have a small part in Wakullas. Were grateful, Frank said. She added that she was grateful Green, Heritage Village Park Committee Chariman Murray McLaughlin, Cal Jamison and others had the vision for this park. And were glad he had the vision also, Frank said of the Boynton family. Continued on Page 2A JENNIFER JENSENBen Boynton at the ceremony on FridayJENNIFER JENSENWakulla students returned to class on Thursday, Aug. 16. These students at Shadeville Elementary played follow-the-leader to the school bus after the rst day, which was reported as very smooth by Superintendent David Miller. Enrollment is down slightly in Wakulla, but Miller expected the district would meet projections. More photos in News Extra! on Page 1B. St. Marks streetscape work will begin soon. Page 5A. Community Center Advisory Committee meets. Page 5A. More local government news inside:Recent rains bring mushrooms to Wakulla lawnsSee Page 14A

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Continued from Page 1A Members of the historical society appeared before the Wakulla County Commission in early 2011 and presented their vision for the park and the need for land. Boynton was at the commission meeting and approached McLaughlin after the meeting about the possible donation. Boynton was looking to create larger lots in the subdivision and in creating larger lots, the natural state would be lowered and not meet the state requirement of 45 percent. The gift to the society would help him meet requirements for conservation easements and the natural state requirement. A portion of the natural state will now be used for the Heritage Village. The land use revision for the change was approved at the July meeting of the county commission. This is a 500-year donation, said County Commissioner Jerry Moore. This is the history of your county. The 40-acre site will be the nal resting place for the 12 historic homes that were donated by local families. These homes, along with an old school house, will be restored and on display for visitors to see how people lived in the late 1800s. There will also be education kiosks, exhibits and walking trails. There is also an idea of an amphitheater to perform educational programs and plays to share the local history, said McLaughlin. There is also an idea to have a farmstead, which would include demonstrations of the sugar cane and turpentine industries. Those things that are indigenous to Wakulla County, McLaughlin said. He added that they will probably incorporate something for the shing industry as well. One aspect that the society feels is very important is to have an African American community at the park also, similar to Hyde Park, McLaughlin said. One house has been donated to them and they are hoping to get more. There was also an idea to have a Native American site on the property. You get a vision and go with it, Frank said. The rst step was acquiring the land, she said. The society has a lot of ideas, but needs to come to a consensus and gure out exactly what they want at the site, he said. The conceptual plan is being nalized. After that, there will be engineered drawings then infrastructure. In the meantime, McLaughlin said the society is looking at raising money for the site through grants and fundraising. The cost to move each one of the old homes could be $5,000 each or more, he said. It could take years for the park to open, but members of the community and historical society were excited at the possibilities. We hope it will be one of the top attractions of Wakulla County, Frank said. For more information, call 926-3931, email 24research@gmail.com or visit http://wakullahistory.org.James Parham is running for property appraiser Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1AIt is this type of information and experience that Parham says makes him a strong candidate: his ability to identify studies of the local market and then report what the strongest demand is. Appraisal is a study of human behavior in the real estate market, he says. For two years in the 1990s, Parham took a sabbatical. He had worked all his adult life and decided he needed to do something different. He bought a travel-trailer and drove the Oregon Trail. Not a mid-life crisis, he says, but a mid-life adjustment. Those two years shifted some priorities, he adds, I live a far less consumptive life than before a simpler life. He has since started Red Hills Land Company, and while he makes less money now, thats because I only work for who I want to, doing work that I love. New jobs in Wakulla County depend on a reputation of fair play for all, he says. Im an independent. I dont owe anybody any allegiance. Im funding my campaign myself because I dont want to owe anybody. He says he will accept campaign donations, but makes potential donors acknowledge that it doesnt imply any future favors. Hes married to Ramsay Carsell Parham and has two stepdaughters and four grandchildren. His wifes grandfather was Jack Simmons, who owned Simmons Lodge on Ochlockonee Bay as well as Elberta Crate, and who originally owned the property where they currently live. Of his candidacy, Parham says, I want to do this for, with and about Wakulla County.Land donated by Ben Boynton to create historic Heritage Village PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENNIFER JENSEN LAND FOR A HERITAGE VILLAGE: The historical societys Museum Director Cal Jamison, above, gives a tour of the property, showing off sinkholes and other features that will be incorporated into the village. Cathy Frank, the historical society president, at right, is all smiles as Anne Boynton signs the paperwork to transfer ownership of the land to the group. In addition to the 12 donated houses, the village may also have a farmstead with demonstrations of the sugar cane and turpentine industries, and possibly something of the shing industry as well. LETS DO THIS TOGETHER! DO YOU WANT IT?Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN GET YOU MOTIVATED! GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netCurrently, all new developments within Wakulla County are required to install a performance based septic system, however, effective Oct. 1, these systems will only be required within the Wakulla Springs Special Planning Area for properties that are smaller than 5 contiguous acres. It will also be required for properties where the total acreage is less than 0.229 acres and those where the system will be installed within 150 feet of the high water level of any surface water, wet sink, swallet or within 300 feet of a rst of second magnitude spring. This change was approved by the Wakulla County Commission at its Aug. 20 meeting with a vote of four to one, with Commissioner Lynn Artz opposing. Artz felt the Wakulla Springs Special Planning Area did not include all the sensitive areas of the county. We are not being responsible stewards of our environment, Artz said. The area mirrors the Wakulla Springs contributing area, said Commissioner Randy Merritt. Previously, there were areas not included that were of concern to Artz and Commissioner Alan Brock, including Spring Creek. Artz and Brock both voted against sending the amendments to the Department of Environmental Protection. DEP also had some concerns about the area proposed and recommended including the entire Wakulla Spring contributing area. So, the staff proposed using the Wakulla Spring Special Planning Area map, which has already been in existence and encompasses a larger area than the previous one, according to County Planner Melissa Corbett. Resident and Planning Commissioner Chuck Hess said the current proposed area is better than the original, but still needs to be broader. The whole purpose is protecting the groundwater and those sensitive areas need to be included, he said. Another change would be for the requirement that nitrogen levels must be reduced by 90 percent to the state standards of 50 percent. Also, repairs and modi cations to existing septic systems are allowed without requiring an upgrade to performance based septic systems. The group, a 1,000 Friends of Florida endorsed the proposed change, Merritt said. That letter proves that we can protect the environment, but still have common sense. Merritt brought the amendment forward because he felt requiring the entire county to have performance based septic systems was not necessary. Previously, the commission was looking at taking out the specific septic tank language in the comprehensive plan and incorporating general protection language. The more speci c requirements would be made in the land Development code. However, the Florida Legislature adopted House Bill 1263 which repealed the requirement for septic tank inspections and limited the area where performance based systems can be required. The countys comprehensive plan provisions are grandfathered in and to ensure that the county is in the best legal position, County Attorney Heather Encinosa suggested instead to propose a separate policy that includes these revisions and narrows the policy already in the comprehensive plan. Artz said she didnt feel comfortable with passing the amendments because of the possibility of losing the countys grandfathered status. Its a risk, Artz said.Board approves new septic system standards GRAPHIC: WAKULLA COUNTY GOVERNMENTOn Oct. 1, performance-based septic systems will only be required in the Wakulla Springs Special Planning Area, which is roughly from the county line south to Shadeville Road.We can protect the environment, but still have common sense, one county commissioner says of reducing the area where advanced waste treatment is required, while another, on the losing side of a 4-1 vote, contends the change means We are not being responsible stewards of our environment. COUNTY COMMISSION The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, September 10, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, October 1, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.AUGUST 23, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSCopies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.AUGUST 23, 2012The Wakulla County Planning Commission and the Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, September 10 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, October 1, 2012 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be holding two public hearings on Ordinance 2012-02.An Ordinance of the City of Sopchoppy adopting the operating budgets for the City of Sopchoppy for the 2012-2013 scal year. The rst public hearing, followed by the rst reading of Ordinance 2012-02, will be held Tuesday, August 30 2012 at a special called meeting of the Council. The second public hearing on the budget and adoption of Ordinance, 2012-02 will be September 10, 2012 during the regular monthly meeting of the City Council. Both meetings will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, Florida. A copy of the Budget may be viewed at City Hall from 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Thursday and from 8:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Friday. If special assistance is needed to attend this meeting, please call the Clerks ofce at 962-4611 at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting.PUBLIC MEETINGS TO ADOPT THE BUDGET OF THE CITY OF SOPCHOPPYAUGUST 23, 30, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:Langston not prohibited from running for sheriff Lucinda Cindy Norman obituary Teachers vote overwhelmingly for contract Lucinda Cindy Norman obituary Coast Guard Auxiliary for Aug. 23, 2012 From the Dock for Aug. 16, 2012 People You Should Know: Jimmie Doyle, NAMI Wakulla Big Hearted Angels visit Wakullathewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Editor, The News: The League of Women Voters of Wakullas rst forum moderated by the Tallahassee Democrats former Capital Bureau reporter Bill Cotterell, will be held Thursday, Aug. 23. It will start at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library, 4330 Crawfordville Highway. Our first office will be Superintendent of Schools which is an open seat. The next of ce, at 8 p.m. will be Property Appraiser. This will be Wakulla citizens opportunity to meet the candidates and hear their positions on various topics pertaining to their of ce. This is the rst of three forums the League of Woman Voter of Wakulla will be sponsoring. We hope this letter will serve to encourage Wakullans to attend. The League of Women voters is a nonpartisan political organization encouraging the informed and active participation of all citizens in the political process. We encourage all citizens to vote and vote early! Mary Cortese President LWV WakullaEditor, The News: I planned to wait a bit after the primary election to write another political letter but recent events have prompted me to cut the wait short. A few weeks ago I noticed that electioneering communication focused on the County Commission Seat 3 race had started to appear. Print ads, Facebook pages and websites had appeared some focused on the candidacy of former County Commissioner Howard Kessler and others focused on current Commissioner Mike Stewart. As of now, the Wakulla Democratic Party has not endorsed a candidate in this race. We may not do so at all since there is no Democratic candidate in the race. However, as a voting citizen of this county, I personally have an interest in the outcome of this race. Previously, I have voted for both Mike Stewart and Howard Kessler albeit for different races. I have never had to choose between them on a ballot before. Their campaigns in this cycle will in uence how I cast my vote this November. Over the weekend, I saw an electioneering site on Facebook take a very negative turn. Previously, the Facebook page and the website, www.tellthetruthmikestewart.com critiqued Commissioner Stewarts record in of ce. However, on Saturday, a post from the Facebook page administrator posed questions about Commissioner Stewarts ties to a group called Floridians for Accountability engaged in electioneering communication against Dr. Howard Kessler. The posting suggested that the group supported marriage equality, but referred to the issue as gay marriage and questioned Commissioner Stewarts family values. I was disturbed by this negative turn. No human rights ordinance has been proposed in Wakulla County. There has been no referendum on marriage of any kind in this community. Why say this and why attack someones family values for something that would be a state or federal issue rather than a county commission issue? Furthermore, there doesnt seem to be a link between Commissioner Stewart and this electioneering communications organization. On my own Facebook page, I linked to the electioneering page and spoke out against negative campaigning. I also called for Dr. Kessler to take a stand against the page. Both Commissioner Stewart and Dr. Kessler responded to my posts. Other community members participated in the thread as well. The Facebook page has since been taken down or perhaps I have been blocked from viewing it but the address and name was www.facebook.com/pages/Tell-the-TruthMike-Stewart/372675729469564?ref=ts. The thread on my own Facebook page disappeared with it. The page still shows up in search engines but can no longer be accessed. I felt compelled to write this letter because Dr. Kessler stated that he did not approve of negative campaigning and that he had no connection to the Facebook page or to the website www.tellthetruthmikestewart.com/. Both were listed as paid electioneering communication paid for by FLQOL, 3019 Spirea Street, Sarasota FL 34231. This group is the Florida Quality of Life Council, Inc. It is a registered electioneering communications organization. The only source of income for this group are a series of inkind donations for accounting made by the BATTLEGROUND GROUP, INC. An inquiry into the actual IP address of the website www.tellthetruthmikestewart. com shows that it is registered to Republican political strategist Chris Akins. I believe there is a place in politics for electioneering communication. However, I think such groups need to stick to actual issues that are relevant to the race. I think it is important that candidates are honest with citizens about efforts undertaken on their behalf. To say, this is terrible and I didnt authorize it nor do I condone it is one thing. Candidates cant always control what their supporters do. However, in this instance, the connecting lines between Dr. Kessler, Chris Akins, FQOL, the Battleground Group and the negative electioneering communication sites beg for scrutiny. Im calling for a clean, honest race for County Commission Seat 3 in which the candidates stick to the issues and campaign on their own merits. Candidates, please keep it clean. Rachel Sutz Pienta Chair Wakulla Democratic Party Ive written so many columns about the dif culties of growing older not that I am getting older, Nurse Judy, my vain alter ego, is quick to add but now I feel I should give a positive message. It is true that ones memory isnt as sharp as when one was younger, but even that isnt all bad. Let me explain. I am a nurse, not a home economics major, so I have never been good at sewing. That never stopped me from trying in my younger days, and my children suffered through all the homemade matching out ts I made them until the day my son rebelled, reminding me that he was the only boy in school whose pants didnt have a y. I had no idea how to make pants except to cut out two halves, sew them together and put elastic in the waist, so his complaint left me with no alternative but to give up my seamstress career. The family was pleased. My sewing machine was not. Going into retirement, except for some mending chores, was demeaning for a machine of this caliber. It knew its abilities were being severely underutilized. After all, it could stitch forward or backward, wide or thin, embroider, buttonhole, hem, cross-stitch, pleat, tuck and smock. It had every kind of bell and whistle on it, which I never had any idea how to use. Im sure if I had ever learned how to direct it, it could have done the entire job by itself and make me a cup of coffee while I waited for it to accomplish the task. Alas, I have never been good at technical non-medical equipment, although I did marvel at its underused talents. I believe if I put wheels on it, and I was smart enough, I could have driven it to work. Anyhow, this machine stayed with me wherever I went for the next x&*# years (forgive the typo), and a curious thing happened to it. It was supposedly a portable number and in my younger day I could sling it out of the cupboard and onto a table with no problem. As time went on that machine began to put on weight. I could understand this as the same thing had happened to me. Still, it became more and more dif cult for me to man-handle it to a useable platform, so the mending would pile up for months going on years. A few weeks ago the mending basket was so high that Bee Bee, the kitten, couldnt nd his way out. I ate a hearty breakfast, drank an energy drink, put on an abdominal brace and reluctantly made my way to the cupboard to try and wrestle the behemoth of a sewing machine out and up onto the table. I opened the door and couldnt believe my eyes. A brand new lightweight machine was sitting in the old guys place. Where had it come from? I racked my brain for quite a while trying to gure this gift out. Little bits of information began to lter in. I remembered that when WalMart stopped selling yard goods they had a sewing machine sale. I vaguely remembered looking at them. I must have bought one. How delightful! So memory lapses arent all that bad. If you buy something and put it away for later use, you can get a wonderful gift from time to time. There is one slight problem. Where did that old machine go? Do you suppose it got wheels and drove away? More later.Judy Conlin is a nurse in Wakulla and Gadsden counties. Her website is www.nursejudyinfo.comEditor, The News: When Obama took of ce the national debt was $10 trillion. The difference from what he delivered and promised is $11 trillion ($16 trillion minus $5 trillion): Too surreal a miscalculation to be other than deliberate. Obama is using the debt to attain the power of the moral equivalent of war. Debt is the excuse to concentrate power: the masses must submit. Witness Greece. Soon, the interest on the debt cant be paid, or massive in ation begins, or buyers of treasury notes will dry up, or interest rates will rise on our debt, or further downgrades will occur: Any number of dire consequences from a grotesquely purposeful, unsustainable scal policy. Climate change having failed to deliver this moral equivalent, Obama knows his foot on the spending pedal is the best chance remaining. Third world progressives use the police or military to stay in control, but Obama will use taxes, class warfare and the IRS. Obamas reelection portends the Cassandra TV commercial: You are beautiful, but you are about to loose everything. Joel Thornton Joelthornton91@yahoo.com Editor, The News: Attention, 2nd Infantry Division Veterans: The Florida Branch of the Second (Indianhead) Division Association will have its annual reunion in Titusville on Oct. 12-14 at the Best Western Space Shuttle Inn. For reservations, call the hotel at (321) 2699100 and say you are with the Second Division. For more information, call the branch secretarytreasurer, Donald Calnan, at (561) 742-5379 or send an email to 2ida.mail@ charter.net. Mike Davino Vice President Olivia, N.C. Its not always a bad thing growing older Judy Conlin Nurse Judys Nook READERS WRITE:Speaking out on negative campaigning Obamas scal policy is purposeful Leagues rst forum is ursday 2nd Infantry to hold reunionA news item in last weeks News, Sheriffs Of ce to host sporting clays tournament as bene t for youth ranch, had a date for the event that was apparently changed after the information was sent out. The event is now set for Sept. 22. An updated article appears on page 13A of this issue.CorrectionBy SLIM RANDLES When the world is hot and my skin is fried, scratching from the constant dry, let the clouds boil up, boil up high, and then shade the earth with the darkening sky and bring the secrets and the smell of rain. The coolness and the blessed rain again. Our land is brown but blessed, stressed in the heat, the shiny heat of day. The slender green of rivers slide along, striving to continue, to feed its own along the banks, the banks where the dust rises. Rises, powdery clomp by clomp as we walk, walk the shady way. And though the heat, the dryness of heat, pushes down our weary feet, we plod along. When the heat falls hard, on many days, unquenched by the dark of night, we ask, in quiet times, we ask. Bring us the clouds, the black-bellied clouds, the clouds that softly hold the heads of gods in their moistening grasp. Let them come, with their silver tops and their bellies black as night and cool as forgiveness. The clouds, the rain, the respite from the toil. To soak the thirsty soil. Fill our pores, smooth our skin, wash us free of dirt and sin, with the rain, the cleansing, blessing rain. Sink the water to the core of the earth and push it through the dust, making it heavy and loath to leave the ground. When its done, when its over, when weve had our treasure and the clouds have gone, when its over, please, bring it again another day. Another day of clouds, of life, of rain, of supreme love and comfort, of one more treat for man and his animal friends. Wait until its right, but then, bring the big rollers in from the west, and let us watch the world get its ery drink, and drink in the noise and think about cooler times, but knowlet us know that there is nothing better than this. Brought to you by the new book Home Country,at www.slimrandles.com. Home country: e blessing of rain

