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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00421
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 08-09-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00421
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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 30th Issue Thursday, August 9, 2012 T h r e e S e c t i o n s Three Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A News Extra! .....................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Green Scene ....................................................................Page 3B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 12B Back to School .................................................................Page 1C Classi eds ......................................................................Page 10C Legal Notices .................................................................Page 10C Comics ...........................................................................Page 13C INDEX OBITUARIES Charmayne J. Chouinard Jerry Braxton Crutchfield Joseph D. Hicks Charles C. Laughton Eula Wardene Nichols Josephine Bullock Rozar Colleen Maybee Weber By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA proposal to transfer the Wakulla County Community Center to the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce by County Commissioner Jerry Moore was shot down by the other commissioners at the Aug. 6 commission meeting. Moore, who has mentioned selling the community center in the past, suggested the county use the space proposed for the community center as a government complex. The former sanctuary would have served as the commission chambers and the other building, which currently houses the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce annex, would have been used by Wakulla County Fire Rescue and Emergency Medical Services. The county acquired the 22-acre property that was previously home to New Life Church on May 24, 2010, with plans to turn it into a community center, but has yet to offer programs and services at the facility. We can consolidate all our products into one area,Ž Moore said. The community center activities would then be transferred to the extension of“ ce, which, he said, already serves as somewhat of a community center. Moore said this would have saved the county $1 million. I was trying to save the county money,Ž he said. He added that many people view the current Community Center as the Crawfordville neighborhood center.Ž People who live in Panacea, Sopchoppy, Ochlockonee Bay, St. Marks and other areas are not going to visit the community center, he said. Transportation is a big thing,Ž he said. The other commissioners disagreed. Commissioner Alan Brock said the majority of Wakulla County residents live within Crawfordville. Commissioner Mike Stewart said the current location, at the corner of Trice Lane and Shadeville Road, is the most prime location in the county. I think thats where it needs to be,Ž Stewart said. The legislative appropriation of $392,000, which must go toward adding to or renovating the Community Center, could be used to make improvements to the extension of“ ces facilities, Moore said. The extension of“ ce is applying for a $255,000 grant to upgrade its kitchen, classrooms and lifestock pavilion and add a teaching pavilion in the demonstration garden. Moore said the federal money could pay for these upgrades. County Commissioner Lynn Artz said if the extension of“ ce gets the grant, they wouldnt need the legislative appropriation. Moore said they could still use the legislative appropriation to increase the size of the facility. Its not going to do much,Ž Moore said. And $40,000 has already been used toward engineering, he said. Stewart said the county needs to do as much as it can with the legislative appropriation and look ahead at the possibilities for the site. Were not going to have a Taj Mahal,Ž Stewart said. Commissioner Randy Merritt agreed and said the current site is good for a long term plan. Artz wondered if the current extension office staff could even handle the extra work of serving as the Community Center. Extension Of“ ce Director Les Harrison said he was doubtful. Some commissioners and members of the audience expressed concern about transferring the Community Center from a 22-acre site to a 7-acre site. If the commission were to give up the current Community Center site, it would lose the opportunity to possibly add a swimming pool and other outdoor activities in the future, Artz said. We would be giving up all the things people in our community have told us they wanted,Ž Artz said. We bought this site for a Community Center. I think we need to keep our promise.Ž She referenced the more than 700 surveys that were “ lled out by adults and students and the No. 1 want was a swimming pool. It may take 10 years, she said, but the county has the land. Other outdoor facilities were a playground, trails, basketball court and open “ eld. Several audience members asked the commission to think about the children of the county who do not have a place to go and hang out. Herb Donaldson, artistic director for the Palaver Tree Theater and president of Healing Arts of Wakulla County, said when he asks students what they do for fun in Wakulla County he gets three responses: Go to Tallahassee, watch TV and nothing. Give them what we promised,Ž Donaldson said. Resident Judith Harriss agreed. Make them a priority,Ž said Harriss. Give them a dedicated space.Ž Community Center Advisory Group Member and Wakulla High School Assistant Principal Simeon Nelson told the commission, Man up, woman up, and do what youre supposed to do.Ž He added that he didnt care if this proposal saves the county money, he was more concerned about the children of the county. Continued on Page 12A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhen residents of Wakulla Gardens were asked if they would be willing to pay to have their roads paved, an overwhelming majority of them answered with an emphatic, No.Ž A ballot was sent out to each property owner in Wakulla Gardens to see if they would pay a voluntary assessment between $180 and $235 per year for 10 to 15 years for road improvements. The ballots were due on July 31 and 1,214 were received. There are five units within Wakulla Gardens and each unit was addressed separately. The majority for each unit was a no vote. For unit 1, 33 percent voted no, 67 voted yes. Unit 2 was 65 percent to 35 percent, Unit 3 was 87 percent to 13 percent, Unit 4 was 65 percent to 35 percent and Unit 5 was 62 percent to 38 percent. Well, thats that,Ž said County Commissioner Randy Merritt at the Aug. 6 meeting. I think this is democracy in action.Ž Continued on Page 13AWakulla Gardens roundly rejects pay for paving Community Center stays on track This concept shows possible future uses of the Community Center property, including a lap pool and wading pool, basketball and multi-use courts, playgrounds, a stage, walking trails and Frisbee “ elds. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA proposal by Commissioner Jerry Moore fails. He had suggested using the property for government of ces and transferring the Community Center to the Extension Of ce PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENCommissioner Jerry Moore explains his idea for the Community Center as Commissioner Lynn Artz listens. She placed the drawing of the concept on the easel. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn an effort to address the large need of those suffering from food insecurity in the county, the Wakulla County Feeding Task Force has been revived and a new group has formed called the Hunger Team. The team started meeting to try and better serve the children of the county during the Summer Feeding Program, which provided free breakfast and lunch to all school age children. There was no requirement to receive food and it is provided through the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The concept of the program is great, but the members of the group felt not enough kids were being served. So, the team concentrated on spreading the word about the program and looking for better ways to serve children in the future. Since that time, the team has met to focus on three areas: launching Operation Santa, planning for next years Summer Feeding Program and continuing to help stock the local food pantries. Continued on Page 2AHunger Team discusses the need in Wakulla 50.6 Percentage of Wakulla students on free or reduced lunch, meaning the majority of families are low income or living in poverty. Democracy in action,Ž said Commissioner Randy Merritt. BACK TO SCHOOL SECTION See Page 1C

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Continued from Page 1A Their recent meeting was held on July 30. Our need is paramount,Ž said Shelley Swenson, team member and Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce agent. In the county, 50.6 percent of students are on free or reduced lunch, meaning a majority of families with children in the county and living in poverty or low income, according to the school district. The team is made up of individuals, church leaders, businesses and agencies devoted to addressing food insecurity and hunger in Wakulla County, Swenson said. Last years Operation Santa opened the eyes of the volunteers to the huge need of food many people are experiencing in the county. Many people who were helped during the Christmas program, which gave toys, clothes, toiletries, household items and some food to 141 families in need, expressed the need for food more than anything else. There are 4,480 people in Wakulla County who live with food security, not knowing where their next meal might come from, according to Feeding America. This hunger initiative and Operation Santa go hand in hand,Ž said Gail Campbell, executive director of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, the organization that runs Operation Santa. Campbell said the group didnt think about the huge need of food, but was trying to provide Christmas presents. But the responses from the families made it clear that the need for food was much greater than the need for presents. The team has begun to brainstorm about ways to get more food to people this year. Glenn Hamel, pastor of Promise Land Ministries, said they serve a free Christmas dinner every year. He suggested including a ticket for that dinner with the items they receive from Operation Santa. County Commissioner Lynn Artz said the team also needs to reach out to the local stores to possibly donate Christmas meals, like what was done last year. She also suggested including a ” yer with information about the local pantries and other aid available in each families items. She added that it would be a good idea to require members of groups such as the Hunger Team, coalition for youth and others to show up at each meeting with a non-perishable food item. The coalition has also planned a raf” e to help with Operation Santa. The group will be selling $5 tickets for a chance to win a kids John Deere battery-powered tractor with trailer. SUMMER FEEDING PROGRAM Thanks to efforts by members of the Hunger Team, the Summer Feeding Program was able to feed more children this year. The group marketed the program more broadly and another site to serve food was added at Wakulla Christian School. One of the major challenges of the program is transportation, getting the students to one of the sites. There is a need for more sites and possibly mobile sites that will come to the students, Swenson said. Florida Impact has grant funding available that may help with transportation challenges, she added. There was also some discussion about having more than one sponsor in the county. Currently, the Wakulla County School District is the only sponsor. Sponsors handle the administrative and “ nancial responsibility for the program. Summer food sponsors can feed children at numerous sites throughout the community. The school district has three locations, plus Wakulla Christian. Lori Ciszak, assistant program manager for the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, said an organization or church or anyone who wants to become a sponsor is eligible. They would be required to “ ll out an application and go through training, but she said she was willing to work with anyone who was interested. Ciszak said the sponsor gets reimbursed based on the amount of children who are served. To become a sponsor, a 2-day training is required. The sponsor will then be required to train someone at each of their sites. She suggested having several churches ban together to become a sponsor. Churches that have the capacity to make and serve the food could be additional sites for next year and those churches without the capacity could deliver to those areas with a high need, Swenson said. LOCAL FOOD PANTRIES The team also addressed the status of the local food pantries, many of which are struggling to meet the needs of people in their area. The food pantries in Wakulla County are usually donation driven and some also buy food from Americas Second Harvest of the Big Bend. It costs around $1,500 a month to keep a food pantry open, Swenson said. Currently, there are 11 pantries in the county. Some who rely solely on word of mouth and do not want to be publicized. However, Hamel said it would be helpful to him to know where the other pantries are located and when they serve food. This way if he is unable to provide food to someone, he can tell them who can. Swenson said she would provide it to the members of the Hunger Team, but urged them to use it with care, as some pantries would become too overwhelmed if word got out. There was also some discussion about a meeting held in February when a software program was mentioned that would link all the pantries into one system. However, the software is currently not available. Better communication between pantries remains a need. Rick Jackley, member of Healing Arts of Wakulla County, said the biggest challenge is getting everyone to work together. Currently, they are all working independently and there is no point person to connect them. Bruce Ashley, president of the coalition for youth, said his organization is trying to get coordinators for that effort through the Hunger Team. A hunger grant from the Wal-Mart Foundation would have helped stock the pantries, but it was not awarded. Campbell said the coalition will apply for the grant again, which is due soon. Madeleine Carr agreed to re-write the grant. EMPTY BOWL PROJECT An upcoming project of Healing Arts of Wakulla was also discussed at length at the meeting. This event is called the Empty Bowl project. This is an effort to raise money for the local food pantries. The idea is to get people in the community to create and paint bowls that will hold soup. People will then purchase one of these bowls and will get soup and bread with it. They are then allowed to keep the bowl to remind them of all the empty bowls in the world and here in Wakulla County. All the money raised would go to purchase food for the pantries. It has merit because it raises funds, but it also raises awareness,Ž Campbell said. An event is scheduled for Nov. 3 at Hudson Park from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Haydee Jackley, the organizer of the event, is looking for people to donate bowls, paint bowls and get involved in this event. The Empty Bowl Project is an international grassroots effort to “ ght hunger and has been successful in many communities, Jackley said. There was some discussion about getting the local students involved and Assistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell suggested Jackley reach out to the district art coordinator. This position is currently vacant, but should be “ lled soon, she said. This person could con-nect Jackley to the school art teachers and have them incorporate creating the bowls and painting them into class time. For more information about the Empty Bowl project, email Jackley at ribitsceramic@yahoo.com or call 567-4212. Those who would like to help fight hunger in Wakulla County, can drop off non-perishable items at the Wakulla County Extension Office, 84 Cedar Avenue, the Wakulla County Public Library and the Senior Center. Swenson encouraged people to drop off good donations, such as rice, beans, low sodium canned vegetables, whole wheat pastas and things that are low in sugar. The coalition for youth is also accepting monetary donations which will stay local. Financial donations are the very best,Ž Swenson said. For more information, contact Swenson at 9263931. Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comHunger Team discusses the need in Wakulla County WAKULLA COUNTY SENIOR CENTER THANKS YOU FOR SPONSORING CHRISTMAS IN JULY CHRISTMAS IN JULYAir-Con of Wakulla Bevis Funeral Home Centennial Bank ESG Operations Inc. Maurice & Judy Langston James Moore & Company Wakulla Democratic Commitee Wakulla Insurance Agency Wakulla Rotary Wal-Mart is proud to announce that Dr. Chukwuma M. Okoroji is now providing Obstetrics and Gynecology services 1st & 3rd Thursday of each month CRMC Medical Group Building, 2382 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite-D, Crawfordville FL. We accept most insurance, including BCBS, CHP, Medicaid and more. To schedule your appointment or for more information Call 850-320-6054NatureCoastWomensCare.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullnews.netIn addition to preparing a budget for the next “ scal year, the Wakulla County Commission is also looking at approving a 5-year plan for county projects. The commission held a workshop on Aug. 6 on the proposed $40.8 million-budget which includes no new tax increases, zero position growth, no employee raises and the same millage rate of 8.5 mills. The overall budget includes an estimated ad valorem tax decrease of 3 percent. Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman said he anticipates it coming in a little lower than that, but would rather estimate too high than too low. I dont see anything out there coming in a negative direction,Ž Sparkman said. The budget also includes a 5-percent increase in health insurance costs, which the commission chose not to pass on to county employees. They also chose not to decrease any funding to outside agencies. There is an overall increase in expenditures of 4.73 percent, or $875,940, from last year. This includes an increase in medical costs for the jail; emergency medical services increase for a third shift supervisor; a full year of salaries for county administrator, planning director and parks and recreation director; increase in retirement; and increase in library funding. There was also an increase in facilities management for preventative maintenance. County Administrator David Edwards said there are seven roofs on county buildings that are leaking and air conditioners go out on a regular basis. Weve got to maintain them,Ž Edwards said. Commissioner Lynn Artz said preventative maintenance will save the county money in the long run. The commission also agreed to reinstitute the Fine and Forfeiture Fund, which is dedicated to capture all “ nes received from various court related sources and the sheriffs of“ ce. This will allow for more transparency, Edwards said. There are several projects included for the “ ve-year plan for the one-cent sales tax fund. For 2012-13, public safety will receive money from the one-cent sales tax fund to pay for the purchase of a new ambulance, vehicles for the sheriffs of“ ce and an animal control vehicle. For the future, there will be money budgeted for a new animal control building, new ambulance and sheriffs of“ ce equipment, including emergency radios. Over the next 5 years for public facilities, there is money budgeted for the new sheriffs of“ ce annex, roof repair of the public works building, money for the new “ re and EMS facility, loan payment on the courthouse renovations and development of a soccer complex. For this upcoming “ scal year for parks and recreation, there is money set aside to improve Azalea Park and look at extending the walking trail into Hudson Park. The public really uses these parks,Ž Edwards said. We need to accommodate the public.Ž In the future, there is money earmarked for Hudson Park improvements; Newport Park bathroom improvements; Medart Park improvements, including ball “ eld lighting, park lighting, bathrooms, ball “ elds and storage facilities; and Equestrian Center improvements. For roads, there is money for road striping and Upper Bridge repairs for the upcoming “ scal year. For the future, money will be set aside for subdivision paving and re-striping. In the solid waste fund, Edwards said the county will be completely healed in 5 years and no increases are anticipated from Waste Pro. Also discussed during the workshop was the administrative restructuring that will occur at the end of this year. Deputy Administrator Tim Barden will no longer be with the county at the end of the year and the county budget will be turned over to the clerks of“ ce. Edwards said there will be other personnel changes as well. The “ rst budget hearing is scheduled for Sept. 4.COUNTY COMMISSION$40.8M budget proposedThe proposed $40.8 million budget includes no new tax increases, zero position growth, no employee raises and the same millage rate of 8.5 mills. NOTICE OF HEARING TO IMPOSE AND PROVIDE FOR COLLECTION OF SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS IN THE NORTHWOOD SUBDIVISION MUNICIPAL SERVICES BENEFIT UNIT AUGUST 9, 2012 City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be holding a Budget Workshop, August 21, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. A second Budget workshop meeting is scheduled for August 29, 2012 at 6:30 p.m., if needed. The meetings will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. AUGUST 9, 16, 2012BUDGET WORKSHOP MEETINGSAny person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling 850-962-4611. City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be changing the date of the regular August, 2012 meeting from the second Monday to the third Monday in August. The meeting will be held, August 20, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL For further information or special assistance please contact the City Clerks Of“ce at 850-962-4611AUGUST 9, 16, 2012NOTICE OF MEETING CHANGE PUBLIC NOTICEThe Wakulla County Canvassing Board will begin the opening of absentee ballots for the Primary Election Monday, August 13, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. and continue to open absentee ballots on Tuesday, August 14, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. in the ballot accounting room in the supervisor of elections of“ce. The public is invited to attend. Henry F. Wells Supervisor of Elections Wakulla CountyAUGUST 9, 2012 WAKULLA COUNTY SMALL CITIES COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT NOTICE OF SECOND PUBLIC HEARING Monday, August 20, 2012 at 5:00 pm Wakulla County Commission Chambers 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Activity Budget LMI % (Approximately) Housing Rehabilitation $634,500 100% Temporary Relocation $ 3,000 100% Administration $ 112,500 N/A TOTAL BUDGET $750,000AUGUST 9, 2012 EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITYA FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• School board employees will get pay raise •RJ Crum obituary •Loren Heath Langston obituary • Juvenile arrested for vandalism of church • Tornado causes damage • Wakulla could receive up to $40M from oil spill fines • Ann Denson Poucher obituary • Sheriff’s office investigating possible fraud by attorney in Panaceathewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Editor, The News: We would like to thank Ivanhoe Carroll, director of Wakulla County Animal Control, for her article in the July 26 Wakulla News about the 30 puppies left at the shelter recently. She has done an excellent job of educating the public about the importance of spaying and neutering pets. Hopefully, pet owners who have not already done so will do their part to prevent unwanted litters! As for the person(s) who allowed these 30 puppies to be born … shame on you. Tom & Janet McPherson Shell Point Beach Editor, The News: Sheriff Donnie Crum has recently spoken in some detail about the extraordinary response and effort by the staff of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce and others who assisted in responding to Tropical Storm Debby. A large THANK YOU to the sheriff and members of the WCSO is warranted. Sheriff Crum, Chief Deputy Jared Miller and majors Maurice Langston and Shepard Bruner all showed before, during and after the storm their intimate knowledge, devotion to the community and understanding of the impact of a natural disaster event. The sheriff and his command staff evidenced that they are part of the heart of Wakulla County and its citizens. From early planning and response before the storm, members of the WCSO were deployed to assist citizens with evacuation and security of their property. Members worked throughout the storm answering calls, providing calm and rendering aid to citizens. Others responded to downed powerlines and manned chainsaws to remove dozens of downed trees affecting homes, roadways and safety. Numerous land and water rescues were performed. The details of each of these efforts are quite extraordinary. For many days since the storm, the sheriff and WCSO staff have continued to respond to those affected. Assistance has been provided in areas of personal and property safety, security and debris removal and clean up. The sheriff has generously coordinated efforts with other community organizations deploying members to assist citizens who were dramatically affected by Debby. This effort continues, while the WCSO continues to provide the high level of public safety and aggressive response to crime the county has come to be known for. All of this comes from the sheriff, the WCSO leadership team and its members being deeply engaged, connected to, and caring about Wakulla County. Too many times the many activities and services provided by the WCSO can be taken for granted. The WCSO is not just the public safety agency of our county. We are very fortunate to have Sheriff Crum and members of the WCSO as part of the strong “ ber of our community, part of its heart. I wish to personally thank the sheriff and all of the men and women of the WCSO so very much for their dedication and service. Bruce Ashley CrawfordvilleEditors Note: Bruce Ashley is a detective at the WCSO, chair of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth and lost his home in the ” ooding from Tropical Storm Debby.Editor, The News: I am pleased to be a candidate for the Florida House of Representatives, District 7. During my campaign, I have had the opportunity to meet with many gracious residents of Wakulla and other counties. One question that I frequently hear or am asked to respond to centers on, What I can do for the folks in Wakulla County?Ž as I serve them in the legislature. Fortunately for me and residents of Wakulla, I can speak to the record I created when I served the small rural counties of northwest Florida a few years ago as the representative for the district also numbered at that time as District 7. While I served as representative, I worked tenaciously to keep rural hospitals viable, to get sparsity funding in education for small districts, to be sure that this areas state correctional of“ cers received the cost area differential (CAD) equalizing their starting salaries to the level begun for of“ cers in south Florida in the 1980s, to represent with aggression the fishing industry (even though Wakulla County was not speci“ cally my constituency at that time), to preserve the residents rights to hunting and recreational activities without undue or burdensome bureaucracy, and to work to continue to upgrade much needed roads in all rural counties in northwest Florida, Wakulla County. (The road issue in Wakulla County is one that desperately demands focused and constant attention. Many residents use these roads as they travel to work; potential customers and tourists must use them too, if they are to come to Wakulla County.) As a legislator (l996-98), I was recognized as Legislator of the YearŽ for my support of all small counties by the Florida Sheriffs Association, the Small County Coalition, Florida Association of Counties, the Small Schools Consortium and the Fishermans Federation. I am proud of this hard-earned record just as I am honored to have served the people in rural northwest Florida. I ask that you consider all that you have seen and heard in my brochures, letters, TV and radio spots. Then VOTE for an effective legislator who is and will continue to be available to you, accessible at all times, and willing to work hard to represent the people of District 7, Jamey Westbrook. I ask for your VOTE so that I can work for YOU! Sincerely, Jamey Westbrook gayle.westbrook@jcsb.org Editor, The News: In last weeks Wakulla News, two environmental items caught my eye that warrants further discussion. Since we tout ourselves as the natural place to beŽ and are pursuing a niche in ecotourism including bringing an environmental institute here, it is important to present information in The News accordingly. ON FISH First, in the Outdoor section, which often is my favorite to read, there was a picture of a young boy, his dad and a Gulf Sturgeon they just pulled onto the boat and were trying to hold up for the photograph. Catching some a prehistoric beast is indeed quite a feat and something to remember. Having just taken my family fishing that same weekend and seeing the excitement in my youngsters faces (and wifes for that matter) when catching even small “ sh, including a baby shark, is quite a joy. So I can imagine this boys and his fathers excitement. Unfortunately, the pictured fish should never have been brought onto the boat. Gulf Sturgeon are listed as threatenedŽ on the U.S. Endangered Species List due to decades of over“ shing and habitat degradation (i.e., damming rivers). The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission lists it as a Prohibited Species meaning it is unlawful to harvest, possess or landŽ this species. Bringing a “ sh onto a boat constitutes possessionŽ and prohibited species should instead be returned immediatelyŽ to the water according to FWC guidance for handling prohibited species. This guidance does not consider bringing the animal onto the boat temporarily in order to take pictures as immediateŽ release and therefore constitutes a violation. It is up to the angler to anticipate what may be caught and how to react appropriately not only for the safety of the angler (in this case including a boy), but also for the safety of the “ sh. The Wakulla News should be aware of fish regulations enough as to know what type of messages will be presented when publishing pictures and “ sh stories. In my opinion, this type of picture of bringing prohibited species onto a boat for the sole purpose of taking photos sends the wrong message about how we should be caring for our shared public resources … particularly those whose populations are severely depleted and still in trouble. ON FROGS The other article (by the Countys Extension Of“ cer) that caught my eye was on the Eastern Spadefoot Toads plaguingŽ Wakulla. Calling this huge bloom of toads a plagueŽ was an unfortunate depiction as it implies widespread af” iction. While I certainly appreciated the article, the negative connotation of the emergence of these wonderful toads takes away from the great public service theyve contributed to following the deluge from Tropical Storm Debby. In the days following the storm, millions upon millions of tadpoles could be seen in much of the standing water and ditches throughout Wakulla County. If one looked close enough, as me and my 7 year old did, one would see that there were also no mosquito larvae to speak of where these tadpoles ” ourished. These pollywogs came to our rescue! They, along with the mosquito “ sh … if your ditches were lucky enough to have them … cleaned up on the mosquito larvae helping to ensure that the inevitable mosquito explosion wouldnt be nearly as bad as it otherwise could be. So instead of referring to this toad phenomenon as a plague,Ž I would refer to it as major boon in natural mosquito control. While these little critters can “ t on a dime, they sure indeed can and did eat a ton of mosquito larvae preventing countless additional mosquitoes emerging to plague us (a more appropriate use of that word). Chad Hanson CrawfordvilleREADERS WRITE:Some comments on “ sh and frogs Democratic Party o ers endorsements anks for story on the 30 puppies Sheri Crum, WCSO part of community Jamey Westbrook asks for support Don Curtis stands outEditor, The News: There is a “ ne crop of Republican primary candidates for the newly created district 7 … Florida Legislature. They all are running great campaigns. When all the speeches are “ nished and all the postcard mailers are mailed, one candidate stands out as THE conservative candidate we all can count on … Don Curtis. Don is not new to Wakulla County. Years before his run for this position, Don was in our community, supporting our local Republican committee as we sought to organize and reach out to other county Republicans. Don helped us lay the foundation and was willing to do whatever it took to help us get started. Don will always be there for us in Wakulla County. He has an impressive resume; he is a farm owner, former school board member, assistant director of the Florida Division of forestry, member of the governing board of the Suwannee River Management District and a lifetime member of the NRA, to name a few. Don Curtis believes we need to get back to the basics of governing. He believes that the U.S. and Florida Constitutions are the laws of the land and any other laws that get passed must conform with constitutional authority granted by the people to government not the other way around. He believes that in order to keep our individual tax burden low, we must have a vibrant private sector economy. That means creating private sector jobs. He believes tax dollars are your dollars. They must be spent frugally for the services that government should be providing … they shouldnt be used for porkŽ projects or wishŽ lists. As a businessman and family man, Don is used to balancing budgets. He also worked in government for 10 years of his career. He can hit the ground runningŽ in Tallahassee as he already knows how budget, tax and spending issues work. He also knows how to spot when theyre not working. Thats part of the government oversight role a Legislator must provide. As our representative, Don will listen and stand up against special interests that seek to gain at our expense. He will work to thwart bad legislation, and support good legislation that helps our part of Florida. Don is a good conservative friend of Wakulla County. He stands out as the clear choice. Gordon McCleary Former Chairman Wakulla County Republican Party Founding Past President Wakulla County Republican Club Editor, The News: As Chair of the Wakulla Democratic Party, I would like to urge all registered voters in Wakulla to take the time to vote in the Aug. 14 primary election. All voters … Democrat, Republican, and non-partisan … are able to vote for the Circuit Judge 2nd Circuit Group 2, School Board District 2, and Soil and Water Seats 3 and 5. Please take the time to cast your ballot in these races. On the Democratic Party ballot, we have several races pending. U.S. Senator Bill Nelson has been endorsed by the Florida Democratic Party. I ask you to join me with your vote in returning Senator Nelson to Washington to serve Florida. There are four candidates competing to be the Democratic nominee for Congressional District 2. The Wakulla Democratic Party is not endorsing a candidate in this contested primary. Three candidates are vying to be the Democratic nominee in State House District 7. The Wakulla Democratic Party will not endorse in this primary race. We will also not be endorsing in the Circuit Judge race. For School Board District 2, the Wakulla Democratic Party supports Mike Scott. His service on the School Board has been part of the Wakulla County School District formula for success. Our status as a high performing school is known across Florida … why second guess success? For Soil and Water Seat 3, the Wakulla Democratic Party supports Chuck Hess. Hess has professional experience relevant to this position and his personal advocacy for the natural resources that make Wakulla such a special place to live is widely known. For Soil and Water Seat 5, the Wakulla Democratic Party supports Cal Jamison. His work on behalf of Wakulla Springs is known far and wide. He is the right man to serve Wakulla on a board devoted to the stewardship of our precious natural resources. Finally, I would like to take the opportunity to invite Wakulla citizens to celebrate the Primary results with us at our Wakulla Democratic Party headquarters on Tuesday, Aug. 14, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Northpointe Center on Crawfordville Highway. Refreshments will be served. For more information, visit our website at wakullademocrats.org. Thank you, Rachel Sutz Pienta ChairWakulla Democratic Executive Committee

