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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00422
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 08-16-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00422
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By JENNIFER JENSEN and WILLIAM SNOWDEN Melisa Taylor won a seat on the Wakulla County School Board in what was probably the most-watched race in the local primary. The turnout of 32.4 percent was lower than Supervisor of Elections Henry Buddy Wells had hoped for. It was smaller than I would have liked, Wells said. Only 5,776 ballots were cast. There are more than 18,000 registered voters in Wakulla. There were no reported problems or incidents with the election. Because the higher pro le races sheriff, county commission are set in November, it didnt appear the races on Tuesday nights primary ballot drew a lot of voter interest. Taylor won 52 percent of the votes with 2,975 votes to Scotts 2,690 votes. The school board seat in non-partisan. I appreciate so much that they believed in me and what I bring to the table, Taylor said. Taylor said she brings a teachers perspective to the school board, one that has not been represented on the board in quite some time. First of all, overwhelmed with gratitude for everybody who came out and supported me. She was thankful to all those who helped her and supported her. Im de nitely very anxious to do the very best I can for the students, teachers, parents and taxpayers. Taylor, who has been an educator since 1984 and has been at Wakulla High School for the last 12 years, challenged long-time School Board Member Scott. Scott served on the board for 16 years, currently serving as chairman. He could not be reached for comment prior to press time. Taylors husband, Larry, won Republican state committeeman over Gordon McCleary and Kurt Ahrendt. He won 821 votes to McClearys 539 votes and Ahrendts 465 votes. Im very excited that people believed in me enough to have me represent Wakulla County, Larry Taylor said. I will do my very best to take any issues Wakulla County has to the state level. Of the double-Taylor victory, he said, Were real excited. Former Wakulla County Commissioner Ed Brimner won a seat on the Soil & Water Conservation Committee over Chuck Hess. Brimner won 3,059 votes to Hess 2,463 votes. Brimner said neither he nor Hess campaigned hard for the committee seat and expressed his respect for Hess. Hes a great guy, Brimner said. In this position, I hope to be able to assist the county commission in making decisions, Brimner said. And Tina Brimner won Republican state committeewoman over Anne Ahrendt. Tina Brimner took 965 votes to Ahrendts 911. Im happy and looking forward to Wakulla County having a presence, Tina Brimner said. Its been a good night, Tina Brimner said of her win, as well as her husbands. Cal Jamison won a seat on Soil & Water over Mitchell Kauffman, who is the Brimners son-in-law. Jamison won by a large margin, taking 3,167 votes to Kauffmans 2,015 votes. Jamison was the lone candidate at the elections of ce along with a handful of spectators. Jamison laughed heartily when congratulated about winning elected of ce. Proud to be here, he said. Voters in Wakulla County supported Halsey Beshears for the Republican nomination for state representative district 7, with 840 votes. Mike Williams came in second with 458 votes, Jamey Westbrook in third with 407 votes and Don Curtis taking 288 votes. For the Democratic nomination, voters had a close race with A.J. Smith taking 1,176 votes, Thomas Dickens 1,097 votes and Robert Hill 1,028 votes. Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 31st Issue Thursday, August 16, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A News Extra! .....................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Arts & Entertainment .......................................................Page 3B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 8B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 9B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 9B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 12B Comics ...........................................................................Page 13BINDEX OBITUARIES Lucinda Cindy Norman William Dannelley Dan Oaks Lola Inez Posey Willis Melisa Taylor wins school board seatBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter a complaint was led in June with the Of ce of Special Counsel against Major Maurice Langston, candidate for Wakulla County sheriff, for a possible violation of the Hatch Act, he decided to request an advisory opinion. On Aug. 8, the OSC issued its opinion and found that Langston was in compliance with the law. Under the Hatch Act, any local or state employee who has a connection with activity nanced in whole or in part by federal funds is covered by the Hatch Act, passed in 1939, and would not be allowed to run for of ce in a partisan election. In Langstons role as undersheriff, he dealt with federal funds related to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainees. On June 13, Langston accepted a voluntary demotion to the major of administration and no longer dealt with those funds. Continued on Page 12ALangston not prohibited from running for sheriffTeachers vote overwhelmingly for contract Big Hearted Angels visit Wakulla By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netBig hearted pretty much sums up Trave Williams, the man behind Big Hearted Angels Inc. and the back to school shopping spree held for children in Wakulla County on Aug. 11. This is something we are doing from our heart, Williams says. Williams started the nonpro t organization with his wife and son in 2003, which provides children with $50 to spend on much needed school supplies, clothes, toiletries and more. There is also a Christmas shopping spree held in Lakeland, Chattanooga, Tenn., and Havana. It came to me in a vision, Williams says. I love to give. The rst event was held in Lakeland and Williams sponsored 25 children with money from his own pocket to go on a Christmas shopping spree. I like looking outside the box, Williams says. I think big. The next year, 125 children participated and it continued to grow. His organization was incorporated in 2005 and a board of directors was established. In 2009, he decided to take this idea back to his roots, back to Wakulla County. Williams was born and raised in Wakulla. I wanted to do something, Williams says. I wanted to give back to where Im from. Williams says he went to the courthouse and government of ces to ask for support. He was directed to Superintendent David Miller, who he says has been a huge supporter of the program. It helps our kids, says Miller. Its a no-brainer. Williams says he receives a lot of support from the Wakulla County School Board and other people and businesses in the community. He receives donations from organizations, businesses and individuals all of which goes to the children. Credibility is what builds you, Williams says. Each year it gets bigger and bigger. This is now the fourth year for the back to school shopping spree in Wakulla and 80 children loaded into two school buses and headed to Wal-Mart to spend their $50. Continued on Page 16A PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENStudents and volunteers with Big Hearted Angels line up at Wal-Mart in Crawfordville, above, to buy school supplies on Saturday. The event was founded and spearheaded by Trave Williams, below, a native of Wakulla County who now lives in Lakeland. People You Should KnowJIMMIE DOYLE: NAMI WakullaSee Page 1BStaff ReportWakulla Classroom Teachers voted last week overwhelmingly to approve the contract for the 2012-13 school year. The vote was held Thursday, Aug. 9, the day teachers returned to the classroom, with 98 percent voting yes. WCTA President Missy Rudd said there were 308 yes votes, 5 no votes, 1 abstention, and 1 challenged vote that could not be counted. The new salary schedule and a $200 bonus will be re ected in teachers August paychecks. On behalf of the Wakulla Classroom Teachers Association, thank you for voting so ef ciently on the rst day of the school year, Rudd told her members. And thanks again to Superintendent (David) Miller and the school board for moving teachers salaries in a positive direction. Superintendent Miller said the agreement is a scally responsible, fair contract that enables Wakulla County to remain competitive in attracting and retaining a high quality teaching staff. Continued on Page 5A Major Maurice Langston Taylors, Brimners are winners in local racesMelisa Taylor, left, won the school board seat held by Mike Scott, right, for the past 16 years.

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County, along with seven other counties along the Gulf Coast in Florida, is in line to receive a substantial amount of money once the federal judge decides the amount of negligence on the part of BP and other responsible parties for the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, or once a settlement is reached. The amounts that are being tossed around for the total ne range from $5 billion to $20 billion, according to Gulf County Commissioner Bill Williams and president of the Florida Association of Counties. A portion of the Clean Water Act nes that will be imposed will go directly to the Gulf states that were affected by the spill. The Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities and Revived Economies (RESTORE) of the Gulf Coast Act was signed by President Barack Obama on July 6 and ensures that 80 percent of the nes will be used for Gulf Coast recovery. Out of this 80 percent, 35 percent will be divided evenly among the five states. In Florida, state legislation was passed to ensure that 75 percent of that share will flow directly to the eight counties that were affected, Wakulla included. Florida is the only state that has direct money that will ow to the counties, Williams said. A formula is currently being worked on to decide how to divide up the 75 percent among the eight counties. Under the proposed formula, Wakulla would receive 4 percent. If the total amount of nes is $10 billion, Wakulla would receive $16.8 million, Williams said. This is unprecedented, said County Commissioner Alan Brock. And what it can do for Wakulla County is unprecedented. Representatives from the eight counties and state are still working on a formula that is fair for everyone, Williams said. The numbers are up for grabs, Williams said. And this is just for one pot out of the total four pots of money that will be made available, Williams said. In an effort to understand and plan for these funds, the Wakulla County Commission held a workshop on Aug. 13, with Williams and FAC consultant Doug Darling. The Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council will receive 30 percent and the Impact/Allocation Consortium will receive 30 percent. The remaining 5 percent will be dedicated to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration and Science, Observation, Monitoring and Technology Program administered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Centers of Excellence. These pots will be competitive and Florida will be competing against all the states, Darling said. For portion that goes to the consortium, each county will have a representative to help come up with the allocation formula. Williams said the hope is to have all the counties work together. We dont want this to be a food ght, Williams said. The state will develop a comprehensive plan to compete for funding, Darling said. Williams suggested the county look at its comprehensive plan and capital improvement plan as models for possible projects that would be appropriate for this money. He also suggested the county meet with residents and stakeholders to get community input. County Administrator David Edwards said there is a plan to have each county commission in each county set up a similar committee so that it is uniform across the board. He added that the county staff plans to start looking at project possibilities now rather than later. This will be a game changer, not just for Wakulla County, but the entire Gulf, Edwards said. Some possible areas this funding could be used is the TCC Environmental Institute, wasterwater treatment plant, beach restoration, park development, park improvement, canal dredging, xing the port at Port Leon, sheries, oyster relay, etc., said County Commissioner Alan Brock. Edwards said the county will hold several workshops on the Restore Act. Were learning as we go, Edwards said. FAC is holding a meeting on Aug. 16 with county representatives to further discuss the allocation formula and other aspects of the Restore Act.COUNTY COMMISSIONWakulla eyes potentially lucrative RESTORE Act payment T T h h a a n n k k Y Y o o u u ! 1391 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Telephone: 850.926.5583 Email: wakullachristian@yahoo.com ~ www.wakullachristian.com Jane A. Hennessy & Paul P. Sanford Wakulla County Sheriff's Office Tiger Rock Martial Arts Paul P. Sanford & Associates, P.A. Palaver Tree Theater Co. Wakulla County 4-H Club Second Harvest Wakulla Dance Academy Five Star Limousines, Inc. Music Lessons Express Wakulla Springs Baptist Church The children, staff and volunteers at Wakulla Christian School Academic and Personal Enrichment Summer Program would like to express our sincerest gratitude to the following businesses for supporting and encouraging this year's camp. We had a wonderful time! all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree)HAIR SALON ALL STUDENTS 10% OFFAll Hair ServicesFULLSERVICEFAMILYSALON We offer exible hours starting at 10AM (TUE-FRI) and at 9AM on SAT Sopchoppy VFD is named station of the month for JulyBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA specially designed ag ies high at Sopchoppy City Hall recognizing the Sopchoppy Volunteer Fire Department for their efforts during and after Tropical Storm Debby in late June. Not only was their community heavily damaged, but their volunteers spent countless hours assisting in rescuing victims from fast moving over owing river to delivering food and water to those trapped in their homes and not wishes to relocate, said Fire Chief Mike Morgan. Station 1 was awarded station of the month by Chief Morgan. The ag was presented at the July meeting of the Wakulla United Fire Fighters Association. Typically, a station receives the award for training hours, improving turn out on incidents, community involvement, etc. This time it was because of their many man hours and service to the community during Debby, Morgan said. They went well beyond what could be expected. The battalion chief for station 1 is Joey Tillman and consists of 11 members, Morgan said. The station of the month recognition program was conceived by a former chief, but was never implemented. Morgan started the program earlier this year. Tropical Storm Debby stalled the program, until station 1 received the award last month. The idea is to recognize one of the 10 volunteer re stations that goes above its normal duty. Each station have members in varying degrees of certification for interior re ghting, exterior firefighting and first responder. These members receive very little in the way of monetary compensation while they provide an invaluable service to our community, Morgan said. In order to answer medical calls and provide assistance to Wakulla County Emergency Medical Service, a member of a VFD must successfully complete a 60-hour class on their own time. To be able to ght re, the member must complete a rigid 220 hours of training in this eld, Morgan said. Prior to Tropical Storm Debby, Tillman, a certi ed water safety instructor and an advanced rescue diver, conducted a water rescue training exercise at Upper Bridge on the Wakulla River that was attended by 22 people from re rescue and EMS. Equipment from squad 1 was used to demonstrate several techniques to assist victims in the water. This training came in handy just a short time later. Squad 1 responded to a water rescue on the Sopchoppy River during the aftermath of Debby. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTRAINING: Volunteer refighters practice rescuing victims in water, training that came in handy during Tropical Storm Debby.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe rst step towards implementing the Crawfordville Town Plan were discussed at a public hearing at the Aug. 6 Wakulla County Commission meeting which included creating the of cial boundaries of the town plan and regulations. The commission came up with numerous changes to the draft regulations and decided to continue the hearing to its Aug. 20 meeting. The countys land development code has not been updated since the Crawfordville Town Plan was adopted in 2011, so the county had no way of enforcing what was included in the plan. Included in the amendments are regulations that are incentive-based to try and encourage development in the town plan area. In the overlay district, Planning Director Luis Serna said the existing uses and zoning will stay in place. No one will be required to move. There are density bonuses for donated land for a park or other public facility, as well as a bonus for a green building. The county commission will also be able to grant impact fee exemptions. There was also a requirement for sidewalks. There were also regulations for parking. The commission decided to reduce the number of required parking spaces by 50 percent below the standards. Commissioner Lynn Artz also wanted to include a provision to allow businesses to build right up to the road. It would allow them to do this, but would not be a requirement. Commissioner Alan Brock said, It would give more freedom to the business owner. There was also a regulation that increased the maximum building coverage by 35 percent above the maximum speci ed by the underlying zoning district if its within the district. Building coverage may be increased by another 10 percent for each of the following: screening parking, shared parking and landscaping. In other news: The board approved the adoption of an ordinance that authorizes the commission to grant economic development ad valorem exemptions to new businesses and expansions to existing businesses. Exemptions will be granted based on the following factors: number of jobs created, average wage of employees, amount of capital investment, type of business, environmental impact, if its located within the enterprise zone, the extent the business plans to source its supplies and materials within the county and whether the business would be established or expanded without the exemption. Commissioner Randy Merritt wanted to see the property tax exemption dropped to 5 years, not 10. Commissioner Jerry Moore agreed, You dont have to give away the cow. Brock said there may come a time and place when the county needs the 10 years so they can compete with a neighboring county. A referendum election will be held in conjunction with the general election of Nov. 6 to determine whether the Board should be authorized to grant economic development ad valorem tax exemptions to new businesses and expansions of existing businesses. The commission approved construction of new walking trails at Medart Recreation Park. The funds will be used to construct sidewalks and hard trails that would connect many of the sports complexes and facilities within Medart Park. This project would also improve the handicap accessibility to many areas of the park. The county has an existing contract with Mike Turner Construction for concrete installation. The estimated cost for the new walking trails is $25,000. This project was originally funded in the 200910 budget, but a spending freeze was implemented. These funds are from impact fees, said Parks and Recreation Director Bryan Roddenberry. The next county commission meeting is Aug. 20 at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.COUNTY COMMISSIONImplementation of Crawfordville Town Plan is discussed WAKULLAS FLOODPLAIN Flooding can threaten at any time of the year from various sources. Wakulla County regulates construction and development in the oodplain to ensure that buildings will be protected from ood damage. All developments in the oodplain, not just construction of buildings, need permits. Filling and similar work are prohibited in certain areas, so check with the Planning and Community Development Department before you begin a project to build, ll or otherwise. Should unauthorized development in the oodplain be witnessed by a citizen, they can report it to the Countys Code Enforcement Ofce at (850) 926-7636. It is also important to know that houses in the oodplain that are substantially damaged by re or ood must be repaired to new construction standards. This includes elevating the structure to or above the base ood elevation when it is repaired. Damage is considered to be substantial when the cost of reconstruction equals or exceeds 50% of the buildings market value. When damage of this type occurs to a structure and repairs are necessary, visit the Planning and Community Development Department for a Development Permit Application to begin your permitting process. A recorded warranty deed and site plan, showing the improvements/repairs to the property, will be required to complete this Application. Once obtained from Planning and Zoning, the Development Permit Application should be submitted to the Building Division for permitting. Depending upon the types of work performed additional materials will be requested from the Building Division to complete the permitting of repairs to the structure. Applicable fees are due for Development Permit Applications and Building Division permits, unless otherwise waived by the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners for widespread storm damage. An important protection measure in regards to ooding is ood insurance. Homeowners insurance policies do not cover damage from oods, so obtaining a ood insurance policy can help you should you experience a ood. Since Wakulla County and the City of St. Marks participate in the National Flood Insurance Program, you can purchase a separate ood insurance policy in these areas. This insurance is backed by the Federal government and is available to properties that have been previously ooded. Dont wait for the next ood to buy insurance protection. In most cases, there is a 30 day waiting period before National Flood Insurance Program coverage takes effect. Also, consider obtaining contents coverage if it is not already included in your current insurance policy. Contact your insurance agent for more information on rates and coverage. For further information on these topics contact the Planning and Community Development Department at (850) 926-3695. AUGUST 16, 2012 City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be holding a Budget Workshop, August 21, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. A second Budget workshop meeting is scheduled for August 29, 2012 at 6:30 p.m., if needed. The meetings will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. AUGUST 9, 16, 2012BUDGET WORKSHOP MEETINGSAny person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling 850-962-4611. City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be changing the date of the regular August, 2012 meeting from the second Monday to the third Monday in August. The meeting will be held, August 20, 2012 at 6:30 p.m., 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL For further information or special assistance please contact the City Clerks Ofce at 850-962-4611AUGUST 9, 16, 2012NOTICE OF MEETING CHANGEPUBLIC NOTICE1SER08-4 Post-Election Certication Voting System AuditNotice of Canvassing Board to randomly select and audit a Race and Precinct on Friday August 24, 2012 at 9:00 A.M. from the Primary Election to be audited according to Rule 1SER08-4 in the Supervisor of Elections ofce, located at 3115-B, Crawfordville Highway. The public is invited to attend.AUGUST 16, 2012 PUBLISHER/ADVERTISING SALES MANAGERApplications are being accepted for the position of Publisher/ Advertising Sales Manager for the Wakulla News and the Gadsden County Times. The papers are located in Wakulla County and Gadsden County both contiguous to the state capital in Tallahassee. A qualied, motivated and organized self-starter is needed to direct the staff in sales, circulation and growth in both markets. Separate staffs operate each of these county-seat weekly newspapers and would report directly to the publisher/ advertising sales manager. The successful manager will act as advertising sales leader of both staffs and will also deal directly with key advertisers in the market. Two years newspaper management experience to include bottom line responsibility and previous advertising sales management is preferred. The candidate should have high ethical conduct and standards. This person will need leadership skills and ability to lead a staff of ve and also demonstrate strong team-building, delegation and administrative skills. The candidate should demonstrate high ethical conduct and standards and have a commitment to exceptional quality in all aspects of the operation. The publisher/ad manager provides vision, skill development direction, coaching and leadership to newspaper staff to accomplish strategic and business objectives of the company. This person will personally grow advertising account base revenues in order to meet and exceed nancial targets of the company. They will prepare, implement and operate within an annual operating budget to accelerate prot growth. This person will actively participate in various community functions and events and also take a leadership role in the community. The publisher/ad manager will oversee business, marketing and growth development of all products published. Interested persons should apply to: Gerry Mulligan, Publisher, Citrus Publishing/Landmark Community Newspapers, LLC, c/o Mike Arnold, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL 34429 or by e-mail to marnold@chronicleonline.com LANDMARKCOMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS, LLC. MANAGING EDITORCitrus Publishing is seeking a versatile candidate with the ability to write news stories, design and layout news pages and develop strong internal and external relationships to be Managing Editor for the Gadsden County Times, a weekly newspaper with a circulation of 3,000 in Quincy. This person will be responsible for the weekly page design and layout of the entire newspaper. This person will be responsible for writing accurate, compelling and balanced stories on deadline and covering local events, meetings and other activities. The managing editor will be responsible for managing reporters and correspondents. This person will also develop beat sources within the community and gain a thorough knowledge and understanding of community issues. Stong initiative, news judgement, time management, organizational and communication skills are are must. A bachelors degree in journalism, with 3 5 years editing and management experience is required. Qualied candidates should be procient in layout and design using Quark Express. Interested persons should send cover letter and resume to: Mike Arnold, HR Director, Citrus Publishing by e-mail at marnold@chronicleonline. com LANDMARKCOMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS, LLC. Former state Sen. Al Lawson of Tallahassee will square off against Republican incumbent Steve Southerland after Lawson defeated state House Rep. Leonard Bembry of Greenville in the Democratic primary for Congressional District 2 in northwest Florida. With most of the vote counted, Lawson led with 56 percent of the vote over his Democratic rival, who conceded the race shortly before 9 p.m. Alvin Peters and Mark Schlakman rounded out the eld. News Service of FloridaLawson to take on Southerland ELECTION NIGHT: Canvassing board members share a laugh as the last precinct comes in on Tuesday night. The board is County Judge Jill Walker, County Commissioner Randy Merritt, and Supervisor of Elections Henry Buddy Wells. PHOTO BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN The Wakulla News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: From the Dock for Aug. 16, 2012 School board employees will get pay raise Charlie Creel is an honest man Lucinda Cindy Norman obituary Lola Inez Posey Willis obituary Coast Guard Auxiliary for Aug. 16, 2012 Remembering Ruth McCallister Davis-High Juvenile arrested for vandalism of churchthewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Editor, The News: I am disappointed and amazed by the recent actions of the Wakulla County School District pertaining to the email and voice robo-calls that went out Sunday, June 24 to almost everyone in the county. In the communication, Robert Bobby Pearce represented that he was the assistant superintendent of the school district. According to the school districts own website this was not true. Heres what happened for those unfamiliar: On June 24 the district sent out a voicemail and an email with voicemail attachment about schools being closed because of Tropical Storm Debby. It was Mr. Pearces voice. On the next day, June 25, I heard about the email. I went to the school website. Bobby Pearce was not listed as assistant superintendent. Mr. Pearce was listed as principal on special assignment. He was not listed as assistant superintendent according to the school boards published minutes and their website. In the June 28 issue of The Wakulla News, on page 12B, there are minutes of the school board meeting in very small type. Under the Administrative Reappointments 12 month employee 7/1/126/30/13 it does have Robert Pearce Asst. Super. For Admin. How was he reappointed? His actual title was Principal Special Assignment. There was no prior (as of June 25) appointment for Mr. Pearce so how could he be reassigned if the position never existed? As of the June 24 email, he was still on special assignment so how could he send an email representing himself as assistant superintendent? If there was a new position created, the position should have been advertised. If it was, I am sure others would have applied. I have submitted all my evidence to The Wakulla News along with this letter. I nd the situation very offensive. The Wakulla County School District needs to provide clari cation on this issue as it places Pearce in a precarious position. Ruth Francis Crawfordville In a front page story in last weeks Wakulla News on residents of Wakulla Gardens rejecting a pay for paving plan proposed by county commissioners, because of a typographical error, the vote was reported backwards. For unit 1, the votes were 67 percent against and 33 percent voting for the proposal. We regret the error.Editor, The News: Ive personally known Major Langston for nearly 40 years, and have worked with him when he came back to us from Hendry County as a deputy and K-9 handler under then Sheriff W.R. Bill Taff. I know just how much blood, sweat, and tears have went into building OUR sheriffs of ce from a small ve deputy operation to the fully accredited agency it is today. And whether you like it or not, David Harvey, Donnie Crum and Maurice Langston, as well as their respective staffs, have made that happen. Ive always been taught to give credit where credit is due. Having known Maurice as a friend and co-worker, I know that he is a man of integrity, both in the pulpit and in his professional and private life. He retired once, and he didnt have to come back on active duty. He came back because he knew his job was not nished. He knew he still had a vision for the people of this county. To that end, he applied for, was selected, and attended the FBI National Academy at Quantico, Va. Now, imagine if you will what kind of stress that could be for a man in his late 50s-early 60s competing against 20-somethings fresh out of college. But Maurice went, and applied himself to the training curriculum, and graduated from that prestigious program. NOT because it put another feather in his cap, but because HE KNEW it would give him the tools and knowledge hed need to help make this county a much safer place to live. Yes, Charlie Creel is a good man and a ne law enforcement officer, but this isnt about sheriffs of ce vs. Florida Highway Patrol. You see, all this talk of The good ol boys is the same ridiculous propaganda that has been bandied around in nearly EVERY sheriffs election Ive witnessed in this county for the last 50 years. Between the two candidates, only one has the knowledge of sheriffs operations on EVERY LEVEL, and that makes a great administrator and when you add in education in criminal justice on a state and NATIONAL level you have the perfect man for sheriff. And THAT is why I support T.W. Maurice Langston for Sheriff of Wakulla County. I hope you will too. Rev. Dr. R. Perry Sanders IronHorsesNLthr@aol.com Editor, The News: I am hearing people using misinformation and complete distortions of the facts when talking about the District 3 commissioner race. On taxes: I discovered that Dr. Kessler voted against raising taxes 7 out of 8 times. The one time he voted for the budget, the taxes were decreased by over $400,000. If you are familiar with the Communications Services Tax, it went from 1.84 percent to 5.22 percent. Dr. Kessler was not on the board then. Dr. Kessler was not on the board when the Tourist Development Tax rose from 2 percent to 4 percent. Nor was Dr. Kessler on the board when Public Utilities Tax was voted in place for a 7 percent tax on water, gas and electric usage. Yes, the property taxes went down, but all these other taxes made up for the loss (Over $4 million of non-ad valorem taxes and fees were levied) and it came out of your pocket. We are talking about millions of dollars here, and you can go to the Clerk of Court and ask for these records to satisfy yourself on the truth. If you want a change and if you want someone that will watch our money and spend it with in reason, then I think Dr. Kessler is your man. Mary Pitts PanaceaBy HERB DONALDSON Receding hairlines, excess body fat, gray hair, wrinkles, no husband, wife, children, money, nor any prospects of something real for the future these were among the many thoughts that cluttered my mind as I prepared for the 25th reunion of Wakulla High Schools Class of 1987. I was expecting a comedy of errors, with me falling at on my face as the joke, crawling off into the wings for the denouement. Id no idea what to do or who to be. Every move I made and all the words Id spoken as a teenager burst upon me like a dam and consumed me in the ood. I was no Noah, and there was no ark. And to top it off, Id no lifeline; no one I could prompt to call me on the cell phone 30 minutes into the horror, giving me an emergency excuse to make the great escape. For months, Kathy Bailey, Nikki and Michelle Sanders, Terry Lynn, Mike Dodson, and others sent Facebook noti cations, made telephone calls and more trying to corral the old gang for one more hurrah. The event was held Saturday, July 21, with a picnic at Wakulla Springs during the day, followed by a reception at Wildwood that evening. Some would attend church that Sunday morning. I tried to distract myself in the car after parking at Wildwood looking for this, searching for that, telling myself I could always turn around and go home. Finally, I forced myself to climb out and walk toward the building. I was stopped on the steps by a group of people who looked vaguely familiar. Eventually their names, or rather, incidents from the past that involved one or two of them oated to the surface, giving me a vague idea as to their identities as we all went inside. Kathy, Nikki and Michelle were at the door. It dawned on me that they were girls no longer, but women. I couldnt help but smile when I saw them. And to my sweet surprise, the smile didnt leave my face the entire evening. All of them, my classmates, were images Id carried in the back of my mind for years. Through some trick of the universe, wed become full-grown people. The faces had changed: Some were thinner and a few including mine had grown a bit pudgier, while one or two seemed completely altered. We had all been through something. If not a lot, then just enough to bring about a signi cant change. Some had been married twice, others, thrice. Some were grandparents. Others had kids in college, cribs or the armed services. One couple, who were dating as far back as the seventh grade, have a daughter making national headlines in teen rodeo. One was in a band where he recently performed in front of a crowd of more than 9,000. Our rowdy group were now parents, former county commissioners, respiratory therapists, educators, musicians, sheriff deputies, deacons, business owners, and a lot more. Though some of our family was lost to us during our senior year, or shortly thereafter, they were remembered. They include Frances Pearce, Cleve Laird, Craig Barber, Edwin Hughes, Scott Thacker and Jill Alexander who wasnt in our class but, at the time of her passing, was in a theatrical production with a number of us. I found myself watching everyone, their connections and body language, their joy in being 17 again for one night only. I cant wait to see how we bloom into our 30th. Herb Donaldson is a local playwright and director of Palaver Tree Theatre Company.Going to the Wakulla High School Class of reunionEditor, The News: Wakulla Greenwing held its latest event on Oct. 9, 2011, at the Sheriffs Range in Otter Creek. Wakulla Greenwing with the assistance of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce utilize the range for our event; we offer bench shooting, shotgun shooting, archery, turkey and chicken shoot and many more activities. We also have assistance from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission offering a helicopter yover and touring. FWC also visits with a demonstration from the K-9 unit. Each year our event continues to grow in numbers and this is due to the support of our Greenwing staff, which is made up of many Wakulla County Ducks Unlimited committee members, the help of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce and the staff of the Wakulla County shooting range facility. As the committee chairlady, I would like to send out a heartfelt thank you to our staff, the sheriffs department, the staff at the Sheriffs Range and most of all to our sponsors. Without your donations and sponsorship we wouldnt have the success of the Greenwing event. Your donation and dollars go towards the youth in our community, to educating on firearm safety and insuring the preservation of our wildlife for the next generation. For Wakulla Greenwing its about young conservationists protecting wildlife today and tomorrow. Again, thank you and we look forward to your sponsorship in 2012. Sincerely, Holly Porter Committee Chairlady wakullagreenwing@embarqmail.comMaurice Langston is a man of integrity Greenwing sponsorship appreciated Disappointed by school districts actions Kessler will watch taxpayers moneyREADERS WRITE: WILLIAM SNOWDEN/THE WAKULLA NEWS Its time for election year politics again.Correction

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 5A An independent for independent appraisals in 35 counties for 38 years (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief SupportCOST FREE 850-878-5310 (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. LWVVote Wakulla 2012 CANDIDATE FORUMSPresented by The League of Women Voters#The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization encouraging the informed and active participation of all citizens in the political process. CLIP AND SAVE THESE FORUM DATES! All forums will take place at theFor more information call: Membership in the Wakulla League is open to all interested citizens. the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringBob DonawayJuly 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromMy wife and I have been entering in the Off the Eatin Path since the program rst began. She has won once and now I am a winner too! Thank You! OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l a t nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlorank You So Much! Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 TheWakulla newsLook Us Up Online for Classi ed ads from The Wakulla News.www.thewakullanews.comAlso check out your Community CalendarBy JENNIFER JENSEN jjensen@thewakullanews.net Those who were affected by Tropical Storm Debby have until Sept. 4 to register with the Federal Emergency Management Agency for assistance. We are encouraging anybody in Wakulla County who sustained damage to their home or property to register as soon as possible, said FEMA spokesperson Jim Homstad. Although the Disaster Recovery Center has closed, people can still apply online or by phone. Visit www.DisasterAssistance. gov; With a smartphone or tablet use the FEMA app or go to m.FEMA.gov; by phone call FEMAs helpline at 800-621-FEMA (3362). People who are deaf or hard of hearing and use a TTY can call 800-462-7585. In Wakulla County, 608 households have contacted FEMA for assistance or information. FEMA has approved $885,000 in individual assistance. Of that, $776,000 went to housing assistance and $109,000 went to other needs, according to Homstad. Statewide, for 22 counties, FEMA has approved $20 million.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Office will host a Sporting Clays Tournament as a fundraiser for the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches. The event begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 25 with three relays at 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Refreshments and lunch will be available at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range and Training Center where the fundraiser will take place. The tournament will be $50 per person with a ve person team. Winners of each relay will receive a 12 gauge shotgun. A Firearm Side Match will be also be held during the event. The cost of the match is $20 per person with a 50-50 payout. A money ball giveaway will be held for $10 and a chance to win half of the lucky jackpot. Preregister for your choice of relays. Contact Lt. Fred Nichols at (850) 251-1676 or call the Wakulla Range at (850) 7457290 to register. The Wakulla Range accepts Visa/MasterCard, cash or checks as payment to enter the event. You may also go to www. wcso.org and look at the bottom of the left hand side menu for an opportunity to download the registration forms. Continued from Page 1A Miller commended the school board for their leadership during the economic downturn. We have all been determined and focused on ways to save dollars, Miller said. Little by little those savings added up. The contract includes a step pay increase, as well as increased health insurance coverage and a $200 bonus. This School Board has worked really hard over the past couple of years, to position the district scally, to be able to provide teachers and employees with an actual step increase raise this year. I hope and pray that our district has weathered the worst of the economical storm and that we can start seeing the much needed funding restored in education in the state. Our School Board truthfully believes that the reason this district maintains the distinction of a High Performing School District is the quality teachers, administration and support staff and it is important that we continue to invest in the best.Last day to register with FEMA approaching Teachers vote overwhelmingly for contractSheri s O ce to host sporting clays tournament as bene t for youth ranch Historical Society to accept land from Boynton familyThe Wakulla County Historical Society announced it will be celebrating the gift conveyance of almost 40 acres of land from the Ben Boynton familyon Friday, Aug. 17, at 10 a.m. The conveyance will take place at the Zion Hill United Methodist Church which is adjacent to the land to be conveyed. The Boynton family, members of the Wakulla County Commission, members of the Wakulla County Historical Society and the general public have been invited witness this historic event. Construction work at Woodville Highway and Highway 98Anderson Columbia Co. Inc. and its subcontractors will be starting on a Wakulla County Department of Transportation project on or about Monday, Aug. 13. The project will be the construction of a right turn lane on Highway 363, also known as the Woodville Highway, at the intersection of U.S. Highway 98. The scope of work includes stabilization, road base work, asphalt paving and pavement marking. The project is expected to continue for approximately 90 days. Motorists are reminded to use extra care as they approach the U.S. Highway 98 intersection. Wakulla Health Department to host workshop on local goalsThe Wakulla County Health Department needs your help! We are in the nal stages of our Community Health Improvement Project, and need your assistance in the next phase of the process where we identify the most important issues facing the community and develop goals to address these priority issues. A workshop will be held onTuesday, Aug. 28, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Wakulla County Health Department. During this session, we will review all the data and reports generated in the Community Health Improvement process, identify health priorities which impact Wakulla County residents, and develop goals & strategies for each priority. Your experience and expertise is vital to this process! Please join us at the Wakulla County Health Department, 48 Oak Streetin Crawfordville. A working lunch will be provided during this workshop. Please email your RSVP to Tonya Hobby (850)926-0401 ext. 217 by Aug. 23, and let us know if you have any dietary restrictions. First Sunday at the Refuge to feature Dr. Loran Anderson The First Sunday at the Refuge Presentation Series will feature Dr. Loran Anderson as he presents Floral Strategies in Plants on Sept. 2 at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Anderson is a retired FSU Professor and Volunteer Refuge Botanist whose plant hikes and presentations are always a treat. Come learn about local oral from an engaging presenter. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures Classroom at St. Marks Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Readers can call (850) 925-6121 for information. Area Agency on Aging to meet on Aug. 23The Area Agency on Aging for North Florida, Inc. will hold meetings of its Board of Directors & Advisory Council, Thursday, Aug. 23m at 10:30 a.m. Agendas will be available upon request. The meetings will be held at the Area Agency on Aging for North Florida, 2414 Mahan Drive in Tallahassee. Habitat for Humanity to hold bass tournment in QuincyBig Bend Habitat for Humanitys 3rd Annual Bass Tournament is scheduled to begin Saturday, Sept. 22 and is headquartered at Ingrams Marina and the Whippoorwill Lodge in Quincy. The schedule of events includes live music on Friday night, Sept. 21, beginning at 8 p.m., breakfast Saturday morning, Sept. 22nd, followed by the Blast-off at 6:30 a.m. The event concludes with the weigh-in and prize presentation at 3 p.m. Registration information can be found by visiting the BBHH website, www.bigbendhabitat. org. Big Bend Habitat for Humanity is a local non-pro t ecumenical Christian ministry dedicated to eliminating substandard housing and homelessness in Leon and Gadsden Counties. Staff reportsBriefs