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page 5A The Waku lla News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com M a n a t ee T i m e s Adversing Networks of Florida Statewide advertisingone low price Reach a wide audience (866)742-1373 all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor An independent for independent appraisals in 35 counties for 38 years (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser Interior Remodeling Doors Floors Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling Decks/Barns/Fences Portable, Private, Outdoor ShowersFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS NEW! (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC.Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Back pain Muscle pain Arthritis pain Joint pain By JEFF HUGO Summer afternoons are hot. But early mornings are gorgeous. Nowhere is that statement more evident than on an early morning river cruise on the Wakulla River at Wakulla Springs State Park. One of the best views of the river greets the observer at the rst bend. The suns golden light lters through the silvery strands of Spanish moss dangling from the chartreuse leaves of giant bald cypress trees. Not far distant, the silhouetted form of an anhinga perches upon a heaven-ward pointing cypress knee. Its elegant form embodying the quintessence of an ancient and wild Florida. The snort of a manatee directs attention to its massive yet graceful form as it breaks the still surface for a needed breath. This Wakulla whale embodies the antithesis of a marine mammal. It does not eat esh. It is rarely in a hurry. And it abhors water temperatures below 67 degrees. Bathed in the peacefulness of early morning, the manatee must truly believe it has found a spa at Wakulla Springs. The drone of a bullfrog, the cackling of a moorhen, or the gentle splash of a mullet occasionally punctuates the rivers ambiance. These are all sounds now audible thanks to electric engines installed on two of the parks river boats. The advancement is courtesy of the generosity of park guests and the efforts of the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park. One last opportunity to experience the glory of early morning on the Wakulla River in 2012 presents itself on Saturday, Aug. 25. At 8 a.m., the boat departs the dock. Interested parties can call (850) 5617286 to reserve space. Tickets may be purchased at the Waterfront Visitors Center at Wakulla Springs State Park beginning at 7:45 a.m. Prices are $10 for everyone 13 years old and up while children ages 3-12 are $7. Following the tour, further enhance the morning with a satisfying breakfast in the Wakulla Springs Lodge. Peruse the breakfast menu at www.wakullaspringslodge.com. Enjoy golden griddle cakes or French toast, or Southern classics like country biscuits with sausage gravy or fried chicken with eggs and grits. Round out your morning in a beautiful setting overlooking the worlds largest and deepest freshwater spring.Jeff Hugo is a ranger at Wakulla Springs State Park.By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter a bumpy start, the Wakulla County Community Center Advisory Committee met again on Aug. 14 to establish its purpose. The committee was created by the Wakulla County Commission and included a broad range of representation from members in the community. After those first meetings, it became clear that some of the members did not fully support the idea of a community center. Following that meeting, county commissioners expressed their disappointment in the community and one called the group dysfunctional. Commissioner Lynn Artz was present at the advisory committee meeting said she felt bad that the rst few meetings were frustrating. She added that those on the committee should be advocates of the community center. Committee member and Sopchoppy City Commissioner Aginita Rosier said the community center has already been established and a site has been chosen. Were not here to argue or debate that, Rosier said. Their purpose is to provide guidance to the commission, she added. County Administrator David Edwards said the group needed to refocus what it is doing. We need to refocus the energy, Edwards said. Two areas where the group needs to focus is programs offered at the community center, what the YMCA can offer and those outside of the YMCA, and starting to fundraise to help bring money to the scholarship program of the YMCA, Edwards said. He added that the third area is on funding for infrastructure, but it was not needed at the moment. They also discussed restructuring the committee. Two members, Billy Jones and Bill Versiga, have resigned and others have not been supportive of the community center. The members include Steve Brown, Senior Center Director R.H. Carter, retired art teacher Diane Perez, School Board appointee Louis Hernandez, YMCA representative Ken Franklin, WHS Assistant Principal Simeon Nelson, Sopchoppy City Commissioner Aginita Rosier, Charlotte Cobb and youth representative Natalie Crum. Those in attendance at the meeting included Rosier, Cobb, Franklin and an alternate for Carter. Edwards said they either need to correct members and ll vacancies or they can start small. Artz agreed to reach out to the other members that were not in attendance and see if they are still willing to serve on the committee. No formal business was discussed because the committee did not have a quorum. But all those in attendance agreed the community center was a huge need for the county. We dont want our children to go to Tallahassee, Rosier said. The county acquired the 22-acre property that was previously home to New Life Church on May 24, 2010, with plans to turn it into a community center. The current plan for the community center site is to use a legislative appropriation to renovate the former sanctuary building to include free weight and cardio room, fitness class room, kid zone and restrooms and showers. The other building would remain as it is, with several of ces. Also include in the plans is the addition of an open floor gymnasium, which would have high school and college regulation size basketball court. The former sanctuary building would be utilized by the YMCA, which has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the county to manage the community center. A request for proposals was sent out and the YMCA was the lone responder. There is now discussion needed to determine what kinds of programs the YMCA will offer.Community Center Advisory Committee meets again WAKULLA SPRINGS NEWS & NOTESTake an early morning river cruise By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netConstruction on the city streetscape in St. Marks is expected to start any day. The rain has prevented the company from beginning work on the project, which was anticipated to start on Monday, Aug. 20. The contract was awarded to Hale Contracting on July 9. It will be paid for by a $600,000 Community Development Block Grant for downtown revitalization. City Manager Zoe Mans- eld said the contractor has promised to have the project completed by the Stone Crab Festival on Oct. 20. They have 90 days to nish, but have said they will do it in 45 days, she said. Hale Contractings bid was $398,123 and includes the addition of a sidewalk on both sides of Port Leon Drive from Pine Street to Riverside Drive, an imprint of a lighthouse in the center of the road at the end of Riverside Drive, benches, trash cans, period lighting and landscaping improvements. The landscaping improvements include a 4-foot median in certain points of the road, which would have owers and other plants to help with the beauti cation of the road. Engineer Joe Hope, with Hydro Engineering, developed the plans and the grant is being administered by Fred Fox. In other news: The city commission approved setting the two public hearings on the proposed budget for 2012-13 for Sept. 5 and Sept. 18. The proposed budget includes the same millage rate as the previous two years of 5.0327 per $1,000 of assessed property value, Mans eld said. Not much has changed from the previous year, she added. All the tanks on the St. Marks Refinery Site, now known as St. Marks Innovation Park, have been removed. Mayor Chuck Shields said now the city will look at other funding to improve the dock and other improvements at the site. The dock could serve as an off-loading facility, ship building yard or seafood processing plant area, he said. The city commission asked St. Marks Waterfronts Florida Partnership to help pursue grants for that project. Billy Bishop, of Waterfronts, said a Florida Recreational Developmental Assistance Program grant he came across might work for that site. The next meeting will be a special called budget meeting on Sept. 5. The regular commission meeting will be Sept. 13.CITY OF ST. MARKSStreetscape construction begins soonSPECIAL TO THE NEWSPassengers look out on the spectacular view of the Wakulla River on an early morning cruise.

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Some things I will do as a parent: I will take my child to school. I will meet my childs teacher. My child will learn. My child will graduate. My child will do his/ her best. I will exchange phone numbers with my childs teacher. I will meet with the teacher when my child has problems. I will not let my child spend hours on TV and games, etc. I will see that my child goes to bed on time. I will see that my child is not late for school. I will see that my child starts his or her school day with a good spirit. The Church of Christ Written in Heaven will hold a Sunday School Convention at the Tabernacle Church of Christ W.I.H. in Gretna on Aug. 21 through Aug. 26 beginning at 8 p.m. nightly. On Sunday will be Sunday School at 10:30 a.m. At noon, worship service. Host pastor Diocese Mother Maylis Harrison. Churches attending the convention will be from Sopchoppy, Marianna, Gretna, Blountstown, Wewahitchka, Hardaway, Two Egg, Tallahassee, Woodville, St. Rose, Quincy, Panama City and elsewhere. You are welcome to come and fellowship. We invite you to come fellowship with us at Skipper Temple Church of Christ on Surf Road in Sopchoppy. On Tuesday, Bible teaching and prayer at 7 p.m. Sunday School is Sunday morning at 10, followed by worship service at 11 a.m. Everyone is welcome. Happy birthday to Isiah Hines Jr. and Shanequa Hines. Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments WEDNESDAY: and Adults 10:30am 11:00am Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Churchreligious views and events New Testament Bible ChurchBible-believing Church meets at Wakulla County Public Library, large conference room. Songs, prayer and Bible teaching/preaching. The Lord Jesus described the basic meaning of a church in a very simple and yet profound way:For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.Come take part in our study of Gods Word.4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Church BriefsResolutions for a parent of school-age childrenBuckhorn NewsBy Ethel SkipperThe simple things in life OUT TO PASTORREV. JAMES L. SNYDER And I must say I do not get very much help on this part, especially from the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Her idea of keeping it simple is not telling me everything. This past week I think she went a little too far. It was Saturday night and I was preparing for my weekly bath. I had assembled all the necessary equipment: my rubber ducky, my reading glasses and the book I was reading at the time. There is nothing more relaxing to me than a hot bubble bath with a good book. Eventually, I put my book up and began the ritual of taking a bath. I reached for the bar of soap and it felt a little different then I had remembered from the week before. It felt as though it had been rolled in gravelly dirt. Wanting to know what the problem was, I called to my wife. Whats wrong with the soap? She then came into the bathroom and said, Theres nothing wrong with the soap. But it feels different, I complained. Thats because its oatmeal soap, she explained. Oatmeal soap? What do you mean, oatmeal soap? Its a new soap I found at the Bath and Body store. Its something new. Its good for you, use it. I immediately began to search my mind (I almost got lost in the process) for information concerning oatmeal. I knew, for example, that oatmeal was a food. I like a bowl of hot oatmeal in the morning with sliced bananas. And oatmeal raisin cookies go perfect with a nice hot cup of coffee. However, I could not nd any information in my brain collaborating the fact that you can wash with oatmeal. I looked at the bar of oatmeal soap and did not know if I should wash with it or eat it. And, where do you put the sliced bananas? To make matters worse, if that could be possible, I discovered in the bathtub a new bottle of shampoo. It was called Sweet Apple Shampoo. There is nothing like a fruity-tooty bubble bath to bring out the manly spirit in a person. This incident only illustrated to me the fact that we live in a very complicated world. Somebody comes up with some simple idea that is a good idea. However, the real money goes to the person who can take that simple idea and complicate it beyond all recognition. There aint nothing simple anymore, my grandfather used to say. And hes been dead for 30 years. What would he say today? For example, take your common everyday telephone. The telephone is no longer a phone but rather a full communication system. You can do everything on your cell phone. I tried to buy a new cell phone recently and found it rather dif cult. All I want is to be able to phone my wife when Im away from the house. Do you know I could not nd a cell phone that just was a phone. I remember the days when the telephone was a party system. What parties we used to have. Each person on that party phone line had a certain ring. I still remember ours. It was two rings. Of course, whenever the phone rang everybody on the party line knew who was getting a call and felt complete liberty in joining in. Not just telephones but also everything else has been complicated for us. A watch is no longer a watch, but rather a timepiece that does everything but tell time. I saw one that was also a cell phone. Now, I need a cell phone to nd out what time it is and I need a watch to make a phone call. While Im on the subject, try to nd a phone booth in the neighborhood. The absence of the neighborhood phone booth may explain the rise in crime. Where in the world does Clark Kent change into his Superman suit? Then there is coffee. On a recent trip, I had to use the services of our friendly airline service, which necessitated spending time in airports, which is as close to purgatory as a person can get without dying. I tried to nd a plain cup of coffee. Everywhere I went they had everything but plain coffee. The coffee had been avored with everything from vanilla to pineapples and a few ingredients I could not pronounce. No wonder so many elderly people go senile. Its the only sane thing to do in such a complicated world. Where, oh where have the simple things in life gone? Only one place remains simple for me. That is the Bible. It is not hard understanding what Jesus meant. Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me. John 14:6 (KJV). As far as Im concerned, nothing is complicated about trusting Jesus.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. Its REVOLUTION time at First Baptist in Crawfordville From Aug. 22 through Aug. 25, First Baptist Church of Crawfordville (FBCC) will host its annual, county-wide youth revival REVOLUTION. Everyone is invited to attend this exciting four-night event with this years speaker, Pastor Sterling Lynn from Blackshear Place Baptist Church. Come and hear what Jesus death has accomplished for humanity and where you t into Gods plan for the world. Teenagers bring your questions and your friends. Music worship will be led by Chaotic Resemblance, and you can check them out in advance at www.facebook.com/pages/ Chaotic-Resemblance/153396921344744. REVOLUTION runs nightly from 7 to 9 p.m., and dinner is provided Wednesday through Friday at 6 p.m. Dont miss the Friday night concert by Chaotic Resemblance from 9:30 to 10:30 p.m., and the Saturday night ice cream party from 9 to 10 p.m. Adults are invited to attend all events, and are encouraged to come to an informative talk Saturday morning from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. covering basic areas of concern and providing conversation starters for dif cult topics. For more information, call the FBCC ofce at 926-7896. Family of Ruth McCaliister High says thank you for support The family of Ruth McCallister High would like to thank all their friends and relatives for all the support, food, owers, help and for being by our side, and Ruths, during this time. God Bless everyone! Thank you. Judy Pat Larson and family

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From News ServicesThere was a slight increase in Wakullas unemployment rate, up to 7.5 percent from 7.3 percent in June. But the gures showed a decrease overall in Wakullas jobless rate over the past year from 8.9 percent a full 1.4 percent reduction. The unemployment rate for the state reversed course last month, edging up to 8.8 percent, 0.2 percent higher than in June, but was still nearly two percentage points below where it was a year ago, the government said Friday. The states total number of jobs in July decreased by 3,300 from June, the state Department of Economic Opportunity said. But Gov. Rick Scott said the overall picture when looking at several months is positive, and noted the state has high numbers of online job ads. While the unemployment rate can vary from month to month, Florida continues to see positive private sector job growth, Scott said in a statement put out by his of ce. My goal remains the same, to make Florida the number one business destination in the world by improving the states economic climate, highlighting our talented and skilled workforce and getting Floridians back to work. Neighboring Leon County saw a slight increase moving from 7.6 percent to 8.1 percent over the month but had a 1.0 percent decrease over the year from 9.1 percent. In the local area, Gadsden County saw a 1.1 percent increase from the June 2012 rate, moving from 8.7 percent to 9.8 percent. However, over the year, there was a decrease of 1.5 percent from 11.3 percent. Even with the slight increases seen locally, the Tallahassee MSA maintained the fth lowest unemployment in the state at 8.2 percent and fell below the national rate of 8.6 percet and the state rate of 9.3 percent. Local rates reported are not seasonally adjusted, meaning that seasonality (regularly occurring yearly events such as summer break for schools) plays a signi cant role for the over-the-month increase in the unemployment rate. Declines in trade, transportation and utilities, retail trade and government, made up the largest job losses seen locally. DEO said there were 816,000 jobless Floridians in July out of a labor force of 9.2 million. Nationally, the unemployment rate in July was 8.3 percent, essentially unchanged from June. Floridas big employment problem remained the construction industry. There were still nearly 17,000 fewer construction jobs in July than in the same month of 2011, a 5.2 percent year-over-year decline. Counties with relatively high proportions of government employment remained among those with the lowest unemployment rates. Monroe County at 5.3 percent was best in the state, followed by Walton and Okaloosa, the only other counties under 6.5 percent. The highest unemployment was in Hendry County, where 16.1 percent of the workforce is jobless. Flagler, St. Lucie, and Indian River counties all have unemployment over 12 percent. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page 7ABy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 17 Floridas political parties this week named their respective teams for the upcoming general election as primaries separated the no longer hopefuls from the standard bearers. Like any All-Star team, Democrats and Republicans alike will recognize many familiar faces as incumbents and heirs apparent swept into of ce during Tuesdays primary from both camps. But each party had a few surprises as incumbents fell and newcomers emerged. Eyes now turn toward the general election, less than 12 weeks away. To that end, election of- cials said they will once again begin culling through the names of potentially ineligible voters after striking a deal to access a federal database following months of legal wrangling over its use. The states economics were also part of the political fray this week as Gov. Rick Scott and GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney took different views of the latest jobless gures released for July. Scott said he sees blue skies ahead despite a small uptick in the states unemployment rate as Florida continues to claw its way back. Romney, meanwhile, sees that same sky, but its not so blue. Also, it is falling. PRIMARY COLORS Voters from across the state cast ballots Tuesday on host of races from U.S. Senate to local precinct committeemen. Much speculation surrounded the Republicans and how the partys conservative wing would fare. The results were mixed. In one race for Congress, 10-term incumbent John Mica survived a challenge from Sandy Adams, who had been ushered into Congress as part of the tea party push in 2010. Mica easily defeated Adams in what he called a battle for the soul of the Republican Party. Im happy to report the heart and soul of the party endures, Mica said this week. Tea party supporters, however, had better luck in other parts of the state. In north central Florida, Gainesville veterinarian Ted Yoho unseated 12-term Congressman Cliff Stearns, who had moved north to run in the sprawling District 3. And in southwest Florida, conservative talk show host Trey Radel defeated a slate of political veterans and household names as he took the GOP primary in Congressional District 19 in Lee and Collier Counties. We had a message that resonated with the common man, Yoho said after polls closed and it appeared he would defeat Stearns. It was the feeling that career politicians had created this mess or they failed to prevent it. Neither was acceptable. Despite the throw-thebumsout messages, most incumbents won on Tuesday. In state legislative elections, a handful of competitive primaries may set the direction of the chambers in the years ahead. Former Rep. Aaron Bean and Rep. Jeff Brandes easily won their bids for GOP Senate nominations. Both candidates Bean in Duval and Nassau counties and Brandes in the Tampa Bay region -are aligned with Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart. Negron is running against Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, for Senate president in 2016-18. Not surprisingly both Negron and Latvala were sanguine over Tuesdays results, each saying they are still on track to lead the 40-member chamber when the opportunity arrives. Meanwhile, the Senate is guaranteed to lose one incumbent as Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale and Sen. Maria Sachs, DBoca Raton, battle it out in November. Florida voters sent three incumbent House members packing, rejuvenated the political careers of a few old names --and likely elected the states rst openly gay lawmaker. Miami-Dade voters chose Rep. Jose Felix Diaz over fellow Rep. Ana Rivas Logan in a Republican primary in House District 116, and Rep. Barbara Watson held a narrow lead late Tuesday over Rep. John Patrick Julien in a Democratic primary in District 107, a race that was headed to a recount on Friday. Rep. Steve Perman was also ousted in the primary. Meanwhile, Miami-Dade Democrats in District 113 chose David Richardson over three other candidates, electing likely the rst openly gay member of the Legislature. Farther north, Palm Beach County voters gave former Rep. Kevin Rader, DDelray Beach, a big primary win over Perman of Boca Raton. Rader joined former lawmakers such as Alex Diaz de la Portilla, R-Miami, in winning primaries as they seek to return to Tallahassee. In addition to the Watson-Julien recount, one other House race and one Senate primary were being re-checked. The Senate District 27 battle between Reps. Jeff Clemens, D-Lake Worth, and Mack Bernard, D-West Palm Beach; and a House District 55 race between former Rep. Randy Johnson, R-Sebring, and Cary Pigman, R-Avon Park; were the others. CITIZENS FACES SOME UNHAPPINESS Citizens Property Insurance Corp., the states largest property insurer, announced this week it will revisit its highly controversial program to take away discounts for hurricane hardening efforts the insurer says were improperly applied. The Miami Herald and Palm Beach Post have recently reported that reinspections have increased Citizens premiums by more than $130 million, with more than 75 percent of property owners paying more after the inspections are completed. Citizens has completed about 255,000 reinspections and has 88,000 more to go. Citizens Board chairman Carlos Lacasa, a former Miami-Dade County lawmaker, said one of the problems facing homeowners is that standards for receiving the credits have changed in recent years. The newer standards are more stringent, which has led to people losing credits during reinspections. FLORIDA ECONOMY INK BLOT TO GOP Floridas economy is either doing well or it is not, depending on which Republican leader you talk to. Floridas jobless rate in July rose 0.2 points to settle at 8.8 percent, the state reported Friday. Gov. Rick Scott issued a statement saying the economy is chugging along. The governors message has been consistent: Florida is creating jobs and returning to prosperity. While the unemployment rate can vary from month to month, Florida continues to see positive private sector job growth, Scott said in a statement put out by his of ce Not so, says Romney, whose campaign is targeting the nations lack of economic recovery as a reason to replace his Democratic opponent. More than 800,000 Floridians remain jobless, 42 months after Barack Obama and Charlie Crist stood on stage in Fort Myers and promised spending money we could not afford would lower the unemployment rate, the Romney campaign said in response to the same results. STORY OF THE WEEK: Party members went to the polls this week to determine who would represent them in the general election in the fall. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Who Is Ted Yoho? Headlines from a handful of media publications including Politico, the Miami Herald and the Huf ngton Post on the tea party candidates Republican primary victory over incumbent U.S. Rep. Cliff Stearns.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)With the teams picked, all eyes turn to NovemberUnemployment edges back up in July One Click. Job Resources. Real Results.The Employ Florida network helped me to improve my professional skills and connected me with a training opportunity. THE RESULT: Elizabeth Matthews was trained and hired by Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point.Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. T THE RESUL T : T T Elizabeth Matthews w w as tra i ne d an d hi re d b y R e gi ona l M M edical Center Bayonet Point.ELIZABETH MATTHEWS Monitor Technician and Unit Secretary Hudson, FL R R R R R R e e a a a l l l R R R e e e s s s s u u u u l l l t t t s s s . HIRED EmployFlorida.com1-866-FLA-2345 MANAGING EDITORCitrus Publishing is seeking a versatile candidate with the ability to write news stories, design and layout news pages and develop strong internal and external relationships to be Managing Editor for the Gadsden County Times, a weekly newspaper with a circulation of 3,000 in Quincy. This person will be responsible for the weekly page design and layout of the entire newspaper. This person will be responsible for writing accurate, compelling and balanced stories on deadline and covering local events, meetings and other activities. The managing editor will be responsible for managing reporters and correspondents. This person will also develop beat sources within the community and gain a thorough knowledge and understanding of community issues. Stong initiative, news judgement, time management, organizational and communication skills are are must. A bachelors degree in journalism, with 3 5 years editing and management experience is required. Qualied candidates should be procient in layout and design using Quark Express. Interested persons should send cover letter and resume to: Mike Arnold, HR Director, Citrus Publishing by e-mail at marnold@chronicleonline. com LANDMARKCOMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS, LLC. PUBLISHER/ADVERTISING SALES MANAGERApplications are being accepted for the position of Publisher/ Advertising Sales Manager for the Wakulla News and the Gadsden County Times. The papers are located in Wakulla County and Gadsden County both contiguous to the state capital in Tallahassee. A qualied, motivated and organized self-starter is needed to direct the staff in sales, circulation and growth in both markets. Separate staffs operate each of these county-seat weekly newspapers and would report directly to the publisher/ advertising sales manager. The successful manager will act as advertising sales leader of both staffs and will also deal directly with key advertisers in the market. Two years newspaper management experience to include bottom line responsibility and previous advertising sales management is preferred. The candidate should have high ethical conduct and standards. This person will need leadership skills and ability to lead a staff of ve and also demonstrate strong team-building, delegation and administrative skills. The candidate should demonstrate high ethical conduct and standards and have a commitment to exceptional quality in all aspects of the operation. The publisher/ad manager provides vision, skill development direction, coaching and leadership to newspaper staff to accomplish strategic and business objectives of the company. This person will personally grow advertising account base revenues in order to meet and exceed nancial targets of the company. They will prepare, implement and operate within an annual operating budget to accelerate prot growth. This person will actively participate in various community functions and events and also take a leadership role in the community. The publisher/ad manager will oversee business, marketing and growth development of all products published. Interested persons should apply to: Gerry Mulligan, Publisher, Citrus Publishing/Landmark Community Newspapers, LLC, c/o Mike Arnold, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL 34429 or by e-mail to marnold@chronicleonline.com LANDMARKCOMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS, LLC. Qualifications o 4th generation Floridian o Professional designations; highest standards and ethics o Held offices in professional associations, local & statewide (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community Community omas excels at UCFSpecial to The NewsHolly Thomas, a 2009 Wakulla High School graduate, was inducted into the Professional Selling Track at the University of Central Florida, College of Business Administration. She is a senior at UCF and is the daughter of Ralph and Cynthia Thomas of Crawfordville. The Professional Selling Track is a prestigious, specialized program offered by the Department of Marketing in the UCF College of Business Administration. The competitive program accepts no more than 35 exceptional students each year that show potential and promise in the fascinating and lucrative eld of sales. One of only approximately 50 specialized sales undergraduate programs in the nation, the Professional Selling Track is at the forefront in preparing students for successful careers in the competitive job market of today. Admitted students will partake in rigorous sales training and preparation during the programs one-year duration. Students in the Professional Selling Track consistently excel in the National Collegiate Sales Competition, judged by industry professionals and recruiters. This program is supported by over 50, top local and national companies and has a 98-percent placement rate for graduates in companies such as Oprah Magazine, Google, Wells Fargo, Orlando Magic, Edward Jones, Tom James, and Cox Media Group. Dustin and Jade Grubbs of Crawfordville announce the birth of their son, Bradley Thomas Grubbs, on May 24 at 9:43 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 7 pounds, 10 ounces, and was 19.9 inches. His maternal grandparents are Mark Oliver and Andy and Lynn Williams-Lynn of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are arry and Eleanor Grubbs and Kirk and Kathy Gordon, all of Crawfordville. His great-grandparents are Fred and Rachel Oliver of Crawfordville, Dave and Peggy Williams of Crawfordville and Clyde Grubbs of Tampa. Holly Thomas Grubbs welcome baby boy Sopchoppy Lions Club are quiet dogoodersBy MARJ LAWSpecial to The NewsIf a lion roared in Sopchoppy, would you hear it? Probably not. The Sopchoppy Lions Club is full of quiet dogooders. Come September, Sopchoppy Lions will celebrate 60 years of service to Wakulla County citizens. I visited the Sopchoppy Lions on Monday, Aug. 6. The Sopchoppy Lions, like Lions Clubs around the world, ght to prevent blindness and to promote sight restoration to people of all ages here in Wakulla County. Beginning with the challenge from Helen Keller, to hasten the day when there would be no preventable blindness, our Lions are one of the worlds leading international groups dedicated to help people see and see better. Zone Chairman Anne Davis, at Sopchoppys recent zone meeting, said that Lions Clubs give service from the heart. In order to do this, each Lions Club provides fundraisers; some of which are found in Lions Clubs around the states, and some are unique to our local clubs. Jessie Quigg, who chairs the fundraising committee at the Sopchoppy Club, said that their club receives donations from their brooms and mops, an annual sh fry, the Birthday Calendar and from recycling computer printer toner cartridges. These are just a few of their projects to raise money. Of these funds, 80 percent raised goes straight to sight conservation and preservation, said Fundraising Chairman Jessie Quigg. Other monies assist with a local food bank, scholarships and local charities. One Lions Club assists another. Sal Martocci sponsored the Carrabelle Club. Also, as head of the Public Service Committee, he worked with middle school students and art teacher Carole Benancik to devise a peace poster contest promoting world peace. The Sopchoppy Lions Club has picked up trash from Rose Street for about 20 years. As the then Executive Director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, we worked together in the Adopt A Road program. The Sopchoppy Lions Club people agreed to pick up trash on a quarterly basis from many miles of Rose Street. I knew they worked faithfully, even devising special buckets to carry as they cleaned the litter from the street. So, for almost two decades, Ive heard a gentle roar emanating from Sopchoppy. Its from the men and women of the Sopchoppy Lions Club: your neighbors, doing good deeds for our community. SAL MARTOCCI/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSZone Chairwoman Anne Davis addresses the club at a recent meeting. Last day to apply for FEMA assistance is Sept. 4Special to The NewsTropical Storm Debby survivors have two weeks remaining to register for federal disaster assistance. Applications must be received by Tuesday, Sept. 4, to be considered for disaster assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Small Business Administration. All survivors who had storm-related damage to their home, vehicle, personal property, business or its inventory between June 23 and July 26 should register for assistance. Federal disaster assistance helps eligible applicants with temporary housing, uninsured personal property losses and medical, dental and funeral expenses caused by the disaster, along with other disaster-related expenses and serious needs. Anyone who has not registered with FEMA for disaster aid, has questions about their application or needs more information about recovery programs should call FEMAs toll-free helpline at 800-621-FEMA (3362). People who are deaf or hard of hearing can call(TTY) 800-462-7585. Lines are open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. and assistance is available in many languages. Online registration is available at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or through a smartphone or tablet at m.fema.gov. Survivors must register with FEMA to be considered for federal disaster assistance even if they have contacted the state, their local emergency management agency, the American Red Cross or other charitable organizations. Low-interest disaster loans from the SBA are also available to help with residential and business losses not covered by insurance. Survivors and businesses may obtain information on SBA disaster loan applications by calling 800659-2955 (800-877-8339 for people who are deaf or hard of hearing) or online at www.SBA.gov. They may also apply for disaster loans at https:// disasterloan.sba.gov/ela. Applications are due Sept. 4. Sign up for Tropical Storm Debby recovery updates via email by going to www.FEMA.gov/Disaster/4068 and clicking the subscription link. Its a simple process that only requires a valid email address. During signup, subscribers can choose to receive updates immediately, daily or weekly.Bene t fundraiser for Commy Ta on Sunday Special to The NewsA bene t for Commy Taff to help pay for his medical bills due to cancer will be held at Hudson Park at 8 a.m. There will be food, drinks, yard sale and bake sale. Donations are greatly appreciated. Taff has been a lifetime resident of Wakulla county and is having complications with chemotherapy. He has been out of work since January and he and his family are struggling. Email community announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space becomes available. Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe WakuulanewsYouve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Tallahassees Champagne Party -Beneting Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend-Dust o your dancing shoes and get ready for a smashing good time cuz the 3rd Annual BIG Champagne Bash is just around the corner. Save the date for this spectacular evening of dancing, dinner by-the-bite, free-owing bubbly, and unforgettable fun. Were celebrating the Roaring 20s once again an era of silent lm, speakeasies, and sensational parties!Who: 300+, community-minded, fun-loving Fellas and Flappers from across the Big Bend come together for the event of the season to make a BIG, positive, and lasting impact in the lives of children in our area. Why: Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend believes all children have the ability to achieve success in life. When: Friday, August 24, 8:00 p.m. 12:00 a.m. Venue: Hotel Duval, 415 North Monroe Street (Reserve your special $99 BIG Bash hotel guest rate by calling 850.224.6000 with the code BBSBBSI by Friday, August 10th.) Attire: Get all dolled-up for the 1920s silent movie theme Hosted by: Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bends BIG Alliance (www.bbbs.org/ bigalliance) T icket Info: INCLUDES UNLIMITED CHAMPAGNE! Pre-Sale (expires August 17): $70/single, $130/couple, $600/group rate-10 tickets Standard Rate (August 18 Sold-Out): $75/single, $150/couple Purchase tickets at www.bbbs.org/bigbash. Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO

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By CASSIE TUCKERWHS Art TeacherWhat did you do this summer? Travel to Europe will be the reply from the 10 of us who went to London, Paris, Florence, Rome and Sorrento on the Wakulla 2012 Eurotrip. I had the pleasure of leading my group of seven fantastic, young ladies and two tremendously helpful parents on this educational journey through Explorica. Much of our enjoyment came from our friendly and amusing Oxford/Cambridge graduate/ guide, Thomas who uently spoke French and Italian besides his British English. We joined four other small, high school groups from Houston, Kansas City, Salt Lake City and San Francisco at the National Gallery with its stupendous collection of Old Master paintings in Trafalgar Square. There was time to walk through Leicester Square, China Town and Soho before sh and chips for dinner. Our next day in London included a sightseeing tour of the city that lead to a special treat: the rehearsals for the trooping of the Queens Household Guard at the parade ground near Buckingham Palace. Free time in the afternoon allowed my group to wander through the Tower of London, stroll across London Bridge and along the Thames to Shakespeares Globe. After we navigated the tube to West Minister Abbey, we joined our big group for dinner at The Albert. Our evening excitement expanded as we braved the London Eye. We tagged along with our Salt Lake City pals, switching tube connections until we came to Kings Cross Station, also Platform 9 Having explored this mysterious entry to Hogworts, we proceeded to navigate our way back to our hotel. We got to Paris on the Eurostar train the next afternoon and headed straight into town. Even with the damp, drizzle Notre Dame Cathedral was breathtaking, the Latin Quarter inquisitive and dinner at the Hippopotamus lively. And then a super boat cruise on the Seine at dusk. We passed the Concierge where Marie Antoinette was imprisoned prior to being executed, seeing the Eiffel Tower light up and catching a glimpse of our sister Statue of Liberty. Other highlights in Paris, included a self-guided tour through the Louvre, a climb up to Sacre Coeur in Montmartre, and the Opera Garnier. Our last day in Paris ended with free time after lunch to stroll on the Champs Elysees, through the Arc de Triomphe and do some nal Parisian shopping. Our group wandered around the monumental Duomo, past the Gates of Paradise, up to the Ponte Vecchio and enjoyed the open markets. That night a small group of us ventured to the Space Disco for a little karaoke. We drove down to Rome day 8 via Assisi, the beautiful hill town that is also one of the most important pilgrimages in the Catholic church. The Basilica of St. Francis is full of artistic treasures from the medieval period. Final day began in the morning in the Sistine Chapel and Saint Peters Basilica with local guide Carla, and continuing in the afternoon in ancient Rome, where we went inside the Colosseum and walked through the evocative ruins of the forum. Then Tom took us to Piazza Navona and the Pantheon. We were one of three groups that took the extension to Sorrento. On our way we explored the ancient city Pompeii, buried and destroyed by Mount Vesuvius, 79AD. Sorrento provided us a cool, refreshing splash into the aqua blue Mediterranean after we descended dozens of steps to Hotel Il Faro. Our journey concluded with an early morning ferry boat ride across sky blue water to the lovely island of Capri. We visited one of the caves, the so called blue grotto by climbing into row boats that slipped through an opening; quite exhilarating. Sorrento, Italy, was again the top favorite and will be in the program planned for the next Wakulla Eurotrip. Participants this summer included: Kristie Hodges, Ashley Roberts, Caitlyn Wagner, Megan Waller, Kat Wilson, Ashlyne and Marc Sandberg and Emily and Mary Katherine Westmark. If interested in the next Wakulla Eurotrip, the first information meeting will be on Thursday, Aug. 30 at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Library. Anyone interested in traveling to Great Britain, France and Italy is welcome to attend. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools School The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bareld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for qualied applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and oor rate of 2.5% Students travel to Europe over the summer SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe group visits the Louvre while in Paris during the trip. By BETH ODONNELLAssistant SuperintendentWakulla High School has several Career and Technical Education (CTE) opportunities for its students. These programs, formerly termed as Vocational, offer students the chance to learn many skills that can lead directly to employment after high school graduation; to certi cate programs in postsecondary schools like Lively Technical Center; and/or on to college degrees. For the rst time, in the 2012-2013 school year both Riversprings Middle School and Wakulla Middle School technology teachers Scott Rossow and Jessica Mapes are teaching a high school credit CTE course. It is the rst course in a series called Computing for College and Careers. It will articulate to several programs at WHS should students choose to continue in the areas of Digital Design, Web Design or Accounting. It will also meet their vocational credit requirement for high school graduation. In the newly established Engineering Academy starting this year in 2012-2013, students will be able to earn college dual enrollment credits that lead to certi cates in areas of manufacturing engineering before they even graduate from high school. Other CTE programs of study include Culinary Operations, Accounting, Web Design, Digital Design, Carpentry, and TV Production. Students can also take other CTE classes at Lively Technical Center at no cost while in high school. Students who complete a program or who are close to completing one can also work in their area while in high school and get paid for their On the Job Training (OJT) experience. Courses are open to all students in general education and in exceptional education classes who are seeking a standard diploma. There are no prerequisites to the initial CTE classes, and anyone may apply. The Engineering Academy does have a prerequisite of passing Algebra I in middle school. There are specialized career preparation programs for students with disabilities seeking a special diploma. They also have OJT work experience opportunities in which they are paid. Schedule requests are made during the second semester of the school year with the help of a high school administrator or guidance counselor. Parents are encouraged to be involved in the process. We want all of our students prepared for careers and college so they can make informed decisions about their futures. With todays advanced technology, all careers will need advanced reading and math skills, stated Superintendent David Miller. For more information, WHS Career Specialist Sarabeth Jones or WHS Assistant Principal Sunny Chancy can answer questions about the CTE programs at 9267125. Administrators at the Wakulla County School District of ce at 926-0065 can answer questions about Title IX Sue Anderson; 504 compliance Tanya English,; and high school and postsecondary CTE courses Beth ODonnell.CTE classes o ered at WHS and both middle schools