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 5ANominate this years Farm FamilyNominations for the 2012 Wakulla Farm Family of the Year Award are being accepted through Aug. 24 at the Extension Of“ ce. The annual recognition program is a cooperative effort between the North Florida Fair and county Extension Of“ ces. This award acknowledgment of the contributions farmers, ranchers and other agricultural producers have made to the economy, culture and lifestyle of Wakulla County. To make a nomination contact Cathy Frank at (850) 926-3931 or at cathy52@u” edu for an application. Editor, The News: Republicans in Wakulla County have four candidates to choose from during the Primary for the State House District 7 race. Of those, only candidate Halsey Beshears has never held public of“ ce or run for public of“ ce. The other three candidates have been in the political arena for years. Folks may remember that candidate Jamey Westbrook is a former Democratic State Legislator, and that both Mike Williams and Don Curtis ran unsuccessful political campaigns to try and “ ll the State House seat that was ultimately won by Leonard Bembry. Wakulla County needs a representative who will put our local wants and needs ahead of his own, as well as a representative who knows what its like to run a small business. Halsey Beshears has those quali“ cations. Halsey and his family have owned property in Wakulla County for years and Halsey is the only candidate to open up a campaign of“ ce here in Wakulla County, as well as employ local citizens to work at that of“ ce. His commitment to Wakulla County is quite evident. Couple Halseys ties to Wakulla County with his experience as a successful small business owner, who has not spent years running for a political of“ ce, but rather on running a small business that has led to economic growth, and it becomes apparent that Halsey Beshears is the best choice for Wakulla County in the House District 7 Republican Primary. I hope you will join me in voting for Halsey Beshears during the Primary. And please vote … remember, early voting has begun for the Primary here in Wakulla County and I truly hope everyone is making it a priority to get out and vote. Many folks have paid dearly for us to have this right and every American should take the time to exercise this symbolic gesture of freedom. By the time this edition of The Wakulla News has been published, you will still have three days left that you can utilize to vote early in the Primary (at the Supervisor of Elections Of“ ce). Then you will have an additional day to vote, which is the traditional Primary Election on Aug. 14, which you do at your precinct. Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells and his team of paid and volunteer staff, do an excellent job of making it very easy for you to vote. Theres no reason we cannot achieve a 100 percent voter turnout here in Wakulla County. Voting gives each citizen an opportunity to make a difference. Please get out and exercise this cherished freedom. Chris Russell Crawfordville Editor, The News: Cal Jamison is pleased to announce his candidacy for the of“ ce of Soil & Water Conservation District Supervisor, Seat 5. This unpaid, non-partisan position, will be decided by the Aug. 14 Primary Election. Im running for this of“ ce because I saw a need for someone with my abilities and qualification to step up and help reactivate the commission,Ž Jamison said. The Wakulla Soil & Water Conservation District has five elected supervisors. Current Chair Joe Duggar was unopposed and will remain on the board in Seat 2. He had worked with Jamison on several projects and encouraged him to run for the vacant seat. After attending an informational meeting at the library about the duties of the position, and attending a recent meeting of the Soil & Water District, Jamison felt he was a perfect fit to carry out the duties of this job. From 2002 to 2011 Jamison served as the Wakulla Springs Ambassador, a position with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection that served to promote the protection and restoration of Wakulla Springs through education and outreach. For More than 10 years Ive been the Wakulla Springs Ambassador and during that time I have acquired what I think is an awesome education in our karst geology and the waters that ” ow through and under Wakulla County,Ž Jamison said. During that time he has spent countless hours performing “ eld studies and has added more than 600 sinkholes to the database that covers the Wakulla Springs Basin and surrounding areas and has worked with numerous landowners, both public and private, to help preserve and protect the aquifer. Under the Florida Springs Initiative Program Jamison was able to acquire funding to assist landowners in cleaning up contaminated sinkholes and protecting our drinking water. All of the projects were done at no cost to the landowner. Jamison has led the restoration efforts at Butler Sink, Turner Sink, Indian Spring and two sinks on a tree farm off of New Light Church Road, as well as assisted with the projects at Emerald and Cherokee sinks now on Wakulla Springs property. All of the projects had speci“ c goals but working with farmers, landowners and others to implement best practices for land management that serve to protect the aquifer, was the ultimate goal of the projects. In the course of his job as Springs Ambassador, Jamison has developed excellent working relationships with many of the agencies that will be an asset to the position on the Soil & Water Conservation District. I have a good working rapport with Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Geological Survey and Northwest Florida Water Management District.Ž he said. I have worked closely with the Division of State Lands to identify and acquire lands for the protection of Wakulla Spring sand I have been intimately involved with the dye traces to Wakulla Springs.Ž Jamison is currently assisting the county planning department in developing a comprehensive plan amendment to allow for the restoration of sinkholes, a proposal he initiated to assist landowners. In discussing the impact the Soil & Water Conservation District can make in Wakulla County, Jamison said, Currently there are programs we are not taking full advantage of and I would like to bring these monies home to Wakulla.Ž The Soil & Water Con-servation Districts conserve Floridas natural resources through a variety of programs including demonstration projects, educational workshops, conservation projects and cooperative programs. Jamison said he looks forward to helping Wakulla County landowners, both public and private, in implementing the best land management practices to preserve our world class environment. Jamison has been very active in the community for a number of years. He is a founding member of the Wakulla County Historical Society serving on its Board of Directors since its inception and is currently the director of their local History Museum and Archives. He is also a Board member of the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park. Jamison has Associate of Arts Degree as well as Bachelor and Masters degree in anthropology and archaeology from FSU and has lived in Wakulla County for more than 30 years. Cals wife, Susan, is the librarian at Shadeville Elementary School. Doug Jones Crawfordville Editor, The News: The following letter was written two weeks before our dad went to be with our Lord. In talking with my dad, this was truly the way he felt about Mr. Charlie Creel. At my dads service, we all appreciated the kind words Mr. Creel said about dad, and we will always be grateful for all that he has done for us. Sharon Wisham Crawfordville Editor, The News: I would like to take this opportunity to say its time for a change in the sheriffs of“ ce in Wakulla County. I started in law enforcement in 1972 and retired in 2000. I served with W.R. (Bill) Taff and David Harvey. Its time for a sheriff for all of the citizens of Wakulla County. I have known Charlie Creel for 20 years and I have found him to be an honest man and an outstanding state trooper. He will be the sheriff for everyone. I worked with him on several occasions and he was always respectful to the citizens of the county and treated them with dignity. Lets elect Charlie Creel the next sheriff of Wakulla County. He is the right man for the job. Lt. Fred Bailey Retired … Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce MariannaEditors Note: Lt. Fred Bailey died in Marianna on July 10. Charlie Creel is an honest man Supporting Halsey Beshears for House Leonard Bembry is her choice for Congressreaders speak out More OpinionsEditor, The News: For those of you who do not know my dad, Leonard Bembry, I would like to give you a little personal background from a daughters perspective. I believe that when you learn more about Leonard Bembry and his values, he will be your choice for U.S. Congress. My dad is one of the most dedicated and determined people I know. I have watched him as a community leader, farmer, businessman, state representative and most importantly as a father and grandfather. He has always been the spiritual leader of our family and I know his faith and dedication to serving you in Washington will outweigh even what I have experienced in the past. He and my mom raised us on our family farm in Madison County. In those days we grew row crops and tobacco and as the youngest of three children I was always looking for a way to get out of work in the tobacco “ eld. I fondly remember getting to escape by going with my dad every other Friday to the tobacco warehouse in Valdosta, Ga. He would talk to me during that long ride and I remember him telling me, Our true character is judged by the degree to which we are willing to keep our commitments to others.Ž I did not fully understand what he meant when I was a child, but I have watched him live his life by this principle. Of course dad was also running a small business in Tallahassee … which he did for more than 40 years … and certainly faced some tough economic times over the years. Whether it was working on the farm, running his business or representing us in the Florida House, I can honestly say with conviction that he made it because he is the hardest working man I know. That personal experience is why my dad is committed to the way of life we lead as the small business owners, farmers and middle class families of North Florida. He doesnt need a lobbyist to tell him the issues important to you, he has lived them. My dad will be dedicated to stand up for these issues and he is solidly committed to ensuring that our issues in North Florida are heard in Washington. In his four years in the Florida House, dad has often said that his position as a legislator is to loyally represent the peoples interest. He has stood up to the special interests for the communities he represents, and the people who live there. His seat in the Florida House belongs to the people of the district and his seat in the U.S. House will belong to you and all of the people he will tirelessly represent in Washington, D.C. I feel lucky to have been molded by the principles by which my dad lives, and my husband and I strive to raise our children much the same way. I know we would be fortunate to have him as our voice in the United States Congress. Sincerely, Melissa Bembry Culp missybembryculp@gmail.comJamison seeks seat on Soil & WaterBy HERB DONALDSON The Palaver Tree Theater Company is putting together a small documentary tentatively titled, The Wakulla 50Ž in which 50 people, over 50, tell their stories of living and working here. I had spoken with Cheryl Creel about the project. She said I should contact Miss Ruth,Ž whose connection to Wakulla Springs, among other things, might be worth considering. Almost six weeks ago, I reached out to Miss Ruth, telling her who I was and about the project. Without hesitation she agreed to take part. Wed set a date to get together a week later. She also mentioned that she had something for me … a play: Maybe you can take a look at it and do something with it,Ž she said. I told her Id be honored to take a look. And I was, for Id no idea she even knew I existed, or was aware of the work that I did. At her house, Miss Ruths sister and brother-in-law greeted me. And there, in the threshold, stood her husband, D.P. High Sr. I put out my hand, we shook, and with a big grin he asked who I was. I told him, and he spoke my grandmother Annies name, along with her mothers, sisters and brothers. My grandma babysat his kids from his “ rst marriage. It was with this feeling of welcome that I looked down at the lady who sat on a small chair, just inside the doorway: Ruth McCallister Davis-High. I could tell from the smile on her face that she was ready to talk. I found that shed been having spellsŽ lately. One had occurred only a few hours earlier. I begged to come back some other time, but she asked that I stay. I thought it rude to take out my recorder to capture the moment, so I left it in my bag. It was a decision I now regret. She was born in 1926, only a few yards from the house in which we sat. An FSU graduate, she taught at schools in our area and in south Florida. Some years later she lived in Lexington because of her sons desire to attend the University of Kentucky. Her fascination with the Kentucky Derby, in Louisville, sparked impromptu meetings and lifelong friendships with a number of those who owned and raced horses. Kentucky is also where she got into fashion, which helped catapult her to New York. But it was Wakulla Springs that tingled my interest. Ruth had been hired by the big man himself, Edward Ball, to become manager of the Springs. When it came to Ruth, Ball was nothing more than a gentle giant. If there was anything he thought I needed to know, Ruth said, he made sure I learned it.Ž She told me of Balls taste for a particular Spanish Bean soup. He sent me all the way to Louisiana so that I could learn first-hand how to make it,Ž she recalled. He would send her on excursions around the country to “ nd what other resorts and natural hideaways were doing to gain customers. She meet with managers and directors abroad, then sat with Ball upon her to return to tinker with her notes and ideas; shaping them in ways to better promote the Springs. And promote it she did. She reached out to FSU and set in place something akin to a work-study program. College students worked at the Springs and earned school credit. As legislative sessions took place Ruth wrote personal letters to governors, senators and other dignitaries encouraging them to stay at the lodge, convincing them to hold events there. While attending a function in Tallahassee shed heard that Margaret Truman, daughter of Americas 33rd President, Harry S. Truman, was coming to town. She wrote Ms. Truman a letter, welcoming her to our area and extended an invitation to visit the Springs. Ms. Truman accepted. Ruth was often asked how she managed such a feat. Her response was always the same: With a 3 cent stamp,Ž she laughed. Peter Lawford, a member of the original Rat Pack, who married a Kennedy, and is believed to be the last person to speak to Marilyn Monroe alive, visited the Springs more than once. There was a great deal more she, her husband and I talked about, including those publicity photos of her in Native of the Mysterious WatersŽ out“ ts. Not to mention the infamous bottled water debacle that set a few environmentalists on edge some years back. She gave me the typed script of a play and I promised her I would read it. Just then, her sister and brotherin-law returned. They were not alone: two paramedics were in tow. I thanked her and her husband for their time and promised her I would see her in a week. Her hand was the last one I touched before I left. That day, I read the entire script. Later, I was due to call Miss Ruth and schedule our interview. It was a Thursday morning, and I decided to read the Tallahassee Democrat before the call. That was when I saw her name in the obituary column. I dropped the paper and went to the phone. I spoke to a lady who, I believe, was her stepdaughter. Overcoming my shock, I expressed my condolences. During the conversation she repeated my name and I heard Mr. High in the background say: Tell him I need to speak to him. He can stop by any time.Ž A few days later I did so, bringing the script with me to return. Id heard often that life is short. I couldnt help being disappointed with myself for taking the gift of time for granted. It was odd, walking in, seeing the familiar things in the room, the origins of which wed discussed during my last visit. Only now, something special was missing, which I and, obviously, Mr. High, both felt. We stopped and took the time to remember it all. Herb Donaldson is a local playwright and director of Palaver Tree Theater.Remembering Ruth McCallister Davis-High

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments WEDNESDAY: and Adults 10:30am 11:00am Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Churchreligious views and events Church Briefs Mrs. Lottie Roddenberry’s 101st birthday partyThe family of Mrs. Lottie Roddenberry invites friends and relatives to help celebrate her 101st birthday on Saturday, Aug. 11, at the fellowship hall of Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. Drop in between noon and 3 p.m. for refreshments and visiting. No gifts, please. Booksigning set for local author at Books-A-Million Local author John Wade, whose book, “In Sketch of a Prophecy” was recently published, will hold a booksigning at BooksA-Million bookstore in Tallahassee on Saturday, Aug. 11, from noon to 3 p.m. In the book, Wade illustrates many of the features of the Tabernacle of Moses and Temple of Solomon, along with the historic Old Testament rituals that took place there. Coupled with meticulous citations of scripture and intricate artwork, he uses the biblical descriptions of these buildings to show what Christians can expect in heaven. These descriptions are blueprints of the transformed Christian heart and even patterns of heaven itself, our future home. Holy Ghost Revival to be held at Charlotte FaithYou’re invited to a Holy Ghost Summer Revival at Charlotte Faith and Deliverance Temple beginning Wednesday, Aug. 8, through Friday, Aug. 10. For more information, contact Alice Williams at 926-7322.Youth raise money for camp OUT TO PASTORLocal church appreciation dayBy REV. JAMES L. SNYDER It is funny where you pick up an idea. I know I was not born with a truck full of ideas like some people. Take, for example, the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. She has more ideas than you can shake a stick at, and believe me; I have shaken many a stick at her, behind her back, of course. I have to scrap around for an idea and then when I do “ nd one I am so exhausted from the search that I am not sure what to do with it. Then an idea comes looking for me. That is a strange phenomenon. I was watching the news with my wife when we heard the lead story of the day about the Chick-“ l-A appreciation day. Im not sure I know all the political ins and outs of that sort of thing. Everything seems to have some kind of political overtone to it these days. What was once a matter of morality has become a matter of policy. Politics have invaded every aspect of our life, and I am so looking forward to heaven where, someone told me and I cannot reveal the source, but the word is out, there are no politics in heaven. Whenever you have an opportunity to go out and buy some chicken, I say take it. It was not hard to convince my better half to go out for supper. We do not do it too much anymore. What with the traf“ c and the “ nances, it hardly seems worthwhile. That is why I always brag on my wifes cooking. Oh, boy,Ž I will say after a meal, you cant get anything this good at some restaurant.Ž She smiles, but I suspect she knows what I am saying. Well, we did try to go to Chick-“ l-A but we could not get within 17 blocks of it. It seems everybody and their third cousin was out getting chicken for supper. Oh well, you cannot participate in everything, but at least we tried. As we circled the block for the 19th time, the idea came to me. If we can have a Chick-“ l-A appreciation day because the head of the company said he believed in some traditional values, then why cant I? I believe in everything traditional. I am the most traditional person you will ever meet. Before there was a me, there was not much that was traditional. I go back so far I can remember when dirt was clean. I want the whole world to know that I believe in tradition and I am not just “ ddling on the roof. I know it is old fashioned but I believe in the Bible. If it is in the Bible, I believe it, although I must confess I do not understand everything in the Bible. But then, nobody understands everything in their world. The smartest person knows he does not know everything. I built my life upon the values stressed in the Bible and I take it as the Word of God. I know tradition is old-fashioned, but I still embrace it. If it is traditional, I probably believe it. Some people believe that if it is new, it is okay and if it is old, throw it away. Experience teaches us that it is the exact opposite. Take medicine for example. Sure, many people have bene“ ted from modern advancements in medicine. I am appreciative of every advancement. But then, if medicine has made such inroads into our culture why are more and more people sick? Why are the hospitals full and over” owing? Why are there not enough doctors to take care of all of the sick? I am thankful for what medicine has done, but for every cure it achieves, three more diseases pop up sticking out their tongue. Yes, I believe in tradition. Most people are traditional in many areas of their life. Do you realize that it was traditional for your great, great, great grandfather to drink water? It was traditional for your great, great, great grandfather to go to sleep at night... To get up in the morning... And the list goes on and on. Those things, which are traditional, are those things that have endured the wearing element of time. In light of all of this traditional headwagging, I want to propose another appreciation day. This coming Sunday I declare it to be Local Church Appreciation Day. Everybody who believes in traditional values will show up at the church of their choice and make their vote count. I know it will be a shock and we run the danger that many church ceilings will cave in, but I think it is worth the risk. Of course, there is the possibility that when many pastors see their sanctuary “ lled with people they will pass out in sheer shock. In the meantime, I am going to stick to what the Bible says here regardless of what happens. In everything give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus to you-wardŽ (1 Thessalonians 5:18 KJV). Every Sunday should be local Church Appreciation Day.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. He lives with his wife, Mart ha, in Silver Spring s Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. New Testament Bible ChurchBible-believing Church meets at Wakulla County Public Library, large conference room. Songs, prayer and Bible teaching/preaching. The Lord Jesus described the basic meaning of a church in a very simple and yet profound way:For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.ŽCome take part in our study of Gods Word.4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Special to The NewsDue to their fundraising efforts and donations, the youth group of the Wakulla United Methodist Church attended the popular Camp CrosSWILD in Panama City in early August. Youth Director Josh Hawkins said the youth of Wakulla UMC have worked hard to raise the almost $300 per person camp tuition. According to the CrosSWILD Summer Camp website, their vision is to ignite the youth to live boldly and wild for the cross of Jesus Christ.Ž TOP: Youth Director Josh Hawkins, center, takes a few moments with Wakulla UMC youth from left to right, Hannah Barbree, Carah Cox, Cameron Sherrell, Devon Jose, Haley Barbree and Caylee Cox. BOTTOM: Barbree, Devon Jose and Gabrial Jose wash cars for dollars. Tikvat Ami Messianic SynagogueThe Hope of My PeopleŽRabbi Joshua Lessardrabbijosh@tikvatami.com850-364-8925 Rabbi JoshService: Saturday at 11 am www.tikvatami.com3324 N. Monroe Street, TallahasseeLocation: 3324 N. Monroe St. Tallahassee at Gingerbread Pre-school/Heritage Academy

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 7AObituariesCharmayne J. Chouinard Jerry Braxton Crutchfield Joseph D. Hicks Charles C. Laughton Eula Wardene Nichols Josephine Bullock Rozar Colleen Maybee Weber Charmayne J. Chouinard, 69, of Crawfordville, went to be with the Lord on Monday, Aug. 6, in Tallahassee. She was born in Chicago on Nov. 15, 1942, the daughter of Edward and Esther Gabriel. She was an active member of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church in Medart. She worked for many years as a real estate agent in the Chicago area and, later in life, at WalMart of Crawfordville. She loved to travel, was an avid NASCAR fan, and always welcomed others with open arms and a warm smile. The family and friends of Charmayne have been blessed knowing she was in their lives. A memorial service will be held at a later date at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church in Medart. Call (850) 728-7925 for further details. Charmayne was predeceased by her beloved husband, Joseph Antoine Chouinard; and her sister, Gayle Gabriel. Survivors include her son and daughter-in-law, Richard and Maureen Chouinard of Crawfordville; son and girlfriend, Michael Chouinard and Danielle Ryan of Tallahassee; and grandchildren, Michael Chouinard Jr. of Orlando, Carla Chouniard, and John Brenkus Jr., both of Crawfordville. In lieu of flowers, the family requests any donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice of Tallahassee and/or the American Cancer Society. Jerry Jay Braxton Crutch“ eld, 74, of Sanford, died on Thursday, Aug. 2. He was born in Alamance County, N.C., on Oct. 27, 1937, to Elisha and Leona Crutch“ eld. He served in the U.S. Air Force for 24 years and was a minister for more than 20 years. Visitation was held on Sunday, Aug. 5, at Central Baptist Church in Sanford, with a funeral service following. Another funeral service was held on Tuesday, Aug. 7, at 3 p.m. at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church in Crawfordville. Interment followed at Pigott Cemetery in Crawfordville with military honors. Survivors include his wife, Bertie Pigott Crutchfield of Sanford; two sisters, Val Carden of Graham, N.C., and Nettie Day (Bob) of Burlington, N.C.; one brother, Graham Crutch“ eld (Caroline) of Raleigh, N.C.; one son, Jay Crutchfield (Dana) of Lake Mary,; two daughters, Sandy Barnes (Randy) of Crawfordville, and Kristy Woolsey (Justin) of Sanford, as well as seven grandchildren. Besides his parents, he was predeceased by his sister, Dorothy Cates; and brother-in-law, Thomas Cates. Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay is in charge of the arrangements. Joseph D. Hicks, 76, of Panacea, died on Tuesday, July 31. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Survivors include his wife, Donna Hicks of Panacea; sons, Craig (Patsy) Hicks and Wayne Hicks, both of Knoxville, Tenn., Eddie (Angela) Hicks of Atlanta, Eldon Hicks of Panacea, and Joe (Brenda) Hicks of Madison; daughters, Dena (Charles) Hicks of Knoxville, Tenn., Patricia (Donnie) Mullens of Snellville, Ga., Tammy (Leonard) Henderson of Lawrenceville, Ga., and Dea Hicks of Panacea; a sister: Judy (Walter) Mathis of Bremen, Ga.; 20 grandchildren, 26 great-grandchildren, one great-great-grandchild; and many nieces and nephews. Arrangements under the direction of Forbes Funeral Home (850) 559-3380. Please sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome. net. Charles C. Laughton, 48, of Sopchoppy, passed away Thursday, Aug. 2. A Corrections Officer with the State of Florida, he was actively involved with the Police Benevolent Association, the K-9 team of Franklin County, and was a Field Training Of“ cer for the Department of Corrections. He enjoyed playing guitar, taking pictures, boating, spending time with his family and being involved in his church, Christian Worship Center. Survivors include his wife, Sarah Laughton of Sopchoppy; son, Isaiah Laughton of Sopchoppy; daughters, Tina Laughton of Eastpoint and Isabella Laughton of Sopchoppy; parents, Charles and Marilyn Laughton of Norfolk, N.Y.; brother, Kevin Laughton of Norfolk, N.Y.; sister, Penny Sue (Mike) Williams of New York; stepsons, Allen (Amy) James of Madison, Conn., and Joseph (Tonya) James of Apalachicola; and three grandchildren. Funeral Services were held on Tuesday, Aug. 7, at Christian Worship Center in Crawfordville with Pastor Steve Taylor and Rev. Nolan Kent of“ ciating. Burial followed at Panacea Park Cemetery in Panacea. The family received friends on Monday, Aug. 6, at Christian Worship Center. Arrangements are under the direction of Forbes Funeral Home (850) 559-3380. Please sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome.net. Eula Wardene DeneŽ Eastman Nichols, 76, died on Sunday, July 29, at Eden Springs Rehabilitation Center in Crawfordville. She was born in Foley, but lived most of her life in Tallahassee. She was a member of the Presbyterian Church. She worked as an executive secretary for the State of Florida. A memorial service was held on Sunday, Aug. 5, at 3 p.m. at Beggs Chapel in Perry. A reception followed at the Perry Shrine Club. Survivors include her daughter, Rhonda Chapman of Tallahassee; her sister, Louise Gray of Tallahassee; one granddaughter; four great grandchildren; and her lifelong friend, Helen Harvey. Josephine Bullock Rozar, 97, was born Sept. 8, 1914. in Crawfordville and died Aug. 6, peacefully at her home in Tallahassee with her family by her side. She was the daughter of Truman Brack Thomas and Sallie Coeska Raker. Her grandparents were Edward Truman Thomas and Josephine Bullock of Gadsden County and Robert Henry Raker and Maggie Wallace of Wakulla County. She was an avid golfer, a member of Capital City Country Club, Tallahassee Garden Club and Thomasville Road Baptist Church. She lived a long and interesting life, traveled throughout the world in her younger years with her husband, Buck, and loved her home and family. She had a great appreciation for her extended family and until her most recent years, was a great family historian. She was predeceased by her husband, Hansel Singleton BuckŽ Rozar, founder of Tallahassee Welding & Machine Shop; son-in-law, William George Jones III; and sisters, Geraldine Whaley, Margaret Revell and Anna SnooksŽ Carroll. Survivors include her daughter, Lucki Jo Jones; granddaughters, Shannon Jones (Jeff), Elizabeth GiGiŽ Jones, Allison Small (Kenny); and three great-grandchildren, George Jones, Lucki Jo and Hannah Small. The family wishes to celebrate Jos life with JoyŽ at Thomasville Road Baptist Church in Tallahassee on Thursday, Aug. 9, at 3 p.m. In lieu of ” owers, memorial contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308 or Thomasville Road Baptist Church. Bevis Funeral Home (850 385-2193) is handling the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at www.bevisfh.com. Colleen Maybee Weber, 84, passed away on Aug. 1, in Crawfordville. She was a native of Dundalk, Ontario, Canada, and had lived in Monticello for 24 years. She was a member of the Red Hats of Monticello, Triple L of Lloyd, and the First United Methodist Church of Monticello. Survivors include her son, William John MayBee; three daughters, Sharon Ann McGuire (David), Patty Sue Bartlum (Guy), and Rebecca Whatley (William Meador); one brother, Donald Colgan; and one sister, Hazel Guerin; one grandchild, Darek James MayBee (Jennifer); and four great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by William B. Maybee, Edward Finley Maybee, John J. Weber, and William Benjamin Zuber. A private burial will be held at a later date. Charmayne J. Chouinard Jerry Braxton Crutch eld Eula Wardene E. Nichols Colleen Maybee Weber Josephine Bullock Rozar Charles C. Laughton Joseph D. Hicks CREEL FOR SHERIFF e 20,000 Florida law enforcement ocers of the Fraternal Order of Police, Florida State Lodge, have endorsed Charlie Creel as the best choice for Sheri of Wakulla County.The endorsement I value most comes from YOU, the citizens of Wakulla County on Nov. 6th election day. Integrity You Can Count On Facebook at Charlie Creel for Sheriff charlieforsheriff@gmail.com (850) 926-4712 PO Box 482, Crawfordville, FL 32326www.charliecreel.comPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Af“liation, for sheriff. 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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings CommunityAlexander Lewis earns Eagle Scout rankSpecial to The NewsAlexander Lewis, Boy Scout from Troop 5 Crawfordville, was awarded the Eagle Scout medal during a ceremony held on July 21 in Sopchoppy. The Eagle Scout title is the highest ranking honor a scout may hold with approximately two in every 100 scouts ever earning this title. During the ceremony Lewis recognized four mentors who have encouraged and inspired him including Andy Keith and Lambert West, both Scout troopmasters, Nancy Richardson, AVID high school teacher, and Winky Jenkins Rice, church youth leader. Lewis built a playset for the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church (SUMC) as his Eagle Scout project, and is currently seeking to earn the Scout God and CountryŽ honor. He is a senior at Wakulla High School and is active in the WHS band and drama programs. He is also a youth leader for the SUMC, and will be part of the “ rst class of AVID graduates at the high school. He aspires to attend the University of Florida and to become a school teacher and writer. Ashley and Robert Heuring Jr. of Crawfordville announce the birth of their daughter, Blakely RaeMarie Heuring, on July 24 at 2:41 a.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She was 6 pounds, 10 ounces, and was 20.3 inches in length. She has two brothers, Hayden, 7, and Robbie, 4, and two sisters, Harley, 8, and Keeley, 6. Her maternal grandparents are the late Michael and Ronda Hurley Sr. Her paternal grandparents are Robert and Vickie Heuring Sr. of Crawfordville. Special to The NewsThe Secondary Reading Council of Florida (SRCFL) awarded its 2012 Reading Teacher of the Year designation in the veteran category to reading educator Clara Michelle McMillan Kirby of the Leon County School District. Kibry is a reading coach at James R. Rickards High School under the administration of Dr. Michelle Gayle. The award was presented at the SRCFL Annual Conference held in Deer“ eld Beach on May 11 and 12. Kevin Smith of Just Read, Florida!, said Kirby is a collaborative practitioner who ƒcorrals resources and leads the charge in impacting student performance.Ž He added that she was a tireless change agent for secondary reading.Ž Each recipient will receive a check for $250 and free registration for the spring 2013 SRCFL annual conference. She is the daughter of Finley and Jean McMillan of Ochlockonee Bay. She has four children. She currently serve as president of the Leon County Reading Council. She is a member of the R. Don McLeod Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy, located in Crawfordville, and is also active in the American Legion Auxiliary and Daughters of the American Revolution chapters in Tallahassee. She is also the State Senior Curator for the Children of the American Revolution.Kirby named reading teacher of the year by reading councilSPECIAL TO THE NEWSNancy Lewis pins an Eagle Scout medal on her son, Alexander Lewis, during a medal ceremony on July 21. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSClara Michelle McMillan Kirby and son Ren GowanHeurings welcome baby girl, Blakely, on July 24 Email community news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar. Paid for by Leonard Bembry for Congress DON CURTIS is the right man at the right time for the Florida House Political advertisement paid for and approved by Don Curtis, Republican, for State Representative ENDORSED BY United Christians of Florida Florida Forestry Association National Federation of Independent Business Police Benevolent Association Tallahassee Democrat 7 Call me and visit our website 850-843-0520 www.ElectDonCurtis.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolBy BETH ODONNELLAssistant Superintendent On top of being named an AŽ school district, Wakulla County School District has been designated an Academically High Performing DistrictŽ for the “ fth consecutive year. Wakulla is one of only 19 school districts to earn this recognition, and one of only six districts that has maintained it for “ ve or more consecutive years. More than FCAT scores are taken into consideration to be designated as Academically High PerformingŽ, a school district must meet the following requirements: 1. Earn a grade of AŽ for at least two consecutive years and have no district-operated school that earned a grade of F.Ž 2. Comply with the class size requirements. 3. Have no material weaknesses or instances of material noncompliance noted in the school districts annual “ nancial audit. This honor not only recognizes the high expectations we have for educating our students, it also recognizes the importance of being fiscally responsible with the taxpayers money,Ž said Superintendent David Miller. It is the collaborative effort of students, teachers, parents, and administrators giving their best every day that keeps this school district high performing. We are truly a community that values our childrens education.Ž In 2007, the Legislature created the Academically High Performing DistrictŽ designation to recognize school districts that were consistently doing an outstanding job educating their students. Special to The NewsWakulla Middle School eighth grader Danna Richardson was recently recognized for her exceptional scores on the ACT. She received medals for State Recognition and Grand Recognition for scoring in the top 2 percent of seventh graders who took the ACT or SAT. The Duke University Talent Identi“ cation Programs seventh Grade Talent Search identifies students who scored in the 95th percentile on a grade-level achievement test. As part of the program, these students take the ACT or SAT. More than 77,000 students participated this year, and the Grand Recognition Ceremony honored seventh graders who earned scores equal to or better than 90 percent of college-bound seniors who took the same tests. Richardson is on the honor roll, a member of the WMS drama club, track team, brain bowl team and band. She cofounded the Wildcat Poetry Society, and she earned a green belt in tae kwon do. By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATHE CAPITAL, Aug. 3...With Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson resigning in the wake of a series of public-relations miscues and grading mistakes surrounding Floridas high-stakes testing and accountability regime, critics are sensing an opening to change the direction of the schoolreform movement in Florida. Lawmakers and parent organizations who want the state to focus less on FCAT results in evaluating schools are trying to use the search for a replacement for Robinson -who resigned this week to spend more time with his family -as a reason to re-evaluate the system he oversaw. Its a chance to throw out the old status quo of high-stakes testing and look at what might be best for kids and make some changes,Ž said Kathleen Oropeza, one of the founders of Fund Education Now, an advocacy group. Rep. Perry Thurston, a Plantation Democrat set to lead his party in the next legislative session, was more blunt. The FCAT has failed students, teachers, and our state,Ž he said in a statement responding to Robinsons resignation. A new state education commissioner can help Florida install a better and broader education accountability system for every school receiving taxpayer dollars that takes into account all the things students and teachers accomplish throughout the year.Ž Robinsons tenure was marked by a major collapse in FCAT writing scores, blamed on increased standards, and a revision to school grades that changed the marks for more than 200 schools after the grades were released. The PTA has pressed members to send emails to Gov. Rick Scott encouraging him and state Board of Education members to appoint a Commissioner of Education who values a well-rounded, high quality public education and reduces the emphasis on high-stakes testing.Ž The emails have poured into Scotts inbox. Another form email of unclear origin that has shown up several times in Scotts inbox … which can be publicly viewed on the governors Sunburst email system hits many of the same notes. Commissioner Robinsons resignation will not quiet the discontent of Floridians for current politically-driven reform efforts,Ž the letter begins. Sen. Bill Montford, a Tallahassee Democrat who also serves as CEO of the Florida Association of District School Superintendents, is not as critical of the FCAT as some other Democrats but still said the state should re-evaluate the test regardless of Robinsons decision. Lets have a serious discussion about, is this the best approach?Ž he said. Even Scott recently questioned in off-the-cuff remarks whether Florida might test too much,Ž though he hasnt elaborated on that thought since, and hasnt made any suggestion that he is likely to push for a major change in that area. But Republicans seem unlikely to budge from the reform effort that has formed the backbone of their education agenda since former Gov. Jeb Bush pushed accountability during his tenure. And Bushs Foundation for Floridas Future remains in” uential in school debates in the Legislature. Patricia Levesque, executive director of the foundation, praised Robinson and the states high-stakes testing model in a statement following the commissioners resignation. He kept Florida an education-reform model for the nation,Ž Levesque said. Under his leadership, Florida pushed forward with important improvements to its standards and accountability system to better prepare students for success.Ž An overhaul of the states testing system is already on the way as Florida and other states move toward a more standardized curriculum. But the idea of testing as a major barometer for schools is still endorsed by Republicans, and at least one key lawmaker says the state shouldnt dump the FCAT in the meantime. This is an opportunity to take a breath and renew our commitment to the FCAT done right,Ž said Sen. David Simmons, a Maitland Republican who chairs the panel that oversees school funding. While he didnt question the reasons for Robinsons resignation, Simmons said the change gives us an opportunity to put those mistakes behind us and move on.Ž As for what the state should look for in its next commissioner, Simmons suggested the state make sure that the person is able to “ ll the dual roles of running the Department of Education and advising state leaders on policy. Obviously, we need somebody with both management skills and vision,Ž he said. And Montford said it should be someone familiar with the landscape in Florida. Were moving so fast ... we cant afford the luxury of someone coming in and learning on the job,Ž he said.Wakulla named Academically High Performing district Richardson honored for ACT scoresDanna Richardson FCAT critics see opening in Robinson resignation School news and announcements:Email jjensen@thewakullanews.net or drop it by the of ce at 3119-A Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. Email is preferred. News is edited for style, space, clarity and grammar and runs when space becomes available. Fellowship University of FloridaTallahassee Memorial HealthCare Physician Partners Cancer & Hematology Specialists has proudly assembled the best physicians from leading cancer institutions in the nation to form the strongest cancer “ghting team in the area.NOW ACCEPTING New Patients Tim Broeseker, M.D. Fellowship Winship Cancer Institute/ Emory University School of Medicine Fellowship University of Florida Fellowship Indiana University School of Medicine Fellowship University of Florida Jeannine Silberman, M.D. Janice Lawson, M.D. Amit Jain, M.D. Iman Imanirad, M.D. TMH Physician PartnersCANCER & HEMATOLOGY SPECIALISTSp (850) 431-5360 f (850) 431-5367 Tallahassee Memorial Cancer Center | 1775 One Healing Place | Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Specialized Care. 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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBy MARJ LAW Cleaning black powder guns or those old folk with the dishpan hands. Stop!Ž says Joe. Dont use your regular gun solvents to clean my black powder Kentucky Pistol!Ž And he grabs it to himself like Im about to murder it. You dont clean a black powder gun like you do a modern gun,Ž he continues his lecture. Black powder and the newer smokeless black powders are very corrosive. Theres a different solution for them.Ž Actually, I did read up on the subject. In the old days, some of the pistols had barrels that would come easily off the gun. Since no one had fancy solvents back then, they dropped the barrels into vats of soapy water. And scrubbed. Of course, if you have a gorgeous long stock like Joes Kentucky Pistol, you dont drop it in a vat of water. But you still can use soapy water to scrub it inside and out. Not only are you scrubbing out the nasty smelly black powder, but on revolvers, people often put bear grease over the cylinders to keep them from going off together in a big chain reaction explosion. Bear grease has a consistency like Crisco, so its thick. Imagine Crisco impregnated with sulfur-y smelling ” our, and you can feel for someone having to clean that! Like modern day pistols, the insides of the barrels have no bluing or other “ nishes because they would not hold up to the explosive shooting. This means the metal is bare and ripe for rust. So, after a good scrub, the barrel needs to be lubricated. If you dont plan to shoot until the next black powder season, the whole pistol, revolver or long gun needs lubricating wherever there is metal. Then careful storage in a dry place is important. Joe ended up cleaning his Kentucky Pistol himself with a modern black powder solvent. I think he saw me eyeing the Dawn.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid gunner in her retirement.Cleaning black powder guns HOME ON THE RANGE Capt. Bert Strickland with his 99-pound black grouper caught aboard the Marion J from Lynn Brothers Seafood V in St. Marks. The world record is 113.6 pounds. Brag book:Berts grouper Panacea team winsSPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPanaceas Team Reel Smoker took “ rst place in the King“ sh Shootout on Sunday, Aug. 5, in Carrabelle with a 48.5-pound King. Capt. Blake Gardner of Reel Smoker Charters in Panacea lead the team to their second win. The “ rst win was a record holding 50.4-pound King in 2009. Congratulations Team Reel Smoker! In my last article, I wrote about the venomous three pit vipers we are likely to encounter in the Wakulla County area, especially after tropical storms like Debby. After heavy rains, snakes wander or disperse to “ nd new waters and feeding areas. They can be found just about anywhere, like in your yard or storage building! And, as I wrote last time, their venom can be very toxic … its a specialized saliva full of unique enzymes and proteins, similar to the white of an egg. When we have egg nog were swallowing the white of eggs … no problem. But if you were to inject the albumin of an egg into your vascular system, your precious bod would respond just as if youd been bitten. Things would get serious fast! Youll recall how some stunt people do an act of swallowing snake venom? Unless you had a massive bleeding ulcer, the venom would not affect you! The three pit vipers in our region are the little Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus milarius barbouri), the large Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteurs), and medium-sized, the Florida Cottonmouth (Afkistrodonpiscivorus conanti). The Cottonmouth is a true moccasin. Many water snakes are referred to as moccasins,Ž but they are NOT venomous! Just west of our area along the Apalachicola River basin is the other North American true moccasin, the Southern Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrixcontortrix). Ive seen them around Torreya State Park. Neither have rattles, but like all pit vipers, they have their unique vertical pupils and keeled scales giving them a rough appearance. All pit vipers give birth to live young, termed viviparous, encased in a clear watery sack which soon ruptures when they crawl out to be on their own. The young of our native Cottonmouth looks almost exactly like a Copperhead. Both have a coppery color, bands crossing over their thick (for their length) body, and a bright yellow tail, which is … believe it or not, used as a lure mostly for toads and frogs! Only the young Cottonmouth though has a distinct dark streak through the eye. Copperheads do not have this dark eye streak! And, according to experts who have made extensive (exhausting would be a better word) studies of our areas herpsŽ (the study of reptile and amphibians) the Copperhead does NOT range into Wakulla County, but is thought to when people see young Cottonmouths, they look so similar. Another pit viper is found northwest of our area, but east around the Okefenokee Swamp, and that is the Canebrake Rattlesnake, a beautiful pink colorphase of the true Timber Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus). Ive seen them live in the Osceola Management Area north of Interstate 10, but they are not in the Big Bend. Yes, when snakes are about to shed their skin their eyes (which remember, dont blink) get a milky opaqueness to them. They sense they are more vulnerable and will tend to hold up in a hiding place until theyve shed. If encountered while preparing to shed they can be more nervous, and perhaps a little more likely to defend themselves by striking. This also applies to the pit vipers. If a viper has just eaten, or if its very hot or fairly cool, or if the serpent feels exposed as in the middle of a road, then they may feel threatened … perhaps not. Every snake (like us) has a different temperament, so just how likely they are to stand their ground is completely unpredictable.Wakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHMore on our local pit vipers The Wak u lla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com “Re-Store”Shadeville Highway926-4544Open Tues. Sat.  9 a.m. 5 p.m.