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments WEDNESDAY: and Adults 10:30am 11:00am Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Churchreligious views and events New Testament Bible ChurchBible-believing Church meets at Wakulla County Public Library, large conference room. Songs, prayer and Bible teaching/preaching. The Lord Jesus described the basic meaning of a church in a very simple and yet profound way:For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.Come take part in our study of Gods Word.4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Church Briefs Mrs. Lottie Roddenberry celebrates 101st birthdayMrs. Lottie Roddenberry celebrated her 101st birthday on Saturday, Aug. 11, at the fellowship hall of Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. Wakulla UMC events for the weekWakulla United Methodist Church, 1584 Old Woodville Road in Wakulla Station, has the following events scheduled for the week: On Sunday, Aug. 19, at 8:30 a.m., Contemporary Service. 9:30 a.m. Fellowship. 10 a.m. Adult Sunday School led by Steve Montgomery. 10 a.m. Other Sunday School Classes. 11 a.m. Traditional Service. 4:30 p.m. Chancel Choir Practice. 6 p.m. Youth Activity. On Tuesday, Aug. 21, at 6 p.m. Praise Team Practice. On Wednesday, Aug. 22, at 6 a.m., Mens Bible Study, At 8 a.m., Dutch Treat Breakfast, Savannahs, all welcome. On Thursday, Aug. 23, at 9 a.m.. Quilting Group. At 7 p.m. Youth Bible Study. For more information, call Wakulla UMC at 850 421-5741.Pastor wants local churches to create youth centers in areaMidsummers Day nightmareBy REV. JAMES L. SNYDER I am not sure who invented summer vacation but I think they deserve a Nobel Peace Prize. Every year is worth the intense strain when there is a summer vacation to look forward to. Ah, summer vacation. The freedom of not having anything to do. No schedule in my face. No appointments frustrating me. Just an agenda of fun and more fun and dont forget the eating. Both the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and me got up early to begin the drive to the airport to take us to our vacation location. I was so full of energy I could not sit still. It was then that I broke into singing, comfortably off key, a Carpenters song much to the agitation of my wife. Weve only just begun/White lace and promises/A kiss for luck and were on our way. All my wife could do was stare at me. Finally, she said, You sure are excited. Ive never seen you so excited. Are you sure youre all right? I could not have been more all righter. All I could think of was a week before me surrounded by grandchildren I have not seen for over a year. How old is...? I went through all the grandchildren. It is easy to forget how old kids are because every year their age changes. When you get to be my age, it is hard to keep up with all of these changes. A week of stuf ng them with all the candy I could carry. Taking them out to a restaurant and showing them the proper use of the drinking straw and the ne art of a spitball battle. After all, it is a grandfathers solemn duty to teach his grandchildren the ne art of shenaniganism. Where else are they going to learn it? Their grandmother? I dont think so. We nally arrived at the airport, parked our car, and proceeded to the check-in counter with our baggage. One of the attendants asked me a simple question. I hate it when people ask me a question when I am in one of my silly moods. Believe me; I was in one of my silliest silly moods at this time. Sir, the attendant asked me very seriously, do you have anything perishable or ammable in your luggage? With silliness smeared all over my mug I said, I sure do. I got a Bible in there and it is Dyn-O-Mite. Then it happened. Someone said, Did he say dynamite? Wheres the dynamite? The attendant said, He said the dynamite was in his briefcase. Suddenly, lights went on, buzzers began ringing, men in uniforms surrounded me, and two grabbed and subdued me. In a few moments, the hazmat men arrived asking where the dynamite was. They begin moving people away while the hazmat men came in to remove the briefcase with the alleged dynamite. At this time, I was absolutely stunned. Every ounce of silliness had drained from my person and I knew I was about to go to jail. Finally, the senior security guard came and looked at me. Where did you say the dynamite was, sir? I stammered and stuttered but nally I said, I said my Bible was dynamite. He stared at me. Look me up and down, glared at me with eyes that burned into my very soul. Then he spoke. Would you by any chance be a minister? He said rather gruf y. Yes sir, I stammered as if my life depended upon what I was going to say, I am a minister, a preacher of the gospel. He glared at me and shouted, False alarm. Just another crazy preacher. As he walked away, I could hear him muttering under his breath, Where do all these crazy preachers come from? The terminal nally quieted down, I went through the inspection, and I must say the pat down was a little longer and rougher than I remembered it being in the past. They stripped me down almost to my birthday suit. Thank God for wrinkles. As I walked down the aisle on the plane, I could hear people whispering, Thats him. Thats the crazy preacher with the dynamite. I nally sat down next to my wife who was staring out the window. In a few minutes the plane took off and as we reached our altitude she, while still staring out the window, said to me, Next time well take separate planes. She paused for a moment and then said, In fact, well take separate airports. I think I am going to stick to what the Bible says. For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart (Hebrews 4:12 KJV).Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. OUT TO PASTORSpecial to The NewsIn response to the ever growing need for extensive youth programs in the Wakulla and Franklin county area, the International Coalition For Youth Of Christ is asking local area churches, regardless of denomination, to open their doors to the ICYC ministry to allow them to organize weekly youth events geared toward 13-19 year olds. ICYC is a non-denominational international Christian outreach ministry, organized in 1999 following the Columbine High School Shooting in Littleton, Colo. Pastor Daniel Bodhi Chapin, who founded the program and is nationally been recognized in media and private circuits for his youth advocacy, recently relocated to Carrabelle. This is a family oriented community, Chapin said. This is a community which obviously is committed to encouraging its youth to engage in positive activities rather than simply roaming the streets or parks where they might become engaged with questionable behavior ultimately leading them to trouble. The challenge is that there are no real locations in the area which are open on a daily basis, speci cally with activities which young people can enjoy and which ultimately can encourage them. Chapin said media attention will aid in spreading the word on this endeavor. In addressing the call to area churches to open their doors on speci c hours or the week, speci cally over the weekends, Chapin said. Wed like to show the kids and the community that there is a place for them to come into and play games, receive homework assistance, attend church services and outings. Chapin said hed like to see Carrabelle serve as a beacon for other communities to follow. Chapin hopes that local churches that typically are open a few hours per week, primarily on Sundays, will respond by opening their doors throughout the week to be there for the youth. Chapin will oversee the collective program along with church leaders, parents and stated that he feels the community would support such a program nancially and otherwise encourage youth oriented activities. There are Senior Centers there should be a youth center. Chapin said. He called upon the community to create a collective of youth centers across the area. Church groups or community building overseers who wish to dedicate their space for such programs are encouraged to contact Chapin at (850) 720-1061 or by email at internationalyouthforchrist@yahoo.com. Mrs. Lottie Roddenberry at her birthday party.PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 7AObituariesLucinda Cindy Norman William Dannelley Dan Oaks Lola Inez Posey Willis Lucinda Norman passed away on Aug. 9 after a tragic accident on Aug. 3. Over the years, Cindy provided daycare for many children who have grown to be outstanding and promising individuals. Her joys in life were spending time with family and friends and riding her horse. She loved the outdoors and everything in it: animals, the water, dancing, music she loved everything she loved life. She will be remembered as a loving and devoted wife, mother, sister and friend. Everyone in Cindys life will not forget her beautiful smile, contagious laugh, honesty and most of all spirit. A memorial service will be held on Friday, Aug. 17, at 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, 3106 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. In lieu of owers, please make your donations to Hands and Hearts for Horses (providing therapeutic horseback riding for the disabled), 3824 Lower Cairo Road, Thomasville GA, 31792. Survivors include her husband of 28 years, Gerald Norman; daughter, Allison Norman; son, Benjamin Norman; loving brothers and several other family members and close friends whose life will be forever altered with this sudden loss. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) William Dannelley Dan Oaks, 73, of Oakwood, died Friday, Aug. 10, in Gainesville, Ga. He was born on Dec. 21, 1938, in Crestview. His family moved to Crawfordville shortly after. He grew up in Crawfordville until age 18 when he joined the Marines. After a short but successful stint in the military, he moved back to Florida and became a Florida State trooper. His charismatic personality and determination led him to a different eld altogether, insurance. Dans insurance career began in Atlanta, where he met his wife, Barbara Ivester. The happy couple moved to Montgomery, Ala., where Dan and two longtime friends and co-workers began Association Self Insurance Inc. He was a leader in the community, in his work and within his family. After many prosperous years in Montgomery, Dan retired to Crawfordville to become an active member of Wakulla County until his last move to Georgia. He was a vibrant, charming man who always saw the best in other people. He resided at Autumn Breeze Assisted Living in Gainesville, Ga., for the last 19 months. He will be greatly missed by friends and family alike. Funeral services were held Monday, Aug. 13, at the Shirley Grove Baptist Church. The Rev. Kirby Smith and the Rev. Dennis Ledford of ciated with interment in the church cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made in memory of Dan Oaks to In Touch Ministries, P.O. Box 7900, Atlanta GA 30537 or to Hospice of Northeast Georgia Medical Center, Attn: Gold Team, 2050 Limestone Parkway, Suite 222, Gainesville, GA 30501. Survivors include his wife, Barbara I. Oaks of Oakwood; daughter, Misti Sanders (Andrew) of Corpus Christi, Texas; stepson, Jerome Wood (Cindy) of Montgomery, Ala.; sisters, Betty Jo Green of Crawfordville and Sally Hirschmann (Jack) of Port Ludlow, Wash.; grandchildren, Morgan and Mason Wood, and Maylon, Hayden, and Patton Sanders, as well as many nieces and nephews. Arrangements by Hillside Memorial Chapel, Clarkesville. 706-754-6256. Condolences may be sent at www. hillsidememorialchapel. com.Special to The NewsWhen people think about volunteering for hospice, their rst thought may be, I could never do that, or I would be too depressed. Talk to a Covenant Hospice volunteer and he or she will tell you a very different story. Covenant volunteers come from many different backgrounds, ranging from retired persons, to working professionals, active military personnel, high school and college students. They all have one thing in common a desire to give back, and in giving they receive so much in return. Covenant has opportunities for people with diverse skills and interests. Volunteers who are looking for a chance to meet new people and to be active in the community will love Covenants Ambassador Program. Here are some highlights of Covenants volunteer opportunities: Patient and Family Support Volunteers provide companionship and practical help for patients in a variety of settings including private homes, assisted living facilities, nursing homes and Covenants two hospice inpatient units in Pensacola. Volunteers do not take the place of clinical professionals employed by Covenant and do not provide hands-on care. 11th Hour Volunteers provide emotional support and a caring presence for patients nearing death, in order to ensure that no Covenant patient dies alone. Life Review Volunteers assist patients and loved ones in completing a Re ections journal that is a gift for them. Tuck-in Volunteers call patients before the weekend to make sure that they have everything that they need. Bereavement Volunteers assist Covenants bereavement specialists in supporting families that have lost loved ones. Childrens Programs Volunteers work closely with childrens specialists to provide support through Camp Monarch and the Partners in Care/Together for Kids program. Administrative Support Volunteers provide help in Covenants branch and corporate of ces. Ambassador and Military Ambassador Volunteers expand outreach, education and access to hospice care for community members by representing Covenant at community activities and veterans events or by speaking to small groups. Covenant Care Teens High school students (ages 14-18) volunteer to visit nursing home patients, assist with fundraising events, and provide computer and administrative support in a Covenant of ce. For more information, call Kortney Rudd at (850) 575-4998.Lola Inez Posey Willis, 95, of Tallahassee, died on Thursday, Aug. 9, in Tallahassee. She was born April 4, 1917, in Medart, the daughter of Noah Hall Posey and Nannie Whaley Posey. She was co-owner of H & W Equipment and Willis Marine with her husband, J. Hendrix Willis. After retiring she worked as a pink lady at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She was a Baptist. She enjoyed clogging, dancing and bowling. A graveside service was held at Lake Ellen Cemetery, 4495 Crawfordville Highway in Medart on Tuesday, Aug. 14, at 2 p.m. The family received friends following the service. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions can be made to the charity of your choice. She was preceded in death by her parents; her rst husband, James Hendrix Willis; her second husband, Eddie Dean Hyde; brothers, Tom Posey, Raymond Posey and George Posey; and her sisters, Opal Durrance, Myra Carter, Emily Tucker, Duma Fain, Nellie Posey and Annettee Posey. Survivors include a devoted nephew, Noah (Mildred) Posey of Panacea; brother-inlaw, Fletcher Durance; and many nieces and nephews. Special thanks for the love and care given to Aunt Lola by Deborah Bruce, Stephanie Harris, Kim Jones, Marlene Rains, Kathy Reynold, Odell Virgil and Covenant Hospice during her illness. Arrangements under the direction of Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Homes.Lola Inez Posey Willis William Dannelley Dan Oaks Lucinda Cindy NormanCovenant Hospice seeks volunteers This Sunday evening, Aug. 19, at 6pm, Summit Life Church at 158 Arran Road, is hosting a special event with award winning comedian Barry McGee. Barry McGee is a chaplain for NASCAR, working with Richard Petty race team, Tom Bodine and other popular NASCAR drivers. McGee is also a multi-award winning comedian and musician. You will not wont to miss this event! In addition, there is a free cookout beginning at 5 p.m., with hamburgers and hotdogs served to the community before the event. Come early, seating is limited. For more information call the church at (850) 926-1028 or online at www.summitlifechurch.net. See you at the Summit.NASCAR chaplain McFee to appear at Summit Life I dont really believe it takes a village to raise a child, but I think it takes a village and a church to help parents raise a child, especially some children who are physically challenged. Heath Langston was stricken with bacterial encephalitis when he was 17 years of age. Wakulla County stepped up to make sure he was given every opportunity to succeed in the new hand he had been dealt. Difculties did not deter or detract from his determination. Heath would say and did say; Walking is highly overrated.For those of you who had to slow down or stop on Highway 319 when his black service dog, Sherlock, pulled him in his wheelch air across the busy roadway; thank you for looking out for his safety. Many business owners at gas stations would see him pull up to the pumps and would go out and pump his gas, help him with the transaction and bid he and Sherlock a good day; thank you! To the banks and drive thru establishments that started stocking the windows with milk-bones for Sherlock when Heath pulle d through; bless you! To the churches who provided a hand up the ramp when he would visit and never complain about sitting in church with a dog ne ar a young mans side; thank you perhaps Sherlock was saved too! And to his many friends that called, came by, e-mailed him, facebooked him, took him to dinner and a movie you touched him d eeply. Some of you helped him on his Senior Trip; loading him in and out of rides in Orlando; your love made him love others all th e more. To those who came by the house early in the morning to take him to college, you helped him get his degree but more important ly you gave him friendship and a lesson in love and there is no degree to that kind of compassion. To everyone who gave him encouragement and assistance we cannot thank you enough. For those at Wakulla High who helped him make it through to graduation and for the staff who helped him with his studies at home and in the classroom, you gave him not only help but hope. Wakulla County is special and its people like you who took time out of your busy day to spend it with him that makes us a very thankful family. Your expression of love and support is not only a tribute to life in this county but was a tribute to our son, Heath. Many of you have expressed that you wish you could take our sorrow away but you could not. No, but you did share it and that has lighten our sorrow and we sincerely appreciate it. The Langston Family hearts are not broken per se, but there is a hole and a void that no one can replace. Its a Heath-shaped hole but the memories are treasures in not only our heads but our hearts and those memories can never be taken from us. The Bible doesnt say not to grieve; it just says not to grieve as those who have no hope! We have hope knowing that our Son is Heaven, hes eternally healed, he has been kissed by the Father and we will see him there one day. We believe and are assured that by faith and the Word of God! Heath challenged his brother Cale to a foot race down the streets of gold when he arrives. Our hope is more than a wish or a maybe-so; its a know-so type hope lled with faith in the God who loves him more than even we do! Heath loved the Lord Jesus Christ with all his heart, soul and spirit. He embraced Jesus while he was alive and now Jesus has embraced him. We, his family nd comfort in this knowledge. Even though his body had been slammed by disease and he had many physical limitations the last twenty years, his soul and spirit was stable and limitless. He ath was a stable man in an unstable world. He didnt experience much fame or fortune by the worlds standards, he left no great art work to be remembered by, nor did he ever write a book or make great medical discoveries but perhaps he touched you, inuenced you, provided you with a smile or side splitting laughter; it was accomplishment enough for him. Heaths goals were high and his joys were simple, his friendship was genuine, and his love for people was unquestionable. He leaves his legacy, his family, his friends and his faith! While we were sadden by his passing, Heath would be the rst to tell you; its never a bad time to go to heaven. We had time (time is sweet) to tell him how much we loved him, so many people dont have this time as death is sometimes sudden Many parents dont have the chance to spend the last three days with their loved ones, loving them, sharing laughter, tears and embraces and I love yous; we were granted this great privilege and we are so thankful. He w as at perfect peace and spent a lot of his remaining time comforting family and friends. We reminisced quite a bit both at the hospital and home! His life ashed before our eyes many times and it was worth watching every time! Its a re-run we the family will never get tired of! Parents spend an enormous amount of time with their children teaching them from a young age how to live. We mustnt just teach our children how to live right; we must teach them how to die right when it comes that time in their lives. Judy and I have done that with both of our sons. Its every parents duty as a good parent. Death begins with o ur rst drawn breath; life begins with the last drawn breath when death is touched. Sadly all of us who are reading or hearing this are dying, Heath as well as all our loved ones who have gone before us are living. The Langston Family wanted to say thank you to YOU! The love, support, prayers, kindness and compassion have been overwhelming and humbling. Love is stronger than death and our love and faith will strengthen us through the healing and grieving process. Death can only take a life; it cant touch a relationship built on love. For us to have raised Heath in your presence, with your help, your good and godly inuence, we are forever thankful to you who joined with us in directing him, guiding him, watching out for him and encouraging him. Especially to the ones who never told him; you cant do that. Instead you encouraged him to go for it! Thanks for not giving him a hand out but a hand up!God Bless you all and God bless you each! The Heath Langston Family Open Letter to Wakulla County in Loving Memory of Loren Heath LangstonDecember 6, 1974 July 21, 2012

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityBig Brothers Big Sisters fundraiser is Aug. 24Foret marries DavisDevin Foret returned from deployment to his hometown of Cairo, Ga., on Sunday, July 22 where later that day he married his childhood sweetheart, Emily Marie Davis, of Crawfordville. The wedding was poolside at the grooms grandmothers house, under a generous canopy of white tulle anchored by large potted ferns and ivy. In her familys presence and with their blessing, the Rev. McDonald performed the marriage ceremony for his grandson. Now residing in Oceanside, Calif., their cross country trip included a celebration with the grooms family in Louisiana. While deployed and with his mothers help, he proposed to Emily immediately following her 2012 graduation from Wakulla County High School. She will continue her education beginning in January 2013. He graduated Cairo High School in 2007 and Southwest Georgia Technical College in 2009. He serves the United States Marine Corp. The brides parents are Susan Purvis and Patrick Davis, and her paternal grandparents are Max and Doris Davis, all of Crawfordville. The grooms parents are Michelle Blanchette of Cairo and Scott Foret of Raceland, Louisiana. His maternal grandparents are the Rev. Wayne and Vera McDonald. Their attendants were Macy Wytaske and Thurman Sadler, also of Cairo. Mr. and Mrs. Devin Foret Special to The NewsOn Friday, Aug. 24, Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend will host the Roaring 20s themed third Annual Big Champagne Bash at Hotel Duval from 8 p.m. to midnight. They will celebrate an era of silent lm, speakeasies, and sensational parties with unlimited champagne and dinner by-the-bite. With music provided by GT Entertainment, guests too can Charleston like its 1929. The dress is 20s period, apper, or cocktail attire, zoot suits, or even dress as your favorite silent lm star (Marlene Dietrich, Charlie Chaplin, etc.). This has been a SELL-OUT event for the past two years. Pre-Sale tickets are good until Aug. 17. They are $70 person a person and $130 couple per couple. The standard rate is $75 person and $150 per couple. There will be unlimited champagne, a photobooth complete with silent lm title cards to create your own caption and live auction. Proceeds bene t Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend, the leading mentoring organization serving more than 380 children each year. With the help of a Big Brother or Big Sister, these children realize their potential, change their perspective, and build their futures. Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend believes all children have the ability to achieve success in life. Thanks to the generosity of Big Bash guests and sponsors, BBBS is able to help 380-plus youth overcome huge odds to develop higher aspirations, greater con dence, better relationships with parents, teachers and peers, avoidance of of violence, drugs, and other illegal activities and success in school. For information on sponsorships, please visit www.bigbendmentoring/ bash or call 386-6002. Heritage Village Park celebration on Friday Special to The NewsThe Heritage Village is a plan of the Wakulla County Historical Society that calls for relocation of some 12 historic homes that have been donated. The homes would become the focus for a park featuring not only the historic homes, but a representation of the life and times of early Wakulla families. An educational center, signage and kiosk, interpretive exhibits, amphitheater, hiking trails and other amenities would make the Park a tourism destination. The largest barrier to establishment of the Park was the lack of land suitable for the village. There is an old adage, timing is everything. Ben Boynton, a local developer, was sitting in the audience when Murray McLaughlin of the Wakulla County Historical Society made a presentation to the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners in early 2011 regarding the WCHS vision for a Heritage Village. As a result, Boynton communicated to McLaughlin that he would be interested in talking to the Society about a donation of up to 40 acres for location of the Village. Soon, members of the Heritage Village were out walking on a beautiful piece of property ideally located and well suited for the Village vision. Boynton advised the Society that he would le a revised land use plan for Bloxham Plantation to include approximately 40 acres for the Society. The gift to the Society would help him meet requirements for conversation easements and green space and simultaneously help the Society with location of the Heritage Village. It would then be up to the County to look favorably upon the change. On March 11, 2011, the rst formal action by the Commission began a journey of many staff meetings, Planning Commission meetings and three meetings of the Board of County Commission. This culminated in a nal Board meeting on July 16 which approved Boyntons project and cleared the way for transfer the land to the WCHS. The transfer will take place on Aug. 17, at the Zion Hill United Methodist Church adjacent to the property. To locate the site, drive one mile south of State Road 267 on U.S. Highway 319 and turn right on Zion Hill Road. This road ends at the church. The Boynton Family, county of cials, members of the Historical Society and the general public are invited to celebrate this historic event. An of cial of the Historical Society will be available to lead interested parties on a short tour of the property. McLaughlin said, This is a tremendous opportunity for the WCHS and will go a long way toward making our dream a reality. We are very grateful to Mr. Boynton for his generosity and for considering our vision worthy of this gift. We can now begin the planning and fund raising needed, knowing we have a home. Kidwell graduates from WGUSpecial to The NewsPatricia Kidwell of Panacea received a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Western Governors University on July 14 at the semi-annual commencement ceremony in Salt Lake City, Utah. It celebrated the graduation of more than 3,200 graduates WGUs largest class ever. This year, Western Governors University celebrates its 15th anniversary. Incorporated in 1997, the university has grown to a national institution with more than 33,000 students and 16, 000 graduates in just 15 years. WGU founding governor, The Honorable Michael O. Leavitt, (Utah Governor, 1993-2003, and former U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services) delivered the commencement keynote address. WGU founding governors, The Honorable Roy Romer (Colorado Governor, 1987-1999) and chairman of the WGU Board of Trustees, The Honorable Jim Geringer (Wyoming Governor, 1995-2003) also spoke at the event. Students and graduates who were not able to attend the ceremony were able to watch the event via live video stream on the WGU website. Anyone interested in coaching any of the youth sports are encouraged to contact WPRD at 926-7227. All volunteer coaches are required and subjected to a Florida Department of Law Enforcement Criminal history background check to ensure the safety of our youth participants.SATURDAY 8/11/12 and SATURDAY 8/18/12 8:00 am TO 12:00 NOON SATURDAY 8/18/12, 12:00 PM MEDART RECREATION PARK OFF US 98 SEPTEMBER 1st FOR ALL SPORTSExample: A participant must turn 5 before September 1, 2012 in order to be eligible to participate, NO EXCEPTIONS.WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT2012 FALL SPORTS REGISTRATION REGISTRATION DATES: REGISTRATION TIMES: REGISTRATION DEADLINE: REGISTRATION PLACE: AGE DETERMINING DATE: 1. FLAG FOOTBALL: AGES 5 7 DIVISION AND 8 10 DIVISION COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD. Player must be 5 prior to 9/1/12 to be eligible.2. TACKLE FOOTBALL BANTAM DIVISION AGES 6 8. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 90 LBS. MAXPEE WEE DIVISION AGES 9 11. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 145 LBS. MAX JUNIOR DIVISION AGES 12 14. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 170 LBS. MAXCOST FOR TACKLE FOOTBALL IS $85.00 PER CHILD A COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED. 3. TACKLE CHEERLEADING BANTAM DIVISION AGES 5 8 PEE WEE DIVISION AGES 9-11 COST FOR TACKLE CHEERLEADING IS $45.00 PER CHILD (Includes shirt and pom poms) A COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED.All players must provide proof of health insurance or purchase a policy for $10.00. For more information contact WCPRD at 926-7227 or our web page at www.WCPRD.com Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. 20+ FL PropertiesAugust 22 27real estate auctionsFL Daniel S. Nelson Re Lic BK3223097. Williams & Williams Re Lic 1032049. Thomas Barnes Auc Lic AU3383. Williams & Williams Auc Lic AB2784 Buyers Premium May Apply. 8387 Riverdale Ln, Champions Gate Nominal Opening Bids from $1,000 For details, visit williamsauction.com800.801.8003 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Special to The NewsThe First Sunday at the Refuge Presentation Series will feature Dr. Loran Anderson as he presents Floral Strategies in Plants at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Dr. Anderson is a retired FSU professor and volunteer Refuge Botanist whose plant hikes and presentations are always a treat. Come learn about local floral from an engaging presenter. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures Classroom at St. Marks Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850.925-6121 for information. First Sunday at the refuge presents botanist Dr. Loran Anderson Community announcementsSend in your community announcements, news and events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net. Or drop it off at the of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. Email is preferred. News will be edited for style. clarity. grammar and length and will run as space becomes available. Find us on

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolThe Wakulla High School cross country teams, both boys and girls, will begin practices for the 2012 season this week on Thursday, Aug. 16 at the high school track. Thursdays practice will begin at 12:30 p.m., but the rest of the practices will start at 2:30 p.m., beginning on Friday. Everyone is welcome, regardless of experience, and there are no cuts everyone runs. All interested athletes should show up with running clothes/shoes and a current physical. Questions, call Coach Paul Hoover at 509-7861.Cross country starts Aug. 16NJROTC unit underwayBy HUNTER MCKAYEPublic Affairs Of cerIts time to start a new school year and that means a new Navy Junior ROTC unit as well. The summers been promising, even with the disasters caused by Tropical Storm Debby. Were con dent that the school year will go well based on the attitudes displayed by cadets during the annual summer miniboot camp and the clean ups held in response to Debby. The mini-boot camp went very well, with all the cadets pushing through the tough week. The new first-year cadets learned how to drill, how to properly wear their uniform and much of the basic knowledge necessary for the school year. The returning cadets experienced new levels of leadership in their mini-boot camp roles. All in all, the mini-boot camp was a great success. There were three community service events held this summer. The cadets who volunteered in these events showed their ability to step up to the plate and take the initiative, giving up time during their vacation to help those in need. They assisted at the Wakulla County Health Department and helped clean up two ood victims homes. They worked in poor conditions, but got the job done, providing some relief to those they were helping. With the way this whole summer has played out, despite the disaster, it looks like the school years going to be great. Theres a lot expected of the cadets, and were confident these expectations will be met. We expect 2,000 hours of community service this year. Summer Academy prepares students for AP classesSpecial to The NewsWakulla High School teachers, tutors, and volunteers banded together to offer the second AVID Summer Academy with the goal of assisting WHS AVID Scholars Program students prepare for their upcoming Advanced Placement classes. With the assistance of AVID elective teachers Nancy Floyd Richardson, Melinda House, and Will Pafford, along with AVID tutors Danny and Katie Lilly, and volunteers Pam Smith, Dr. Rachel Pienta, Heather Gray, and Deidre Walker, students met twice during the summer. Parent volunteer Deidre Walker said, I was very proud of the students for showing determination and taking time out of their summer activities to spend on schoolwork. During the day-long program, students attended different sessions to assist them in preparation for AP literature, history, and science courses. Students held small-group discussions, completed online assignments, worked on flash cards, studied maps, and prepared for essay questions. Junior Tiana Haskett said the summer sessions helped her get her work done on time. And if I needed help, I had someone who had also read the novel. Part of the AVID program is the expectation that students will enroll in challenging courses. All AVID seniors will take at least one AP or College Prep class and one honors class. Juniors in the AVID program will take AP English Language and Composition and at least one honors class. Sophomores will take Pre-AP English Composition and at least one honors course, and freshmen will take at least two honors classes. Many AVID students are choosing to take more classes than required because they feel con dent in their ability to succeed with the AVID support, which includes tutoring from college students twice a week. Superintendent David Miller advocated for the Wakulla County school system to be one of Floridas rst rural districts chosen for The Florida Partnership with the College Board grant. AVID stands for Advancement Via Individual Determination, and both middle schools and the high school have been recognized for earning AVID National Certi- cation. The program helps hard-working students get prepared for college. Many of the students in the program will be the rst in their families to attend college. AVID is a college preparation program that has been in place for more than 30 years. Wakulla is entering its fourth year in the program and will graduate its first senior class next year. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWHS AVID students work in groups over the summer to prepare for AP classes. Special to The NewsStudents, teachers and volunteers at Wakulla High School came together during the 20112 school year to raise $927.80 in the Pennies for Patients fundraising program. The program is a school and youth program fundraising effort for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS). Funds raised support blood cancer research and patient services. Its almost unbelievable to me that one school can raise so much money to help nd a cure for blood cancers, said Kelley Lesperance, executive director of the Northern and Central Florida Chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Were honored that Wakulla County High School put forth so much effort to be the winning school in Wakulla County this year, and were proud to partner with the school to make such an impact on research and patient services. Pennies for Patients is a coin collection and classroom competition program that encourages service learning, team work and philanthropy while raising significant funds. For more information, visit www.schoolandyouth. org/nc .WHS raises needed funds for Pennies for Patients #1 transfer college to neighboring Florida State University In-state tuition and fees under $100 per credit hour TCC is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access campus. Visit www.tcc.fl.edu for full statement.TCCs new location at the Centennial Bank building is opening for Fall classes.Visit our new location at 2932 Crawfordville Highway on August 21, 22, 28 or 29for advising, registration and testing Call 922-2416 for more detailsTallahassee Community College Tallahassee Community College The College of choice! TCC is a smart investment for students planning to transfer to a university or advance directly into the workforce. www.GoToTCC.com | (850) 201-TCC1 www.GoToTCC.com | (850) 201-TCC1 School Meal PricesDaily Lunch Price Pre-K & Elementary: Full Pay $2.10, Reduce $.40 Middle & High School: Full Pay $2.35, Reduce $.40 Daily Breakfast Price Pre-K & Elementary: Full Pay $1.35, Reduce $.30(Breakfast not available at middle & high school)

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsHere it is the middle of August and well be talking about fall shing before you know it. The water temperature yesterday on the ats was staying around 80 degrees, which is very cool for this time of the year. That accounts for the number of trout still on the flats in relatively shallow water. It wont be long before the reds start schooling up and the Spanish start their migration back south. Tarpon and cobia will start leaving and shing the ats will again be very good until it gets so cold nothing is left there for the trout to eat. Then its head up in the creeks and rivers. All that said, the Spanish, cobia and tarpon are still here and its still summer. Mike Pearson was down over the weekend from Tifton and he and a buddy went out to the shoals and caught six nice trout and a ounder shing grubs in about 15 feet of water. They then eased offshore and caught a couple of grouper before the weather made them come in. Capt. David Fife who shes out of Spring Creek has been catching quite a few reds around the bars using live mudminnows and on Sunday morning he shed near Spring Creek drifting a Gulp under a Cajun Thunder in about 4 feet of water and caught his limit of trout and a 26-inch red. He and I went over to Panacea and tried to catch a tarpon that afternoon and managed to catch quite a few sharks and hooked a tarpon on a light rod while reeling in a silver trout. It looked to weigh about 90 pounds and after two jumps and quite a long run it broke the line. We saw quite a few jumping but that was the only bite we had. I shed with Morris Brown of Crawfordville last week and we caught four ounder, a couple of speckled trout and a bunch of silver trout. We used a Gulp on the bottom. Fishing over around St. George has been pretty good. Lots of tarpon around dry bar and quite a few trout also being caught there. Trout in the bay are taking the Gulp and topwater baits early and late. Use spoons and live bait around the oyster bars for reds and look for the big reds in the pass. Live or cut bait on the bottom. Dr. Norm Griggs bought a house over on the bay in East Point and has been catching lots of trout and reds. He said he found a creek where he has been doing extremely well shing a top water bait for reds. The King sh Shootout held out of C-Quarters Marina in Carrabelle on Aug. 3 and Aug. 4 was another big success. The top 10 largest sh took home $15,600 and $35,000 was raised for the Leukemia Research Foundation. This was the ninth tournament and in those nine years this tournament has raised more than $667,000 for the foundation. My hat is off to everyone over there who works so hard on this tournament each year and you should all pat yourself on the back. First place in the tournament went to the team of Reel Smoker out of Panacea with a 48.5-pound king. Team Bud K out of Thomasville brought in a 35.9-pound king on Saturday and on Sunday they had one that weighed 38.5 pounds and took second place. Blake Gardner was the captain on Team Reel Smoker and Bud Kadel was captain of Team Bud K. Capt. Max Lawhon was shing with Millard Collins on the boat Smooth Drag and he caught a 70-inch sail sh in about 68 feet of water. The Kevins Seatrout Shootout will be held Sept. 16. You can put in anywhere and weigh-in will be at Jerrys Bait and Tackle on Woodville Highway. The heaviest string of ve trout between 15 and 20 inches will take rst place and prizes will also be paid for biggest trout, biggest red, red with most spots and a random drawing. All the rain we have been having has done nothing to the scallops. There are more scallops now than at the beginning of the season and everyone is getting their limit. Last weekend, David Fife and I took the McWilliams family from Mobile and Vero Beach and these folks had never been scalloping, much less ever seen one alive. Once they found one and knew what they were looking for the rest was easy. We got our limit in a couple of hours and they all said they enjoyed this more than diving in the Keys. Remember to know your limits and watch out for the thunderstorms that pop up every afternoon. Good luck and good shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Spanish, cobia and tarpon are on the atsThe Waldrep brothers Ryan, 15, above, and Hurston, 13, below, caught their rst Amberjack on a recent trip offshore compliments of Major Alan Lamarche and Plantation Security Inc. Amberjack are commonly referred to as Reef Donkeys because of their tremendous ghting prowess. The Waldrep brothers each whipped several AJs but only kept the legal limit of one to take home. Their father Cliff Waldrep and granddad Wayne Waldrep from Hines Hill & Mandalay Plantations went along to help bait hooks and release sh. The brothers also went home with several gag grouper and a box full of sea bass and Key West grunts. The brothers go back to school next week in south Georgia, and they have some great Donkey stories to tell their friends. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWaldrep brothers catchBrag book: Tallahassees Champagne Party -Beneting Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend-Dust o your dancing shoes and get ready for a smashing good time cuz the 3rd Annual BIG Champagne Bash is just around the corner. Save the date for this spectacular evening of dancing, dinner by-the-bite, free-owing bubbly, and unforgettable fun. Were celebrating the Roaring 20s once again an era of silent lm, speakeasies, and sensational parties!Who: 300+, community-minded, fun-loving Fellas and Flappers from across the Big Bend come together for the event of the season to make a BIG, positive, and lasting impact in the lives of children in our area. Why: Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend believes all children have the ability to achieve success in life. When: Friday, August 24, 8:00 p.m. 12:00 a.m. Venue: Hotel Duval, 415 North Monroe Street (Reserve your special $99 BIG Bash hotel guest rate by calling 850.224.6000 with the code BBSBBSI by Friday, August 10th.) Attire: Get all dolled-up for the 1920s silent movie theme Hosted by: Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bends BIG Alliance ( www.bbbs.org/ bigalliance) T icket Info: INCLUDES UNLIMITED CHAMPAGNE! Pre-Sale (expires August 17): $70/single, $130/couple, $600/group rate-10 tickets Standard Rate (August 18 Sold-Out): $75/single, $150/couple Purchase tickets at www.bbbs.org/bigbash. www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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As many of you know, Flotilla 12 Apalachee Bay is part of a larger Division that runs from Pensacola through our eastern end of the panhandle. While this is a large geographic area, there is a special bond between auxiliarists that seems to remain strong no matter how many miles we have to cross. Some of the greatest friendships are ones where we only see each other two or three times per year at Division meetings or special trainings. As they say, some people come into your life for a moment and leave a memory for a lifetime. Nancy Kenaston is one of those ladies. Nancy crossed the bar this past week. Many in the Division knew Nancy well. Patti Fritchie wrote the following: The world lost another piece of history today with the passing of Nancy Kenaston. Nancy was a young energetic journalist when World War II broke out and her beloved homeland England was being pounded by German bombs. She wrote and survived to see that war end. Because of her tenacity, ease with words and accurate reporting she was chosen to cover the Nuremburg trials. She sat for days listening, recording and interpreting the horrors of what had occurred during those war crimes trials. Moving to the USA with her Air Force husband, Nancy quickly became involved with community and settled in Fort Walton. She became a USCG Auxiliarist, often piloting her recreational boat through Destin pass to aid mariners in peril, to conduct Aids to Navigation patrols and whatever else she was asked to do to help the U.S. Coast Guard. We will miss Nancy Kenaston very much. Our hearts and our prayers go out to her family. Ann Del Bello also knew Nancy and wrote the following: Nancy Kenaston joined the Coast Guard Auxiliary on July 19, 1977. At that time, there was no Coast Guard presence or Station in the Destin area. The Flotilla received its orders from Station Pensacola. In the early years, Flotilla 14 held its meeting at Eglin Air Force Base. Nancy lived on Santa Rosa Sound and owned a Pro-Line boat, so she was very involved in Search & Rescue. The Flotilla boat owners would get as many as three to four calls per week to rescue stranded boaters in the Gulf of Mexico, usually at night. She rose in the Auxiliary from Flotilla Commander to Division Captain/Commander and held many staff of ces. She was editor of the Division 1 Salt Spray and eight years as editor of District 8 CR Behind the Eighth newsletters. Nancy worked as a reporter for the Panama City News-Herald and became Womens Editor of the local newspaper then titled Playground News. Nancy was able to publish many articles on the Flotilla activities and accomplishments of Flotilla members. Nancy said her happiest and most rewarding time was doing operations/ search & rescue in the Auxiliary. During one search & rescue for two people in the water from a sinking sailboat, Nancy had crewman Lester Rowley sit in the bow to guide her to the men. She radioed that she was having trouble finding the men due to high waves. An Auxiliary aircraft piloted by Betty NcNab heard the transmission and guided them to the downed sailboat. This was the rst time in Auxiliary history a rescue had been completed by an Auxiliary female pilot working with a female Auxiliary coxswain. Another time, Nancy and Lester were working for almost 20 hours on three successive rescues in rough weather. When back on land, their sea legs were still affecting them for a while. When she was asked what do you want people to say about you? She replied: She wanted to be remembered as someone who tried. In my opinion, Nancy M. Kenaston has succeeded many times over. Our Auxiliary and local community are a better place due to her involvement in it. Her British World War II experiences are told in her book, When Destiny Steps In. Nancy Kenaston was the most remarkable person I have ever met. Nancy, fair winds and following seas to you, you will be dearly missed. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident Be the example of safety out on the water. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies SPECIAL TO THE NEWSNancy Kenaston UnderwaterWakullaBy Travis Kersting A while back I talked about redundancy and how divers of all levels have incorporated redundant equipment into their activity, such as spare gas supplies via redundant tank, two knives or line cutters, even backup masks. There is a piece of equipment that you cant bring extra though, unless you dive with a buddy, and thats a brain. You only have one, and no amount of money can buy you a redundant copy. Diving without a buddy, that is solo diving, has almost always been considered taboo, primarily among recreational divers, and especially by the family members of these divers, and for reasons of various concerns. A long time ago, early equipment may have been of questionable reliability, but there were other issues at play too. In those days, scuba regulators lacked a pressure gauge, or redundant air source (now called an octopus), meaning your buddy was your redundant air supply. Under those circumstances a dive buddy became a necessity. Things have come a long way as far as equipment availability, build quality, and built in safety functions are concerned. The modern diver now has a certain level of redundancy built into their recreational life support package, but does this make solo diving OK? Spear shing seems to be a good example of two people jumping off the boat at the same time, only to split up almost immediately. This may happen for many reasons, including bad visibility, distraction due to a speared sh, or searching for a lost spear shaft. These folks practice what is sometimes referred to as same ocean buddy diving. Technically there is a dive partner around, but nding them in the event of an emergency is less than likely. This may be considered acceptable, because in open water divers have the option to simply surface and solve their problems topside. However, some problems, like entanglement cant be solved on the surface. Many cave divers, but not all, have long been practicing solo diving. The reasons are as endless as the cave passages we go to explore. Are we crazy for it? Most would say we are crazy for even entering a cave. Trained cave divers all follow a few basic rules to keep us and a buddy alive in the event of problems. Solo cave divers typically pad these rules for more of a safety buffer, and many divers add some extra rules for additional safety margin. For instance, I always carry at a minimum one additional cylinder of decompression mix and a buddy bottle of bottom mix when cave diving solo. That makes 120 cubic feet of breathing gas which I have no intention of using. That is in addition to the cylinder of 100 percent oxygen hanging at 20 feet and while following the standard gas management practice for safe cave diving. I personally dont limit my penetration distance or depth speci cally for solo diving, but many cavers do impose additional restrictions on themselves. Still, with all these pieces of redundant equipment and extra breathing gas I do lack a second brain. So why undergo the increased risk? Diving is peaceful for me, and not having someone else around to talk to or rush me means I can take more time to prepare my equipment and visualize the dive. During the dive I can take more time and pay attention to details I might otherwise overlook when monitoring a buddy. These are details that come in handy when exiting in low visibility, often found when exploring smaller passages. Having muscle memory to immediately react to a problem, like a diminishing gas supply, is key to solo diving and to not turning an inconvenience into an emergency. For me, solo diving is my preference. I dive longer, farther and calmer when I am alone. Most divers would likely be opposite of that and for good reason. Diving alone, in cave or open water, is not for everyone but it also doesnt have to be the high risk activity that most people think it is. After all, we drive a car solo almost every day, and that is considered acceptable or even normal despite the accident statistics. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday g Thu Aug 16, 12 Fri Aug 17, 12 Sat Aug 18, 12 Sun Aug 19, 12 Mon Aug 20, 12 Tue Aug 21, 12 Wed Aug 22, 12 Date 3.4 ft. 2:38 AM 3.6 ft. 3:06 AM 3.7 ft. 3:32 AM 3.9 ft. 3:57 AM 3.9 ft. 4:23 AM 4.0 ft. 4:50 AM 4.0 ft. 5:21 AM High 1.4 ft. 7:58 AM 1.1 ft. 8:37 AM 0.8 ft. 9:15 AM 0.6 ft. 9:54 AM 0.4 ft. 10:35 AM 0.3 ft. 11:20 AM 0.3 ft. 12:10 PM Low 4.0 ft. 1:58 PM 4.1 ft. 2:37 PM 4.2 ft. 3:17 PM 4.2 ft. 3:58 PM 4.0 ft. 4:42 PM 3.8 ft. 5:30 PM 3.4 ft. 6:24 PM High 0.1 ft. 8:49 PM 0.1 ft. 9:17 PM 0.2 ft. 9:45 PM 0.4 ft. 10:13 PM 0.6 ft. 10:43 PM 0.9 ft. 11:16 PM 1.3 ft. 11:52 PM Low Thu Aug 16, 12 Fri Aug 17, 12 Sat Aug 18, 12 Sun Aug 19, 12 Mon Aug 20, 12 Tue Aug 21, 12 Wed Aug 22, 12 Date 3.5 ft. 2:35 AM 3.7 ft. 3:03 AM 3.8 ft. 3:29 AM 3.9 ft. 3:54 AM 4.0 ft. 4:20 AM 4.1 ft. 4:47 AM 4.1 ft. 5:18 AM High 1.5 ft. 7:55 AM 1.2 ft. 8:34 AM 0.9 ft. 9:12 AM 0.6 ft. 9:51 AM 0.4 ft. 10:32 AM 0.3 ft. 11:17 AM 0.3 ft. 12:07 PM Low 4.0 ft. 1:55 PM 4.2 ft. 2:34 PM 4.3 ft. 3:14 PM 4.3 ft. 3:55 PM 4.1 ft. 4:39 PM 3.9 ft. 5:27 PM 3.5 ft. 6:21 PM High 0.1 ft. 8:46 PM 0.1 ft. 9:14 PM 0.2 ft. 9:42 PM 0.4 ft. 10:10 PM 0.7 ft. 10:40 PM 1.0 ft. 11:13 PM 1.4 ft. 11:49 PM Low Thu Aug 16, 12 Fri Aug 17, 12 Sat Aug 18, 12 Sun Aug 19, 12 Mon Aug 20, 12 Tue Aug 21, 12 Wed Au g 22, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 3:14 AM 3.3 ft. 3:42 AM 3.5 ft. 4:08 AM 3.6 ft. 4:33 AM 3.7 ft. 4:59 AM 3.7 ft. 5:26 AM High 1.3 ft. 9:02 AM 1.0 ft. 9:41 AM 0.8 ft. 10:19 AM 0.5 ft. 10:58 AM 0.3 ft. 11:39 AM 0.2 ft. 12:24 PM 0.8 ft. 12:20 AM Low 3.7 ft. 2:34 PM 3.8 ft. 3:13 PM 3.9 ft. 3:53 PM 3.9 ft. 4:34 PM 3.8 ft. 5:18 PM 3.5 ft. 6:06 PM 3.8 ft. 5:57 AM High 0.1 ft. 9:53 PM 0.1 ft. 10:21 PM 0.2 ft. 10:49 PM 0.3 ft. 11:17 PM 0.6 ft. 11:47 PM 0.2 ft. 1:14 PM Low 3.2 ft. 7:00 PM High Thu Aug 16, 12 Fri Aug 17, 12 Sat Aug 18, 12 Sun Aug 19, 12 Mon Aug 20, 12 Tue Aug 21, 12 Wed Aug 22, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 2:30 AM 2.7 ft. 2:58 AM 2.8 ft. 3:24 AM 2.9 ft. 3:49 AM 3.0 ft. 4:15 AM 3.0 ft. 4:42 AM 3.0 ft. 5:13 AM High 1.0 ft. 8:09 AM 0.8 ft. 8:48 AM 0.6 ft. 9:26 AM 0.4 ft. 10:05 AM 0.3 ft. 10:46 AM 0.2 ft. 11:31 AM 0.2 ft. 12:21 PM Low 3.0 ft. 1:50 PM 3.1 ft. 2:29 PM 3.1 ft. 3:09 PM 3.1 ft. 3:50 PM 3.0 ft. 4:34 PM 2.8 ft. 5:22 PM 2.6 ft. 6:16 PM High 0.1 ft. 9:00 PM 0.1 ft. 9:28 PM 0.1 ft. 9:56 PM 0.3 ft. 10:24 PM 0.5 ft. 10:54 PM 0.7 ft. 11:27 PM Low Thu Aug 16, 12 Fri Aug 17, 12 Sat Aug 18, 12 Sun Aug 19, 12 Mon Aug 20, 12 Tue Aug 21, 12 Wed Aug 22, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 2:22 AM 2.8 ft. 2:50 AM 2.9 ft. 3:16 AM 3.0 ft. 3:41 AM 3.1 ft. 4:07 AM 3.1 ft. 4:34 AM 3.2 ft. 5:05 AM High 1.4 ft. 7:37 AM 1.1 ft. 8:16 AM 0.8 ft. 8:54 AM 0.6 ft. 9:33 AM 0.4 ft. 10:14 AM 0.3 ft. 10:59 AM 0.3 ft. 11:49 AM Low 3.1 ft. 1:42 PM 3.2 ft. 2:21 PM 3.3 ft. 3:01 PM 3.3 ft. 3:42 PM 3.1 ft. 4:26 PM 2.9 ft. 5:14 PM 2.7 ft. 6:08 PM High 0.1 ft. 8:28 PM 0.1 ft. 8:56 PM 0.2 ft. 9:24 PM 0.4 ft. 9:52 PM 0.6 ft. 10:22 PM 0.9 ft. 10:55 PM 1.2 ft. 11:31 PM Low Thu Aug 16, 12 Fri Aug 17, 12 Sat Aug 18, 12 Sun Aug 19, 12 Mon Aug 20, 12 Tue Aug 21, 12 Wed Au g 22, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 3:16 AM 2.8 ft. 3:33 AM 2.8 ft. 3:48 AM 2.9 ft. 4:03 AM 3.0 ft. 4:20 AM 3.1 ft. 4:42 AM 3.2 ft. 5:08 AM High 1.7 ft. 7:13 AM 1.5 ft. 7:51 AM 1.3 ft. 8:29 AM 1.1 ft. 9:08 AM 0.9 ft. 9:52 AM 0.7 ft. 10:42 AM 0.6 ft. 11:43 AM Low 3.2 ft. 1:12 PM 3.2 ft. 2:03 PM 3.2 ft. 2:54 PM 3.1 ft. 3:48 PM 2.9 ft. 4:46 PM 2.7 ft. 5:51 PM 2.5 ft. 7:09 PM High 0.2 ft. 8:14 PM 0.3 ft. 8:41 PM 0.5 ft. 9:07 PM 0.8 ft. 9:32 PM 1.0 ft. 9:58 PM 1.3 ft. 10:25 PM 1.6 ft. 10:50 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacAug. 16 Aug. 22First Aug. 24 Full Aug. 31 Last Sept. 8 New Aug. 17Major Times 12:25 AM 2:25 AM 12:49 PM 2:49 PM Minor Times 6:03 AM 7:03 AM 7:28 PM 8:28 PM Major Times 1:13 AM 3:13 AM 1:38 PM 3:38 PM Minor Times 7:03 AM 8:03 AM 8:05 PM 9:05 PM Solunar Rating Solunar Best Hunting Times and Best Fishing Times Rating is for a Best day of Hunting or Fishing Image Major Times 2:02 AM 4:02 AM 2:26 PM 4:26 PM Minor Times 8:03 AM 9:03 AM 8:41 PM 9:41 PM Major Times 2:51 AM 4:51 AM 3:16 PM 5:16 PM Minor Times 9:05 AM 10:05 AM 9:19 PM 10:19 PM Major Times 3:40 AM 5:40 AM 4:06 PM 6:06 PM Minor Times 10:07 AM 11:07 AM 9:57 PM 10:57 PM Major Times 4:31 AM 6:31 AM 4:58 PM 6:58 PM Minor Times 11:11 AM 12:11 PM 10:37 PM 11:37 PM Better Best Better++ Better Average Average7:05 am 8:16 pm 6:04 am 7:29 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:05 am 8:15 pm 7:04 am 8:06 pm 7:06 am 8:14 pm 8:04 am 8:43 pm 7:07 am 8:13 pm 9:06 am 9:19 pm 7:07 am 8:12 pm 10:08 am 9:58 pm 7:08 am 8:11 pm 11:12 am 10:38 pm 7:08 am 8:10 pm 12:16 pm 11:23 pm9% 3% 4% 12% 19% 26% 33% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE LETS DO THIS TOGETHER! DO YOU WANT IT?Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN GET YOU MOTIVATED! GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Qualifications o 4th generation Floridian o Professional designations; highest standards and ethics o Held offices in professional associations, local & statewide (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) joined forces on Sunday, Aug. 12 to bring overdue boaters safely back to shore, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. At approximately 9 p.m., a Tallahassee woman reported that a boat with three adults and ve juveniles on board was stranded in the water approximately one mile off the coast of the St. Marks Lighthouse. The complainant told Deputy Randy Phillips that she received a text message from her friends onboard stating that they required assistance. Deputy Taff Stokley retrieved and launched the WCSO Search and Rescue vessel and Deputy Phillips set up a command post at the St. Marks Lighthouse boat ramp. FWC also launched a boat and helicopter. The helicopter located the boat paddling back toward the lighthouse and Deputy Stokley towed the vessel and passengers back to the lighthouse boat ramp. There were no injuries. The operation concluded at 11:58 p.m. By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 13, A crowded race in what is essentially a new House district in north Florida is in some ways serving as an outlet for the areas frustration over its diminishing influence and the GOPs continuing interest in privatizing prisons. All seven candidates running for House District 7 -which spans nine counties from Calhoun in the Panhandle to Lafayette in the Big Bend and also takes in a piece of Leon -are opposed to handing prisons over to for-pro t companies. They also knock changes that would ask existing state employees to contribute to their own retirements -though most keep the door open on changes for future employees. While those views are common among legislative Democrats, they would be maverick positions if one of the four Republicans wins the seat -which covers at least a share of what used to be six different House seats. It is in some ways a function of the district, which has the third-lowest percentage of its population working for private businesses among the states 120 House seats, according to a survey by the U.S. Census Bureau. While Republican U.S. Sen. John McCain would have easily won the district with almost 62.1 percent of the vote in the 2008 presidential election, Gov. Rick Scott squeaked out a 3.5-percentage point win in 2010 after he spent the campaign pledging to slash government, overhaul pensions and privatize prisons. And so while the economy and how to x it are also major issues in House District 7, promises to keep prisons open and in the hands of state government have been routine during this campaign cycle. Public safety is the primary responsibility of government, said Mike Williams, 53, a nancial adviser from Madison whos running as a Republican. We dont need to be leasing that out, if you will, to administer that for us. Some of the concerns, particularly when it comes to proposals to shutter some of the facilities, are economic. Halsey Beshears, president of the Florida Nursery, Growers & Landscape Association and a businessman, said that any reductions in prison workers should come in other parts of the state, where additional prisons might be nearby and other work opportunities exist -unlike in District 7. Those people have less opportunity to go find a job, said Beshears, 40, of Monticello. He is also a GOP candidate. The prison in Jefferson County, where Beshears lives, narrowly escaped closure during last years legislative session. Other concerns stem from a deal that the candidates say their constituents made when the prisons were built in the northern part of the state: local residents would get jobs in their area in exchange for the dangers of having prisons nearby. It rankles me that some people would want to close those facilities now, said Republican Don Curtis, 57, a forester from Perry. The issue has taken center stage in a clash between two of the candidates on the Democratic side. Thomas Dickens, an attorney from Leon County, has slammed A.J. Smith for gaining the support of Putting Florida First, an electioneering communications organization that has accepted contributions from privatization giant The GEO Group. You bet, I do take issue with that, Dickens, 37, said when asked about a mailer pointing out the links. Smith, 53, a consultant and former law enforcement of cer from Apalachicola, bristles at the allegation. He said he is certain none of the contributions from GEO to the ECO have been used to support him. GEO has not given me money, and I would not take money from GEO, he said. Smith has joined the other candidates in pledging to fight privatization and boasts of having visited all nine prisons in the area. Pensions are also an issue. Robert Hill, who served for the last 12 years as Liberty County clerk of court -a position that required him to double as county administrator -said he is opposed to any changes that would affect current state workers. We had a contract with those employees, and theres an attempt to change that contract, said the 64year-old Bristol resident. But there is also a sense, voiced most prominently by former Rep. Jamey Westbrook, that despite its proximity to the state Capitol, District 7 is simply being forgotten. Westbrook, a Republican now, who was a Democrat during his rst stint in the House, has seized on that issue with a vow to set them straight if elected. The only person thats a lobbyist for the small counties is the legislator thats elected there, said Westbrook, 63, from Port St. Joe. Im not going to let them run over the constituents of House District 7, Westbrook said. Beshears raised the most money in the district, according to state records, with $261,451; Curtis was next with almost $156,755; Westbrook raised $152,450; and Williams reported just $34,739 in contributions. All have funded their own campaigns to some extent. Westbrook has chipped in almost all of his total $150,000. Meanwhile, Curtis has spent $100,000 on the race while Beshears has poured more than $86,000 into his effort. Williams had contributed less than $225 of his own money. Among the Democrats, Hill is the leader with $93,675, of which he contributed $50,000; followed by Smith with $85,490, including $500 of his own money, and Dickens with $80,583 -$50,000 of which came from the candidate.Race for House District 7 seat focuses on prisons, state workersContinued from 1A Langston announced his candidacy for sheriff at a press conference in August 2011. According to the OSC, he began accepting campaign contributions as early as Aug. 25, 2011, which would mean he has been a candidate for sheriff since then. The opinion states,We nd that, from Aug. 25, 2011, through June 12, 2012, Major Langstons candidacy in the partisan election for sheriff of Wakulla County was in violation of the Hatch Act. However, because Langston is no longer involved in the administration of federal grants or loans, does not participate in federally funded activities and does not supervise anyone who has duties in connection with federally funded activities, he is no longer subject to the provisions of the Hatch Act, the opinion states. If someone is found to be in violation, the OSC typically gives the person the opportunity to come into compliance, by either withdrawing their candidacy or no longer being employed in a position where their duties are connected to federally funded activities. The opinion states, We nd that Major Langston has effectively come into compliance with the law. Thus,. the Hatch Act does not prohibit his current candidacy for sheriff. In response to the ndings, Langston issued this statement: I do not want to take the voters attention away from the fact that I am running a clean and successful campaign for Sheriff. My intention is to continue to address Public Safety in Wakulla County. No further action will be taken by the OSC.Overdue boaters found Langston not prohibited from running for sheri Special to The NewsAlzheimers Project Inc. along with Area Agency on Aging for North Florida will host its 14th Annual Caregiver Forum at the Tallahassee Community College Ghazvini Learning Center on Sept. 21. The forum will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event, which provides a day of pampering for caregivers, is completely free of charge to attendees. Breakfast and lunch will be provided, as well as massages, goody bags, multiple health screenings, facials, hand massages, speakers and great entertainment. Every year in September, Area Agency on Aging for North Florida and Alzheimers Project collaborate to sponsor a day of rest and relaxation designed especially for the caregivers in our community, said Alzheimers Project CEO Bill Wertman. Caregivers come together on this day to share stories, hear motivational speakers, mingle with community providers, and become lost in a magic massage or receive a mini beauty-makeover. This day, the entire day, which is tailored just for caregivers is 100 percent free and includes a catered breakfast and lunch. We are honored to be a part of it all. Respite Care will be provided on-site for those requiring temporary care for their loved one with Alzheimers or related dementia. Trained volunteers will provide care and engage everyone in interactive social activities and breakfast and lunch will be provided as well. Spaces will ll up quickly!! If you know a caregiver who may be interested in attending, please contact Alzheimers Project Inc. at (850) 386-2778 to make a reservation. Alzheimers Project, Inc.:is a non-pro t organization funded by grants and private donations. A lzheimers Project, Inc. is dedicated to providing relief to the caregivers of persons suffering from Alzheimers disease or other memory impairments. All services available to the caregivers are provided free of charge. The goal of Alzheimers Project, Inc. is to keep caregivers healthier, both physically and emotionally, to prolong the abilities of caregivers to care for their loved ones, and to delay institutionalization of their family members. With over 20 years of consistent quality service, Alzheimers Project, Inc. helps local families nd their way through support, respite and training. Call them at (850) 3862778 or view more information on their website, http://www.alzheimersproject.org..Alzheimers Project to o er day of fun for area caregivers