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBy MARJ LAWBlack powder guns, percussion guns, muzzle-loading guns: these are generic terms for old 1800s era guns. To load them, they require basically the same ingredients. First, you need the charge which is the black powder. You pour a measured amount of black powder from this flask directly into the barrel of the gun. I tap the gun lightly to make sure the charge has slid all the way down. Second, you need the projectile and a patch. The projectile ball is a soft piece of lead. Take an oily patch and place it on the barrel with the ball on top. With a pusher, called a ball starter, push the ball into the barrel. Third, with a longer pusher, a ramrod, shove it all the way down the barrel so it rests on top of the charge. Finally, place a percussion cap over the nipple which is a protrusion located above and near the trigger. The spark from the cap sets off the charge which explodes the ball out of the gun. These two handguns are the Philadelphia Derringer and, my favorite, the Kentucky Pistol. When you shoot them, it feels like shooting a bit of history.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid gunner in her retirement.Loading 101 for black powder guns HOME ON THE RANGEBrag book: SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JARROD RICHARDSONBernard Brooks, Kyle Jones, and Josh Lawhon successfully harpooned and landed a TROPHY 12-foot, 2-inch alligator on Aug. 17. The locals lled both of their tags in one hunt harvesting a 10-foot alligator the same night. Jarrod Richardson submitted this photo of ve deer, including a pretty good size buck, in his yard.Gator gigging Herding deer 1. 2. 3. 4.Black powder in. Patch and ball. Push in with rod. Place cap on nipple. At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) Fall Baseball and So ball SeasonJ. Lewis Hall Park, Woodville, FL 7500 Old Woodville Rd. Registra on dates: Friday, August 24, 2012 from 6-8PM Saturday, August 25, 2012 from 10-1PM Sunday, August 26, 2012 from 1-3PM Registra on Fee: $30BASEBALLAges: 7-13Machine Pitch, Minors, Majors, and 50/70SOFTBALLAges: 7-12Minors and MajorsNO WEEKEND GAMESFor more informa on contact: Andy Miller 274-9955 April Johnson 459-0083 or Kim Gilley 510-0498 s s s s s s s 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A A A A A A A A A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD As the summer winds down and the school year starts, we see less and less traffic out on the water. Many boats are being prepared for a season of inactivity and may be sitting for longer times between use. There are several things that you can do to help make sure your boat is in decent condition when you are ready to enjoy the water once again. One of the most important things to do is remove the bilge plug so that any water that may get inside has a way to get out. A gallon of water weighs 8 pounds. That can add a great deal of excess weight to your lift or trailer very quickly. To help prevent moisture from getting inside in the rst place, a good cover is essential. Covers help not only keep out moisture, but also protect your boat from dirt, grime and the scorching sun. It is a good idea to take all valuables off your boat as well as anything that can be damaged by the elements such as shing gear and tools. Even on your own property, it is a good idea to use a trailer lock for safety. A little WD40 or similar lubricant can make it a lot easier to get the lock off after sitting for a while. If you are keeping your boat on a trailer, be sure to check the tire pressure and use wheel chocks. To prevent at spots on the tires, it is wise to move them periodically. Wheel covers are also bene cial for longer-term storage. To prevent the batteries from losing their charge, remove the negative connections or disconnect completely and store in a safe place. It is important to keep the batteries charged and run the motor at least once a month for about 15 minutes to ensure that all is in good working order and prevent buildup in the engine. Depending on your engine, this may or may not be an easy task. Just be sure that there is an adequate water supply to the engine while running it. Fuel stabilizer is also recommended for longer-term storage. After lling the fuel tank, follow the directions to add stabilizer. A partially empty fuel tank can build up moisture adding water to your gas. There are several good ones out on the market today. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident You can never be too prepared. The Intern. Over 20 years ago, I was teaching our introductory class in compressed gas diving at FSU and was frustrated that the staff assisting me was poorly trained in the mechanics of diving. We had a leadership program to train enthusiastic students in Assistant Instructor, Dive Master and Instructor, but many who applied could not explain how our life support technology worked, let alone x it. What to do? I had just hired Michael Dunning, a man from the Isle of Man, to become our dive engineer, to be sure our life support equipment worked. He needed a lot of help and there was no money to hire additional staff. After many late night deliberations, he and I realized that we had a solution to several challenges. I soon had a semester curriculum for a Dive Locker Technician that included training on nearly everything I saw missing in my Leadership Program. Students bought books but paid for training with volunteer labor. And because training required pro ciency to become bene cial, Michael got his much needed help. Michael lled in the considerable details and then assisted me through several classes, ultimately taking over, where I became the guest speaker. Students rst learned workplace safety procedures, then eased in to ll station operations. Filling high pressure cylinders can be challenging if you are not taught correctly. Every week another topic, such as cylinder inspections, regulator repair, hydrostatic testing, gas blending, exposure suit repair, and the list went on for 15 weeks. The nal exam was a room full of stations, each with a question or problem technology to repair. Those who passed got a certi cation in Dive Locker Technology and a list of speci c credentials from national agencies that went a long way toward future employment at dive shops around the country. And I now had a prerequisite for my Leadership Program! In the space of one year, the quality of our growing dive locker, and our Leadership Program improved dramatically, enabling us to take on many more ambitious challenges in the decades to follow. I carried the entire package to Panama City in 2000 to teach the Scientist in the Sea Program at the Naval Coastal Systems Center, followed by the Advanced Science Diving Program and ultimately the Underwater Crime Scene Investigations Project. None were possible without what we now call the Diving Intern. I retired a few years ago. I was soon asked to provide the Diving Internship training privately. When we opened Wakulla Diving Center in Medart, we incorporated the class much as it was taught at FSU. Travis Kersting now serves as my Dive Engineer and coordinated the interns. Justin Heath, the latest graduate of our internship this summer, is from the University of Texas in Austin where he has returned to continue classes. He is the 12th intern to graduate since my retirement from FSU. But I cannot begin to explain the vitality these folks bring to our table. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Some activities reported in the Northwest Region by FWC during the week of Aug. 3 through Aug. 9: OKALOOSA COUNTY: Officers Pete Rockwell, Henry Rockwell, and Investigator Drew Nelson responded to a boating accident involving a collision between a 38-foot vessel and a personal watercraft (PWC). The operator of the PWC, a 17-year-old male on vacation from Oklahoma, received a complete amputation of his left foot during the collision. Investigator Eddie Gatlin is conducting the boating accident investigation. Lt. Mark Hollinhead and Investigator Eddie Gatlin responded to a single vessel boating accident on the Yellow River. Two occupants were ejected when their vessel struck a submerged log. The vessel capsized leaving the subjects stranded along the riverbank. The subjects were not injured and were transported back to their vehicle at the Rivers Edge Boat Ramp. Investigator Eddie Gatlin and Of cers Alan Kirchinger and Sulin Schafer later assisted the owner of the vessel recover the submerged vessel. Some activities reported during the week of Aug. 10 through Aug. 16: ESCAMBIA COUNTY: Of cers Randy Webb and Gary Ridaught responded to a complaint concerning two individuals suspected of stealing crabs from a commercial trap in Pensacola Bay. The officers responded to the area and located the vessel described in the complaint. Of cers Webb and Ridaught discovered two individuals onboard with recreational traps deployed. The traps were not properly marked and the individuals were checking and harvesting the recreational traps at night, which is prohibited. Both individuals were cited for the violations. SANTA ROSA COUNTY: Of cers Steve Hoomes and Nick Barnard responded to a complaint that an individual was shing with a gill net in Escambia Bay near the Floridatown Boat Ramp. The of cers arrived and observed the individual retrieving a set gill net. The individual was approached and he explained he did not realize it was illegal. Of cer Barnard seized the net and cited the individual for the violation. Of cers Randy Webb and Gary Ridaught observed a personal watercraft being operated at night near Oriole Beach. The PWC operator performed poorly during eld sobriety exercises and was arrested for boating under the in uence. Before the subject was transported to jail, he slipped and scraped his leg. The subject claimed he was injured and officers requested EMS. While checking the subjects knee, the paramedics noticed his blood pressure was very high, so the individual was transported to the hospital for further evaluation. Later, he was taken to the Santa Rosa Jail and booked for BUI, and cited for operating a PWC at night. A 31-foot powerboat was leaving the Crab Island no wake zone in the north Destin Pass when the operator lost control of the vessel and ejected the crew of four. Good Samaritan vessels responded and reported the incident via VHF radio and advised that one male occupant had not resurfaced or been rescued. Of cers responded within minutes and eventually four FWC vessels with two U.S. Coast Guard vessels performed medical evacuation for two injured occupants and began a search for the missing male. An FWC 29-foot patrol asset using side scan sonar detected a possible sonar echo within 30 minutes with moderate surface conditions and a strong outgoing tide. The Okaloosa County Sheriffs dive team arrived and the deceased victim was recovered within two hours of the initial call. The investigation is ongoing and charges are pending. Of cers working the Crab Island area responded to a similar accident in the north Destin Pass. A 24-foot Louisiana-registered powerboat operator lost control exiting the no wake zone. The operator attempted to cross the wake of a northbound yacht, became airborne and landed stern down, ooding and sinking the vessel. Good Samaritan vessels rescued the operator. Further investigation at the U.S. Coast Guard Destin resulted in the arrest of the operator for BUI. A citation was issued for violation of inland navigation rule #6, safe speed, resulting in an accident without injuries.FWC Law Enforcement operations Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday g Thu Aug 23, 12 Fri Aug 24, 12 Sat Aug 25, 12 Sun Aug 26, 12 Mon Aug 27, 12 Tue Aug 28, 12 Wed Aug 29, 12 Date 4.0 ft. 5:56 AM 3.1 ft. 12:54 AM 3.3 ft. 1:36 AM High 0.4 ft. 1:12 PM 1.6 ft. 12:34 AM 1.9 ft. 1:29 AM 2.1 ft. 2:51 AM 2.1 ft. 4:32 AM 1.8 ft. 5:59 AM 1.5 ft. 7:02 AM Low 3.1 ft. 7:29 PM 3.9 ft. 6:41 AM 3.7 ft. 7:45 AM 3.6 ft. 9:23 AM 3.7 ft. 11:08 AM 3.9 ft. 12:23 PM 4.0 ft. 1:20 PM High 0.5 ft. 2:28 PM 0.5 ft. 3:58 PM 0.4 ft. 5:22 PM 0.2 ft. 6:28 PM 0.2 ft. 7:20 PM 0.2 ft. 8:03 PM Low 2.8 ft. 8:56 PM 2.7 ft. 10:38 PM 2.9 ft. 11:59 PM High Thu Aug 23, 12 Fri Aug 24, 12 Sat Aug 25, 12 Sun Aug 26, 12 Mon Aug 27, 12 Tue Aug 28, 12 Wed Aug 29, 12 Date 4.1 ft. 5:53 AM 3.2 ft. 12:51 AM 3.4 ft. 1:33 AM High 0.4 ft. 1:09 PM 1.7 ft. 12:31 AM 2.1 ft. 1:26 AM 2.3 ft. 2:48 AM 2.3 ft. 4:29 AM 2.0 ft. 5:56 AM 1.6 ft. 6:59 AM Low 3.1 ft. 7:26 PM 4.0 ft. 6:38 AM 3.8 ft. 7:42 AM 3.7 ft. 9:20 AM 3.7 ft. 11:05 AM 3.9 ft. 12:20 PM 4.1 ft. 1:17 PM High 0.5 ft. 2:25 PM 0.5 ft. 3:55 PM 0.4 ft. 5:19 PM 0.3 ft. 6:25 PM 0.2 ft. 7:17 PM 0.2 ft. 8:00 PM Low 2.8 ft. 8:53 PM 2.8 ft. 10:35 PM 2.9 ft. 11:56 PM High Thu Aug 23, 12 Fri Aug 24, 12 Sat Aug 25, 12 Sun Aug 26, 12 Mon Aug 27, 12 Tue Aug 28, 12 Wed Au g 29, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 12:35 AM 2.9 ft. 1:30 AM 3.1 ft. 2:12 AM High 1.2 ft. 12:56 AM 1.5 ft. 1:38 AM 1.8 ft. 2:33 AM 1.9 ft. 3:55 AM 1.9 ft. 5:36 AM 1.7 ft. 7:03 AM 1.3 ft. 8:06 AM Low 3.7 ft. 6:32 AM 3.6 ft. 7:17 AM 3.4 ft. 8:21 AM 3.3 ft. 9:59 AM 3.4 ft. 11:44 AM 3.6 ft. 12:59 PM 3.7 ft. 1:56 PM High 0.3 ft. 2:16 PM 0.4 ft. 3:32 PM 0.5 ft. 5:02 PM 0.4 ft. 6:26 PM 0.2 ft. 7:32 PM 0.1 ft. 8:24 PM 0.2 ft. 9:07 PM Low 2.8 ft. 8:05 PM 2.6 ft. 9:32 PM 2.5 ft. 11:14 PM High Thu Aug 23, 12 Fri Aug 24, 12 Sat Aug 25, 12 Sun Aug 26, 12 Mon Aug 27, 12 Tue Aug 28, 12 Wed Aug 29, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 5:48 AM 2.3 ft. 12:46 AM 2.5 ft. 1:28 AM High 0.3 ft. 1:23 PM 1.2 ft. 12:45 AM 1.4 ft. 1:40 AM 1.5 ft. 3:02 AM 1.5 ft. 4:43 AM 1.3 ft. 6:10 AM 1.1 ft. 7:13 AM Low 2.3 ft. 7:21 PM 2.9 ft. 6:33 AM 2.8 ft. 7:37 AM 2.7 ft. 9:15 AM 2.7 ft. 11:00 AM 2.9 ft. 12:15 PM 3.0 ft. 1:12 PM High 0.4 ft. 2:39 PM 0.4 ft. 4:09 PM 0.3 ft. 5:33 PM 0.2 ft. 6:39 PM 0.1 ft. 7:31 PM 0.1 ft. 8:14 PM Low 2.1 ft. 8:48 PM 2.0 ft. 10:30 PM 2.2 ft. 11:51 PM High Thu Aug 23, 12 Fri Aug 24, 12 Sat Aug 25, 12 Sun Aug 26, 12 Mon Aug 27, 12 Tue Aug 28, 12 Wed Aug 29, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 5:40 AM 2.4 ft. 12:38 AM 2.6 ft. 1:20 AM High 0.4 ft. 12:51 PM 1.6 ft. 12:13 AM 1.9 ft. 1:08 AM 2.1 ft. 2:30 AM 2.0 ft. 4:11 AM 1.8 ft. 5:38 AM 1.5 ft. 6:41 AM Low 2.4 ft. 7:13 PM 3.0 ft. 6:25 AM 2.9 ft. 7:29 AM 2.8 ft. 9:07 AM 2.9 ft. 10:52 AM 3.0 ft. 12:07 PM 3.1 ft. 1:04 PM High 0.5 ft. 2:07 PM 0.5 ft. 3:37 PM 0.4 ft. 5:01 PM 0.2 ft. 6:07 PM 0.2 ft. 6:59 PM 0.2 ft. 7:42 PM Low 2.2 ft. 8:40 PM 2.1 ft. 10:22 PM 2.3 ft. 11:43 PM High Thu Aug 23, 12 Fri Aug 24, 12 Sat Aug 25, 12 Sun Aug 26, 12 Mon Aug 27, 12 Tue Aug 28, 12 Wed Au g 29, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 5:41 AM 3.4 ft. 6:22 AM 3.3 ft. 7:15 AM 3.3 ft. 8:25 AM 2.6 ft. 1:59 AM 2.7 ft. 2:15 AM 2.7 ft. 2:35 AM High 0.5 ft. 1:01 PM 0.5 ft. 2:36 PM 0.4 ft. 4:04 PM 0.3 ft. 5:15 PM 2.1 ft. 3:53 AM 1.9 ft. 5:21 AM 1.7 ft. 6:22 AM Low 2.3 ft. 8:55 PM 3.2 ft. 9:51 AM 3.2 ft. 11:18 AM 3.2 ft. 12:33 PM High 1.8 ft. 11:12 PM 0.2 ft. 6:12 PM 0.3 ft. 7:00 PM 0.4 ft. 7:41 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacAug. 23 Aug. 29First Aug. 24 Full Aug. 31 Last Sept. 8 New Sept. 15Major Times 6:20 AM 8:20 AM 6:48 PM 8:48 PM Minor Times --:---:-1:21 PM 2:21 PM Major Times 7:17 AM 9:17 AM 7:46 PM 9:46 PM Minor Times 12:11 AM 1:11 AM 2:24 PM 3:24 PM Major Times 8:16 AM 10:16 AM 8:45 PM 10:45 PM Minor Times 1:05 AM 2:05 AM 3:25 PM 4:25 PM Major Times 9:15 AM 11:15 AM 9:44 PM 11:44 PM Minor Times 2:04 AM 3:04 AM 4:21 PM 5:21 PM Major Times 10:12 AM 12:12 PM 10:40 PM 12:40 AM Minor Times 3:06 AM 4:06 AM 5:13 PM 6:13 PM Major Times 11:07 AM 1:07 PM 11:34 PM 1:34 AM Minor Times 4:09 AM 5:09 AM 5:58 PM 6:58 PM Major Times --:---:-12:00 PM 2:00 PM Minor Times 5:12 AM 6:12 AM 6:39 PM 7:39 PM Average Average Average+ Average Average Average Better7:09 am 8:09 pm 1:21 pm --:--Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:09 am 8:08 pm 2:25 pm 12:12 am 7:10 am 8:07 pm 3:26 pm 1:06 am 7:11 am 8:06 pm 4:22 pm 2:05 am 7:11 am 8:04 pm 5:13 pm 3:07 am 7:12 am 8:03 pm 5:59 pm 4:10 am 7:12 am 8:02 pm 6:40 pm 5:13 am41% 48% 55% 63% 70% 77% 84% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn Aug. 9, Homer Harvey of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief on Crawfordville Highway where several vintage motor vehicles are stored. Three female suspects were observed at the scene. A vintage vehicle windshield was damaged, but the suspects left the scene before law enforcement arrived. Damage was estimated at $300. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On Aug. 9, Tawanna Maxwell of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone cut a 10 foot section of the victims chain link fence. Damage was estimated at $50. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On Aug. 9, James Rackley of Crawfordville reported a lost wallet. It has not been determined exactly where the wallet was lost. It contained the victims driver license, credit cards and cash. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. On Aug. 9, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a concern by an Animal Control Of cer over a Crawfordville juvenile pointing a gun in his direction while he was carrying out his duties. Deputy Zimba determined that the juvenile was unaware he had pointed his BB gun at the ACO. The deputy counseled the juvenile and his mother about having the gun in the yard where passing traf c can observe him. No charges were led. On Aug. 9, Brandi Mayfield of Crawfordville reported hitting a deer with her vehicle on U.S. Highway 98 just west of Rehwinkel Road. Damage to her vehicle was estimated at $1,500. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. On Aug. 10, Maura Jeanne Evans, 27, of Sopchoppy was cited for careless driving after a traf c crash was reported at 225 Rehwinkel Road. The vehicle ran through a fence and crashed into a tree. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On Aug. 10, Leah McManus of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. The victim discovered two unauthorized charges on her bank account. The charges totaled $813 and were created at a pharmacy in San Francisco. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On Aug. 12, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) joined forces to bring overdue boaters safely back to shore. At approximately 9 p.m., a Tallahassee woman reported that a boat with three adults and ve juveniles on board was stranded in the water approximately one mile off the coast of the St. Marks Lighthouse. The complainant told Deputy Randy Phillips that she received a text message from her friends onboard stating that they required assistance. Deputy Taff Stokley retrieved and launched the WCSO Search and Rescue vessel and Deputy Phillips set up a command post at the St. Marks Lighthouse boat ramp. FWC also launched a boat and helicopter. The helicopter located the boat paddling back toward the lighthouse and Deputy Stokley towed the vessel and passengers back to the lighthouse boat ramp. There were no injuries. The operation concluded at 11:58 p.m. On Aug. 10, Michael Monteith of Crawfordville reported the loss of a rearm. The rearm and magazines are valued at $340 and may have been taken by an acquaintance. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On Aug. 10, Rebecca Padowitz of Carrabelle reported the theft of her vehicle from Franklin County. On Aug. 11, the vehicle was observed at Highway 267 and Sandy Acres Circle. The keys were still in the ignition. The vehicle was turned over to the owner. The vehicle was originally entered in the FCIC/NCIC data base by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. It was removed from the data base. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. On Aug. 11, Joseph Brown of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims camping cabin was vandalized. A window was broken out; a television was damaged along with window framing. Total damage at the cabin was $400. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. On Aug. 11, Teresa Hunter of Tallahassee was involved in a traf c crash at Promise Land Ministries thrift store. The driver, Hunter, was backing out of a parking spot when she backed into the wooden walkway in front of the store which destroyed the walkway. Damage was estimated at $3,000. There were no injuries, but the vehicle was towed from the scene. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On Aug. 12, William Pascoe of Panacea reported the theft of gasoline from his crab boat. The victim observed an oily sheen on the oor of the boat. The gasoline/oil mixture theft was valued at $50. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. On Aug. 12, Charles Shields of Shields Marina in St. Marks reported a forged check. Someone forged a business check and cashed the $1,600 check at a Crawfordville bank. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. On Aug. 12, Kenneth Smith of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Tire tracks were observed in the back yard. A suspect has been identi ed. Removed from the home were household products, a microwave oven, coins, food and other items, valued at $349. A warrant for arrest of the suspect has been requested. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On Aug. 12, Kerry Brandon Mulford, 29, of Tallahassee received a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Deputy Cole Wells received intelligence that possible drug activity was occurring at a gas station in Crawfordville. Deputy Wells asked the suspect if there was any illegal narcotic inside the vehicle and he produced a marijuana cigar. The cigar was seized as evidence. On Aug. 13, Kenneth Redding of Crawfordville reported a vehicle crash on U.S. Highway 98 and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Road. The victim was involved in a single vehicle accident caused by a deer. There were no injuries. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. On Aug. 13, Kara Vathis of Crawfordville was involved in a single vehicle accident. The driver drove off the road and struck a fence along Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Road. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. On Aug. 13, Joseph Trice reported nding miscellaneous property at U.S. Highway 319 and Cedar Avenue. Two boxes of tools, valued at $450, were recovered and turned over to the Property and Evidence Division for storage until the owner can be located. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On Aug. 13, Robert Thompson of Crawfordville reported a hit-and-run traf- c crash at the intersection of U.S. Highway 319 and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road. The victim was slowing down for the traf c signal when he was struck from behind by another vehicle which quickly left the area heading northbound. vehicle suffered some damage, but the victim was not injured. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell, Lt. Dale Evans and Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On Aug. 13, Stephen Balchuck of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief as someone destroyed his mailbox. The mailbox was damaged and discovered on the ground. It was valued at $20. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. On Aug. 13, Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated a fight at a Medart convenience store. Two male juveniles, ages 15 and 17, were attempting to leave the scene when they were detained. One of the juveniles suffered a minor injury to his lip. Deputy Mitchell issued the two juveniles notices to appear in court for Public Affray. On Aug. 14, a concerned citizen from Crawf ordville reported nding a 3-year-old female walking by herself in the citizens driveway. The child was unable to tell where she lived. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell and Deputy Nick Gray used the childs barefoot tracks to locate her home. Other children at the home woke the father up from sleeping. The lost child was uninjured but did have dirt and bug bites on her legs. The Florida Department of Children and Families was noti ed and made aware of the incident. No charges have been led. On Aug. 13, a gasoline drive-off was reported by a clerk at a convenience store at 2616 Crawfordville Highway. A motorist pumped $8 more gas than they paid for. Suspect information was passed along to other members of the Road Patrol Unit. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On Aug. 14, John Kane of Panacea reported a fraud on his credit card account. The victim and his spouse purchased gasoline from a Crawfordville convenience store but were charged for approximately double what they actually spent on gas. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. On Aug. 14, Kyley Smith of Crawfordville reported a trespass at her home. Someone attempted to enter her home, but nothing was reported missing. A suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. On Aug. 15, Deputy Nick Gray was attempting to locate a missing 16-year-old male. The deputy discovered the juvenile in the back of a vehicle consuming alcoholic beverages. A Juvenile Civil Citation was issued for disorderly intoxication, but additional criminal activity was discovered and the juvenile was taken to the juvenile detention center. A notice to appear in court was issued for the intoxication charge. Deputy Ian Dohme also investigated. On Aug. 15, Cody Wayne Nolin, 27, of Crawfordville was arrested for disorderly intoxication for causing a disturbance at Dux Liquors. The suspect attempted to get away from law enforcement by running into U.S. Highway 319 and he was detained for his own safety. After an interview with a witness, Nolin was arrested and transported to the Wakulla County Jail where he refused to get out of the patrol vehicle, laid on the oor of the jail sally port and resisted efforts by the corrections staff to place him in the holding cell. Deputies Clint Beam and Ian Dohme investigated. On Aug. 15, Deputy Randy Phillips was working a potential Baker Act mental health case in Crawfordville when marijuana and drug paraphernalia was discovered at the subjects home. Wakulla EMS of cials were also on the scene performing a medical evaluation. The marijuana and smoking pipe were seized and the narcotics weighed 18 grams. No charges were led. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 973 calls for service during the past week including: 22 business and residential alarms; 12 assists to other agencies; 83 citizen contacts; 16 disturbances; 11 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 27 regular E-911 calls; 42 investigations; 43 medical emergencies; 278 business and residential security checks; 23 special details; 51 subpoena services; 11 suspicious people; 17 suspicious vehicles; 33 traf c enforcements; 87 traf c stops; and 10 wanted people.Sheri s Report As a young man getting ready to register to vote for the rst time, I was told by many that I should register as a Democrat because, back then, as a Republican, I would not have been able to vote in Floridas primary elections. I didnt understand that reasoning then and I dont support it now. Voters should be able to cast their vote in a primary election, as in a general election, for the person they think is best for the job, regardless of political party afliation. This belief is one of the reasons I registered to run for sheriff of Wakulla County as a No Party Afliation candidate, even though I am a registered Democrat. My reasoning is simple: A sheriffs duty is to work with everyone equally, fairly and with no partiality. Politics is politics; ghting crime and making our communities safe is law enforcement. Politics and law enforcement do not belong together. Now let me go one step further. I also believe a candidate who is campaigning while working as a supervisor at a sheriffs ofce should refuse political contributions from their staff and vendors doing business with the sheriffs office. Asking support from staff or vendors is wrong. As far as Im concerned, candidates for sheriff have a special duty to show citizens that they answer to the law, the citizens and their own conscience, not party politics. Sheriffs, above all others, must be respected if they want to effectively enforce the law. This is my belief, and it will be the way I do my job as sheriff of Wakulla County. For a FRESH START with a FULL-TIME Sheriff I ask for your support and vote on November 6.Please contact me at(850) 926-4712 Post Ofce Box 482, Crawfordville, FL 32326 charlieforsheriff@gmail.comwww.charliecreel.com ADVERTISEMENTPolitics and law enforcement do not belong together. ADVERTISEMENTPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Afliation, for sheriff.Charlie Creel: Politics has no place in the Sheris Oce FEATURED ITEMS Musical Instruments and Equipment, Egyptian furniture, Gold and Sterling Silver Jewelry and lots more! Conveniently Located In Downtown Crawfordville 12 Towles Rd, Crawfordville, FL (Across from the School Board inside the old Post Office bldg.) AUCTION!DONT MISS OUT! ALLERY 50%BRING THIS AD AND SAVE 50% ON BUYERS PREMIUM!Preview & Pre-bidding begin at 5 pm850-926-73556:00 pm Sat., Aug. 25thView our full catalog online at www.Gallery 319.biz Did you know... We Buy and Sell Gold & Silver? Coins & Jewelry? 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page 13ASpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of ce detectives have made two arrests in connection with an Aug. 14 armed robbery following an attempted marijuana sale that went bad, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Gary Angelo Simmons Jr., 22, of Crawfordville was charged with robbery with a rearm and grand theft. Lyntonio Ivan Bowdry, 19, of Crawfordville was charged with robbery with a firearm. An 18-year-old Crawfordville victim originally reported the case as a residential burglary, but later admitted to investigators that he lost the rearm, currency and personal property during the armed robbery incident which involved the sale of marijuana. The victim met the suspects in the Bethel section of Crawfordville at which time Simmons allegedly pointed a handgun at the victim and a second suspect grabbed the victims gun and backpack. Simmons allegedly put a gun to the head of the victim and threatened to kill him. Simmons and another suspect, later identi ed as Jacob Heath Hemp, 21, of Crawfordville, ran to Bowdrys vehicle and left the scene. The victim followed Bowdrys vehicle back to Crawfordville where the two vehicles stopped on Wakulla Arran Road and Simmons pointed a rearm at the victim again. The victim stopped following the suspects for fear of being shot and reported the theft of 17 grams of marijuana, $205, his driver license and a .32 caliber semi-automatic handgun. On Aug. 15, detectives interviewed Bowdry and charged him with one count of robbery with a rearm for his involvement in the case. A search warrant was served at the home of Simmons on Aug. 15 and detectives located a plastic bag containing 10 grams of marijuana and two separate pistols allegedly used in the crime. Simmons and Bowdry were transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Detectives with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and members of the U.S. Marshals Fugitive Task Force were searching for Kemp on Thursday, Aug. 16, when he was reportedly spotted late in the afternoon on the east side of Sam Smith Circle in northeast Wakulla County. Of cers reportedly chased Kemp on foot for approximately one-half mile before he was caught on nearby Field Loop. Kemp was arrested and charged with armed robbery with a rearm, grand theft of a rearm and aggravated assault in the case. Simmons, Bowdry and Kemp are all being held in the Wakulla County Jail with no bond.Three arrests in robbery case Gary Angelo Simmons Jr. Lyntonio Ivan Bowdry Jacob Heath Kemp Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree)HAIR SALON ALL STUDENTS 10% OFFAll Hair ServicesFULL SERVICE FAMILY SALON We offer exible hours starting at 10AM (TUE-FRI) and at 9AM on SAT of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief SupportCOST FREE 850-878-5310 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringBob DonawayJuly 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromMy wife and I have been entering in the Off the Eatin Path since the program rst began. She has won once and now I am a winner too! Thank You! OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l a t nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlorank You So Much! Continued from Page 1A Those in support of the airport have argued that the expansion is needed for safety reasons and if improvements continue, revenue could be generated for the county. The future plans for the airport could include the addition of several hangars and a service fuel farm. Commissioner Mike Stewart wanted to see the buffer restored, no property taken from homeowners who do not want to sell, and the runway moved just enough to the west to satisfy the minimum requirements. He did not want to see the runway paved, which was included in the future plan of the airport. Its a win-win, Stewart said for all involved. For the ALP, Sewell said their main objective is making the runway protection zones as clear as possible. The obstruction analysis will drive the end points of the runway, he said. They will also look at what will impact property owners the least. Once the JPA is amended, the survey is completed and the ALP is updated, the county would look at appraising property or simply asking those property owners if they intend to sell. The land that was cleared next to the airport is included in the land acquisitions of the airport expansion and requires wetland mitigation. During the timbering, they entered a wetland buffer. If the county acquires that property, they will be required to perform the mitigation. Sewell said they will look into those costs as well. The advising portion of the consulting will deal with operating costs, Sewell said. They will also look at possible expansion of services, pros and cons and long term bene ts. He added that there are several funding options available to the county that they have been unable to tap into because the county has not made a rm stand on the airport. They need to know what you want to do, Sewell said. Commissioner Lynn Artz said she also wanted to see the data for fees collected from those who use the airport. She also wanted to make sure those Tarpine residents are contributing their share. Some fees are not being collected and will have to be in order to run the airport, Edwards said. The fees charged will be used to maintain the airport, he said. The county commission also voted to dissolve the Airport Advisory Committee.Board approves airport expansionSpecial to The NewsTALLAHASSEE, Aug. 17 The Florida Department of Education today announced the conclusion of an investigation into test anomalies on the 2011 administration of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. The investigation was focused on an unusually high number of erasures at four schools in Broward (Charter School of Excellence), Duval (Chaffee Trail Elementary), Gadsden (Greensboro Elementary), and Jefferson (Jefferson Elementary) counties. The investigation by the departments Of ce of Inspector General revealed that although the number of erasures on test answer documents was above the conservative threshold of one in a trillion when tests are taken under standardized conditions, a determination could not be made about the cause of the high number of wrong-to-right erasures at three of the four schools (Charter School of Excellence, Chaffee Trail Elementary, and Jefferson Elementary). Although evidence does not support that teachers at Greensboro Elementary altered student documents, statements taken during the investigation revealed they did coach or interfere with student responses during the administration of the FCAT. Through its contract with Pearson, the 2011 spring administration of the FCAT and FCAT 2.0 was the rst year the Department of Education utilized a sophisticated analysis of test answer documents by Caveon Data Forensics to identify atypical testing results. In May 2011, Caveon identi ed 25 instances of excessive erasures at 21 schools throughout the state and asked school districts to conduct internal investigations at the agged schools to determine the cause. As a result of these school district investigations, all but the four schools mentioned above were cleared of any wrongdoing.FCAT investigation concludesThe Department of Education looked at four schools with high erasures, but cleared all four of wrongdoing Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Office will host a Sporting Clays Tournament as a fundraiser for the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches. The event begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 22 with three relays at 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. This is a new date as the fundraiser was originally scheduled in August but had to be pushed back to September. Refreshments and lunch will be available at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of- ce Range and Training Center where the fundraiser will take place. The tournament will be $50 per person with a ve person team. Winners of each relay will receive a 12 gauge shotgun. A Firearm Side Match will also be held during the event. The weapons of choice for the side match are ri e, pistol and shotgun. The cost of the match is $20 per person with a 50-50 payout. A money ball giveaway will be held for $10 and a chance to win half of the lucky jackpot. Pre-register for your choice of relays. Contact Lt. Fred Nichols at (850) 251-1676 or call the Wakulla Range at (850) 7457290 to register. The Wakulla Range accepts Visa/MasterCard, cash or checks as payment to enter the event. You may also go to www.wcso.org and look at the bottom of the left hand side menu for an opportunity to download the registration forms. The Southeastern Community Blood Center will be at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce parking area Friday, Aug. 24 from 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. to accept donations of blood. By giving blood, donors are automatically entered to win a new Honda Civic. Donors will receive a beach tote gift for giving blood. You may register to give blood by contacting Lt. Billy Jones at 728-6835 or 745-7108. You need to have identification to donate blood and your must weigh at least 110 pounds. The Get into the Civic Spirit-Honda for the Holidays giveaway is sponsored by Flowers Automotive Group.New date for shooting tournamentWCSO Blood drive set

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LES HARRISONWakulla Extension Director The current explosion of mushroom growth in lawns and landscapes is a byproduct of the hot humid weather that is delivering the much appreciated daily rains. Grass and shrubs are growing, but mushrooms are taking advantage of these conditions too. Technically, a mushroom could be described as a eshy to leathery Basidiomycota with normally umbrella-shaped sporulating structures, usually possessing a stalk topped by a cap or pileus. The underside of the cap bears either gills or pores, which forms spores insides. Because of their size, shape, bright color variations, and ephemeral nature, mushrooms have long been a fascination to mankind, and the subject of legends and lore. In childrens stories, countless faeries, gnomes and leprechauns have lived in or around these fungi. Many an unsuspecting youth has been granted a special wish for not destroying the mushroom abode of a forest sprite. The reality is most homeowners and landscape managers consider them a blemish, special wishes notwithstanding, on the otherwise perfect and highly manicured turf. Making them disappear as fast as the seemingly appeared is the only supernatural or mystic qualities of interest Other than the cosmetic issue, mushrooms rarely cause a landscape any substantial damage. The appearance of mushrooms in a lawn can mean conditions are right for the growth of fungal diseases which can damage a landscape. Most lawn mushrooms feed on damp, decomposing grass clippings. Collecting grass clipping and mulching away from the lawn will reduce the prospect of mushrooms or some other fungi. Rather than attempting to control mushrooms with fungicides, enjoy their delicate beauty. When they are past their prime remove them to a compost pile. Mowing will remove them from the landscape, but they will return as the spores are easily spread. When environmental conditions are right they will sprout again. There is an interest by some in the culinary aspects of wild mushrooms. Extreme caution should be uses to correctly identify any before consuming. There are toxic mushrooms which grow in the area. Consumption by humans, pets or other mammals will result in very unpleasant symptoms. To learn more about lawn and landscape fungi, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at (850) 926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Recent rains bring mushrooms to Wakulla lawns PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/Special to The NewsA wide variety of mushrooms are sprouting in Wakulla County lawns. Where the little things Make a Difference! Where the little things Make a Difference! 2504 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32304 2504 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32304 850 765-0042 07 Nissan Altima SL LEATHER, SUNROOF $14,400 2000 Ford MustangCONVERTABLE, COLD A/C $5,500 05 GMC Envoy XL-SLT7 PASSENGER, LEATHER $11,900 09 Chevrolet Impala LT FULL SIZE $12,900 04 Chrysler Crossre LOW MILES $11,250 05 Cadillac STS LUXURY THROUGHOUT $10,900 07 Nissan Sentra GREAT GAS MILEAGE! $10,900 11 Chevy Impala LTONLY $14,900! 08 Kia Sorento LX ALL THE COMFORTS! $11,900 02 Chevy Monte Carlo LOADED! $9,400 850576-LOAN ( 5626 )WE HAVE THE ANSWER TO YOUR USED CAR NEEDS! 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Although there are several de nitions of a blue moon, the term commonly refers to the second full moon in a month. The moon was also full on August 2. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at (850) 9277744 or toll free at (888) 927-7744. At right, the St. George Lighthouse. PHOTO BY JIM KEMP SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Blue Moon Climb will be held at St. George Lighthouse

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012The Wakulla news EXTRA! Preacher cakeJust a Pinch, Page 10BCamp visits refugePhotos, Page 4BChristmas in July was a successR.H. Carter, Page 3B Wakulla Students go Back to School Students returned to public schools in Wakulla on Thursday, Aug. 16. Reporter Jennifer Jensen visited Shadeville Elementary on the rst day and snapped these photos. More photos online at thewakullanews.com