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This past week, the Coast Guard celebrated its 222nd birthday. According to the Coast Guard Historians Website (www.uscg.mil/history): The Coast Guards of“ cial history began on 4 August 1790 when President George Washington signed the Tariff Act that authorized the construction of ten vessels, referred to as cutters, to enforce federal tariff and trade laws and to prevent smuggling. Known variously through the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as the revenue cutters, the system of cutters, and “ nally the Revenue Cutter Service, it expanded in size and responsibilities as the nation grew. The Coast Guard is one of the oldest organizations of the federal government and until Congress established the Navy Department in 1798 it served as the nations only armed force a” oat.Ž In honor of the celebration of Coast Guard Day, members in attendance at the Flotillas monthly meeting enjoyed a cake specially made for the occasion. We were joined by several new and prospective members. What a great opportunity to show them what we are all about and share a part of our history! During the meeting, several things were discussed including the continued progress on our communications trailer, upcoming opportunities for public education and participating in events throughout our area through public affairs. Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos passed out awards as the meeting concluded. Dave Rabon received certi“ cate of appointment as FSO-Detatchment and will work with Flotilla leadership in building the detachment in the Carrabelle, St. George, Apalachicola area. Mike Harrison received an award for completing more than 60 vessel safety checks/marine dealer visits so far this year. This award is usually presented at the end of the year because it usually takes a member a year to accomplish this task. As part of our member training, Mark Rosen talked about the Midgett family who has had more than 150 family members serve in the Coast Guard since it first began. For more information on the family with information on a cutter named after one family member, visit www.uscg. mil/pacarea/cgcmidgett/ history.asp. Member Susan Blake also discussed her knowledge of the 1812 re-enactment of the Coast Guard in the Great Lakes. Hopefully we will hear more from her on this in a later column as well as from Mark Rosen on the Midgett family. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident … Dont become a part of history for all the wrong reasons. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAuxiliarists celebrate the Coast Guards 222nd birthday with a cake. David Rabon receiving FSO appointment. Mike Harrison receives an award. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Rules for Safe Cave Diving During discussions with leaders from Wakulla County, I became aware that many did not understand the great measures our diving community have taken to promote safe cave diving. Several decades ago, when the cave diving community was a secret society, Sheck Exley wrote of a study he conducted of 800 Florida diving fatalities. He found most were educated people, unlike how they were portrayed. Half were found to be in open water and were set aside. The remaining were then evaluated for cause of death. In this group, he found open water dive instructors, U.S. Navy divers, scientists and more people usually described as knowledgeable divers. However, the largest subset of this group was found to lack overhead environment training (Rule 1: Formal Training). The cave community turned to their training agencies and sought to correct this problem by providing a class that is an extension to open water diving called Cavern Diving. All caves have a cavern. It is de“ ned as the cave (overhead environment) entrance, no further than 200 feet in from the surface, no deeper than 100 feet, and always in natural daylight with a visibility of 40 feet or better. Cavern diving is not conducted at night. During the cavern class, the rules for safe cave diving are discussed, to expose people to the hazards of cave diving. Cavern diving is now offered through all of the national diving training agencies. Sheck went on to describe in his study, why people died in a cave. People became disoriented and got lost. Did you ever get lost at the mall? Caves are similar underground passages with many rooms and passages. They are easily confusing and even more dif“ cult if the diver stirs up the sediment on the ” oor. Dry cavers get lost also, but they have air all around them, unlike the diver who must carry his breathing gas. The solution is to run a continuous line to the surface, one that can be followed by touch, one with directional arrows indicating the way out. Trained cave divers ALWAYS follow or deploy a continuous line when cave diving (Rule 2). The next was a lack of breathing gas management. Yes, they ran out of air, but more importantly, they failed to carry enough air to get back out of the overhead condition. Open water divers are taught when they run low of air, just ascend, which is not possible in a cave. Cave (and cavern) air management includes turning around to exit when you reach two-thirds of your remaining breathing supply: one-third to return and one-third for emergencies that may crop up along the way (Rule 3). A room with no windows or lights is dark. A cave is even darker. The study found perished divers carried few and unreliable lights. When they fail, without cave training, the diver is left with few options to “ nd their way out. While a diver can never carry too many lights, the standard is for a primary (bright light) and two back up reliable lights. Cavern divers use daylight as one light so they require a total of two. The third rule for safe cave diving is a minimum of three lights (Rule 4). Back in the day of the study, air was the only gas available to divers. Narcosis was a problem when diving deeper than 130 feet. The study found divers narcotized at deeper depth, like being drunk, but underwater. The rule became limit your depth. But today, divers can be trained on a readily available helium based mix that reduces narcosis, so the new rule is called narcosis management. Divers must know their breathing mixtures (Rule 5). All cave divers are trained to follow these safe cave diving rules. Open water divers can learn to safely dive the cavern and learn the rules for safe cave diving in a weekend long class. The vast majority of people diving caves do so safely, that is with careful risk management. P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday g Thu Aug 9, 12 Fri Aug 10, 12 Sat Aug 11, 12 Sun Aug 12, 12 Mon Aug 13, 12 Tue Aug 14, 12 Wed Aug 15, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 12:54 AM 3.1 ft. 1:34 AM 3.3 ft. 2:08 AM High 1.6 ft. 12:33 AM 1.9 ft. 1:14 AM 2.1 ft. 2:19 AM 2.2 ft. 3:52 AM 2.1 ft. 5:22 AM 1.9 ft. 6:27 AM 1.7 ft. 7:16 AM Low 3.4 ft. 6:36 AM 3.2 ft. 7:19 AM 3.1 ft. 8:29 AM 3.1 ft. 10:18 AM 3.3 ft. 11:41 AM 3.5 ft. 12:35 PM 3.8 ft. 1:18 PM High 1.2 ft. 2:16 PM 1.2 ft. 3:51 PM 1.0 ft. 5:22 PM 0.8 ft. 6:25 PM 0.5 ft. 7:11 PM 0.3 ft. 7:47 PM 0.2 ft. 8:19 PM Low 2.5 ft. 8:36 PM 2.4 ft. 10:27 PM 2.6 ft. 11:58 PM High Thu Aug 9, 12 Fri Aug 10, 12 Sat Aug 11, 12 Sun Aug 12, 12 Mon Aug 13, 12 Tue Aug 14, 12 Wed Aug 15, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 12:51 AM 3.1 ft. 1:31 AM 3.3 ft. 2:05 AM High 1.7 ft. 12:30 AM 2.0 ft. 1:11 AM 2.3 ft. 2:16 AM 2.4 ft. 3:49 AM 2.3 ft. 5:19 AM 2.1 ft. 6:24 AM 1.8 ft. 7:13 AM Low 3.4 ft. 6:33 AM 3.3 ft. 7:16 AM 3.2 ft. 8:26 AM 3.2 ft. 10:15 AM 3.4 ft. 11:38 AM 3.6 ft. 12:32 PM 3.8 ft. 1:15 PM High 1.3 ft. 2:13 PM 1.3 ft. 3:48 PM 1.1 ft. 5:19 PM 0.8 ft. 6:22 PM 0.6 ft. 7:08 PM 0.3 ft. 7:44 PM 0.2 ft. 8:16 PM Low 2.5 ft. 8:33 PM 2.5 ft. 10:24 PM 2.6 ft. 11:55 PM High Thu Aug 9, 12 Fri Aug 10, 12 Sat Aug 11, 12 Sun Aug 12, 12 Mon Aug 13, 12 Tue Aug 14, 12 Wed Au g 15, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 12:34 AM 2.6 ft. 1:30 AM 2.8 ft. 2:10 AM 3.0 ft. 2:44 AM High 1.5 ft. 1:37 AM 1.7 ft. 2:18 AM 1.9 ft. 3:23 AM 2.0 ft. 4:56 AM 1.9 ft. 6:26 AM 1.8 ft. 7:31 AM 1.5 ft. 8:20 AM Low 3.1 ft. 7:12 AM 3.0 ft. 7:55 AM 2.9 ft. 9:05 AM 2.9 ft. 10:54 AM 3.1 ft. 12:17 PM 3.3 ft. 1:11 PM 3.5 ft. 1:54 PM High 1.1 ft. 3:20 PM 1.1 ft. 4:55 PM 0.9 ft. 6:26 PM 0.7 ft. 7:29 PM 0.5 ft. 8:15 PM 0.3 ft. 8:51 PM 0.2 ft. 9:23 PM Low 2.3 ft. 9:12 PM 2.3 ft. 11:03 PM High Thu Aug 9, 12 Fri Aug 10, 12 Sat Aug 11, 12 Sun Aug 12, 12 Mon Aug 13, 12 Tue Aug 14, 12 Wed Aug 15, 12 Date 2.1 ft. 12:46 AM 2.3 ft. 1:26 AM 2.4 ft. 2:00 AM High 1.2 ft. 12:44 AM 1.4 ft. 1:25 AM 1.5 ft. 2:30 AM 1.6 ft. 4:03 AM 1.5 ft. 5:33 AM 1.4 ft. 6:38 AM 1.2 ft. 7:27 AM Low 2.5 ft. 6:28 AM 2.4 ft. 7:11 AM 2.3 ft. 8:21 AM 2.4 ft. 10:10 AM 2.5 ft. 11:33 AM 2.7 ft. 12:27 PM 2.8 ft. 1:10 PM High 0.9 ft. 2:27 PM 0.9 ft. 4:02 PM 0.7 ft. 5:33 PM 0.6 ft. 6:36 PM 0.4 ft. 7:22 PM 0.2 ft. 7:58 PM 0.1 ft. 8:30 PM Low 1.9 ft. 8:28 PM 1.8 ft. 10:19 PM 1.9 ft. 11:50 PM High Thu Aug 9, 12 Fri Aug 10, 12 Sat Aug 11, 12 Sun Aug 12, 12 Mon Aug 13, 12 Tue Aug 14, 12 Wed Aug 15, 12 Date 2.2 ft. 12:38 AM 2.4 ft. 1:18 AM 2.5 ft. 1:52 AM High 1.6 ft. 12:12 AM 1.8 ft. 12:53 AM 2.0 ft. 1:58 AM 2.1 ft. 3:31 AM 2.1 ft. 5:01 AM 1.9 ft. 6:06 AM 1.7 ft. 6:55 AM Low 2.6 ft. 6:20 AM 2.5 ft. 7:03 AM 2.4 ft. 8:13 AM 2.4 ft. 10:02 AM 2.6 ft. 11:25 AM 2.8 ft. 12:19 PM 2.9 ft. 1:02 PM High 1.1 ft. 1:55 PM 1.2 ft. 3:30 PM 1.0 ft. 5:01 PM 0.8 ft. 6:04 PM 0.5 ft. 6:50 PM 0.3 ft. 7:26 PM 0.2 ft. 7:58 PM Low 1.9 ft. 8:20 PM 1.9 ft. 10:11 PM 2.0 ft. 11:42 PM High Thu Aug 9, 12 Fri Aug 10, 12 Sat Aug 11, 12 Sun Aug 12, 12 Mon Aug 13, 12 Tue Aug 14, 12 Wed Au g 15, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 6:35 AM 3.1 ft. 7:15 AM 3.1 ft. 8:05 AM 3.1 ft. 9:06 AM 2.6 ft. 2:07 AM 2.7 ft. 2:33 AM 2.7 ft. 2:56 AM High 0.6 ft. 2:24 PM 0.5 ft. 3:40 PM 0.4 ft. 4:47 PM 0.3 ft. 5:42 PM 2.0 ft. 4:29 AM 1.9 ft. 5:38 AM 1.8 ft. 6:30 AM Low 2.1 ft. 10:06 PM 3.1 ft. 10:13 AM 3.1 ft. 11:18 AM 3.2 ft. 12:18 PM High 1.7 ft. 11:51 PM 0.2 ft. 6:29 PM 0.1 ft. 7:09 PM 0.1 ft. 7:43 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacAug. 9 Aug. 15First Aug. 24 Full Aug. 31 Last Aug. 9 New Aug. 17Major Times 7:07 AM 9:07 AM 7:30 PM 9:30 PM Minor Times 12:14 AM 1:14 AM 2:02 PM 3:02 PM Major Times 7:54 AM 9:54 AM 8:18 PM 10:18 PM Minor Times 12:53 AM 1:53 AM 2:55 PM 3:55 PM Major Times 8:42 AM 10:42 AM 9:06 PM 11:06 PM Minor Times 1:37 AM 2:37 AM 3:47 PM 4:47 PM Major Times 9:31 AM 11:31 AM 9:55 PM 11:55 PM Minor Times 2:23 AM 3:23 AM 4:36 PM 5:36 PM Major Times 10:20 AM 12:20 PM 10:45 PM 12:45 AM Minor Times 3:14 AM 4:14 AM 5:23 PM 6:23 PM Major Times 11:10 AM 1:10 PM 11:35 PM 1:35 AM Minor Times 4:08 AM 5:08 AM 6:07 PM 7:07 PM Major Times --:---:-12:00 PM 2:00 PM Minor Times 5:05 AM 6:05 AM 6:48 PM 7:48 PM Average Average+ Average+ Average Average Good Better7:01 am 8:23 pm 12:15 am 2:03 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:01 am 8:22 pm 12:54 am 2:56 pm 7:02 am 8:21 pm 1:37 am 3:47 pm 7:03 am 8:20 pm 2:24 am 4:37 pm 7:03 am 8:19 pm 3:15 am 5:24 pm 7:04 am 8:18 pm 4:09 am 6:08 pm 7:04 am 8:17 pm 5:06 am 6:49 pm53% 47% 41% 35% 29% 22% 16% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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Continued from Page 1A My kid is worth a million dollars,Ž Nelson said. The current plan for the community center site is to use the legislative appropriation to renovate the former sanctuary building to include a free weights and cardio room, “ tness class room, kid zone and restrooms and showers. The other building would remain as it is, with several of“ ces. Also included in the plans is the addition of an open ” oor gymnasium, which would be a high school and college regulation size basketball court. The former sanctuary building would be utilized by the YMCA, which is enteringinto a Memorandum of Understanding with the county to manage the community center. A request for proposals was sent out and the YMCA was the lone responder. We cannot afford to operate that facility,Ž said County Administrator David Edwards. The county commission wondered if the parks and recreation department could run the community center, but Edwards said that would only be possible if more staff is hired. The YMCA would charge a fee to use the facility in order to pay for administrative costs. President of the Capital Area YMCA, Ken Franklin, said the YMCA is not trying to make money, but in order to run the center, it would need to break even. Commissioner Alan Brock said he is not in favor of transferring the community center or giving the legislative appropriation back, which has been mentioned before, but did have some concerns about the YMCA. He said he envisioned more of an open ” oor space for the former sanctuary building and not so much a gym. He also had concerns about the fees the YMCA will charge and people not being able to afford them. There were other concerns voiced about the YMCA competing with the local gyms and having an unfair advantage because they would be exempt from paying expenses associated with the building. Mary Walsh, co-owner of BodyTek, said this would make it dif“ cult for the businesses to compete. She asked the commission to have a detailed plan and know exactly what will take place at the community center. Crawl before you walk and walk before you run,Ž Walsh said. Other residents pointed out that the RFP was sent out and none of these businesses responded. Resident David Damon compared locals gyms competing with the YMCA like Barnes and Noble competing with a public library. It doesnt seem to make sense,Ž Damon said. If there was a need to re-bid the project, Stewart said he was “ ne with that, but Edwards said this project needed to get moving. The county must spend the legislative appropriation by September 2013. Artz said additional discussion may continue regarding the conceptual plans and RFP and Edwards was tasked with determining the best route. Unless the county attorney advises the county to rebid the RFP, Artz said she thinks a contract will be “ nalized with the YMCA and the RFP for construction will be issued. The county is currently behind its timeline for the renovation project. The RFP should have already been out to bid, Artz said. The YMCA wanted to be able to start offering programs on Jan. 1, 2013. Several of the commissioners also expressed disappointment in the Community Center Advisory Committee. Several of the members on the committee are not in support of a community center and even mentioned getting rid of the center and giving the legislative appropriation back, Artz said. She was hoping these members would be advocates for the Community Center. Stewart said, That committee is dysfunctional.Ž Committee member Charlotte Cobb, who is in favor of the community center, said at a recent Wakulla County Coalition for Youth meeting, that thee people on the committee who oppose the Community Center dont understand the huge need of that kind of facility for the children of the county. They dont have their hand on the pulse,Ž Cobb said, who is very active at Wakulla Christian School. Several members have also resigned from the committee, Billy Jones and Bill Versiga. The remaining committee members include Steve Brown, Senior Center Director R.H. Carter, retired art teacher Diane Perez, School Board appointee Louis Hernandez, YMCA representative Ken Franklin, WHS Assistant Principal Simeon Nelson, Sopchoppy City Commissioner Aginita Rosier and youth representative Natalie Crum. The next meeting of the committee will be Aug. 14 at 4 p.m. in the county commission conference room. Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Randy Merritt “This is a good site for a long term plan.” Mike Stewart On the Community Center Advisory Committee: “That committee is dysfunctional.” Alan Brock “The YMCA makes me nervous” with its proposal for the center. Jerry Moore “I was trying to save the county money.” Lynn Artz “We bought this site for a Community Center. I think we need to keep our promise.”County commissioners on Community Center: Community Center stays on track NOTICE OF HEARING TO IMPOSE AND PROVIDE FOR COLLECTION OF SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS IN THE TUPELO RIDGE SUBDIVISION MUNICIPAL SERVICES BENEFIT UNIT AUGUST 9, 2012 Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 13AContinued from Page 1A The commission stated in the past that it would never impose the assessment on the residents unless the majority of residents agreed to it. So, for now, the idea of a voluntary assessment dies. The project would have costed $5.2 million and would have paid for the paving of 21.17 miles of roads in Wakulla Gardens and minimal stormwater improvements. The commission has said it will look at devoting a certain percentage of onecent sales tax revenue for roads to Wakulla Gardens. This percentage would be based on the number of roads in Wakulla Gardens versus the total number of county-owned roads. It would equate to 2.7 percent. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he would not vote for paving any road before Wakulla Gardens. He wanted Wakulla Gardens to be added to the top of the paving list. However, Merritt pointed out that many of the roads currently at the top of the list have been there for years. The county is also looking at long term options for funding infrastructure improvements. This would include the creation of a Community Redevelopment Area for an area that includes Wakulla Gardens. The CRA funds projects through tax increment “ nancing. After the CRA is established, the value of real property in the area is determined on a fixed date; as the value increases because of improvements, the tax revenue increases. The difference is set aside for the CRA. Commissioner Lynn Artz said the commission plans to continue the effort to get infrastructure improvements to Wakulla Gardens. There are several infrastructure improvements needed in Wakulla Gardens, including water for lots that arent on central water, stormwater treatment, sewer, fire hydrants and road paving. The county, with the leadership of Artz, applied for a technical assistance grant for Wakulla Gardens from the American Planning Associations Community Planning Assistance Team. The county was selected and a team will visit the county and make recommendations to the commission at a Sept. 11 workshop.Wakulla Gardens rejects pay for paving Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  P a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICEƒ EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter being in Wakulla County for a month, representatives with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Small Business Administration will be moving on. The Disaster Loan Recovery Center in Crawfordville, which transitioned from a Disaster Recovery Center on Saturday, Aug. 4, will close on Thursday, Aug. 9 at 6 p.m. The Disaster Recovery Center opened on July 5 at the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce in response to Tropical Storm Debby and the county being approved for individual assistance. Since that time, 802 people have visited the center. The DRC made the transition to a DLRC on Aug. 4 after FEMA and the state determined that all the needs had been met in the county, said FEMA media relation specialist, Jim Homstad. At the time of the transition, the SBA took over operation of the center and the focus shifted from the needs of homeowners and renters to businesses. However, a FEMA representative was still available to assist indivduals with assistance, such as regsitering with FEMA, “ lling out an application, checking the status of an application or changing an application. In Wakulla County, 596 households have contacted FEMA for assistance or information. FEMA has approved $839,000 in assistance, $738,000 of that for housing assistance and the remainder for other needs. Statewide, for all 22 counties, 14,052 households have contacted FEMA for assistance or information. FEMAs has approved $19 million for Individuals and Households Program. Once the DRC closes, people will still be able to register with FEMA and apply for assistance until Sept. 4 or 60 days from the declaration. This can be done over the phone by calling 1-800-621-3362 or going online at www. disasterassistance.gov.TROPICAL STORM DEBBY AFTERMATHDisaster Recovery Center will close JENNIFER JENSENSigns directing people to center when it opened after the ” ooding from Debby in July. Wakulla Gardens resident Connie Savage expresses skepticism at a July 12 county workshop on paving. 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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn July 26, Thomas Reinhardt of Crawfordville reported an animal complaint. The victim left the doors to his vehicle open to air out and returned to discover a large dog sitting in the front seat. The dog became aggressive when Reinhardt attempted to remove him from the vehicle and bit him on the hand. The Animal Control Unit responded to the scene and collected the animal. The animal control of“ cer suffered a dog bite collecting the animal. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On July 26, Deputy Joe Page recognized a 16-yearold inside Wal-Mart that he reportedly knew from his duties as a school resource officer. The juvenile had been issued a no trespass warning for shoplifting 10 days earlier by Deputy Scott Rojas. A warrant was issued for trespassing against the juvenile. € On July 26, James McGehee of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Three unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank account. The charges totaled approximately $700 and included sporting goods from a California company. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € On July 26, Helen Posey of Crawfordville reported a fraud. An unauthorized charge of $1,400 was discovered on the victims telephone bill. A cellular account was opened by a suspect who has been identi“ ed. The suspect used the victims Social Security number. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € On July 26, Deputies Joe Page and Scott Rojas investigated an indecent exposure complaint at a Crawfordville business. The victims reported that a 67year-old Tallahassee man exposed his genitals at the nail treatment business. The business owner is seeking criminal charges against the man as well as a no trespass warning. € On July 27, Bossie Hawkins of Tallahassee and Thessalonia Missionary Baptist Church in Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief. Someone vandalized the main sanctuary of the church with toilet paper, paper towels, painters tape, ink, food and liquid soap. Two German Swastikas were observed on the walls. Damage was estimated at $6,000. Evidence was collected at the scene and the case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. On Aug. 1, a 13-year-old Crawfordville boy was arrested for his involvement in the case. € On July 28, Eric Brumby of Tallahassee reported a hit and run accident on Rock Landing Road in Panacea. The victim was struck by a motorist who pinned him between his vehicle door and vehicle door frame and left the scene. Deputy Rachel Oliver discovered the suspect vehicle nearby and determined that the vehicle had been stolen from a Tallahassee victim in Ochlockonee Bay. Dorothy Jean Stephens, 42, of Panacea was located nearby by Deputy Oliver and arrested for grand theft auto, leaving the scene of an accident with injuries, careless driving and driving while license suspended or revoked. Brumby was treated by Wakulla EMS but refused to be transported to the hospital. € On July 28, Richard Swain of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The door of his vehicle was left open and the illuminated dome light drained the vehicle battery. The vehicle was left unsecured, but nothing was reported missing. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On July 28, Roy McCall of Sopchoppy reported the theft of a gasoline can. The can was taken off the victims trailer. The value of the can and contents is $31. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. € On July 28, Ricky Harrell of Crawfordville found three bicycles in the woods on his property. The bikes are valued at $140 and were placed in the WCSO Impound Yard until they are claimed. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On July 28, Margaret Cooper of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. While Deputy Mike Crum was investigating, Denise Cooper Skipper, 51, of Crawfordville returned with the missing car and was arrested for vehicle theft. During the search of the suspects possessions, a small piece of crack cocaine was allegedly found in her purse along with some drug paraphernalia, which added additional charges for possession of crack cocaine. € On July 29, a three vehicle traffic crash was reported at U.S. Highway 319 and Elie Carter Lane in Medart. Billy Nathaniel Porter, 65, of Crawfordville was driving a Ford truck with a 9-year-old passenger when a boat trailer he was pulling was struck by a Dodge, also traveling southbound. The impact of the crash ” ipped the Porter truck and it landed on its side. Porter sustained injuries and was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. The juvenile was not injured. Deborah Collins Harrell, 56, of Tallahassee was traveling northbound with a passenger, Phalacia Adams Birge, 49, when she got past the Ford truck and was struck by the Dodge. Her vehicle also ” ipped onto its side. Both Harrell and Birge received non-life threatening injuries and were transported to the hospital. Deputy Rachel Oliver and Deputy Cole Wells interviewed the driver of the Dodge, Sherry Renee Massey, 45, of Sopchoppy and she gave consent to the drawing of blood. She was also transported to the hospital. A witness told Deputy Wells that she observed Massey driving at a high rate of speed and swerving prior to the crash. The case is pending the results of the blood draw. € On July 29, Ruby Barnes of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from her garage. The bike is valued at $100. Juveniles are suspected and have been identified. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On July 29, Wal-Mart of“ cials allegedly observed three black females loading carts with merchandise and departing the store without paying. The suspects got into a vehicle and sped off toward Tallahassee. Store of“ cials estimate the loss at $1,050. One of the suspects has been identi“ ed. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € On July 29, Robert Bottrell of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at his home. The victim answered the door and discovered paper on “ re on the front door mat. The victim put out the small “ re with water. There was no damage to the home. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € On July 27, Aaron Cosson of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim lost his bank card and later observed a $118 charge from Santa Rosa Beach on the account. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € On July 30, Julie Dennis of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense with suspicious activity on her bank card. A total of $250 worth of charges was observed at a gas station in Memphis, Tenn. An attempt to create another $92 transaction failed. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € On July 30, Wal-Mart reported a retail theft involving two female suspects who allegedly left the store without paying for items they had in their possession. They were identi“ ed by Wal-Mart staff and returned to the store at a later time. Rosalyn Wvette Robinson, 25, of Tallahassee and Kanesha Lafaye Wilson, 20, of Tallahassee were charged and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The amount of the theft was $40. Robinson and Wilson were issued trespass warnings for Wal-Mart along with two other members of their party who are still being investigated to determine their involvement. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On July 31, Sara Wilkinson of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. An electric game controller was stolen. The property is valued at $50. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On July 31, Kimberly Ruiz of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victims card was charged $190 from an internet site. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € On July 31, Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated a report of a wanted person. Sgt. Harrell made contact with the 16-year-old suspect who pushed the deputy off a porch and ” ed from the scene on foot. In addition to facing a warrant for failure to appear, the suspect will be charged with battery on a law enforcement of“ cer and resisting arrest with violence. On Aug. 1, the juvenile was captured following the execution of a search warrant. The juvenile was located in the attic of the home. and allegedly resisted attempts by deputies to take him into custody … reportedly physically attacking the deputies. Deputies Tasered the boy and he was transported to jail. Detectives Lorne Whaley, Nick Boutwell, Rob Giddens and Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. € On July 31, Tyniqua Nicole Davis, 33, of Tallahassee was arrested for retail theft at Wal-Mart. The suspect was allegedly observed taking $477 worth of merchandise from the store without paying for it. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On July 31, Onesimo Cortes of Crawfordville reported the loss of his passport. The victim was involved in a traf“ c crash and was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. His vehicle was towed by a towing company after the crash. His passport was inside the vehicle at the time of the crash. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € On Aug. 1, Gary Keene of Holly Hill reported the loss of a wallet. The victim reported losing his wallet while riding a motorcycle between Edgar Poole Road and Winn-Dixie. The wallet contained the victims identification, personal items and cash. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On Aug. 1, Michael Collins of Crawfordville reported the theft of his bicycle from Huddle House. The bike is valued at $150. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € On Aug. 2, George Barwick of Panacea reported a criminal mischief on Bottoms Road. Someone attempted to pull the county boat ramp fee box out of the ground. A forced entry into the box was reported and cash was removed from the box. The payment envelopes were tossed on the ground. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € On Aug. 1, Robert Reynolds of Crawfordville reported the theft of a cell phone. The phone was lost between Mike Stewart Drive and Highway 267. The phone is valued at $80. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On Aug. 1, Edward Brimner of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim discovered a Pay-Pal charge on his bank account. The victim does not have a PayPal account. Detective Matt Helms investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,056 calls for service during the past week including 19 residential and business alarms; 81 citizen contacts; 17 disturbances; 316 security checks; 153 traf“ c enforcements; 131 traf“ c stops; and 18 wanted people. As I talk with Wakulla County citizens during my campaign for sheriff, Ive found three issues that they are most concerned with; our children, our taxes and our safety. After spending the last eight years of my 30+ career as a state law enforcement officer, assigned to Wakulla County, I realized something had to be done about the rising numbers of high school students being seriously injured or killed in a vehicle crash. Thats why in my 2008 race for sheriff, and now in 2012, one of my platform issues has been and will be a teen-driving program conducted by the sheriffs of“ce personnel. Is this a critical issue? You be the judge. Last week a Wakulla Area Times article submitted by the current Wakulla County sheriff said, Wakulla County ranks “fth highest in the state among teenagers driving fatalities and injuries from the “ve year period of 2006 to 2010.Ž Losing one of our teenagers while driving, or having one teenager injured, is far too many. This trend can and should be turned around with a successful teen driving program, and it will be under Charlie Creels administration as sheriff. For a FRESH START with a FULL-TIME SHERIFF, I ask for your support and vote on Nov. 6th as the next sheriff of Wakulla County.Please contact me at(850) 926-4712 Post Of“ce Box 482, Crawfordville, FL 32326 charlieforsheriff@gmail.comwww.charliecreel.com ADVERTISEMENTLosing one of our teenagers while driving, or having one teenager injured, is far too many.Ž ADVERTISEMENTPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Af“liation, for sheriff.Charlie Creel: Wakulla Countys teen-driving injuries and fatalities report demands action 000BK7W