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 13A

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On Aug. 2, Thomas Platt of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at A&P Seafood in Panacea. Someone lled the fuel tank of a refrigerated truck full of dirt and water. The fuel tank was damaged. A suspect has been identified. Damage was estimated at $1,000. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On Aug. 2, Edward Bewick of Tallahassee, and most recently of Crawfordville, was arrested for failure to report a change of address as a sex offender. Detective Josh Langston discovered that Bewick had moved to Crawfordville and failed to register his new address with law enforcement as required. Detective Langston and State Attorney Investigator Erika Buckley arrested Bewick at his place of business and transported him to the Wakulla County Jail. On Aug. 2, Shelby Rollins of Crawfordville reported the theft of an antique bicycle from outside her home. The bicycle, which was more than 60 years old, was used as a decoration at the victims home and is valued at $200. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On Aug. 2, Lashawnia Webster of Crawfordville reported a hit-and-run traf c crash at her place of business in Crawfordville. The victim discovered a dent in her vehicle which had been parked in the business parking lot. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On Aug. 2, Tina Everett of Panacea reported a residential burglary. Someone removed a satellite television box from her home. The cable box is valued at $120. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. On Aug. 1, Stephanie Exline of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her home. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. On Aug. 3, Norma Land of Crawfordville reported the theft of a hand truck and dresser from her residence. The victim was in the process of moving. The stolen property is valued at $125. Two days later, the victim reported recovering the dolly in a wooded area near her home. Deputy Mike Zimba and Lt. Dale Evans investigated. On Aug. 3, Joe Walker of Crawfordville reported a fraud. A suspect, who has been identi ed, used the victims Social Security number to open a communications account without authorization. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. On Aug. 4, a retail theft was reported at Wal-Mart. Franklin Raphael Thomas, 21, of Crawfordville was arrested for felony shoplifting. The suspect allegedly removed four tires from the store without paying for them. The tires are valued at $406. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. On Aug. 4, James Eskelund of Ochlockonee Bay reported the theft of a lawn mower from his property. The mower is valued at $175. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. On Aug. 5, Lt. Dale Evans discovered a kayak sitting on the side of Skipper Bay Road near U.S. Highway 98. The kayak was transported to the sheriffs of ce for storage until an owner can be found. On Aug. 5, a concerned citizen contacted the sheriffs of ce about a reckless driver on U.S. Highway 319. Deputy Vicki Mitchell observed the driver driving with both passengerside tires off the pavement. Frank Grady Johnson, 39, of Crawfordville was stopped on the highway and could not produce a driver license. He was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked, third or subsequent conviction and reckless driving. On Aug. 5, Lilly Meinhardt of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Four unauthorized charges were discovered on her bank account. The charges totaled $1,005 and were created over the Internet. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On Aug. 5, Irma Seaman of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victim loaned her vehicle to a friend who failed to return it. The vehicle was discovered in the Wakulla Gardens area. The victim reported that $450 worth of damage was observed on the vehicle. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Vicki Mitchell and Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. On Aug. 6, Sherrie Stokes of Crawfordville reported a theft of her wallet from her vehicle while it was parked at a Medart business. The victim left the wallet inside the vehicle with the windows down. The wallet contained a driver license, some cash and a credit card. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. On Aug. 6, Virginia Story of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Someone attempted to use the victims credit card to make purchases over the Internet. The fraudulent charges totaled $300. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. On Aug. 6, Shaun Chovan of Crawfordville reported an animal incident as a family member discovered the family dog deceased inside a family vehicle. The dog was missing for a period of time and was discovered when a family member retrieved an item from the vehicle. It has not been determined how the animal got into the vehicle. Damage was observed inside the vehicle as the animal attempted to get out. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On Aug. 6, Robert Ceska, Cleveland Dickens and Angela Holshouser, all of Crawfordville, reported a hit-and-run. A suspect vehicle struck two mailboxes on Duck Pond Drive while traveling on Lonnie Raker Lane. The suspect also hit a street sign and a fence in the Lonnie Raker Lane and Duck Pond Drive area. The total value of the damage was estimated at $230. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On Aug. 7, James B. Brooks of Sopchoppy reported a theft of property from his Panacea business. A hand pump, gas can and chain was stolen from the property. The value of the stolen items is $150. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. On Aug. 7, Scott Joyner of the Wakulla County Public Library reported a criminal mischief. Someone put graf- ti on the side of the building. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. On Aug. 7, Jenna Hurst of Crawfordville reported the theft of a GPS unit. The victim is unsure where the unit was taken from. It is valued at $150. The unit was entered in the FCIC/NCIC data base. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On Aug. 7, State Probation Of cer Norman Vickers reported discovering possible stolen items in a shed at a home used by a probationer. The owner of the home was present when Of cer Vickers searched the unlocked shed. A crack pipe was recovered and turned into the Evidence Division. The other items were turned over to Detective C.L. Morrison. Deputy Mike Crum also investigated. On Aug. 8, Corbin Smith of Crawfordville reported the theft of cigarettes and lighters from his patio. Evidence at the scene led Deputies Will Hudson and Cole Wells to a 15-yearold suspect who admitted taking the property. The juvenile was charged with burglary and petit theft. A second suspect has also been identi ed. On Aug. 8, Deputy Joe Page recovered a wallet on Shadeville Highway near the Habitat for Humanity Re-Store. The property belonged to Christopher Daniel Dailey of Crawfordville. The wallet and contents were soaked from a recent heavy rain and the wallet was placed in the WCSO Evidence Division until contact can be made with the owner. On Aug. 8, Donald Finch of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone led a tax return using the victims name and Social Security number. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. On Aug. 9, Christina Lee Mills, 38, of Tallahassee was arrested for resisting an of cer by disguise and possession of narcotic equipment. Deputies Clint Beam and Ian Dohme stopped along Shadeville Highway early in the morning to check on the welfare of Mills, who was walking on the side of the road. Mills gave deputies a false name and was acting nervously. It was discovered that Mills had an outstanding warrant for violation of probation in Wakulla County. She admitted possessing a pad to smoke narcotics. The pad was recovered with narcotics residue on it. She was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. On Aug. 8, James Corbett of Crawfordville reported the theft of tools, a mower and hanging pots, valued at $185. The possessions were removed from the victims property. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On Aug. 8, Molly Weller of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed two unauthorized charges on her bank account totaling $1,968. The charges were created at a telecommunications store in New Jersey. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. On Aug. 8, Adele Reese of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Electronic games, equipment and tools, valued at $650, were stolen from the victims home. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 917 calls for service during the past week. Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report Dawn Reed, GRI, SFR, RealtorCell (850) 294-3468dawnjreed@yahoo.com www.WakullaInfo.comCheryl Swift, CLG, CHP, RealtorCell (850) 766-3218cswiftrealtor@yahoo.comwww.CrawfordvilleProperties.com SHORT SALE VS. FORECLOSUREwww.WakullaShortSales.com Your Local Short Sale Specialists!!! It allows a more digni ed exit from the home. In a foreclosure, an of cial eventually comes to the home and tells the occupants to leave-immediately. In a short sale, the seller knows the closing date and can prepare in advance for the move. The seller could possibly avoid a de ciency judgment. Most banks will release the seller from this obligation in a short sale process. A short sale has less of a negative impact on sellers credit report. Once a short sale is completed, the sellers begin to clean-up their credit report. The timeline can be much longer as a foreclosure proceeds through the process. There is a ticking clock on tax relief. There is currently legislation, the Mortgage Forgiveness Relief Act of 2007, ensuring that homeowners who received principal reductions or other forms of debt forgiveness on their primary residence do not have to pay taxes on the amount forgiven. This legislation is set to expire at the end of the year.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 15A DR. DAVID A. KEEN, M.D., M.P.H.BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PRACTICEELIZABETH HEULER, ARNP-C VALERIE RUSSELL, ARNP-C2615 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, SUITE 103, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327PH 850-926-3140 FX 850-926-3163 (Next to the Winn-Dixie Shopping Plaza) www.wakullaurgentcare.comCOME VISIT US FOR ALL OF YOUR HEALTHCARE NEEDSOur program is simple to follow and teaches you new healthy habits, safe and effective weight loss. Get in tune with your body. Call today for a weight loss program customized to t you. WE NOW ACCEPT We are an approved drawing site for all insurances! Medically Supervised Weight LossPulmonary Function Testing Pediatrics/Immunizations X-Ray, EKG, Labs Sleep Study Ultrasound DEXA Bone Density Testing Workers Comp Injury Overnight Pulse Ox Holter/Event Monitor Pre-Employment Drug Screening School/Bus/DOT/Sports Physicals Family Primary Care Urgent Care/Walk Ins

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Is moving & expanding to meet the needs of more students!1616 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C(North Pointe Center)Call today and register for tutoring in a specic class or receive homework help for any age.K 5: Reading & Math Skills, Homework Help 6 8: FCAT & End-of-Course Exam Prep: Reading, Math, Advanced Math, Algebra 1, Study & Organizational Skills 9 12: FCAT Prep: English & Reading; End-of-Course Exam Prep: Algebra 1, Geometry, Biology; Study & Organizational Skills; ACT & SAT Test Prep; College Admissions Consulting; Tutoring for every subject; individual or small group sessions available. 850.926.2179 Continued from Page 1A In order to participate, applications are lled out and then the applicants are screened, ensuring that the children truly need the help of Big Hearted Angels. The children were broken up into groups of ve, led by a volunteer chaperon. Volunteer Carolyn Kent, who is a teacher and had two children shopping, says she was excited to help. Having four kids, we need every little help we can get, Kent says. Another volunteer, Dena Vice, who works with pre-K students, says some of the children in her group put back $14 shoes to try and stretch their dollar even further. They were very frugal, Vice says. Her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Vice, who she recruited to be a chaperon also, agrees, saying that the children were very responsible with their choices. She adds that she was happy to be a part of the event. A mother herself, she says she hopes if her children were in the same situation, that someone would help them. The need is a lot greater this year, Elizabeth Vice says. Following the shopping spree, all the volunteers, parents and students gathered at Hudson Park to listen to a guest speaker and have lunch. Lunch is also provided by Big Hearted Angels. The students were treated to steaks, chicken, salad and smashed potatoes, donated from Charlies Steak House. Williams says one of the owners sits on the Big Hearted Angels Board. The guest speaker was Lydia Mount, who previously worked under former Gov. Bob Graham. Williams says the purpose of the guest speaker is to educate the students. Students who participate in the shopping spree are required to attend the program. So many kids, they are going astray, Williams says. I take a lot of kids under my wing. Parents and role models have a responsibility to teach children respect. In order to respect others, they must rst respect themselves, he says. Mount took some time and spoke to the students, letting them know that no dream is too big. She described Big Hearted Angels as dream pushers. Youre our future, Mount told the students. We believe in you. Mount, who has spoken at other events for Big Hearted Angels, says she was again honored to be the guest speaker. Im grateful for his vision, for his heart, Mounts says of Williams. Mr. Williams has a big heart. Others agreed, Miller says, He has a heart as big as a trash can. Williams want to continue to expand the organization and his hope is to one day have chapters nationwide. I stay busy, but I love it, he says. I get a lot of joy out of doing it. For more information about Big Hearted Angels, visit www.bigheartedangels. org.Big Hearted Angels visit Wakulla PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN School buses unload students and chaperones at the Wal-Mart parking lot, above. Chaperon, Carolyn Kent, helps a shopper pick up school supplies, below.

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012The Wakulla news EXTRA! Green chile cheese squaresJust a Pinch Recipes, Page 7BRed and Blue are primary colorsWeekly Roundup, Page 12BThe wreck of the DispatchRed Clay Footprints, Page 3B By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhen Jimmie Doyle ran for a seat on the Wakulla County Commission in 2008 and didnt win, she says it was divine intervention. Not winning was a blessing and gave her the chance to start NAMI Wakulla, an af liate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. NAMI is a non-pro t, grass roots, self-help, support and advocacy organization that offers peer education and training programs, as well as services for consumers, family members, health-care providers and the general public. I gave birth to NAMI, Doyle says. Doyle is the founding president of NAMI. There wouldnt be a NAMI without Jimmie, says Dana Peck, NAMI director and one of the original founding members. While going door-to-door campaigning, Doyle saw people with mental illness who needed help and it broke her heart. I just cried, Doyle says. That was what planted the seed. She knew of NAMI because of her daughter who worked for NAMI Florida. I had been exposed, Doyle says. She also has mental illness in her own family and worked as a nurse, mainly in nursing homes, for more than 25 years. She saw there was a need for this type of service in Wakulla County and decided to start a chapter. Ive always said, Im nothing but a kook, Doyle says. Her children were grown and she had lost her husband shortly before the election in 2008. So why not do something to help somebody. She reached out to her circle of friends and invited anybody she thought might want to be a part of NAMI. There was a compelling need, Peck says. And according to the statistics, 1 in 4 people in the United States will have a mental illness, she adds. From inception to the first public meeting was about three months, she says. The rst organizational meeting was Jan. 26, 2009. The rst meeting the group chose a board of directors and spent all day writing its by-laws. That night, Doyle says she paid the dues to NAMI Florida. NAMI held its rst public meeting at the health department and a large crowd attended, the second meeting was in Judge Jill Walkers courtroom and Doyle says the courtroom was lled. Education is a huge part of what NAMI does, Doyle says. There is a stigma associated with a mental illness which causes many people to not get the help they need, she adds. I care about everybody, Doyle says. And it breaks my heart to see people who feel that nobody cares. NAMI is all about helping and encouraging people, she says. NAMI will make people aware that there is a recovery road, Doyle says. And we want to help as many of them as possible get on that road. NAMI Wakulla is completely free and offers several different programs for those with a mental illness or those who know someone with a mental illness. These programs are NAMI Basics, which is for parents or caregivers of a child who became symptomatic before age 13. It allows families to connect with each other, Doyle says.Continued on Page 5B People You Should KnowJIMMIE DOYLE: NAMI WakullaThis is part of an ongoing series of feature stories on people who are busy doing things to improve Wakulla County. Do you know of someone whos making a difference in the community? Send your ideas to editor@thewakullanews.net.Past pro les for People You Should Know have included: R.H. Carter, executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center; Amy Geiger, president of Capital City Bank Wakulla, because of her numerous community activities; Scott Joyner, director of the Wakulla County Public Library.PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENJimmie Doyle speaks to a recent meeting of the Domestic Violence-Sexual Violence Task Force about NAMI Wakulla programs.Tonier Cain makes plea for recognizing, treating traumaBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt was an emotional and riveting presentation that Tonier Kane gave to a group of education and mental health professionals this week, a plea that they be aware of those they see who may suffer from trauma. Cain made the presentation at Wakulla Education Center on Monday before a crowd of more than 50 people, in an event sponsored by the Wakulla School District and NAMI Wakulla. Cains story was disturbing: Growing up in Maryland as the oldest of nine children by an alcoholic mother whose various boyfriends molested her beginning when she was 9 years old. She and her siblings were taken from that home in the projects when she was 11 and she lived with an older cousin for a few years, but her mother took her back at 14. She attempted suicide, then was placed with an alcoholic aunt, and then married an abusive man. By 19 she was addicted to crack cocaine and would go through 83 arrests and 66 convictions and, homeless, stayed under a bridge where she lived like a rat on scraps. But, after all that, while pregnant and in prison, she took part in a program that helped her deal with and begin to heal from the various traumas of her life. Continued on Page 5B Tonier Cain 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt is proud to announce that Dr. Chukwuma M. Okoroji is now providing Obstetrics and Gynecology services 1st & 3rd Thursday of each month CRMC Medical Group Building, 2382 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite-D, Crawfordville FL. We accept most insurance, including BCBS, CHP, Medicaid and more. To schedule your appointment or for more information Call 850-320-6054NatureCoastWomensCare.com ANTIQUES C ARRIES C OVEC ARRIES C OVEPICK YOUR DISCOUNTDRAW FOR 5% TO 25% OFFDOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PET STOP P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pe t Holistic Select WellnessC Lbt n Pfr tf Ab n ALL Yr P Nf.Wbf Sbt n PrbSpecial Orders AvailablePhone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. CommunityFINANCE, LLC ASK ABOUT FIN ANCING ty C LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator Walk the Walk the Shops Near Shops Near Courthouse Courthouse Square Square The Wakulla News

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Aug. 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, Aug. 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Aug. 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. Sunday, Aug. 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. Monday, Aug. 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Aug. 21 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Wednesday, Aug. 22 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Aug. 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. Special EventsFriday, Aug. 17 WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY CELEBRATION of almost 40 acres of land from the Ben Boynton family for the Heritage Village Park will be held at 10 a.m. The conveyance will take place at the Zion Hill United Methodist Church which is adjacent to the land to be conveyed. The Boynton family, members of the Wakulla County Commission, members of the Wakulla County Historical Society and the general public has been invited to help celebrate this historic event. Saturday, Aug. 18 EDEN SPRINGS FUNDRAISER will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Hudson Park. All proceeds go into the special activity fund for events such as Senior Prom, Harvest Festival, Thanksgiving dinner, Christmas, etc. There will be a bake sale, yard sale, hot dogs, hamburgers, chips and soda. Free school supplies will be given out. There will also be free blood pressure screenings. Donations of yard sale items and baked goods needed, as well as cooking supplies and volunteers. For more information, call Kathy Edel at 631-0689 or Margie Hamilton at 274-2111 or 726-7181. Wednesday, Aug. 22 CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held from noon to 1:15 p.m. at Dickeys BBQ Pit, 8159 Woodville Highway, Woodville. Cost is $12. RSVP to Chamber of ce by calling 926-1848.Upcoming EventsFriday, Aug. 24 THIRD ANNUAL BIG CHAMPAGNE BASH for Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend will be held from 8 p.m. to midnight at Hotel Duval in Tallahassee. All proceeds bene t Big Brothers Big Sisters. The theme is the Roaring 20s. Costumes are encouraged. Enjoy music, dancing appetizers and unlimited champagne. Until Aug. 17, tickets are $70 per person, $130 per couple and group rate at $600 for 10 tickets. To purchase tickets, visit www. bbbs.org/bigbash or call 386-6002. Tuesday, Aug. 28 55 ALIVE SAFETY DRIVER CLASS will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the library. To register call Ernie Conte at 926-4605. WAKULLA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT WORKSHOP will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the health department, 48 Oak Street, Crawfordville. They are in the nal stages of our Community Health Improvement Project, and need assistance in the next phase of the process where we identify the most important issues facing the community and develop goals to address these priority issues. During this session, they will review all the data and reports generated in the Community Health Improvement process, identify health priorities which impact Wakulla County residents, and develop goals and strategies for each priority. A working lunch will be provided during this workshop. Please email your RSVP to Tonya Hobby (850)926-0401 ext. 217 by Aug. 23. Sunday, September 2 FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Loran Anderson as he presents Floral Strategies in Plants at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Anderson is a retired FSU professor and volunteer refuge botanist whose plant hikes and presentations are always a treat. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures Classroom at St. Marks Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850-925-6121 for information. Wednesday, Sept. 8 ST. MARKS YACHT CLUB will host Dr. Felicia Coleman, director of the FSU Coastal and Marine Laboratory, as its featured guest at the Clubs Up Close and Personal Spotlight Event at 7:30 p.m. The Club is located at 36 Yacht Club Lane, St. Marks, Florida, 32355. Seating is limited, so reservations should be made by calling (850) 925-6606. In a conversational-style interview led by Dr. Betty Ann Korzenny, adjunct professor, Florida State University, School of Communication, she and Coleman will discuss what in uenced Coleman to pursue her study of sea life, and the local and international impact of the Laboratorys research. Friday, Sept. 14 SILENT AUCTION will be held to bene t the Wakulla County Public Library from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. Items include gift certi cates, vacations, marine supplies, art, school supplies and more. Refreshments will be provided. To make a donation to the auction or for more information, please contact: PO Box 1737, Crawfordville, FL 32326. Call (850) 926-4244 or FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com for more information. CAMPAIGN PARTY for County Commissioner Candidate Howard Kessler will be held at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, at 7:30 p.m. There will be music by Big Daddy Randall Webster. Desserts and refreshments will be served. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Tourist Development Council meeting at 8:30 a.m. at Welcome Center. Eden Springs Fundraiser at Hudson Park from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. County Commission meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Chamber luncheon at Dickeys BBQ Pit from noon to 1:15 p.m. ThursdaySaturdayMondayWednesday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Government Meetings Thursday, Aug. 16 WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway. Monday, Aug. 20 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for its regular meeting in the commission chambers. SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. for its regular meeting at city hall. Tuesday, Aug. 21 SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold a meeting on the city budget at 6:30 p.m. at city hall.By SCOTT JOYNER Library DirectorWe are going to begin doing some community outreach by reading to the younger patients at the Wakulla County Health Department each Wednesday morning beginning the rst week in September. Were asking anyone who has childrens books theyd like to donate to leave at the health department or give to the children to take home to please bring them by WCPL. Were excited to begin doing this for the department and this will be the rst in our attempts to have a more visual presence in the community. Thank You. On Thursday, Aug. 16, there are several events. They include Edit Your Digital Pictures computer class at 1:30 p.m. at the Computer Lab. Healing Arts of Wakulla will hold a meeting at 5 p.m. in the Conference Room. LinkedIn: Getting Started will be held at 5:30 p.m. at the Computer Lab. Volunteer Wakulla Board meeting will be held at 6 p.m. at the Childrens Room. Concerned Citizens of Wakulla will meet at 7 p.m. in the Main Meeting Room. Library News... Political EventsThursday, Aug. 23 POLITICAL FORUM for the superintendent of schools candidates will be held at 7 p.m. at the library. POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for property appraiser will be held at 8 p.m. at the library. Thursday, September 27 POLITICAL FORUM for County Commission seats 1, 3, 5. Seat 1 will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Seat 3 at 7:30 p.m. and Seat 5 at 8:30 p.m. FILE PHOTOThe Ross-Linzy House was dismantled in 2008 and is to be reassembled at the Heritage Village Park. A celebration is planned for Aug. 17 at 10 a.m. at Zion Hill Methodist Church, next to the land proposed for the park.

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A morsel of genuine history is a thing so rare as to be always valuable. Thomas Jefferson. This months feature is The Wreck of the Dispatch detailing what is known of the wreck which lies in shallow water near the St. Marks Lighthouse, and has sometimes been a mystery to people who have seen the remains of it at low tide. A similar mystery boat was in last months paper, information provided by Bill McLean of Moultrie, Ga. As of my last contact with Bill, no positive leads to the identity of that boat have been received. So if you think you may have some good information, dont forget to contact the Historical Society or call Bill directly. THE WRECK OF THE DISPATCH When I was just a boy, maybe 60 years or so ago, we all knew that shipwreck near the St. Marks Lighthouse which made its appearance at least once a day at low tide. It is just offshore and south of the mouth of the canal that marks the entrance to what is now a large boat ramp where sports sherman and other outdoor enthusiasts launch their boats. It is the resting place of the Dispatch. Of all the events that have transpired in the waters off the St. Marks Lighthouse, what happened to the Dispatch back in 1928 was probably not that momentous. A ship was lost in a re but no lives were lost. Because I always saw it out there and knew something of the story as to how it got there, it made a lasting impression on me. I guess it was just an interesting event that happened at a place near and dear to my heart. So many years have passed now and the remains of the Dispatch are not nearly as obvious as she is decaying and sinking deeper into the bottom of the river. Except on very low tides, she is hardly visible at all. And to many of those young folks who now come and go near her, the story of the Dispatch is being lost in the fog of time. In the not distant future, there will be no trace of the Dispatch. Thanks to the recent efforts of the historians at the Wildlife Refuge where the lighthouse is located, a brief account of the Dispatch is provided in a pamphlet available at a marker near the mouth of the canal. My purpose here is to make some additional record available to the public so that the Dispatch and what happened to her will not be forgotten. The story of the Dispatch is also important to me, personally, since members of my family were witnesses to the ships demise. Available information, not fully con rmed, has it that the Dispatch began her life as a pleasure yacht and was later donated to the U.S. Navy for use as a Submarine Chaser during World War I. Further, that after the war the State of Florida came into possession of the ship and it was acquired by the Florida Shell sh Commission. At some point in time after the disestablishment of the Shell sh Commission, the Dispatch was retained by the State of Florida and converted to use as a pleasure craft by state employees. It is not known if the name of the ship was changed to Dispatch after the state acquired her, or if she had always borne that name. It is possible that research through the Florida Archives may shed some light on the ships background. My mother was 14 or 15 years old in 1928 when the Dispatch burned and sank near the St. Marks Lighthouse. She told me the Dispatch was at anchorage in Spanish Hole near the end of Long Bar in front of the Lighthouse. Mother said the Dispatch caught re and her father, John Y. Gresham, the Lighthouse Keeper, went to her aid in the lighthouse launch. As the Dispatch burned, he was able to cut her anchor cable and tow her out of the St. Marks River channel where she grounded in shallow water at her present location. She said there was no way to save the ship and she continued to burn and sank. Thankfully, mother ran out onto the lighthouse pier and was able to take pictures of the Dispatch as it was burning in Spanish Hole. Mother told me that no one was killed or injured. My sisters book, Keepers of the Light, mentions the demise of the Dispatch and there are two photographs of her on re and also a photograph of three unidentified members of the crew, taken in 1928 at the Lighthouse. I have included one photograph with this article. I do not know the exact date in 1928 when the ship burned, and may have missed the pertinent entry in the lighthouse logbook which I reviewed at the National Archives. I would definitely think that my grandfather would have made an entry with details. The wreck of the Dispatch was the subject of an underwater archaeology project undertaken over two weekends in early November 1998 by Florida State University. A report was made in June 2000. My uncle, mothers brother Alton Gresham, who was about 16 years old in 1928, was interviewed and provided what details he could recall. In addition to what is previously reported herein, he said the Dispatch was a steel hulled vessel with a propulsion system consisting of twin screw propellers, powered by steam. He said the Dispatch was converted by the Vinyard Boat Building Company. He said an on-board generator caught re and quickly spread through the ship, engul ng it in ame. The ships bottom buckled and she sank when it was towed by Greshams father into shallow water. He concluded that much of the remains of the Dispatch were salvaged for scrap during World War II. Next month, in addition to a feature story, I will tell you folks about a very interesting artifact provided to our museum by a visitor from Cripple Creek, Colo. Please never forget us at your Wakulla County Historical Society Museum, 24 High Dr., Crawfordville FL, or P.O. Box 51, Crawfordville, 32326. (850) 926-1110. Mark your calendars for Sept. 8 and plan to attend the yard sale at the Museum (the old jail) in Crawfordville beginning at 8 a.m. A good cause as all proceeds will go to our museum, and you all need to get their early to get some great items. & www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 3B Red Clay Footprints By John Roberts The wreck of the Dispatch JOHN ROBERTS PERSONAL COLLECTIONFrom 1928: A view from the dock at the St. Marks Lighthouse of the ship Dispatch burning. The remains of the Dispatch are still visible at low tide. Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for qualied applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and oor rate of 2.5% M a n a t e e T i m e s Adversing Networks of Florida Statewide advertising in over 100 Florida newspapers for one low price. Call for details! 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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comARTS & ENTERTAINMENT The Purvis Brothers Band will perform a special show featuring the music of singer/songwriter Willie Nelson on Saturday, Aug. 25, at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. Also appearing will be vocalist Ronnie Weeks and renowned ddle player Wayne Martin. Tickets are $15 and may be reserved by calling 9623711. The St. Marks Yacht Club will host Dr. Felicia Coleman, director of the FSU Coastal and Marine Laboratory in St. Teresa, as its featured guest at the clubs Up Close and Personal Spotlight Event on Saturday, Sept. 8 at 7:30 p.m. Coleman will discuss what in uenced her to pursue the study of sea life. Though the evening is free, seating is limited, so reservations should be made by calling 925-6606.Special to The News Everyone is welcome at the Gadsden Arts Center on Friday, Aug. 17 at 6 p.m. to celebrate the 100th Birthday of our highly acclaimed Bell & Bates Building, a heart of our community for 100 years. The celebration will recognize Founding Director Zoe Golloway, building donors Mark and Patsy Bates, Architect Joel Sampson, and an army of volunteers for the amazing transformation of the Bell & Bates Building from beloved hardware store into a museum-quality arts center. This team raised $1.4 million dollars to create a visual arts space that is admired by everyone who experiences it a remarkable achievement by a community working together for the greater good. With this 100th Birthday Celebration Gadsden Arts is opening four exhibitions simultaneously. Inside/Out: Beth Appleton assemblage and Deborah LaGrasse sculpture feature works of art by two of the most highly acclaimed women artists in our region. The Beth Appleton exhibition is also an integral part of the 100th Birthday Celebration, the first time a major exhibition of Appletons work has been featured in the Sara May Love Gallery since it was the inaugural exhibition in the Bell and Bates Building when it opened as Gadsden Arts in 2000. LaGrasse exhibits largescale mixed-media sculpture that help her de ne the mystery, strength, and power of the human spirit. Bound and Unfettered: Ben Bivins painting and sculpture explores the searches and struggles of life through abstraction. Brush Strokes is the annual members juried exhibition for the venerable Tallahassee Watercolor Society; and the Gadsden Arts Center Artists Guild, now numbering 50 artists, present new works in all mediums. All four exhibitions present 202 new works of art. The exhibitions run through Nov. 3. The exhibitions are presented by Mayo Woodward, Ameriprise Financial. And co-presented by TCC Foundation and Bell & Bates Home Center, with additional support from Katies Cakes and Catering, Quincy Rotary Club, and the Gadsden Board of Realtors. The Gadsden Arts Center is located in Quincy. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $1. For more information, call (850) 875-4866 or www.gadsdenarts.org.Gadsden Arts celebrates 100th birthdayFour new exhibitions will open on Friday, Aug. 17 PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA detail of artist Beth Appletons assemblage Biosphere, one of the works to be exhibited. The Gadsden Arts Center on the square in Quincy. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPurvis Brothers to play at Sopchoppy Opry Marine Labs Coleman to speak at yacht club 5Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2Go to http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click Continue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click Continue. The Waku lla News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 5BContinued from Page 1BOne participant of NAMI Basics says, This course has given me a much greater appreciation for the heroism of people living with mental illness and for the families who love and support them. Doyle says the most rewarding stories are those involving parents of young adults who have a mental illness. NAMI just taught them how to live with their child, Doyle says. Sometimes a mental illness in a child is labeled as attitude or the child being a brat, Doyle says. Or sometimes the illness is simply ignored because the parent does not want to admit something is truly wrong. A lot is blamed on early childhood, but thats not always true, Doyle says. That kids not a brat, hes sick. One of the most important issues is addressing the mental health needs of children, she says. This requires parents and teachers working as allies, which is another NAMI program. This program emphasizes the important role teachers play in a childs life. Last year, a mental health education program for school professionals and families to help them better understand early warning signs of mental illness and how best to intervene. This is to try and ensure a kid does not have to go to Second Chance, but can graduate with their classmates, Doyle says. NAMI Connection is a support group for those with a mental illness. This togetherness of NAMI is encouraging, Doyle says. We have problems. We share our problems. NAMI PROGRAMS NAMI Connection: I am not alone. There is a place where people understand me, are there to help me and I feel better about myself when I help someone else. I can get involved in NAMI connection and make a difference. The Peer-to-Peer program is an education course that provides a full approach to recovery for people with mental illness. One participant says, Peer-to-peer has allowed me to take the focus off my illness and learn to balance it with the rest of my life. By engaging in recovery I am able to be more relaxed and productive, both at work and home. Another course NAMI offers is Family-to-Family which is for a mental health consumer on the road to recovery or for someone who has a family member with a mental illness. With the stigma associated, its very very hard for people to realize, not only can I help myself by accepting this bad news, I can learn and help others, Doyle says. Anyone who has a mental illness of has a family member with a mental illness can take the training required to lead the Familyto-Family course. Doyle quali ed because of mental illness in her family. She has also taken the course. Im a much happier person now, Doyle says after taking the course. I get up now, every morning, with an attitude of gratitude. One of her favorite stories during her time with NAMI was of a young man in his 20s who was sent to NAMI after he violated probation and was sent to jail. He had been in and out of mental health facilities since he was a child. He had quit taking his medication and relapsed. Doyle visited him in jail for 3 months, offering support. While incarcerated, he got back on his medication and once released he moved to Utah and has a job working in the mines, she says. His mother drove all the way from South Florida to Wakulla County to thank Doyle and NAMI for what they did for her son. Doyle says she just talked with him and was that support for him. He came to realize he could have a life, she says. Doyle hopes NAMI continues to grow and offer more courses and programs in the future. I say that were crawling now, Doyle says. We have to very diligently, slowly and graciously cultivate an appetite for what the public sees and the people NAMI has helped. Everyone is welcome at NAMIs meetings, she says. Come if only to nd out more, she says. It could put your mind at ease. Early diagnosis is as valuable there as it is in other diseases. Her hope is that one day when her youngest grandchild is her age that there is a mental health facility in Wakulla County. And that NAMI played an important part, Doyle says. NAMI Wakulla is located at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 926-1033 or email namiwakulla@centurylink. net.Continued from Page 1B Cain asked throughout her story, beginning with when she was a child, where was someone who could recognize that there was a problem? Instead, she said, her story was one of being re-traumatized by arresting officers, corrections of cers, drug addiction counselors, the use of seclusion of restraint and being over-medicated in hospitals. The treatment at a Maryland womens prison by a trauma therapist provided a safe environment where she could start to heal. (That was the basis of the 2010 documentary Healing Neen about Cains life. Neen is Cains nickname.) That was in 2004. Eight years ago, Cain was homeless. Six years ago, she bought a house. Her daughter is thriving. My daughter doesnt know what its like to live in the projects, Cain said. She talked of breaking the cycle that includes her mother. When my belief system changed, my thought process changed, she said. What if, she asked, when she was 9 someone had recognized her trauma? What if early on she had received trauma treatment? What if employees at schools, hospitals and state agencies were trained to recognize trauma? Standing at the rostrum with a mugshot of her from years ago projected on a screen, the woman she is today as opposed to the drug addicted woman of the past, Cain pointed at the photo and asked those at the conference: If that woman walked into your of ce, as a client or one of your caseloads, would you be able to see this? She urged them not to pass judgment that people cant change or want to be that way. Theres always hope, she said. As long as you breathe. Fielding questions after her speech, Cain said shes still in almost daily contact with her mother. But her mother is not allowed to have contact with her daughter. Her mother still drinks, Cain said. Im more concerned about her soul than her sobriety. People You Should Know: Jimmie Doyle, NAMI WakullaPHOTO BY WILLIAM SNOWDENTonier Cain at the rostrum, and projected on the screen behind her is a mugshot from one of her frequent drug arrests from several years ago. If that woman walked into your of ce, she asked, would you be able to see this?Tonier Cain makes plea for recognizing, treating traumaEighty percent of our population has been traumatized. e trauma is the underlying reason and the basis that leads to the self-medication, the drug use, and then eventually landing in jail, according to the documentary Healing Neen about Tonier Cains life. How many light bulbs does it take to change an American?