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Aug. 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. Friday, Aug. 24 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Aug. 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. Sunday, Aug. 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. Monday, Aug. 27 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Aug. 28 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Wednesday, Aug. 29 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Aug. 30 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsFriday, Aug. 24 THIRD ANNUAL BIG CHAMPAGNE BASH for Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend will be held from 8 p.m. to midnight at Hotel Duval in Tallahassee. All proceeds bene t Big Brothers Big Sisters. The theme is the Roaring 20s. Costumes are encouraged. Enjoy music, dancing appetizers and unlimited champagne. Tickets are $75 per person, $150 per couple. To purchase tickets, visit www.bbbs.org/bigbash or call 386-6002. BLOOD DRIVE will be held by the Southeastern Community Blood Center at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce parking area from 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. By giving blood, donors are automatically entered to win a new Honda Civic. Donors will receive a beach tote gift for giving blood. Register by contacting Lt. Billy Jones at 728-6835 or 745-7108. Identi cation is required to donate blood and one must weigh at least 110 pounds. The Get into the Civic Spirit-Honda for the Holidays giveaway is sponsored by Flowers Automotive Group. Saturday, Aug. 25 SOPCHOPPY ECO-HERITAGE TOUR will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. starting with a historic walking tour, followed by a river scenic cruise. Take a stroll back in time when dogs lazed in the dusty street, men sat on the corner bench and the train pulled into the depot loaded with goods. Then cruise on the winding Sopchoppy River where sturgeon were once so plentiful, they were harvested for their caviar and bass shing was a local way of life. Tickets are $30 for adults, $15 for children (12 and under), free (3 and under). Visit www.PalmettoExpeditions.com or call 850-926-3376 to purchase tickets. MEET AND GREET FOR LOCAL DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES will be held by the Wakulla County Democratic Party from 4 to 7 p.m. at the home of Al Pasini in The Farm, 24 Carriage Drive. Invited candidates include Congressional District 2 Democratic nominee Al Lawson, House District 7 Democratic nominee Robert Hill, and all of the local Wakulla Democratic candidates and elected of cials. There is a suggested minimum donation of $10. The event is a barbecue picnic and pool party and side dishes are welcome. Please RSVP to Joan Hendrix at granpetunia@comcast.net or the Wakulla Democratic Party on Facebook. Sunday, Aug. 26 BENEFIT FOR COMMY TAFF to help pay for his medical bills due to cancer will be held at Hudson Park at 8 a.m. There will be food, drinks, yard sale and bake sale. Donations are greatly appreciated. Tuesday, Aug. 28 55 ALIVE SAFETY DRIVER CLASS will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the library. To register call Ernie Conte at 926-4605. WAKULLA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT WORKSHOP will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the health department, 48 Oak Street, Crawfordville. They are in the nal stages of our Community Health Improvement Project, and need assistance in the next phase of the process where we identify the most important issues facing the community and develop goals to address these priority issues. During this session, they will review all the data and reports generated in the Community Health Improvement process, identify health priorities which impact Wakulla County residents, and develop goals and strategies for each priority. A working lunch will be provided during this workshop. Please email your RSVP to Tonya Hobby (850)926-0401 ext. 217 by Aug. 23. CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for its newest member, Stix Grill, Inc., at 11:30 a.m. at the Chamber of ce, 23 High Drive, Crawfordville.Upcoming EventsSunday, September 2 FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Loran Anderson as he presents Floral Strategies in Plants at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Anderson is a retired FSU professor and volunteer refuge botanist whose plant hikes and presentations are always a treat. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures Classroom at St. Marks Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850-925-6121 for information. Thursday, Sept. 6 HOUSTON TAFF MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held at Wildwood Country Club. Entrance fee for the tournament is $500 per team or $125 per player. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m. with a 12:30 p.m. Shotgun Start. The tournament format will be Select a Shot, and prizes will be awarded to the top 3 teams, in 3 ights. Mulligans will be available at $20 per player (4 mulligans). There will be 3 contests, including Closest to the Pin, Longest Drive, and Putting Contest. The total entrance fee for all three is $20 per player. For more information, contact Steve Brown at 570-3910 or Tara C. Sanders at 926-5211 or 566-8272. Saturday, Sept. 8 ST. MARKS YACHT CLUB will host Dr. Felicia Coleman, director of the FSU Coastal and Marine Laboratory, as its featured guest at the Clubs Up Close and Personal Spotlight Event at 7:30 p.m. The Club is located at 36 Yacht Club Lane, St. Marks, Florida, 32355. Seating is limited, so reservations should be made by calling (850) 925-6606. In a conversational-style interview led by Dr. Betty Ann Korzenny, adjunct professor, Florida State University, School of Communication, she and Coleman will discuss what in uenced Coleman to pursue her study of sea life, and the local and international impact of the Laboratorys research. Friday, Sept. 14 SILENT AUCTION will be held to bene t the Wakulla County Public Library from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. Items include gift certi cates, vacations, marine supplies, art, school supplies and more. Refreshments will be provided. Sign up to be a bidder, browse through a book of all the items and start bidding on Sept. 1 at the Friends table in the lobby of the library. Call (850) 926-4244 or FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com for more information. CAMPAIGN PARTY for County Commission Candidate Howard Kessler will be held at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, at 7:30 p.m. There will be music by Big Daddy Randall Webster. Desserts and refreshments will be served. Saturday, Sept. 15 A FAMILY NIGHT OUT will be held at the Senior Center at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. All proceeds bene t the center. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Political forum at 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. at the library. Big Champagne Bash from 8 p.m. to midnight at Hotel Duval. Sopchoppy Ecoheritage Tour from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Bene t for Commy Taff at 8 a.m. at Hudson Park. ThursdayFridaySaturdayWednesday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Government Meetings Thursday, Aug. 30 SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold a special meeting on the budget at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. By SCOTT JOYNER Library DirectorStarting the rst week of September, the library is doing some community outreach by reading to the child patients at the Wakulla County Health Department each Wednesday morning. Were taking donations of any gently used childrens books that you may have so that we can give them out to the kids or leave them at the health department for families to pass the time while they wait for their appointment. You can drop off the donations at the front desk at the library and we thank you in advance for your generosity. This is only the rst step in our plan to begin doing more community outreach so please keep an eye out for us around town! Friday Night Movie On Friday, Aug. 24 at 7 p.m., we are showing the lm based upon the rst book in the global phenomenon Hunger Games series. Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson and Liam Hemsworth, the lm tells of a dystopian world where after a uprising against the government was put down decades past, two teenage tributes from each district are forced each year to join in the Hunger Games where they ght to the death as entertainment for the masses and as an example of the control the Capitol has over their lives. When Katniss younger sister is chosen as a tribute, she volunteers to take her sisters place and must make some very adult decisions while becoming a symbol for resisting the Capitol. We are expecting a large crowd for this PG13 (for violence and suspense) lm and seating will be limited so please arrive early. The doors open at 6:45 p.m. Refreshments will be provided by Capital City Bank for small donations to the library. Community Meetings at WCPL With the summer ending, many of the great community groups begin their new cycle of public meetings next month. For those interested, some of the groups that meet at the library are the Wakulla County Historical Society, the Iris Garden Club, Native Plant Society, NAMI Wakulla, and of course the Friends of the Library. These are only a few of the groups that meet here which allow you to get involved in the Wakulla County community. For more information please see the events calendar on our website www.wakullalibrary.org, and give us a call about any group youre interested in and we will be more than happy to give you contact info. Or you can just stop by for one on the meetings as all meetings held at the library are free of charge and open to the public. Library News... Political EventsThursday, Aug. 23 POLITICAL FORUM for the superintendent of schools candidates will be held at 7 p.m. at the library. POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for property appraiser will be held at 8 p.m. at the library. Thursday, September 27 POLITICAL FORUM for County Commission seats 1, 3, 5. Seat 1 will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Seat 3 at 7:30 p.m. and Seat 5 at 8:30 p.m.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page 3B Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate LifeChristmas In July was a huge nancial success. The sponsors, fundraising committee, other volunteers, Board of Directors and staff did a wonderful job preparing for this event and ensuring its success. We have expressed our appreciation through our local news publications and recognized them during the event. Lamar Advertising provided their portable sign parked north of Crawfordville that also expresses our appreciation for the sponsors. Its easy to recognize an event and discuss its details. But we have to explore the actual results of such an event to gain appreciation of how our community supports our senior citizens services. In the Senior Center our clients receive lunches, exercise, entertainment and education for health and aging successfully. They interact in social groups, men and women meet and enjoy the companionship and some just hang out. In-home services to clients unable to attend the center receive meals, homemaking, personal care, home improvements such as bathroom safety and wheelchair ramps, pest control, emergency alert response systems, telephone reassurances and other needed services. Every client who quali es for a service is served. We are able to provide services far beyond available state and federal funding. The most visible service is daily lunch. The Older Americans Act provides about 20 meals per day. Some days you will find over 100 eating lunch. Quarterly, you will nd Donnie Sparkman and several of his friends such as Jerrell Metcalf providing a fish fry. Sometimes they catch and dress the sh. On those days there is often more than 125 in for lunch. Working with our older citizens has a strong impact on our lives. Its an emotional rollercoaster. One day you are meeting with a new client who is so proud of the center and they feel alive again. The next day you learn of close friends that have passed away. Every individual relationship in the center is special. You learn how temporary life is. You learn the value of enjoying each day. You gain understanding of how each day could be your last. Most of all you learn the value of daily interaction with people that are facing end of life issues. I keep a few pictures from years past. One has several seniors sitting at a table in the park at one of our sh fries in the 1990s. None of them are alive now, but I sit and smile at things I remember them saying to me and the compassion they shared with others. On one occasion I asked a lady if there was anything we could do that would be special for her. I knew that her illness was bringing her to the end of life. She smiled and said, I love coconut cakes and I have not had any at the center. This was on a Tuesday and she came in only on Tuesday. I con rmed that we would have a coconut cake the next Tuesday. She smiled and was happy for that plan. The next day I learned that she had passed away over night. I did not mention to any one as to why we were having coconut cake on the following Tuesday until after we had eaten. As the seniors nished lunch and learned of its purpose they were happy. They did not grieve for the loss of a friend, they rejoiced for the time they shared. Writing articles about a senior reveals so much value in their life that we often overlook. One lady could not understand why anyone would write about her because her life was so mediocre. My conclusion of her life was that she had gained a level of peace and satisfaction that many seek for a lifetime and never nd. These experiences in the Senior Center are written to let our community know the results of their support. Without your support, many of the seniors that attend the Senior Center would be excluded. Margo Anderson will be in the Senor Center on Friday, Sept. 28th to present A Tribute to Patsy Cline. Tickets can be purchased by calling 926-7145 ext. 221. You may also call this number to sponsor this event. Some have already paid $250 and one paid $1,000 to sponsor this program. You are invited to call my cell phone 273-2242 to discuss your sponsorship. Sponsors will add so much to the nancial success of this event. Financial success is a direct bene t to our Senior Citizens. You too, can participate in these successes. R.H. Carter is executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizen Center. R.H. Carter Wakulla County Senior Center Christmas in July was a huge successJuly was celebrated with red, white and blue, ags and music at the Senior Center plus moreBy TAMARA BYRNES and DIANE LANTER Red, white and blue along with Stars and Stripes were the theme for July. We celebrated our holiday with the Pickin n Grinnin Band playing the familiar patriotic songs of the day. All of the seniors received a small ag to wave and a ribbon to wear. Chef Mary xed a typical picnic lunch of hot dogs, potato salad, baked beans and apple pie. We are all so very grateful for our freedom and having the Senior Center open ve days a week. We appreciate everyone who donates their time and money to keep the activities available for everyone to enjoy. Our nal projects from our Pottery Program sponsored by HAWC, Healing Arts of Wakulla County, turned out so beautiful. The seniors had so much fun with Nancy Jefferson and piles of clay. They wound snail shapes and applied them to their bowls then pressed leaves into the center. This has been such a wonderful program and has reached so many people. We want to thank HAWC for their generous donations to programs like this. We also celebrated our annual Christmas in July Event on the 25th. This fundraiser was very successful and thanks goes out to all of the creative volunteers who helped us. The room sparkled with lights and the tables were decorated with Christmas in mind. We had many lovely gifts for the silent auction and for the raf- e that was held during lunch. These items come from board, staff and community donations. This event provides for the meal programs here at the center. We rely on donated items for our arts and crafts classes and wish to thank all who think about us when you clean out that craft room or closet! We also accept donations for the local food bank. You may bring canned or boxed foods and leave them in the container at the center. For more information, please call 926-7145. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCelebrating the Fourth of July at the Senior Center. Getting crafty with seashells. Lunch featuring turkey and dressing at Christmas in July. Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 000ARKA The Wakulla News

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Special to The News Another summer is about to come to an end. School will be starting and our children will get back to their routines. So too ends the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Summer Program taking care of children ages Pre-K to 5th grade. What a time we have had this year. Everything from going to the beach at Carrabelle to movies, skating, crafts, Fun Days at the Center to our trip to Gulf World, but our best time was St. Marks Wildlife Refuge. The refuge took our children to new levels of education, teaching them that every living creature has a purpose, from the tiniest of creepy crawlers to the biggest reptile in Florida. The rst day of the four week program the children missed so many things because they didnt know what or how to look for them. By the end of the program the children were nding animal tracks and butter y cocoons. They had fun making bug jars, bird feeders, and plaster casts of animal tracks to bird houses. These experiences will be a life time of memories. Whether it was a hike through the refuge or wading in the coastal waters around the Lighthouse, fun was had by all. Our junior rangers came away with an experience they will never forget, and the teachers had the satisfaction of knowing the future of Floridas wildlife can be preserved. As Ranger Lori says, All life has a purpose, and deserves a chance. Its in the hands of our children to keep it safe. Thank you St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and thank you to the great group of Rangers and Volunteers. See you next Summer! Ms. Sam, Ms. Judy, Ms. Sarah, Ms. Megan.Senior Citizens Summer Program included visiting the refuge ALL PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page 5B Readers Choice Contest! Heres your chance to participate in Readers Choice Contest! is asking our readers to participate in the Readers Choice Contest to identify Wakulla Countys most popular local businesses! Tell us your favorite Readers Choices by lling out the ofcial entry ballot below. Your name will then be registered in a random drawing for $100 in Cash. One entry per person. Please follow these guidelines: All ballots should be clearly printed. The business name must be clearly identied. Your nominations must t the appropriate category. Use the ofcial entry ballot. All ballots must be received at The Wakulla News ofce by 4:00 p.m., Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. Ballots may be mailed to: The Wakulla News, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326, or you may drop off the ballot at The Wakulla News ofce at 3119-A Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. Send your nominations today. Then watch for results in the Sept. 27, 2012 edition of !Animal Care: Pet Care, Grooming & Supplies ________Automotive: Auto Engine Repair __________ Auto Body Shops ____________Used Car Dealer ____________ Financial Services: Bank _____________________ Credit Union _______________ Mortgage Company _________ Food and Beverage Liquor Store _______________ Grocery __________________Ice Cream/Snacks __________ Bakery ___________________ Health and Fitness Gym _____________________ Massage Therapist __________Chiropractor _______________ Fitness Instructor/Trainer _____ Homes and Land Builder ___________________ Real Estate Company _______ Title Company _____________ Surveyor _________________Lawn Care/Landscaping _____ Nursery/Garden Center ______ Flooring __________________ Plumbing _________________ Electrician ________________ A/C-Heating ______________ Painter ___________________ Tree Service ______________ Pool Care ________________ Home Cleaning Service _____ Miscellaneous: Childcare __________________Clothing and Gifts ____________ Storage Centers _____________ Dance Studio _______________Photographer _______________Hotel ______________________Hardware __________________ Personal Services: Barber Shop ________________ Hair Salon __________________Nail Care __________________ Tanning ____________________Professional Services: Accountant _________________Attorney ___________________ Doctor _____________________Dentist ____________________ Recreation: Marina ____________________Fishing Charter _____________ Bait & Tackle _______________ Boat and Motor Repair _______________ Canoe/Kayak Rental _________Scuba ____________________ Restaurant: Atmosphere ________________Breakfast __________________ Lunch _____________________Dinner ____________________ Service ___________________Entertainment ______________Readers Choice Categories:Name______________________ Address_____________________________ City_____________________________ State_________ Zip______________ Phone____________________ Email________________________ Age____ Are you a current subscriber to ? _____Yes ______No*Entries must be handwritten on ofcial entry ballot from Sorry, no computer generated ballots, mechanical reproductions, photocopies, carbon copies, illegible entries or ballots with answers that are not true and/or relevant will be accepted. *At least 25% of the categories must be lled out. *Only one entry per person. Ballots not meeting these requirements will be voided. *All ballots must be received by by 4:00 p.m. on Aug. 31, 2012. Send entire ballot to Readers Choice Contest, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326 or bring it to our ofce at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville. (No purchase required.) *Winning entry will be drawn by a representative of *All entrants agree to publication of their name, home town, and photograph without additional compensation. Announcement of the winner will appear in the Readers Choice special section to be published in the Sept. 27, 2012 edition of *Employees of and their families are not eligible to win. Not intended for residents of states where prohibited by law. Winner must be 18 years of age or older. *All ballots that do not meet this criteria will not be counted.THIS AD IS YOUR OFFICIAL BALLOT & ENTRY FORM.Please complete and return to by 4:00 p.m. Aug. 31, 2012. Use the area beside each category to list your favorite business. Mail your ofcial entry form and completed ballot to: WIN $100Submit your completed entry form and be entered in the drawing to win $100 in Cash ENTRY FORM: The News Wakulla Th e T h e Readers Choice 2012 eadersChoiceCategories: S S S S S u b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b m i i i t t t t t t t t t t t t t y y y y y y y y y y e e e e e e e e e e n t t t t t t e r e e e d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d Register Today for your chance toc/o Readers Choice Contest P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326OR drop it off at ofce: 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville.