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 15ASpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Office detectives arrested a juvenile involved with the vandalism of Thessalonia Missionary Baptist Church in Crawfordville on July 27, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. On July 31, a 13-year-old Crawfordville male was arrested and charged with two counts of burglary of a dwelling and felony criminal mischief related to the vandalism of the church. The juvenile was also arrested and charged with two counts of burglary of an occupied structure and two counts of felony theft related to an incident unrelated to the church vandalism that occurred on Ann Circle. Charges of burglary of a conveyance and petit theft were leveled in reference to a second incident that occurred at another Ann Circle residence. He was also arrested and charged with burglary and petit theft for a third incident at an Old Woodville Highway location. When deputies investigated the church vandalism they observed a forced entry, two swastikas on the walls, food and ketchup splattered on walls and painters tape spread through the facility. Liquid soap, toilet paper and paper towels were also spread around the sanctuary. Detectives learned that the juvenile went to an Ann Circle residence and removed a mountain bicycle, returned it and took it a second time the same day. The bike was recovered in a wooded area near the St. Marks Rail Trail. A second bicycle was recovered at the bike trail location. The bikes were returned to their owners on Ann Circle and Old Woodville Highway. In addition, the juvenile admitted entering an unlocked vehicle at a second address on Ann Circle and removing cigarettes, soft drinks and a bag of change from the vehicle. The value of the stolen items is less than $100. The value of the two bicycles is $100 and $80. The juvenile was transported to the juvenile detention center in Tallahassee where he was later released to parents. The case investigation continues. Detective Nick Boutwell and Detective Lorne Whaley investigated.Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Office Deputy Billy Metcalf saved the life of a 69-year-old Crawfordville woman Wednesday, Aug. 1 on Sanders Cemetery Road in Sopchoppy, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Deputy Metcalf was dispatched to a downed power line when he arrived and discovered the victim inside a vehicle in a driveway. A tree had fallen across the power lines. The complainant, William Raker of Sopchoppy, checked on the victim who told him that this incident scared her very badly.Ž A Progress Energy work crew arrived on the scene to “ x the power lines when a member of the crew observed the victim experiencing health issues. Deputy Metcalf arrived at the vehicle and observed that she was no longer breathing. He requested Wakulla EMS and Fire Rescue to come to the scene and went to his patrol vehicle to retrieve his AED Heart De“ brillator. Deputy Metcalf administered an AED shock and began CPR with the help of Mr. Raker and one of the Progress Energy linemen until Fire Rescue and EMS arrived on scene. Deputy Metcalfs presence of mind to rapidly deploy the Automatic External De“ brillator was a direct cause of the successful resuscitation of this citizen. Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Joey Tillman answered the call for additional help from his home just a few blocks away. Tillman also serves as a paramedic with Wakulla EMS. Together this team of “ rst responders was able to successfully treat this victim until Advanced Life Service paramedics could arrive. The men got the victim breathing again and EMS transported the woman to a medical helicopter where she was transported to a Tallahassee hospital. The woman survived the ordeal. The AED equipment was purchased using grant money from the State of Florida EMS Division several years ago and is carried in all of the Wakulla Sheriffs Of“ ce road patrol vehicles.Special to The NewsA Tallahassee man saved the lives of two dogs that were trapped under a capsized boat in the Wakulla River on Saturday, July 28, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. Nigel and Paige Forshay Safe were enjoying a leisurely day canoeing on the Wakulla River when their tranquility was shattered by sounds on the river in front of them. They witnessed a large motor boat with “ ve or six people on board badly listing in the water. The occupants were in a state of panic and jumping off the boat,Ž said Paige Safe. As we approached, the boat completely capsized, leaving only a small portion of the hull exposed.Ž Concerned boaters at the scene determined that all of the humans were safe but that two dogs were unaccounted for. Either paralyzed by the incident or shock, the occupants of the boat were unable to dive for their dogs,Ž said Safe. We tied our canoe to a cypress tree and Nigel jumped into the water and began to dive under the capsized boat to retrieve and save the two dogs.Ž The capsized boat continued to ” oat down the river at the same time Nigel was attempting to locate the “ rst missing dog. He grabbed the scared and frantic animal despite getting scratched by the animals claws and brought him to safety. The second dog was smaller and more dif“ cult to locate and Nigel did not know the layout of the vessel. But after a few more minutes passed, the second dog was brought to the surface. The humans and animals were reunited and wet, cold and scared, the dog owners were very relieved and thankful about the outcome,Ž said Paige Safe. I think the whole ordeal was probably over in about 15 minutes, but it felt like it took an eternity.Ž13-year-old charged with church vandalismMan saves dogs trapped in capsized boat PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSANIMAL RESCUE: The capsized boat ” oating in the Wakulla River, above. Nigel Safe, below, with the second dog he saved. Deputy credited with saving womans life Deputy Billy Metcalf www.NFMC.org Family Medicine Well Care Adults / Pediatrics School Physicals, Sports Physicals Immunizations Vaccines Quality Affordable Healthcare for the Entire Family PREVENTION PREVENTION PREVENTION IS THE KEY TO IS THE KEY TO IS THE KEY TO HEALTHY HAPPY FAMILIES HEALTHY HAPPY FAMILIES HEALTHY HAPPY FAMILIES WE WANT TO BE YOUR FAMILY’S HEALTHCARE HOME Medicare / Medicaid CHP / BCBS & Most Other Insurance Accepted Slide Fee Program Available www.NFMC.org Celebrating National Health Center Week August 5th 11th Chitra Mony, MD Wakulla Medical Center Celebrates National Health Center Week We are proud to serve every member of the community, including those that have insurance such as CHP, Blue Cross / Blue Shield, Medicare, Medicaid, …. and we offer a sliding fee scale. We serve the needs of our community, where every patient is treated as individuals, with dignity and respect. This is what health care should be, and what we celebrate during National Health Center Week. We extend an open invitation to visit us to find out what being a Community Health Center is all about. Wakulla Medical Center 1328 Coastal Highway, Panacea Florida (850) 984-4735 Wakulla Medical Center 1328 Coastal Highway, Panacea Florida (850) 984-4735 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com At 3Y You Get MOW For Your Money!Chris Hindle, Jimmy Wheeler, Calvin Graves, Richard Taylor, Chad Smith, Skip Young & Brian Young 850926-3300Chris Hindle, Jimmy Wheeler, Calvin Graves, Richard Taylor, Chad Smith, Skip Young & Brian Young THIS SEASON I WANT SOMETHINGRELIABLE $15999BG 55 HANDHELD BLOWERProven handheld blower at an affordable price Great for quickly cleaning driveways, sidewalks and hard-to-reach places STIHL has you covered with protective apparel and accessories. $17999MS 170 CHAIN SAWDesigned for occasional wood-cutting tasks around the home Includes many of the excellent design features of our professional models Bar lengths may vary by region. STIHLusa.com Available at participating dealers while supplies last. 2011 STIHL$15999FS 45 TRIMMER Easy-to-use, well-balanced trimmer for homeowner use Lightweight, reliable and fast starting Chris Hindle, Jimmy Wheeler, Calvin Graves, Richard Taylor, Chad Smith, Skip Young & Brian Young

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012The Wakulla news EXTRA! Republicans, Democrats hold local forums Page 6-7B Robinson leaves, but Greer, Crist dont go away Weekly Roundup, Page 12B Wakulla seafood is safeGreen Scene, Page 3B Back to School OutreachIt was a rainy morning in Crawfordville on Saturday, Aug. 4, but despite the drizzle, there was a good size crowd at Hudson Park for the second annual Back to School Outreach Event. There was free food, free school supplies, music and fun. Sponsored by the Back to School Outreach Ministry and Generation NOW Ministries, made up of churches and organizations from Wakulla. Glenda Washington of Little Salem Church, who serves on the event committee, said with a smile that she hadnt expected such a big crowd. John Bird, 4, blows bubbles at an activity center at the Back to School rally. Sgt. Ray Johnson of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce lets kids check out the sheriffs Search and Rescue boat. 4-H Agent Sherri Kraeft shows off a Jam 4 Camp Tshirt and talks about the clubs activities. Information was available on the planned Empty Bowls fundraiser to create handcrafted bowls and have a meal of soup and bread in exchange for a donation. Pictured at left are Rick Jackley of Ribits Ceramics, Charlean Lanier, Gaballi host site director at Harvest Fellowship Church, and Dianne Coleman. Below, Centennial Bank gave out popcorn and held a drawing for a piggy bank. Expert physicians.Quality medical care.Of“ce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. … 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comFamily Practice Accepting new patients X-Ray Services Pediatric patients 2 yrs. & older Offering specialty care: Capital Regional Cardiology Associates 850-877-0216 Capital Regional Medical Group Podiatry Services 850-878-8235 Capital Regional Surgical Associates 850-219-2306 Robert Frable, DO Aida Torres, ARNPCRAWFORDVILLE

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Aug. 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Aug. 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 5451853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Aug. 11  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. Sunday, Aug. 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. Monday, Aug. 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Aug. 14  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant. Wednesday, Aug. 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Aug. 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Special EventsThursday, Aug. 9  TALLAHASSEE ORCHID SOCIETY will host renowned orchid grower, world traveler and internationally recognized speaker Francisco Miranda at their meeting at 7 p.m. The location is the Jubilee Cottage at the Goodwood Museum and Gardens. His presentations will be “Orchids from the Brazilian Amazon”. Special plants from Brazil will be offered for sale. Please go to www.mirandaorchids.com for photos and pre-orders.  DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at the library. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for refreshments with the meeting scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. Local Democratic candidates Donnie Sparkman, property appraiser; Bobby Pearce, superintendent of schools; Alan Brock, county commission District 1; John Shuff, county commission District 5; and Mike Scott, school board District 2, will be the special guests. The public is cordially invited to come out and meet their local Democratic candidates. For more information please contact Doug Jones at 926-1177 for more information. Saturday, August 11  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet from 10 a.m. to noon at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road, Crawfordville. RSVP to Carrie Stevens at 274-9474 or carriejstevens@ comcast.net. This is not a therapy session, this is social interaction for Spectrum Children. Children need to bring a good, wholesome snack and drink. Children must be accompanied by a parent at all times.  BABYSITTER’S TRAINING CLASS will be held at the Capital Area Chapter of the American Red Cross, 1115 Easterwood Drive, Tallahassee, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This training class provides youth ages (11 years and older) with the skills and con dence to safely and responsibly care for children and infants. Students will learn how to supervise children and infants, how to perform basic child care skills such as diapering and feeding, how to choose safe, ageappropriate games and toys, among other babysitting staples and tips. Course attendees also receive their certi cation of Adult Infant and Child CPR/AED with First Aid. The $85 fee for the Babysitter’s Training Class includes the American Red Cross Babysitter’s Training Handbook and CD-ROM, Emergency Reference Guide, and Certi cation in Adult Infant and Child CPR/AED with First Aid. Monday, Aug. 13  TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE PROGRAM will feature Tonier Cain at 4 p.m. at the Wakulla Education Center. She will speak about devastation of trauma and the hope of recovery. She is the team leader for the National Center for Trauma Informed Care. The Wakulla Education Center is located at 87 Andrew Hargrett Sr. Road, Crawfordville.Upcoming EventsSaturday, Aug. 18  EDEN SPRINGS NURSING AND REHAB CENTER FUNDRAISER will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Hudson Park. All proceeds go into the special activity fund for events such as Senior Prom. There will be a bake sale, yard sale, hot dogs, hamburgers, chips and soda. Free school supplies will be given out. There will also be free blood pressure screenings. Donations of yard sale items and baked goods needed, as well as cooking supplies and volunteers. For more information, call Kathy Edel at 631-0689 or Margie Hamilton at 274-2111 or 726-7181 Thursday, Aug. 23  POLITICAL FORUM FOR the superintendent of schools candidates will be held at 7 p.m. at the library.  POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for property appraiser will be held at 8 p.m. at the library. Friday, Aug. 24  THIRD ANNUAL BIG CHAMPAGNE BASH for Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend will be held from 8 p.m. to midnight at Hotel Duval in Tallahassee. All proceeds bene t Big Brothers Big Sisters. The theme is the Roaring 20s. Costumes are encouraged. Enjoy music, dancing appetizers and unlimited champagne. Until Aug. 6, tickets are $70 per person, $130 per couple and group rate at $600 for 10 tickets. To purchase tickets, visit www. bbbs.org/bigbash or call 386-6002. Tuesday, Aug. 28  55 ALIVE SAFETY DRIVER CLASS will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the library. To register call Ernie Conte at 926-4605.  WAKULLA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT WORKSHOP will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the health department, 48 Oak Street, Crawfordville. During this session, the health department will review all the data and reports generated in the Community Health Improvement process, identify health priorities which impact Wakulla County residents and develop goals and strategies for each priority. A working lunch will be provided during this workshop. RSVP to Tonya Hobby at (850)926-0401 ext. 217 by Aug. 23. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com St. Marks City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Train Cub for Spectrum Children at 10 a.m. at Harvest Fellowship. Trauma-Informed Care Team Leader Tonier Cain speaks at 4 p.m. at WEC. Community Center Advisory Group meeting at 4 p.m. at administration of ce.ThursdaySaturdayMondayTuesday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Government Meetings Thursday, Aug. 9  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, Aug. 13  WAKULLA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION will hold its meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, Aug. 14  COMMUNITY CENTER ADVISORY GROUP will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room.By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director With the summer winding down wed like to thank everyone who participated in our Summer Program this year. We had dozens of families take part in our reading programs, performances and “ eld trips. Our “ rst talent show was a great success and we look forward to making it an annual end to the summer event. Special thanks go out to Molly Clore who stepped in for Leilania Nichols, our childrens coordinator, while she was on maternity leave this summer and did a great job with the reading programs. WCPL is lucky to have two great assets to tap to continue to grow and improve our childrens programs year around. Lastly wed like to thank the Friends of the Library for once again funding our Summer Program. Book Extravaganza Another Success! Wed also like to thank everyone who came out to our Book Extravaganza Fundraiser last Saturday. Your generous donations raised more than $500 for the Friends of the Library. As always, these funds will go directly toward supporting our childrens programs, collection management, along with other needed expenses. Remember that the Friends have saved the taxpayers of Wakulla County more than $70,000 the past 3 years but continue to need your help and support. For more information, please contact us and be sure to come to the second Annual Silent Auction on Sept. 14. More information will be coming on the auction in the coming weeks. Friday Night Movie This Friday, Aug. 10, were showing the animated “ lm based upon the Dr. Seuss classic book, The Lorax.Ž Starring the voices of Danny DeVito, Zac Efron and Taylor Swift among others, the film tells the story of a 12-year-old boy who searches for the one thing that will enable him to win the affection of the girl of his dreams. To “ nd it he must discover the story of the Lorax, the grumpy yet charming creature who fights to protect his world. This “ lm will make the whole family laugh, while sending an important message about the environment. Door open at 6:45 p.m. for this PG-rated “ lm and popcorn will be provided by Capital City Bank. Library News... FILE PHOTOPelicans are captured sunbathing near the water.

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Green Scene Genetically engineered mosquitoes? EarthTalk, Page 14B www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 3BRead the newspaper, listen to the news? If you have, you are aware of what is happening in the Midwest where much of the corn grows. Its dry there; the corn is being plowed under due to the conditions. Corn has been the number one “ eld crop in America in value and production for many years. Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and Minnesota produce more than 50 percent of the corn grown in the United States. When Florida corn becomes available, usually from December through May, higher demand for it may raise the prices. Les Harrison, UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Small Farms agent, reminded me that Florida produces less than 1 percent of the corn grown in the United States. It is highly dependent upon nitrogen-based fertilizer which has gone up in cost in recent years. At the moment only 24 percent of the nations corn crop is rated good or excellent, while 48 percent of the crop is rated poor to very poor. Corn is a major component in many food items like cereals, snack foods and even soft drinks. When considering MYPlates food classi“ cation, is corn considered a vegetable or grain? USDA Food Patterns categorize food based on tradition, nutritional value, and its use at meals. The maturity level of corn at harvest may affect the use at meals and the nutritional value. For these reasons fresh corn is considered a starchy vegetable and (milled) dried corn (e.g. cornmeal, tortillas) is considered a grain. Due to the anticipated rising costs of corn, include it often on your menu in the next few months. Choose fresh corn ears with green husks, fresh silks and tight rows of kernels. Store it in the refrigerator with husks on for use as soon as possible or within 1 to 2 days. Nutritionally, corn is considered low fat (90 calories in 1 medium ear), has no saturated fat, is sodium and cholesterol free, if left in its original form, and is a good source of vitamin C. The national campaign to encourage the increased consumption of more fruits and vegetables is called Fruits and Veggies More Matters. The campaign offers this list of the Top 10 Ways to Enjoy Corn: 10. Beef Up Your Soup! Add corn to soup, whether it is chili or chowder. Corn enhances the soups hardiness as well as its nutritional pro“ le. 9. Add a Little Crunch to Your Guacamole. Add corn kernels and diced tomatoes to guacamole or salsa. 8. Corn in Cornbread? Imagine That! For a little different texture, add corn to your cornbread or corn muf“ ns in addition to using corn meal. 7. Relish Your Corn. Make a corn relish to serve as a side dish or salad by combining chopped vegetables and beans mixed with vinaigrette. Continued on Page 6BCorn: Eat it now, preserve it for later By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING By TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar“ eld@thewakullanews.netRepresentatives from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Department of Environmental Protection and the Wakulla County Health Department met with a gathering of Wakulla residents to discuss seafood safety and water quality. The town hall meeting was held on Tuesday, July 31, at the Panacea Welcome Center in response to a possible fraud involving a woman, who met with Panacea “ shermen on July 20 and 21 claiming she was representing a Texas law “ rm handling Deepwater Horizon claims.The representatives from each agency made presentations and answered questions about DEPs response to the Deep Water Horizon Oil Spill in 2010 with speci“ c interest in the impact on locally harvested seafood. Jo Marie Cook, with the division of food safety, presented a slideshow featuring the chemicals contained in the the Corexit dispersant. The chemicals listed on the slide were propylene glycol, petroleum distillates, DOSS and sorbitan oleate emulsi“ ers. According to Cook and the other representatives the dispersant was not toxic to animals including humans at the levels that were dispersed. Jack Rudloe, owner of the Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea, asked why then was there so much toxicity in the water and dead “ sh were still being found. Timothy Fitzpatrick, a representative from DEP, responded that oil and water together is actually more toxic to certain members of the food chain. He also said that lack of oxygen and indigenous bacteria can also result in toxicity. He said that plumes of bacteria and the colder weather in late spring could result in some dolphin deaths. Rudloe reported that late one night in May of 2010 he was outside his home when an airplane ” ew over spraying something and he felt the toxic effects and continued to observe them in gulf marine life after that. Martin May with the bureau of seafood told the group no dispersant was sprayed in Floridas state waters in 2010 in response to the oil spill. An employee with the EPA was present as a member of the audience and con“ rmed there was no spraying reported. Continued on Page 6BWakulla seafood is safeSpecial to The News Representatives of seven Florida Panhandle counties met last week in Tallahassee to launch the Panhandle Wildflower Alliance and discuss strategies for positioning the regions profuse wildflowers as a primary focus of the states 2013 Viva Florida 500 commemoration. The Alliance is a loosely structured group focused on education and marketing efforts that will increase conservation as well as awareness of potential wild” ower ecotourism opportunities. Hosted by the Florida Wild” ower Foundation and facilitated by Pam Portwood and Diane Delaney, the meeting brought together stakeholders to learn about establishing wildflower ecotourism in Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla, Franklin, Jackson and Jefferson counties. Almost 50 people attended, representing county commissions, tourism agencies, chambers of commerce, environmental organizations, national and state lands and state agencies. The Panhandle is widely acknowledged as the place in Florida to view wild” owers due to the fantastic seasonal displays along its roadsides and in natural and rural areas,Ž Lisa Roberts, the Foundations executive director, told participants. Some of the best displays in the Southeastern United States are at your doorstep.Ž By next year, every resident of the state should know that La Florida means land of ” owers, said DOT State Landscape Architect Jeff Caster, who heads DOTs wild” ower program. Caster suggested meeting participants help make government and business leaders aware of Floridas constitutional policy to protect the states natural resources and scenic beauty. Ask leaders to spend less money, not more,Ž he said, referring to reduced mowing regimes that can save taxpayers money while promoting wild” ower growth. Continued on Page 9BPanhandle Wildflower Alliance holds meeting TAMMIE BARFIELDPANEL: Pad Juarez of Wakulla Health Department; Timothy Fitzpatrick of DEP; and Chris Brooks and Martin May of state Department of Agriculture. FILE PHOTO 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 Please Recycle

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTH & FITNESSIf you have spent considerable time at the gym, you have probably witnessed the dreaded rounded shoulder inwardly rotated arm position on one of your muscled gym mates. Or maybe you have seen it in yourself: a slouched shoulder slumping that no bit of correcting seems to help long term. Like the person at the gym, maybe you need to start taking better care of your chest. Doing so will not only improve your posture but also set you up for success in many yoga poses that require ” exible chest muscles. The pectorals are a set of chest muscles that originate on the sternum (breastbone) and collarbones and insert on the humerus (upper arm bones). The job of your chest muscles is to, among other things, internally rotate and extend the arms, and depress and protract (move away from each other) the scapula (shoulder blades). When chest muscles become tight, what can result is the dreaded rounded shoulder position I mentioned earlier. Even more, the muscles along the front of the neck become short and tight which can lead to neck and upper back pain. Tight pectoral muscles limit shoulder ” exion, the ability to raise the arm up overhead. Think of how dif“ cult it would be to do Urdhva Hastasana, Downward-Facing Dog, or Handstand without being able to lift your arms overhead! Tight pecs also strongly draw the shoulders into internal rotation. Most yoga poses ask for external rotation. Think of the upper arm in Cow-Faced Pose (Gomukasana). The upper arm must move into shoulder ” exion and externally rotate so the palm faces inwards to allow for a safe practice of the pose. Chest muscles can become short and tight because of weight training, lifestyle and a lack of stretching. A desk job, poor posture, a shoulder injury or the simple fact that we never perform activities that release the chest muscles can all lead to tight pecs. Here is an easy way to release the pectoral muscles. Practice two minutes a day to see results. 1. Fold a firm blanket (think Indian or Mexican) into a tri-fold so it is half as narrow as the width of your upper back. 2. Roll onto the folded blanket, lay on your back on the support with everything from the back of your head to your buttocks supported. If you feel any discomfort in the low back or tension in the front of the neck, place a second thinner blanket under the buttocks. 3. Reach your arms out along the ” oor in line with your shoulders. Externally rotate the arms so the shoulders roll to the ” oor and the palms face up to the ceiling. 4. For a deeper stretch, bend the elbows and slide the forearms and hands along the ” oor up to your head until you feel a comfortable release in the chest. Dont go further than 90 degrees at the elbows! If your hands and forearms come off the ” oor, you are still good to go as long as you dont feel any shoulder pain. Enjoy the gentle pull of gravity on the arms. If you feel any pulling through the backs of the shoulders, support the underside of the arms with additional folded blankets. 5. Variations: Use a thinner blanket to create less height under the back and hence a gentler stretch. If you dont have a blanket to use, a rolled mat and block for under the buttocks can do the trick. Play around with the size of the roll as you would with the blanket to give yourself more or less height. 6. Hold for two to “ ve minutes, focus on your breath and let go. If you experience pins and needles in the “ ngers, hands, and arms, straighten the arms until feeling returns. There you have it! The perfect pecs stretch you can practice daily that wont hurt the back, neck or shoulders. Your posture will thank you for it.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Yoga teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140 or by email at Focusyoga@ yahoo.com. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY There are a lot of different opinions on stretching out there today. Some people think you need to stretch before and after exercise, some only before, some only after, and some think you dont need to do it at all! Stretching is a wonderful tool that is very helpful in many ways. As we age, stretching can help our muscles stay limber. This is very bene“ cial to prevent injury and to help with our balance. I believe a lot of broken hips and injuries such as that could be avoided if people worked on ” exibility, strength and balance as they got older. Stretching increases a muscles function which increases our range of motion. Functional strength is the ability to do everyday tasks such as taking out the garbage, loading groceries into your car or climbing the stairs to the attic or even tying your shoes. These things are made easier, and sometimes even possible, by ” exible muscles. A muscle that wont move is not a very strong muscle. As people age, being able to do things like put your shoes and socks on and tie your shoes without assistance is often the difference between staying in your home if you live alone, or having to live with a family member or in an assisted living facility. Stretching is also a valuable tool for muscle injuries. A supervised and doctor recommended stretching program can reduce the length of the healing process, giving you back your range of motion and reducing your pain. Stretching is as important for young people and people who workout moderately as it is for older people or for athletes. There are a great range of stretching exercises and programs for almost any situation or problem. From simply being able to touch your toes, to easing workout soreness and injury recovery, stretching is a great asset to almost anyone. As always, get your doctors approval before you stretch, workout or treat any injury.Gena Davis is a CFT at Body-Tek 24-Hour Fitness Center in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348. GET FITBy GENA DAVIS Your pecs – avoid the slump The importance of stretching The Skin Cancer Foundation offers these sun safety tips for those with an active, outdoor lifestyle: € Seek the shade, especially between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. whenever possible. Schedule training, practices and games for the early morning or late afternoon. € Do not burn. A persons risk for melanoma doubles if he or she has had more than “ ve sunburns over the course of a lifetime. € Cover up with clothing, including a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses. Clothing can be your most effective form of sun protection, so make the most of it with tightly woven or knit, darkor brightcolored fabrics, which offer the best defense. € For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant, broad spectrum (UVA/ UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes before going outside. € Reapply sunscreen every two hours or immediately after swimming or excessive sweating. Be careful to cover often-missed exposed spots such as the hands, ears and the back of the neck.Sun safety to avoid burn Are yARE YOUR EARS "BLURRY"? DO YOU TURN THE TV UP LOUD? ASK PEOPLE TO REPEAT THEMSELVES? STRAIN TO UNDERSTAND WHAT'S BEING SAID?Now you see it...Now you don'tOPEN FIT TECHNOLOGYONCE A YEAR NOW $1,050Retail Price $2,100.00SAVE50%CRAWFORDVILLE3295 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY THE LOG CABIN, BARRY BUILDINGTALLAHASSEESEARS MIRACLE EAR GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL 1500 Apalachee ParkwayANN HENNESSY, MA, CCC-A CERTIFIED & LICENSED AUDIOLOGISTCall for an appointment 850-942-4007 Find Out Now Whether it's Hearing Loss or Just Ear Wax with a FREE Hearing Evaluation* and FREE Video Ear Inspection*SUMMER SALESUMMER SALE Toll Free 1-866-942-4007*Hearing evaluation and video otoscope inspection are always free. Hearing evaluation is an audiometric test to determine prope r amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnosis, nor are they intended to replace a physician's care. If you suspect a medical problem please seek treatment from your doctor.Now through August 31st PER AID ME4 MODELHUNTERS… ACT NOW & ORDER HEARING PROTECTION • Miracle Ear Guardian

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 5B DR. DAVID A. KEEN, M.D., M.P.H. BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PRACTICEELIZABETH HEULER, ARNP-C VALERIE RUSSELL, ARNP-C2615 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, SUITE 103, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327PH 850-926-3140 FX 850-926-3163 (Next to the Winn-Dixie Shopping Plaza) www.wakullaurgentcare.com Medically Supervised Weight LossCOME VISIT US FOR ALL OF YOUR HEALTHCARE NEEDSFamily Primary Care/Urgent Care/Walk Ins School/Bus/DOT/Sports Physicals Pulmonary Function Testing Pediatrics/Immunizations X-Ray, EKG, Labs Sleep Study Ultrasound DEXA Bone Density Testing Worker’s Comp Injury Overnight Pulse Ox Holter/Event Monitor Pre-Employment Drug ScreeningOur program is simple to follow and teaches you new healthy habits, safe and effective weight loss. Get in tune with your body. Call today for a weight loss program customized to t you. We Now AcceptWe are an approved drawing site for all insurances!