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Readers Choice Contest! Heres your chance to participate in Readers Choice Contest! is asking our readers to participate in the Readers Choice Contest to identify Wakulla Countys most popular local businesses! Tell us your favorite Readers Choices by lling out the ofcial entry ballot below. Your name will then be registered in a random drawing for $100 in Cash. One entry per person. Please follow these guidelines: All ballots should be clearly printed. The business name must be clearly identied. Your nominations must t the appropriate category. Use the ofcial entry ballot. All ballots must be received at The Wakulla News ofce by 4:00 p.m., Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. Ballots may be mailed to: The Wakulla News, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326, or you may drop off the ballot at The Wakulla News ofce at 3119-A Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. Send your nominations today. Then watch for results in the Sept. 27, 2012 edition of !Animal Care: Pet Care, Grooming & Supplies ________Automotive: Auto Engine Repair __________ Auto Body Shops ____________Used Car Dealer ____________ Financial Services: Bank _____________________ Credit Union _______________ Mortgage Company _________ Food and Beverage Liquor Store _______________ Grocery __________________Ice Cream/Snacks __________ Bakery ___________________ Health and Fitness Gym _____________________ Massage Therapist __________Chiropractor _______________ Fitness Instructor/Trainer _____ Homes and Land Builder ___________________ Real Estate Company _______ Title Company _____________ Surveyor _________________Lawn Care/Landscaping _____ Nursery/Garden Center ______ Flooring __________________ Plumbing _________________ Electrician ________________ A/C-Heating ______________ Painter ___________________ Tree Service ______________ Pool Care ________________ Home Cleaning Service _____ Miscellaneous: Childcare __________________Clothing and Gifts ____________ Storage Centers _____________ Dance Studio _______________Photographer _______________Hotel ______________________Hardware __________________ Personal Services: Barber Shop ________________ Hair Salon __________________Nail Care __________________ Tanning ____________________Professional Services: Accountant _________________Attorney ___________________ Doctor _____________________Dentist ____________________ Recreation: Marina ____________________Fishing Charter _____________ Bait & Tackle _______________ Boat and Motor Repair _______________ Canoe/Kayak Rental _________Scuba ____________________ Restaurant: Atmosphere ________________Breakfast __________________ Lunch _____________________Dinner ____________________ Service ___________________Entertainment ______________Readers Choice Categories:Name______________________ Address_____________________________ City_____________________________ State_________ Zip______________ Phone____________________ Email________________________ Age____ Are you a current subscriber to ? _____Yes ______No*Entries must be handwritten on ofcial entry ballot from Sorry, no computer generated ballots, mechanical reproductions, photocopies, carbon copies, illegible entries or ballots with answers that are not true and/or relevant will be accepted. *At least 25% of the categories must be lled out. *Only one entry per person. Ballots not meeting these requirements will be voided. *All ballots must be received by by 4:00 p.m. on Aug. 31, 2012. Send entire ballot to Readers Choice Contest, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326 or bring it to our ofce at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville. (No purchase required.) *Winning entry will be drawn by a representative of *All entrants agree to publication of their name, home town, and photograph without additional compensation. Announcement of the winner will appear in the Readers Choice special section to be published in the Sept. 27, 2012 edition of *Employees of and their families are not eligible to win. Not intended for residents of states where prohibited by law. Winner must be 18 years of age or older. *All ballots that do not meet this criteria will not be counted.THIS AD IS YOUR OFFICIAL BALLOT & ENTRY FORM.Please complete and return to by 4:00 p.m. Aug. 31, 2012. Use the area beside each category to list your favorite business. Mail your ofcial entry form and completed ballot to: WIN $100Submit your completed entry form and be entered in the drawing to win $100 in Cash ENTRY FORM: The News Wakulla Th e Th e Readers Choice 2012 e a d e r s C h o i c e C a t e g o r i e s : S S S S S u b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b m i t t t t t t t t t t t t y y y y y y y y y y e e e e e e e e e n t t t t t t t t t t e r e d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d Register Today for your chance toc/o Readers Choice Contest P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326OR drop it off at ofce: 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 7B -Janet By DAVID WHITE Whether youre a veteran oenophile or a budding wine enthusiast, youve probably fallen into a wine rut at one point or another. Perhaps youve never been disappointed by a Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, so these days, its all you buy. Or maybe you stock your pantry with perennial crowd pleasers like Washington State Merlot and California Chardonnay, so those are the only wines you drink. All too often, I nd myself reaching for Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir. My favorite examples combine all the elements I look for in Pinot rich, ripe aromas of cherries along with fresh herbs and earth, together with lively acidity so regardless of the season or the meal, its my go-to wine. Such complacency is easy to understand. After all, were creatures of habit. But its silly. The world of wine is in nite. There are, quite literally, thousands of different wine grape varieties planted in dozens of countries. Tasting different wines is the best way to learn, and surprising your palate is the best way to keep things fun. So be adventurous. To begin, consider exploring different regions. If you like Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, try a classic, Left Bank Bordeaux or see what Chile has to offer. If you regularly reach for Sonoma Pinot Noir, explore the wines of Burgundy, Oregon, or New Zealand. Next, look for wines with similar pro- les. If you like Chardonnay, consider Viognier. If you like Sauvignon Blanc, try Torrontes or Albarino. If Pinot Noir is your go-to grape, try Tempranillo or Blaufrnkisch. If youre a fan of Cabernet Sauvignon, consider ordering Malbec or Merlot. Seek obscurity. Some of the most exciting wines are hard to compare to the more popular styles on the market. This summer, for example, Ive fallen for Muscadet, a white wine produced in Frances Loire Valley from a grape called Melon de Bourgogne. Typically, the wines are marked by subtle yet precise aromas of apples, limes, and seawater. Thanks to extended contact with the dead yeast cells left over after fermentation, Muscadet is also known for exhibiting a creamy mouthfeel. These wines are perfect with shell sh and light seafood dishes. Plus, like most obscure-but-delicious wines, Muscadet is generally affordable. Orange wines are also worth nding. Despite the moniker, these wines arent made from oranges theyre white wines produced like red wines, remaining in contact with their skins for an extended period during fermentation. As a result of this process, the wines pick up features that are typically associated with red wines, like tannins. These wines are certainly unusual many taste sour but theyre captivating. Unpopular doesnt have to mean esoteric there are plenty of fun, food friendly wines that simply havent caught on in the United States, even though theyre guaranteed hits. Austrian Grner Veltliner, a white, and Sicilian Nero dAvola, a red, are two varieties thatll pair with virtually everything. Both work great if all your dinner companions have ordered something different. The wine world is vast, so avoiding complacency is easy. You just have to embrace surprise.David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet. WHITES WINESTo avoid the wine rut, embrace surprise WWW.TERROIRIST.COM/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bareld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink)

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com This page sponsored in part by: Air As Ax Be Car Creates Dam Dew Do Echoing Eye Few Fig Fly Get Got Had He His Hunts Icy Ink Intend It Kid Knife Lazier Lid Lie Listening May Mustnt No Oats Of Oil Or Own Panic Phone Pig Puts Sack Sank Saw Script Sets Sir Ski So Tea Tip Ton Too Toy Try Very Visible We Who Yard Yes Yet WORD SEARCH

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THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 9B SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEmploymentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements 5313-0816 TWN Wakulla County Code Enforcement Case No. CE2011-205 PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULLACOUNTYCODE ENFORCEMENTBOARD CASE NO. CE2011-205 Parcel No. 20-2s-01e-142-04917-D07 Property Address: 157 Finner Drive Crawfordville, Florida 32327 WAKULLACOUNTY, a political subdivision of the State of Florida Petitioner, v. The Estate of Sherrol Wilson, David Wilson, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Sherrol Wilson; Brianna Donaldson, as an heir of he Estate of Sherrol D. Wilson; and the heirs, Devisees, grantees, assignees, or other claimants of the Estate of Sherrol D. Wilson, Respondents. FINDINGS OF FACT, CONCLUSIONS OF LAW AND ORDER THIS CAUSE came for public hearing before the Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board (the Board) on July 11, 2012 and having heard testimony under oath and received evidence, the Board issues its Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law, and enters its Order in this case as follows: FINDINGS OF F ACT 1. Respondents are the owners of the subject property. 2. On August 15, 2011, the Code Enforcement Office conducted an inspection in response to a complaint received regarding the subject property, located at 157 Finner Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Parcel ID No 20-2S-01E-142-0491 7-D07, and observed the storage ofa large amount of tires in an unenclosed area in violation of section 8 .042, Wakulla County Code of Ordinances. 3. Pursuant to s 162.06, Fla. Stat. and s. 8065, Wakulla County Code, the Code Enforcement Officer issued an initial Notice of Violation to Respondents on August 22, 2011, by way of regular mail and certified mail, providing notice of the violation and also providing a reasonable time for correction of the violation and a date for compliance of September 15, 2011 4. On January 6, 2012, the Code Enforcement Office conducted a follow-up inspection to determine whether the violations were corrected by the date for compliance. The inspection revealed that the violations had not been corrected, The Code Enforcement Office issued a new Notice of Violation to Respondents by way of regular mail and certified mail, providing notice of the violation and a new date for compliance of February 6, 2012. An additional notice was mailed on March 26, 2012, providing a compliance date of April 10, 2012. 5. Additional notice of the violation and the hearing on the violation was given by way of publication in the Wakulla News once a week each week from May 17, 2012 through June 7, 2012, for four consecutive weeks, 6. Respondents failed to provide written notice of the correction of the violations to the Code Enforcement Office on or before the date for compliance, and the violations were not actually corrected. 7. Respondents were served with proper notice of the public hearing and Respondents, or their representative, failed to appear at the hearing. 8. Code Enforcement staffs testimony expresses concern that the tires constitute a health hazard due to the accumulation of water within the tires. CONCLUSIONS OF LA W The subject property is alleged to be in violation of section 8.042, of the Wakulla County Code of Ordinances Sections 8.042, states: All property shall remain free from any nuisance accumulation of rubbish or garbage other than that placed in an approved, and enclosed receptacle. Anuisance accumulation of rubbish or garbage in violation of this section shall be deemed to have occured if an owner or occupant of property allows garbage to remain on the property beyond a period of seven days or rubbish to remain on the property beyond a period of 15 days. 8,042(a), Wakulla County Code. For the purposes of section 8.042, rubbish is defined to include combustible and non-combustible waste materials, including, but not limited to: the residue from the burning of wood, coal, coke and other combustiblematerials, paper, rags, cartons, boxes, wood, excelsior, rubber, leather, tree branches, yard trimmings, tin cans, disconnected or inoperable appliances, metals, mineral matter, glass, crockery and dust, construction debris, and other similar materials. 8.041, Wakulla County Code. An accumulation of tires would be included within the definition of rubbish Section 8 .042 further requires that property owners dispose of rubbish in a safe and sanitary manner by placing such rubbish in approved containers, if possible, and removing it to an approved disposal facility within the County Pursuant to the above stated provision of the Wakulla County Code, and based on the evidence and testimony presented at the public hearing, the Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board finds by clear and convincing evidence that the Respondents have allowed items meeting the definition of rubbish to remain on the subject property for a period in excess of fifteen days, Furthermore, this violation presents a serious risk to the public health due to the potential for standing water which may contribute to an increased number of mosquitos and the spread of mosquito-born illnesses. ORDER Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 120 community newspapers, 32 websites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)742-1373 General Help Attn: Drivers Great Miles+ Top 5% Pay = Money Security + Respect= PRICELESS 2 Mos CDL Class A Exp (877)258-8782 DriversRefrigerated and Dry Van freight. Flexible hometime. Annual salary $45K to $60K. Quarterly Bonus. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. (800)414-9569. www. driveknight.com General Help EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERSearn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE Schools/ Instruction MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDEDBecome a Medical Office Assistant at SC Train!! No Experience needed! Online training gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLEFri. 17 & Sat. 18 9am-3pm Power tools, Yard tools Home Items. 125 Shar Mel Re Lane Call for Info (850) 926-4125 CRAWFORDVILLEFri. 17 & Sat. 18 9am-3pmBenefit Yard Sale For Rescue Animals35 Garner Circle N. (850) 926-2843 EDEN SPRINGS NURSING AND REHAB CENTER FUNDRAISER Saturday, Aug. 18 8AM-5PM, Hudson Park. Bake Sale, Yard Sale,hot dogs, hamburgers, chips, soda. Free school supplies, Free blood pressure screenings. For more information, call Kathy Edel 631-0689; Margie Hamilton 274-2111 or 926-7181. All proceeds go into the special activity fund for residentsevents. Musical Instruments Upright PianoMendelssohn ivory keys $100 You Move (850) 962-3799 Mobile Homes For Rent Crawfordville2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Expando, Living room, bedroom, $400 mo. $300 deposit 850-766-0170 CRAWFORDVILLERent to own! 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Located at 3 Celebrity Lane Beside Senior Center (850) 926-0207 TDD 800-955-7771 Equal Housing Opportunity Rental Houses PanaceaCottage, for Rent 2/1, Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Rennovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, covered front proch & open back deck, Small pets acceptable Excellent fishing! $585/month 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $750/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1935 Crawfordville3 Bedroom, 1 Bath 10510 Ted Lot Lane $600. mo. $300 secuirty 850-766-0170 CRAWFORDVILLEBeach Front at Shell Point Cute 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Screen porch, decks, great views, Avaialable furnished or unfurnished 1 yr. lease $1,200 month, (850) 926-8948 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEWakulla Gardens Nice 3Bedroom 2 Bath Home with Garage Central heat and air, jacuzzi tub, $925. mo (850) 926-8948 IVAN3 Bdroom. 1 Bath 93 Stokley Road (850) 926-5336 Auctions Estates REAL ESTATE Auction,Executive Mountain Home w/Guest House & Lake on 212+/-Acres Divided, Independence, VA. 9/8/12 at 2 p.m. On Site at 1002 Saddle Creek Road, Independence, VA. Live & Online. Iron Horse Auction Co. (800)997-2248. NCAL3936. VAAL580. ironhorse auction.com 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $855mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $850Mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $825mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $700Mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $675Mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $625Mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker AUGUST 16, 2012 Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432we sell and service most makes and models Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 850-926-9760 850-509-1013BryantsCARPET AND UPHOLSTERY CAREProfessional carpet, upholstery, tile/grout and area rug cleaning.IICRC/CLEANTRUST CERTIFIED TECHNICIANBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! 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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5332-0830 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201202746 TO: Richard A. Greene ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. August 9, 16, 23 & 30 5321-0816 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTYANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING: EVENT: School Board Meeting DATE: Monday, August 20, 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE : School Board Room, 69 Arran Board, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL32326, 850-926-0065 Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News August 16, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5333-0816 TWN vs. Nall, Andrea M., Case No:65-2008-CA-000152FC Notice of Foreclosure Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 65-2008-CA-000152FC TA YLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP., Plaintiff, ANDREAM. NALLA/KA/ ANDREANALL; GEOFFREYNALL; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to Final Judgement of Foreclosure dated the 29th day of May, 2009, and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000152FC, of the Circuit Court of the 2NDJudicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORPORATION is the Plaintiff and ANDREAM. NALLA/K/AANDREANALL, GEOFFREYNALL, JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONTLOBBYof WAKULLA COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 4th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 69, BLOCK A, MAGNOLIAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 59, PAGE 261, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDATOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2007 FLEETWOOD MOBILE HOME, SER. NO.GAFL675AB78594-CD2. 5336-0823 TWN vs. Maryvonne Ashley Case No: 12 CA13 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 12 CA13 ONEWESTBANK, FSB, Plaintiff, UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALLOTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTERESTIN THE ESTATAE OF MARYVONNE H. ASHLEY, et, al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALLOTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARYVONNE H. ASHLEY LASTADDRESS UNKNOWN CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN ALBERT ASHLEY LASTADDRESS UNKNOWN CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN NANCYCARTER LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 103 OAK AVE., HAVANA, FL32333 CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 35 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA AND PROCEED SOUTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 785.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 657.15 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 402.44 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 19 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 189.07 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 231.19 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 189.07 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 230.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO A30.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAYEASEMENT ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARYTHEREOF. SUBJECT TO A15.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAYEASEMENT ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARYTHEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A30.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAYEASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 35 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA AND PROCEED SOUTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 785.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 657.15 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 591.51 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 231.19 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 300.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 314.04 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 381.51 FEET TO THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD #365 SAID POINT BEING A POINT ON ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE WESTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYAND THE ARC OF SAID CURVE HAVING ARADIUS OF 5729.59 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 48 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 31.33 FEET THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 02 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 31.33 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 402.48 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 314.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 269.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 30.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A1993 BRENNER MOBILE HOME, IDENTIFICATION NOS. 10L23424U AND 10L23424X, FLORIDATITLE NOS. 65833078 AND 65833079 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address i is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL33309 on or before September 13, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in The Wakulla Times and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoo rdinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled Court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 6th day of August, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News August 16 & 23, 2012 : 5341-0906 TWN vs. KEVIN R. GABYCase No. 4:12-CV-00053-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:12-CV-00053-RH-WCS CENTENNIALBANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN R GABYa/k/a KEVIN RILEYGABY; KERRYR. GABY; and WILDWOOD COUNTRYCLUB PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in the above-styled case on June 5, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, and the Amendment to Judgment of Foreclosure entered July 10, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 10th day of September 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Eastern T ime), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices and being in Wakulla County and Franklin County, Florida: SEE EXHIBITS A, B AND C ATTACHED HERETO. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshal, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated: August 8, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL32591-3010 EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND ALSO MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 82 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER AND THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 1575.73 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARYOF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 480.95 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AND AN EXTENSION THEREOF 386.57 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF U.S. HIGHWAYNO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY225.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 385.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 225.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. EXHIBIT B Parcel 1: Lot 21 of Wildwood Country Club, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 35, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 10, Block E of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 3: Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Less and Except: that part of Lots 1 and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, deeded to the State of Florida, recorded 12/19/1973 in Official Records Book 39, Page 784, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 4: Lots 26 and 27, Block O of Lanark Beach Unit No. 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, all water and riparian rights, ditches, and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, and replacements that may now, or at any time the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). EXHIBIT C BEGIN AT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 13 ADISTANCE OF 726.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EDGE OF SWIRL SWAMP, THENCE RUN ALONG THE EDGE OF SAID SWIRLSWAMPAS FOLLOWS: NORTH 70 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 282.08 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 213.59 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 107.30 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 97.25 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 125.54 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 243.65 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 190.70 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 152.83 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 285.84 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 133.29 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID SWAMPS EDGE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 3340.12 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1530.27 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE ON THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 13, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY834.01 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 1560.24 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOTS 86 AND 87 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 131.30 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 660.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 528.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS OVER AND ACROSS THAT CERTAIN EASEMENT RECORDED OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 191, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News August 16, 23, 30 and September 6 2012 A1135183.DOC 5341-0906 Based upon the foregoing Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law, and pursuant to the authority granted in Chapter 162, Florida Statutes, and Chapter 8, Wakulla County Land Development Code, by motion made and duly seconded and passed by the Board by a majority vote of at least four (4) members, it is hereby ORDERED: 1:. Respondents shaIl correct said violations on or before August 11, 2012 (the Compliance Date), by which date Respondents must correct the violations of the Code described herein by disposing of all rubbish material, including the tires. Small rubbish items may be separated into the containers provided by the Countys solid waste hauler and left curbside for pickup on the day designated for solid waste collection for the property, or it may disposed of at the Wakulla County transfer station at the landfill. Other materials, including the tires, must be removed to the Wakulla County transfer station during its hours of operation, In addition, Respondents shall pay an administrative charge in the amount of $150.00 for administrative costs associated with inspecting the subject property and presenting this Case to the Board on or before the Compliance Date., 2, In the event that Respondents comply with this Order, as verified in an Affidavit of Compliance filed with the Board by the Code Enforcement Officer, the Chairman shall be authorized to enter an Order Acknowledging Compliance on behalf of the Board, a certified copy of which shall be recorded in the public records of Wakulla County, and provided by certified mail to Respondents, Ahearing is not required for issuance of the Order Acknowledging Compliance. 3 In the event that Respondents fail to comply with this Order on or before the Compliance Date, as verified in an Affidavit of Non-Compliance filed with the Board by the Code Enforcement Officer, the Board hereby authorizes the Chairman to enter an Order Imposing Fines, a certified copy of which shall be recorded in the public records of Wakulla County, and provided by certified mail to Respondents. Such fines shall be imposed in the amount of $150.00 for the first day and $50.00 for each and every day thereafter that the violation continues past the Compliance Date. Ahearing is not required for issuance of the Order Imposing Fines. 4. Upon recordation in the public records, the Order Imposing Fines shall constitute a lien against the land on which the violation exists and upon any other real or personal property owned by Respondents. Upon petition to the circuit court, such Order shall be enforceable in the same manner as a court judgment. The fines imposed in the Order shall continue to accrue until Respondents come into compliance or until judgment is rendered, whichever occurs first. 5, In addition, if Respondent fails to comply with this Order, the Board hereby directs Wakulla County, through the Code Enforcement Officer to obtain quotes from the vendors on the Countys approved vendor list for removal of the tires and disposal at an appropriate location. Quotes shall be brought back to the Code Enforcement Board at its next meeting for consideration by the Board due to the public health threat created by the existence of the tires. 6. It is the Respondentsobligation to provide written notice to the Code Enforcement Officer of compliance with this Order or the Order Imposing Fines. Upon providing such written notice, the Code Enforcement Officer shall perform an inspection of the subject property for the purposes of determining whether Respondents have obtained compliance with the Order. 7 Respondents may appeal this Order to the circuit court within 30 days of its execution. DONE AND ORDERED this 16th day of July, 2012. By:/s/ Jeffrey Ewaldt, Vice-Chairman STATE OF FLORIDA COUNTYOF WAKULLA SWORN TO AND SUBSCRIBED before me this 16th day of July, 2012, by Jeffrey Ewaldt, who is personally know to me /s/ Sarah Ion Blalock / Notary Public(Seal) Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News July 26, August 2, 9 & 16, 2012 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./$900 Deposit 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl. Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of ofce space, fenced 82 Mimosa 3BR/1BA $650Mo./$650 Deposit 56 Myers Woods 3BR/2BA $1,000Mo./$1,000 Deposit Pets ok w/$250 pet fee 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA Available Sept. 1, $900Mo./$900 Deposit We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!2323 Surf Rd. 3BR/2BA Bayfront road on Ochlockonee Bay, Screened Porch, Deck and Dock. No Smoking. No Pets. $1,050 per month. 112 Captain James St. 4BR/2BA 2,280 sq. ft. MH on 9 acres. Located in North Wakulla near Woodville. Complete with replace, workshop and dishwasher. No Smoking. No Pets. $775 per month.Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Thu8/16 91/75Partlycloudy withastray thunderstorm. Fri8/17 88/75Partlycloudy withastray thunderstorm. Sat8/18 85/75Scattered thunderstorms.Highs inthemid 80sandlows inthemid 70s. Sun8/19 84/74Afewthunderstorms possible. Highsinthe mid80sand lowsinthe mid70s. Mon8/20 84/73Scattered thunderstormspossible.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 11B ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 25th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News August 9 & 16, 2012 5333-0816 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5250-0614 vs. Vaillancourt, Debra Case No:2012CA000083 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 2012CA000083 FEDERALNATIONALMORTGAGE ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, DEBRAVAILLANCOURT, et, al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAELT BRACKIN LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 30 CHICKATTRL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 ALSO ATTEMPTED AT: 2142 HIGHWAY98 E, CARRIABLLE, FL32322 AND 1349 BRANCH HILLCT, APOPKA, FL32712 CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOTS 63 AND 64, BLOCK WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT V, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address i is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL33309 on or before June 7th, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in The Wakulla Times and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoo rdinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled Court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or Voiice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 25th day of May, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News June 7 and 14, 2012 5250-0614 : 5278-0816 TWN Vs. Farmer, Claudette Case No. 11-174-FC Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 11-174-FC UCN:0652011CA000174XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. CLAUDETTE L. FARMER A/K/ACLAUDETTE FARMER; EARLE W. MURPHY; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 20, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11-174-FC UCN:652011CA0000174XXXXXX if the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and CLAUDETTE L. FARMER A/K/ACLAUDETTE FARMER; EARLE W. MURPHY; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL.32327 at Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 10th day of January 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 16, BLOCK 1, WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 39, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE, DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on June 20, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 9 & 16, 2012 5278-0712 1183-96619 5322-0823 TWN Vs. GERIN BRUMBAUGH Case No. 2010-CA000338 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000338 U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. GERIN D. BRUMBAUGH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GERIN D. BRUMBAUGH; JOHN DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOT 54, BLOCK 20, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT THREE, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA a/k/a 5 POWHATAN ST, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, ON September 13, 2012 at eleven oclock a.m. ESTin the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 19th day of July, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTLETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. August 16 & 23, 2012 665102518. 5323-0823 TWN Vs. Joan Valerie Pound Case No. 12-0016-FC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 12-0016-FC, UCN: 652012CA000016XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. JOAN VALERIE POUND A/K/AVALERIE LANDER A/K/AVALERIE POUND et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 12-0016-FC. UCN: 652012CA000016XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.Ais Plaintiff and JOAN VALERIE POUND A/K/AVALERIE LANDER A/K/AVALERIE POUND; UNKNOWN TENANTNO.1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 at Wakulla County Florida, at 11:00a.m on the 6th dayof jDecember, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 19, WOODLAND HERITAGE COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 4, T3S, R1W, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 37 MINUTES AND 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 4, ADISTANCE OF 2074.85 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES, 23 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 669.88 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES, 23 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SAID CENTERLINE 669.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES, 36 MINUTES, 41 SECONDS WEST 399.96 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES, 23 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 669.92 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 36 MINUTES, 41 SECONDS EAST 399.57 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AROADWAYEASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS TJE EASTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on July18, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk SMITH, HIATT& DIAZ, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff P.O. Box 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 16 & 23, 2012 5323-0823 5324-0823 TWN Vs. Wesley D. Dukes Case #: 2009-CA-000236 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2009-CA-000432 Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, formerly known as Bankers Trust Company of California, N.A.., as Trustee for Asset Backed Securities Corporation Long Beach Home Equity Loan Trust 2000-LB1. Plaintiff, -vs.Wesley D. Dukes, Jr. a/k/a Wesley D. Dukes and Nancy E. Dukes, Husband and Wife; Summerwind Roadowners Maintenance Association, Inc.; JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as successor in interest to Provident National Bank Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000236 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Deutsche Bank National trust Company, formerly known as Bankers Trust Company of California, N.A., as Trustee for Asset Backed Securities Corporation Long Beach Home Equity Loan Trust 2000-LB1, Plaintiff and Wesley D. Dukes, Jr. a/k/a Wesley D. Dukes and Nancy E. Dukes, Husband and Wife are defendants(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONTDOOR OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED ATCHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M. on September 9, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit; COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 32 ADISTANCE OF 2749.18 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 666.79 FEET TO AN IRON ROD SET IN THE CENTERLINE OF A60 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLYALONG ACURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 370.38 FEET FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 195.34 FEET (CHORD NORTH 75 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 193.09 FEET), THENCE RUN NORTH 59 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 455.31 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING ARADIUS OF 370.38 FEET, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE CURVE 195.18 FEET (CHORD NORTH 75 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 192.92 FEET), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 249.21 FEET TO THE WESTERLYRIGHT OF WAYFOR A POWERLINE TO THE CITYOF TALLAHASSEE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY338.77 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 412.28 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 666.79 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN YEAR: 1986, MAKE: CHANDLER, VIN#: AFLCW2AG240511628 AND VIN#: AFLCW2BG240511628, MANUFACTURED HOME, WHICH IS PERMANENTLYAFIXED TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS. AS SUCH IT IS DEEMED TO BE AFIXTURE AND APART OF THE REALESTATE. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 5325-0816 TWN v. Melissa Foote Case No.: 2011-CA-000225 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION CASE NO: 2011-CA-000225 SCORE FEDERALCREDITUNION, Plaintiff, v. MELISSAFOOTE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MELISSAFOOTE; RICHARD D. FOOTE, PEARLE. FOOTE; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; COMDATANETWORK, INC.; SUMMERWOOD ROADOWNERS MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATION; WACHOVIA, a division of Wells Fargo, N.A. Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F .S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVENthat, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, at 11:00 a.m. oclock on September 6, 2012, the following described property: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREE 22 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 1323.21 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 1315.89 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 330.99 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 330.99 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 657.77 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60 FOOT ROADWAY, UTILITYAND DRAINAGE EASMENT, THENCE RUN 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID EASEMENT 331.29 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 657.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING (A.P.N. R 05-3S-01E-205-05021-013) ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: July 18, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court By;/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) CER TIFICA TE OF SER VICE I CERTIFYthat a true and correct copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale under F.S. Chapter 45 has been furnished by United States Mail on July 18, 2012, to each of the following: Henry L. Miller, Jr., Attorney for Score Federal Credit Union, Mathews Law Firm, P. A., 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; Jason Guevara, Collections Manager, Score Federal Credit Union, 3218 N. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; and William R. Pfeiffer, The Pfeiffer Law Group, LLC, attorney for Defendants, Melissa Foote, Richard D. Foote, and Pearl E. Foote, 2910 Kerry Forest Parkway, Suite D4-276, Tallahassee, Florida 32309 By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Court Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 9 & 16, 2012 5325-0816 5329-0816 TWN vs. William Miller Case No. 65-2012-CA-000179 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTYCIVILDIVISION Case No.65-2012-CA-000179 Division BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANY Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM L. MILLER, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WILLIAM L. MILLER CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN LASTKNOWN ADDRESS 228 BOB MILLER RD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY OF BOB MILLER ROAD 991.70 FEET TO AROD AND CAPFOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY406.24 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 660.11 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 406.24 FEET TO AROD AND CAP,THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 660.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. commonly known as: 228 BOB MILLER RD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Paul M. Messina, Jr. of Kass Shuler, P.A., plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813) 229-0900, on or before September 7, 2012, (or 30 days from the first date of publication, whichever is later) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated:July 25, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Honorable J. H. Thurmond 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301: (850) 577-4401 within 7 working days of your receipt of this notice: if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. August 9 & 16, 2012 5329-0816 5331-0816 TWN Vs. Gentry, Laura Etta Case #65-2010-CA-000087CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000087CA ONE WESTBANK,FSB Plaintiff(s) vs. LAURAETTAGENTRY; et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July. 26, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000087CAof the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for County, Florida, wherein One West Bank, FSB is the Plaintiff and LAURAETTAGENTRYand MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. FOR AMERICAS WHOLESALE LENDER, are the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 27th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 23, BLOCK D OF SHELLPOINT BEACH, UNIT V, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES 47 AND 48 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 11 PEBBLE CT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANYREMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at County, Florida this 26th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk, County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, County, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 -County Phone: 850-926-0905 EXT. 223 TDD 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. August 9 & 16, 2012. 800669.000606 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEYFOR THE PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100, Tampa, FL33614 (813)880-8888, (813)880-8800 August 16 & 23, 2012. 09-139423 FC01 5338-0823 TWN Estate of Ann Denson Poucher CASE NO.: 12-63-CPNotice To Creditors IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 12-63-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ANN DENSON POUCHER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ANN DENSON POUCHER, deceased, File Number 12-63, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including un-matured, contingent or un-liquidated claims, on whom a copy of the notice is served must file their claims with the Court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTIONS 733.702 AND 733.710, OR BE FOREVER BARRED. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including un-matured, contingent or un-liquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTIONS 733.702 AND 733.710. ALLCLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 16, 2012. RAYMOND EARLPOUCHER Personal Representative 443 Seminole Lane Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 Steve M. Watkins, III Attorney for Personal Representative 41 Commerce Street, Apalachicola, FL32320 (850)653-1949 Fla Bar No. 0794996 August 16 & 23, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5334-0823 TWN Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGALNOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON AUGUST 31, 2012 at 1 1:00a.m AT2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONALPROPERTYOF: JENNIFER BABCOCK Before the sale date of AUGUST31, 2012, The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. TO RUN IN THE WALULLANEWS AUGUST16 & 23, 2012. 5334-0823 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5343-0823 TWN Vs. Cesar, Markly 65-2009-CA-000427CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000427CA HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC. Plaintiff, vs. MARKLYCESAR AND HAYDEE CESAR, et al. 5335-0816 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Spring Creek Land Company, LLC Doing business as:Bay Leaf Market at 19 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville, FL32327 with a mailing address of 19 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville, FL32327 Fictitious Name Notices desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with the Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this August 9, 2012 Wakulla News August 16, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices 5337-0816 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Christopher Green Fictitious Name Notices Doing business as:FBN Productions at 623 River Plantation Rd, Crawfordville, FL32327 with a mailing address of 623 River Plantation Rd, Crawfordville, FL32327 desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this August 8, 2012 Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News August 16, 2012 Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 24, 2012, and entered in 65-2009-CA-000427CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES INC. is the Plaintiff and HAYDEE CESAR; MARKLYJ. CESAR; THE FARM HOMEOWNERSASSOCIATION, INC; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the lobby of Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 AM on September 6, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 30, BLOCK F OF THE FARM, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE(S) 93-98, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 10th day of July, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, as Deputy Clerk. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less that 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 16 & 23, 2012. 12-01747 The Waku lla News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 10 Candidates scurried across their respective districts this week, putting the finishing touches on campaigns aimed at gaining their partys endorsement in this Tuesdays primaries. In many cases however, Tuesdays vote will determine the winner, with victors facing no opponent, or only token opposition, on Election Day, Nov. 6. Tight primary races will occur in several congressional, state Senate and House races made more interesting by the once-a-decade reshuf ing that occurs as the states demographics are re-calibrated and a continuing push from outsiders to throw out the establishment of ce holders, even if they are in the same party. Beyond the primaries, Republicans are nalizing preparations for the national GOP shindig later this month in Tampa, and learned this week that Floridas governor will be among the mix of speakers, despite his inconvenient sunny outlook on the economy. Scotts buoyant optimism of the states economic recovery was borne out this week as economists said Floridas slow rebound continues and will pick up momentum beginning next year. Scott also said this week hell continue that optimism even as his partys nominee for president tries to paint a gloomier picture. PRIMARY COLORS Just under 4.6 million Democrats and about 4.1 million Republicans are registered to vote in Floridas Aug. 14 primary, according to nal registration gures from the Division of Elections. Most of those voters, however, will not go to the polls. That lack of interest leaves the decision in the hands of a minority of highly motivated citizens. These super voters will decide a handful of tight primary races shaping up around the state. Candidates were heading into the weekend making last minute pushes to get voters motivated, hitting up the political clubs this week for speeches and debates, and making their pitch through the electronic media. SCOTT, OTHERS SLATED TO SPEAK AT RNC Dogged by low approval ratings and touting a message different from his partys presidential hopeful, Gov. Rick Scott this week was added to the pantheon of speakers who will address the Republican National Convention in Tampa later this month. As governor of the host state, Scotts appearance at the event was largely assured but the governor has not made his inclusion any easier as he continues to tout the states economic recovery, including its increasingly lower jobless rate. Its a positive, well-worn message that does not dovetail well with a national GOP campaign that is trying to convince voters the economy stinks and Democrats are to blame. My job is to continue to talk about what were doing in Florida and the fact that were headed in the right direction, and that were going to continue to do well, Scott told reporters on Tuesday. Scott isnt the only Floridian scheduled to make an appearance at the Republican convention. Former Gov. Jeb Bush and Attorney General Pam Bondi are also expected to address the multitude at the balloon- lled, signage strewn party venue. VOTER PURGE FIGHT CONTINUES State and federal of cials traded barbs this week in the continuing battle over Florida efforts to purge the voting ranks of ineligible ballot casters. According to the Miami Herald/Tampa Bay Times, the U.S. Department of Justice has subpoenaed documents from nine Florida counties to determine how voters are identi ed to be purged. The agency has led suit against the state, saying efforts to remove non-eligible voters from the rolls comes too late in the process. Meanwhile, state officials have yet to gain access to the Department of Homeland Security database despite reaching an agreement last month. The governors office said this week it would considering going back to court if needed to secure access to the SAVE database. STORY OF THE WEEK: Primary candidates hit the homestretch this week to shore up support for upcoming party primaries scheduled for Aug. 14. CO-QUOTES OF THE WEEK: Under President Obama, 8.6 percent unemployment. Record foreclosures; 600,000 more Floridians in poverty. A Mitt Romney ad about how bad things are in Florida. Look at the jobs that have been generated in the last 18 months. Floridas headed in the right direction. Republican Gov. Rick Scott, hitting his own talking points on the state of the state.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Red and Blue are primary colors

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 13B 1. LANGUAGE: In English slang, what is a jumper? 2. LITERATURE: What author used the pen name Ellis Bell? 3. SUPERHEROES: Who was the Green Hornets sidekick? 4. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capital of Laos? 5. MUSIC: The film Rhapsody in Blue was a biographical movie about what composer? 6. MOVIES: Who wrote the music score to the movie Jaws? 7. AD SLOGANS: You can trust your car to the man who wears the star was an advertising slogan of what company? 8. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What was the original name of the island that is home to the Statue of Liberty? 9. TELEVISION: What sport is featured in the series Friday Night Lights? 10. RELIGION: What is the color of the skullcaps worn by Catholic bishops? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. A sweater 2. Emily Bronte 3. Kato 4. Vientiane 5. George Gershwin 6. John Williams 7. Texaco 8. Bedloes Island 9. High school football 10. Purple YOUR AD HERE Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear EarthTalk: Has anyone calculated the energy wasted at night by unnecessary lighting in and around buildings? What can we do to reduce our light footprint? Bill Rehkamp via e-mail Americans do squander a lot of electricity keeping things lit up at night while most of us sleep. This light blocks our view of the night sky and stars, creates glare hazards on roads, messes with our circadian sleep-wake rhythms, interrupts the patterns of nocturnal wildlife, and is by and large annoying. It also takes a nancial toll: The federally funded National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) reports that poorly-aimed, unshielded outdoor lights waste $2 billion (17.4 billion kilowatt-hours) of energy in the U.S. each year. NOAO has monitored outdoor lighting levels across the U.S. and beyond for the past six years through its GLOBE at Night program whereby citizenscientists track nearby outdoor lighting levels over a two-week period beginning in late March and submit their observations to NOAO electronically. A simple star map provided by NOAO is all that participants need to track their slice of sky. All it takes is a few minutes for a family to measure their night sky brightness by noting how many stars are missing from an easy-to-find constellation like Leo (in the northern hemisphere) or Crux (in the southern hemisphere), says GLOBE at Night project director Connie Walker. This tells us how much light is directed upwards into the sky. Over the last six annual campaigns, participants from 100-plus countries have contributed almost 70,000 measurements, giving project organizers a detailed picture of light pollution globally. Unfortunately, analysis of the data shows that participants have seen brighter skies and fewer stars over time, meaning that light pollution is a growing problem. The free and publiclyaccessible data gathered by the project is not only useful for educational purposes but can also help inform planners and policymakers on decisions about increasing public safety, reducing energy consumption and even identifying parks and green spaces that can serve as sky oases where city dwellers can appreciate the night sky from a safe, dark place. According to the McDonald Observatorys Dark Skies Initiative (DSI), the solution to light pollution is 90 percent education and 10 percent technology. We can reclaim vast amounts of energy currently wasted inadvertently into the night sky...by using light xtures that are shielded to reflect light down where it is needed, as well as using the smallest number of lights and lowest wattage bulbs necessary to effectively light an area, says DSI. Leading by example through the installation of downward-pointing outdoor light xtures is a great place for home and building owners to start: Once people see it in action, and understand its implications for cost savings and enhanced visibility, they are far more likely to adopt good lighting practices on their own. Another group committed to reducing light pollution, the International DarkSky Association, maintains a list of distributors that sell approved fixtures to prevent light pollution. Some cities have instituted standards to limit outdoor night lighting to protect citizens against unwanted light (or light trespass). The International Dark-Sky Association has developed a set of model lighting ordinances that cities and towns can adopt and modify to suit their needs accordingly. Also, the U.S. Green Building Council has incorporated a credit for buildings seeking to reduce the amount of light trespass and sky glow through its Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program. Dear EarthTalk: I read that CO2 in our atmosphere is now more than 300 parts per million. Doesnt this mean that were too late to avoid the worst impacts of climate change? Karl Bren Richmond, Va. Actually the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere today is roughly 390 parts per million (ppm). And thats not good news. Experts agree that this level cannot be sustained for many decades without potentially catastrophic consequences, reports the Geos Institute, an Oregonbased non-pro t and consulting rm that uses science to help people predict, reduce and prepare for climate change. While were unlikely to get atmospheric CO2 concentrations down as low as they were (275 ppm) before we started pumping pollution skyward during the Industrial Revolution, climate scientists and green leaders agree that 350 ppm would be a tolerable upper limit. Prior to 2007 scientists werent sure what emissions reduction goal to shoot for, but new evidence led researchers to reach consensus on 350 ppm if we wished to have a planet, in the words of NASA climatologist James Hansen, similar to the one on which civilization developed and to which life on earth is adapted. The non-pro t 350.org, launched in 2008 by writer and activist Bill McKibben and others to raise awareness about global warming, has circled the proverbial wagons around the cause of reducing atmospheric CO2 to 350 ppm. The group has enlisted the help of thousands of student volunteers around the world to mobilize public support for reducing humanitys carbon footprint. McKibben, whose 1989 book The End of Nature detailed the potential effects of climate change and remains one of the most in uential environmental books of all time, believes that 350 ppm is attainable. Were like the patient that goes to the doctor and learns hes overweight, or his cholesterol is too high. He doesnt die immediately but until he changes his lifestyle and gets back down to the safe zone, hes at more risk for heart attack or stroke, says McKibben. The planet is in its danger zone because weve poured too much carbon into the atmosphere, and were starting to see signs of real trouble: melting ice caps, rapidly spreading drought. We need to scramble back as quickly as we can to safety. Scrambling back will entail nothing short of transforming our energy infrastructure, including how we transport people and goods and power our structures. According to 350.org, it means building solar arrays instead of coal plants, planting trees instead of cutting forests, increasing energy ef ciency and reducing waste. Getting to 350 means developing a thousand different solutionsall of which will become much easier if we have a global treaty grounded in the latest science and built around the principles of equity and justice, the group reports. To get this kind of treaty, we need a movement of people who care enough about our shared global future to get involved and make their voices heard. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). How much energy is wasted at night with unnecessary lighting? The federally funded National Optical Astronomy Observatory reports that poorly-aimed, unshielded outdoor lights waste 17.4 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity in the U.S. each year.PHOTO BY BRAND X PICTURES Leading by example through the installation of downward-pointing outdoor light xtures is a great place for home and building owners to start reducing light pollution. Where the little things Make a Difference! Where the little things Make a Difference! 2504 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32304 2504 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32304 850 765-0042 09 Chevrolet Impala FULL SIZE $13,790 02 Nissan Maxima DRIVE IN STYLE! $7,500 05 Cadillac STS LUXURY THROUGHOUT $10,500 06 Chevy Malibu SMOOTH RIDE! $10,990 05 Pontiac Grand AM SEGREAT FIRST CAR! 08 Kia Sorento LX LX VALUE $13,895 02 Chevy Monte Carlo RED HOT DEAL! $9,900 850576-LOAN ( 5626 )WE HAVE THE ANSWER TO YOUR USED CAR NEEDS! 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By JENNIFER JENSEN and WILLIAM SNOWDEN Melisa Taylor won a seat on the Wakulla County School Board in what was probably the most-watched race in the local primary. The turnout of 32.4 percent was lower than Supervisor of Elections Henry BuddyŽ Wells had hoped for. It was smaller than I would have liked,Ž Wells said. Only 5,776 ballots were cast.Ž There are more than 18,000 registered voters in Wakulla. There were no reported problems or incidents with the election. Because the higher pro“ le races … sheriff, county commission … are set in November, it didnt appear the races on Tuesday nights primary ballot drew a lot of voter interest. Taylor won 52 percent of the votes with 2,975 votes to Scotts 2,690 votes. The school board seat in non-partisan. I appreciate so much that they believed in me and what I bring to the table,Ž Taylor said. Taylor said she brings a teachers perspective to the school board, one that has not been represented on the board in quite some time. First of all, overwhelmed with gratitude for everybody who came out and supported me.Ž She was thankful to all those who helped her and supported her. Im de“ nitely very anxious to do the very best I can for the students, teachers, parents and taxpayers.Ž Taylor, who has been an educator since 1984 and has been at Wakulla High School for the last 12 years, challenged long-time School Board Member Scott. Scott served on the board for 16 years, currently serving as chairman. He could not be reached for comment prior to press time. Taylors husband, Larry, won Republican state committeeman over Gordon McCleary and Kurt Ahrendt. He won 821 votes to McClearys 539 votes and Ahrendts 465 votes. Im very excited that people believed in me enough to have me represent Wakulla County,Ž Larry Taylor said. I will do my very best to take any issues Wakulla County has to the state level.Ž Of the double-Taylor victory, he said, Were real excited.Ž Former Wakulla County Commissioner Ed Brimner won a seat on the Soil & Water Conservation Committee over Chuck Hess. Brimner won 3,059 votes to Hess 2,463 votes. Brimner said neither he nor Hess campaigned hard for the committee seat and expressed his respect for Hess. Hes a great guy,Ž Brimner said. In this position, I hope to be able to assist the county commission in making decisions,Ž Brimner said. And Tina Brimner won Republican state committeewoman over Anne Ahrendt. Tina Brimner took 965 votes to Ahrendts 911. Im happy and looking forward to Wakulla County having a presence,Ž Tina Brimner said. Its been a good night,Ž Tina Brimner said of her win, as well as her husbands. Cal Jamison won a seat on Soil & Water over Mitchell Kauffman, who is the Brimners son-in-law. Jamison won by a large margin, taking 3,167 votes to Kauffmans 2,015 votes. Jamison was the lone candidate at the elections of“ ce … along with a handful of spectators. Jamison laughed heartily when congratulated about winning elected of“ ce. Proud to be here,Ž he said. Voters in Wakulla County supported Halsey Beshears for the Republican nomination for state representative district 7, with 840 votes. Mike Williams came in second with 458 votes, Jamey Westbrook in third with 407 votes and Don Curtis taking 288 votes. For the Democratic nomination, voters had a close race with A.J. Smith taking 1,176 votes, Thomas Dickens 1,097 votes and Robert Hill 1,028 votes. Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 31st Issue Thursday, August 16, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A News Extra! .....................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Arts & Entertainment .......................................................Page 3B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 8B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 9B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 9B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 12B Comics ...........................................................................Page 13B INDEX OBITUARIES Lucinda ‘Cindy’ Norman William Dannelley ‘Dan’ Oaks Lola Inez Posey Willis Melisa Taylor wins school board seatBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter a complaint was “ led in June with the Of“ ce of Special Counsel against Major Maurice Langston, candidate for Wakulla County sheriff, for a possible violation of the Hatch Act, he decided to request an advisory opinion. On Aug. 8, the OSC issued its opinion and found that Langston was in compliance with the law. Under the Hatch Act, any local or state employee who has a connection with activity “ nanced in whole or in part by federal funds is covered by the Hatch Act, passed in 1939, and would not be allowed to run for of“ ce in a partisan election. In Langstons role as undersheriff, he dealt with federal funds related to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainees. On June 13, Langston accepted a voluntary demotion to the major of administration and no longer dealt with those funds. Continued on Page 12ALangston not prohibited from running for sheriffTeachers vote overwhelmingly for contract Big Hearted Angels visit Wakulla By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netBig hearted pretty much sums up Trave Williams, the man behind Big Hearted Angels Inc. and the back to school shopping spree held for children in Wakulla County on Aug. 11. This is something we are doing from our heart,Ž Williams says. Williams started the nonpro“ t organization with his wife and son in 2003, which provides children with $50 to spend on much needed school supplies, clothes, toiletries and more. There is also a Christmas shopping spree held in Lakeland, Chattanooga, Tenn., and Havana. It came to me in a vision,Ž Williams says. I love to give.Ž The “ rst event was held in Lakeland and Williams sponsored 25 children with money from his own pocket to go on a Christmas shopping spree. I like looking outside the box,Ž Williams says. I think big.Ž The next year, 125 children participated and it continued to grow. His organization was incorporated in 2005 and a board of directors was established. In 2009, he decided to take this idea back to his roots, back to Wakulla County. Williams was born and raised in Wakulla. I wanted to do something,Ž Williams says. I wanted to give back to where Im from.Ž Williams says he went to the courthouse and government of“ ces to ask for support. He was directed to Superintendent David Miller, who he says has been a huge supporter of the program. It helps our kids,Ž says Miller. Its a no-brainer.Ž Williams says he receives a lot of support from the Wakulla County School Board and other people and businesses in the community. He receives donations from organizations, businesses and individuals … all of which goes to the children. Credibility is what builds you,Ž Williams says. Each year it gets bigger and bigger.Ž This is now the fourth year for the back to school shopping spree in Wakulla and 80 children loaded into two school buses and headed to Wal-Mart to spend their $50. Continued on Page 16A PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENStudents and volunteers with Big Hearted Angels line up at Wal-Mart in Crawfordville, above, to buy school supplies on Saturday. The event was founded and spearheaded by Trave Williams, below, a native of Wakulla County who now lives in Lakeland. People You Should KnowJIMMIE DOYLE: NAMI WakullaSee Page 1BStaff ReportWakulla Classroom Teachers voted last week overwhelmingly to approve the contract for the 2012-13 school year. The vote was held Thursday, Aug. 9, the day teachers returned to the classroom, with 98 percent voting yes. WCTA President Missy Rudd said there were 308 yes votes, 5 no votes, 1 abstention, and 1 challenged vote that could not be counted. The new salary schedule and a $200 bonus will be re” ected in teachers August paychecks. On behalf of the Wakulla Classroom Teachers Association, thank you for voting so ef“ ciently on the “ rst day of the school year,Ž Rudd told her members. And thanks again to Superintendent (David) Miller and the school board for moving teachers salaries in a positive direction.Ž Superintendent Miller said the agreement is a “ scally responsible, fair contract that enables Wakulla County to remain competitive in attracting and retaining a high quality teaching staff.Ž Continued on Page 5A Major Maurice Langston Taylors, Brimners are winners in local racesMelisa Taylor, left, won the school board seat held by Mike Scott, right, for the past 16 years.