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SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEmploymentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements 5332-0830 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201202746 TO: Richard A. Greene ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. August 9, 16, 23 & 30 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Todays New Ads CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTSCNAs & HHAs for in-home & facility patient care. Part-time, full-time, 24/7. Background check required. Visit www.hopewellcare.com for an application or apply @ 2121 Killarney Way, Tallahassee. Good Things to Eat Raker FarmsWere Still Here Blanched & Frozen Peas, Okra. And we process Beef, Hogs & Deer850-926-7561 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Medical CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTSCNAs & HHAs for in-home & facility patient care. Part-time, full-time, 24/7. Background check required. Visit www.hopewellcare.com for an application or apply @ 2121 Killarney Way, Tallahassee. General Help HELPWANTED PT Bus DriversCoast Charter School St. Marks, 850-925-6344 Garage/ Yard Sales CrawfordvilleFriday 24, 9a-5p Dresser w/ mirror, desk, TVs, Chest & misc. 61 Pine Lane CRAWFORDVILLEINDOOR YARD SALE IN CRAWFORDVILLE SAT AUG 25 8:30 a.m. til 1 p.m. HOUSEHOLD AND OUTDOOR ITEMS; SOME CLOTHES AND SPORTING GOODS. 19 SHADEVILLE RD (former Home Respiratory Solutions bldg.) Musical Instruments Upright PianoMendelssohn ivory keys $100 You Move (850) 962-3799 Mobile Homes For Rent Crawfordville2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Expando, Living room, bedroom, $400 mo. $300 deposit 850-766-0170 MOBILE HOME FOR RENT 1, 2,3 BEDROOMS (850) 251-1468 SusanCounciI @earthlink.net North Wa kulla2BR, 2BA, Central heat & Air, City water included $525. mo. $250 dep. (850) 926-5326 Apartments Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEWakula Trace Apartments Now Accepting Applications ForBeautiful 1 Bedroom Apartmentsfor persons 62 years of age or older Handycapped/ disabled regardless of age. Must meet income requirements. Rental assistance based on availability. Located at 3 Celebrity Lane Beside Senior Center (850) 926-0207 TDD 800-955-7771 Equal Housing Opportunity Rental Houses PANACEACottage, for Rent 2/1, Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Rennovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, covered front proch & open back deck, Small pets acceptable Excellent fishing! $585/month 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $750/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1935 Crawfordville3 Bedroom, 1 Bath 105 Ted Lot Lane $600. mo. $300 secuirty 850-766-0170 CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Br/2 Ba, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 CRAWFORDVILLEBeach Front at Shell Point Cute 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Screen porch, decks, great views, Avaialable furnished or unfurnished 1 yr. lease $1,200 month, (850) 926-8948 CRAWFORDVILLEWakulla Gardens Nice 3Bedroom 2 Bath Home with Garage Central heat and air, jacuzzi tub, $925. mo (850) 926-8948 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEConvient Locations 2 BEDROOM on 3 Acres, Nice Oak Trees $625 mo. 2 BEDROOM on 2 Fenced Acres $700. moBrenda Hicks Realy (850) 251-1253 IVAN3 Bedroom, 1 Bath 93 Stokley Road (850) 926-5336 Boats KEY LARGO2004, 18 foot, 115HP Yamaha, very few hrs. on boat and motor. Aluminum magic tilt trailer, bimini top. Great condition $9,500 obo (850) 421-2792 (850) 320-0455 5347-0830 TWN Vs. Parsons, William 65-2011-CA-000151 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000151 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANY Plaintiff(s) vs. WILLIAM J. PARSONS; et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000151 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANYis the Plaintiff and LAURAETTAGENTRYand WILLIAM J. PARSONS, JANE D. PARSON and UNKNOWN TENANTS n/k/a MATTGORE are the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 13th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 1 AND 2 AND 3, BLOCK F, SOUTH TOWN OF PANACEA, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 7 AND 7AOF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA and commonly known as: 206 CLARK DR. P ANACEA, FL 32346 IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANYREMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida this 18th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk, County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, Wakulla County, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL, 32327 -County Phone 850-926-0905 EXT. 223, TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. August 23 & 30, 2012 864242.000234FMT 5348-0830 TWN vs. JOKI, KRISHNAKUMAR Case No.65-2012-CA-000178 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000178, DIVISION: Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. : KRISHNAKUMAR A. JOKI A/K/AJ. A. KRISHNAKUMAR, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: KRISHNAKUMAR, JOKI A/K/AJ.A. KRISHNAKUMAR LASTKNOWN ADDRESS:73 DOGWOOD FORESTROAD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-0589 CURRENTADDRESS : UNKNOWN HEMARANI R. KANTHALU A/K/AK. R. HEMARANI LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 73 DOGWOOD FORESTROAD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-0589 CURRENTADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENTADDRESS : UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLACounty, Florida: LOT 22, SPRINGBROOK FARMS, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 118-120 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates, P.L. Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in The W akulla News. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on this _____ day of __________, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: /s/ __________________, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News AUGUST23 & 30, 2012 F12007587 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page 7B AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432we sell and service most makes and models Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $855mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $825mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $750mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $700mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $675mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $625mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSAVE ONMOVE IN EXPENSES on some properties. Call today for details. GARAGE SALESaturday 7AM 2PMTOOLS, Books, Lamps, Kitchenware and much more.2 Hines St. ( at the end of Taf inger )Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 5326-0830 TWN vs.Lundy, William 65-2009-CA-000440Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000440 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM E. LUNDY, et. al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, and entered in 65-2009-CA000440 of the Circuit Court of the second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., is the Plaintiff and WILLIAM E. LUNDY; CHASE BANK USA, NATIONALASSOCIATION are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Door, Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at 11:00 a.m. on September 20, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, WAKULLARANCHETTES, MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 50 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 147.37 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE NORTHERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYOF U. S. HIGHWAYNO 98 (STATE ROAD NO. 30), THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 16 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 1857.90 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID LOT 50, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTH HALF OF SAID LOT 50 ADISTANCE OF 1,311.59 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTH HALF OF SAID LOT 50 ADISTANCE OF 327.38 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 931.91 FEET TO THE CENTER POINT OF ACUL-DE-SAC (SAID CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A50.00 FOOT RADIUS) AND TO THE CENTER LINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTER LINE 327.37 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 931.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 7.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO AROADWAYEASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTH 30.00 FEET THEREOF. ALSO SUBJECT TO CUL-DE-SAC EASEMENT IN THE SOUTHEAST CORNER THEREOF. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 50, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 1311.59 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 327.20 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 665.14 FEET TO AROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 327.17 FEET TO AROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 664.69 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS EASEMENT MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A15 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT LYING 15 FEET EAST OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LINE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 50, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 1311.59 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 664.69 FEET TO AROD AND CAPFOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 236.33 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYOF A60 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY, SAID POINT BEING THE POINT OF TERMINUS Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 18th day of July, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 23 & 30, 2012 11-04309 5341-0906 TWN vs. KEVIN R. GABYCase No. 4:12-CV-00053-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:12-CV-00053-RH-WCS CENTENNIALBANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN R GABYa/k/a KEVIN RILEYGABY; KERRYR. GABY; and WILDWOOD COUNTRYCLUB PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in the above-styled case on June 5, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, and the Amendment to Judgment of Foreclosure entered July 10, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 10th day of September 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Eastern T ime), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County and Franklin County, Florida: SEE EXHIBITS A, B AND C ATTACHED HERETO. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshal, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated: August 8, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL32591-3010 EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND ALSO MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 82 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER AND THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 1575.73 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARYOF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 480.95 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AND AN EXTENSION THEREOF 386.57 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF U.S. HIGHWAYNO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY225.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 385.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 225.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. EXHIBIT B Parcel 1: Lot 21 of Wildwood Country Club, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 35, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 10, Block E of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 3: Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Less and Except: that part of Lots 1 and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, deeded to the State of Florida, recorded 12/19/1973 in Official Records Book 39, Page 784, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 4: Lots 26 and 27, Block O of Lanark Beach Unit No. 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, all water and riparian rights, ditches, and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, and replacements that may now, or at any time the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). EXHIBIT C BEGIN AT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 13 ADISTANCE OF 726.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EDGE OF SWIRL SWAMP, THENCE RUN ALONG THE EDGE OF SAID SWIRLSWAMPAS FOLLOWS: 5343-0823 TWN Vs. Cesar, Markly 65-2009-CA-000427CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000427CA HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC. Plaintiff, vs. MARKLYCESAR AND HAYDEE CESAR, et al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 24, 2012, and entered in 65-2009-CA-000427CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES INC. is the Plaintiff and HAYDEE CESAR; MARKLYJ. CESAR; THE FARM HOMEOWNERSASSOCIATION, INC; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Craw5344-0830 TWN Vs. Shepherd, Cheryl and Mark 65-2012-CA-000142 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000142 FEDERALNATIONALMORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. CHERYLL. SHEPHERD, MARK SHEPHERD, UNKOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 and #2, et. al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MARK SHEPHERD (Last Known Address) 4 CHOCTAW ROAD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 873 BIRCH STREET ALCOA, TN 37701 1523 BERWYN DR. MARYVILLE, TN 37803 3630 STEEPLECHASE RD. WESLEYCHAPEL, FL33543 (Current Residence Unknown) if living, and ALLOTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named Defendant is deceased, the personal representatives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming, by, through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described Defendants YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 1 AND 68 OF BLOCK 15, OF WAKULLAGARDENS, AS SHOWN BYPLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, POPKIN & ROSALER, P.A., 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL33442., Attorney for Plaintiff, on or before September 21, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the Wakulla News and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISIONS OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTTHE CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTATTHE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327, TELEPHONE (850) 926-0905 WITHIN TWO (2) WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPTOF THIS NOTICE; IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL1-800-955-8771. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 20th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk August 23 & 30, 2012 12-33532 5344-0830 5345-0830 TWN Vs. Cruzado, Ricky 2008-CA-000224 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case No.: 2008-CA-000224 Division: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, v. RICKYCRUZADO; MAYRASANTIAGO; UNKNOWN TENANT#1, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated July 18, 2012 entered in Civil Case No.: 2008-CA-000224, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC is Plaintiff, and RICKYCRUZADO; MAYRASANTIAGO; UNKNOWN TENANT#1, are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 1 1:00 a.m. at front lobby of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327 on the 13th day of September, 2012the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, BLOCK T, HUDSON HEIGHTS, UNIT 4, ADDITION TO CRAWFORDVILLE ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 38, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 102 DOGWOOD DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on July 18, 2012 (COURTSEAL) BRENTX. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT By; /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintif f: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544,Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 at least 7 working days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News August 23 & 30, 2012 5345-0830 File No. 7992T-03963 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices fordville Hwy., the lobby of Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 AM on September 6, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 30, BLOCK F OF THE FARM, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE(S) 93-98, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 10th day of July, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, as Deputy Clerk. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less that 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 16 & 23, 2012. 12-01747 NORTH 70 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 282.08 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 213.59 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 107.30 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 97.25 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 125.54 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 243.65 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 190.70 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 152.83 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 285.84 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 133.29 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID SWAMPS EDGE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 3340.12 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1530.27 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE ON THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 13, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY834.01 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 1560.24 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOTS 86 AND 87 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 131.30 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 660.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 528.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS OVER AND ACROSS THAT CERTAIN EASEMENT RECORDED OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 191, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News August 16, 23, 30 and September 6 2012 A1135183.DOC 5341-0906 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available, all utilities included. 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./$900 Deposit 36 Stephen Donaldson 3BR/2BA MH on 1.33 Acres, $650 mo/$650 Security. Pets ok with $250 pet fee. 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/ Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of ofce space, fenced 82 Mimosa 3BR/1BA $650Mo./$650 Deposit 56 Myers Woods 3BR/2BA $1,000Mo./$1,000 Deposit Pets ok w/$250 pet fee 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA Available Sept. 1, $900Mo./$900 Deposit 14 Cutchin Ct. 3BR/2BA $675 mo/$675 deposit. We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!2323 Surf Rd. 3BR/2BA Bayfront road on Ochlockonee Bay, Screened Porch, Deck and Dock. No Smoking. No Pets. $1,150 per month. 112 Captain James St. 4BR/2BA 2,280 sq. ft. MH on 9 acres. Located in North Wakulla near Woodville. Complete with replace, workshop and dishwasher. No Smoking. No Pets. $775 per month.Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page 9B 5250-0823 TWN vs. Vaillancourt, Debra Case No:2012CA000083 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 2012CA000083 FEDERALNATIONALMORTGAGE ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, DEBRAVAILLANCOURT, et, al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAELT BRACKIN LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 30 CHICKATTRL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 ALSO ATTEMPTED AT: 2142 HIGHWAY98 E, CARRIABLLE, FL32322 AND 1349 BRANCH HILLCT, APOPKA, FL32712 CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOTS 63 AND 64, BLOCK WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT V, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address i is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL33309 on or before September 14, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in The Wakulla Times and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoo rdinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled Court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 25th day of May, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News August 16 & 23, 2012 5250-0823 : 5322-0823 TWN Vs. GERIN BRUMBAUGH Case No. 2010-CA000338 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000338 U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. GERIN D. BRUMBAUGH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GERIN D. BRUMBAUGH; JOHN DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE 5323-0823 TWN Vs. Joan Valerie Pound Case No. 12-0016-FC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 12-0016-FC, UCN: 652012CA000016XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. JOAN VALERIE POUND A/K/AVALERIE LANDER A/K/AVALERIE POUND et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 12-0016-FC. UCN: 652012CA000016XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.Ais Plaintiff and JOAN VALERIE POUND A/K/AVALERIE LANDER A/K/AVALERIE POUND; UNKNOWN TENANTNO.1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 at Wakulla County Florida, at 11:00a.m on the 6th dayof jDecember, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 19, WOODLAND HERITAGE COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 4, T3S, R1W, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 37 MINUTES AND 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 4, ADISTANCE OF 2074.85 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES, 23 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 669.88 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES, 23 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SAID CENTERLINE 669.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES, 36 MINUTES, 41 SECONDS WEST 399.96 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES, 23 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 669.92 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 36 MINUTES, 41 SECONDS EAST 399.57 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AROADWAYEASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS TJE EASTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on July18, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk SMITH, HIATT& DIAZ, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff P.O. Box 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 16 & 23, 2012 5323-0823 5324-0823 TWN Vs. Wesley D. Dukes Case #: 2009-CA-000236 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2009-CA-000432 Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, formerly known as Bankers Trust Company of California, N.A.., as Trustee for Asset Backed Securities Corporation Long Beach Home Equity Loan Trust 2000-LB1. Plaintiff, -vs.Wesley D. Dukes, Jr. a/k/a Wesley D. Dukes and Nancy E. Dukes, Husband and Wife; Summerwind Roadowners Maintenance Association, Inc.; JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as successor in interest to Provident National Bank Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000236 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Deutsche Bank National trust Company, formerly known as Bankers Trust Company of California, N.A., as Trustee for Asset Backed Securities Corporation Long Beach Home Equity Loan Trust 2000-LB1, Plaintiff and Wesley D. Dukes, Jr. a/k/a Wesley D. Dukes and Nancy E. Dukes, Husband and Wife are 5327-0830 TWN vs. Family Tides Case No. 2011-165CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2011-165 CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, v. FAMILYTIDES INVESTMENTS, LLC, BRADLEYR. WILL, BRIAN K. WILL, DOUGLAS A. WILL, RICHARD GENTRY, DOUGLAS MARK HOLLEY, and ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AGAINST, THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on September 20, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real properties situated in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 2, OF FIDDLERS COVE, PHASE I, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 84, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. LOT 19, OF FIDDLERS COVE, PHASE I, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 84, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327, (850) 926-0905 at least 7 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 19th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND Clerk of the Circuit Court [SEALOF THE COURT] By:/s/Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk August 23 & 30, 2012 5328-0830 TWN Vs. Beard, Earl Case No: 2012-FC-000068 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2012-FC-000068 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. EARLBEARD; DEBRADENISE BEARD A/K/ADEBRABEARD A/K/ADENISE BEARD A/K/ADEBRAD. BEARD; UNKNOWN TEANANTI; UNKNOWN TENANTII, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 20th day of September, 2012, at 11:00 oclock A.M. at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: TRACT 24, CASORAESTATES UNIT NO. 2 (UNRECORDED) COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 90 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 90 ADISTANCE OF 165.80 FEET TO THE EAST RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF CASORADRIVE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 47 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EAST RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY335.61 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 50 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY213.11 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF GLOVER DADDY ROAD 923.60 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY209.78 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 598.87 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 290.12 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 796.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 18th day of July, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904) 926-0905. not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk August 23 & 30, 2012 5328-0830 5336-0823 TWN vs. Maryvonne Ashley Case No: 12 CA13 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 12 CA13 ONEWESTBANK, FSB, Plaintiff, UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALLOTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTERESTIN THE ESTATAE OF MARYVONNE H. ASHLEY, et, al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALLOTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARYVONNE H. ASHLEY LASTADDRESS UNKNOWN CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN ALBERT ASHLEY LASTADDRESS UNKNOWN CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN NANCYCARTER LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 103 OAK AVE., HAVANA, FL32333 CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 35 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA AND PROCEED SOUTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 785.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 657.15 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 402.44 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 19 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 189.07 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 231.19 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 189.07 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 230.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO A30.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAYEASEMENT ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARYTHEREOF. SUBJECT TO A15.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAYEASEMENT ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARYTHEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A30.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAYEASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 35 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA AND PROCEED SOUTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 785.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 657.15 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 591.51 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 231.19 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 300.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 314.04 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 381.51 FEET TO THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD #365 SAID POINT BEING A POINT ON ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE WESTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYAND THE ARC OF SAID CURVE HAVING ARADIUS OF 5729.59 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 48 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 31.33 FEET THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 02 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 31.33 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 402.48 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 314.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 269.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 30.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A1993 BRENNER MOBILE HOME, IDENTIFICATION NOS. 10L23424U AND 10L23424X, FLORIDATITLE NOS. 65833078 AND 65833079 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address i is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL33309 on or before September 13, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in The Wakulla Times and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoo rdinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled Court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 6th day of August, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News August 16 & 23, 2012 : Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices defendants(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONTDOOR OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED ATCHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M. on September 9, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit; COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 32 ADISTANCE OF 2749.18 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 666.79 FEET TO AN IRON ROD SET IN THE CENTERLINE OF A60 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLYALONG ACURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 370.38 FEET FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 195.34 FEET (CHORD NORTH 75 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 193.09 FEET), THENCE RUN NORTH 59 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 455.31 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING ARADIUS OF 370.38 FEET, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE CURVE 195.18 FEET (CHORD NORTH 75 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 192.92 FEET), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 249.21 FEET TO THE WESTERLYRIGHT OF WAYFOR A POWERLINE TO THE CITYOF TALLAHASSEE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY338.77 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 412.28 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 666.79 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN YEAR: 1986, MAKE: CHANDLER, VIN#: AFLCW2AG240511628 AND VIN#: AFLCW2BG240511628, MANUFACTURED HOME, WHICH IS PERMANENTLYAFIXED TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS. AS SUCH IT IS DEEMED TO BE AFIXTURE AND APART OF THE REALESTATE. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEYFOR THE PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100, Tampa, FL33614 (813)880-8888, (813)880-8800 August 16 & 23, 2012. 09-139423 FC01 5338-0823 TWN Estate of Ann Denson Poucher CASE NO.: 12-63-CPNotice To Creditors IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 12-63-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ANN DENSON POUCHER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ANN DENSON POUCHER, deceased, File Number 12-63, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including un-matured, contingent or un-liquidated claims, on whom a copy of the notice is served must file their claims with the Court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTIONS 733.702 AND 733.710, OR BE FOREVER BARRED. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including un-matured, contingent or un-liquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTIONS 733.702 AND 733.710. ALLCLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 16, 2012. RAYMOND EARLPOUCHER Personal Representative 443 Seminole Lane Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 Steve M. Watkins, III Attorney for Personal Representative 41 Commerce Street, Apalachicola, FL32320 (850)653-1949 Fla Bar No. 0794996 August 16 & 23, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5334-0823 TWN Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGALNOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON AUGUST 31, 2012 at 1 1:00a.m AT2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONALPROPERTYOF: JENNIFER BABCOCK Before the sale date of AUGUST31, 2012, The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. TO RUN IN THE WALULLANEWS AUGUST16 & 23, 2012. 5334-0823 5342-0830 TWN Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida Statues, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Thursday, September 6, 2012 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Shara Harvey Before the sale date of September 6th, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the StowAway Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327 August 23, 2012 5342-0830 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5349-0913 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 005 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN, that GULF GROUPHOLDINGS AQUISITIONS & APPLICATIONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2418 Year of Issuance 2008 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-121-155-12084-D14 SHELLPOINTBEACH UNIT5 BLOCK D LOT14 OR 231 P594 OR 260 P828 Name in which assessed PIERRE LAWRENCE OLIVAREZ said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 3rd day of October, 2012, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 2nd day of August, 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida August 23, 30 and September 6, 13, 2012 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOT 54, BLOCK 20, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT THREE, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA a/k/a 5 POWHATAN ST, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, ON September 13, 2012 at eleven oclock a.m. ESTin the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 19th day of July, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTLETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1800-955-8771. August 16 & 23, 2012 665102518.