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy ED BRIMNERWakulla Republican Party Following weeks of researching candidates, listening to debates and forums, and meeting and talking with candidates, it is time to vote. Wakulla Republicans encourage you to get out and vote. Leading up to this primary, local Republicans have held both debates and forums so voters could meet and discuss issues of importance with all Republican candidates. There was a debate featuring all the candidates running for State Representative District 7. For the first time in years, Wakulla County will be represented by a single representative in the State House of Representatives. House District 7 is the largest district in the state in terms of geography and Wakulla County is in the center of the district. Candidate Mike Williams, a small business owner, called for simpler government with fewer regulations, better secondary and college education, and a judicious use of natural resources „ especially water. Candidate Don Curtis, a farmer and professional forester from Taylor County stressed his belief in limited, constitutionally based government; balanced budgets; and lower taxes. Candidate Jamey Westbrook, a professional well driller from Port St. Joe, spent time talking about his experience as a past representative and his desire to defend small counties in the State House. Candidate Halsey Beshears, a plant nursery owner from Jefferson County, did not make the debate but has been conspicuous in Wakulla County throughout this campaign and is the only candidate to open a campaign of“ ce in Wakulla County. There was also a forum open to all Republican candidates held in Azalea Park on July 28. In addition to the House candidates, all local Republican contenders were welcome to speak. Other than the House Candidates, there were no other contested Republican primary candidates that spoke in Wakulla County. Other local Republicans running for of“ ce include: € Pete Williams, State Attorney, 2nd Judicial Circuit € Maurice Langston, Wakulla County Sheriff € Ralph Thomas, Wakulla County Commissioner, District 1 € Mike Stewart, Wakulla County Commissioner, District 3 € Richard Harden, Wakulla County Commissioner, District 5 Other races of interest to local Republicans include the non-partisan District 2 School Board Race. Melisa Taylor, a long-time Republican, is hoping to join the School Board to help lead Wakulla County Schools into the future. Mitchell Kauffman and Ed Brimner are running for seats on the Soil and Water Board. The primary duty of the Soil and Water Board is to advocate and educate local farmers on water conservation and soil erosion issues. Kauffman has experience in large-scale ranching in Australia. Brimner owns and is improving a small local farm. Of interest to strictly Republican voters are the Republican State Committeewoman and Committeeman races: Tina Brimner and Anne Ahrendt are vying for Wakulla County State Committeewoman. Larry Taylor, Kurt Ahrendt and Gordon McCleary are competing to represent Wakulla County as State Committeeman. None of the candidates for Floridas Senate seat have visited Wakulla County.Wakulla Republicans hold debate with candidatesContinued from Page 3B It was reported that less than 5 percent of the samples were found to contain any detectable level of the dispersant. That was 89 of some 1,700 samples more or less. Cook said the highest level found during the testing was 0.043 ppm and the level of concern is 100 ppm in pin“ sh. Cook said there is funding for testing Gulf seafood until October 2013 which will result in having tested more than 3,000 samples. Rudloe asked whether they had tested Royal Reds, a deep water shrimp. He was told they test them when they can “ nd them and that when they do the testing they only test the edible parts of the seafood. Rudloe was assured they would make a conscious effort to test more shrimp in the future. Wakulla County Health Department Director Pad Juarez told the group his department researches the more human factorŽ side of the issue of oil spill effects. Juarez said Material Safety Data Sheets provide the products that were used during and after the oil spill and that the CDC is conducting a study on the people who worked on the rigs and those who were involved in the cleanup. Juarez encouraged anyone who has a concern about their health or the health of their children to call the health department at 926-0400, and for mosquito control, call 926-0410. Fitzpatrick addressed DEPs response to the oil spill and presented a chronology of events beginning with the day the rig exploded. He said beach monitoring and sampling continues with the following sampling objectives: baseline conditions were established for the National Resources Damage Assessment (NRDA); assess safety of bathing beaches; characterize petroleum products; monitor air quality. He said the departments analytical objectives were more technical in nature tracking petro hydrocarbons (C8-C40 Aliphatics); polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS); biomarkers; dispersant markers (DOSS) DPBE or DPnB; trace metals; and air toxics. Rudloe asked what impact the volumes of oil sitting on the ocean ” oor in frigid temperatures could have in the future. Fitzpatrick said there are still studies going on for ways to address that question. Florida beaches are still being monitored every couple of weeks in eight coastal counties from Escambia to Wakulla. There are two monitoring sites in Wakulla County, one at Mashes Sands and the other at Shell Point. DEPs website contains a section on the Deep Water Horizon spill which can be found at www.dep.state. ” .us/deepwaterhorizon.Panel reports Wakulla seafood is safeSwenson: CornContinued from Page 3B Try this combination: corn, chopped red onion, chopped red and green peppers, pinto beans and tomatoes. 6. Say Cheese! Add cheese and corn to your potatoes and put a smile on the faces of your family members. 5. Corn is Perfect in Dips, Sides or Toppings! Try adding corn to these items. They will be great with low-fat tortilla chips, as a side to grilled meat or as a topping for your burger. Roasted corn kernels are also great in quesadillas! 4. A Taco Salad without Corn? No Way. Adding corn will take you south of the border! 3. A Healthy Saut. Saut cooked corn in a small amount of oil with green chilies and onions. Serve hot; it makes a wonderful side dish. 2. Quick corn for lunch? Microwave It! Open husk but do not remove leaves. Remove silk and wash the corn kernels. Close leaves around corn and microwave for 1-2 minutes until cooked. 1. Veer from the Usual Ear. Sprinkle your corn-onthe-cob with a little Parmesan cheese or some of your favorite herbs and spices, such as chili powder, parsley, and chives. You might even try chili powder-lime butter spread. It is also time to consider preserving corn for future use. This will save you money as you see the prices climb. Corn can be preserved in the following ways: cream-style (no quart size jars, please) and whole kernel canning, drying, freezing and in a relish. If you need researchbased, tested recipes for any of the preservation methods, please contact me and I will make sure you receive them. When canning corn, realize that you are preserving a low acid vegetable. A pressure canner is required for its safe preservation. Shelley Swenson can be reached at (850) 926-3931. TAMMIE BARFIELDJack Rudloe asks about seafood safety. Mitchell Kauffman, Seat 3-Local Businessman --Small Farmer -Protect our Soil and Water and our Property RightsEd Brimner, Seat 5Small Local Farmer Small Businessman Proven Advocate of Wakulla Water Committed Conservative Believes in Property and Water RightsSOIL and WATERLarry Taylor as State CommitteemanTina Brimner as State CommitteewomanPolitical advertisment paid for and approved by Ed Brimner for soil and water and Mitchell Kauffman, paid in-kind for by Ed Bri mner, for soil and water.ELECT FOUR CONSERVATIVES Jon Kilpatrick, Ralph Thomas, Larry Taylor Ed Brimner, Melisa Taylor, and Tina Brimner with Senator Marco Rubio Tina Brimner with Governor Rick Scott

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 7BBy DOUG JONESWakulla Democratic PartyThe three Democratic candidates for the House District 7 seat recently attended a forum held at the Wakulla County Public Library, “ elding a series of challenging questions and expressing their views on a variety of topics. Sponsored by the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee, nearly 50 members of the public were present and questions were posed by Committee members as well as from the audience on July 12. Candidates began by introducing themselves and stating the three top issues for their campaigns. Thomas Dickens was “ rst and said that he was a father, husband, attorney, teacher, and Iraq War Veteran. His top three issues were “ rst, energy independence … protecting our democracy by having energy security at home. Secondly he would stand up for jobs. And third was to stand up for education and provide adequate funding for education. He said he was a consensus builder while in Iraq and wanted to take those skills to the Florida Legislature. The next candidate was Robert Hill. He stated that his career began as a math teacher and coach which led to becoming Superintendant of Schools in Liberty County. In 2000 he was elected to Clerk of Court for Liberty County and is now completing his third term as Clerk while also serving as Liberty County Administrator. His top three priority issues were economic growth and job development, education, and championing the State operated rural prison program. He stated that he was against prison privatization of the states rural prisons. He also stated that he wanted to help state and local government employees and that he was a strong advocate of 2nd amendment rights. Due to a schedule con” ict, A.J. Smith was not able to join the forum until later in the evening. The “ rst question posed by moderator Rachel Sutz Pienta, Chair of the Wakulla DEC, concerned the restoration of civil rights for convicted felons after they have served their time. First to respond was Hill, who believes those incarcerated should have more educational opportunities while in prison and that programs could be set up by the Department of Corrections to start the burdensome paperwork needed for rights restoration. He would try to streamline this process. Dickens said that he celebrated former Governor Charlie Crists efforts to restore the civil rights of those who have served their time. The goal of prison is to rehabilitate and bring them back as contributing members of society. He felt that an onerous process for completing the requirements for restoration was not necessarily a bad thing as it would provide a sense of accomplishment for those who complete the process. The next question was how should the State of Florida address the water needs of its citizens protecting their water rights over the profit-driven corporations who want to sell this precious commodity or pipe it elsewhere? Dickens responded “ rst saying that any policy should protect everyones right to the reasonable uses of water. If practices are going to cut into anothers livelihood, if it does them harm, then it should not be allowed. On the other hand, if the use is within certain reasonable parameters that it could be permitted. Hill responded that when it comes to preserving the water flow of the Apalachicola River, a “ ght that has been ongoing for years, we must do everything we can to protect our coastal seafood industry. Our local needs are more important than the building of new subdivisions in Atlanta and that if negotiations to maintain adequate water flow fail, lawsuits would be an appropriate response. He also stated he would restrict the piping of water to south Florida citing an example of water being trucked out of Liberty County that may have adversely affected the water levels of the lake from which it was drawn. The next question concerned the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Noting that Governor Scott, in response to the recent ruling upholding ACA, said he would not implement several of the Acts provisions in Florida. Candidates were asked their opinion on this issue and how they would help citizens receive affordable health care. Hill responded that he disagreed with the governor on a number of issues and this was certainly one point of disagreement. He stated we are in a crisis mode in this country on affordable health care, something needs to be done about it, and the ACA was a step in the right direction. He liked the provisions of not discriminating against those with pre-existing conditions and the provisions to allow children to remain on their familys coverage to age 26. He stated the ACA is not perfect but throwing up our hands and turning our back on the issue was not a solution either. Dickens agreed with Hill especially concerning the provisions of pre-existing conditions. He commented that the ACA is very new and very complex legislation, not everybody understands it right now but overall it is an extraordinarily important law. He cited a personal case of a young child with severe medical problems and how the existing rules and health care system prevents the family involved from making decisions about their future without jeopardizing them from losing critically needed health care for the child due to a pre-existing condition. He believes that ACA must move forward. The next question asked the candidates what three issues were most important to the citizens of their district. Dickens responded that “ rst was jobs and to have adequate funding for government employees, teachers, and law enforcement. Second, was the economy, stating that his plan for energy independence will create a lot of jobs for citizens in this district. Third, was education, citing this as a security issue. He said the bottom line is that to provide security for our nation you have to a highly educated populace and that education has to be adequately funded so that we will have the educated trained work force needed. Hill responded that the top issue was jobs. He proposed a remedy to cut down on red tape for businesses to establish in our communities. Those compatible with our community and lifestyle should get incentives. For this to be successful, we also need a properly prepared workforce. The second issue was education and adequate funding to ensure its success, Hill said. He suggested looking at school districts that are successful, like Wakulla which is second to none, and model other programs around the state based on what works here. Thirdly, citizens in his district want to see adequate funding for local and state government employees. He does not want to balance state and local budgets on the back of these employees. The next question concerned water bottling. Candidates were asked if they have a plan for protecting natural resources such as Wakulla Springs from plans to come in and bottle the spring water. Hill stated he did not have an answer to this question but said he would consult with experts at TCC and Florida State University to help get a grasp on this issue. Dickens stated that we have a good model in the District with the Nestle plant in Madison. He would want some robust studies and clear data concerning potential issues that water bottling might bring forth. Citing his degree in Biology he further stated it would be absolutely imperative that proper precautions be taken should water bottling be instituted. The next question asked candidates their position on the proposed Amendment 6 to the Florida Constitution, Prohibition on Public Funding of Abortions; Construction of Abortion Rights. Pienta read the candidates the summary of the proposed amendment. At this point candidate A.J. Smith arrived at the meeting and the candidates took turns discussing the meaning of the language in the amendment but all confessing they were unfamiliar with the proposal. Pienta told the candidates that this and 10 other amendments are slated to be on the ballot in November and stressed that candidates and citizens have a duty to study and be informed on these very complex issues before casting their ballots in November. She said that the amendment process is very dif“ cult for the average citizen to understand without becoming educated on the issues. In the next question, candidates were asked what would be there “ rst action as a newly elected member to the Florida House. Dickens was “ rst to respond saying that his “ rst act would be to thank his constituents, those who elected him to office. He said he would do what he could to restore respect to the institution of state employment. He cited his own employment as an attorney with the Department of Health prior to being deployed to Iraq in 2010. By law his job was held open for him but when he got back, his bene“ ts had been stripped and his case load had been doubled. He said it was shameful how he and other state workers, highly educated individuals who have worked tirelessly for the citizens of Florida, are being treated. Smith was next to respond and he stated that his “ rst act following election would be to set up town hall meetings across the district to get to know his constituents better, “ nd out what they expect from him and let them know how they can contact him. He stated that although many issues were similar district wide, each community had its own special needs and he wanted to be aware of what those issues are and let citizens in his district know that he would be accessible by phone, email and in person. Hill said that the first thing he would do is say a thank you prayer. He would then call the Speaker of the House and ask to be put on the Appropriations Committee, to play a role in how funds are allocated. The next question concerned womens reproductive rights. Pienta said that since Governor Scott had been elected there have been major attacks on womens rights in the Florida Legislature with over 20 anti-choice bills in 2011, another 20 in 2012, and a similar number expected in 2013. She asked the candidates how they felt about this issue. Hill responded that he spent much time thinking about this issue. He felt that this should be a decision made by a woman and the family involved. If the decision came down to his family, and it was up to him to decide, he would choose life. Dickens said that the law on this issue has been clear for 40 years. The question posed opens up the door to a broader discussion on womens rights and equality. He applauds efforts to push for equal pay for equal work and flexible work schedules for women and their families. He wants to see the discussion broadened to include relaxing adoption laws and better health care choices for women making sure that every choice is truly theirs. Smith said it was pretty simple, when it comes to a womans right to choose, she has the right to choose. For the final question of the evening, candidates were asked to summarize the issues of importance to them or discuss or revisit other topics of their choice. Hill began by thanking the crowd for the opportunity to meet them or for them to meet him. He asked for their con“ dence in him as a candidate and for their vote on Aug. 14. He encouraged voters to contact him and that he was available and accessible by phone or email on any topic of importance to them. Dickens also thanked the crowd for coming and said that he viewed this race as a privilege and an opportunity. He said only in this country can a 37-year -old man, with little more than his name, do what he has the chance to do on a dayto-day basis. In this country we can discuss all of the issues. He asked the voters to think about the privileges our democracy affords as they vote in August and November and to thank God that we have these inalienable rights. Smith had the final words for the evening. He apologized for missing the beginning of the forum. He said District 7 was a massive district and its going to take somebody who works very hard, long hours to represent the district and that was the commitment he would make. He stated that he was from Apalachicola and was a retired law enforcement of“ cer. He has worked to serve people all of his life and thats what he would continue to do. He further stated that its very important as we go forward that a strong candidate emerge from the primary. The Republican party is doing all it can do to defeat us and we will have to work together to defeat them in November. We must come together to support whatever candidate wins the primary. The Cookies and Candidates Forum was held on July 12.Forum for Democratic candidates is held on July 12Democratic candidates for state House District 7 … omas Dickens, Robert Hill, A.J. Smith … share their views on issues with voters.

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy NATALIE REVELSSpecial to The NewsTrey Young from HRTV and American Competitive Trail Horse Association (ACTHA) have partnered together to host The American Horseman CompetitionŽ scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 11, at 3Y Ranch in Crawfordville. All horseback riding disciplines are welcome. This competition consists of six miles and six judged obstacles. Young will have a demo for audit and Dr. Stephen Fisch DVM from AVS Equine Hospital will be the guest speaker. In addition, there will be over-night boarding for Friday night arrivals, amazing prizes, ribbons, and of course wonderful fellowship with fellow horse people and their family and friends throughout the day. Registration is limited to 100 riders. This is also a Cash Jackpot Ride. Contestant registration on-line is required. Registration closes at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 8. 3Y Ranch is a beautiful ranch, in the heart of Wakulla County and home of Trey Young of The American HorsemanŽ from HRTV. The ranch is approximately 900 acres, consisting of a state of the art covered and lighted arena, loping pen, round pen, two large barns, plenty of cattle and horses and of course, miles of trails. The ranch is typical Florida terrain; therefore, horseshoes for the ride are not necessary. Chason Photos will be the photographer for the event and Dr. Fisch will speak on equine dehydration and use of electrolytes. There will also be great prizes. If you plan on camping out Friday night please make sure you call Natalie Revels at (504) 905-9493 to reserve your spot. There are limited 30-amp connections and limited 110 connections. If you wish to bring a generator as your power source, you are encouraged to do so. If you would like primitive camping, please call to reserve. Payment for camping is due upon arrival. Breakfast and lunch will be provided by a local horse rescue. The proceeds from the meals will bene“ t Cauzican Animal Rescue (cauzican.org). Payment for meals is cash at the ride. Breakfast is $5 and includes breakfast casserole, fresh fruit, breakfast breads, bagels and cream cheese, yogurt, coffee and fruit juices. Lunch is $7 and consists of barbecue sandwiches, cold “ nger sandwiches, potato salad, slaw, brownies, dessert, lemonade and water. To learn more about the ACTHA please visit www. actha.us Or visit Trey Young at treyyoung.com. ACTHAs Mission is to provide an enjoyable venue showcasing the wonderful attributes of the great American Trail Horse, granting them the recognition they so richly deserve. Trail ride competition set at 3Y Ranch on Aug. 11 PHOTO BY KIMBERLY CHASON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTrey Young shows how to cross water on a horse. e six-mile trail ride competition is hosted by 3Ys Trey Young, host of  e American HorsemanŽ on HRTV www.RobertHill4House.com http://twitter.com/hill4house www.facebook.com/RobertHill4House Political advertisement paid for and approved by Robert Hill, Democrat, for Florida House of Representatives District 7 Wakulla Countycan count on Robert Hill...ƒ to ght Prison Privatization „ I will oppose any eorts to privatize the state-operated prisons in our area and put our local people out of work.Ž ƒ to oppose New Taxes „ You will not nd me advocating for any new taxes. I will ght the state budget cuts that endanger the vulnerable and put our friends and neighbors out of work, but this is one Democrat that will not ask you to pay more in taxes.Ž ƒ to support Public Education „ Im a former teacher and I know public education is important. I intend to support our teachers, administrators and public schools as a member of the legislature.Ž ƒ to listen to the People „ I will advocate for the working people and their families … like the people who live o the land and the water, retirees, police ocers and small business owners who labor every day and make up the rural communities in our district.Ž ƒ to create Jobs „ We need jobs and economic development that are compatible with our rural communities and lifestyle. I have brought jobs into my community as an elected ocial and I will bring jobs into our district as your State Rep.Ž ƒ to preserve our Heritage „ I have hunted and shed in the rivers, bays and woods around these parts for a very long time. I want those same opportunities for my children and grandchildren. That is why I will ght against those who seek to damage the environment, dry up our rivers, scar our landscape and change the way of life in our area.ŽRobert Hill is a public servant we can trust and a leader who will listen!For Real Experience, Sound Judgment and Proven Leadership you can Count on Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 9BContinued from Page 3B State Department Marketing Director Kerri Post told the audience that more than 100 Viva Florida 500 events are planned for 2013, which marks 500 years since European arrival. Wild” owers and the states beauty … its a natural,Ž she said, explaining that wildflower tourism crosses boundaries into many niche markets, such as photography and birdwatching. A wildflower ecotourism marketing plan, funded in part by Visit Florida, also was discussed during the meeting. With partner input, the plan will serve as a roadmap for the Panhandle effort. Six of the counties represented have resolutions to preserve and conserve wildflowers, and participants had many ideas on how to achieve those goals. Eleanor Dietrich, who is leading a protection and awareness effort in Leon County, told the group that Leon commissioners modi“ ed the countys original resolution on July 10 to eliminate references to speci“ c roads. The move will allow more ” exibility to work with the county and FDOT to choose roads as options become available, she said. Dietrich, who continuously monitors Leon Countys roadsides, is also working on presentations for Leon County commissioners to help them understand what is taking place. Were trying to move slowly to make sure of our base of support,Ž she said. Wakulla County Commissioner Lynn Artz told the group her county has made progress protecting roadside wild” owers, but not without concerns from residents about safety. To address concerns, Wakulla increased the six-foot strip being mowed along roadsides to 12 feet, she said. To learn more about Floridas wild” owers or to request a brochure on Eastern Panhandle wild” ower sites, visit www.FlaWild” owers.org/learn.php. To learn about Viva Florida 500 events, visit www. VivaFlorida.org. Wild” ower resolutions can be viewed at www. FlaWild” owers.org/resolution.php.Panhandle Wild” ower Alliance holds meetingBy JO ANN PALMERKWCB DirectorAnother Saturday, another cleanup. KWCB worked again this past Saturday helping a helper. Several KWCB board members and NJROTC cadets cleaned up debris caused by Tropical Storm Debby, which was not your typical storm. As Scott Nelson explained at Green Drinks recently, Debby was the kind of storm you could not be prepared for. That was obvious by the damage caused to the Sopchoppy community and closer to town, at the home of Bruce and Nina Ashley. I am always amazed at how many hands can make a difference in a short period of time. I put out a call for help, and Saturday morning, Lt. Mike Stewart and the Wakulla High School NKJROTC Cadets showed up, ready and willing to work. These young men and women are awesome. Its impressive to see the commitment, respect and loyalty they have to their fellow cadets, community and especially to their leaders, Capt. Ron Huddleston and Lt. Stewart. The cadets sprayed repellent by the can, donned gloves, grasped pickers, bags, shovels, rakes and wheelbarrows and began walking around the perimeter of the Ashley property. They slogged through swamp waters, from where I heard a couple of screams, but never saw the alert. I suspect there was a snake or two involved. They dragged chairs, tables, loose wood, plastic containers, paint cans and a refrigerator to the clearings. From the clearing they skillfully used a tractor with a front-end loader to scoop up the debris and deliver it to the dumpster. Lessons in driving a tractor are always good. Woody Palmer directed the cadet driver who was at times unsure about the balance of the load, but made the exact control movements to drop the load on the mark every time. As KWCB Board Members Ray Cade, Lori Gilbertson, Nancy Paul, two of her grandsons, Durene Gilbert, Marc Dickieson, Jo Ann and Woody Palmer and friend, Gail Campbell, did their own share of picking, separating and sorting, the piles of debris got smaller. At the end of the day, I know we made a difference for Bruce and Nina. Thanks to everyone who came out to work. I am proud to be part of an organization that cares about this community. JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBruce Ashley poses with volunteers, including NJROTC cadets, who helped him clean his property.KEEP WAKULLA COUNTY BEAUTIFULKWCB helps a helper FILE PHOTOWild” owers blooming on the roadside right-of-way in Wakulla County last year. Special to The NewsAdd color to your landscape year-round by joining the Arbor Day Foundation in August. Everyone who joins the nonpro“ t Arbor Day Foundation with a $10 donation will receive 10 free white ” owering dogwood trees through the Foundations Trees for America campaign. The trees will be shipped postpaid at the right time for planting in each members area, which falls between Oct. 15 and Dec. 10. The 6to 12-inch trees are guaranteed to grow or they will be replaced free of charge. Planting instructions are enclosed with each shipment of trees. Dogwood trees will add color and beauty to your yard throughout the year, with their showy spring ” owers, scarlet autumn foliage and red berries that attract songbirds in the winter,Ž said John Rosenow, founder and chief executive of the Arbor Day Foundation. New members of the Arbor Day Foundation also receive The Tree Book, which includes information about tree planting and care, and Arbor Day, the Foundations bimonthly publication. To receive the free white ” owering dogwood trees, by Aug. 31 send a $10 membership contribution to: Ten Dogwoods Arbor Day Foundation 100 Arbor Ave. Nebraska City NE 68410 Or join online at arborday.org/august.Receive 10 dogwood trees free Our Small County Defender! Jamey Westbrook REPUBLICAN for FLORIDA HOUSE, DISTRICT 7 I promise I’ll be available in your community with offices set up throughout the district to meet with you one-on-one. I understand the many issues facing us today like job creation, high food and gas prices, the condition of our roads, clean water & environmental issues, government over-regulation, education, immigration and, of course, healthcare. Other issues include the high cost of homeownership, insurance and taxes. I pledge to fight for our Second Amendment rights, and I will work to see that a hunter is appointed to the Florida Wildlife Commission. I have owned & operated the same well drilling business for 35 years and farmed for 25 years. I am a member of the NRA, and have been married for 31 years to Dr. Gayle Westbrook, a school principal. Too many of the folks in Tallahassee don’t care about our small counties… Jamey will set them straight! F F e a r l e s s L e a d e r s h i p F o r O u r S m a l l C o u n t i e s Calhoun | Franklin | Gulf | Jefferson | Lafayette Leon* | Liberty | Madison | Taylor | Wakulla just a small part! Call Jamey at 8 8 5 0 5 2 6 8 4 5 0 Political advertisement paid for and approved by Jamey Westbrook, Republican, for Florida House, District 7 1 1 8 6 6 7 4 2 1 3 7 3 w w w f l o r i d a c l a s s i f i e d s c o m T h e k e y t o a d v e r t i s i n g s u c c e s s Classified • Display • Metro Daily • Online Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain THG-11909 BANKRUPTCY SOVEREIGN OAKS 119 ACRE HORSE FARM CR E HO RS OCALA, FLFriday € August 24th € 11 a.m. RowellAuctions.comRowell Auctions, Inc. | 800-323-8388Auction To Be Held Onsite, Online Bidding AvailableA MarkNet Alliance MemberAU 479 AB 3109 € 10% Buyers Premium 2% Broker Participation (*2% of Bid Price) € 30 Day Closing€ Corporate Office with Beautiful Views € 3 Bedroom/ 2 Bath Newly Renovated Home for Guest/Manager House € 6 Stall Stallion Barn w/Breeding Shed and Office/Apartment € 18 Stall Custom Show Stable w/Apartment, Air Conditioned Tack Room, Saddling Station & Arena, 60 Covered Round Pen w/Viewing StandFor Property Information Contact: Joan Pletcher, Realtor, 352-266-910012871 South Highway 475, Ocala, FL (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs.

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The News Aiming to provide a stable, dedicated funding source for the acquisition of conservation and recreation lands in Florida, a coalition of leading defenders of the states environment today launched a Constitutional amendment petition drive to ask voters to guarantee support for this long-term state priority. This will be the most signi“ cant vote in Florida for our environment in our lifetimes,Ž said Will Abberger, the campaigns chair and the director of conservation “ nance for the Trust for Public Land. We are launching a grassroots effort to let the people decide if clean water and natural land are a legacy we want to leave for our children and grandchildren … and generations to come.Ž The amendment would take effect July 1, 2015, and for 20 years would dedicate one-third of the net revenues from the existing excise tax on documents to restore the Everglades, protect drinking water sources, and revive the states historic commitment to protecting natural lands and wildlife habitat through the Florida Forever Program. Under the amendment, the monies deposited into the Land Acquisition Trust Fund will remain separate from the States General Revenue Fund. The amendment would provide more than $5 billion for water and land conservation in Florida over the next 10 years and $10 billion over the 20-year life of the measure, without any tax increase. The Florida Water and Land Legacy Campaign brings together the Trust for Public Land, Audubon Florida, the Florida Wildlife Federation, the Sierra Club, the Nature Conservancy, 1000 Friends of Florida, Defenders of Wildlife, and others. The campaign will reach out to gain signatures of at least 676,811 registered voters to put the issue on the 2014 ballot. The Coalition notes that since 2009, the Florida Legislature has provided only $23 million for the landmark Florida Forever program. This is a 97.5 percent reduction in previous funding. State appropriations for land management and ecological restoration, including the Everglades, have suffered similar declines. In 2012, the Legislature allocated $8.5 million to safeguard important water protection areas and conservation lands. In light of a state budget of $60 billion, that means that for every dollar the state spends in 2012, less than two-hundredths of one penny will go to water and land conservation … less than $1 for each Floridian. We are reaching out across our state to business leaders, conservationists, people of every age, ethnicity, creed, and political stripe, to ask them to protect what is fundamental to our economy and our quality of life in Florida … the land and water that makes this such a special place,Ž added Eric Draper, executive director of Audubon Florida. Florida Forever has been cut drastically since 2009. We cant protect this state on less than a dollar per year per Floridian. It just wont work.Ž The Coalition sees the proposed amendment as a responsible remedy to counter the dramatic reduction in funding for environmental protection and preservation, without having to raise taxes. When it comes to dedicating funding to protect Floridas environment, the Great Recession has led to a complete depression. State funding to protect our most precious natural resources has slowed to a trickle,Ž said Manley Fuller, president of the Florida Wildlife Federation, and a leader in the effort. This amendment is not a tax increase. It is the dedication of an existing funding source back to its historic purpose. Passing this amendment will ensure Floridas longterm traditional conservation values are secure and protected from short-term political pressures.Ž The amendment would create Article X, Section 28, of the Florida Constitution. Under the amendment, Floridas Land Acquisition Trust Fund would receive a guaranteed 33 percent of net revenues from the existing excise tax on documents. These funds would be dedicated to support financing or re“ nancing the acquisition and improvement of: € Land, water areas, and related property interests and resources for conservation lands including wetlands, forests, and “ sh and wildlife habitat; € Lands that protect signi“ cant water resources and drinking water sources, including lands protecting the water quality and quantity of rivers, lakes, streams, springsheds, and lands providing recharge for groundwater and aquifer systems; € Lands in the Everglades Agricultural Area and the Everglades Protection Area, as de“ ned in Section 7(b) of Article II of the Florida Constitution; € Beaches and shores; outdoor recreation lands, including recreational trails, parks, and urban open space; rural landscapes; historic, archaeological, or geologic sites as well as management of lands acquired; € Restoration of natural systems related to the enhancement of public access and recreational enjoyment; and € Payment of the debt service on bonds issued pursuant to Article VII, Section 11(e) of the Florida Constitution. The Coalition says support for environmental protection remains strong in Florida and is solidly nonpartisan. Since 1994, Florida voters have approved “ ve of the six amendments proposed to the state Constitution related to conservation and the environment … an 83 percent passage rate. Regardless of political party and in good times and bad, for more than 20 years Legislatures and Governors have supported these programs. Since the recent economic downturn, our water and land, our beaches and springs, have suffered greater cuts and more damage than almost any other area of statewide concern,Ž said Abberger. The campaign will rely on volunteer signature gatherers and donors from across the state, and is urging supporters to sign up at FloridaWaterLandLegacy. org, or call (850) 629-4656, or e-mail to campaign@ FloridaWaterLandLegacy. org.ENVIRONMENTAL NEWSGroups seek amendment to guarantee funding for environmentBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE – An audit of the state of ce charged with administering grants meant to encourage energy efciency and alternative fuels turned up nearly $3 million in potential fraud along with other nancial mismanagement, according to a report issued recently by the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. The inspector general’s report, which comes a little more than a year after the department took control of the Of ce of Energy, also says nearly $200,000 had been awarded to a company that had led for bankruptcy. Most of the funds were stopped before they reached their destinations, including almost $2.3 million in the alleged fraud cases; the bankrupt company also didn’t get the $198,000. And auditors found that the Of ce of Energy didn’t have invoices for $800,000 in reimbursements from $17 million in requests they examined. Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam blamed a lack of leadership at the of ce, which has been housed at various times in the current Department of Management Services, what is now the Department of Economic Opportunity, the Department of Environmental Protection and the governor’s of ce before going to Putnam’s department. “This audit really reveals the consequences of an agency that has bounced around ve different places in the course of its existence,” Putnam said. That became an even greater issue when almost $176 million came pouring into the state’s energy initiatives from President Barack Obama’s stimulus package. Combined with state funding, the of ce was charged with spending more than $219.7 million in a bit more than three years. “You had a limited staff with a lack of training and absolutely no direction, who were inundated in a very short period of time by $200 million and orders to get it out the door as fast as possible,” Putnam said. State of cials said two companies were under investigation for the fraud, though company names were not released Tuesday. One of the projects was purportedly to manufacture and store equipment for wind and solar energy systems; $700,000 of the $2.5 million awarded to the program had already been given to the initiative before ofcials stopped it. The other program, aimed at farm equipment using biodiesel, never received the $500,000 allocated for it. But those were not the only failures, Putnam said. A drive to install new gas stations using ethanol-heavy fuel around the state has stalled; of the 20 grants for E-85 sites, 12 have already been terminated. The audit also knocked the office for not sending grant administrators to renewable energy sites often enough to check up on the projects they were overseeing. In a response to the audit, Of ce of Energy Director Patrick Sheehan -who was appointed by Putnam after the of ce’s transfer -said former Gov. Charlie Crist barred staff members from traveling when he oversaw the of ce. Sheehan said the of ce has already carried out 120 site visits over the last year.Audit: fraud in energy programs • 5 Acres Sweetwater Ridge – Crawfordville, Owner Financing $44,999 • 5 Acres Brook Forest Crawfordville, Owner Financing – $44,999 • 5.7 Acres – Old Plank Rd, SE Tallahassee, Owner Financing $24,900 • 5 Acres – MaryAnn Circle, Crawfordville, $55,000 • 2.67 Acres – Lawhon Mill Rd, Crawfordville, $29,900 lots & landJR Milton3/2 Ranch in Wakulla Gardens. Short Sale Price to sell fast $83,000Woodville Hwy.Home, Cottage, Cook House, Shop and more nestled on 12 acres $249,900Mill Hollow Charmer, Great location, mature landscape, inground pool, 2 car garage, 1 acre lot. $174,900Boynton Ct.Large 5/3 on one acre in North Crawfordville. Bank Owned Just reduced $114,000Two Houses(1 DWMH & 1 SWMH) Two Acres. Main home nice kitchen newly remodeled, second is rented. Only $134,900Dixie DriveLarge 5/3 on 7 acres, close to Shadeville Elem. Short Sale $89,000“Ponderosa Plus”Located on Wakulla Springs Rd. 3/2, 5 acres, 2,083 sq. ft., partly fenced for horses, etc. Only $149,900New ConstructionReady to move in Lots of special features w/ city water and sewer. New Low Price, $104,900. GuinevereCome see this beauty, a 2 story townhome, private back yard, community features a pool $88,900 MUST SEE! let us get you home all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽWe would like to WELCOME;MARY APPLEGATE to Rossetti Realty, She has recently relocated to Wakulla County from Ft Myers via Tallahassee. She has been licensed in Real estate for over 7 years and has demonstrated a high level of service to clients and community. We are very pleased to have her join our team. Please call her directly for any and all your real Estate needs: 850-926-3787 or TMapplegate@ymail.com. our ome own ealtor ŽŽRossetti Realty would be willing to speak to any perspective agent, experienced, or newly licensed, or just thinking about a new career. Call David Rossetti today for your condential interview. 850-591-6161