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County, along with seven other counties along the Gulf Coast in Florida, is in line to receive a substantial amount of money once the federal judge decides the amount of negligence on the part of BP and other responsible parties for the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, or once a settlement is reached. The amounts that are being tossed around for the total “ ne range from $5 billion to $20 billion, according to Gulf County Commissioner Bill Williams and president of the Florida Association of Counties. A portion of the Clean Water Act “ nes that will be imposed will go directly to the Gulf states that were affected by the spill. The Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities and Revived Economies (RESTORE) of the Gulf Coast Act was signed by President Barack Obama on July 6 and ensures that 80 percent of the “ nes will be used for Gulf Coast recovery. Out of this 80 percent, 35 percent will be divided evenly among the five states. In Florida, state legislation was passed to ensure that 75 percent of that share will flow directly to the eight counties that were affected, Wakulla included. Florida is the only state that has direct money that will ” ow to the counties,Ž Williams said. A formula is currently being worked on to decide how to divide up the 75 percent among the eight counties. Under the proposed formula, Wakulla would receive 4 percent. If the total amount of “ nes is $10 billion, Wakulla would receive $16.8 million, Williams said. This is unprecedented,Ž said County Commissioner Alan Brock. And what it can do for Wakulla County is unprecedented.Ž Representatives from the eight counties and state are still working on a formula that is fair for everyone, Williams said. The numbers are up for grabs,Ž Williams said. And this is just for one pot out of the total four pots of money that will be made available, Williams said. In an effort to understand and plan for these funds, the Wakulla County Commission held a workshop on Aug. 13, with Williams and FAC consultant Doug Darling. The Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council will receive 30 percent and the Impact/Allocation Consortium will receive 30 percent. The remaining 5 percent will be dedicated to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration and Science, Observation, Monitoring and Technology Program administered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Centers of Excellence. These pots will be competitive and Florida will be competing against all the states, Darling said. For portion that goes to the consortium, each county will have a representative to help come up with the allocation formula. Williams said the hope is to have all the counties work together. We dont want this to be a food “ ght,Ž Williams said. The state will develop a comprehensive plan to compete for funding, Darling said. Williams suggested the county look at its comprehensive plan and capital improvement plan as models for possible projects that would be appropriate for this money. He also suggested the county meet with residents and stakeholders to get community input. County Administrator David Edwards said there is a plan to have each county commission in each county set up a similar committee so that it is uniform across the board. He added that the county staff plans to start looking at project possibilities now rather than later. This will be a game changer, not just for Wakulla County, but the entire Gulf,Ž Edwards said. Some possible areas this funding could be used is the TCC Environmental Institute, wasterwater treatment plant, beach restoration, park development, park improvement, canal dredging, “ xing the port at Port Leon, “ sheries, oyster relay, etc., said County Commissioner Alan Brock. Edwards said the county will hold several workshops on the Restore Act. Were learning as we go,Ž Edwards said. FAC is holding a meeting on Aug. 16 with county representatives to further discuss the allocation formula and other aspects of the Restore Act.COUNTY COMMISSIONWakulla eyes potentially lucrative RESTORE Act payment T T h h a a n n k k Y Y o o u u ! 1391 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Telephone: 850.926.5583 Email: wakullachristian@yahoo.com ~ www.wakullachristian.com Jane A. Hennessy & Paul P. Sanford Wakulla County Sheriff's Office Tiger Rock Martial Arts Paul P. Sanford & Associates, P.A. Palaver Tree Theater Co. Wakulla County 4-H Club Second Harvest Wakulla Dance Academy Five Star Limousines, Inc. Music Lessons Express Wakulla Springs Baptist Church The children, staff and volunteers at Wakulla Christian School Academic and Personal Enrichment Summer Program would like to express our sincerest gratitude to the following businesses for supporting and encouraging this year's camp. We had a wonderful time! all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree)HAIR SALON ALL STUDENTS 10% OFFAll Hair ServicesFULLSERVICEFAMILYSALON We offer ”exible hours starting at 10AM (TUE-FRI) and at 9AM on SAT Sopchoppy VFD is named station of the month for JulyBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA specially designed ” ag ” ies high at Sopchoppy City Hall recognizing the Sopchoppy Volunteer Fire Department for their efforts during and after Tropical Storm Debby in late June. Not only was their community heavily damaged, but their volunteers spent countless hours assisting in rescuing victims from fast moving over” owing river to delivering food and water to those trapped in their homes and not wishes to relocate,Ž said Fire Chief Mike Morgan. Station 1 was awarded station of the month by Chief Morgan. The ” ag was presented at the July meeting of the Wakulla United Fire Fighters Association. Typically, a station receives the award for training hours, improving turn out on incidents, community involvement, etc. This time it was because of their many man hours and service to the community during Debby,Ž Morgan said. They went well beyond what could be expected.Ž The battalion chief for station 1 is Joey Tillman and consists of 11 members, Morgan said. The station of the month recognition program was conceived by a former chief, but was never implemented. Morgan started the program earlier this year. Tropical Storm Debby stalled the program, until station 1 received the award last month. The idea is to recognize one of the 10 volunteer “ re stations that goes above its normal duty. Each station have members in varying degrees of certification for interior “ re“ ghting, exterior firefighting and first responder. These members receive very little in the way of monetary compensation while they provide an invaluable service to our community,Ž Morgan said. In order to answer medical calls and provide assistance to Wakulla County Emergency Medical Service, a member of a VFD must successfully complete a 60-hour class on their own time. To be able to “ ght “ re, the member must complete a rigid 220 hours of training in this “ eld, Morgan said. Prior to Tropical Storm Debby, Tillman, a certi“ ed water safety instructor and an advanced rescue diver, conducted a water rescue training exercise at Upper Bridge on the Wakulla River that was attended by 22 people from “ re rescue and EMS. Equipment from squad 1 was used to demonstrate several techniques to assist victims in the water. This training came in handy just a short time later. Squad 1 responded to a water rescue on the Sopchoppy River during the aftermath of Debby. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTRAINING: Volunteer “ refighters practice rescuing victims in water, training that came in handy during Tropical Storm Debby.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe “ rst step towards implementing the Crawfordville Town Plan were discussed at a public hearing at the Aug. 6 Wakulla County Commission meeting which included creating the of“ cial boundaries of the town plan and regulations. The commission came up with numerous changes to the draft regulations and decided to continue the hearing to its Aug. 20 meeting. The countys land development code has not been updated since the Crawfordville Town Plan was adopted in 2011, so the county had no way of enforcing what was included in the plan. Included in the amendments are regulations that are incentive-based to try and encourage development in the town plan area. In the overlay district, Planning Director Luis Serna said the existing uses and zoning will stay in place. No one will be required to move. There are density bonuses for donated land for a park or other public facility, as well as a bonus for a green building. The county commission will also be able to grant impact fee exemptions. There was also a requirement for sidewalks. There were also regulations for parking. The commission decided to reduce the number of required parking spaces by 50 percent below the standards. Commissioner Lynn Artz also wanted to include a provision to allow businesses to build right up to the road. It would allow them to do this, but would not be a requirement. Commissioner Alan Brock said, It would give more freedom to the business owner.Ž There was also a regulation that increased the maximum building coverage by 35 percent above the maximum speci“ ed by the underlying zoning district if its within the district. Building coverage may be increased by another 10 percent for each of the following: screening parking, shared parking and landscaping. In other news: € The board approved the adoption of an ordinance that authorizes the commission to grant economic development ad valorem exemptions to new businesses and expansions to existing businesses. Exemptions will be granted based on the following factors: number of jobs created, average wage of employees, amount of capital investment, type of business, environmental impact, if its located within the enterprise zone, the extent the business plans to source its supplies and materials within the county and whether the business would be established or expanded without the exemption. Commissioner Randy Merritt wanted to see the property tax exemption dropped to 5 years, not 10. Commissioner Jerry Moore agreed, You dont have to give away the cow.Ž Brock said there may come a time and place when the county needs the 10 years so they can compete with a neighboring county. A referendum election will be held in conjunction with the general election of Nov. 6 to determine whether the Board should be authorized to grant economic development ad valorem tax exemptions to new businesses and expansions of existing businesses. € The commission approved construction of new walking trails at Medart Recreation Park. The funds will be used to construct sidewalks and hard trails that would connect many of the sports complexes and facilities within Medart Park. This project would also improve the handicap accessibility to many areas of the park. The county has an existing contract with Mike Turner Construction for concrete installation. The estimated cost for the new walking trails is $25,000. This project was originally funded in the 200910 budget, but a spending freeze was implemented. These funds are from impact fees, said Parks and Recreation Director Bryan Roddenberry. The next county commission meeting is Aug. 20 at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.COUNTY COMMISSIONImplementation of Crawfordville Town Plan is discussed WAKULLAS FLOODPLAIN Flooding can threaten at any time of the year from various sources. Wakulla County regulates construction and development in the ”oodplain to ensure that buildings will be protected from ”ood damage. All developments in the ”oodplain, not just construction of buildings, need permits. Filling and similar work are prohibited in certain areas, so check with the Planning and Community Development Department before you begin a project to build, “ll or otherwise. Should unauthorized development in the ”oodplain be witnessed by a citizen, they can report it to the Countys Code Enforcement Of“ce at (850) 926-7636. It is also important to know that houses in the ”oodplain that are substantially damaged by “re or ”ood must be repaired to new construction standards. This includes elevating the structure to or above the base ”ood elevation when it is repaired. Damage is considered to be substantial when the cost of reconstruction equals or exceeds 50% of the buildings market value. When damage of this type occurs to a structure and repairs are necessary, visit the Planning and Community Development Department for a Development Permit Application to begin your permitting process. A recorded warranty deed and site plan, showing the improvements/repairs to the property, will be required to complete this Application. Once obtained from Planning and Zoning, the Development Permit Application should be submitted to the Building Division for permitting. Depending upon the types of work performed additional materials will be requested from the Building Division to complete the permitting of repairs to the structure. Applicable fees are due for Development Permit Applications and Building Division permits, unless otherwise waived by the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners for widespread storm damage. An important protection measure in regards to ”ooding is ”ood insurance. Homeowners insurance policies do not cover damage from ”oods, so obtaining a ”ood insurance policy can help you should you experience a ”ood. Since Wakulla County and the City of St. Marks participate in the National Flood Insurance Program, you can purchase a separate ”ood insurance policy in these areas. This insurance is backed by the Federal government and is available to properties that have been previously ”ooded. Dont wait for the next ”ood to buy insurance protection. In most cases, there is a 30 day waiting period before National Flood Insurance Program coverage takes effect. Also, consider obtaining contents coverage if it is not already included in your current insurance policy. Contact your insurance agent for more information on rates and coverage. For further information on these topics contact the Planning and Community Development Department at (850) 926-3695. AUGUST 16, 2012 City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be holding a Budget Workshop, August 21, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. A second Budget workshop meeting is scheduled for August 29, 2012 at 6:30 p.m., if needed. The meetings will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. AUGUST 9, 16, 2012BUDGET WORKSHOP MEETINGSAny person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling 850-962-4611. City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be changing the date of the regular August, 2012 meeting from the second Monday to the third Monday in August. The meeting will be held, August 20, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL For further information or special assistance please contact the City Clerks Of“ce at 850-962-4611AUGUST 9, 16, 2012NOTICE OF MEETING CHANGEPUBLIC NOTICE1SER08-4 Post-Election Certi“cation Voting System AuditNotice of Canvassing Board to randomly select and audit a Race and Precinct on Friday August 24, 2012 at 9:00 A.M. from the Primary Election to be audited according to Rule 1SER08-4 in the Supervisor of Elections of“ce, located at 3115-B, Crawfordville Highway. The public is invited to attend.AUGUST 16, 2012 PUBLISHER/ADVERTISING SALES MANAGERApplications are being accepted for the position of Publisher/ Advertising Sales Manager for the Wakulla News and the Gadsden County Times. The papers are located in Wakulla County and Gadsden County both contiguous to the state capital in Tallahassee. A quali“ed, motivated and organized self-starter is needed to direct the staff in sales, circulation and growth in both markets. Separate staffs operate each of these county-seat weekly newspapers and would report directly to the publisher/ advertising sales manager. The successful manager will act as advertising sales leader of both staffs and will also deal directly with key advertisers in the market. Two years newspaper management experience to include bottom line responsibility and previous advertising sales management is preferred. The candidate should have high ethical conduct and standards. This person will need leadership skills and ability to lead a staff of “ve and also demonstrate strong team-building, delegation and administrative skills. The candidate should demonstrate high ethical conduct and standards and have a commitment to exceptional quality in all aspects of the operation. The publisher/ad manager provides vision, skill development direction, coaching and leadership to newspaper staff to accomplish strategic and business objectives of the company. This person will personally grow advertising account base revenues in order to meet and exceed “nancial targets of the company. They will prepare, implement and operate within an annual operating budget to accelerate pro“t growth. This person will actively participate in various community functions and events and also take a leadership role in the community. The publisher/ad manager will oversee business, marketing and growth development of all products published. Interested persons should apply to: Gerry Mulligan, Publisher, Citrus Publishing/Landmark Community Newspapers, LLC, c/o Mike Arnold, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL 34429 or by e-mail to marnold@chronicleonline.com LANDMARKCOMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS, LLC. MANAGING EDITOR Citrus Publishing is seeking a versatile candidate with the ability to write news stories, design and layout news pages and develop strong internal and external relationships to be Managing Editor for the Gadsden County Times, a weekly newspaper with a circulation of 3,000 in Quincy. This person will be responsible for the weekly page design and layout of the entire newspaper. This person will be responsible for writing accurate, compelling and balanced stories on deadline and covering local events, meetings and other activities. The managing editor will be responsible for managing reporters and correspondents. This person will also develop beat sources within the community and gain a thorough knowledge and understanding of community issues. Stong initiative, news judgement, time management, organizational and communication skills are are must. A bachelors degree in journalism, with 3 5 years editing and management experience is required. Quali“ed candidates should be pro“cient in layout and design using Quark Express. Interested persons should send cover letter and resume to: Mike Arnold, HR Director, Citrus Publishing by e-mail at marnold@chronicleonline. com LANDMARKCOMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS, LLC. Former state Sen. Al Lawson of Tallahassee will square off against Republican incumbent Steve Southerland after Lawson defeated state House Rep. Leonard Bembry of Greenville in the Democratic primary for Congressional District 2 in northwest Florida. With most of the vote counted, Lawson led with 56 percent of the vote over his Democratic rival, who conceded the race shortly before 9 p.m. Alvin Peters and Mark Schlakman rounded out the “ eld. … News Service of FloridaLawson to take on Southerland ELECTION NIGHT: Canvassing board members share a laugh as the last precinct comes in on Tuesday night. The board is County Judge Jill Walker, County Commissioner Randy Merritt, and Supervisor of Elections Henry BuddyŽ Wells. PHOTO BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN The Wakul la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• From the Dock for Aug. 16, 2012 •School board employees will get pay raise •Charlie Creel is an honest man •Lucinda ‘Cindy’ Norman obituary • Lola Inez Posey Willis obituary • Coast Guard Auxiliary for Aug. 16, 2012 • Remembering Ruth McCallister Davis-High • Juvenile arrested for vandalism of churchthewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Editor, The News: I am disappointed and amazed by the recent actions of the Wakulla County School District pertaining to the email and voice robo-calls that went out Sunday, June 24 to almost everyone in the county. In the communication, Robert BobbyŽ Pearce represented that he was the assistant superintendentŽ of the school district. According to the school districts own website this was not true. Heres what happened for those unfamiliar: On June 24 the district sent out a voicemail and an email with voicemail attachment about schools being closed because of Tropical Storm Debby. It was Mr. Pearces voice. On the next day, June 25, I heard about the email. I went to the school website. Bobby Pearce was not listed as assistant superintendent. Mr. Pearce was listed as principal … on special assignment.Ž He was not listed as assistant superintendent according to the school boards published minutes and their website. In the June 28 issue of The Wakulla News, on page 12B, there are minutes of the school board meeting in very small type. Under the Administrative Reappointments … 12 month employee 7/1/126/30/13Ž it does have Robert Pearce … Asst. Super. For Admin.Ž How was he reappointed? His actual title was Principal … Special Assignment.Ž There was no prior (as of June 25) appointment for Mr. Pearce … so how could he be reassigned if the position never existed? As of the June 24 email, he was still on special assignmentŽ so how could he send an email representing himself as assistant superintendent?Ž If there was a new position created, the position should have been advertised. If it was, I am sure others would have applied. I have submitted all my evidence to The Wakulla News along with this letter. I “ nd the situation very offensive. The Wakulla County School District needs to provide clari“ cation on this issue as it places Pearce in a precarious position. Ruth Francis Crawfordville In a front page story in last weeks Wakulla News on residents of Wakulla Gardens rejecting a pay for paving plan proposed by county commissioners, because of a typographical error, the vote was reported backwards. For unit 1, the votes were 67 percent against and 33 percent voting for the proposal. We regret the error.Editor, The News: Ive personally known Major Langston for nearly 40 years, and have worked with him when he came back to us from Hendry County as a deputy and K-9 handler under then Sheriff W.R. BillŽ Taff. I know just how much blood, sweat, and tears have went into building OUR sheriffs of“ ce from a small “ ve deputy operation to the fully accredited agency it is today. And whether you like it or not, David Harvey, Donnie Crum and Maurice Langston, as well as their respective staffs, have made that happen. Ive always been taught to give credit where credit is due. Having known Maurice as a friend and co-worker, I know that he is a man of integrity, both in the pulpit and in his professional and private life. He retired once, and he didnt have to come back on active duty. He came back because he knew his job was not “ nished. He knew he still had a vision for the people of this county. To that end, he applied for, was selected, and attended the FBI National Academy at Quantico, Va. Now, imagine if you will what kind of stress that could be for a man in his late 50s-early 60s competing against 20-somethings fresh out of college. But Maurice went, and applied himself to the training curriculum, and graduated from that prestigious program. NOT because it put another feather in his cap, but because HE KNEW it would give him the tools and knowledge hed need to help make this county a much safer place to live. Yes, Charlie Creel is a good man and a “ ne law enforcement officer, but this isnt about sheriffs of“ ce vs. Florida Highway Patrol. You see, all this talk of The good ol boysŽ is the same ridiculous propaganda that has been bandied around in nearly EVERY sheriffs election Ive witnessed in this county for the last 50 years. Between the two candidates, only one has the knowledge of sheriffs operations on EVERY LEVEL, and that makes a great administrator and when you add in education in criminal justice on a state and NATIONAL level … you have the perfect man for sheriff. And THAT is why I support T.W. Maurice Langston for Sheriff of Wakulla County. I hope you will too. Rev. Dr. R. Perry Sanders IronHorsesNLthr@aol.com Editor, The News: I am hearing people using misinformation and complete distortions of the facts when talking about the District 3 commissioner race. On taxes: I discovered that Dr. Kessler voted against raising taxes 7 out of 8 times. The one time he voted for the budget, the taxes were decreased by over $400,000. If you are familiar with the Communications Services Tax, it went from 1.84 percent to 5.22 percent. Dr. Kessler was not on the board then. Dr. Kessler was not on the board when the Tourist Development Tax rose from 2 percent to 4 percent. Nor was Dr. Kessler on the board when Public Utilities Tax was voted in place for a 7 percent tax on water, gas and electric usage. Yes, the property taxes went down, but all these other taxes made up for the loss (Over $4 million of non-ad valorem taxes and fees were levied) and it came out of your pocket. We are talking about millions of dollars here, and you can go to the Clerk of Court and ask for these records to satisfy yourself on the truth. If you want a change and if you want someone that will watch our money and spend it with in reason, then I think Dr. Kessler is your man. Mary Pitts PanaceaBy HERB DONALDSON Receding hairlines, excess body fat, gray hair, wrinkles, no husband, wife, children, money, nor any prospects of something realŽ for the future … these were among the many thoughts that cluttered my mind as I prepared for the 25th reunion of Wakulla High Schools Class of 1987. I was expecting a comedy of errors, with me falling ” at on my face as the joke, crawling off into the wings for the denouement. Id no idea what to do or who to be. Every move I made and all the words Id spoken as a teenager burst upon me like a dam and consumed me in the ” ood. I was no Noah, and there was no ark. And to top it off, Id no lifeline; no one I could prompt to call me on the cell phone 30 minutes into the horror, giving me an emergencyŽ excuse to make the great escape. For months, Kathy Bailey, Nikki and Michelle Sanders, Terry Lynn, Mike Dodson, and others sent Facebook noti“ cations, made telephone calls and more trying to corral the old gang for one more hurrah. The event was held Saturday, July 21, with a picnic at Wakulla Springs during the day, followed by a reception at Wildwood that evening. Some would attend church that Sunday morning. I tried to distract myself in the car after parking at Wildwood … looking for this, searching for that, telling myself I could always turn around and go home. Finally, I forced myself to climb out and walk toward the building. I was stopped on the steps by a group of people who looked vaguely familiar. Eventually their names, or rather, incidents from the past that involved one or two of them ” oated to the surface, giving me a vague idea as to their identities as we all went inside. Kathy, Nikki and Michelle were at the door. It dawned on me that they were girls no longer, but women. I couldnt help but smile when I saw them. And to my sweet surprise, the smile didnt leave my face the entire evening. All of them, my classmates, were images Id carried in the back of my mind for years. Through some trick of the universe, wed become full-grown people. The faces had changed: Some were thinner and a few … including mine … had grown a bit pudgier, while one or two seemed completely altered. We had all been through something. If not a lot, then just enough to bring about a signi“ cant change. Some had been married twice, others, thrice. Some were grandparents. Others had kids in college, cribs or the armed services. One couple, who were dating as far back as the seventh grade, have a daughter making national headlines in teen rodeo. One was in a band where he recently performed in front of a crowd of more than 9,000. Our rowdy group were now parents, former county commissioners, respiratory therapists, educators, musicians, sheriff deputies, deacons, business owners, and a lot more. Though some of our family was lost to us during our senior year, or shortly thereafter, they were remembered. They include Frances Pearce, Cleve Laird, Craig Barber, Edwin Hughes, Scott Thacker and Jill Alexander who wasnt in our class but, at the time of her passing, was in a theatrical production with a number of us. I found myself watching everyone, their connections and body language, their joy in being 17 again for one night only. I cant wait to see how we bloom into our 30th. Herb Donaldson is a local playwright and director of Palaver Tree Theatre Company.Going to the Wakulla High School Class of ‘87 reunionEditor, The News: Wakulla Greenwing held its latest event on Oct. 9, 2011, at the Sheriffs Range in Otter Creek. Wakulla Greenwing with the assistance of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce utilize the range for our event; we offer bench shooting, shotgun shooting, archery, turkey and chicken shoot and many more activities. We also have assistance from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission offering a helicopter ” yover and touring. FWC also visits with a demonstration from the K-9 unit. Each year our event continues to grow in numbers and this is due to the support of our Greenwing staff, which is made up of many Wakulla County Ducks Unlimited committee members, the help of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce and the staff of the Wakulla County shooting range facility. As the committee chairlady, I would like to send out a heartfelt thank you to our staff, the sheriffs department, the staff at the Sheriffs Range and most of all to our sponsors. Without your donations and sponsorship we wouldnt have the success of the Greenwing event. Your donation and dollars go towards the youth in our community, to educating on firearm safety and insuring the preservation of our wildlife for the next generation. For Wakulla Greenwing its about young conservationists protecting wildlife today and tomorrow. Again, thank you and we look forward to your sponsorship in 2012. Sincerely, Holly Porter Committee Chairlady wakullagreenwing@embarqmail.comMaurice Langston is a man of integrity Greenwing sponsorship appreciated Disappointed by school districts actions Kessler will watch taxpayers moneyREADERS WRITE: WILLIAM SNOWDEN/THE WAKULLA NEWS Its time for election year politics again.Correction

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 – Page 5A An independent for independent appraisals in 35 counties for 38 years (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser of Wakulla Sponsored bywww.bigbendhospice.orgyour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983Compassionate Care Pain Management & Grief SupportCOST FREE 850-878-5310 (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. LWV Vote Wakulla 2012Ž CANDIDATE FORUMSPresented by The League of Women Voters#The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization encouraging the informed and active participation of all citizens in the political process. CLIP AND SAVE THESE FORUM DATES! All forums will take place at theFor more information call: Membership in the Wakulla League is open to all interested citizens. the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Bob DonawayJuly 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromMy wife and I have been entering in the Off the Eatin Path since the program “rst began. She has won once and now I am a winner too! Thank You!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l a t nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 TheWakulla newsLook Us Up Online for Classi“ ed ads from The Wakulla News.www.thewakullanews.comAlso check out your Community CalendarBy JENNIFER JENSEN jjensen@thewakullanews.net Those who were affected by Tropical Storm Debby have until Sept. 4 to register with the Federal Emergency Management Agency for assistance. We are encouraging anybody in Wakulla County who sustained damage to their home or property to register as soon as possible,Ž said FEMA spokesperson Jim Homstad. Although the Disaster Recovery Center has closed, people can still apply online or by phone. Visit www.DisasterAssistance. gov; With a smartphone or tablet use the FEMA app or go to m.FEMA.gov; by phone call FEMAs helpline at 800-621-FEMA (3362). People who are deaf or hard of hearing and use a TTY can call 800-462-7585. In Wakulla County, 608 households have contacted FEMA for assistance or information. FEMA has approved $885,000 in individual assistance. Of that, $776,000 went to housing assistance and $109,000 went to other needs, according to Homstad. Statewide, for 22 counties, FEMA has approved $20 million.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Office will host a Sporting Clays Tournament as a fundraiser for the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches. The event begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 25 with three relays at 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Refreshments and lunch will be available at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Range and Training Center where the fundraiser will take place. The tournament will be $50 per person with a “ ve person team. Winners of each relay will receive a 12 gauge shotgun. A Firearm Side Match will be also be held during the event. The cost of the match is $20 per person with a 50-50 payout. A money ball giveaway will be held for $10 and a chance to win half of the lucky jackpot. Preregister for your choice of relays. Contact Lt. Fred Nichols at (850) 251-1676 or call the Wakulla Range at (850) 7457290 to register. The Wakulla Range accepts Visa/MasterCard, cash or checks as payment to enter the event. You may also go to www. wcso.org and look at the bottom of the left hand side menu for an opportunity to download the registration forms. Continued from Page 1A Miller commended the school board for their leadership during the economic downturn. We have all been determined and focused on ways to save dollars,Ž Miller said. Little by little those savings added up.Ž The contract includes a step pay increase, as well as increased health insurance coverage and a $200 bonus. This School Board has worked really hard over the past couple of years, to position the district “ scally, to be able to provide teachers and employees with an actual step increase raise this year. I hope and pray that our district has weathered the worst of the economical storm and that we can start seeing the much needed funding restored in education in the state. Our School Board truthfully believes that the reason this district maintains the distinction of a High Performing School District is the quality teachers, administration and support staff and it is important that we continue to invest in the best.ŽLast day to register with FEMA approaching Teachers vote overwhelmingly for contractSheri s O ce to host sporting clays tournament as bene“ t for youth ranch Historical Society to accept land from Boynton familyThe Wakulla County Historical Society announced it will be celebrating the gift conveyance of almost 40 acres of land from the Ben Boynton familyon Friday, Aug. 17, at 10 a.m. The conveyance will take place at the Zion Hill United Methodist Church which is adjacent to the land to be conveyed. The Boynton family, members of the Wakulla County Commission, members of the Wakulla County Historical Society and the general public have been invited witness this historic event. Construction work at Woodville Highway and Highway 98Anderson Columbia Co. Inc. and its subcontractors will be starting on a Wakulla County Department of Transportation project on or about Monday, Aug. 13. The project will be the construction of a right turn lane on Highway 363, also known as the Woodville Highway, at the intersection of U.S. Highway 98. The scope of work includes stabilization, road base work, asphalt paving and pavement marking. The project is expected to continue for approximately 90 days. Motorists are reminded to use extra care as they approach the U.S. Highway 98 intersection. Wakulla Health Department to host workshop on local goalsThe Wakulla County Health Department needs your help! We are in the nal stages of our Community Health Improvement Project, and need your assistance in the next phase of the process where we identify the most important issues facing the community and develop goals to address these priority issues. A workshop will be held onTuesday, Aug. 28, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Wakulla County Health Department. During this session, we will review all the data and reports generated in the Community Health Improvement process, identify health priorities which impact Wakulla County residents, and develop goals & strategies for each priority. Your experience and expertise is vital to this process! Please join us at the Wakulla County Health Department, 48 Oak Streetin Crawfordville. A working lunch will be provided during this workshop. Please email your RSVP to Tonya Hobby (850)926-0401 ext. 217 by Aug. 23, and let us know if you have any dietary restrictions. First Sunday at the Refuge to feature Dr. Loran Anderson The First Sunday at the Refuge Presentation Series will feature Dr. Loran Anderson as he presents Floral Strategies in PlantsŽ on Sept. 2 at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Anderson is a retired FSU Professor and Volunteer Refuge Botanist whose plant hikes and presentations are always a treat. Come learn about local ” oral from an engaging presenter. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures ClassroomŽ at St. Marks Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Readers can call (850) 925-6121 for information. Area Agency on Aging to meet on Aug. 23The Area Agency on Aging for North Florida, Inc. will hold meetings of its Board of Directors & Advisory Council, Thursday, Aug. 23m at 10:30 a.m. Agendas will be available upon request. The meetings will be held at the Area Agency on Aging for North Florida, 2414 Mahan Drive in Tallahassee. Habitat for Humanity to hold bass tournment in QuincyBig Bend Habitat for Humanity's 3rd Annual Bass Tournament is scheduled to begin Saturday, Sept. 22 and is headquartered at Ingram's Marina and the Whippoorwill Lodge in Quincy. The schedule of events includes live music on Friday night, Sept. 21, beginning at 8 p.m., breakfast Saturday morning, Sept. 22nd, followed by the "Blast-off" at 6:30 a.m. The event concludes with the weigh-in and prize presentation at 3 p.m. Registration information can be found by visiting the BBHH website, www.bigbendhabitat. org. Big Bend Habitat for Humanity is a local non-pro t ecumenical Christian ministry dedicated to eliminating substandard housing and homelessness in Leon and Gadsden Counties. Staff reportsBriefs