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1 14 17 23 28 31 36 39 45 49 52 58 61 2 24 46 3 25 42 4 20 29 43 5 26 40 53 59 62 6 37 18 32 54 7 15 30 50 8 27 47 9 21 44 60 63 10 41 22 38 51 11 16 19 33 48 55 12 34 56 13 35 57 ACROSS 1. Ill will 7. "Ed Wood" star Johnny 11. Second-stringer 14. Fix, as a chair 15. Melville tale 16. Beehive State tribesman 17. Gun with a flaring muzzle 19. Rickey need 20. Overly sentimental 21. Istanbul's region 23. Special __ (movie enhancers) 26. President pro __ 27. Arboreal rodent 28. Made secure 30. Gives a leg up to 31. Felt sore 32. Mr. Chips player Robert 33. Stylish, in the '60s 36. Go sour 37. Blew it 38. Aesopian also-ran 39. Paul Anka's "__ Beso" 40. Pigs' digs 41. Bad habits 42. Ma y honoree 44. Holder of the "dead man's hand" 45. "Go ahead!" 47. Swabbie 48. Draft org. 49. Day to wear a bonnet 50. Israeli native 52. Debate side 53. 1934 Jackie Cooper film 58. Country singer McGraw 59. Disney dog 60. Perpetual, in poesy 61. Latish lunchtime 62. "If all __ fails ..." 63. Beethoven's "Moonlight __"DOWN1. Certain Wall Streeter, briefly 2. "__ blu, dipinto di ..." ("Volare" lyrics) 3. Post-OR place 4. Assigns workers to 5. Not listing year of creation 6. Flowed slowly 7. Larr y, the first black American Leaguer 8. Cassowary cousin 9. Mail carrier's route, once 10. Most swanky 11. Sweet cereal renamed in the '80s 12. City near Syracuse, NY 13. "John Brown's Body" poet 18. Turntable letters 22. Emeritus: Abbr. 23. Make jubilant 24. Adjust the lenses 25. Sex determinant 27. Shadings 29. Slugger Griffey Jr. 30. Hole-making bug 32. Like prunes or raisins 34. Stackable cookies 35. Cubicle fillers 37. Light and delicate 38. Sot's sound 40. Church topper 41. Amplifier effect 43. MLB playoffs mo. 44. Calvin's tiger 45. __-B ismol 46. __' to go (eager) 47. Krypton or radon 50. Terrier type 51. Yemeni port 54. DJ's assortment 55. Bikini piece 56. Toronto's prov. 57. Thumbs-up voteAmerican Prole Hometown Content 8/19/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 12 3 4 53467 815 4 31 58 379 7 36 62174 9583 2009 HometownContent 162 7853 4 9 539462187 478139265 854 396721 927518436 316247958 741 853692 683921574 295674813 A R B E L A T E P E P T O N E L F O C U S R A R I N I C U X C H R O M O S O M E M A N S K E N O C T U N D A T E D S T E E P L E S E E P E D E T H E R E A L R P M D R I E D C D S D O B Y B O R E R S K Y E E M U T O N E S G A S P O S T R O A D H O B B E S P O S H E S T V I B R A T O R E T H I C A D E N S U G A R S M A C K S B R A U T I C A O R E O S O N T B E N E T D E S K S Y E A -Janet By DAVID WHITE Last week, nearly 400 wine writers gathered in Portland, Ore., for the fth annual Wine Bloggers Conference. The event opened with a keynote speech from Randall Grahm, the legendary vintner behind Bonny Doon Vineyard, who urged attendees to support originality and strangeness, two features that the wine business, especially in the New World, desperately needs. Itd be hard to ignore the fact that Grahm was urging the audience to embrace more winemakers like himself. Grahm rose to fame in the 1980s thanks to his originality he was among the rst American winemakers to embrace Rhone varieties like Syrah and Grenache. And Grahm is proudly strange. For most of his career, he was best known for his amboyant and irreverent marketing campaigns. Six years ago, he famously decided to cast aside his three biggest wine brands in order to focus on smallproduction wines made with minimal intervention. Such originality and strangeness should be applauded. And fortunately, more and more winemakers are following in Grahms footsteps. For some, this means introducing Americans to obscure grapes. Consider Red Tail Ridge Winery on Seneca Lake in New York. Like most producers in the Finger Lakes, Red Tail Ridge makes a number of different Rieslings. But it also produces varieties like Teroldego, a red wine that hails from northeast Italy, and Blaufrankisch, Austrias signature red wine. Or look at Chateau OBrien in the Blue Ridge Mountains of northern Virginia. Its agship wine is a Tannat, a grape thats typically associated with Uruguay. On a recent visit to the winery, I was extremely impressed by its Petit Manseng, even though the variety is historically used in southwest France as an unremarkable blending grape. Chateau OBrien and Red Tail Ridge arent alone. Across the country, countless producers are introducing consumers to unfamiliar grapes. For other winemakers, originality and strangeness means jettisoning modern winemaking techniques and mimicking the producers of yesteryear. Just think about the arsenal of tools todays winemakers can employ. On the vineyard, viticulturists can ensure that their vines receive the perfect amount of water through irrigation. With chemical fertilizers, grape growers can maintain textbook levels of soil nutrients. By using pesticides and herbicides, growers can protect their grapes from fungi and invasive weeds. In the cellar, winemakers can manipulate their wines in a number of ways. Adding sugar just before fermentation can raise alcohol; using a specialized ltration system can lower it. Winemakers can make a wine seem fresher by adding tartaric acid. Aging wine in oak barrels is expensive; using oak chips saves money and time. Adding a small amount of grape juice concentrate to a wine can mask vegetal aromas. These practices arent necessarily bad many are critical in the production of affordable, consistent, commercial wine. But they make it dif cult for a wine to express a sense of place. That sense of place or terroir is what makes wine special. Its why two wines made from adjacent vineyards can taste distinctively different from each other. The pursuit of terroir inspires numerous winemakers to produce wine as if theyre living in ancient times. For longtime California producer Steve Edmunds, who, like Randall Grahm, is known for his focus on Rhone varieties, this makes perfect sense. Winemaking isnt Rocket Science, he explains on his website. Its an ancient, relatively straightforward process that should yield, in any wine, a precise expression of the vineyard and the season that produced it. Even big wineries have started to move in this direction. Since 2007, Sonomas Benziger Family Winery has pursued the highest level of natural farming appropriate for each of its vineyards, not solely because of environmental concerns, but because the Benziger family believes such practices help produce more honest, authentic wine. As Grahm nished his speech in Portland, he urged the audience to speak up on behalf . of those who are innovating new styles, or preserving something precious. Every year, it seems as if an increasing number of American winemakers are doing just that. Its a development worth celebrating.David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet. WHITES WINESIn praise of originality and strangeness in wines

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page 11B 1. FOOD & DRINK: What is French pate de foie gras made from? 2. GEOGRAPHY: The island of Madagascar lies in what body of water? 3. LANGUAGE: What is a similar way to describe a ribald joke? 4. AD SLOGANS: What movie was promoted with the slogan, Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water? 5. HUMAN ANATOMY: What is the most common type of blood? 6. POLITICS: What longtime Ohio senator was known as Mr. Republican? 7. LITERARY: What famous author used the pen name Boz in his early career? 8. MOVIES: Which three actors have starred in major roles as Inspector Clouseau in the Pink Panther movies? 9. CHEMISTRY: What does the Ag stand for in the chemical symbol for silver? 10. HISTORY: When did Queen Annes War (Third Indian War) begin in colonial America? Answers 1. Goose or duck liver 2. Indian Ocean 3. Vulgar 4. Jaws II 5. O positive 6. Robert A. Taft 7. Charles Dickens 8. Peter Sellers, Alan Arkin and Steve Martin 9. Argentum, the Latin word for silver 10. 1702 YOUR AD HERE

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear EarthTalk: What exactly is the federal governments Recreational Trails Program and is it true that its on the chopping block? Randy Caldwell Lyme, N.H. The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) is a federal assistance program that helps states pay for the development and maintenance of recreational trails and trail-related facilities for both nonmotorized and motorized recreational trail uses. The Congressionally mandated program was in jeopardy due to budget cuts, but its backers in Congress announced this past July that RTP would be retained to the tune of $85 million per year as part of the new surface transportation agreement law called MAP-21. Minnesota Democratic Senator Amy Klobuchar was instrumental in the retention of RTP by introducing it as an amendment to MAP-21 as a stand-alone program with its own dedicated funding. Overall, MAP-21 allocates $105 billion for scal years 2013 and 2014 to improve safety, reduce traf c congestion, maintain infrastructure and improve the overall ef ciency of highway transportation. RTP is one of several provisions of MAP-21 that bolster transit, bike and pedestrian programs across the country. Funding for the RTP portion of MAP-21 comes from a portion of the motor fuel excise tax collected across the country from non-highway recreational fuel use in snowmobiles, all-terrain vehicles, off-highway motorcycles and off-highway light trucks, and comes out of the Federal Highway Trust Fund. Half of the RTP funds are distributed equally among all 50 states, and half are distributed in proportion to the estimated amount of non-highway recreational fuel use in each state. Individual states are responsible for administering their own RTP monies and soliciting and selecting qualifying projects. That said, the use of RTP funding is restricted to maintenance and restoration of existing trails, development and rehabilitation of trailside and trailhead facilities and trail linkages, purchase and lease of trail construction and maintenance equipment, construction of new trails, acquisition of easements or property for trails, and assessment of trail conditions for accessibility and maintenance. RTP funding may not go toward property condemnation (eminent domain), construction of new trails for motorized use on federally managed public lands or for facilitating motorized access on otherwise nonmotorized trails. States must allocate 30 percent of their RTP funding for motorized trail use, 30 percent for non-motorized use, and the remaining 40 percent for so-called diverse (motorized and non-motorized) trail use. Projects may satisfy two categories at the same time, giving states some flexibility in how to allocate their share of the RTP pie. States can use up to ve percent of their funds to disseminate related publications and operate educational programs to promote safety and environmental protection related to trails. Trail lovers across the country are thrilled that Congress extended RTP, which began in 2005 with a $60 million allocation and was increased each of the following years until it plateaued at $85 million in 2009. The continuation of the $85 million allocation was also good news to those who feared that if it wasnt cut entirely it would be scaled back signi cantly. With new funding for the next two years, Americans can look forward to the creation of many new trails and continued maintenance of existing ones. Dear EarthTalk: What is the Domestic Fuels Protection Act of 2012 and why are environmental groups opposing it? William Bledsoe Methuen, Mass. The Domestic Fuels Protection Act of 2012 (H.R. 4345) is a bill that was introduced in the House of Representatives in April 2012 by a bipartisan group of Congress members to protect domestic producers of ethanol, biodiesel and other green-friendly fuels from liability to end-users who put the wrong kind of fuel or fuel mix into their tanks and damage their engines and/or emit exaggerated amounts of pollution accordingly. The idea behind the bill is to ensure that domestic green fuel and related equipment producers arent forced into dire financial straits or put out of business due to crippling liability claims. But some feel that the fuel industry, whether its products are environmentally friendly or not, should be held accountable for damage its products may cause. Most recently, E15, a fuel blend containing 85 percent gasoline and 15 percent ethanol (a renewable crop-based fuel) came under re for causing engine damage in some older cars and trucks. The EPA approved the use of E15 in 2010 after lobbying from the ethanol industry, which seeks to up the ethanol content of gasoline from what had been the standard of 10 percent, which is much easier for gasoline engines to tolerate. The Auto Alliance, an industry group, recently released a study claiming that upwards of ve million cars on U.S. roads today could be damaged if owners pump in E15 instead of straight gasoline or even the milder E10 (10 percent ethanol, 90 percent gasoline). Problems included damaged valves and valve seats, which can lead to loss of compression and power, diminished vehicle performance, mis- res, engine damage, as well as poor fuel economy and increased emissions, reports the group, adding that the potential costs to consumers are signi cant. The most likely repair would be cylinder head replacement, which costs from $2,000-4,000 for single cylinder head engines and twice as much for V-type engines. Environmental and consumer advocates say that H.R. 4345 is a bad deal for consumers who will be left footing the bill for these repairs. The non-pro t Environmental Working Group (EWG) bemoans the bill because it would exempt hugely pro table and already favored interests including fuel producers, engine makers and retailers of fuels and fuel additives from liability for damage caused by their products. H.R. 4345 is currently under committee review in the House, but analysts doubt it will ever make it to a oor vote given the contentious debate surrounding the fact that it puts the burden of repair costs on end consumers. Users on the govtrack. us website (which provides fr ee and comprehensive legislative tracking for everyday citizens) give H.R. 4345 only a three percent chance of passing. Meanwhile, the Senate is considering a companion bill, the so-called Domestic Fuels Act (S. 2264). But unless the House passes its version first, the Senate bill is unlikely to gain much traction. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www. emagazine.com). Recreational Trails Program will continue to receive federal funding The Congressionally mandated Recreational Trails Program was in jeopardy due to budget cuts, but its backers in Congress announced this past July that it would be retained to the tune of $85 million in funding per year.iSTOCKPHOTOS Some green groups bemoan the recently-introduced Domestic Fuels Protection Act because it would exempt highly pro table producers of fuels and fuel additives from liability for damage caused by their products and push the burden of cost onto consumers.HEMERA COLLECTION is proud to announce that Dr. Chukwuma M. Okoroji is now providing Obstetrics and Gynecology services 1st & 3rd Thursday of each month CRMC Medical Group Building, 2382 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite-D, Crawfordville FL. We accept most insurance, including BCBS, CHP, Medicaid and more. To schedule your appointment or for more information Call 850-320-6054NatureCoastWomensCare.com 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator Like us on