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 11BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 1 … More than 13,000 ex-felons may be eligible to vote but dont know it, the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida said Wednesday, citing data it obtained from the Florida Parole Commission. The ACLU said the commission is sitting on more than 17,000 Restoration of Civil Rights certi“ cates that would notify former felons that they can now register to vote, but which have not reached their intended recipients. The civil rights group cross-checked the names on those certi“ cates with voter registration lists and found that 13,571 of them are not registered voters, presumably because many of them dont know theyve been cleared to register. Florida is one of a minority of U.S. states that does not automatically restore civil rights once a felon has completed a sentence. The certi“ cates were sent between 2007 and March 2011, during which time a change in policy spearheaded by former Gov. Charlie Crist allowed nonviolent exfelons to have their rights automatically restored. The policy was repealed in March 2011 after Florida Gov. Rick Scott and newly elected members of the Florida Cabinet voted to eliminate automatic restoration and again make it more dif“ cult for ex-felons to get their civil rights, including the right to vote, restored. Scott has been aggressively pursuing efforts to clean up the states voter rolls because, he says, there are some non-citizens who are ineligible to vote who are registered. Following a legal battle, the state last month gained access to a federal Department of Homeland Security database to continue the effort to remove ineligible voters. An initial effort stalled when local supervisors of elections balked because of possible inaccuracies on an earlier list of potentially ineligible voters sent to the counties by the state. The parole commissions website … fpcweb.fpc.state. ” .us … allows a search to see if an ex-offenders rights have been restored. F T s t l M 1 2 F ree for fa T his 12 we s upport in d t rained N A iving with M exico ha v Clas 2 W mily mem P a ek educat i d ividuals w A MI family one of th e v e gradua t ses st a Myra 266 9 To regNAMI eek bers, part Majo r Schizop h B o nic Disord P o i onal cour s w ith seriou member v e se brain il t ed from t h a rt Th u Jean’s 9 Cra w ister, c or e m Wakulla F R Edu ners, signi r Depressi o h renia an d o rderline P er, Obses s o st traum a s e is struc t s mental d v olunteers lnesses. O v h is outsta n u rsday, Resta u w fordvil c all NA M m ail namiw is a (501 R E E cati Fa m ficant oth e o n and Bip o d Schizoaff e P ersonality s ive Comp u a tic Stress t ured to h e d isorders. T who kno w v er 300,0 0 n ding progAugu s u rant C le Hw y M I Waakulla@c e (C) 3) no E ona m ily t ers, and f r olar Disor d e ctive Dis o y Disorder u lsive Dis o Disorder e lp caregi v T his cours e w what it i s 0 0 people i ram. s t 16, 2 C onfer e y Cra w kulla a e nturylink. o n profit o l Co u t o Fa r iends of i n d er o rder o rder, and v ers under s e is taught s like to h a i n the U.S. 2 012, 5 e nce R o w fordvi t 926 1 net o rganiza t u rs e mily n dividuals s tand and by a tea m a ve a love d Canada, a 5 :30 p. m o om lle 1 033 t ion e with m of d one a nd m PARTNER… E R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy 926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of ConnieMack MikeMcCalister MarielenaStuart DaveWeldonUNITEDSTATESENATOR (VoteforOne) HalseyBeshears DonCurtis JameyWestbrook MikeWilliamsSTATEREPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT7 (VoteforOne) KrisDunn BarbaraHobbs JosefinaM.TamayoCIRCUITJUDGE2NDCIRCUIT GROUP2 (VoteforOne) MikeScott MelisaTaylorSCHOOLBOARD DISTRICT2 (VoteforOne) EdBrimner ChuckHessSOILANDWATER SEAT3 (VoteforOne) DEMOCRATICPARTY REPUBLICANPARTYNONPARTISAN GlennA.Burkett BillNelson UNITEDSTATESENATOR (VoteforOne) LeonardBembry AlLawson AlvinL.Peters MarkSchlakman REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT2 (VoteforOne) ThomasDickens RobertHill A.J.Smith STATEREPRESENTATIVE District7 (VoteforOne) KrisDunn BarbaraHobbs JosefinaM.Tamayo CIRCUITJUDGE2NDCIRCUIT GROUP2 (VoteforOne) MikeScott MelisaTaylor SCHOOLBOARD DISTRICT2 (VoteforOne) INCONGRESS EdBrimner ChuckHessSOILANDWATER SEAT3 (VoteforOne) CalJamison MitchellKauffmanSEAT5 SOILANDWATER (VoteforOne) SOILANDWATER SEAT5 (VoteforOne) CalJamison MitchellKauffmanPARTYOFFICES KurtAhrendt GordonMcCleary LarryTaylorSTATECOMMITTEEMAN (VoteforOne) AnneAhrendt TinaBrimnerSTATECOMMITTEEWOMAN (VoteforOne) KrisDunn BarbaraHobbs JosefinaM.TamayoCIRCUITJUDGE2NDCIRCUIT GROUP2 (VoteforOne) MikeScott MelisaTaylorSCHOOLBOARD DISTRICT2 (VoteforOne) EdBrimner ChuckHessSOILANDWATER SEAT3 (VoteforOne) CalJamison MitchellKauffmanSOILANDWATER SEAT5 (VoteforOne) OFFICIALPRIMARYSAMPLE BALLOT WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAUGUST 14, 2012 M A K E I T C O U N T V o t e f o r O N E Y O U R C H O I C E N O T Y o u r C h o i c e M A R K Y O U R B A L L O T C O R R E C T L Y – C O MP L E T E L Y F I L L I N T H E O V A L N E X T T O Y O U R C H O I C E ELECTION DAY POLLS OPEN 7:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.OFFICIAL SAMPLE BALLOTPRIMARY ELECTION • WAKULLA COUNTY • AUGUST 14, 2012 Henry F.“Buddy”Wells Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P.O. Box 305 Crawfordville, FL32326 THIS SAMPLE BALLOT MAYBE TAKEN TO THE POLLS FOR REFERENCE.EARLYVOTING SCHEDULE August 4th throughAugust 11th–8:00 am to 6:00 pm August 5th1:00 pm to 7 pm –Please study this ballot before going to vote. Your precinct number is designated on your Voter Information Card. Please vote in the Primary ElectionAugust 14, 2012Please have Photo & Signature Identification ready -even if the poll wor k er knows you. (Florida Statute 101.043) Vote early this year & avoid the large crowds of election day!You no longer have to wait until election day to make your vote count! Florida now allows voters to cast their ballot up to 10 days prior to each Election Day. Just bring your signature & photo ID to the Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections office at 3115-B Crawfordville Hwy. in Crawfordville EachRegisteredvoterinthisstate should: 1.Familiarizehimselforherself withthecandidatesandissues. 2.Maintainwiththeofficeofthe supervisorofelectionsacurrent address. 3.Knowthelocationofhisorher pollingplaceanditshoursof operation. 4.Bringproperidentificationto thepollingstation. 5.Familiarizehimselforherself withtheoperationofthevoting equipmentinhisorherprecinct. 6.Treatprecinctworkerswith courtesy. 7.Respecttheprivacyofother voters. 8.Report any problems orviolationsofelectionlawstothesupervisorofelections. 9.Askquestions,ifneeded. 10.Makesurethathisorhercompletedballotiscorrectbefore leavingthepollingstation. NOTETOVOTER:Failuretoperformanyoftheseresponsibilities doesnotprohibitavoterfromvoting.F.S.101.031(2) FORADDITIONAL INFORMATION CONTACT THE WAKULLACOUNTY ELECTIONS OFFICEATP.O. Box 305 Crawfordville, FL32326-0305 Phone: (850) 926-7575 Website: www.wakullaelection.com:M A K E I T C O U N T .V o t ef o r O N E Y OU R C H OI C E N O T Y o u r C h o i c e MA R K Y O U R B A LL O T C O R R E C T LY – C O MP LE T E LY F I L L I N T H E O V A L N E X T T O Y O U R C H O I C E CANDIDATE Voter's Bill of RightsEach registered voterin this state has the right to: 1.Vote and have his orhervote accurately counted. 2.Cast a vote if he orshe is in line at the official closing of the polls in that county. 3.Ask forand receive assistance in voting. 4.Receive up to two replacement ballots if he orshe makes a mistake priorto the ballot being cast. 5.An explanation if his orher registration oridentity is in question. 6.If his orherregistration or identity is in question, cast a provisional ballot. 7.Written instructions to use when voting, and, upon request, oral instruction in voting from elections officers. 8.Vote free from coercion or intimidation by elections officers orany otherperson. 9.Vote on a voting system that is in working condition and that will allow votes to be accurately cast.Voter Responsibilities 12 13,000 quali“ ed ex-felons are not registered to vote

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 3 … When Gerard Robinson was chosen in June 2011 to become Florida education commissioner, Gov. Rick Scott hailed the newcomers leadership as exactly what Florida needs to reach the next level of education reforms that will bene“ t both our students and the businesses of our state.Ž But with Robinsons resignation this week, someone else will have to help lead Florida to that next level. In announcing his resignation, Robinson said he wanted to spend more time with his family in Virginia. But the departure also came after the department found itself embroiled recently in back-to-back controversies about its handling of Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test scores and school grades. Robinsons tenure was short enough that he might leave little impression in Tallahassee political circles. But the same cant be said for two other once-close “ gures … former Gov. Charlie Crist and former state Republican Chairman Jim Greer … who drew headlines this week. Crist looks like he might get back into campaign mode, possibly as a Democrat. Greer, meanwhile, continues a legal battle with the state Republican Party about a severance agreement from his time as chairman. MR. ROBINSON, WE HARDLY KNEW YE Scott and Kathleen Shanahan, chairwoman of the state Board of Education, praised Robinson after he announced his resignation. He has worked with the board as we have raised standards for our students and our schools,Ž Shanahan said in a statement released by the Department of Education. He is a leader who embodies and understands the importance of education reform. We wish him the best as he makes the decision that is best for his own young children.Ž Under Robinson, however, the department gave fuel to critics of Floridas heavy emphasis on the FCAT and school grades. The Board of Education held an emergency meeting in May to lower passing scores on FCAT writing tests, after the department saw plummeting percentages of students meeting new, tougher standards. In July, the department had to revise grades for 213 elementary and middle schools and nine school districts because of problems in the grading process. Robinsons resignation spurred further calls from Democrats to place less emphasis on standardized testing. The FCAT has failed students, teachers and our state, said Plantation Rep. Perry Thurston, who is expected to become the House Democratic leader after this falls elections. A new state education commissioner can help Florida install a better and broader education accountability system for every school receiving taxpayer dollars that takes into account all the things students and teachers accomplish throughout the year.Ž With many Republicans invested politically in the FCAT, it remains to be seen whether the state will make changes to the accountability system. The Board of Education chose Public Schools Chancellor Pam Stewart to serve as interim commissioner while it searches for Robinsons replacement. GREER, CRIST SEND MESSAGES TO THE GOP Greer and Crist once were close allies atop the Florida GOP. Now, they are vili“ ed by the party. But both … in far different ways … keep coming back to give Republicans reasons to curse them. Greer, who faces criminal money-laundering and fraud charges because of an alleged fund-raising scheme while he was chairman, is locked in a messy civil lawsuit with the party about a severance agreement. The case took a bizarre turn this week when Greers attorney released a document to reporters that indicated the party has been involved in settlement talks. Weve been talking about a settlement this whole time, Greer attorney Damon Chase said. But Stephen Dobson, a lawyer for the party, denied that talks are ongoing. While Dobson said discussions had been held in the past, he said the GOP does not plan to pay Greer to make the case vanish. While I dont want to get into speci“ cs, I will tell you that the Republican Party has never made an offer to pay Jim Greer any money to settle his lawsuit … not one dollar, not one red cent, Dobson said. Crist, meanwhile, continued to add to speculation that he will become a Democrat and run for governor in 2014. He appeared this week at an Orlando fund-raiser for Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson … a fund-raiser that also included former President Bill Clinton. Crist, who left the GOP in 2010 to run unsuccessfully as an independent for the U.S. Senate, is backing Nelson over Republican U.S. Rep. Connie Mack. Senator Nelson has been a friend, he and Grace both, Crist told the Associated Press, referring to Nelsons wife. Its no knock on Connie. AP also reported that Mack campaign spokesman David James had a three-word response to the news. Is anyone surprised? James said. FINALLY, ITS TIME TO VOTE Bombarded by nasty mail pieces and television ads, Florida voters “ nally are getting their chance to have a say in this years elections. Early voting starts this weekend in most of the state, though it was allowed to start Monday in Collier, Hardee, Hendry, Hillsborough and Monroe counties. Those “ ve counties are treated differently than the rest of the state because of a history of discrimination. State lawmakers last year changed an election law to reduce the number of days for early voting. But that change will not take effect for the five counties until the federal government signs off on it ---something that has not happened. The start of early voting, however, has not eliminated the steady stream of lawsuits and assertions that the state is hindering people from voting. The latest example came this week when the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida said more than 13,000 ex-felons might be eligible to vote but dont know it. The ACLU said the Florida Parole Commission has more than 17,000 Restoration of Civil Rights certi“ cates that would notify former felons they can now register to vote. But the civil-liberties group said the certificates have not reached their intended recipients. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gerard Robinson resigns as Florida education commissioner. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: I think its important to remember that only one person in this lawsuit has been arrested and charged with six felony charges, and thats Jim Greer,Ž Stephen Dobson, an attorney for the state Republican Party, in dismissing the possibility of a settlement agreement that would involve the GOP paying former Chairman Greer.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Robinson leaves, but Greer, Crist don’t go away Dawn Reed, GRI, SFR, RealtorCell (850) 294-3468dawnjreed@yahoo.com www.WakullaInfo.comCheryl Swift, CLG, CHP, RealtorCell (850) 766-3218cswiftrealtor@yahoo.comwww.CrawfordvilleProperties.com SHORT SALE VS. FORECLOSURE www.WakullaShortSales.com Your Local Short Sale Specialists!!! It allows a more digni ed exit from the home. In a foreclosure, an of cial eventually comes to the home and tells the occupants to leave-immediately. In a short sale, the seller knows the closing date and can prepare in advance for the move. The seller could possibly avoid a de ciency judgment. Most banks will release the seller from this obligation in a short sale process. A short sale has less of a negative impact on sellers credit report. Once a short sale is completed, the sellers begin to clean-up their credit report. The timeline can be much longer as a foreclosure proceeds through the process. There is a ticking clock on tax relief. There is currently legislation, the Mortgage Forgiveness Relief Act of 2007, ensuring that homeowners who received principal reductions or other forms of debt forgiveness on their primary residence do not have to pay taxes on the amount forgiven. This legislation is set to expire at the end of the year. 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 13B -Janet (ARA) When you think of baking, your mind probably goes right to warm cookies, fruit-“ lled cobblers or pies and savory bread. While those are all the happy results of spending some time in the kitchen, when children, tweens and teens get involved in baking, theyll come away from the experience with a lot more than just happy taste buds. Its no secret that kids learn while theyre at play, but baking is a particularly great way to make learning interactive, effective and fun. With so many positive outcomes wrapped up into one activity, teachers, parents and others responsible for helping young people learn can use baking to create hands-on experiences that relate to everything from science to managing money. Consider all of the ways that baking can apply to school subjects, everyday life skills and a richer food future: € Science Chemistry goes hand in hand with baking. A range of results can be clearly seen when including or leaving out key ingredients. Biology, agriculture and local food production become real when kids learn where ingredients like ” our, butter, sugar, and leavening come from, or the physical changes that occur in a product when substituting ingredients to meet health and nutritional needs. € Math Baking is an activity that applies sequencing, ordering, fractions, weights, measures, dimensions, temperatures, adding, subtracting, dividing and multiplying. Children can learn at all ages, from the early days when they can stack measuring cups, count out the number of ingredients that go into a recipe to more complex tasks for older kids, like working with fractions and calculating the costs, and savings of do-it-yourself (DIY) baking. € Health As you pick out recipes and ingredients for baked goods, its the perfect opportunity to talk about the nutritional value and function of the grains, milk, eggs, fruits, veggies, sugars, butter, leavening and salt used in baking. Theres sometimes a misperception that baking cant be healthy, but teaching kids how to divide and control portion sizes, and to bake using a wide variety of ingredients actually helps young people try new foods and ingredients. € Personal economics Learning about managing household resources is a skill that will bene“ t kids throughout their lives. Baking not only teaches kids how to make delicious foods for themselves, but it also includes lessons about how much it costs when others prepare food for you, how much you can save with a few DIY food skills, saving and managing money. The economics of an active lifestyle includes food skills that save money and time all while burning calories and building traditions. € Literacy Another critical skill comes with reading ingredient lists, recipe directions and sequencing preparation steps. Combining reading with baking emphasizes comprehension, because kids apply what theyre reading to an activity. If you miss a step in the instructions or dont read it properly, it can have a dramatic effect on what youre baking. But all is not lost this leads to evaluating the results, problem solving and critical thinking to improve the product. Baking at home was far more common, if not essential, in past generations. Many adults have lost those skills. However, research conducted in 2011 by Mintel for the Home Baking Association showed that adults still know baking brings value to life … 33 percent say they would bake from scratch, if only they knew how. Because no ones too old, or young, to learn to bake, it can be a great way for parents and kids to share a learning experience. And if you try out some of grandmas or great-grandmas baking recipes, it can be a tradition-rich, multi-generational family affair.How baking serves up a batch of skills for children, tweens and teens SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for quali“ed applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and ”oor rate of 2.5% TRINITY LUTHERAN PRESCHOOLContinuously providing a high quality Christian early learning program for more than two decades NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for 2012-2013 VPK AND 3KFull and Part-time C o Call (850) 926-5557 for information and to enroll your childLocated on Coastal Highway across from Wakulla High School Tallahassees Champagne Party -Bene“ting Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend-Dust o your dancing shoes and get ready for a smashing good time cuz the 3rd Annual BIG Champagne Bash is just around the corner. Save the date for this spectacular evening of dancing, dinner by-the-bite, free-owing bubbly, and unforgettable fun. Were celebrating the Roaring 20s once again an era of silent lm, speakeasies, and sensational parties !Who: 300+, community-minded, fun-loving Fellas and Flappers from across the Big Bend come together for the event of the season to make a BIG, positive, and lasting impact in the lives of children in our area. Why: Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend believes all children have the ability to achieve success in life. When: Friday, August 24, 8:00 p.m. … 12:00 a.m. Venue: Hotel Duval, 415 North Monroe Street (Reserve your special $99 BIG Bash hotel guest rate by calling 850.224.6000 with the code BBSBBSIŽ by Friday, August 10th.) Attire: Get all dolled-upŽ for the 1920s silent movie theme Hosted by: Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bends BIG Alliance ( www.bbbs.org/ bigalliance ) Ticket Info: INCLUDES UNLIMITED CHAMPAGNE! Pre-Sale (expires August 17): $70/single, $130/couple, $600/group rate-10 tickets Standard Rate (August 18 Sold-Out): $75/single, $150/couple Purchase tickets at www.bbbs.org/bigbash.

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Page 14B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear EarthTalk: I couldnt believe my ears: genetically engineered mosquitoes?Ž Why on Earth would they be created? And I understand there are plans to release them into the wild? Marissa Abingdon Sumter, SC Yes its true, genetically engineered mosquitoes, which were bred in the lab to transmit a gene during the reproductive process that kills their offspring, have already been used on an experimental basis in three countries „ the Cayman Islands, Malaysia and Brazil „ to counteract the quickly spreading mosquitoborne viral infection dengue fever. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that as many as 100 million cases of humans infected with dengue fever „ which causes a severe ” u-like illness and can in certain instances be fatal „ occur annually in more than 100 tropical and sub-tropical countries. The British company behind the project, Oxitec, is focusing initially on dengue fever, given that the particular virus which causes it is only carried by one subspecies of mosquito. This makes the illness easier to target than malaria, for instance, which is carried by many different types of mosquitoes. Oxitec first released some of the genetically modified mosquitoes in the Cayman Island in the Caribbean in 2009, much to the surprise of the international community and environmental advocates, many of whom are opposed to genetic engineering in any of its forms due to the unknown and unintended side effects that unleashing transgenic organisms into the world could cause. In Brazil, where the largest experiments have been carried out to date, the government is backing a new facility designed to breed millions of genetically engineered mosquitoes to help keep dengue fever at bay. Dengue fever isnt considered to be a big problem in the U.S. as yet. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that most of the dengue fever cases showing up in the continental U.S. are among those who have travelled to sub-tropical and tropical areas of the world. Still, WHO reports that the incidence of dengue fever in the U.S. has increased some thirty-fold over the last half century. A proposal by Oxitec to test its transgenic mosquitoes in the Florida Keys has some locals upset. In April 2012, the town of Key West passed an ordinance prohibiting the release of the mosquitoes pending further testing on possible implications for the environment. In the meantime, Oxitec has applied to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a patent on their mosquito and permission to release them in the U.S. Some 80,000 people have signed onto a campaign on the Change.org website calling on the FDA to deny Oxitecs application. Mila de Mier, the Key West mother who launched the campaign, is concerned about the potential consequences of releasing an experimental organism on a delicate ecosystem. Oxitecs business goal is to sell genetically modi“ ed mosquitoes in the United States,Ž said de Mier. Weve already said we dont want these mosquitoes in our backyards, but Oxitec isnt listening.Ž More de“ nitive scienti“ c study is needed, she says, that looks at the long-term impacts. Dear EarthTalk: Commercial whaling was banned around the world years ago, but some nations continue to hunt whales. Why is this and whats being done about it? Jackie ONeill Hershey, PA Sadly for our world and its biodiversity, whales are still being killed despite an international ban on commercial whaling. Indeed, rampant whaling over the last two centuries has decimated just about every whale population around the globe. According to Greenpeace, many whale species are down to around one percent of their estimated former abundance before the days of commercial whaling. Fourteen whaling nations came together in 1946 to form the International Whaling Commission (IWC) to manage whale stocks and recommend hunting limits where appropriate. But the continuing decline of populations forced the IWC to call for an outright ban on all commercial whaling in 1986. Japan, Norway and Iceland continue to defy the ban, each harvesting hundreds if not more whales every year. The Japanese invented the concept of scienti“ c whaling in 1987 as a way around the moratorium on commercial whaling,Ž reports Greenpeace. Their research is not really research. It is an excuse for supplying whale meat on the Japanese market.Ž The research consists, among other things, of analysis of the contents of the digestive tract. The data on what the animals eat is then used to argue that whales eat too much commercially important fish and that the populations should be culled to save the “ sh, argues Greenpeace, and that the Japanese selectively release data on certain species and ignore data on others. Norway resumed whaling in 1993 as an attempt by the political party in power at the time to gain popularity in northern Norway,Ž says Greenpeace. And Iceland increased its whaling dramatically in recent years. In 2010 alone, Icelandic whalers killed hundreds of whales „ including endangered “ n whales „ and shipped more than 750 tons of whale meat and products to Japan, whose market is already glutted with whale meat from its own scienti“ c research whaling program,Ž reports the non-pro“ t Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). Several green groups including NRDC recently petitioned the Obama administration to take action against Iceland under the Pelly Amendment to the Fishermans Protective Act. The Amendment allows the President to impose trade sanctions against a country that is diminishing the effectiveness of a conservation agreement „ in Icelands case the whaling moratorium and another international treaty that prohibits trade in endangered species,Ž says NRDC. Greenpeace has been pressuring Japan to not only end its own whaling but also its support of whaling by other nations not abiding by the IWC moratorium. We are working around the world to increase the pressure put on Japan by conservation-minded governments at the IWC to close the political loopholes that allow the reckless hunt to continue,Ž says Greenpeace. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com.EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Genetically modi“ ed mosquitoes released to “ ght disease In a very controversial experiment, genetically engineered mosquitoes, which were bred to transmit a gene during the reproductive process that kills their offspring, have been used in three countries „ the Cayman Islands, Malaysia and Brazil „ to counteract the quickly spreading mosquito-borne viral infection dengue fever.PHOTO USDA e World Health Organization estimates that as many as 100 million cases of humans infected with dengue fever occur annually. A STRONG VOICEFOR OUR VALUESfor StateREPRESENTATIVEAJ SMITH A STRONG VOICEThe people of North Florida deserve a strong voice with strong values — someone who will stand up for our families and our way of life. Rising from the most humble of beginnings right here at home, A. J.’s legacy is one of fighting for the people of North Florida. Whether as a SWAT commander or as the co-founder of Cops for Kids, A. J. Smith is a leader who has devoted his career to defending our values and our families.A DECISION MAKERNorth Florida’s citizens deserve someone in Tallahassee who can make tough decisions. The ability to make wise decisions in difficult situations is something A. J. has learned to do in almost 30 years of serving people at the local and state level. A. J. Smith understands that now is a time to not only work hard, but to work smart.SMALL TOWN VALUESBeing raised in our district, and having worked most of my career locally, I understand the importance we hold for family and service to this country.FISCAL RESTRAINT, LOCAL CONTROLTallahassee does not understand what is best for us. With more budget cuts looming, we need someone who will stand up and say enough is enough. I will demand the state return local control to local leaders.RESPECT FOR FAMILY AND THE VALUE OF HARD WORKThis district’s citizens appreciate the value of a hard day’s work and a family to come home to. I have dedicated my life to protecting these needs, as well as being an active leader in building stronger families and giving back to our community.AJSmithCampaign.com facebook.com/AJSmithCampaign twitter.com/AJSmithCampaignPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by A.J. Smith, Democrat for State Representative, District 7. nd er st st an an ds ds t t ha ha t no w i s a ti me t o no t on l y wor k h ar d b u t t o wor k smar t l h /h ENDORSED BY THE FLORIDA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FLORIDA RETAIL FEDERATION.

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Section C THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012BACK TO SCHOOLWakulla County public schools are hosting their annual open houses for parents, guardians and students to attend. Students can “ nd out their teachers, schedules, bus routes, and requirements for many of their classes. Riversprings Middle School and Wakulla Middle School open houses are Monday, Aug. 13 from 4:30 p.m. until 7 p.m. Wakulla High Schools is from 5:30 until 8 p.m. the same day. € On Tuesday, Aug. 14, Wakulla Pre-K sites in Crawfordville and Sopchoppy will host open houses from 3 p.m. until 5 p.m. Elementary schools Crawfordville, Medart, Riversink, and Shadeville will have their open houses from 4:30 p.m. until 7 p.m. The “ rst day of school for students is Thursday, Aug. 16. It is an Early Release day in order to get students familiar with their travel routes and school schedules. Middle and high school students will be released around 12:15 p.m. Pre-K and elementary students will be “ nished around 1:15 p.m. BUS ROUTES Bus routes are posted on the district website, wakullaschooldistrict.org. They are also posted in Wal-Mart and are available at the open houses. The rst day of school is Thursday, Aug. 16Open houses will be held at the schools on Monday, Aug. 13, and Tuesday, Aug. 14COAST Charter School in St. Marks will hold its open house on Tuesday, Aug. 14, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The Charter School for Arts, Science and Technology serves students VPK-4 and grades Kindergarten through 8th grade. Bus transportation is available. For more information, call 925-6344. Wakulla Christian School is excited about the 201213 school year, which will begin Thursday, Aug. 16. Orientation will be held on Tuesday, Aug. 14, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. After a brief assembly in the auditorium, parents and students will then visit the classrooms to meet with their teachers. Enrollment is still open for students in 4K … 8th grade. WCS is an approved providers for the Step Up for Students Scholarship and 4K-VPK program. For more information or questions, please contact the school of“ ce at 926-5583.Coast Charter School Wakulla Christian Our Dad has always instilled in us, that our education is of the highest priority in our lives and he has worked hard to make sure that we have had the best education possible. As he is committed to our success, he will be COMMITTED TO THE SUCCESS of all students in our school district. His proven leadership and experience will allow our school district to maintain the recognition it deserves as a High Performing School District. Our Dad has:PROVEN LEADERSHIP, EXPERIENCE, and is COMMITTED TO SUCCESS OF ALL STUDENTS. ON AUGUST 14TH PLEASE VOTE FOR AND RE-ELECTOUR DAD, MIKE SCOTTSchool Board District 2 Paid Political Advertisement Approved by Mike Scott Campaign Fund, Non-Partisan Hello, I am Corban Scott an 11th grade student at Wakulla High School and I am Connor Scott a 7th grade student at Riversprings Middle School. 2nd Annual Landon Greene Memorial Scholarship CHARITY Golf Tournament Saturday Aug. 11, 2012 at 8:15 A.M.Hole Sponsors are $100 per holeAll Proceeds go to WAKULLA PRE-KFor more information or to sign up call Jared Greene (850-556-8982) or Amber Greene (850-556-6109) or email amber@famb.org. $220 Per Team (4 person team) or $55 per personThank You for Your Support!!! Donations can be made to Landon Greene Scholarship FundŽ via Cash or Check Mail to: 988 Wakulla Arran Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB, GOLF COURSE 3870 Coastal Hwy 98, Crawfordville, FL

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Page 2C – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comCRAWFORDVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL School day: 8:55 a.m. to 3:25 p.m. Angie Walker, Principal, angela. walker@wcsb.us Laura Kelley, Assistant Principal, laura.kelley@wcsb.us 379 Arran Road, Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850)926-3641 Fax: (850) 926-4304 Grades: K-5 MEDART ELEMENTARY SCHOOL School day: 8:55 a.m. to 3:25 p.m. Sharon Kemp, Principal, sharon. kemp@wcsb.us Belinda McElroy, Assistant Principal, belinda.mcelroy@wcsb.us 2558 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 962-4881 Fax: (850) 962-3953 Grades: K-5 RIVERSINK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL School day: 8:55 a.m. to 3:25 p.m. Jackie High, Principal, jackie. high@wcsb.us Melinda Young, Assistant Principal, melinda.young@wcsb.us 530 Lonnie Raker Lane, Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 926-2664 Fax: (850) 926-9462 Grades: K-5 SHADEVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL School day: 8:55 a.m. to 3:25 p.m. Susan Brazier, Principal, susan. brazier@wcsb.us Dee Ann Hughes, Assistant Principal, deeann.hughes@wcsb.us 45 Warrior Way, Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 926.7155 Fax: (850) 926.5044 Grades: K-5 RIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL School day: 7:40 a.m. to 2:25 p.m. Dod Walker, Principal, william. walker@wcsb.us Michele Baggett, Assistant Principal, sabrina.baggett@wcsb.us 800 Spring Creek Hwy., Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 926-2300 Fax: (850) 926-2111 Grades: 6-8 WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL School day: 7:40 a.m. to 2:20 p.m. Mike Barwick, Principal, michael.barwick@wcsb.us Tolar Grif n, Assistant Principal, tolar.grif n@wcsb.us 22 Jean Drive, Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 926-7143 Fax: (850) 926-3752 Grades: 6-8 WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL School day: 7:40 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mike Crouch, Principal, michael.crouch@wcsb.us Sunny Chancy, Assistant Principal, sunny.chancy@wcsb.us Simeon Nelson, Assistant Principal, simeon.nelson@wcsb.us 3237 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 926-7125 Fax: (850) 926-8571 Grades: 9-12 SOPCHOPPY EDUCATION CENTER Tom Askins, Principal/Site Administrator, thomas.askins@wcsb. us 164 Yellow Jacket Ave., Sopchoppy FL 32358 Phone: (850) 962-2151 Fax: (850) 962-1005 Multi Purpose Campus Dropout Programs – Second Chance Alternative High School Pre-Kindergarten Program Adult/Community Education WAKULLA EDUCATION CENTER PRE-K CENTER School day: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Kim Dutton, Principal/Site Administrator, kimberly.dutton@ wcsb.us 87 Andrew Hargrett Sr. Road, Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 926-8111 Fax: (850) 926-1964 Multi Purpose Campus Pre-Kindergarten ProgramSchoolsWelcome back to all Wakulla students for the 2012-13 school year. e teachers, administrators and sta are all looking forward to seeing our returning students and to welcoming the new ones to our system in pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, and other grades where students have just moved into our school district. I look forward to another successful year with the best students, parents, and educators in the state. e teamwork we have contributes to making our school system one of the best in Florida and in the nation. Wakulla County School District was the only school district in the Big Bend that earned an AŽ rating for 2011-12 in the combined areas of Reading, Math, Writing and Science. We are proud to keep our AŽ designation for the seventh year in a row. Wakulla was also one of 19 districts named an Academically High Performing DistrictŽ for 2011-12. is means that in addition to earning an AŽ rating, we met the Class Size requirement and had a good “ nancial audit outcome. I am con“ dent that we will continue this tradition of excellence in 2012-13. In addition, the Wakulla County School System very successfully passed its district-wide accreditation for all public schools from prekindergarten through grade 12 in 2011-12. Accreditation is vital to a school district and its community so that a high level of education is maintained, plus only a diploma from an accredited high school is accepted by accredited colleges and universities. e involvement from our parents and community makes Wakulla a special place to teach our children. With such a value placed on education and a motto of Committed to Success,Ž we hope that 2012-13 is your best year yet. Sincerely, David Miller Superintendent, Wakulla County SchoolsWelcome back from Superintendent of Schools David Miller Tallahassee Community College The College of Choice # 1 transfer college to neighboring Florida State University In-state tuition and fees under $100 per credit hour TCC is a smart investment for students planning to transfer to a university or advance directly into the workforce.www.GoToTCC.com | (850) 201-TCC1 TCC is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access campus. Visit www.tcc..edu for full statement. announcingTCCs new location at the Centennial Bank building is opening for Fall classesJoin us at our new location for testing, advising and registration:August 14 and 15 from 3-5 p.m. August 21 and 22 from 4-6 p.m.2932 Crawfordville Highway Find out more details at:www.tcc.fl.edu/Wakullaor call 922-2416