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments WEDNESDAY: and Adults 10:30am 11:00am Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Churchreligious views and events New Testament Bible ChurchBible-believing Church meets at Wakulla County Public Library, large conference room. Songs, prayer and Bible teaching/preaching. The Lord Jesus described the basic meaning of a church in a very simple and yet profound way:For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.ŽCome take part in our study of Gods Word.4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Church Briefs Mrs. Lottie Roddenberry celebrates 101st birthdayMrs. Lottie Roddenberry celebrated her 101st birthday on Saturday, Aug. 11, at the fellowship hall of Sopchoppy United Methodist Church.  Wakulla UMC events for the weekWakulla United Methodist Church, 1584 Old Woodville Road in Wakulla Station, has the following events scheduled for the week: On Sunday, Aug. 19, at 8:30 a.m., Contemporary Service. 9:30 a.m. Fellowship. 10 a.m. Adult Sunday School led by Steve Montgomery. 10 a.m. Other Sunday School Classes. 11 a.m. Traditional Service. 4:30 p.m. Chancel Choir Practice. 6 p.m. Youth Activity. On Tuesday, Aug. 21, at 6 p.m. Praise Team Practice. On Wednesday, Aug. 22, at 6 a.m., Men’s Bible Study, At 8 a.m., Dutch Treat Breakfast, Savannah’s, all welcome. On Thursday, Aug. 23, at 9 a.m.. Quilting Group. At 7 p.m. Youth Bible Study. For more information, call Wakulla UMC at 850 421-5741.Pastor wants local churches to create youth centers in areaMidsummer’s Day nightmareBy REV. JAMES L. SNYDER I am not sure who invented summer vacation but I think they deserve a Nobel Peace Prize. Every year is worth the intense strain when there is a summer vacation to look forward to. Ah, summer vacation. The freedom of not having anything to do. No schedule in my face. No appointments frustrating me. Just an agenda of fun and more fun and dont forget the eating. Both the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and me got up early to begin the drive to the airport to take us to our vacation location. I was so full of energy I could not sit still. It was then that I broke into singing, comfortably off key, a Carpenters song much to the agitation of my wife. Weve only just begun/White lace and promises/A kiss for luck and were on our way.Ž All my wife could do was stare at me. Finally, she said, You sure are excited. Ive never seen you so excited. Are you sure youre all right?Ž I could not have been more all righter. All I could think of was a week before me surrounded by grandchildren I have not seen for over a year. How old is...?Ž I went through all the grandchildren. It is easy to forget how old kids are because every year their age changes. When you get to be my age, it is hard to keep up with all of these changes. A week of stuf“ ng them with all the candy I could carry. Taking them out to a restaurant and showing them the proper use of the drinking straw and the “ ne art of a spitball battle. After all, it is a grandfathers solemn duty to teach his grandchildren the “ ne art of shenaniganism. Where else are they going to learn it? Their grandmother? I dont think so. We “ nally arrived at the airport, parked our car, and proceeded to the check-in counter with our baggage. One of the attendants asked me a simple question. I hate it when people ask me a question when I am in one of my silly moods. Believe me; I was in one of my silliest silly moods at this time. Sir,Ž the attendant asked me very seriously, do you have anything perishable or ” ammable in your luggage?Ž With silliness smeared all over my mug I said, I sure do. I got a Bible in there and it is Dyn-O-Mite.Ž Then it happened. Someone said, Did he say dynamite? Wheres the dynamite?Ž The attendant said, He said the dynamite was in his briefcase.Ž Suddenly, lights went on, buzzers began ringing, men in uniforms surrounded me, and two grabbed and subdued me. In a few moments, the hazmat men arrived asking where the dynamite was. They begin moving people away while the hazmat men came in to remove the briefcase with the alleged dynamite. At this time, I was absolutely stunned. Every ounce of silliness had drained from my person and I knew I was about to go to jail. Finally, the senior security guard came and looked at me. Where did you say the dynamite was, sir?Ž I stammered and stuttered but “ nally I said, I said my Bible was dynamite.Ž He stared at me. Look me up and down, glared at me with eyes that burned into my very soul. Then he spoke. Would you by any chance be a minister?Ž He said rather gruf” y. Yes sir,Ž I stammered as if my life depended upon what I was going to say, I am a minister, a preacher of the gospel.Ž He glared at me and shouted, False alarm. Just another crazy preacher.Ž As he walked away, I could hear him muttering under his breath, Where do all these crazy preachers come from?Ž The terminal “ nally quieted down, I went through the inspection, and I must say the pat down was a little longer and rougher than I remembered it being in the past. They stripped me down almost to my birthday suit. Thank God for wrinkles. As I walked down the aisle on the plane, I could hear people whispering, Thats him. Thats the crazy preacher with the dynamite.Ž I “ nally sat down next to my wife who was staring out the window. In a few minutes the plane took off and as we reached our altitude she, while still staring out the window, said to me, Next time well take separate planes.Ž She paused for a moment and then said, In fact, well take separate airports. I think I am going to stick to what the Bible says. For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heartŽ (Hebrews 4:12 KJV).Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. OUT TO PASTORSpecial to The NewsIn response to the ever growing need for extensive youth programs in the Wakulla and Franklin county area, the International Coalition For Youth Of Christ is asking local area churches, regardless of denomination, to open their doors to the ICYC ministry to allow them to organize weekly youth events geared toward 13-19 year olds. ICYC is a non-denominational international Christian outreach ministry, organized in 1999 following the Columbine High School Shooting in Littleton, Colo. Pastor Daniel Bodhi Chapin, who founded the program and is nationally been recognized in media and private circuits for his youth advocacy, recently relocated to Carrabelle. This is a family oriented community,Ž Chapin said. This is a community which obviously is committed to encouraging its youth to engage in positive activities rather than simply roaming the streets or parks where they might become engaged with questionable behavior ultimately leading them to trouble.Ž The challenge is that there are no real locations in the area which are open on a daily basis, speci“ cally with activities which young people can enjoy and which ultimately can encourage them. Chapin said media attention will aid in spreading the word on this endeavor. In addressing the call to area churches to open their doors on speci“ c hours or the week, speci“ cally over the weekends, Chapin said. Wed like to show the kids and the community that there is a place for them to come into and play games, receive homework assistance, attend church services and outings.Ž Chapin said hed like to see Carrabelle serve as a beacon for other communities to follow. Chapin hopes that local churches that typically are open a few hours per week, primarily on Sundays, will respond by opening their doors throughout the week to be there for the youth. Chapin will oversee the collective program along with church leaders, parents and stated that he feels the community would support such a program “ nancially and otherwise encourage youth oriented activities. There are Senior Centers … there should be a youth center.Ž Chapin said. He called upon the community to create a collective of youth centers across the area. Church groups or community building overseers who wish to dedicate their space for such programs are encouraged to contact Chapin at (850) 720-1061 or by email at internationalyouthforchrist@yahoo.com. Mrs. Lottie Roddenberry at her birthday party.PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 – Page 7AObituariesLucinda ‘Cindy’ Norman William Dannelley ‘Dan’ Oaks Lola Inez Posey Willis Lucinda Norman passed away on Aug. 9 after a tragic accident on Aug. 3. Over the years, Cindy provided daycare for many children who have grown to be outstanding and promising individuals. Her joys in life were spending time with family and friends and riding her horse. She loved the outdoors and everything in it: animals, the water, dancing, music … she loved everything … she loved life. She will be remembered as a loving and devoted wife, mother, sister and friend. Everyone in Cindys life will not forget her beautiful smile, contagious laugh, honesty and most of all … spirit. A memorial service will be held on Friday, Aug. 17, at 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, 3106 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. In lieu of ” owers, please make your donations to Hands and Hearts for Horses (providing therapeutic horseback riding for the disabled), 3824 Lower Cairo Road, Thomasville GA, 31792. Survivors include her husband of 28 years, Gerald Norman; daughter, Allison Norman; son, Benjamin Norman; loving brothers and several other family members and close friends whose life will be forever altered with this sudden loss. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) William Dannelley DanŽ Oaks, 73, of Oakwood, died Friday, Aug. 10, in Gainesville, Ga. He was born on Dec. 21, 1938, in Crestview. His family moved to Crawfordville shortly after. He grew up in Crawfordville until age 18 when he joined the Marines. After a short but successful stint in the military, he moved back to Florida and became a Florida State trooper. His charismatic personality and determination led him to a different “ eld altogether, insurance. Dans insurance career began in Atlanta, where he met his wife, Barbara Ivester. The happy couple moved to Montgomery, Ala., where Dan and two longtime friends and co-workers began Association Self Insurance Inc. He was a leader in the community, in his work and within his family. After many prosperous years in Montgomery, Dan retired to Crawfordville to become an active member of Wakulla County until his last move to Georgia. He was a vibrant, charming man who always saw the best in other people. He resided at Autumn Breeze Assisted Living in Gainesville, Ga., for the last 19 months. He will be greatly missed by friends and family alike. Funeral services were held Monday, Aug. 13, at the Shirley Grove Baptist Church. The Rev. Kirby Smith and the Rev. Dennis Ledford of“ ciated with interment in the church cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made in memory of Dan Oaks to In Touch Ministries, P.O. Box 7900, Atlanta GA 30537 or to Hospice of Northeast Georgia Medical Center, Attn: Gold Team, 2050 Limestone Parkway, Suite 222, Gainesville, GA 30501. Survivors include his wife, Barbara I. Oaks of Oakwood; daughter, Misti Sanders (Andrew) of Corpus Christi, Texas; stepson, Jerome Wood (Cindy) of Montgomery, Ala.; sisters, Betty Jo Green of Crawfordville and Sally Hirschmann (Jack) of Port Ludlow, Wash.; grandchildren, Morgan and Mason Wood, and Maylon, Hayden, and Patton Sanders, as well as many nieces and nephews. Arrangements by Hillside Memorial Chapel, Clarkesville. 706-754-6256. Condolences may be sent at www. hillsidememorialchapel. com.Special to The NewsWhen people think about volunteering for hospice, their “ rst thought may be, I could never do that,Ž or I would be too depressed.Ž Talk to a Covenant Hospice volunteer and he or she will tell you a very different story. Covenant volunteers come from many different backgrounds, ranging from retired persons, to working professionals, active military personnel, high school and college students. They all have one thing in common … a desire to give back, and in giving they receive so much in return. Covenant has opportunities for people with diverse skills and interests. Volunteers who are looking for a chance to meet new people and to be active in the community will love Covenants Ambassador Program. Here are some highlights of Covenants volunteer opportunities: € Patient and Family Support Volunteers … provide companionship and practical help for patients in a variety of settings including private homes, assisted living facilities, nursing homes and Covenants two hospice inpatient units in Pensacola. Volunteers do not take the place of clinical professionals employed by Covenant and do not provide hands-on care. € 11th Hour Volunteers … provide emotional support and a caring presence for patients nearing death, in order to ensure that no Covenant patient dies alone. € Life Review Volunteers … assist patients and loved ones in completing a Re” ections journal that is a gift for them. € Tuck-in Volunteers … call patients before the weekend to make sure that they have everything that they need. € Bereavement Volunteers … assist Covenants bereavement specialists in supporting families that have lost loved ones. € Childrens Programs Volunteers … work closely with childrens specialists to provide support through Camp Monarch and the Partners in Care/Together for Kids program. € Administrative Support Volunteers … provide help in Covenants branch and corporate of“ ces. € Ambassador and Military Ambassador Volunteers … expand outreach, education and access to hospice care for community members by representing Covenant at community activities and veterans events or by speaking to small groups. € Covenant Care Teens … High school students (ages 14-18) volunteer to visit nursing home patients, assist with fundraising events, and provide computer and administrative support in a Covenant of“ ce. For more information, call Kortney Rudd at (850) 575-4998.Lola Inez Posey Willis, 95, of Tallahassee, died on Thursday, Aug. 9, in Tallahassee. She was born April 4, 1917, in Medart, the daughter of Noah Hall Posey and Nannie Whaley Posey. She was co-owner of H & W Equipment and Willis Marine with her husband, J. Hendrix Willis. After retiring she worked as a pink lady at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She was a Baptist. She enjoyed clogging, dancing and bowling. A graveside service was held at Lake Ellen Cemetery, 4495 Crawfordville Highway in Medart on Tuesday, Aug. 14, at 2 p.m. The family received friends following the service. In lieu of ” owers, memorial contributions can be made to the charity of your choice. She was preceded in death by her parents; her “ rst husband, James Hendrix Willis; her second husband, Eddie Dean Hyde; brothers, Tom Posey, Raymond Posey and George Posey; and her sisters, Opal Durrance, Myra Carter, Emily Tucker, Duma Fain, Nellie Posey and Annettee Posey. Survivors include a devoted nephew, Noah (Mildred) Posey of Panacea; brother-inlaw, Fletcher Durance; and many nieces and nephews. Special thanks for the love and care given to Aunt Lola by Deborah Bruce, Stephanie Harris, Kim Jones, Marlene Rains, Kathy Reynold, Odell Virgil and Covenant Hospice during her illness. Arrangements under the direction of Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Homes.Lola Inez Posey Willis William Dannelley ‘Dan’ Oaks Lucinda ‘Cindy’ NormanCovenant Hospice seeks volunteers This Sunday evening, Aug. 19, at 6pm, Summit Life Church at 158 Arran Road, is hosting a special event with award winning comedian Barry McGee. Barry McGee is a chaplain for NASCAR, working with Richard Petty race team, Tom Bodine and other popular NASCAR drivers. McGee is also a multi-award winning comedian and musician. You will not wont to miss this event! In addition, there is a free cookout beginning at 5 p.m., with hamburgers and hotdogs served to the community before the event. Come early, seating is limited. For more information call the church at (850) 926-1028 or online at www.summitlifechurch.net. See you at the Summit.NASCAR chaplain McFee to appear at Summit Life I dont really believe it takes a village to raise a child, but I think it takes a village and a church to help parents raise a child, especially some children who are physically challenged. Heath Langston was stricken with bacterial encephalitis when he was 17 years of age. Wakulla County stepped up to make sure he was given every opportunity to succeed in the new hand he had been dealt. Dif“culties did not deter or detract from his determination. Heath would say and did say; Walking is highly overrated.ŽFor those of you who had to slow down or stop on Highway 319 when his black service dog, Sherlock, pulled him in his wheelch air across the busy roadway; thank you for looking out for his safety. Many business owners at gas stations would see him pull up to the pumps and would go out and pump his gas, help him with the transaction and bid he and Sherlock a good day; thank you! To the banks and drive thru establishments that started stocking the windows with milk-bonesŽ for Sherlock when Heath pulle d through; bless you! To the churches who provided a hand up the ramp when he would visit and never complain about sitting in church with a dog ne ar a young mans side; thank you perhaps Sherlock was saved too! And to his many friends that called, came by, e-mailed him, facebooked him, took him to dinner and a movie you touched him d eeply. Some of you helped him on his Senior Trip; loading him in and out of rides in Orlando; your love made him love others all th e more. To those who came by the house early in the morning to take him to college, you helped him get his degree but more important ly you gave him friendship and a lesson in love and there is no degree to that kind of compassion. To everyone who gave him encouragement and assistance we cannot thank you enough. For those at Wakulla High who helped him make it through to graduation and for the staff who helped him with his studies at home and in the classroom, you gave him not only help but hope. Wakulla County is special and its people like you who took time out of your busy day to spend it with him that makes us a very thankful family. Your expression of love and support is not only a tribute to life in this county but was a tribute to our son, Heath. Many of you have expressed that you wish you could take our sorrow away but you could not. No, but you did share it and that h as lighten our sorrow and we sincerely appreciate it. The Langston Family hearts are not broken per se, but there is a hole and a void that no one can replace. Its a Heath-shaped hole but the memories are treasures in not only our heads but our hearts and those memories can never be taken from us. The Bible doesnt say not to grieve; it just says not to grieve as those who have no hope! We have hope knowing that our Son is Heaven, hes eternally healed, he has been kissed by the Father and we will see him there one day. We believe and are assured that by faith and the Word of God! Heath challenged his brother Cale to a foot race down the streets of gold when he arrives. Our hope is more than a wish or a m aybe-so; its a know-so type hope “lled with faith in the God who loves him more than even we do! Heath loved the Lord Jesus Christ with all his heart, soul and spirit. He embraced Jesus while he was alive and now Jesus has e mbraced him. We, his family “nd comfort in this knowledge. Even though his body had been slammed by disease and he had many physical limitations the last twenty years, his soul and spirit was stable and limitless. He ath was a stable man in an unstable world. He didnt experience much fame or fortune by the worlds standards, he left no great art work to be remembered by, nor did he ever write a book or make great medical discoveries but pe rhaps he touched you, in”uenced you, provided you with a smile or side splitting laughter; it was accomplishment enough for him. Heaths goals were high and his joys were simple, his friendship was genuine, and his love for people was unquestionable. He leaves his legacy, his family, his friends and his faith! While we were sadden by his passing, Heath would be the “rst to tell you; its never a bad time to go to heaven.Ž We had time (time is sweet) to tell him how much we loved him, so many people dont have this time as death is sometimes sudden Many parents dont have the chance to spend the last three days with their loved ones, loving them, sharing laughter, tears and embraces and I love yous; we were granted this great privilege and we are so thankful. He w as at perfect peace and spent a lot of his remaining time comforting family and friends. We reminisced quite a bit both at the hospital and home! His life ”ashed before our eyes many times and it was worth watching every time! Its a re-run we the family will never get tired of! Parents spend an enormous amount of time with their children teaching them from a young age how to live We mustnt just teach our children how to live right; we must teach them how to die right when it comes that time in their lives. Judy and I have done that with both of our sons. Its every parents duty as a good parent. Death begins with o ur “rst drawn breath; life begins with the last drawn breath when death is touched. Sadly all of us who are reading or hearing this are dying, Heath as well as all our loved ones who have gone before us are living. The Langston Family wanted to say thank you to YOU! The love, support, prayers, kindness and compassion have been overwhelming and humbling. Love is stronger than death and our love and faith will strengthen us through the healing and grieving process. Death can only take a life; it cant touch a relationship built on love. For us to have raised Heath in your presence, with your help, your good and godly in”uence, we are forever thankful to you who joined with us in directing him, guiding him, watching out for him and encouraging him. Especially to the ones who never told him; you cant do that. Instead you encouraged him to go for itŽ! Thanks for not givin g him a hand out but a hand up!God Bless you all and God bless you each! The Heath Langston Family Open Letter to Wakulla County in Loving Memory of Loren HeathŽ LangstonDecember 6, 1974 … July 21, 2012

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityBig Brothers Big Sisters fundraiser is Aug. 24Foret marries DavisDevin Foret returned from deployment to his hometown of Cairo, Ga., on Sunday, July 22 where later that day he married his childhood sweetheart, Emily Marie Davis, of Crawfordville. The wedding was poolside at the grooms grandmothers house, under a generous canopy of white tulle anchored by large potted ferns and ivy. In her familys presence and with their blessing, the Rev. McDonald performed the marriage ceremony for his grandson. Now residing in Oceanside, Calif., their cross country trip included a celebration with the grooms family in Louisiana. While deployed and with his mothers help, he proposed to Emily immediately following her 2012 graduation from Wakulla County High School. She will continue her education beginning in January 2013. He graduated Cairo High School in 2007 and Southwest Georgia Technical College in 2009. He serves the United States Marine Corp. The brides parents are Susan Purvis and Patrick Davis, and her paternal grandparents are Max and Doris Davis, all of Crawfordville. The grooms parents are Michelle Blanchette of Cairo and Scott Foret of Raceland, Louisiana. His maternal grandparents are the Rev. Wayne and Vera McDonald. Their attendants were Macy Wytaske and Thurman Sadler, also of Cairo. Mr. and Mrs. Devin Foret Special to The NewsOn Friday, Aug. 24, Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend will host the Roaring 20s themed third Annual Big Champagne Bash at Hotel Duval from 8 p.m. to midnight. They will celebrate an era of silent “ lm, speakeasies, and sensational parties with unlimited champagne and dinner by-the-bite. With music provided by GT Entertainment, guests too can Charleston like its 1929. The dress is 20s period, ” apper, or cocktail attire, zoot suits, or even dress as your favorite silent “ lm star (Marlene Dietrich, Charlie Chaplin, etc.). This has been a SELL-OUT event for the past two years. Pre-Sale tickets are good until Aug. 17. They are $70 person a person and $130 couple per couple. The standard rate is $75 person and $150 per couple. There will be unlimited champagne, a photobooth complete with silent “ lm title cardsŽ to create your own caption and live auction. Proceeds bene“ t Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend, the leading mentoring organization serving more than 380 children each year. With the help of a Big Brother or Big Sister, these children realize their potential, change their perspective, and build their futures. Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend believes all children have the ability to achieve success in life. Thanks to the generosity of Big Bash guests and sponsors, BBBS is able to help 380-plus youth overcome huge odds to develop higher aspirations, greater con“ dence, better relationships with parents, teachers and peers, avoidance of of violence, drugs, and other illegal activities and success in school. For information on sponsorships, please visit www.bigbendmentoring/ bash or call 386-6002. Heritage Village Park celebration on Friday Special to The NewsThe Heritage Village is a plan of the Wakulla County Historical Society that calls for relocation of some 12 historic homes that have been donated. The homes would become the focus for a park featuring not only the historic homes, but a representation of the life and times of early Wakulla families. An educational center, signage and kiosk, interpretive exhibits, amphitheater, hiking trails and other amenities would make the Park a tourism destination. The largest barrier to establishment of the Park was the lack of land suitable for the village. There is an old adage, timing is everything.Ž Ben Boynton, a local developer, was sitting in the audience when Murray McLaughlin of the Wakulla County Historical Society made a presentation to the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners in early 2011 regarding the WCHS vision for a Heritage Village. As a result, Boynton communicated to McLaughlin that he would be interested in talking to the Society about a donation of up to 40 acres for location of the Village. Soon, members of the Heritage Village were out walking on a beautiful piece of property ideally located and well suited for the Village vision. Boynton advised the Society that he would “ le a revised land use plan for Bloxham Plantation to include approximately 40 acres for the Society. The gift to the Society would help him meet requirements for conversation easements and green space and simultaneously help the Society with location of the Heritage Village. It would then be up to the County to look favorably upon the change. On March 11, 2011, the “ rst formal action by the Commission began a journey of many staff meetings, Planning Commission meetings and three meetings of the Board of County Commission. This culminated in a “ nal Board meeting on July 16 which approved Boyntons project and cleared the way for transfer the land to the WCHS. The transfer will take place on Aug. 17, at the Zion Hill United Methodist Church adjacent to the property. To locate the site, drive one mile south of State Road 267 on U.S. Highway 319 and turn right on Zion Hill Road. This road ends at the church. The Boynton Family, county of“ cials, members of the Historical Society and the general public are invited to celebrate this historic event. An of“ cial of the Historical Society will be available to lead interested parties on a short tour of the property. McLaughlin said, This is a tremendous opportunity for the WCHS and will go a long way toward making our dream a reality.Ž We are very grateful to Mr. Boynton for his generosity and for considering our vision worthy of this gift. We can now begin the planning and fund raising needed, knowing we have a home.Ž Kidwell graduates from WGUSpecial to The NewsPatricia Kidwell of Panacea received a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Western Governors University on July 14 at the semi-annual commencement ceremony in Salt Lake City, Utah. It celebrated the graduation of more than 3,200 graduates … WGUs largest class ever. This year, Western Governors University celebrates its 15th anniversary. Incorporated in 1997, the university has grown to a national institution with more than 33,000 students and 16, 000 graduates in just 15 years. WGU founding governor, The Honorable Michael O. Leavitt, (Utah Governor, 1993-2003, and former U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services) delivered the commencement keynote address. WGU founding governors, The Honorable Roy Romer (Colorado Governor, 1987-1999) and chairman of the WGU Board of Trustees, The Honorable Jim Geringer (Wyoming Governor, 1995-2003) also spoke at the event. Students and graduates who were not able to attend the ceremony were able to watch the event via live video stream on the WGU website. Anyone interested in coaching any of the youth sports are encouraged to contact WPRD at 926-7227. All volunteer coaches are required and subjected to a Florida Department of Law Enforcement Criminal history background check to ensure the safety of our youth participants.SATURDAY 8/11/12 and SATURDAY 8/18/12 8:00 am TO 12:00 NOON SATURDAY 8/18/12, 12:00 PM MEDART RECREATION PARK OFF US 98 SEPTEMBER 1st FOR ALL SPORTSExample: A participant must turn 5 before September 1, 2012 in order to be eligible to participate, NO EXCEPTIONS.WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT2012 FALL SPORTS REGISTRATION REGISTRATION DATES: REGISTRATION TIMES: REGISTRATION DEADLINE: REGISTRATION PLACE: AGE DETERMINING DATE: 1. FLAG FOOTBALL: AGES … 5 … 7 DIVISION AND 8 … 10 DIVISION COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD. Player must be 5 prior to 9/1/12 to be eligible.2. TACKLE FOOTBALL BANTAM DIVISION … AGES 6 … 8. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 90 LBS. MAXPEE WEE DIVISION … AGES 9 … 11. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 145 LBS. MAX JUNIOR DIVISION … AGES 12 … 14. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 170 LBS. MAXCOST FOR TACKLE FOOTBALL IS $85.00 PER CHILD A COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED. 3. TACKLE CHEERLEADING BANTAM DIVISION … AGES 5 … 8 PEE WEE DIVISION … AGES 9-11 COST FOR TACKLE CHEERLEADING IS $45.00 PER CHILD (Includes shirt and pom poms) A COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED.All players must provide proof of health insurance or purchase a policy for $10.00. For more information contact WCPRD at 926-7227 or our web page at www.WCPRD.com Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. 20+ FL PropertiesAugust 22 27real estate auctions FL Daniel S. Nelson Re Lic BK3223097. Williams & Williams Re Lic 1032049. Thomas Barnes Auc Lic AU3383. Williams & Williams Auc Lic AB2784 Buyers Premium May Apply. 8387 Riverdale Ln, Champions Gate Nominal Opening Bids from $1,000 For details, visit williams auction .com 800.801.8003 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Special to The NewsThe First Sunday at the Refuge Presentation Series will feature Dr. Loran Anderson as he presents Floral Strategies in PlantsŽ at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Dr. Anderson is a retired FSU professor and volunteer Refuge Botanist whose plant hikes and presentations are always a treat. Come learn about local floral from an engaging presenter. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures ClassroomŽ at St. Marks Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850.925-6121 for information. First Sunday at the refuge presents botanist Dr. Loran Anderson Community announcementsSend in your community announcements, news and events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net. Or drop it off at the of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. Email is preferred. News will be edited for style. clarity. grammar and length and will run as space becomes available. Find us on

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolThe Wakulla High School cross country teams, both boys and girls, will begin practices for the 2012 season this week on Thursday, Aug. 16 at the high school track. Thursdays practice will begin at 12:30 p.m., but the rest of the practices will start at 2:30 p.m., beginning on Friday. Everyone is welcome, regardless of experience, and there are no cuts … everyone runs. All interested athletes should show up with running clothes/shoes and a current physical. Questions, call Coach Paul Hoover at 509-7861.Cross country starts Aug. 16NJROTC unit underwayBy HUNTER MCKAYEPublic Affairs Of“ cerIts time to start a new school year and that means a new Navy Junior ROTC unit as well. The summers been promising, even with the disasters caused by Tropical Storm Debby. Were con“ dent that the school year will go well based on the attitudes displayed by cadets during the annual summer miniboot camp and the clean ups held in response to Debby. The mini-boot camp went very well, with all the cadets pushing through the tough week. The new first-year cadets learned how to drill, how to properly wear their uniform and much of the basic knowledge necessary for the school year. The returning cadets experienced new levels of leadership in their mini-boot camp roles. All in all, the mini-boot camp was a great success. There were three community service events held this summer. The cadets who volunteered in these events showed their ability to step up to the plate and take the initiative, giving up time during their vacation to help those in need. They assisted at the Wakulla County Health Department and helped clean up two ” ood victims homes. They worked in poor conditions, but got the job done, providing some relief to those they were helping. With the way this whole summer has played out, despite the disaster, it looks like the school years going to be great. Theres a lot expected of the cadets, and were confident these expectations will be met. We expect 2,000 hours of community service this year. Summer Academy prepares students for AP classesSpecial to The NewsWakulla High School teachers, tutors, and volunteers banded together to offer the second AVID Summer Academy with the goal of assisting WHS AVID Scholars Program students prepare for their upcoming Advanced Placement classes. With the assistance of AVID elective teachers Nancy Floyd Richardson, Melinda House, and Will Pafford, along with AVID tutors Danny and Katie Lilly, and volunteers Pam Smith, Dr. Rachel Pienta, Heather Gray, and Deidre Walker, students met twice during the summer. Parent volunteer Deidre Walker said, I was very proud of the students for showing determination and taking time out of their summer activities to spend on schoolwork.Ž During the day-long program, students attended different sessions to assist them in preparation for AP literature, history, and science courses. Students held small-group discussions, completed online assignments, worked on flash cards, studied maps, and prepared for essay questions. Junior Tiana Haskett said the summer sessions helped her get her work done on time. And if I needed help, I had someone who had also read the novel.Ž Part of the AVID program is the expectation that students will enroll in challenging courses. All AVID seniors will take at least one AP or College Prep class and one honors class. Juniors in the AVID program will take AP English Language and Composition and at least one honors class. Sophomores will take Pre-AP English Composition and at least one honors course, and freshmen will take at least two honors classes. Many AVID students are choosing to take more classes than required because they feel con“ dent in their ability to succeed with the AVID support, which includes tutoring from college students twice a week. Superintendent David Miller advocated for the Wakulla County school system to be one of Floridas “ rst rural districts chosen for The Florida Partnership with the College Board grant. AVID stands for Advancement Via Individual Determination, and both middle schools and the high school have been recognized for earning AVID National Certi“ cation. The program helps hard-working students get prepared for college. Many of the students in the program will be the “ rst in their families to attend college. AVID is a college preparation program that has been in place for more than 30 years. Wakulla is entering its fourth year in the program and will graduate its first senior class next year. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWHS AVID students work in groups over the summer to prepare for AP classes. Special to The NewsStudents, teachers and volunteers at Wakulla High School came together during the 2011…12 school year to raise $927.80 in the Pennies for Patients fundraising program. The program is a school and youth program fundraising effort for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS). Funds raised support blood cancer research and patient services. Its almost unbelievable to me that one school can raise so much money to help “ nd a cure for blood cancers,Ž said Kelley Lesperance, executive director of the Northern and Central Florida Chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Were honored that Wakulla County High School put forth so much effort to be the winning school in Wakulla County this year, and were proud to partner with the school to make such an impact on research and patient services.Ž Pennies for Patients is a coin collection and classroom competition program that encourages service learning, team work and philanthropy while raising significant funds. For more information, visit www.schoolandyouth. org/nc” .WHS raises needed funds for Pennies for Patients #1 transfer college to neighboring Florida State University In-state tuition and fees under $100 per credit hour TCC is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access campus. Visit www.tcc.fl.edu for full statement. TCCs new location at the Centennial Bank building is opening for Fall classes.Visit our new location at 2932 Crawfordville Highway on August 21, 22, 28 or 29for advising, registration and testing Call 922-2416 for more details Tallahassee Community College Tallahassee Community College The College of choice! TCC is a smart investment for students planning to transfer to a university or advance directly into the workforce. www.GoToTCC.com | (850) 201-TCC1 www.GoToTCC.com | (850) 201-TCC1 School Meal PricesDaily Lunch Price Pre-K & Elementary: Full Pay $2.10, Reduce $.40 Middle & High School: Full Pay $2.35, Reduce $.40 Daily Breakfast Price Pre-K & Elementary: Full Pay $1.35, Reduce $.30(Breakfast not available at middle & high school)

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsHere it is the middle of August and well be talking about fall “ shing before you know it. The water temperature yesterday on the ” ats was staying around 80 degrees, which is very cool for this time of the year. That accounts for the number of trout still on the flats in relatively shallow water. It wont be long before the reds start schooling up and the Spanish start their migration back south. Tarpon and cobia will start leaving and “ shing the ” ats will again be very good until it gets so cold nothing is left there for the trout to eat. Then its head up in the creeks and rivers. All that said, the Spanish, cobia and tarpon are still here and its still summer. Mike Pearson was down over the weekend from Tifton and he and a buddy went out to the shoals and caught six nice trout and a ” ounder “ shing grubs in about 15 feet of water. They then eased offshore and caught a couple of grouper before the weather made them come in. Capt. David Fife who “ shes out of Spring Creek has been catching quite a few reds around the bars using live mudminnows and on Sunday morning he “ shed near Spring Creek drifting a Gulp under a Cajun Thunder in about 4 feet of water and caught his limit of trout and a 26-inch red. He and I went over to Panacea and tried to catch a tarpon that afternoon and managed to catch quite a few sharks and hooked a tarpon on a light rod while reeling in a silver trout. It looked to weigh about 90 pounds and after two jumps and quite a long run it broke the line. We saw quite a few jumping but that was the only bite we had. I “ shed with Morris Brown of Crawfordville last week and we caught four ” ounder, a couple of speckled trout and a bunch of silver trout. We used a Gulp on the bottom. Fishing over around St. George has been pretty good. Lots of tarpon around dry bar and quite a few trout also being caught there. Trout in the bay are taking the Gulp and topwater baits early and late. Use spoons and live bait around the oyster bars for reds and look for the big reds in the pass. Live or cut bait on the bottom. Dr. Norm Griggs bought a house over on the bay in East Point and has been catching lots of trout and reds. He said he found a creek where he has been doing extremely well “ shing a top water bait for reds. The King“ sh Shootout held out of C-Quarters Marina in Carrabelle on Aug. 3 and Aug. 4 was another big success. The top 10 largest “ sh took home $15,600 and $35,000 was raised for the Leukemia Research Foundation. This was the ninth tournament and in those nine years this tournament has raised more than $667,000 for the foundation. My hat is off to everyone over there who works so hard on this tournament each year and you should all pat yourself on the back. First place in the tournament went to the team of Reel Smoker out of Panacea with a 48.5-pound king. Team Bud K out of Thomasville brought in a 35.9-pound king on Saturday and on Sunday they had one that weighed 38.5 pounds and took second place. Blake Gardner was the captain on Team Reel Smoker and Bud Kadel was captain of Team Bud K. Capt. Max Lawhon was “ shing with Millard Collins on the boat Smooth Drag and he caught a 70-inch sail“ sh in about 68 feet of water. The Kevins Seatrout Shootout will be held Sept. 16. You can put in anywhere and weigh-in will be at Jerrys Bait and Tackle on Woodville Highway. The heaviest string of “ ve trout between 15 and 20 inches will take “ rst place and prizes will also be paid for biggest trout, biggest red, red with most spots and a random drawing. All the rain we have been having has done nothing to the scallops. There are more scallops now than at the beginning of the season and everyone is getting their limit. Last weekend, David Fife and I took the McWilliams family from Mobile and Vero Beach and these folks had never been scalloping, much less ever seen one alive. Once they found one and knew what they were looking for the rest was easy. We got our limit in a couple of hours and they all said they enjoyed this more than diving in the Keys. Remember to know your limits and watch out for the thunderstorms that pop up every afternoon. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Spanish, cobia and tarpon are on the atsThe Waldrep brothers Ryan, 15, above, and Hurston, 13, below, caught their “ rst Amberjack on a recent trip offshore compliments of Major Alan Lamarche and Plantation Security Inc. Amberjack are commonly referred to as Reef DonkeysŽ because of their tremendous “ ghting prowess. The Waldrep brothers each whipped several AJs but only kept the legal limit of one to take home. Their father Cliff Waldrep and granddad Wayne Waldrep from Hines Hill & Mandalay Plantations went along to help bait hooks and release “ sh. The brothers also went home with several gag grouper and a box full of sea bass and Key West grunts. The brothers go back to school next week in south Georgia, and they have some great DonkeyŽ stories to tell their friends. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWaldrep brothers catchBrag book: Tallahassees Champagne Party -Bene“ting Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend-Dust o your dancing shoes and get ready for a smashing good time cuz the 3rd Annual BIG Champagne Bash is just around the corner. Save the date for this spectacular evening of dancing, dinner by-the-bite, free-owing bubbly, and unforgettable fun. Were celebrating the Roaring 20s once again an era of silent lm, speakeasies, and sensational parties !Who: 300+, community-minded, fun-loving Fellas and Flappers from across the Big Bend come together for the event of the season to make a BIG, positive, and lasting impact in the lives of children in our area. Why: Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend believes all children have the ability to achieve success in life. When: Friday, August 24, 8:00 p.m. … 12:00 a.m. Venue: Hotel Duval, 415 North Monroe Street (Reserve your special $99 BIG Bash hotel guest rate by calling 850.224.6000 with the code BBSBBSIŽ by Friday, August 10th.) Attire: Get all dolled-upŽ for the 1920s silent movie theme Hosted by: Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bends BIG Alliance ( www.bbbs.org/ bigalliance ) Ticket Info: INCLUDES UNLIMITED CHAMPAGNE! Pre-Sale (expires August 17): $70/single, $130/couple, $600/group rate-10 tickets Standard Rate (August 18 Sold-Out): $75/single, $150/couple Purchase tickets at www.bbbs.org/bigbash. www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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As many of you know, Flotilla 12 Apalachee Bay is part of a larger Division that runs from Pensacola through our eastern end of the panhandle. While this is a large geographic area, there is a special bond between auxiliarists that seems to remain strong no matter how many miles we have to cross. Some of the greatest friendships are ones where we only see each other two or three times per year at Division meetings or special trainings. As they say, some people come into your life for a moment and leave a memory for a lifetime. Nancy Kenaston is one of those ladies. Nancy crossed the bar this past week. Many in the Division knew Nancy well. Patti Fritchie wrote the following: The world lost another piece of history today with the passing of Nancy Kenaston. Nancy was a young energetic journalist when World War II broke out and her beloved homeland England was being pounded by German bombs. She wrote and survived to see that war end. Because of her tenacity, ease with words and accurate reporting she was chosen to cover the Nuremburg trials. She sat for days listening, recording and interpreting the horrors of what had occurred during those war crimes trials. Moving to the USA with her Air Force husband, Nancy quickly became involved with community and settled in Fort Walton. She became a USCG Auxiliarist, often piloting her recreational boat through Destin pass to aid mariners in peril, to conduct Aids to Navigation patrols and whatever else she was asked to do to help the U.S. Coast Guard. We will miss Nancy Kenaston very much. Our hearts and our prayers go out to her family. Ann Del Bello also knew Nancy and wrote the following: Nancy Kenaston joined the Coast Guard Auxiliary on July 19, 1977. At that time, there was no Coast Guard presence or Station in the Destin area. The Flotilla received its orders from Station Pensacola. In the early years, Flotilla 14 held its meeting at Eglin Air Force Base. Nancy lived on Santa Rosa Sound and owned a Pro-Line boat, so she was very involved in Search & Rescue. The Flotilla boat owners would get as many as three to four calls per week to rescue stranded boaters in the Gulf of Mexico, usually at night. She rose in the Auxiliary from Flotilla Commander to Division CaptainŽ/Commander and held many staff of“ ces. She was editor of the Division 1 Salt Spray and eight years as editor of District 8 CR Behind the Eighth newsletters. Nancy worked as a reporter for the Panama City News-Herald and became Womens Editor of the local newspaper then titled Playground News. Nancy was able to publish many articles on the Flotilla activities and accomplishments of Flotilla members. Nancy said her happiest and most rewarding time was doing operations/ search & rescue in the Auxiliary.Ž During one search & rescue for two people in the water from a sinking sailboat, Nancy had crewman Lester Rowley sit in the bow to guide her to the men. She radioed that she was having trouble finding the men due to high waves. An Auxiliary aircraft piloted by Betty NcNab heard the transmission and guided them to the downed sailboat. This was the “ rst time in Auxiliary history a rescue had been completed by an Auxiliary female pilot working with a female Auxiliary coxswain. Another time, Nancy and Lester were working for almost 20 hours on three successive rescues in rough weather. When back on land, their sea legsŽ were still affecting them for a while. When she was asked what do you want people to say about you? She replied: She wanted to be remembered as someone who tried.Ž In my opinion, Nancy M. Kenaston has succeeded many times over. Our Auxiliary and local community are a better place due to her involvement in it. Her British World War II experiences are told in her book, When Destiny Steps In.Ž Nancy Kenaston was the most remarkable person I have ever met. Nancy, fair winds and following seas to you, you will be dearly missed. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident … Be the example of safety out on the water. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies SPECIAL TO THE NEWSNancy Kenaston UnderwaterWakullaBy Travis Kersting A while back I talked about redundancy and how divers of all levels have incorporated redundant equipment into their activity, such as spare gas supplies via redundant tank, two knives or line cutters, even backup masks. There is a piece of equipment that you cant bring extra though, unless you dive with a buddy, and thats a brain. You only have one, and no amount of money can buy you a redundant copy. Diving without a buddy, that is solo diving, has almost always been considered taboo, primarily among recreational divers, and especially by the family members of these divers, and for reasons of various concerns. A long time ago, early equipment may have been of questionable reliability, but there were other issues at play too. In those days, scuba regulators lacked a pressure gauge, or redundant air source (now called an octopusŽ), meaning your buddy was your redundant air supply. Under those circumstances a dive buddy became a necessity. Things have come a long way as far as equipment availability, build quality, and built in safety functions are concerned. The modern diver now has a certain level of redundancy built into their recreational life support package, but does this make solo diving OK? Spear “ shing seems to be a good example of two people jumping off the boat at the same time, only to split up almost immediately. This may happen for many reasons, including bad visibility, distraction due to a speared “ sh, or searching for a lost spear shaft. These folks practice what is sometimes referred to as same ocean buddy diving.Ž Technically there is a dive partner around, but “ nding them in the event of an emergency is less than likely. This may be considered acceptable, because in open water divers have the option to simply surface and solve their problems topside. However, some problems, like entanglement cant be solved on the surface. Many cave divers, but not all, have long been practicing solo diving. The reasons are as endless as the cave passages we go to explore. Are we crazy for it? Most would say we are crazy for even entering a cave. Trained cave divers all follow a few basic rules to keep us and a buddy alive in the event of problems. Solo cave divers typically pad these rules for more of a safety buffer, and many divers add some extra rules for additional safety margin. For instance, I always carry at a minimum one additional cylinder of decompression mix and a buddy bottleŽ of bottom mix when cave diving solo. That makes 120 cubic feet of breathing gas which I have no intention of using. That is in addition to the cylinder of 100 percent oxygen hanging at 20 feet and while following the standard gas management practice for safe cave diving. I personally dont limit my penetration distance or depth speci“ cally for solo diving, but many cavers do impose additional restrictions on themselves. Still, with all these pieces of redundant equipment and extra breathing gas I do lack a second brain. So why undergo the increased risk? Diving is peaceful for me, and not having someone else around to talk to or rush me means I can take more time to prepare my equipment and visualize the dive. During the dive I can take more time and pay attention to details I might otherwise overlook when monitoring a buddy. These are details that come in handy when exiting in low visibility, often found when exploring smaller passages. Having muscle memory to immediately react to a problem, like a diminishing gas supply, is key to solo diving and to not turning an inconvenience into an emergency. For me, solo diving is my preference. I dive longer, farther and calmer when I am alone. Most divers would likely be opposite of that and for good reason. Diving alone, in cave or open water, is not for everyone but it also doesnt have to be the high risk activity that most people think it is. After all, we drive a car solo almost every day, and that is considered acceptable or even normal despite the accident statistics. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday g Thu Aug 16, 12 Fri Aug 17, 12 Sat Aug 18, 12 Sun Aug 19, 12 Mon Aug 20, 12 Tue Aug 21, 12 Wed Aug 22, 12 Date 3.4 ft. 2:38 AM 3.6 ft. 3:06 AM 3.7 ft. 3:32 AM 3.9 ft. 3:57 AM 3.9 ft. 4:23 AM 4.0 ft. 4:50 AM 4.0 ft. 5:21 AM High 1.4 ft. 7:58 AM 1.1 ft. 8:37 AM 0.8 ft. 9:15 AM 0.6 ft. 9:54 AM 0.4 ft. 10:35 AM 0.3 ft. 11:20 AM 0.3 ft. 12:10 PM Low 4.0 ft. 1:58 PM 4.1 ft. 2:37 PM 4.2 ft. 3:17 PM 4.2 ft. 3:58 PM 4.0 ft. 4:42 PM 3.8 ft. 5:30 PM 3.4 ft. 6:24 PM High 0.1 ft. 8:49 PM 0.1 ft. 9:17 PM 0.2 ft. 9:45 PM 0.4 ft. 10:13 PM 0.6 ft. 10:43 PM 0.9 ft. 11:16 PM 1.3 ft. 11:52 PM Low Thu Aug 16, 12 Fri Aug 17, 12 Sat Aug 18, 12 Sun Aug 19, 12 Mon Aug 20, 12 Tue Aug 21, 12 Wed Aug 22, 12 Date 3.5 ft. 2:35 AM 3.7 ft. 3:03 AM 3.8 ft. 3:29 AM 3.9 ft. 3:54 AM 4.0 ft. 4:20 AM 4.1 ft. 4:47 AM 4.1 ft. 5:18 AM High 1.5 ft. 7:55 AM 1.2 ft. 8:34 AM 0.9 ft. 9:12 AM 0.6 ft. 9:51 AM 0.4 ft. 10:32 AM 0.3 ft. 11:17 AM 0.3 ft. 12:07 PM Low 4.0 ft. 1:55 PM 4.2 ft. 2:34 PM 4.3 ft. 3:14 PM 4.3 ft. 3:55 PM 4.1 ft. 4:39 PM 3.9 ft. 5:27 PM 3.5 ft. 6:21 PM High 0.1 ft. 8:46 PM 0.1 ft. 9:14 PM 0.2 ft. 9:42 PM 0.4 ft. 10:10 PM 0.7 ft. 10:40 PM 1.0 ft. 11:13 PM 1.4 ft. 11:49 PM Low Thu Aug 16, 12 Fri Aug 17, 12 Sat Aug 18, 12 Sun Aug 19, 12 Mon Aug 20, 12 Tue Aug 21, 12 Wed Au g 22, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 3:14 AM 3.3 ft. 3:42 AM 3.5 ft. 4:08 AM 3.6 ft. 4:33 AM 3.7 ft. 4:59 AM 3.7 ft. 5:26 AM High 1.3 ft. 9:02 AM 1.0 ft. 9:41 AM 0.8 ft. 10:19 AM 0.5 ft. 10:58 AM 0.3 ft. 11:39 AM 0.2 ft. 12:24 PM 0.8 ft. 12:20 AM Low 3.7 ft. 2:34 PM 3.8 ft. 3:13 PM 3.9 ft. 3:53 PM 3.9 ft. 4:34 PM 3.8 ft. 5:18 PM 3.5 ft. 6:06 PM 3.8 ft. 5:57 AM High 0.1 ft. 9:53 PM 0.1 ft. 10:21 PM 0.2 ft. 10:49 PM 0.3 ft. 11:17 PM 0.6 ft. 11:47 PM 0.2 ft. 1:14 PM Low 3.2 ft. 7:00 PM High Thu Aug 16, 12 Fri Aug 17, 12 Sat Aug 18, 12 Sun Aug 19, 12 Mon Aug 20, 12 Tue Aug 21, 12 Wed Aug 22, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 2:30 AM 2.7 ft. 2:58 AM 2.8 ft. 3:24 AM 2.9 ft. 3:49 AM 3.0 ft. 4:15 AM 3.0 ft. 4:42 AM 3.0 ft. 5:13 AM High 1.0 ft. 8:09 AM 0.8 ft. 8:48 AM 0.6 ft. 9:26 AM 0.4 ft. 10:05 AM 0.3 ft. 10:46 AM 0.2 ft. 11:31 AM 0.2 ft. 12:21 PM Low 3.0 ft. 1:50 PM 3.1 ft. 2:29 PM 3.1 ft. 3:09 PM 3.1 ft. 3:50 PM 3.0 ft. 4:34 PM 2.8 ft. 5:22 PM 2.6 ft. 6:16 PM High 0.1 ft. 9:00 PM 0.1 ft. 9:28 PM 0.1 ft. 9:56 PM 0.3 ft. 10:24 PM 0.5 ft. 10:54 PM 0.7 ft. 11:27 PM Low Thu Aug 16, 12 Fri Aug 17, 12 Sat Aug 18, 12 Sun Aug 19, 12 Mon Aug 20, 12 Tue Aug 21, 12 Wed Aug 22, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 2:22 AM 2.8 ft. 2:50 AM 2.9 ft. 3:16 AM 3.0 ft. 3:41 AM 3.1 ft. 4:07 AM 3.1 ft. 4:34 AM 3.2 ft. 5:05 AM High 1.4 ft. 7:37 AM 1.1 ft. 8:16 AM 0.8 ft. 8:54 AM 0.6 ft. 9:33 AM 0.4 ft. 10:14 AM 0.3 ft. 10:59 AM 0.3 ft. 11:49 AM Low 3.1 ft. 1:42 PM 3.2 ft. 2:21 PM 3.3 ft. 3:01 PM 3.3 ft. 3:42 PM 3.1 ft. 4:26 PM 2.9 ft. 5:14 PM 2.7 ft. 6:08 PM High 0.1 ft. 8:28 PM 0.1 ft. 8:56 PM 0.2 ft. 9:24 PM 0.4 ft. 9:52 PM 0.6 ft. 10:22 PM 0.9 ft. 10:55 PM 1.2 ft. 11:31 PM Low Thu Aug 16, 12 Fri Aug 17, 12 Sat Aug 18, 12 Sun Aug 19, 12 Mon Aug 20, 12 Tue Aug 21, 12 Wed Au g 22, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 3:16 AM 2.8 ft. 3:33 AM 2.8 ft. 3:48 AM 2.9 ft. 4:03 AM 3.0 ft. 4:20 AM 3.1 ft. 4:42 AM 3.2 ft. 5:08 AM High 1.7 ft. 7:13 AM 1.5 ft. 7:51 AM 1.3 ft. 8:29 AM 1.1 ft. 9:08 AM 0.9 ft. 9:52 AM 0.7 ft. 10:42 AM 0.6 ft. 11:43 AM Low 3.2 ft. 1:12 PM 3.2 ft. 2:03 PM 3.2 ft. 2:54 PM 3.1 ft. 3:48 PM 2.9 ft. 4:46 PM 2.7 ft. 5:51 PM 2.5 ft. 7:09 PM High 0.2 ft. 8:14 PM 0.3 ft. 8:41 PM 0.5 ft. 9:07 PM 0.8 ft. 9:32 PM 1.0 ft. 9:58 PM 1.3 ft. 10:25 PM 1.6 ft. 10:50 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacAug. 16 Aug. 22First Aug. 24 Full Aug. 31 Last Sept. 8 New Aug. 17Major Times 12:25 AM 2:25 AM 12:49 PM 2:49 PM Minor Times 6:03 AM 7:03 AM 7:28 PM 8:28 PM Major Times 1:13 AM 3:13 AM 1:38 PM 3:38 PM Minor Times 7:03 AM 8:03 AM 8:05 PM 9:05 PM Solunar Rating Solunar Best Hunting Times and Best Fishing Times Rating is for a Best day of Hunting or Fishing Image Major Times 2:02 AM 4:02 AM 2:26 PM 4:26 PM Minor Times 8:03 AM 9:03 AM 8:41 PM 9:41 PM Major Times 2:51 AM 4:51 AM 3:16 PM 5:16 PM Minor Times 9:05 AM 10:05 AM 9:19 PM 10:19 PM Major Times 3:40 AM 5:40 AM 4:06 PM 6:06 PM Minor Times 10:07 AM 11:07 AM 9:57 PM 10:57 PM Major Times 4:31 AM 6:31 AM 4:58 PM 6:58 PM Minor Times 11:11 AM 12:11 PM 10:37 PM 11:37 PM Better Best Better++ Better Average Average7:05 am 8:16 pm 6:04 am 7:29 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:05 am 8:15 pm 7:04 am 8:06 pm 7:06 am 8:14 pm 8:04 am 8:43 pm 7:07 am 8:13 pm 9:06 am 9:19 pm 7:07 am 8:12 pm 10:08 am 9:58 pm 7:08 am 8:11 pm 11:12 am 10:38 pm 7:08 am 8:10 pm 12:16 pm 11:23 pm9% 3% 4% 12% 19% 26% 33% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE LETS DO THIS TOGETHER! DO YOU WANT IT?Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN GET YOU MOTIVATED! GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Qualifications o 4th generation Floridian o Professional designations; highest standards and ethics o Held offices in professional associations, local & statewide (see website) L. James Parham, MAI, SRA "A campaign begun with a mustard seed" Jim Parham for Property Appraiser www. FairValuesInWakulla .com Paid by Jim Parham No Party Affiliation for Property Appraiser The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) joined forces on Sunday, Aug. 12 to bring overdue boaters safely back to shore, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. At approximately 9 p.m., a Tallahassee woman reported that a boat with three adults and “ ve juveniles on board was stranded in the water approximately one mile off the coast of the St. Marks Lighthouse. The complainant told Deputy Randy Phillips that she received a text message from her friends onboard stating that they required assistance. Deputy Taff Stokley retrieved and launched the WCSO Search and Rescue vessel and Deputy Phillips set up a command post at the St. Marks Lighthouse boat ramp. FWC also launched a boat and helicopter. The helicopter located the boat paddling back toward the lighthouse and Deputy Stokley towed the vessel and passengers back to the lighthouse boat ramp. There were no injuries. The operation concluded at 11:58 p.m. By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 13, … A crowded race in what is essentially a new House district in north Florida is in some ways serving as an outlet for the areas frustration over its diminishing influence and the GOPs continuing interest in privatizing prisons. All seven candidates running for House District 7 -which spans nine counties from Calhoun in the Panhandle to Lafayette in the Big Bend and also takes in a piece of Leon -are opposed to handing prisons over to for-pro“ t companies. They also knock changes that would ask existing state employees to contribute to their own retirements -though most keep the door open on changes for future employees. While those views are common among legislative Democrats, they would be maverick positions if one of the four Republicans wins the seat -which covers at least a share of what used to be six different House seats. It is in some ways a function of the district, which has the third-lowest percentage of its population working for private businesses among the states 120 House seats, according to a survey by the U.S. Census Bureau. While Republican U.S. Sen. John McCain would have easily won the district with almost 62.1 percent of the vote in the 2008 presidential election, Gov. Rick Scott squeaked out a 3.5-percentage point win in 2010 after he spent the campaign pledging to slash government, overhaul pensions and privatize prisons. And so while the economy and how to “ x it are also major issues in House District 7, promises to keep prisons open and in the hands of state government have been routine during this campaign cycle. Public safety is the primary responsibility of government,Ž said Mike Williams, 53, a “ nancial adviser from Madison whos running as a Republican. We dont need to be leasing that out, if you will, to administer that for us.Ž Some of the concerns, particularly when it comes to proposals to shutter some of the facilities, are economic. Halsey Beshears, president of the Florida Nursery, Growers & Landscape Association and a businessman, said that any reductions in prison workers should come in other parts of the state, where additional prisons might be nearby and other work opportunities exist -unlike in District 7. Those people have less opportunity to go find a job,Ž said Beshears, 40, of Monticello. He is also a GOP candidate. The prison in Jefferson County, where Beshears lives, narrowly escaped closure during last years legislative session. Other concerns stem from a deal that the candidates say their constituents made when the prisons were built in the northern part of the state: local residents would get jobs in their area in exchange for the dangers of having prisons nearby. It rankles me that some people would want to close those facilities now,Ž said Republican Don Curtis, 57, a forester from Perry. The issue has taken center stage in a clash between two of the candidates on the Democratic side. Thomas Dickens, an attorney from Leon County, has slammed A.J. Smith for gaining the support of Putting Florida First, an electioneering communications organization that has accepted contributions from privatization giant The GEO Group. You bet, I do take issue with that,Ž Dickens, 37, said when asked about a mailer pointing out the links. Smith, 53, a consultant and former law enforcement of“ cer from Apalachicola, bristles at the allegation. He said he is certain none of the contributions from GEO to the ECO have been used to support him. GEO has not given me money, and I would not take money from GEO,Ž he said. Smith has joined the other candidates in pledging to fight privatization and boasts of having visited all nine prisons in the area. Pensions are also an issue. Robert Hill, who served for the last 12 years as Liberty County clerk of court -a position that required him to double as county administrator -said he is opposed to any changes that would affect current state workers. We had a contract with those employees, and theres an attempt to change that contract,Ž said the 64year-old Bristol resident. But there is also a sense, voiced most prominently by former Rep. Jamey Westbrook, that despite its proximity to the state Capitol, District 7 is simply being forgotten. Westbrook, a Republican now, who was a Democrat during his “ rst stint in the House, has seized on that issue with a vow to set them straightŽ if elected. The only person thats a lobbyist for the small counties is the legislator thats elected there,Ž said Westbrook, 63, from Port St. Joe. Im not going to let them run over the constituents of House District 7,Ž Westbrook said. Beshears raised the most money in the district, according to state records, with $261,451; Curtis was next with almost $156,755; Westbrook raised $152,450; and Williams reported just $34,739 in contributions. All have funded their own campaigns to some extent. Westbrook has chipped in almost all of his total … $150,000. Meanwhile, Curtis has spent $100,000 on the race while Beshears has poured more than $86,000 into his effort. Williams had contributed less than $225 of his own money. Among the Democrats, Hill is the leader with $93,675, of which he contributed $50,000; followed by Smith with $85,490, including $500 of his own money, and Dickens with $80,583 -$50,000 of which came from the candidate.Race for House District 7 seat focuses on prisons, state workersContinued from 1A Langston announced his candidacy for sheriff at a press conference in August 2011. According to the OSC, he began accepting campaign contributions as early as Aug. 25, 2011, which would mean he has been a candidate for sheriff since then. The opinion states,ŽWe “ nd that, from Aug. 25, 2011, through June 12, 2012, Major Langstons candidacy in the partisan election for sheriff of Wakulla County was in violation of the Hatch Act. However, because Langston is no longer involved in the administration of federal grants or loans, does not participate in federally funded activities and does not supervise anyone who has duties in connection with federally funded activities, he is no longer subject to the provisions of the Hatch Act, the opinion states. If someone is found to be in violation, the OSC typically gives the person the opportunity to come into compliance, by either withdrawing their candidacy or no longer being employed in a position where their duties are connected to federally funded activities. The opinion states, We “ nd that Major Langston has effectively come into compliance with the law. Thus,. the Hatch Act does not prohibit his current candidacy for sheriff.Ž In response to the “ ndings, Langston issued this statement: I do not want to take the voters attention away from the fact that I am running a clean and successful campaign for Sheriff. My intention is to continue to address Public Safety in Wakulla County.Ž No further action will be taken by the OSC.Overdue boaters found Langston not prohibited from running for sheri Special to The NewsAlzheimers Project Inc. along with Area Agency on Aging for North Florida will host its 14th Annual Caregiver Forum at the Tallahassee Community College Ghazvini Learning Center on Sept. 21. The forum will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event, which provides a day of pampering for caregivers, is completely free of charge to attendees. Breakfast and lunch will be provided, as well as massages, goody bags, multiple health screenings, facials, hand massages, speakers and great entertainment. Every year in September, Area Agency on Aging for North Florida and Alzheimers Project collaborate to sponsor a day of rest and relaxation designed especially for the caregivers in our community,Ž said Alzheimers Project CEO Bill Wertman. Caregivers come together on this day to share stories, hear motivational speakers, mingle with community providers, and become lost in a magic massage or receive a mini beauty-makeover. This day, the entire day, which is tailored just for caregivers is 100 percent free and includes a catered breakfast and lunch. We are honored to be a part of it all.Ž Respite Care will be provided on-site for those requiring temporary care for their loved one with Alzheimers or related dementia. Trained volunteers will provide care and engage everyone in interactive social activities and breakfast and lunch will be provided as well. Spaces will “ ll up quickly!! If you know a caregiver who may be interested in attending, please contact Alzheimers Project Inc. at (850) 386-2778 to make a reservation. Alzheimers Project, Inc.:is a non-pro“ t organization funded by grants and private donations. A lzheimers Project, Inc. is dedicated to providing relief to the caregivers of persons suffering from Alzheimers disease or other memory impairments. All services available to the caregivers are provided free of charge. The goal of Alzheimers Project, Inc. is to keep caregivers healthier, both physically and emotionally, to prolong the abilities of caregivers to care for their loved ones, and to delay institutionalization of their family members. With over 20 years of consistent quality service, Alzheimers Project, Inc. helps local families “ nd their way through support, respite and training. Call them at (850) 3862778 or view more information on their website, http://www.alzheimersproject.org..Alzheimers Project to o er day of fun for area caregivers