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 3CSpecial to The NewsWhen the “ rst bell rings at the start of school on Thursday, Aug. 16, Wakulla County classrooms will be staffed with educators at a fill rate of 100 percent throughout the district. Although the economy of our state and nation still face a number of challenges, and employee workloads continue to increase with unfunded state mandates, the Wakulla County School District continues to thrive as a high performing school district,Ž said Superintendent of Schools David Miller. We just recently received our 7th consecutive A school district designation from Florida DOE, the only A district in the Big Bend,Ž Miller said. There has been unprecedented change in public education in Florida,Ž he added. We have experienced more policy changes in the last nine months (in education) than weve seen in 10 years. Florida is one of 45 states that have adopted Common Core Standards … a set of educational benchmarks that will prepare students for college and career.Ž Human Resources Executive Director Karen Wells adds, In light of the changes and to help ease the transition for Wakullas newest teachers, all new hires attended two days of New Educator Boot Camp the “ rst of August. Each new educator also has an assigned peer teacher/mentor who will assist with the acclimation and acculturation at their school site. Throughout the “ rst semester, New Educator seminars are provided with topics including ethics, progress monitoring, classroom management, recognizing indicators of child abuse and learning dif“ culties and assistive technology.Ž Twenty-two new teachers have been hired to date for the 2012-13 school year as a result of retirements, relocations, and resignations. Sixty-two percent of new instructional hires were from those who were already serving as a paraprofessional, as a substitute teacher, in a time-limited position or as an intern. Of the new teachers hired, 45 percent are secondary school teachers and 86 percent are Wakulla residents. Eighteen additional classi“ ed positions were also “ lled including, school bus drivers, custodians, food service workers, and paraprofessionals. Because of the positive reputation of our school district, we maintain a rich pool of applicants for all positions.,Ž Wells said. We continually attract strong quali“ ed applicants.Ž The New Educator Boot Camp was facilitated by veteran teachers Cindy Loney and Mollie Robinson. Topics such as Floridas Educator Accomplished Practices, classroom management, ethics, the “ rst day of school, lesson planning, technology, constructive criticism and instructional strategies were included in the training. When asked what they are most excited about as the opening day of school approaches, most new educators responded with meeting my students and building relationships with themŽ and teaching in Wakulla County.Ž The positive energy from the new hires was evident even in orientation,Ž Wells said. Over and over again, we heard (comments such as): € I wanted to be a part of this spectacular team. € Wakulla is an excellent district with a kids “ rstŽ attitude and a desire to see every student succeed. € I heard that Wakulla was a great district to work for and that the students are a pleasure to teach. €  I grew up in Wakulla and now I want to give back. € Wakulla County has wonderful schools, amazing teachers and awesome students. € I moved here so that my children would have the chance to be a part of a world-class school district.Ž A quick glimpse at the new teachers by school site follows: MEDART ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Lindsey Pafford (5th Grade Teacher) Her hometown is Crawfordville. She enjoys spending time with her family and friends, going to the beach, reading, “ shing, and boating. She graduated from Florida State University with a major in Elementary Education. Deana Davis (3rd grade teacher) Her hometown is Crawfordville. Deana graduated from Flagler College with a degree in Elementary Education and ESE Education She enjoys reading, baking, and being a baseball mom. Jill Prisco ( 4th grade teacher) Jill comes to Wakulla from St. Lucie County. She graduated from Florida Atlantic University with a degree in Elementary Education. She is a National Board Certi“ ed Teacher. Her interests include traveling, bike riding, and spending time with her family. Kendall Watson (5th Grade Teacher) Her hometown is Norfolk, Va. She earned a bachelors degree from University of West Florida. Interests include cooking and spending time on the water. RIVERSINK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Lauren Miller (Kindergarten teacher) Her hometown is Crawfordville. Married to Casey and has one daughter, Emma. She enjoys spending time with her family, “ shing, hunting and gardening. She graduated with a major in Education from Flagler College. Amber Boutwell (Kindergarten teacher) Her hometown is Marietta, Ga. She graduated from Flagler College with a degree in Elementary Education. Amber enjoys spending time outdoors with her family, cooking, and scrapbooking. Jessica Yarbrough (ESE Teacher) Her home is Wakulla. She earned a bachelors degree in Elementary Education and ESE Education. Jessica enjoys running, kayaking, watching FSU football, and spending time with family and friends. SHADEVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Continued on next pageNew teachers set for the first day of schoolLindsey Pafford Deana Davis Jill Prisco Kendall Watson Lauren Miller Amber Boutwell Jessica Yarbrough Meagan Thurmond ENROLL NOW!CALL 925-6344 2012-2013 REGISTRATION OPENINGS AVAILABLE Serving VPK-4 Full Day at no cost Grades K-8 Free Public School & VPK Strong Academic Support Serving Leon and Wakulla County Students Butter”y Gardens Junior Garden Club National School Lunch Program Free or Reduced Breakfast & Lunch WAKULLAS COAST CHARTER SCHOOL48 Shell Island Rd. P.O. Box 338 St. Marks, FL. 32355Open House August 14, 2012 5 to 7 PM Wakulla’s C.O.A.S.T. Charter School… A Winning Team! August 10th from 5:00 – 7:00pm (No appt. necessary) August 14th from 1:00 – 4:00pm (Appt. only) August 15th from 2:00 – 4:00pm (No appt. necessary) August 16th from 8:30 – 11:30am and 2:00 – 4:00pm. (No appt necessary)• Must bring copy of child’s immunization record* • For more information please call 850-926-0400 The Wakulla County Health Department, 48 Oak Street, will be providing Back to School Immunizations for student’s kindergarten – 12th grade on the following dates: LETS DO THIS TOGETHER! DO YOU WANT IT?Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN GET YOU MOTIVATED! 850 926-2312 Mon-Thurs 3 11p.m. Fri & Sat 11a.m. Midnight Sun 11a.m. 11p.m. CALL NOW! 1 1BUY ONE GET FREE mon & tueBuy any large at menu price get one of equal or lesser value Free! Beat the Clock WednesdaysTHE TIME YOU CALL IS THE PRICE YOU PAYfor a LARGE 1-Topping Pizza 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays Call at 5:07 p.m. and pay $5.07! Plus Tax. Not Valid with other offers or specials. Drivers carry less than $20. Delivery Charges may apply. Expires 12/31/12. Any Way up to 5 Toppings TWO LARGE PIZZAS1 for 2 for (Add $1. for Rock Pile. No Double Portions) Plus Tax. Not Valid with other offers or specials. Drivers carry less than $20. Delivery Charges may apply. Expires 12/31/12. Carry Out Special One topping pizza Medium Large Plus Tax. Not Valid with other offers or specials. Drivers carry less than $20. Delivery Charges may apply. Expires 12/31/12. Family FeastTwo Large 2 Topping Pizzas, 10 Chicken Wings, Bread Side Item, 2-Liter Soda & Garden Fresh Salad or Caesar Salad Plus Tax. Not Valid with other offers or specials. Drivers carry less than $20. Delivery Charges may apply. Expires 12/31/12. 2+2+2 Deal Two med two topping pizzas and two liter of soda Plus Tax. Not Valid with other offers or specials. Drivers carry less than $20. Delivery Charges may apply. Expires 12/31/12.One Large Any Way Pizza with up to 5 Toppings One Order of Wings & One Bread Side Plus Tax. Not Valid with other offers or specials. Drivers carry less than $20. Delivery Charges may apply. Expires 12/31/12. 12 2 3 4 5$1199 $2000 $499 $599$2899 $1499 $1999or 27 C Azalea Dr., Crawfordville FL Any Way Package & 10 Wings School Meal PricesDaily Lunch Price Pre-K & Elementary: Full Pay $2.10, Reduce $.40 Middle & High School: Full Pay $2.35, Reduce $.40 Daily Breakfast Price Pre-K & Elementary: Full Pay $1.35, Reduce $.30(Breakfast not provided at middle & high school)

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Meagan Thurmond (3rd grade teacher) Hometown is Crawfordville. Earned a bachelors degree in Psychology and Child Development. She enjoys spending time with family and friends, shopping, and traveling. Jenny Duggar (Speech Pathologist) Her hometown is Crawfordville. She earned a masters degree in Speech Language Pathology from Florida State University. She loves FSU football and baseball. Elena Myhre (Shadeville/Medart Art Teacher) Her home is Wakulla. She has a Masters in Fine Arts from Florida State University. Elena enjoys all art, art history, baseball, hunting, “ shing, and golf. She is married to Rick and they have one son, Bobby. WAKULLA PRE-K Tina Fleming (Pre-K Teacher) Hometown Headland, Ala. A Troy State and FSU graduate who enjoys kayaking, sailing, hiking and playing tennis. She is married to James Fleming and has one son, Russell. Whitnee Wood (Pre-K Teacher) … Hometown Tallahassee. She earned her degree from Flagler College. Whitnee enjoys shopping, running, and FSU Football. RIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL Terri Brooks (8th grade language arts) Terris hometown is Titusville. She is a graduate of Florida State University. Interests include reading, cycling, Bible studies, and gardening. SOPCHOPPY EDUCATIONAL CENTER Brenda Eaton (Second chance teacher) Brendas hometown is Hookdale, Ill. A graduate of Eastern Illinois University and Greenville College. Her interests include gardening, reading, cooking, learning to knit, and watching her youngest daughter play softball. WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL Farrah Donaldson (English EBD Teacher) … His hometown is Crawfordville. A graduate of FSU. He enjoys writing, sports and “ shing. Served as a paraprofessional at WHS last school year. Freebeau Swindle (Carpentry Teacher) … His hometown is Crawfordville and he is an FSU graduate. He enjoys water skiing, wake boarding, wrestling, “ shing and scuba diving. A lifelong War Eagle. Susan Bistrican (English Teacher) … Originally from St. Petersburg. A graduate of Syracuse University and FSU. She enjoys reading, writing and taking care of her cats. Sara Lovestrand (Math Teacher) … Attended and graduated from Wakulla High School, Chipola College and Florida Southern College. She enjoys softball and church activities. Continued on next page Page 4C – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Elena Myhre Farrah Doonaldson Susan Bistrican Brianna Fordham Brenda Eaton Whitnee Wood Sara Lovestrand Freebeau Swindle Terri Brooks Tina Fleming Jenny Duggar New teachers set for the first day of school Our After School hours are: Monday Friday from 3 pm to 9pm.We are open daily: MondayThursday 3 PM 9 PM, Friday and Saturday 12 PM 11 PM and Sunday 1 PM 8 PM Parents will have to meet us at our location to register. We are located at 635 BWakulla Arran Road Children will have to get off at the bus stop on the corner of the store and will be picked up by staff.facebook.comjGamerZParadiseFor more information please call us at (850) 926-9100. We look forward to serving our schools and the Crawfordville/Wakulla County community! Find us onFacebook “Jet Cadets... ying high for Christ!” Providence Christian AcademyA Ministry of Central Baptist ChurchGrades K-12 Enroll Today! Call today to schedule an appointment.(850) 926-2456, 926-1326, or 933-0046 710 Shadeville Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327Providence Christian Academy grades K-12 with small pupil-to-staff ratio fully-funded scholarships hrist!” r r r r i r r r r i r r r r r r i r i i r r r r r r r r r ist i i ris r r ri ri i i i is t! !” t! ” r at i o ratio ointment. o in ntm in n t m tm en e n t nt. t 3 3-004 6 ville FL 32327 Michelle Snow School of Music926-7627Welcomes You Back to SchoolLessons of all types... For ALL AGES.Toddler/Pre-School Introduction to Music Starts Friday, September 7 NOW OFFERING Private/Small Group Music Therapywww.MichelleSnowSchoolOfMusic.com Coastal Hwy. 98, Medart CALL TODAY! MELISA TAYLOR OWNER/OPERATOR926-21791616 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. SUITE-C NORTH POINTE CENTERK 5Intro to new Skills Individual Tutoring Improve Reading & Math Skills…Homework Help… Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 5CNew teachers set for the first day of schoolBriana Fordham (Math Teacher) A Wakulla native, she graduated from TCC and Flagler College. She always dreamed of becoming a teacher. She enjoys playing and coaching softball. WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL Lindsay Sparkman (Uni“ ed Arts Teacher) Her hometown is Sopchoppy and she is an FSU graduate. She is a talented musician and is married to Troy. Priscilla Tucker (Algebra/Science Teacher) Her hometown is Sylvester, Ga. and she is a graduate of Georgia Southwestern. She is married to Bo and has three children Aleyah, Lane and Jack. Her hobbies include diving and spear “ shing. Alexandra Kauffman (Language Arts Teacher) Originally from Wakulla County, she is a graduate of FSU with a major in creative writing. Lindsay Sparkman Priscilla Tucker Alexandra Kauffman PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBOOT CAMP FOR NEW RECRUITS : New Wakulla educators participated in two days of New Teacher Boot Camp Aug. 1 and Aug. 2 to prepare for their “ rst day of school. e camp was facilitated by veteran teachers Cindy Loney and Mollie Robinson. E CALL TODAY! MELISA TAYLOR OWNER/OPERATOR926-21791616 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. SUITE-C NORTH POINTE CENTERGrades 6-8Intro to New Skills Study Skills & Organization Courses FCAT Prep Intro to Algebra 1 Algebra 1 EOC Prep

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Page 6C – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comFrom Florida DOEParents and Students: Please discuss these safety tips together and be sure to follow them: € Discuss and practice the safest way to get to and from school or the assigned school bus stop. € Never run out into the street or cross between parked cars. At the School Bus Stop: Arrive at the bus stop about “ ve minutes before the bus is scheduled to arrive. € Follow instructions from your bus driver or the school district about where to wait at your assigned bus stop. € Wait in a safe place away from the road. € Do not run and play while waiting for the bus to arrive. € Never sit on the roadway while waiting for your bus. € Never speak to strangers at the bus stop and never get into the car with a stranger. Always tell your parents, the bus driver, or another responsible adult as soon as possible if a stranger tries to talk to you or pick you up. Loading or Unloading from the Bus: As the bus is approaching, watch for the red ” ashing lights and the stop arms to extend. € When the bus stops, wait for the drivers signal that it is safe to cross the road or board the bus. € If crossing the street, look left, right, and left again. When the driver signals that it is safe, walk at least 12 feet in front of the bus where the driver can see you. € Never walk behind the school bus. € Never run after the bus. € Hold the handrail while going up and down the stairs. € Go directly to your bus seat and remain seated during the entire ride. € Exit the bus only at your assigned bus stop. € If you drop something near the bus, tell the bus driver. Never try to pick it up “ rst, because the driver may not be able to see you. € Parents or guardians of small children should wait with them in the morning and meet them at the bus stop in the afternoon. Riding in the School Bus: Keep hands, arms, and head inside bus. € Always buckle up properly if your school bus has safety belts. € Stay in your seat and obey the driver. € Remain seated at all times and keep the aisle clear. € Stop talking and remain silent when the bus comes to a railroad crossing so the driver can hear if a train is approaching. € Avoid any loud or disruptive behavior that could distract the bus driver from safely operating the bus. € Be courteous and respectful to your driver. Safely getting you to and from school is a tremendous responsibility that the driver takes very seriously. Motorists: Please exercise patience and caution, especially around children and school buses. Follow these safety practices: € When approaching a school bus that is stopped with its red lights ” ashing and its stop arms extended, motorists are required to STOP in nearly every instance. For more information on Floridas school bus stop law and penalties, go to www.FloridaSchoolBusSafety.gov. € Be alert and watch for children at all times, but especially near schools, bus stops, school buses, and in school parking lots. € Obey all traf“ c laws and speed limits, paying extra attention to the lower speed limits in school zones. € Do not pass other vehicles in school zones or at crosswalks. € Do not change lanes or make U-turns in school zones. € Watch for and obey signals from school crossing guards. € Do not text or use a cell phone while driving. € Only drive or park in authorized areas to drop off or pick up children at school. (ARA) … The back to school season can be bittersweet. Parents may miss having their youngsters around the house when summer of“ cially ends, but its also fun for parents to watch kids partake in all that school has to offer. One of the things few parents look forward come the end of summer vacation is back-to-school shopping. Such shopping can be costly, especially when its time to out“ t kids with new wardrobes. While a complete wardrobe overhaul might not be necessary, kids typically need to replace a few items theyve outgrown since the start of summer break. There are several ways parents can save on backto-school clothes. € Get a head start. Parents can save themselves some money by shopping early for their childrens back-to-school wardrobes. Though kids may experience a growth spurt during the summer, shop for items, like socks, that they arent likely to grow out of before the back-to-school season begins. This affords you time to comparison shop and spread out the cost of replacing your childs wardrobe instead of being hit with one big bill all at once. € Establish a budget. Without a budget, its easy for parents to overspend on back-to-school clothing, especially for those parents who wait until the last minute and simply buy the “ rst things they see. Establish a budget, ideally several weeks before your childs “ rst day of school. Having a budget in place reduces the likelihood that you will overspend, and developing the budget early helps you spread out your spending. € Shop at consignment stores. Consignment stores offer name-brand clothing at discounted prices, something parents of ever-growing youngsters can appreciate. Kids will like the name-brand gear, while Moms and Dads will enjoying not having to pay name-brand prices. A consignment store with significant inventory might sell anything from blue jeans and T-shirts to sneakers, shoes and jackets. € Swap clothes with other families. Clothing swaps between families have grown increasingly popular as more and more parents look to save money on rising clothing costs for their kids. Typically, families will swap clothes, including jackets, if their kids are similar in age and one youngster has outgrown his or her clothes. If you cant “ nd a family to swap with, visit your local community center or church to see if it has a clothing swap program. € Shop discount stores. If the local consignment store has already been raided, consider a discount store like Marshalls or TJ Maxx. These stores typically sell items at heavily discounted prices and often have similar inventories to mall department stores. € Shop online. A relatively new way for parents to save on back to school clothing is to shop online. A popular stores Web site might offer discounts that their brick-and-mortar store does not. Parents can also scour a host of coupon Web sites to “ nd special codes they can use at checkout. These codes might offer free shipping or a percentage off the bill when consumers spend a certain amount of money. School bus safety tips Some tips to save on back-to-school clothes shopping Parents can visit department store Web sites to “ nd great deals on back to school clothing for their kids.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS FILE PHOTO South East Eye Specialists Sagar Amin, O.D. Eye ExaminationsGlasses-Contact Lenses Walk-ins Welcome, Appointments Recommended 926-9213 2140 Crawfordville Hwy. Monday Friday 8:30-5 Most Insurance Plans Accepted Now accepting Care Credit on qualified purchases BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL Selection of frames up to $129 with prescription lenses, polycarbonate and service agreement for $149 Save up to $98 TRINITY LUTHERAN PRESCHOOLContinuously providing a high quality Christian early learning program for more than two decades NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for 2012-2013 VPK AND 3KFull and Part-time C o Call (850) 926-5557 for information and to enroll your childLocated on Coastal Highway across from Wakulla High School 850-274-8000 Modern Communications Modern CommunicationsNEXT TO EL JALISCOS2481 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY.CRAWFORDVILLE NATIONWIDE PRE-PAID UNLIMITED TALK/UNLIMITED TEXT U NLIMITED TALK & TEXT $4000 PER MO DATA CHARGES MAY APPLY

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 7CJuly 4 Independence Day Holiday August 9 Pre-Planning (10 & 9 1/2 Month Personnel) 10 Staff Development Day 16 Students & Nine Month Personnel Return/ Early Release September 3 Labor Day Holiday 26 Early Release for Staff Development October 18 End of 1st Nine Weeks 19 Teacher Planning Day 26 Report Cards Issued 31 Early Release for Staff Development November 12 Veterans’ Day Holiday 21-23 Thanksgiving Holidays December 20 Early Release Day/End of 2nd Nine Weeks/ End of Semester 1 21 Christmas Holidays Begin January 7 Teacher Planning Day/10 & 9 1/2 Month Personnel Return 8 Students & 9 Month Personnel Return 14 Report Cards Issued 21 Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday 30 Early Release for Staff Development February 18 Presidents’ Day Holiday (10, 9 1/2 & 9 mo.) March 14 End of 3rd Nine Weeks 15 Teacher Planning Day 18-22 Spring Break 29 Report Cards Issued May 27 Memorial Day Holiday 30 Semester Exams/Early Release 31 Semester Exams/Early Release/End of 4th Nine Weeks/ End of Semester 2/GRADUATION June 3 Post Planning 4 Post Planning 12 MONTH PERSONNEL HOLIDAYS Independence Day 7/4 Labor Day 9/3 Veterans’ Day 11/12 Thanksgiving 11/21-23 Christmas 12/24, 12/25 New Year’s 12/31, 1/1 Martin L. King, Jr. 1/21 Memorial Day 5/27 PAID TEACHER HOLIDAYS Labor Day Holiday 9/3 Veterans’ Day 11/12 Thanksgiving 11/22 Christmas 12/25 New Year’s 1/1 Martin L. King Jr. 1/21 EARLY RELEASE FIRST DAY: 8/16 EARLY RELEASE STAFF DEVELOPMENT: 9/26, 10/31, 1/30 EARLY RELEASE FOR CHRISTMAS BREAK: 12/20 EXAM EARLY RELEASE DAYS: 5/30, 5/31 TEACHER PLANNING: 10/19, 1/7, 3/15 STAFF DEVELOPMENT: 8/10Wakulla County School CalendarFrom Florida DOEThe 2012-13 school year kicked off Aug. 7 in Florida with seven of the states 67 school districts beginning classes. Charlotte County leads the way by opening then, with Brevard, Citrus, Lee, Nassau, and Walton counties beginning Aug. 8, and Sumter County on Aug. 9. A new school year is always exciting and brings the promise of high expectations,Ž said Commissioner of Education Gerard Robinson. Florida teachers and district leaders have done phenomenal work increasing student achievement and I am con“ dent they will continue to build on that success in the coming year. My wish for the new school year is for a healthy, safe, and productive environment that gives students the opportunity to excel.Ž For a complete list of Floridas public school district opening and closing dates, see the 2012-13 School District Calendar. The beginning of the school year also brings a reminder of school bus safety. According to a survey conducted earlier this year, more than 21,000 motorists illegally passed stopped school buses on one day in April. By learning about and observing school bus safety laws, citizens can help keep children safe while they travel to and from school on the yellow school bus.Florida School Districts begin the school year Special to The NewsParents of students who prefer to bring their own lunches from home may be left wondering how they can create healthy lunches their kids will eat. Considering school lunches must compete with far less healthy yet widely available alternatives, parents will need to be creative in “ xing homemade lunches. Here are some ideas to get you started. € Purchase a new lunch container. There are many different new and innovative lunch containers that can make separating school lunches easy. Few kids want to dig into a brown paper sack and pull out something that has been so squashed its unrecognizable. Partitioned lunch boxes enable you to pack different items together where they can be stored separately. The divisions also help you remember to include foods from the basic food groups, such as a fruit, vegetable, protein, starch and dairy item. € Have your child make a list of his or her favorite foods. Once the list has been made, see how you can make the foods healthier. For example, if chicken nuggets make the list, prepare your own nuggets with white meat chunks that are baked, not fried. € Get creative. Children may not be inclined to eat loose pieces of fruit. But if the fruit is stuck on skewers or served with a low-fat dipping sauce or caramel, it may look more appealing. Look to miniŽ foods, which tend to be more fun as well. Little sandwiches and little burgers may present an optical illusion, where kids think theyre eating only a small amount, but actually its a full serving. € Hide healthy foods within others. There are entire recipe books that teach you how to mix fruits and vegetables into desserts to increase nutritive value. Everything from spinach to tofu to beets have been included in items like cake, cookies and brownies. € Cut foods into fun shapes. Kids may be more inclined to eat a turkey and cheese sandwich if its cut into star shapes or their favorite cartoon characters. Invest in a few cookie cutters so that lunchtime becomes fun time. € Dont let the time of day dictate what you serve. As long as kids are eating healthy items, it doesnt matter when they eat them. If a child loves bagels, choose whole wheat bagels and add an egg on top for a nutritious lunch. Serve with a gelatin dessert that contains chunks of fruit and low-fat milk, and youre set.How to make healthy school lunches WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Announces its policy for Free and Reduced-Price Meals for students under theNATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH AND BREAKFAST PROGRAMSAny interested person may review a copy of the policy by contacting Gail Mathers, Director, School Food Service,Wakulla School Board Administrative Of ce,69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, (850) 926-0065. Household size and income criteria will be used to determine eligibility. An applica on can not be approved unless it contains complete eligibility informa on. Once approved, meal bene ts are good for an en re year. You need not no fy the organiza on of changes in income and household size. Applica on forms are being sent to all homes with a le er to parents or guardians. To apply for Free or Reduced-Price Meals, households must complete the applica on and return it to the school. Addi onal copies are available at the principal’s o ce in each school. The informa on provided on the applica on will be used for the purpose of determining eligibility and may be veri ed at any me during the school year. Applica ons may be submi ed at any me during the year. Households that receive SNAP (Supplemental Nutri on Assistance Program) or TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) are required to list on the applica on only the child’s name, SNAP/ TANF case number, and signature of adult household member. Foster children will receive free bene ts regardless of the child’s personal income or the income of the household. Households with children who are considered migrants, homeless, or runaway should contact the district liaison Tanya English at (850)926-0065. For the purpose of determining household size, deployed service members are considered a part of the household. Families should include the names of the deployed service members on their applica on. Report only that por on of the deployed service member’s income made available to them or on their behalf to the family. Addi onally, a housing allowance that is part of the Military Housing Priva za on Ini a ve is not to be included as income. All other households must provide the following informa on listed on the applica on: Total household income listed by gross amount received, type of income (e.g., wages, child • support, etc.) and how o en the income is received by each household member; Names of all household members – check the “no income” box if applicable; if household • member is a child, list school name for each; Signature of an adult household member cer fying the informa on provided is correct; and• Social security number of the adult signing the applica on or the word “NONE” for this house-• hold member if he or she does not have a social security number. If a household member becomes unemployed or if the household size changes, the school should be contacted. Children of parents or guardians who become unemployed should also contact the school. Under the provisions of the Free and Reduced-Price meal policy the Director of Food Service will review applications and determine eligibility. If a parent or guardian is dissatis ed with the ruling of the of cial, he or she may wish to discuss the decision with the determining of cial on an informal basis. If the parent wishes to make a formal appeal, he or she may make a request either orally or in writing to Randy Beach, Chief Financial Of cer, P. O. Box 100, Crawfordville, FL 32326, (850) 926-0065. Unless indicated otherwise on the application, the information on the Free and Reduced-Price Meal application may be used by the school system in determining eligibility for other educational programs. FLORIDA INCOME ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR FREE AND REDUCED-PRICE MEALS E ec ve from July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013 FREE MEAL SCALE Household Size AnnualMonthlyTwice Per Month Every Two Weeks Weekly 114,5211,211606559280 219,6691,640820757379 324,8172,0691,035955478 429,9652,4981,2491,153577 535,1132,9271,4641,351676 640,2613,3561,6781,549775 745,4093,7851,8931,747874 850,5574,2142,1071,945973For each addi onal family member, add5,14842921519899 REDUCED-PRICE MEAL SCALE Household Size AnnualMonthlyTwice Per Month Every Two Weeks Weekly 120,6651,723862795398 227,9912,3331,1671,077539 335,3172,9441,4721,359680 442,6433,5541,7771,641821 549,9694,1652,0831,922961 657,2954,7752,3882,2041,102 764,6215,3862,6932,4861,243 871,9475,9962,9982,7681,384For each addi onal family member, add7,326611306282141To determine annual income: If you receive the income every week, mul ply the total gross income by 52. • If you receive the income every two weeks, mul ply the total gross income by 26. • If you receive the income twice a month, mul ply the total gross income by 24. • If you receive the income monthly, mul ply the total gross income by 12. • Remember: The total income before taxes, social security, health bene ts, union dues, or other deduc ons must be reported. “In accordance with Federal Law, and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this ins tu on is prohibited from discrimina ng on the basis of race, color, na onal origin, sex, age, or disability. To le a complaint of discrimina on write USDA, Director, O ce of Adjudica on, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call toll free (866) 632-9992 (Voice). Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabili es may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339; or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.” Anyone interested in coaching any of the youth sports are encouraged to contact WPRD at 926-7227. All volunteer coaches are required and subjected to a Florida Department of Law Enforcement Criminal history background check to ensure the safety of our youth participants.SATURDAY 8/11/12 and SATURDAY 8/18/12 8:00 am TO 12:00 NOON SATURDAY 8/18/12, 12:00 PM MEDART RECREATION PARK OFF US 98 SEPTEMBER 1st FOR ALL SPORTSExample: A participant must turn 5 before September 1, 2012 in order to be eligible to participate, NO EXCEPTIONS.WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT2012 FALL SPORTS REGISTRATION REGISTRATION DATES: REGISTRATION TIMES: REGISTRATION DEADLINE: REGISTRATION PLACE: AGE DETERMINING DATE: 1. FLAG FOOTBALL: AGES … 5 … 7 DIVISION AND 8 … 10 DIVISION COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD. Player must be 5 prior to 9/1/12 to be eligible.2. TACKLE FOOTBALL BANTAM DIVISION … AGES 6 … 8. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 90 LBS. MAXPEE WEE DIVISION … AGES 9 … 11. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 145 LBS. MAX JUNIOR DIVISION … AGES 12 … 14. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 170 LBS. MAXCOST FOR TACKLE FOOTBALL IS $85.00 PER CHILD A COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED. 3. TACKLE CHEERLEADING BANTAM DIVISION … AGES 5 … 8 PEE WEE DIVISION … AGES 9-11 COST FOR TACKLE CHEERLEADING IS $45.00 PER CHILD (Includes shirt and pom poms) A COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED.All players must provide proof of health insurance or purchase a policy for $10.00. For more information contact WCPRD at 926-7227 or our web page at www.WCPRD.com CALL TODAY! MELISA TAYLOR OWNER/OPERATOR926-21791616 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. SUITE-C NORTH POINTE CENTERGrades 9-12Study Skills & Organization Courses ACT & SAT Prep FCAT Prep College Admissions Consulting Algebra 1, Geometry, Biology EOC PrepIndividual or Small Group Tutoring available in all subjects

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Page 8C – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com A: Striped pajamas. What do you call an elephant that flies?A: A jumbo jet.What do tigers wear to bed? Jokes and Riddles Q : Q : List 10 words that rhyme with “zoo.” 1. ____________ 2. ____________ 3. ____________ 4. ____________ 5. ___________ 6. ____________ 7. ____________ 8. ___________ 9. ____________ 10. ___________What Rhymes with…Some answers: blue, boo, coo, do, goo, lieu, moo, pooh, too, who 1) You should follow all of the rules posted. Fact or Fiction?2) If you see an animal that looks lonely, you should give it a toy. Fact or Fiction?3) If you see an animal that looks friendly, you should pet it. Fact or Fiction?4) You should wash your hands after touching any animal. Fact or Fiction?5) If you can’t get an animal’s attention, you should knock on its cage or toss a rock at it. Fact or Fiction?6) If you see an animal trying to get out of its pen, you should help it. Fact or Fiction?7) If you see animals fighting, you should climb into their pen and make them stop. Fact or Fiction?8) If you see an animal that looks hungry, you should give it some food. Fact or Fiction?9) You should eat only in areas set aside at the zoo for eating. Fact or Fiction?10) You should toss your leftovers to any birds wandering around the zoo. Fact or Fiction?Fact or Fiction?Zoo Rules Challenge Zoos are fun to go to, as long as you follow the rules. Here are some questions about zoo rules. How many can you answer correctly?Answers: 1) Fact, 2)Fiction, the animal could try to eat the toy and choke on it, 3) Fiction, you could get bitten, 4) Fact, 5) Fiction, you could irritate or hurt the animal, 6) Fiction, you could get bitten and should tell an adult instead, 7) Fiction, you could get attacked and should tell an adult instead, 8) Fiction, you could get bitten, 9) Fact, 10) Fiction, some foods aren’t good for birds COLORING PICTURE 1) S __ A K __ S2) B __ __ R S3) L __ __ N S4) B __ R __ S5) G I __ A __ __ E S6) M __ N K __ Y S7) H I __ __ O SName That AnimalZoos are home to many animals. Fill in the blanks to name some of the animals found at a zoo. Answers: 1) Snakes, 2) Bears, 3) Lions, 4) Birds, 5) Giraffes, 6) Monkeys, 7) Hippos In the late 1700s, America didn’t have any zoos. Anytime an exotic animal like a tiger or elephant was put on display, however, people would pay to see it. This gave Dr. William Camac in Philadelphia the idea to create a zoo. Camac and others worked hard to get a zoo up and running in Philadelphia. First, they created the Zoological Society of Philadelphia in the 1850s. The Civil War soon started after that, however, and the society would not get the zoo open until July 1, 1874. Over 3,000 people visited the Philadelphia Zoo that day. Adults paid a quarter to get in, and children, a dime. At the time, the zoo had 813 animals. Today the zoo has over 1,300 animals and a million visitors each year. America’s First America’s First This page sponsored in part by:

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 9C 1. LANGUAGE: What does the Greek prefix “crypto” mean? 2. MEASUREMENTS: If the outside temperature is 10 degrees on the Celsius scale, what temperature is it on the Fahrenheit scale? 3. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: The Julian calendar was named for whom? 4. ASTRONOMY: What is perihelion? 5. CHEMISTRY: What is the symbol for the element magnesium? 6. LAW: Legally speaking, what does a testament do? 7. GEOGRAPHY: What modern-day country is in an area known in ancient times as Lusitania? 8. MEDICINE: What disease is caused by deficiency of vitamin A? 9. LITERATURE: Who wrote the novel “The Swiss Family Robinson”? 10. MATH: What does the symbol “r” stand for in geometry? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Hidden 2. 50 degrees F 3. Julius Caesar 4. Point in orbit where an object is closest to the Sun 5. Mg 6. Indicates how a person’s personal property should be distributed 7. Portugal 8. Night blindness 9. Johann David Wyss 10. Radius of a circle YOUR AD HERE