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 – Page 13A

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On Aug. 2, Thomas Platt of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at A&P Seafood in Panacea. Someone “ lled the fuel tank of a refrigerated truck full of dirt and water. The fuel tank was damaged. A suspect has been identified. Damage was estimated at $1,000. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On Aug. 2, Edward Bewick of Tallahassee, and most recently of Crawfordville, was arrested for failure to report a change of address as a sex offender. Detective Josh Langston discovered that Bewick had moved to Crawfordville and failed to register his new address with law enforcement as required. Detective Langston and State Attorney Investigator Erika Buckley arrested Bewick at his place of business and transported him to the Wakulla County Jail. € On Aug. 2, Shelby Rollins of Crawfordville reported the theft of an antique bicycle from outside her home. The bicycle, which was more than 60 years old, was used as a decoration at the victims home and is valued at $200. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € On Aug. 2, Lashawnia Webster of Crawfordville reported a hit-and-run traf“ c crash at her place of business in Crawfordville. The victim discovered a dent in her vehicle which had been parked in the business parking lot. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On Aug. 2, Tina Everett of Panacea reported a residential burglary. Someone removed a satellite television box from her home. The cable box is valued at $120. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. € On Aug. 1, Stephanie Exline of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her home. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € On Aug. 3, Norma Land of Crawfordville reported the theft of a hand truck and dresser from her residence. The victim was in the process of moving. The stolen property is valued at $125. Two days later, the victim reported recovering the dolly in a wooded area near her home. Deputy Mike Zimba and Lt. Dale Evans investigated. € On Aug. 3, Joe Walker of Crawfordville reported a fraud. A suspect, who has been identi“ ed, used the victims Social Security number to open a communications account without authorization. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € On Aug. 4, a retail theft was reported at Wal-Mart. Franklin Raphael Thomas, 21, of Crawfordville was arrested for felony shoplifting. The suspect allegedly removed four tires from the store without paying for them. The tires are valued at $406. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € On Aug. 4, James Eskelund of Ochlockonee Bay reported the theft of a lawn mower from his property. The mower is valued at $175. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € On Aug. 5, Lt. Dale Evans discovered a kayak sitting on the side of Skipper Bay Road near U.S. Highway 98. The kayak was transported to the sheriffs of“ ce for storage until an owner can be found. € On Aug. 5, a concerned citizen contacted the sheriffs of“ ce about a reckless driver on U.S. Highway 319. Deputy Vicki Mitchell observed the driver driving with both passengerside tires off the pavement. Frank Grady Johnson, 39, of Crawfordville was stopped on the highway and could not produce a driver license. He was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked, third or subsequent conviction and reckless driving. € On Aug. 5, Lilly Meinhardt of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Four unauthorized charges were discovered on her bank account. The charges totaled $1,005 and were created over the Internet. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On Aug. 5, Irma Seaman of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victim loaned her vehicle to a friend who failed to return it. The vehicle was discovered in the Wakulla Gardens area. The victim reported that $450 worth of damage was observed on the vehicle. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Vicki Mitchell and Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € On Aug. 6, Sherrie Stokes of Crawfordville reported a theft of her wallet from her vehicle while it was parked at a Medart business. The victim left the wallet inside the vehicle with the windows down. The wallet contained a driver license, some cash and a credit card. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € On Aug. 6, Virginia Story of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Someone attempted to use the victims credit card to make purchases over the Internet. The fraudulent charges totaled $300. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € On Aug. 6, Shaun Chovan of Crawfordville reported an animal incident as a family member discovered the family dog deceased inside a family vehicle. The dog was missing for a period of time and was discovered when a family member retrieved an item from the vehicle. It has not been determined how the animal got into the vehicle. Damage was observed inside the vehicle as the animal attempted to get out. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On Aug. 6, Robert Ceska, Cleveland Dickens and Angela Holshouser, all of Crawfordville, reported a hit-and-run. A suspect vehicle struck two mailboxes on Duck Pond Drive while traveling on Lonnie Raker Lane. The suspect also hit a street sign and a fence in the Lonnie Raker Lane and Duck Pond Drive area. The total value of the damage was estimated at $230. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € On Aug. 7, James B. Brooks of Sopchoppy reported a theft of property from his Panacea business. A hand pump, gas can and chain was stolen from the property. The value of the stolen items is $150. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. On Aug. 7, Scott Joyner of the Wakulla County Public Library reported a criminal mischief. Someone put graf“ ti on the side of the building. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € On Aug. 7, Jenna Hurst of Crawfordville reported the theft of a GPS unit. The victim is unsure where the unit was taken from. It is valued at $150. The unit was entered in the FCIC/NCIC data base. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On Aug. 7, State Probation Of“ cer Norman Vickers reported discovering possible stolen items in a shed at a home used by a probationer. The owner of the home was present when Of“ cer Vickers searched the unlocked shed. A crack pipe was recovered and turned into the Evidence Division. The other items were turned over to Detective C.L. Morrison. Deputy Mike Crum also investigated. € On Aug. 8, Corbin Smith of Crawfordville reported the theft of cigarettes and lighters from his patio. Evidence at the scene led Deputies Will Hudson and Cole Wells to a 15-yearold suspect who admitted taking the property. The juvenile was charged with burglary and petit theft. A second suspect has also been identi“ ed. € On Aug. 8, Deputy Joe Page recovered a wallet on Shadeville Highway near the Habitat for Humanity Re-Store. The property belonged to Christopher Daniel Dailey of Crawfordville. The wallet and contents were soaked from a recent heavy rain and the wallet was placed in the WCSO Evidence Division until contact can be made with the owner. € On Aug. 8, Donald Finch of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone “ led a tax return using the victims name and Social Security number. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € On Aug. 9, Christina Lee Mills, 38, of Tallahassee was arrested for resisting an of“ cer by disguise and possession of narcotic equipment. Deputies Clint Beam and Ian Dohme stopped along Shadeville Highway early in the morning to check on the welfare of Mills, who was walking on the side of the road. Mills gave deputies a false name and was acting nervously. It was discovered that Mills had an outstanding warrant for violation of probation in Wakulla County. She admitted possessing a pad to smoke narcotics. The pad was recovered with narcotics residue on it. She was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. € On Aug. 8, James Corbett of Crawfordville reported the theft of tools, a mower and hanging pots, valued at $185. The possessions were removed from the victims property. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On Aug. 8, Molly Weller of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed two unauthorized charges on her bank account totaling $1,968. The charges were created at a telecommunications store in New Jersey. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € On Aug. 8, Adele Reese of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Electronic games, equipment and tools, valued at $650, were stolen from the victims home. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 917 calls for service during the past week. Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report Dawn Reed, GRI, SFR, RealtorCell (850) 294-3468dawnjreed@yahoo.com www.WakullaInfo.comCheryl Swift, CLG, CHP, RealtorCell (850) 766-3218cswiftrealtor@yahoo.comwww.CrawfordvilleProperties.com SHORT SALE VS. FORECLOSURE www.WakullaShortSales.com Your Local Short Sale Specialists!!! It allows a more digni ed exit from the home. In a foreclosure, an of cial eventually comes to the home and tells the occupants to leave-immediately. In a short sale, the seller knows the closing date and can prepare in advance for the move. The seller could possibly avoid a de ciency judgment. Most banks will release the seller from this obligation in a short sale process. A short sale has less of a negative impact on sellers credit report. Once a short sale is completed, the sellers begin to clean-up their credit report. The timeline can be much longer as a foreclosure proceeds through the process. There is a ticking clock on tax relief. There is currently legislation, the Mortgage Forgiveness Relief Act of 2007, ensuring that homeowners who received principal reductions or other forms of debt forgiveness on their primary residence do not have to pay taxes on the amount forgiven. This legislation is set to expire at the end of the year.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 – Page 15A DR. DAVID A. KEEN, M.D., M.P.H.BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PRACTICEELIZABETH HEULER, ARNP-C VALERIE RUSSELL, ARNP-C2615 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, SUITE 103, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327PH 850-926-3140 FX 850-926-3163 (Next to the Winn-Dixie Shopping Plaza) www.wakullaurgentcare.comCOME VISIT US FOR ALL OF YOUR HEALTHCARE NEEDSOur program is simple to follow and teaches you new healthy habits, safe and effective weight loss. Get in tune with your body. Call today for a weight loss program customized to t you. WE NOW ACCEPT We are an approved drawing site for all insurances! Medically Supervised Weight LossPulmonary Function Testing Pediatrics/Immunizations X-Ray, EKG, Labs Sleep Study Ultrasound DEXA Bone Density Testing Worker’s Comp Injury Overnight Pulse Ox Holter/Event Monitor Pre-Employment Drug Screening School/Bus/DOT/Sports Physicals Family Primary Care Urgent Care/Walk Ins

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Is moving & expanding to meet the needs of more students!1616 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C(North Pointe Center)Call today and register for tutoring in a speci“c class or receive homework help for any age.K … 5: Reading & Math Skills, Homework Help 6 … 8: FCAT & End-of-Course Exam Prep: Reading, Math, Advanced Math, Algebra 1, Study & Organizational Skills 9 … 12: FCAT Prep: English & Reading; End-of-Course Exam Prep: Algebra 1, Geometry, Biology; Study & Organizational Skills; ACT & SAT Test Prep; College Admissions Consulting; Tutoring for every subject; individual or small group sessions available. 850.926.2179 Continued from Page 1A In order to participate, applications are “ lled out and then the applicants are screened, ensuring that the children truly need the help of Big Hearted Angels. The children were broken up into groups of “ ve, led by a volunteer chaperon. Volunteer Carolyn Kent, who is a teacher and had two children shopping, says she was excited to help. Having four kids, we need every little help we can get,Ž Kent says. Another volunteer, Dena Vice, who works with pre-K students, says some of the children in her group put back $14 shoes to try and stretch their dollar even further. They were very frugal,Ž Vice says. Her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Vice, who she recruited to be a chaperon also, agrees, saying that the children were very responsible with their choices. She adds that she was happy to be a part of the event. A mother herself, she says she hopes if her children were in the same situation, that someone would help them. The need is a lot greater this year,Ž Elizabeth Vice says. Following the shopping spree, all the volunteers, parents and students gathered at Hudson Park to listen to a guest speaker and have lunch. Lunch is also provided by Big Hearted Angels. The students were treated to steaks, chicken, salad and smashed potatoes, donated from Charlies Steak House. Williams says one of the owners sits on the Big Hearted Angels Board. The guest speaker was Lydia Mount, who previously worked under former Gov. Bob Graham. Williams says the purpose of the guest speaker is to educate the students. Students who participate in the shopping spree are required to attend the program. So many kids, they are going astray,Ž Williams says. I take a lot of kids under my wing.Ž Parents and role models have a responsibility to teach children respect. In order to respect others, they must “ rst respect themselves, he says. Mount took some time and spoke to the students, letting them know that no dream is too big.Ž She described Big Hearted Angels as dream pushers. Youre our future,Ž Mount told the students. We believe in you.Ž Mount, who has spoken at other events for Big Hearted Angels, says she was again honored to be the guest speaker. Im grateful for his vision, for his heart,Ž Mounts says of Williams. Mr. Williams has a big heart.Ž Others agreed, Miller says, He has a heart as big as a trash can.Ž Williams want to continue to expand the organization and his hope is to one day have chapters nationwide. I stay busy, but I love it,Ž he says. I get a lot of joy out of doing it.Ž For more information about Big Hearted Angels, visit www.bigheartedangels. org.Big Hearted Angels visit Wakulla PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN School buses unload students and chaperones at the Wal-Mart parking lot, above. Chaperon, Carolyn Kent, helps a shopper pick up school supplies, below.

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012The Wakulla news EXTRA! Green chile cheese squares Just a Pinch Recipes, Page 7B Red and Blue are primary colors Weekly Roundup, Page 12B The wreck of the DispatchRed Clay Footprints, Page 3B By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhen Jimmie Doyle ran for a seat on the Wakulla County Commission in 2008 and didnt win, she says it was divine intervention. Not winning was a blessing and gave her the chance to start NAMI Wakulla, an af“ liate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. NAMI is a non-pro“ t, grass roots, self-help, support and advocacy organization that offers peer education and training programs, as well as services for consumers, family members, health-care providers and the general public. I gave birth to NAMI,Ž Doyle says. Doyle is the founding president of NAMI. There wouldnt be a NAMI without Jimmie,Ž says Dana Peck, NAMI director and one of the original founding members. While going door-to-door campaigning, Doyle saw people with mental illness who needed help and it broke her heart. I just cried,Ž Doyle says. That was what planted the seed.Ž She knew of NAMI because of her daughter who worked for NAMI Florida. I had been exposed,Ž Doyle says. She also has mental illness in her own family and worked as a nurse, mainly in nursing homes, for more than 25 years. She saw there was a need for this type of service in Wakulla County and decided to start a chapter. Ive always said, Im nothing but a kook,Ž Doyle says. Her children were grown and she had lost her husband shortly before the election in 2008. So why not do something to help somebody.Ž She reached out to her circle of friends and invited anybody she thought might want to be a part of NAMI. There was a compelling need, Peck says. And according to the statistics, 1 in 4 people in the United States will have a mental illness, she adds. From inception to the first public meeting was about three months, she says. The “ rst organizational meeting was Jan. 26, 2009. The “ rst meeting the group chose a board of directors and spent all day writing its by-laws. That night, Doyle says she paid the dues to NAMI Florida. NAMI held its “ rst public meeting at the health department and a large crowd attended, the second meeting was in Judge Jill Walkers courtroom and Doyle says the courtroom was “ lled. Education is a huge part of what NAMI does, Doyle says. There is a stigma associated with a mental illness which causes many people to not get the help they need, she adds. I care about everybody,Ž Doyle says. And it breaks my heart to see people who feel that nobody cares.Ž NAMI is all about helping and encouraging people, she says. NAMI will make people aware that there is a recovery road,Ž Doyle says. And we want to help as many of them as possible get on that road.Ž NAMI Wakulla is completely free and offers several different programs for those with a mental illness or those who know someone with a mental illness. These programs are NAMI Basics, which is for parents or caregivers of a child who became symptomatic before age 13. It allows families to connect with each other,Ž Doyle says.Continued on Page 5B People You Should KnowJIMMIE DOYLE: NAMI WakullaThis is part of an ongoing series of feature stories on people who are busy doing things to improve Wakulla County. Do you know of someone who’s making a difference in the community? Send your ideas to editor@thewakullanews.net.Past pro les for People You Should Know have included: • R.H. Carter, executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center; • Amy Geiger president of Capital City Bank Wakulla, because of her numerous community activities; • Scott Joyner director of the Wakulla County Public Library.PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENJimmie Doyle speaks to a recent meeting of the Domestic Violence-Sexual Violence Task Force about NAMI Wakulla programs.Tonier Cain makes plea for recognizing, treating traumaBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt was an emotional and riveting presentation that Tonier Kane gave to a group of education and mental health professionals this week, a plea that they be aware of those they see who may suffer from trauma. Cain made the presentation at Wakulla Education Center on Monday before a crowd of more than 50 people, in an event sponsored by the Wakulla School District and NAMI Wakulla. Cains story was disturbing: Growing up in Maryland as the oldest of nine children by an alcoholic mother whose various boyfriends molested her beginning when she was 9 years old. She and her siblings were taken from that home in the projects when she was 11 and she lived with an older cousin for a few years, but her mother took her back at 14. She attempted suicide, then was placed with an alcoholic aunt, and then married an abusive man. By 19 she was addicted to crack cocaine and would go through 83 arrests and 66 convictions and, homeless, stayed under a bridge where she lived like a ratŽ on scraps. But, after all that, while pregnant and in prison, she took part in a program that helped her deal with and begin to heal from the various traumas of her life. Continued on Page 5B Tonier Cain 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt is proud to announce that Dr. Chukwuma M. Okoroji is now providing Obstetrics and Gynecology services 1st & 3rd Thursday of each month CRMC Medical Group Building, 2382 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite-D, Crawfordville FL. We accept most insurance, including BCBS, CHP, Medicaid and more. To schedule your appointment or for more information Call 850-320-6054NatureCoastWomensCare.com ANTIQUES C ARRIE’S C OVEC ARRIE’S C OVE PICK YOUR DISCOUNTDRAW FOR 5% TO 25% OFFDOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PET STOP P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pe t Holistic Select WellnessC L P A ALL Y P N.W S PSpecial Orders AvailablePhone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. CommunityFINANCE, LLC ASK ABOUT FIN A NCING ty C LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator W a l k t h e Walk the S h o p s N e a r Shops Near C o u r t h o u s e Courthouse S q u a r e Square The Wakulla News

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Aug. 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, Aug. 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Aug. 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. Sunday, Aug. 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. Monday, Aug. 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Aug. 21  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant. Wednesday, Aug. 22  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Aug. 23  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. Special EventsFriday, Aug. 17  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY CELEBRATION of almost 40 acres of land from the Ben Boynton family for the Heritage Village Park will be held at 10 a.m. The conveyance will take place at the Zion Hill United Methodist Church which is adjacent to the land to be conveyed. The Boynton family, members of the Wakulla County Commission, members of the Wakulla County Historical Society and the general public has been invited to help celebrate this historic event. Saturday, Aug. 18  EDEN SPRINGS FUNDRAISER will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Hudson Park. All proceeds go into the special activity fund for events such as Senior Prom, Harvest Festival, Thanksgiving dinner, Christmas, etc. There will be a bake sale, yard sale, hot dogs, hamburgers, chips and soda. Free school supplies will be given out. There will also be free blood pressure screenings. Donations of yard sale items and baked goods needed, as well as cooking supplies and volunteers. For more information, call Kathy Edel at 631-0689 or Margie Hamilton at 274-2111 or 726-7181. Wednesday, Aug. 22  CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held from noon to 1:15 p.m. at Dickey’s BBQ Pit, 8159 Woodville Highway, Woodville. Cost is $12. RSVP to Chamber of ce by calling 926-1848.Upcoming EventsFriday, Aug. 24  THIRD ANNUAL BIG CHAMPAGNE BASH for Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend will be held from 8 p.m. to midnight at Hotel Duval in Tallahassee. All proceeds bene t Big Brothers Big Sisters. The theme is the Roaring 20s. Costumes are encouraged. Enjoy music, dancing appetizers and unlimited champagne. Until Aug. 17, tickets are $70 per person, $130 per couple and group rate at $600 for 10 tickets. To purchase tickets, visit www. bbbs.org/bigbash or call 386-6002. Tuesday, Aug. 28  55 ALIVE SAFETY DRIVER CLASS will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the library. To register call Ernie Conte at 926-4605.  WAKULLA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT WORKSHOP will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the health department, 48 Oak Street, Crawfordville. They are in the nal stages of our Community Health Improvement Project, and need assistance in the next phase of the process where we identify the most important issues facing the community and develop goals to address these priority issues. During this session, they will review all the data and reports generated in the Community Health Improvement process, identify health priorities which impact Wakulla County residents, and develop goals and strategies for each priority. A working lunch will be provided during this workshop. Please email your RSVP to Tonya Hobby (850)926-0401 ext. 217 by Aug. 23. Sunday, September 2  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Loran Anderson as he presents “Floral Strategies in Plants” at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Anderson is a retired FSU professor and volunteer refuge botanist whose plant hikes and presentations are always a treat. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, “Nature’s Classroom” at St. Marks Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850-925-6121 for information. Wednesday, Sept. 8  ST. MARKS YACHT CLUB will host Dr. Felicia Coleman, director of the FSU Coastal and Marine Laboratory, as its featured guest at the Club’s Up Close and Personal Spotlight Event at 7:30 p.m. The Club is located at 36 Yacht Club Lane, St. Marks, Florida, 32355. Seating is limited, so reservations should be made by calling (850) 925-6606. In a conversational-style interview led by Dr. Betty Ann Korzenny, adjunct professor, Florida State University, School of Communication, she and Coleman will discuss what in uenced Coleman to pursue her study of sea life, and the local and international impact of the Laboratory’s research. Friday, Sept. 14  SILENT AUCTION will be held to bene t the Wakulla County Public Library from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. Items include gift certi cates, vacations, marine supplies, art, school supplies and more. Refreshments will be provided. To make a donation to the auction or for more information, please contact: PO Box 1737, Crawfordville, FL 32326. Call (850) 926-4244 or FriendsWakullaLibrary@gmail.com for more information.  CAMPAIGN PARTY for County Commissioner Candidate Howard Kessler will be held at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, at 7:30 p.m. There will be music by Big Daddy Randall Webster. Desserts and refreshments will be served. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Tourist Development Council meeting at 8:30 a.m. at Welcome Center. Eden Springs Fundraiser at Hudson Park from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. County Commission meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Chamber luncheon at Dickey’s BBQ Pit from noon to 1:15 p.m. ThursdaySaturdayMondayWednesday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Government Meetings Thursday, Aug. 16  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway. Monday, Aug. 20  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for its regular meeting in the commission chambers.  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. for its regular meeting at city hall. Tuesday, Aug. 21  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold a meeting on the city budget at 6:30 p.m. at city hall.By SCOTT JOYNER Library DirectorWe are going to begin doing some community outreach by reading to the younger patients at the Wakulla County Health Department each Wednesday morning beginning the “ rst week in September. Were asking anyone who has childrens books theyd like to donate to leave at the health department or give to the children to take home to please bring them by WCPL. Were excited to begin doing this for the department and this will be the “ rst in our attempts to have a more visual presence in the community. Thank You. On Thursday, Aug. 16, there are several events. They include Edit Your Digital Pictures computer class at 1:30 p.m. at the Computer Lab. Healing Arts of Wakulla will hold a meeting at 5 p.m. in the Conference Room. LinkedIn: Getting Started will be held at 5:30 p.m. at the Computer Lab. Volunteer Wakulla Board meeting will be held at 6 p.m. at the Childrens Room. Concerned Citizens of Wakulla will meet at 7 p.m. in the Main Meeting Room. Library News... Political EventsThursday, Aug. 23  POLITICAL FORUM for the superintendent of schools candidates will be held at 7 p.m. at the library.  POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for property appraiser will be held at 8 p.m. at the library. Thursday, September 27 POLITICAL FORUM for County Commission seats 1, 3, 5. Seat 1 will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Seat 3 at 7:30 p.m. and Seat 5 at 8:30 p.m. FILE PHOTOThe Ross-Linzy House was dismantled in 2008 and is to be reassembled at the Heritage Village Park. A celebration is planned for Aug. 17 at 10 a.m. at Zion Hill Methodist Church, next to the land proposed for the park.

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A morsel of genuine history is a thing so rare as to be always valuable.Ž … Thomas Jefferson. This months feature is The Wreck of the DispatchŽ detailing what is known of the wreck which lies in shallow water near the St. Marks Lighthouse, and has sometimes been a mystery to people who have seen the remains of it at low tide. A similar mystery boat was in last months paper, information provided by Bill McLean of Moultrie, Ga. As of my last contact with Bill, no positive leads to the identity of that boat have been received. So if you think you may have some good information, dont forget to contact the Historical Society or call Bill directly. THE WRECK OF THE DISPATCH When I was just a boy, maybe 60 years or so ago, we all knew that shipwreck near the St. Marks Lighthouse which made its appearance at least once a day at low tide. It is just offshore and south of the mouth of the canal that marks the entrance to what is now a large boat ramp where sports “ sherman and other outdoor enthusiasts launch their boats. It is the resting place of the Dispatch. Of all the events that have transpired in the waters off the St. Marks Lighthouse, what happened to the Dispatch back in 1928 was probably not that momentous. A ship was lost in a “ re but no lives were lost. Because I always saw it out there and knew something of the story as to how it got there, it made a lasting impression on me. I guess it was just an interesting event that happened at a place near and dear to my heart. So many years have passed now and the remains of the Dispatch are not nearly as obvious as she is decaying and sinking deeper into the bottom of the river. Except on very low tides, she is hardly visible at all. And to many of those young folks who now come and go near her, the story of the Dispatch is being lost in the fog of time. In the not distant future, there will be no trace of the Dispatch. Thanks to the recent efforts of the historians at the Wildlife Refuge where the lighthouse is located, a brief account of the Dispatch is provided in a pamphlet available at a marker near the mouth of the canal. My purpose here is to make some additional record available to the public so that the Dispatch and what happened to her will not be forgotten. The story of the Dispatch is also important to me, personally, since members of my family were witnesses to the ships demise. Available information, not fully con“ rmed, has it that the Dispatch began her life as a pleasure yacht and was later donated to the U.S. Navy for use as a Submarine Chaser during World War I. Further, that after the war the State of Florida came into possession of the ship and it was acquired by the Florida Shell“ sh Commission. At some point in time after the disestablishment of the Shell“ sh Commission, the Dispatch was retained by the State of Florida and converted to use as a pleasure craft by state employees. It is not known if the name of the ship was changed to DispatchŽ after the state acquired her, or if she had always borne that name. It is possible that research through the Florida Archives may shed some light on the ships background. My mother was 14 or 15 years old in 1928 when the Dispatch burned and sank near the St. Marks Lighthouse. She told me the Dispatch was at anchorage in Spanish Hole near the end of Long Bar in front of the Lighthouse. Mother said the Dispatch caught “ re and her father, John Y. Gresham, the Lighthouse Keeper, went to her aid in the lighthouse launch. As the Dispatch burned, he was able to cut her anchor cable and tow her out of the St. Marks River channel where she grounded in shallow water at her present location. She said there was no way to save the ship and she continued to burn and sank. Thankfully, mother ran out onto the lighthouse pier and was able to take pictures of the Dispatch as it was burning in Spanish Hole. Mother told me that no one was killed or injured. My sisters book, Keepers of the Light,Ž mentions the demise of the Dispatch and there are two photographs of her on “ re and also a photograph of three unidentified members of the crew, taken in 1928 at the Lighthouse. I have included one photograph with this article. I do not know the exact date in 1928 when the ship burned, and may have missed the pertinent entry in the lighthouse logbook which I reviewed at the National Archives. I would definitely think that my grandfather would have made an entry with details. The wreck of the Dispatch was the subject of an underwater archaeology project undertaken over two weekends in early November 1998 by Florida State University. A report was made in June 2000. My uncle, mothers brother Alton Gresham, who was about 16 years old in 1928, was interviewed and provided what details he could recall. In addition to what is previously reported herein, he said the Dispatch was a steel hulled vessel with a propulsion system consisting of twin screw propellers, powered by steam. He said the Dispatch was convertedŽ by the Vinyard Boat Building Company. He said an on-board generator caught “ re and quickly spread through the ship, engul“ ng it in ” ame. The ships bottom buckled and she sank when it was towed by Greshams father into shallow water. He concluded that much of the remains of the Dispatch were salvaged for scrap during World War II. Next month, in addition to a feature story, I will tell you folks about a very interesting artifact provided to our museum by a visitor from Cripple Creek, Colo. Please never forget us at your Wakulla County Historical Society Museum, 24 High Dr., Crawfordville FL, or P.O. Box 51, Crawfordville, 32326. (850) 926-1110. Mark your calendars for Sept. 8 and plan to attend the yard sale at the Museum (the old jail) in Crawfordville beginning at 8 a.m. A good cause as all proceeds will go to our museum, and you all need to get their early to get some great items. & www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 – Page 3B Red Clay Footprints By John Roberts The wreck of the Dispatch JOHN ROBERTS PERSONAL COLLECTIONFrom 1928: A view from the dock at the St. Marks Lighthouse of the ship Dispatch burning. The remains of the Dispatch are still visible at low tide. Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! 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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comARTS & ENTERTAINMENT The Purvis Brothers Band will perform a special show featuring the music of singer/songwriter Willie Nelson on Saturday, Aug. 25, at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. Also appearing will be vocalist Ronnie Weeks and renowned “ ddle player Wayne Martin. Tickets are $15 and may be reserved by calling 9623711. The St. Marks Yacht Club will host Dr. Felicia Coleman, director of the FSU Coastal and Marine Laboratory in St. Teresa, as its featured guest at the clubs Up Close and Personal Spotlight Event on Saturday, Sept. 8 at 7:30 p.m. Coleman will discuss what in” uenced her to pursue the study of sea life. Though the evening is free, seating is limited, so reservations should be made by calling 925-6606.Special to The News Everyone is welcome at the Gadsden Arts Center on Friday, Aug. 17 at 6 p.m. to celebrate the 100th Birthday of our highly acclaimed Bell & Bates Building, a heart of our community for 100 years. The celebration will recognize Founding Director Zoe Golloway, building donors Mark and Patsy Bates, Architect Joel Sampson, and an army of volunteers for the amazing transformation of the Bell & Bates Building from beloved hardware store into a museum-quality arts center. This team raised $1.4 million dollars to create a visual arts space that is admired by everyone who experiences it … a remarkable achievement by a community working together for the greater good. With this 100th Birthday Celebration Gadsden Arts is opening four exhibitions simultaneously. Inside/Out: Beth Appleton assemblage and Deborah LaGrasse sculpture feature works of art by two of the most highly acclaimed women artists in our region. The Beth Appleton exhibition is also an integral part of the 100th Birthday Celebration, the first time a major exhibition of Appletons work has been featured in the Sara May Love Gallery since it was the inaugural exhibition in the Bell and Bates Building when it opened as Gadsden Arts in 2000. LaGrasse exhibits largescale mixed-media sculpture that help her de“ ne the mystery, strength, and power of the human spirit. Bound and Unfettered: Ben Bivins painting and sculpture explores the searches and struggles of life through abstraction. Brush Strokes is the annual members juried exhibition for the venerable Tallahassee Watercolor Society; and the Gadsden Arts Center Artists Guild, now numbering 50 artists, present new works in all mediums. All four exhibitions present 202 new works of art. The exhibitions run through Nov. 3. The exhibitions are presented by Mayo Woodward, Ameriprise Financial. And co-presented by TCC Foundation and Bell & Bates Home Center, with additional support from Katies Cakes and Catering, Quincy Rotary Club, and the Gadsden Board of Realtors. The Gadsden Arts Center is located in Quincy. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $1. For more information, call (850) 875-4866 or www.gadsdenarts.org.Gadsden Arts celebrates 100th birthdayFour new exhibitions will open on Friday, Aug. 17 PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA detail of artist Beth Appletons assemblage Biosphere,Ž one of the works to be exhibited. The Gadsden Arts Center on the square in Quincy. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPurvis Brothers to play at Sopchoppy Opry Marine Labs Coleman to speak at yacht club 5 Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2 Go to http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click ContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ. The Wak u lla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 – Page 5BContinued from Page 1BOne participant of NAMI Basics says, This course has given me a much greater appreciation for the heroism of people living with mental illness and for the families who love and support them.Ž Doyle says the most rewarding stories are those involving parents of young adults who have a mental illness. NAMI just taught them how to live with their child,Ž Doyle says. Sometimes a mental illness in a child is labeled as attitude or the child being a brat, Doyle says. Or sometimes the illness is simply ignored because the parent does not want to admit something is truly wrong. A lot is blamed on early childhood, but thats not always true,Ž Doyle says. That kids not a brat, hes sick.Ž One of the most important issues is addressing the mental health needs of children, she says. This requires parents and teachers working as allies, which is another NAMI program. This program emphasizes the important role teachers play in a childs life. Last year, a mental health education program for school professionals and families to help them better understand early warning signs of mental illness and how best to intervene. This is to try and ensure a kid does not have to go to Second Chance, but can graduate with their classmates,Ž Doyle says. NAMI Connection is a support group for those with a mental illness. This togetherness of NAMI is encouraging,Ž Doyle says. We have problems. We share our problems.Ž NAMI PROGRAMS NAMI Connection: I am not alone. There is a place where people understand me, are there to help me and I feel better about myself when I help someone else. I can get involved in NAMI connection and make a difference. The Peer-to-Peer program is an education course that provides a full approach to recovery for people with mental illness. One participant says, Peer-to-peer has allowed me to take the focus off my illness and learn to balance it with the rest of my life. By engaging in recovery I am able to be more relaxed and productive, both at work and home.Ž Another course NAMI offers is Family-to-Family which is for a mental health consumer on the road to recovery or for someone who has a family member with a mental illness. With the stigma associated, its very very hard for people to realize, not only can I help myself by accepting this bad news, I can learn and help others,Ž Doyle says. Anyone who has a mental illness of has a family member with a mental illness can take the training required to lead the Familyto-Family course. Doyle quali“ ed because of mental illness in her family. She has also taken the course. Im a much happier person now,Ž Doyle says after taking the course. I get up now, every morning, with an attitude of gratitude.Ž One of her favorite stories during her time with NAMI was of a young man in his 20s who was sent to NAMI after he violated probation and was sent to jail. He had been in and out of mental health facilities since he was a child. He had quit taking his medication and relapsed. Doyle visited him in jail for 3 months, offering support. While incarcerated, he got back on his medication and once released he moved to Utah and has a job working in the mines, she says. His mother drove all the way from South Florida to Wakulla County to thank Doyle and NAMI for what they did for her son. Doyle says she just talked with him and was that support for him. He came to realize he could have a life,Ž she says. Doyle hopes NAMI continues to grow and offer more courses and programs in the future. I say that were crawling now,Ž Doyle says. We have to very diligently, slowly and graciously cultivate an appetite for what the public sees and the people NAMI has helped.Ž Everyone is welcome at NAMIs meetings, she says. Come if only to “ nd out more,Ž she says. It could put your mind at ease. Early diagnosis is as valuable there as it is in other diseases.Ž Her hope is that one day when her youngest grandchild is her age that there is a mental health facility in Wakulla County. And that NAMI played an important part,Ž Doyle says. NAMI Wakulla is located at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 926-1033 or email namiwakulla@centurylink. net.Continued from Page 1B Cain asked throughout her story, beginning with when she was a child, where was someone who could recognize that there was a problem? Instead, she said, her story was one of being re-traumatized by arresting officers, corrections of“ cers, drug addiction counselors, the use of seclusion of restraint and being over-medicated in hospitals. The treatment at a Maryland womens prison by a trauma therapist provided a safe environment where she could start to heal. (That was the basis of the 2010 documentary Healing NeenŽ about Cains life. NeenŽ is Cains nickname.) That was in 2004. Eight years ago, Cain was homeless. Six years ago, she bought a house. Her daughter is thriving. My daughter doesnt know what its like to live in the projects,Ž Cain said. She talked of breaking the cycle that includes her mother. When my belief system changed, my thought process changed,Ž she said. What if, she asked, when she was 9 someone had recognized her trauma? What if early on she had received trauma treatment? What if employees at schools, hospitals and state agencies were trained to recognize trauma? Standing at the rostrum with a mugshot of her from years ago projected on a screen, the woman she is today as opposed to the drug addicted woman of the past, Cain pointed at the photo and asked those at the conference: If that woman walked into your of“ ce, as a client or one of your caseloads, would you be able to see this?Ž She urged them not to pass judgment that people cant change or want to be that way. Theres always hope,Ž she said. As long as you breathe.Ž Fielding questions after her speech, Cain said shes still in almost daily contact with her mother. But her mother is not allowed to have contact with her daughter. Her mother still drinks, Cain said. Im more concerned about her soul than her sobriety.Ž People You Should Know: Jimmie Doyle, NAMI WakullaPHOTO BY WILLIAM SNOWDENTonier Cain at the rostrum, and projected on the screen behind her is a mugshot from one of her frequent drug arrests from several years ago. If that woman walked into your of“ ce, she asked, would you be able to see this?Tonier Cain makes plea for recognizing, treating traumaEighty percent of our population has been traumatized. e trauma is the underlying reason and the basis that leads to the self-medication, the drug use, and then eventually landing in jail, according to the documentary Healing Neen about Tonier Cains life. How many light bulbs does it take to change an American?

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Readers Choice Contest! Heres your chance to participate in Readers Choice Contest! is asking our readers to participate in the Readers Choice Contest to identify Wakulla Countys most popular local businesses! Tell us your favorite Readers ChoicesŽ by “lling out the of“cial entry ballot below. Your name will then be registered in a random drawing for $100 in Cash. One entry per person. Please follow these guidelines: All ballots should be clearly printed. The business name must be clearly identi“ed. Your nominations must “t the appropriate category. Use the of“cial entry ballot. All ballots must be received at The Wakulla News of“ce by 4:00 p.m., Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. Ballots may be mailed to: The Wakulla News, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326, or you may drop off the ballot at The Wakulla News of“ce at 3119-A Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. Send your nominations today. Then watch for results in the Sept. 27, 2012 edition of !Animal Care: Pet Care, Grooming & Supplies ________Automotive: Auto Engine Repair __________ Auto Body Shops ____________Used Car Dealer ____________ Financial Services: Bank _____________________ Credit Union _______________ Mortgage Company _________ Food and Beverage Liquor Store _______________ Grocery __________________Ice Cream/Snacks __________ Bakery ___________________ Health and Fitness Gym _____________________ Massage Therapist __________Chiropractor _______________ Fitness Instructor/Trainer _____ Homes and Land Builder ___________________ Real Estate Company _______ Title Company _____________ Surveyor _________________Lawn Care/Landscaping _____ Nursery/Garden Center ______ Flooring __________________ Plumbing _________________ Electrician ________________ A/C-Heating ______________ Painter ___________________ Tree Service ______________ Pool Care ________________ Home Cleaning Service _____ Miscellaneous: Childcare __________________Clothing and Gifts ____________ Storage Centers _____________ Dance Studio _______________Photographer _______________Hotel ______________________Hardware __________________ Personal Services: Barber Shop ________________ Hair Salon __________________Nail Care __________________ Tanning ____________________Professional Services: Accountant _________________Attorney ___________________ Doctor _____________________Dentist ____________________ Recreation: Marina ____________________Fishing Charter _____________ Bait & Tackle _______________ Boat and Motor Repair _______________ Canoe/Kayak Rental _________Scuba ____________________ Restaurant: Atmosphere ________________Breakfast __________________ Lunch _____________________Dinner ____________________ Service ___________________Entertainment ______________Readers Choice Categories:Name______________________ Address_____________________________ City_____________________________ State_________ Zip______________ Phone____________________ Email________________________ Age____ Are you a current subscriber to ? _____Yes ______No*Entries must be handwritten on of“cial entry ballot from Sorry, no computer generated ballots, mechanical reproductions, photocopies, carbon copies, illegible entries or ballots with answers that are not true and/or relevant will be accepted. *At least 25% of the categories must be “lled out. *Only one entry per person. Ballots not meeting these requirements will be voided. *All ballots must be received by by 4:00 p.m. on Aug. 31, 2012. Send entire ballot to Readers Choice ContestŽ, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326 or bring it to our of“ce at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville. (No purchase required.) *Winning entry will be drawn by a representative of *All entrants agree to publication of their name, home town, and photograph without additional compensation. Announcement of the winner will appear in the Readers ChoiceŽ special section to be published in the Sept. 27, 2012 edition of *Employees of and their families are not eligible to win. Not intended for residents of states where prohibited by law. Winner must be 18 years of age or older. *All ballots that do not meet this criteria will not be counted.THIS AD IS YOUR OFFICIAL BALLOT & ENTRY FORM.Please complete and return to by 4:00 p.m. Aug. 31, 2012. Use the area beside each category to list your favorite business. Mail your of“cial entry form and completed ballot to: WIN $100Submit your completed entry form and be entered in the drawing to win $100 in Cash ENTRY FORM: The News Wakulla Th e Th e Readers’ Choice 2012 e a d e r s  C h o i c e C a t e g o r i e s : S S S S S u b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b m i t t t t t t t t t t t t y y y y y y y y y y e e e e e e e e e n t t t t t t t t t t e r e d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d Register Today for your chance toƒc/o Readers Choice Contest P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326OR drop it off at of“ce: 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 – Page 7B -Janet By DAVID WHITE Whether youre a veteran oenophile or a budding wine enthusiast, youve probably fallen into a wine rut at one point or another. Perhaps youve never been disappointed by a Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, so these days, its all you buy. Or maybe you stock your pantry with perennial crowd pleasers like Washington State Merlot and California Chardonnay, so those are the only wines you drink. All too often, I “ nd myself reaching for Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir. My favorite examples combine all the elements I look for in Pinot … rich, ripe aromas of cherries along with fresh herbs and earth, together with lively acidity … so regardless of the season or the meal, its my go-to wine. Such complacency is easy to understand. After all, were creatures of habit. But its silly. The world of wine is in“ nite. There are, quite literally, thousands of different wine grape varieties planted in dozens of countries. Tasting different wines is the best way to learn, and surprising your palate is the best way to keep things fun. So be adventurous. To begin, consider exploring different regions. If you like Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, try a classic, Left Bank Bordeaux or see what Chile has to offer. If you regularly reach for Sonoma Pinot Noir, explore the wines of Burgundy, Oregon, or New Zealand. Next, look for wines with similar pro“ les. If you like Chardonnay, consider Viognier. If you like Sauvignon Blanc, try Torrontes or Albarino. If Pinot Noir is your go-to grape, try Tempranillo or Blaufrnkisch. If youre a fan of Cabernet Sauvignon, consider ordering Malbec or Merlot. Seek obscurity. Some of the most exciting wines are hard to compare to the more popular styles on the market. This summer, for example, Ive fallen for Muscadet, a white wine produced in Frances Loire Valley from a grape called Melon de Bourgogne.Ž Typically, the wines are marked by subtle yet precise aromas of apples, limes, and seawater. Thanks to extended contact with the dead yeast cells left over after fermentation, Muscadet is also known for exhibiting a creamy mouthfeel. These wines are perfect with shell“ sh and light seafood dishes. Plus, like most obscure-but-delicious wines, Muscadet is generally affordable. Orange wines are also worth “ nding. Despite the moniker, these wines arent made from oranges … theyre white wines produced like red wines, remaining in contact with their skins for an extended period during fermentation. As a result of this process, the wines pick up features that are typically associated with red wines, like tannins. These wines are certainly unusual … many taste sour … but theyre captivating. Unpopular doesnt have to mean esoteric … there are plenty of fun, food friendly wines that simply havent caught on in the United States, even though theyre guaranteed hits. Austrian Grner Veltliner, a white, and Sicilian Nero dAvola, a red, are two varieties thatll pair with virtually everything. Both work great if all your dinner companions have ordered something different. The wine world is vast, so avoiding complacency is easy. You just have to embrace surprise.David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet. WHITES WINESTo avoid the wine rut, embrace surprise WWW.TERROIRIST.COM/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers … if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bar“eld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year. YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible. For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program. Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor ofƒ At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75¢.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink)

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com This page sponsored in part by: Air As Ax Be Car Creates Dam Dew Do Echoing Eye Few Fig Fly Get Got Had He His Hunts Icy Ink Intend It Kid Knife Lazier Lid Lie Listening May Mustn’t No Oats Of Oil Or Own Panic Phone Pig Puts Sack Sank Saw Script Sets Sir Ski So Tea Tip Ton Too Toy Try Very Visible We Who Yard Yes Yet WORD SEARCH

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THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 – Page 9B SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements 5313-0816 TWN Wakulla County Code Enforcement Case No. CE2011-205 PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULLACOUNTYCODE ENFORCEMENTBOARD CASE NO. CE2011-205 Parcel No. 20-2s-01e-142-04917-D07 Property Address: 157 Finner Drive Crawfordville, Florida 32327 WAKULLACOUNTY, a political subdivision of the State of Florida Petitioner, v. The Estate of Sherrol Wilson, David Wilson, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Sherrol Wilson; Brianna Donaldson, as an heir of he Estate of Sherrol D. Wilson; and the heirs, Devisees, grantees, assignees, or other claimants of the Estate of Sherrol D. Wilson, Respondents. FINDINGS OF FACT, CONCLUSIONS OF LAW AND ORDER THIS CAUSE came for public hearing before the Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board (the BoardŽ) on July 11, 2012 and having heard testimony under oath and received evidence, the Board issues its Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law, and enters its Order in this case as follows: FINDINGS OF F ACT 1. Respondents are the owners of the subject property. 2. On August 15, 2011, the Code Enforcement Office conducted an inspection in response to a complaint received regarding the subject property, located at 157 Finner Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Parcel ID No 20-2S-01E-142-0491 7-D07, and observed the storage ofa large amount of tires in an unenclosed area in violation of section 8 .042, Wakulla County Code of Ordinances. 3. Pursuant to sŽ 162.06, Fla. Stat. and s. 8065, Wakulla County Code, the Code Enforcement Officer issued an initial Notice of Violation to Respondents on August 22, 2011, by way of regular mail and certified mail, providing notice of the violation and also providing a reasonable time for correction of the violation and a date for compliance of September 15, 2011 4. On January 6, 2012, the Code Enforcement Office conducted a follow-up inspection to determine whether the violations were corrected by the date for compliance. The inspection revealed that the violations had not been corrected, The Code Enforcement Office issued a new Notice of Violation to Respondents by way of regular mail and certified mail, providing notice of the violation and a new date for compliance of February 6, 2012. An additional notice was mailed on March 26, 2012, providing a compliance date of April 10, 2012. 5. Additional notice of the violation and the hearing on the violation was given by way of publication in the Wakulla News once a week each week from May 17, 2012 through June 7, 2012, for four consecutive weeks, 6. Respondents failed to provide written notice of the correction of the violations to the Code Enforcement Office on or before the date for compliance, and the violations were not actually corrected. 7. Respondents were served with proper notice of the public hearing and Respondents, or their representative, failed to appear at the hearing. 8. Code Enforcement staffs testimony expresses concern that the tires constitute a health hazard due to the accumulation of water within the tires. CONCLUSIONS OF LA W The subject property is alleged to be in violation of section 8.042, of the Wakulla County Code of Ordinances Sections 8.042, states: All property shall remain free from any nuisance accumulation of rubbish or garbage other than that placed in an approved, and enclosed receptacle. Anuisance accumulation of rubbish or garbage in violation of this section shall be deemed to have occured if an owner or occupant of property allows garbage to remain on the property beyond a period of seven days or rubbish to remain on the property beyond a period of 15 days. § 8,042(a), Wakulla County Code. For the purposes of section 8.042, rubbishŽ is defined to include combustible and non-combustible waste materials, including, but not limited to: the residue from the burning of wood, coal, coke and other combustiblematerials, paper, rags, cartons, boxes, wood, excelsior, rubber, leather, tree branches, yard trimmings, tin cans, disconnected or inoperable appliances, metals, mineral matter, glass, crockery and dust, construction debris, and other similar materials.Ž § 8.041, Wakulla County Code. An accumulation of tires would be included within the definition of rubbish  Section 8 .042 further requires that property owners dispose of rubbish in a safe and sanitary manner by placing such rubbish in approved containers, if possible, and removing it to an approved disposal facility within the County Pursuant to the above stated provision of the Wakulla County Code, and based on the evidence and testimony presented at the public hearing, the Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board finds by clear and convincing evidence that the Respondents have allowed items meeting the definition of rubbishŽ to remain on the subject property for a period in excess of fifteen days, Furthermore, this violation presents a serious risk to the public health due to the potential for standing water which may contribute to an increased number of mosquitos and the spread of mosquito-born illnesses. ORDER Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 120 community newspapers, 32 websites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)742-1373 General Help Attn: Drivers Great Miles+ Top 5% Pay = Money Security + Respect= PRICELESS 2 Mos CDL Class A Exp (877)258-8782 DriversRefrigerated and Dry Van freight. Flexible hometime. Annual salary $45K to $60K. Quarterly Bonus. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. (800)414-9569. www. driveknight.com General Help EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERSearn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE Schools/ Instruction MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDEDBecome a Medical Office Assistant at SC Train!! No Experience needed! Online training gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLEFri. 17 & Sat. 18 9am-3pm Power tools, Yard tools Home Items. 125 Shar Mel Re Lane Call for Info (850) 926-4125 CRAWFORDVILLEFri. 17 & Sat. 18 9am-3pmBenefit Yard Sale For Rescue Animals35 Garner Circle N. (850) 926-2843 EDEN SPRINGS NURSING AND REHAB CENTER FUNDRAISER Saturday, Aug. 18 8AM-5PM, Hudson Park. Bake Sale, Yard Sale,hot dogs, hamburgers, chips, soda. Free school supplies, Free blood pressure screenings. For more information, call Kathy Edel 631-0689; Margie Hamilton 274-2111 or 926-7181. All proceeds go into the special activity fund for residentsevents. Musical Instruments Upright PianoMendelssohn ivory keys $100 You Move (850) 962-3799 Mobile Homes For Rent Crawfordville2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Expando, Living room, bedroom, $400 mo. $300 deposit 850-766-0170 CRAWFORDVILLERent to own! D/W Mobile Home. 3BR 2BA, 1 Acres $650/month, plus deposit. 850-926-9540 Apartments Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEWakula Trace Apartments Now Accepting Applications ForBeautiful 1 Bedroom Apartmentsfor persons 62 years of age or older Handycapped/ disabled regardless of age. Must meet income requirements. Rental assistance based on availability. Located at 3 Celebrity Lane Beside Senior Center (850) 926-0207 TDD 800-955-7771 Equal Housing Opportunity Rental Houses PanaceaCottage, for Rent 2/1 Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Rennovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, covered front proch & open back deck, Small pets acceptable Excellent fishing! $585/month 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $750/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1935 Crawfordville3 Bedroom, 1 Bath 10510 Ted Lot Lane $600. mo. $300 secuirty 850-766-0170 CRAWFORDVILLEBeach Front at Shell Point Cute 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Screen porch, decks, great views, Avaialable furnished or unfurnished 1 yr. lease $1,200 month, (850) 926-8948 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEWakulla Gardens Nice 3Bedroom 2 Bath Home with Garage Central heat and air, jacuzzi tub, $925. mo (850) 926-8948 IVAN3 Bdroom. 1 Bath 93 Stokley Road (850) 926-5336 Auctions Estates REAL ESTATE Auction,Executive Mountain Home w/Guest House & Lake on 212+/-Acres Divided, Independence, VA. 9/8/12 at 2 p.m. On Site at 1002 Saddle Creek Road, Independence, VA. Live & Online. Iron Horse Auction Co. (800)997-2248. NCAL3936. VAAL580. ironhorse auction.com 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $855mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $850Mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $825mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $700Mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $675Mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $625Mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker AUGUST 16, 2012 Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432“we sell and service most makes and models” Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 850-926-9760 850-509-1013Bryant’sCARPET AND UPHOLSTERY CAREProfessional carpet, upholstery, tile/grout and area rug cleaning.IICRC/CLEANTRUST CERTIFIED TECHNICIANBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5332-0830 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201202746 TO: Richard A. Greene ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. August 9, 16, 23 & 30 5321-0816 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTYANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING: EVENT: School Board Meeting DATE: Monday, August 20, 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE : School Board Room, 69 Arran Board, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL32326, 850-926-0065 Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News August 16, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5333-0816 TWN vs. Nall, Andrea M., Case No:65-2008-CA-000152FC Notice of Foreclosure Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 65-2008-CA-000152FC TA YLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP., Plaintiff, ANDREAM. NALLA/KA/ ANDREANALL; GEOFFREYNALL; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to Final Judgement of Foreclosure dated the 29th day of May, 2009, and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000152FC, of the Circuit Court of the 2NDJudicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORPORATION is the Plaintiff and ANDREAM. NALLA/K/AANDREANALL, GEOFFREYNALL, JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONTLOBBYof WAKULLA COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 4th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 69, BLOCK A, MAGNOLIAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 59, PAGE 261, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDATOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2007 FLEETWOOD MOBILE HOME, SER. NO.GAFL675AB78594-CD2. 5336-0823 TWN vs. Maryvonne Ashley Case No: 12 CA13 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 12 CA13 ONEWESTBANK, FSB, Plaintiff, UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALLOTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTERESTIN THE ESTATAE OF MARYVONNE H. ASHLEY, et, al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALLOTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARYVONNE H. ASHLEY LASTADDRESS UNKNOWN CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN ALBERT ASHLEY LASTADDRESS UNKNOWN CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN NANCYCARTER LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 103 OAK AVE., HAVANA, FL32333 CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 35 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA AND PROCEED SOUTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 785.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 657.15 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 402.44 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 19 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 189.07 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 231.19 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 189.07 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 230.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO A30.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAYEASEMENT ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARYTHEREOF. SUBJECT TO A15.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAYEASEMENT ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARYTHEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A30.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAYEASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 35 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA AND PROCEED SOUTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 785.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 657.15 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 591.51 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 231.19 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 300.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 314.04 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 381.51 FEET TO THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD #365 SAID POINT BEING A POINT ON ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE WESTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYAND THE ARC OF SAID CURVE HAVING ARADIUS OF 5729.59 FEET THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 48 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 31.33 FEET THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 02 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 31.33 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 402.48 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 314.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 269.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 30.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A1993 BRENNER MOBILE HOME, IDENTIFICATION NOS. 10L23424U AND 10L23424X, FLORIDATITLE NOS. 65833078 AND 65833079 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address i is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL33309 on or before September 13, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in The Wakulla Times and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoo rdinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled Court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 6th day of August, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News August 16 & 23, 2012 : 5341-0906 TWN vs. KEVIN R. GABYCase No. 4:12-CV-00053-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:12-CV-00053-RH-WCS CENTENNIALBANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN R GABYa/k/a KEVIN RILEYGABY; KERRYR. GABY; and WILDWOOD COUNTRYCLUB PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in the above-styled case on June 5, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, and the Amendment to Judgment of Foreclosure entered July 10, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 10th day of September 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Eastern T ime), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices and being in Wakulla County and Franklin County, Florida: SEE EXHIBITS A, B AND C ATTACHED HERETO. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshal, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated: August 8, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL32591-3010 EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND ALSO MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 82 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER AND THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 1575.73 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARYOF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 480.95 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AND AN EXTENSION THEREOF 386.57 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF U.S. HIGHWAYNO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY225.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 385.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 225.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as PropertyŽ). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. EXHIBIT B Parcel 1: Lot 21 of Wildwood Country Club, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 35, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 10, Block E of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 3: Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Less and Except: that part of Lots 1 and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, deeded to the State of Florida, recorded 12/19/1973 in Official Records Book 39, Page 784, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 4: Lots 26 and 27, Block O of Lanark Beach Unit No. 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, all water and riparian rights, ditches, and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, and replacements that may now, or at any time the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as PropertyŽ). EXHIBIT C BEGIN AT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 13 ADISTANCE OF 726.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EDGE OF SWIRL SWAMP, THENCE RUN ALONG THE EDGE OF SAID SWIRLSWAMPAS FOLLOWS: NORTH 70 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 282.08 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 213.59 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 107.30 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 97.25 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 125.54 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 243.65 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 190.70 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 152.83 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 285.84 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 133.29 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID SWAMPS EDGE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 3340.12 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1530.27 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE ON THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 13, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY834.01 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 1560.24 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOTS 86 AND 87 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 131.30 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 660.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 528.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS OVER AND ACROSS THAT CERTAIN EASEMENT RECORDED OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 191, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as PropertyŽ). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News August 16, 23, 30 and September 6 2012 A1135183.DOC 5341-0906 Based upon the foregoing Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law, and pursuant to the authority granted in Chapter 162, Florida Statutes, and Chapter 8, Wakulla County Land Development Code, by motion made and duly seconded and passed by the Board by a majority vote of at least four (4) members, it is hereby ORDERED: 1:. Respondents shaIl correct said violations on or before August 11, 2012 (the Compliance DateŽ), by which date Respondents must correct the violations of the Code described herein by disposing of all rubbish material, including the tires. Small rubbish items may be separated into the containers provided by the Countys solid waste hauler and left curbside for pickup on the day designated for solid waste collection for the property, or it may disposed of at the Wakulla County transfer station at the landfill. Other materials, including the tires, must be removed to the Wakulla County transfer station during its hours of operation, In addition, Respondents shall pay an administrative charge in the amount of $150.00 for administrative costs associated with inspecting the subject property and presenting this Case to the Board on or before the Compliance Date., 2, In the event that Respondents comply with this Order, as verified in an Affidavit of Compliance filed with the Board by the Code Enforcement Officer, the Chairman shall be authorized to enter an Order Acknowledging Compliance on behalf of the Board, a certified copy of which shall be recorded in the public records of Wakulla County, and provided by certified mail to Respondents, Ahearing is not required for issuance of the Order Acknowledging Compliance. 3 In the event that Respondents fail to comply with this Order on or before the Compliance Date, as verified in an Affidavit of Non-Compliance filed with the Board by the Code Enforcement Officer, the Board hereby authorizes the Chairman to enter an Order Imposing Fines, a certified copy of which shall be recorded in the public records of Wakulla County, and provided by certified mail to Respondents. Such fines shall be imposed in the amount of $150.00 for the first day and $50.00 for each and every day thereafter that the violation continues past the Compliance Date. Ahearing is not required for issuance of the Order Imposing Fines. 4. Upon recordation in the public records, the Order Imposing Fines shall constitute a lien against the land on which the violation exists and upon any other real or personal property owned by Respondents. Upon petition to the circuit court, such Order shall be enforceable in the same manner as a court judgment. The fines imposed in the Order shall continue to accrue until Respondents come into compliance or until judgment is rendered, whichever occurs first. 5, In addition, if Respondent fails to comply with this Order, the Board hereby directs Wakulla County, through the Code Enforcement Officer to obtain quotes from the vendors on the Countys approved vendor list for removal of the tires and disposal at an appropriate location. Quotes shall be brought back to the Code Enforcement Board at its next meeting for consideration by the Board due to the public health threat created by the existence of the tires. 6. It is the Respondentsobligation to provide written notice to the Code Enforcement Officer of compliance with this Order or the Order Imposing Fines. Upon providing such written notice, the Code Enforcement Officer shall perform an inspection of the subject property for the purposes of determining whether Respondents have obtained compliance with the Order. 7 Respondents may appeal this Order to the circuit court within 30 days of its execution. DONE AND ORDERED this 16th day of July, 2012. By:/s/ Jeffrey Ewaldt, Vice-Chairman STATE OF FLORIDA COUNTYOF WAKULLA SWORN TO AND SUBSCRIBED before me this 16th day of July, 2012, by Jeffrey Ewaldt, who is personally know to me /s/ Sarah Ion Blalock / Notary Public(Seal) Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News July 26, August 2, 9 & 16, 2012 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available • 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./$900 Deposit • 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl. Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok • 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced • 82 Mimosa 3BR/1BA $650Mo./$650 Deposit • 56 Myers Woods 3BR/2BA $1,000Mo./$1,000 Deposit Pets ok w/$250 pet fee • 118 Shar Mel Re 3BR/2BA Available Sept. 1, $900Mo./$900 Deposit We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!2323 Surf Rd. 3BR/2BA Bayfront road on Ochlockonee Bay, Screened Porch, Deck and Dock. No Smoking. No Pets. $1,050 per month. 112 Captain James St. 4BR/2BA 2,280 sq. ft. MH on 9 acres. Located in North Wakulla near Woodville. Complete with replace, workshop and dishwasher. No Smoking. No Pets. $775 per month.Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp. $550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. No smoking. No pets. Thu8/16 91/75Partlycloudy withastray thunderstorm. Fri8/17 88/75Partlycloudy withastray thunderstorm. Sat8/18 85/75Scattered thunderstorms.Highs inthemid 80sandlows inthemid 70s. Sun8/19 84/74Afewthunderstorms possible. Highsinthe mid80sand lowsinthe mid70s. Mon8/20 84/73Scattered thunderstormspossible.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 – Page 11B ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 25th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News August 9 & 16, 2012 5333-0816 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5250-0614 vs. Vaillancourt, Debra Case No:2012CA000083 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 2012CA000083 FEDERALNATIONALMORTGAGE ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, DEBRAVAILLANCOURT, et, al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAELT BRACKIN LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 30 CHICKATTRL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 ALSO ATTEMPTED AT: 2142 HIGHWAY98 E, CARRIABLLE, FL32322 AND 1349 BRANCH HILLCT, APOPKA, FL32712 CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOTS 63 AND 64, BLOCK 48Ž, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT V, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address i is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL33309 on or before June 7th, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in The Wakulla Times and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. I f you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoo rdinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled Court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or Voiice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 25th day of May, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News June 7 and 14, 2012 5250-0614 : 5278-0816 TWN Vs. Farmer, Claudette Case No. 11-174-FC Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 11-174-FC UCN:0652011CA000174XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. CLAUDETTE L. FARMER A/K/ACLAUDETTE FARMER; EARLE W. MURPHY; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 20, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11-174-FC UCN:652011CA0000174XXXXXX if the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and CLAUDETTE L. FARMER A/K/ACLAUDETTE FARMER; EARLE W. MURPHY; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL.32327 at Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 10th day of January 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 16, BLOCK 1, WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 39, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE, DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on June 20, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 9 & 16, 2012 5278-0712 1183-96619 5322-0823 TWN Vs. GERIN BRUMBAUGH Case No. 2010-CA000338 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000338 U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. GERIN D. BRUMBAUGH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GERIN D. BRUMBAUGH; JOHN DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOT 54, BLOCK 20, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT THREE, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA a/k/a 5 POWHATAN ST, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, ON September 13, 2012 at eleven oclock a.m. ESTin the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 19th day of July, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTLETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. August 16 & 23, 2012 665102518. 5323-0823 TWN Vs. Joan Valerie Pound Case No. 12-0016-FC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 12-0016-FC, UCN: 652012CA000016XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. JOAN VALERIE POUND A/K/AVALERIE LANDER A/K/AVALERIE POUND et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 12-0016-FC. UCN: 652012CA000016XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.Ais Plaintiff and JOAN VALERIE POUND A/K/AVALERIE LANDER A/K/AVALERIE POUND; UNKNOWN TENANTNO.1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 at Wakulla County Florida, at 11:00a.m on the 6th dayof jDecember, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 19, WOODLAND HERITAGE COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 4, T3S, R1W, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 37 MINUTES AND 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 4, ADISTANCE OF 2074.85 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES, 23 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 669.88 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES, 23 MINUTES, 46 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SAID CENTERLINE 669.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES, 36 MINUTES, 41 SECONDS WEST 399.96 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES, 23 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 669.92 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 36 MINUTES, 41 SECONDS EAST 399.57 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AROADWAYEASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS TJE EASTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on July18, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk SMITH, HIATT& DIAZ, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff P.O. Box 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 16 & 23, 2012 5323-0823 5324-0823 TWN Vs. Wesley D. Dukes Case #: 2009-CA-000236 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2009-CA-000432 Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, formerly known as Bankers Trust Company of California, N.A.., as Trustee for Asset Backed Securities Corporation Long Beach Home Equity Loan Trust 2000-LB1. Plaintiff, -vs.Wesley D. Dukes, Jr. a/k/a Wesley D. Dukes and Nancy E. Dukes, Husband and Wife; Summerwind Roadowners Maintenance Association, Inc.; JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as successor in interest to Provident National Bank Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000236 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Deutsche Bank National trust Company, formerly known as Bankers Trust Company of California, N.A., as Trustee for Asset Backed Securities Corporation Long Beach Home Equity Loan Trust 2000-LB1, Plaintiff and Wesley D. Dukes, Jr. a/k/a Wesley D. Dukes and Nancy E. Dukes, Husband and Wife are defendants(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONTDOOR OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED ATCHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M. on September 9, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit; COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 32 ADISTANCE OF 2749.18 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 666.79 FEET TO AN IRON ROD SET IN THE CENTERLINE OF A60 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLYALONG ACURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 370.38 FEET FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 195.34 FEET (CHORD NORTH 75 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 193.09 FEET), THENCE RUN NORTH 59 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 455.31 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING ARADIUS OF 370.38 FEET, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE CURVE 195.18 FEET (CHORD NORTH 75 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 192.92 FEET), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 249.21 FEET TO THE WESTERLYRIGHT OF WAYFOR A POWERLINE TO THE CITYOF TALLAHASSEE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY338.77 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 412.28 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 666.79 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN YEAR: 1986, MAKE: CHANDLER, VIN#: AFLCW2AG240511628 AND VIN#: AFLCW2BG240511628, MANUFACTURED HOME, WHICH IS PERMANENTLYAFIXED TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS. AS SUCH IT IS DEEMED TO BE AFIXTURE AND APART OF THE REALESTATE. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 5325-0816 TWN v. Melissa Foote Case No.: 2011-CA-000225 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION CASE NO: 2011-CA-000225 SCORE FEDERALCREDITUNION, Plaintiff, v. MELISSAFOOTE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MELISSAFOOTE; RICHARD D. FOOTE, PEARLE. FOOTE; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; COMDATANETWORK, INC.; SUMMERWOOD ROADOWNERS MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATION; WACHOVIA, a division of Wells Fargo, N.A. Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F .S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVENthat, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, at 11:00 a.m. oclock on September 6, 2012, the following described property: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREE 22 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 1323.21 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 1315.89 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 330.99 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 330.99 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 657.77 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60 FOOT ROADWAY, UTILITYAND DRAINAGE EASMENT, THENCE RUN 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID EASEMENT 331.29 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 657.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING (A.P.N. R 05-3S-01E-205-05021-013) ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: July 18, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court By;/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) CER TIFICA TE OF SER VICE I CERTIFYthat a true and correct copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale under F.S. Chapter 45 has been furnished by United States Mail on July 18, 2012, to each of the following: Henry L. Miller, Jr., Attorney for Score Federal Credit Union, Mathews Law Firm, P. A., 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; Jason Guevara, Collections Manager, Score Federal Credit Union, 3218 N. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; and William R. Pfeiffer, The Pfeiffer Law Group, LLC, attorney for Defendants, Melissa Foote, Richard D. Foote, and Pearl E. Foote, 2910 Kerry Forest Parkway, Suite D4-276, Tallahassee, Florida 32309 By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Court Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 9 & 16, 2012 5325-0816 5329-0816 TWN vs. William Miller Case No. 65-2012-CA-000179 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTYCIVILDIVISION Case No.65-2012-CA-000179 Division BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANY Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM L. MILLER, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WILLIAM L. MILLER CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN LASTKNOWN ADDRESS 228 BOB MILLER RD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY OF BOB MILLER ROAD 991.70 FEET TO AROD AND CAPFOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY406.24 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 660.11 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 406.24 FEET TO AROD AND CAP,THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 660.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. commonly known as: 228 BOB MILLER RD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Paul M. Messina, Jr. of Kass Shuler, P.A., plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813) 229-0900, on or before September 7, 2012, (or 30 days from the first date of publication, whichever is later) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated:July 25, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Honorable J. H. Thurmond 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301: (850) 577-4401 within 7 working days of your receipt of this notice: if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. August 9 & 16, 2012 5329-0816 5331-0816 TWN Vs. Gentry, Laura Etta Case #65-2010-CA-000087CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000087CA ONE WESTBANK,FSB Plaintiff(s) vs. LAURAETTAGENTRY; et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July. 26, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000087CAof the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for County, Florida, wherein One West Bank, FSB is the Plaintiff and LAURAETTAGENTRYand MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. FOR AMERICAS WHOLESALE LENDER, are the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 27th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 23, BLOCK DŽ OF SHELLPOINT BEACH, UNIT V, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES 47 AND 48 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 11 PEBBLE CT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANYREMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at County, Florida this 26th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk, County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, County, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 -County Phone: 850-926-0905 EXT. 223 TDD 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay ServiceŽ. August 9 & 16, 2012. 800669.000606 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEYFOR THE PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100, Tampa, FL33614 (813)880-8888, (813)880-8800 August 16 & 23, 2012. 09-139423 FC01 5338-0823 TWN Estate of Ann Denson Poucher CASE NO.: 12-63-CPNotice To Creditors IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 12-63-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ANN DENSON POUCHER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ANN DENSON POUCHER, deceased, File Number 12-63, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including un-matured, contingent or un-liquidated claims, on whom a copy of the notice is served must file their claims with the Court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTIONS 733.702 AND 733.710, OR BE FOREVER BARRED. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including un-matured, contingent or un-liquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTIONS 733.702 AND 733.710. ALLCLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 16, 2012. RAYMOND EARLPOUCHER Personal Representative 443 Seminole Lane Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 Steve M. Watkins, III Attorney for Personal Representative 41 Commerce Street, Apalachicola, FL32320 (850)653-1949 Fla Bar No. 0794996 August 16 & 23, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5334-0823 TWN Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGALNOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON AUGUST 31, 2012 at 1 1:00a.m AT2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONALPROPERTYOF: JENNIFER BABCOCK Before the sale date of AUGUST31, 2012, The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. TO RUN IN THE WALULLANEWS AUGUST16 & 23, 2012. 5334-0823 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5343-0823 TWN Vs. Cesar, Markly 65-2009-CA-000427CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000427CA HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC. Plaintiff, vs. MARKLYCESAR AND HAYDEE CESAR, et al. 5335-0816 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Spring Creek Land Company, LLC Doing business as:Bay Leaf Market at 19 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville, FL32327 with a mailing address of 19 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville, FL32327 Fictitious Name Notices desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with the Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this August 9, 2012 Wakulla News August 16, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices 5337-0816 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Christopher Green Fictitious Name Notices Doing business as:FBN Productions at 623 River Plantation Rd, Crawfordville, FL32327 with a mailing address of 623 River Plantation Rd, Crawfordville, FL32327 desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this August 8, 2012 Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News August 16, 2012 Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 24, 2012, and entered in 65-2009-CA-000427CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES INC. is the Plaintiff and HAYDEE CESAR; MARKLYJ. CESAR; THE FARM HOMEOWNERSASSOCIATION, INC; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendants. Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the lobby of Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 AM on September 6, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 30, BLOCK F OF THE FARM, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE(S) 93-98, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 10th day of July, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, as Deputy Clerk. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less that 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 16 & 23, 2012. 12-01747 The Wak u lla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 10 … Candidates scurried across their respective districts this week, putting the finishing touches on campaigns aimed at gaining their partys endorsement in this Tuesdays primaries. In many cases however, Tuesdays vote will determine the winner, with victors facing no opponent, or only token opposition, on Election Day, Nov. 6. Tight primary races will occur in several congressional, state Senate and House races made more interesting by the once-a-decade reshuf” ing that occurs as the states demographics are re-calibrated and a continuing push from outsiders to throw out the establishment of“ ce holders, even if they are in the same party. Beyond the primaries, Republicans are “ nalizing preparations for the national GOP shindig later this month in Tampa, and learned this week that Floridas governor will be among the mix of speakers, despite his inconvenient sunny outlook on the economy. Scotts buoyant optimism of the states economic recovery was borne out this week as economists said Floridas slow rebound continues and will pick up momentum beginning next year. Scott also said this week hell continue that optimism even as his partys nominee for president tries to paint a gloomier picture. PRIMARY COLORS Just under 4.6 million Democrats and about 4.1 million Republicans are registered to vote in Floridas Aug. 14 primary, according to “ nal registration “ gures from the Division of Elections. Most of those voters, however, will not go to the polls. That lack of interest leaves the decision in the hands of a minority of highly motivated citizens. These super votersŽ will decide a handful of tight primary races shaping up around the state. Candidates were heading into the weekend making last minute pushes to get voters motivated, hitting up the political clubs this week for speeches and debates, and making their pitch through the electronic media. SCOTT, OTHERS SLATED TO SPEAK AT RNC Dogged by low approval ratings and touting a message different from his partys presidential hopeful, Gov. Rick Scott this week was added to the pantheon of speakers who will address the Republican National Convention in Tampa later this month. As governor of the host state, Scotts appearance at the event was largely assured but the governor has not made his inclusion any easier as he continues to tout the states economic recovery, including its increasingly lower jobless rate. Its a positive, well-worn message that does not dovetail well with a national GOP campaign that is trying to convince voters the economy stinks and Democrats are to blame. My job is to continue to talk about what were doing in Florida and the fact that were headed in the right direction, and that were going to continue to do well,Ž Scott told reporters on Tuesday. Scott isnt the only Floridian scheduled to make an appearance at the Republican convention. Former Gov. Jeb Bush and Attorney General Pam Bondi are also expected to address the multitude at the balloon“ lled, signage strewn party venue. VOTER PURGE FIGHT CONTINUES State and federal of“ cials traded barbs this week in the continuing battle over Florida efforts to purge the voting ranks of ineligible ballot casters. According to the Miami Herald/Tampa Bay Times, the U.S. Department of Justice has subpoenaed documents from nine Florida counties to determine how voters are identi“ ed to be purged. The agency has “ led suit against the state, saying efforts to remove non-eligible voters from the rolls comes too late in the process. Meanwhile, state officials have yet to gain access to the Department of Homeland Security database despite reaching an agreement last month. The governors office said this week it would considering going back to court if needed to secure access to the SAVE database. STORY OF THE WEEK: Primary candidates hit the homestretch this week to shore up support for upcoming party primaries scheduled for Aug. 14. CO-QUOTES OF THE WEEK: € Under President Obama, 8.6 percent unemployment. Record foreclosures; 600,000 more Floridians in poverty.Ž … A Mitt Romney ad about how bad things are in Florida. € Look at the jobs that have been generated in the last 18 months. Floridas headed in the right direction.Ž … Republican Gov. Rick Scott, hitting his own talking points on the state of the state.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Red and Blue are primary colors

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 – Page 13B 1. LANGUAGE: In English slang, what is a jumper? 2. LITERATURE: What author used the pen name Ellis Bell? 3. SUPERHEROES: Who was the Green Hornets sidekick? 4. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capital of Laos? 5. MUSIC: The film Rhapsody in BlueŽ was a biographical movie about what composer? 6. MOVIES: Who wrote the music score to the movie JawsŽ? 7. AD SLOGANS: You can trust your car to the man who wears the starŽ was an advertising slogan of what company? 8. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What was the original name of the island that is home to the Statue of Liberty? 9. TELEVISION: What sport is featured in the series Friday Night LightsŽ? 10. RELIGION: What is the color of the skullcaps worn by Catholic bishops? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. A sweater 2. Emily Bronte 3. Kato 4. Vientiane 5. George Gershwin 6. John Williams 7. Texaco 8. Bedloes Island 9. High school football 10. Purple YOUR AD HERE Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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Page 14B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 16, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear EarthTalk: Has anyone calculated the energy wasted at night by unnecessary lighting in and around buildings? What can we do to reduce our light footprint? Bill Rehkamp via e-mail Americans do squander a lot of electricity keeping things lit up at night while most of us sleep. This light blocks our view of the night sky and stars, creates glare hazards on roads, messes with our circadian sleep-wake rhythms, interrupts the patterns of nocturnal wildlife, and is by and large annoying. It also takes a “ nancial toll: The federally funded National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) reports that poorly-aimed, unshielded outdoor lights waste $2 billion (17.4 billion kilowatt-hours) of energy in the U.S. each year. NOAO has monitored outdoor lighting levels across the U.S. and beyond for the past six years through its GLOBE at Night program whereby citizenscientists track nearby outdoor lighting levels over a two-week period beginning in late March and submit their observations to NOAO electronically. A simple star map provided by NOAO is all that participants need to track their slice of sky. All it takes is a few minutes for a family to measure their night sky brightness by noting how many stars are missing from an easy-to-find constellation like Leo (in the northern hemisphere) or Crux (in the southern hemisphere),Ž says GLOBE at Night project director Connie Walker. This tells us how much light is directed upwards into the sky.Ž Over the last six annual campaigns, participants from 100-plus countries have contributed almost 70,000 measurements, giving project organizers a detailed picture of light pollution globally. Unfortunately, analysis of the data shows that participants have seen brighter skies and fewer stars over time, meaning that light pollution is a growing problem. The free and publiclyaccessible data gathered by the project is not only useful for educational purposes but can also help inform planners and policymakers on decisions about increasing public safety, reducing energy consumption and even identifying parks and green spaces that can serve as sky oasesŽ where city dwellers can appreciate the night sky from a safe, dark place. According to the McDonald Observatorys Dark Skies Initiative (DSI), the solution to light pollution is 90 percent education and 10 percent technology. We can reclaim vast amounts of energy currently wasted inadvertently into the night sky...by using light “ xtures that are shielded to reflect light down where it is needed, as well as using the smallest number of lights and lowest wattage bulbs necessary to effectively light an area,Ž says DSI. Leading by example through the installation of downward-pointing outdoor light “ xtures is a great place for home and building owners to start: Once people see it in action, and understand its implications for cost savings and enhanced visibility, they are far more likely to adopt good lighting practices on their own.Ž Another group committed to reducing light pollution, the International DarkSky Association, maintains a list of distributors that sell approved fixtures to prevent light pollution. Some cities have instituted standards to limit outdoor night lighting to protect citizens against unwanted light (or light trespassŽ). The International Dark-Sky Association has developed a set of model lighting ordinances that cities and towns can adopt and modify to suit their needs accordingly. Also, the U.S. Green Building Council has incorporated a credit for buildings seeking to reduce the amount of light trespass and sky glow through its Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program. Dear EarthTalk: I read that CO2 in our atmosphere is now more than 300 parts per million. Doesnt this mean that were too late to avoid the worst impacts of climate change? Karl Bren Richmond, Va. Actually the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere today is roughly 390 parts per million (ppm). And thats not good news. Experts agree that this level cannot be sustained for many decades without potentially catastrophic consequences,Ž reports the Geos Institute, an Oregonbased non-pro“ t and consulting “ rm that uses science to help people predict, reduce and prepare for climate change. While were unlikely to get atmospheric CO2 concentrations down as low as they were (275 ppm) before we started pumping pollution skyward during the Industrial Revolution, climate scientists and green leaders agree that 350 ppm would be a tolerable upper limit. Prior to 2007 scientists werent sure what emissions reduction goal to shoot for, but new evidence led researchers to reach consensus on 350 ppm if we wished to have a planet, in the words of NASA climatologist James Hansen, similar to the one on which civilization developed and to which life on earth is adapted.Ž The non-pro“ t 350.org, launched in 2008 by writer and activist Bill McKibben and others to raise awareness about global warming, has circled the proverbial wagons around the cause of reducing atmospheric CO2 to 350 ppm. The group has enlisted the help of thousands of student volunteers around the world to mobilize public support for reducing humanitys carbon footprint. McKibben, whose 1989 book The End of NatureŽ detailed the potential effects of climate change and remains one of the most in” uential environmental books of all time, believes that 350 ppm is attainable. Were like the patient that goes to the doctor and learns hes overweight, or his cholesterol is too high. He doesnt die immediately „ but until he changes his lifestyle and gets back down to the safe zone, hes at more risk for heart attack or stroke,Ž says McKibben. The planet is in its danger zone because weve poured too much carbon into the atmosphere, and were starting to see signs of real trouble: melting ice caps, rapidly spreading drought. We need to scramble back as quickly as we can to safety.Ž Scrambling backŽ will entail nothing short of transforming our energy infrastructure, including how we transport people and goods and power our structures. According to 350.org, it means building solar arrays instead of coal plants, planting trees instead of cutting forests, increasing energy ef“ ciency and reducing waste. Getting to 350 means developing a thousand different solutions„all of which will become much easier if we have a global treaty grounded in the latest science and built around the principles of equity and justice,Ž the group reports. To get this kind of treaty, we need a movement of people who care enough about our shared global future to get involved and make their voices heard.Ž Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). How much energy is wasted at night with unnecessary lighting? The federally funded National Optical Astronomy Observatory reports that poorly-aimed, unshielded outdoor lights waste 17.4 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity in the U.S. each year.PHOTO BY BRAND X PICTURES Leading by example through the installation of downward-pointing outdoor light “ xtures is a great place for home and building owners to start reducing light pollution. Where the little things Make a Difference! Where the little things Make a Difference! 2504 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32304 2504 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32304 850 765-0042 09 Chevrolet Impala FULL SIZE $13,790 02 Nissan Maxima DRIVE IN STYLE! $7,500 05 Cadillac STS LUXURY THROUGHOUT $10,500 06 Chevy Malibu SMOOTH RIDE! $10,990 05 Pontiac Grand AM SEGREAT FIRST CAR! 08 Kia Sorento LX LX VALUE $13,895 02 Chevy Monte Carlo RED HOT DEAL! $9,900 850576-LOAN ( 5626 )WE HAVE THE ANSWER TO YOUR USED CAR NEEDS! 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