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Page 10C – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements ADVERTISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS!! Call now to grow your business. Get your classified ad in 119 newspapers with one order. Advertising Networks of Florida. 866-742-1373 Medical MEDICAL CAREERSBEGIN HERE GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877)206-6559 MEDICAL CAREERSbegin here „Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www. 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Southeast Regional, Earn up to 39c/mi. 1 year OTR Flatbed experience required, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, LLC EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERSearn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE MARINA HELPERNeeded immediately. Miscellaneous duties to include bagging ice, emptying trash containers, assisting with boat launches, washing boats, etc. Full time position Employee benefits. Drug free work place. Apply at Shields Marina/St. Marks Resume with references required. General Help MARINE PARTS CLERKNeeded immediately. Must be computer literate. Hours: 7-5:30, Tuesday-Friday. Duties include: Phone, restock inventory, counter sales. Drug free work place. Employee benefits. Apply at Shields Marina/St. Marks Resume with references required Transfer DriversNeed 20 Contract Drivers (over the road) CDL A or B to relocate vehicles to and from various locations throughout US(800)501-3783 www.mamo transportation.com Schools/ Instruction AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDEDBecome a Medical Office Assistant at SC Train!! No Experience needed! Online training gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Meet singles right now!No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now (888)744-4426 Furniture DINING ROOM TABLE AND FOUR CHAIRS Light oak 42Ž round $125.00 850 926 9283 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLEFri. & Sat. 9am-Until BIG SALE 8th Ave. off Rewinkle to Tatflinger, Look for Signs Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLEEvery Friday, Saturday and Sunday Until Gone 8am-dark Clothes, Misc. Items, furniture, Hospital Equip AND MORE 799 Rehwinkel Road (850) 926-7064 PANACEA Fri. 10 & Sat. 11 MOVING SALE196 Otter Lake Road Pets AKC Registered CHOCOLATE LAB 170 lb + FOR STUD Price Negotiable (850)766-5666 HAPPY JACK DuraSpot:latest technology in flea, tick, mosquito & mite control on dogs. Patented. At farm, feed & hardware stores. Distributed by Fuller Supply (205)343-3341. www. happyjackinc.com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLENewly renovated 3 bedroom/2 bath. on 3 acres in Kirkland Estates. $850 Mo. 1st/last&sec. req. Tina Ryan 352-325-0494 Rental Houses 3/2 dbl. wide mobile home, Panacea, near coast, $800/mo. + dep. and 3/2 House, in Songbird $1100/mo. + dep. (850) 544-1051 PanaceaCottage, for Rent 2/1 Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Rennovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, covered front proch & open back deck, Small pets acceptable Excellent fishing! $585/month 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $750/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1935 Palm Harbor2 bedroom, one bath Palm Harbor Mobile Home. Pristine condition, energy efficiency build. Off Old Bethel Road on quiet acreage. No pets. $675 per month for year long lease. Damage Deposit of $675 plus first month rent due on signing agreement. 850-926.352 6 5330-0809 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Veronica Wold Doing business as: Fictitious Name Notices Effortless Travel at 32 Shar Mel Re Ln, Crawfordville, FL32327, with a mailing address of 32 Shar Mel Re Ln, Crawfordville, FL32327 desiring to engage in business under a fictitious Fictitious Name Notices name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News. August 9, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices 5313-0816 TWN Wakulla County Code Enforcement Case No. CE2011-205 PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULLACOUNTYCODE ENFORCEMENTBOARD CASE NO. CE2011-205 Parcel No. 20-2s-01e-142-04917-D07 Property Address: 157 Finner Drive Crawfordville, Florida 32327 WAKULLACOUNTY, a political subdivision of the State of Florida Petitioner, v. The Estate of Sherrol Wilson, David Wilson, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Sherrol Wilson; Brianna Donaldson, as an heir of he Estate of Sherrol D. Wilson; and the heirs, Devisees, grantees, assignees, or other claimants of the Estate of Sherrol D. Wilson, Respondents. FINDINGS OF FACT, CONCLUSIONS OF LAW AND ORDER THIS CAUSE came for public hearing before the Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board 5332-0830 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201202746 TO: Richard A. Greene ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. August 9, 16, 23 & 30 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices (the BoardŽ) on July 11, 2012 and having heard testimony under oath and received evidence, the Board issues its Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law, and enters its Order in this case as follows: FINDINGS OF F ACT 1. Respondents are the owners of the subject property. 2. On August 15, 2011, the Code Enforcement Office conducted an inspection in response to a complaint received regarding the subject property, located at 157 Finner Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Parcel ID No 20-2S-01E-142-0491 7-D07, and observed the storage ofa large amount of tires in an unenclosed area in violation of section 8 .042, Wakulla County Code of Ordinances. 3. Pursuant to sŽ 162.06, Fla. Stat. and s. 8065, Wakulla County Code, the Code Enforcement Officer issued an initial Notice of Violation to Respondents on August 22, 2011, by way of regular mail and certified mail, providing notice of the violation and also providing a reasonable time for correction of the violation and a date for compliance of September 15, 2011 4. On January 6, 2012, the Code Enforcement Office conducted a follow-up inspection to determine whether the violations were corrected by the date for compliance. The inspection revealed that the violations had not been corrected, The Code Enforcement Office issued a new Notice of Violation to Respondents by way of regular mail and certified mail, providing notice of the violation and a new date for compliance of February 6, 2012. An additional notice was mailed on March 26, 2012, providing a compliance date of April 10, 2012. 5. Additional notice of the violation and the hearing on the violation was given by way of publication in the Wakulla News once a week each week from May 17, 2012 through June 7, 2012, for four consecutive weeks, 6. Respondents failed to provide written notice of the correction of the violations to the Code Enforcement Office on or before the date for compliance, and the violations were not actually corrected. 7. Respondents were served with proper notice of the public hearing and Respondents, or their representative, failed to appear at the hearing. 8. Code Enforcement staffs testimony expresses concern that the tires constitute a health hazard due to the accumulation of water within the tires. CONCLUSIONS OF LA W The subject property is alleged to be in violation of section 8.042, of the Wakulla County Code of Ordinances Sections 8.042, states: All property shall remain free from any nuisance accumulation of rubbish or garbage other than that placed in an approved, and enclosed receptacle. Anuisance accumulation of rubbish or garbage in violation of this section shall be deemed to have occured if an owner or occupant of property allows garbage to remain on the property beyond a period of seven days or rubbish to remain on the property beyond a period of 15 days. § 8,042(a), Wakulla County Code. For the purposes of section 8.042, rubbishŽ is defined to include combustible and non-combustible waste materials, including, but not limited to: the residue from the burning of wood, coal, coke and other combustiblematerials, paper, rags, cartons, boxes, wood, excelsior, rubber, leather, tree branches, yard trimmings, tin cans, disconnected or inoperable appliances, metals, mineral matter, glass, crockery and dust, construction debris, and other similar materials.Ž § 8.041, Wakulla County Code. An accumulation of tires would be included within the definition of rubbish  Section 8 .042 further requires that property owners dispose of rubbish in a safe and sanitary manner by placing such rubbish in approved containers, if possible, and removing it to an approved disposal facility within the County Pursuant to the above stated provision of the Wakulla County Code, and based on the evidence and testimony presented at the public hearing, the Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board finds by clear and convincing evidence that the Respondents have allowed items meeting the definition of rubbishŽ to remain on the subject property for a period in excess of fifteen days, Furthermore, this violation presents a serious risk to the public health due to the potential for standing water which may contribute to an increased number of mosquitos and the spread of mosquito-born illnesses. ORDER Based upon the foregoing Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law, and pursuant to the authority granted in Chapter 162, Florida Statutes, and Chapter 8, Wakulla County Land Development Code, by motion made and duly seconded and passed by the Board by a majority vote of at least four (4) members, it is hereby ORDERED: 1:. Respondents shaIl correct said violations on or before August 11, 2012 (the Compliance DateŽ), by which date Respondents must correct the violations of the Code described herein by disposing of all rubbish material, including the tires. Small rubbish items may be separated into the containers provided by the Countys solid waste hauler and left curbside for pickup on the day designated for solid waste collection for the property, or it may disposed of at the Wakulla County transfer station at the landfill. Other materials, including the tires, must be removed to the Wakulla County transfer station during its hours of operation, In addition, Respondents shall pay an administrative charge in the amount of $150.00 for administrative costs associated with inspecting the subject property and presenting this Case to the Board on or before the Compliance Date., 2, In the event that Respondents comply with this Order, as verified in an Affidavit of Compliance filed with the Board by the Code Enforcement Officer, the Chairman shall be authorized to enter an Order Acknowledging Compliance on behalf of the Board, a certified copy of which shall be recorded in the public records of Wakulla County, and provided by certified mail to Respondents, Ahearing is not required for issuance of the Order Acknowledging Compliance. 3 In the event that Respondents fail to comply with this Order on or before the Compliance Date, as verified in an Affidavit of Non-Compliance filed with the Board by the Code Enforcement Officer, the Board hereby authorizes the Chairman to enter an Order Imposing Fines, a certified copy of which shall be recorded in the public records of Wakulla County, and provided by certified mail to Respondents. Such fines shall be imposed in the amount of $150.00 for the first day and $50.00 for each and every day thereafter that the violation continues past the Compliance Date. Ahearing is not required for issuance of the Order Imposing Fines. 4. Upon recordation in the public records, the Order Imposing Fines shall constitute a lien against the land on which the violation exists and upon any other real or personal property owned by Respondents. Upon petition to the circuit court, such Order shall be enforceable in the same manner as a court judgment. The fines imposed in the Order shall continue Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432“we sell and service most makes and models” Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 850-926-9760 850-509-1013Bryant’sCARPET AND UPHOLSTERY CAREProfessional carpet, upholstery, tile/grout and area rug cleaning.IICRC/CLEANTRUST CERTIFIED TECHNICIANBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 11C RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available • 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./ $900 Security Deposit • 455 Old Bethel 3BR/2BA Home on one acre north of Crawfordville. $900 Mo./$900 Security Deposit No Pets/ No Smoking • 14 Cutchins 3BR/2BA off of E. Ivan Rd. No Pets, No Smoking $675 Mo./$675 Deposit • 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok • 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced • 14 Windy Ct 3BR/2BA $850mo./$850 Deposit. Available Aug. 1 • 2086 Spring Creek Hwy. 3BR/2BA MH on 2 acres $750 Mo./$750 Deposit. Lease w/option to buy. We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!27 Brentwood Lane 4 Bdr. 3 1/2 ba In-Ground Pool includes Maintenance, Double car garage, replace, large master bedroom, screen porch. $1,050. per month. No Pets, No smoking50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets. to accrue until Respondents come into compliance or until judgment is rendered, whichever occurs first. 5, In addition, if Respondent fails to comply with this Order, the Board hereby directs Wakulla County, through the Code Enforcement Officer to obtain quotes from the vendors on the Countys approved vendor list for removal of the tires and disposal at an appropriate location. Quotes shall be brought back to the Code Enforcement Board at its next meeting for consideration by the Board due to the public health threat created by the existence of the tires. 6. It is the Respondentsobligation to provide written notice to the Code Enforcement Officer of compliance with this Order or the Order Imposing Fines. Upon providing such written notice, the Code Enforcement Officer shall perform an inspection of the subject property for the purposes of determining whether Respondents have obtained compliance with the Order. 7 Respondents may appeal this Order to the circuit court within 30 days of its execution. DONE AND ORDERED this 16th day of July, 2012. By:/s/ Jeffrey Ewaldt, Vice-Chairman STATE OF FLORIDA COUNTYOF WAKULLA SWORN TO AND SUBSCRIBED before me this 16th day of July, 2012, by Jeffrey Ewaldt, who is personally know to me /s/ Sarah Ion Blalock / Notary Public(Seal) Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News July 26, August 2, 9 & 16, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5325-0816 TWN v. Melissa Foote Case No.: 2011-CA-000225 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION CASE NO: 2011-CA-000225 SCORE FEDERALCREDITUNION, Plaintiff, v. MELISSAFOOTE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MELISSAFOOTE; RICHARD D. FOOTE, PEARLE. FOOTE; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; COMDATANETWORK, INC.; SUMMERWOOD ROADOWNERS MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATION; WACHOVIA, a division of Wells Fargo, N.A. Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F .S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVENthat, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, at 11:00 a.m. oclock on September 6, 2012, the following described property: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREE 22 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 1323.21 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 1315.89 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 330.99 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 330.99 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 657.77 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60 FOOT ROADWAY, UTILITYAND DRAINAGE EASMENT, THENCE RUN 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID EASEMENT 331.29 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 657.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING (A.P.N. R 05-3S-01E-205-05021-013) ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: July 18, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court By;/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) 5329-0816 TWN vs. William Miller Case No. 65-2012-CA-000179 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTYCIVILDIVISION Case No.65-2012-CA-000179 Division BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANY Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM L. MILLER, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WILLIAM L. MILLER CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN LASTKNOWN ADDRESS 228 BOB MILLER RD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY OF BOB MILLER ROAD 991.70 FEET TO AROD AND CAPFOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY406.24 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 660.11 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 406.24 FEET TO AROD AND CAP,THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 660.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. commonly known as: 228 BOB MILLER RD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Paul M. Messina, Jr. of Kass Shuler, P.A., plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813) 229-0900, on or before September 7, 2012, (or 30 days from the first date of publication, whichever is later) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. 5331-0816 TWN Vs. Gentry, Laura Etta Case #65-2010-CA-000087CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000087CA ONE WESTBANK,FSB Plaintiff(s) vs. LAURAETTAGENTRY; et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 5333-0816 TWN vs. Nall, Andrea M., Case No:65-2008-CA-000152FC Notice of Foreclosure Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 65-2008-CA-000152FC TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP., Plaintiff, ANDREAM. NALLA/KA/ ANDREANALL; GEOFFREYNALL; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to Final Judgement of Foreclosure dated the 29th day of May, 2009, and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000152FC, of the Circuit Court of the 2NDJudicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORPORATION is the Plaintiff and ANDREAM. NALLA/K/AANDREANALL, GEOFFREYNALL, JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONTLOBBYof WAKULLA COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 4th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 69, BLOCK A, MAGNOLIAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 59, PAGE 261, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDATOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2007 FLEETWOOD MOBILE HOME, SER. NO.GAFL675AB78594-CD2. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 25th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News August 9 & 16, 2012 5333-0816 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Dated:July 25, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Honorable J. H. Thurmond 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301: (850) 577-4401 within 7 working days of your receipt of this notice: if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. August 9 & 16, 2012 5329-0816 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July. 26, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000087CAof the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for County, Florida, wherein One West Bank, FSB is the Plaintiff and LAURAETTAGENTRYand MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. FOR AMERICAS WHOLESALE LENDER, are the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 27th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 23, BLOCK DŽ OF SHELLPOINT BEACH, UNIT V, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES 47 AND 48 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 11 PEBBLE CT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANYREMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at County, Florida this 26th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk, County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, County, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 -County Phone: 850-926-0905 EXT. 223 TDD 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay ServiceŽ. August 9 & 16, 2012. 800669.000606 Wakulla RealtyKaren Williams Broker Associate850-926-5084 850-567-8279 khwilliams@earthlink.net Private Oasis in Your Backyard: Exceptionally Maintained 3/2 House with lots of extras and 1 Car Garage. Privacy Fenced Backyard beholds Screened Porch w/ Beautiful Landscaping, Fruit Trees, and Patio with Built in Fire Pit Area and Playground Equipment. Reduced to $139,900 Ochlockonee River Front: Totally Remodeled 2/1 House on Pilings with Dock & Floating Dock. Improvements include totally New Kitchen, Ceramic Tile Floors, Vinyl Siding, & Metal Roof. Screened Porch and Decks from which you can Enjoy Nature and the River. $230,000 Great Location Close to Coast: 5 Bdrm/2Ba Singlewide Mobile Home with 2 Site Built Additions on each side. Numerous Recent Upgrades but still in need of some TLC. Located on 1 acre of land that has three sheds and beautiful Live Oak Trees. Sold As Is. $49,900 Great Home in Gated Subdivision: 3 Bdrm/2 Ba House w/Separate Of“ce Area on acre in Gated Community. Kitchen w/Bar & Eat in Dining Area, Formal Dining Room, Living Room w/Gas Fireplace & Separate Of“ce Area. Back Deck & Patio Ideal for Entertaining & Overlooks Large Backyard with Beautiful Mature Landscaping & Large Shed. $164,900 Heron Creek Subdivision: This Nature Based Subdivision offers 13 lots from 10-16 Acres in Size. Beautiful Sinkhole, Established Pasture and Woods make for a Diverse Offering of land for any Buyer. Deer, Turkey, and other Wildlife call this spot in Wakulla County Home and You can too. Horses Welcome. Seller Offering Great Financing Terms. Lots start at $59,900. www.wakullarealty.com

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Page 12C – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com CER TIFICA TE OF SER VICE I CERTIFYthat a true and correct copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale under F.S. Chapter 45 has been furnished by United States Mail on July 18, 2012, to each of the following: Henry L. Miller, Jr., Attorney for Score Federal Credit Union, Mathews Law Firm, P. A., 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; Jason Guevara, Collections Manager, Score Federal Credit Union, 3218 N. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; and William R. Pfeiffer, The Pfeiffer Law Group, LLC, attorney for Defendants, Melissa Foote, Richard D. Foote, and Pearl E. Foote, 2910 Kerry Forest Parkway, Suite D4-276, Tallahassee, Florida 32309 By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Court Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 9 & 16, 2012 5325-0816 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5300-0809 TWN vs. NADER, MARIE L. Case No.65-2008-CA-000110 Notice of Foreclosure Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000110, DIVISION: AURORALOAN SERVICES, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. : MARIE L. NADER A/K/AMARIE NADER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated 5314-0809 Vs. Gowdy, Richard L. Case No. 11-281-CANotice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-281-CA FARM CREDITOF NORTHWESTFLORIDA, ACA Plaintiff, v. RICHARD L. GOWDY, a/k/a RICHARD GOWDY, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RICHARD L. GOWDY, a/k/a RICHARD GOWDYand UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT T O CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment dated April 30, 2012 and Order Reopening Case and Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 30, 2012 and order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale Dated July 19, 2012 all entered in Case No. 11„281-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, in which FARM CREDITOF NORTHWESTFLORIDA, ACAis the Plaintiff and RICHARD L. GOWDYa/k/a RICHARD L. GOWDY, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RICHARD L. GOWDY, a/k/a RICHARD GOWDYand UNKNOWN TENANT(S),are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at THE FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAat 11:00 a.m. on August 16, 2012, the property, set forth in the Final Judgment, and more particularly described as follows: Commence at a point marking the Southeast corner of Section 7, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 43 seconds West 37.55 feet to an iron pipe lying on the Westerly right of way line of U.S. Highway Number 319, also known as State Road Number 369; thence run along said right of way line as follows: North 00 degrees 03 minutes 25 seconds West 700.60 feet to a rebar for the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING run North 00 degrees 03 minutes 27 seconds West 661.41 feet to a rebar lying on the North boundary line of the South half of the Southeast quarter of said Section 7; thence leaving said right of way line run along said North boundary line of the South half of the Southeast quarter as monumented as follows: South 89 degrees 13 minutes 51 seconds West 1937.50 feet to an old axle; thence South 89 degrees 13 minutes 51 seconds West 670.63 feet to an old axle marking the Northwest Corner of the South half of the Southeast quarter of said Section 7; thence leaving said North boundary line of the South half of the Southeast quarter run South 00 degrees 26 minutes 56 seconds West 1326.82 feet to a concrete monument marking the Southwest corner of the Southeast quarter of said Section 7; thence South 89 degrees 59 minutes 43 seconds East 1713.00 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 seconds West 564.24 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds East 231.05 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 seconds West 100.00 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds West 286.25 feet; thence North 02 degrees 17 minutes 31 seconds West 476.54 feet; thence North 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds East 262.21 feet; thence South 05 degrees 10 minutes 51 seconds East 477.14 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds East 676.30 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 63.993 acres more or less.. Together with and Subject to a 30 foot wide ingress/egress and utility easement lying over and across a portion of the above described property being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a point marking the Southeast corner of the Section 7, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 43 seconds West 37.55 feet to an iron pipe lying on the Westerly right of way line of U.S. Highway Number 319, also known as State Road Number 369; thence run along said right of way line as follows: North 00 degrees 03 minutes 25 seconds West 700.60 feet to a rebar for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING run North 00 degrees 03 minutes 27 seconds West 30.02 feet; thence leaving said right of way line run South 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds West 678.98 feet; thence South 05 degrees 10 minutes 51 seconds East 30.04 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds East 676.30 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED : July 18, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) /s/ BY: Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Michael P. Bist, Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia, & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Drive Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Published on August 2 & 9, 2012 5314-0809 5316-0809 TWN Vs. Colburn, Sheliah Case #: 2011CA-000095 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2011-CA-000095 CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, -vs.Sheliah D.Colburn a/k/a Sheliah Colburn and Jeffery Scott Colburn, Wife and Husband; Florida Commerce Credit Union; Household Finance Corporation, III; Eagles Ridge Phase II Homeowners Association Inc.; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA-000095 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff and Sheliah D.Colburn a/k/a Sheliah Colburn and Jeffery Scott Colburn, Wife and Husband are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONT LOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED ATCHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M. on August 30, 2012. the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 26 OF EAGLES RIDGE PHASE II, ASUBDIVISION PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 60, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled 5317-0809 TWN Vs. Dudley, Michael Case #: 2012-CA-000166 Notice of Action Foreclosure PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000166 U.S. Bank, National Association, as Trustee for SG Mortgage Securities Trust 2006-FRE2, Asset Backed Certificates, Series 2006-FRE2 Plaintiff, -vs.Michael S. Dudley a/k/a Michael Shane Dudley and Sherry P. Dudley, Husband and Wife; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPERTY TO: Michael S. Dudley; ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUTWHOSE LASTKNOWN ADDRESS IS: 135 Roddenberry Sink Road, Crawfordville, FL32327 and Sherry P. Dudley; ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUTWHOSE LASTKNOWN ADDRESS IS: 135 Roddenberry Sink Road, 5320-0809 TWN vs. Dekle, Bryan Case No.: 11-207-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-207-CA THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUSTCOMPANY, N.A., by and through its sub-servicing agent, VANDERBILTMORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. BRYAN A. DEKLE and PEGGYSUE DEKLE, husband and sife; MIDLAND FUNDING LLC, a Delaware limited liability company authorized to transact business in Florida, as successor in interest to Household Finance; FAMILYDOLLAR STORES OF FLORIDA, INC., a Florida corporation; UNIDENTIFIED JOHN DOE(S) and/or UNIDENTIFIED JANE DOE(S), Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on July 18, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32326, at 11:00 A.M. on August 30, 2012, the following described property: Lot 24 Millers Way South Commence at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of Lot 52 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 72 degrees 50 minutes 52 seconds West 915.00 feet, thence run North 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds West 402.50 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING. From said POINTOF BEGINNING continue North 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds West 524.40 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way of State Road No. S-368, said point lying on a curve concave to the Northerly, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 1091.74 feet thru a central angle of 01 degrees 34 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 30.07 feet (chord of said arc being South 77 degrees 12 minutes 43 seconds West 30.04 feet), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds East 291.97 feet to a point on a curve concave to the Northerly, thence run Northwesterly along said curve having a radius of 1382.74 feet thru a central angle of 31 degrees 08 minutes 57 seconds for an arc distance of 751.73 feet (the chord of said arc being North 87 degrees 31 minutes 55 seconds West 742.51 feet), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds East 484.05 feet, thence run North 72 degrees 50 minutes 52 seconds East 728.96 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING. SUBJECTTO a roadway easement over and across the Southerly and Easterly 30 feet thereof. ALSO SUBJECTTO a 50.00 foot cul-de-sac easement in the Southwest corner thereof. TOGETHER WITH that certain 1996 Cougar General Doublewide Mobile Home bearing I.D. Nos: GMHGA409968932Aand GMHGA409968932B. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERSTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated July 18, 2012 (seal) Brent X. Thurmond,Clerk of Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Quintairos, Prieto, Wood & Boyer, P.A., Attn: Erin Gordon 215 S. Monroe St., Suite 510 Tallahassee, FL32301 Phone: 850-412-1042 Fax: 850-412-1043 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News August 2 & 9, 2012 Crawfordville, FL32327 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendants(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Wakulla County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 105, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 105, ADISTANCE OF 1438.19 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY479.39 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 682.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 479.39 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 682.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 105, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EASTERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 105 ADISTANCE OF 1183.25 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 30.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST ALONG ALINE 30.00 FEET WESTERLYOF AND PARALLELTO THE EASTERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 105 ADISTANCE OF 1153.17 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST ALONG ALINE 30.00 FEET SOUTHERLYOF AND PARALLELTO THE NORTHERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 105 ADISTANCE OF 1562.14 FEET TO THE EASTERLYBOUNDARYOF THE 100.00 FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAYOF STATE ROAD NO. 365, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY37.38 FEET TO THE NORTHERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 105, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID BOUNDARY1569.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH RIGHTS OF INGRESS AND EGRESS AS MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED IN THAT CERTAIN ACCESS EASEMENT DATED AUGUST 27, 1980, AND RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 77, PAGE 499 AND RE-RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 78, PAGE 97 BOTH IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as 135 Roddenberry Sink Road, Crawfordville, FL32327 This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, upon SHIPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL33614, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENTX. THURMOND, Circuit and County Courts (SEAL) By: /s/ Becky Whaley, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 2 & 9 Wakulla News 11-238319 FC01 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ DESIREE D. WILLIS, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEYFOR THE PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100, Tampa, FL33614 (813)880-8888, (813)880-8800 August 2 & 9, 2012. 10-209781 FC01 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON JULY 19, 2012

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 – Page 13C July 18, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000110 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuitin and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein AURORALOAN SERVICES, LLC is the Plaintiff and MARIE L. NADER A/K/AMARIE NADER; WILLIAM CESAR; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WILLIAM CESAR; MARC NADER A/K/AMARC A. NADER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARIE L. NADER A/K/A/ MARIE NADER; WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION; THE FARM HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION INC; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 13thday of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 7 BLOCK H THE FARM SUBDIVISION, PHASE I, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 PAGE 93, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A64 CARRIAGE DR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on July 18, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 2 & 9, 2012 F10105998 5300-0809 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5278-0816 TWN Vs. Farmer, Claudette Case No. 11-174-FC Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 11-174-FC UCN:0652011CA000174XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. CLAUDETTE L. FARMER A/K/ACLAUDETTE FARMER; EARLE W. MURPHY; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 20, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11-174-FC UCN:652011CA0000174XXXXXX if the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and CLAUDETTE L. FARMER A/K/ACLAUDETTE FARMER; EARLE W. MURPHY; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR 5318-0809 TWN estate Smith, Rodger Stephen Case No: 12-62 CPNotice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-62 CP IN RE : ESTATE OF R. STEPHEN SMITH a/k/a RODGER STEPHEN SMITH a/k/a STEPHEN SMITH Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of R. Stephen Smith, deceased, File 12-62 CPis pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is August 2, 2012. Personal Representative: Ruby L. Smith, 64 Lake Ellen Shores Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville, FL32327 (850)926-8245 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 2 & 9, 2012 5319-0809 estate Ventry, Joice Case # 12-59 CPNotice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-59 CP. IN RE : ESTATE OF JOICE J. VENTRY Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Joice J. Ventry, deceased, File 12-59 CPis pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is August 2, 2012. Personal Representative: Rebecca Jane Moore, 148 Longleaf Drive Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5315-0809 TWN 8/18 sale Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will Self Storage Notices hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, August18,2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: MIKE ROBERTS MARANDACOX Before the sale date of SatSelf Storage Notices urday, August 18, 2012, the owners my redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. August 2 & 9, 2012 Self Storage Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL.32327 at Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 10th day of January 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 16, BLOCK 1, WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 39, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE, DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on June 20, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 9 & 16, 2012 5278-0712 1183-96619 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville, FL32327 (850)926-8245 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 2 & 9, 2012 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 25 32 37 40 46 49 56 59 62 2 26 47 3 27 43 4 28 44 5 23 41 57 60 63 18 38 50 6 15 33 58 7 29 51 8 30 48 9 21 31 45 10 24 42 61 64 22 39 52 11 16 19 34 53 12 35 54 13 36 55 ACROSS 1. Ankle bones 6. Bernhardt or Vaughan 11. An NCO 14. __ Jack (British flag) 15. It was acquired by BP 16. Make haste 17. Indian drum? 19. __-Locka, Florida 20. Not saturated 21. The ear's "stirrup" 23. Cleanse 24. Wield, as authority 25. Strip bare 29. About 3.26 lightyears 32. Dungeon restraints 33. Four-star reviews 34. Letters for the Pinafore 37. Grackle or grosbeak 38. Witches' assembly 39. Inside info 40. "Told you so!" 41. Be indecisive 42. Former Oldsmobile Cutlass model 43. Like matched socks 45. Mull over 46. Ballplayer's rep 48. Comfy room 49. Left Bank cash, once 51. Just okay 56. Romper room habitu 57. Top-secret? 59. Night before 60. Went for congers 61. Sierra __ (African nation) 62. Bolshevik 63. Unfeeling 64. Grand __ (Wyoming peak)DOWN1. "Swan Lake" skirt 2. Author unknown: Abbr. 3. Lens holders 4. Explorer Hernando de __ 5. Approaching the center 6. Filled completely 7. In the thick of 8. CD-__ 9. Breezes through 10. Twinkies maker 11. On the double? 12. Kilted musician 13. Tiniest bit 18. "__ from Muskogee" 22. Bunyan's tool 25. Claimant's cry 26. Toledo's lake 27. Taboo? 28. Sturm __ Drang 29. Unlike many country roads 30. State positively 31. Cartoon Chihuahua 33. Gad about 35. "Encore!" 36. Work with a pug 38. Mercury or Saturn 39. Jesse Ventura victory, once 41. Brew makers? 42. Seek the advice of 44. Shakers founder Lee 45. South-of-theborder simoleon 46. Fairy tale closer 47. Lemons' locale 48. __-longlegs (wispy arachnid) 50. Fatty tissue 51. Fen-__ (withdrawn diet treatment) 52. "... sting like __" 53. Reputation tarnisher 54. Lantern-jawed Jay 55. Genesis site 58. __-mo replay American Prole Hometown Content 8/5/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 23 4 5 63 748 23 169 96 57913 9 12 54 16587 200 9 HometownContent 918 7236 4 5 426958137 573416892 237 164958 891235764 645879213 789 341526 352697481 164582379 T U T U D I B S A F T E R A N O N E R I E G R O V E R I M S N O R E P E A T E D S O T O U N D A N N I N W A R D S W I T C H E S O K I E C A R S U E T S A T E D R O V E S L O A M I D P A V E D P H E N R O M A V E R D A D D Y A C E S R E N P E S O H O S T E S S C O N S U L T A X E P I N A B E E C H O P E C H O E D B L O T P I P E R M O R E L E N O L E A S T S P A R E D E N Am Arc Away Axle Bar Be Bug Buy By Cat Coral Dads Date Debt Deliver Far Fed Fly Form Fox Frown God Got Hay He Hi Home How Hunter In Is Leg Lid Male My Net No Nut Oaks Oar Of Onions Pegs Pet Pigeon Rent Run Sea See Send Slot So Style Tea Tended To Tug Up Vary Vase Wax We Why Wood Wounded Yawn YogaWord Find

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Page 14C – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com(ARA) When school starts, kids schedules “ ll up fast, and that means they need the right fuel to keep their growing bodies and minds satis“ ed. After a long day of learning, kids require a snack that will get them through homework, after-school sports and other activities until dinner is served. Before you reach for the default bag of chips, consider these healthier alternatives that are just as easy and convenient. Creative, healthier afterschool snack ideas that your kids will gobble up: 1. Refresh with frozen apple sauce Apple sauce has been a snacking staple for years, but now you can add a little excitement to those prepackaged apple packs. Simply buy Tree Top apple sauce cups, made with 100 percent USA apples, and place them in the freezer for a tasty treat similar to sorbet, and a healthier alternative to most ice cream and frozen snacks. Kids can grab them on their own when they get home from school so mom and dad dont have to lift a “ nger. Stock up on Tree Top apple juice boxes, too, for a complementary, easy grab-and-go drink option. 2. Delight in dip Its no secret kids love to dip, so make afterschool snacking more interesting by providing dip along with fresh fruit, veggies and crackers. Instead of salad dressing, change things up by mixing a single serve apple sauce cup with two tablespoons of peanut butter for a healthier dip alternative. Watch as your little ones wolf down their carrots, celery, apples, pretzels and more. Parents love that this dip option has many nutritional bene“ ts the apple sauce in it is a good source of vitamin C and peanut butter is packed with protein. 3. Wrap it up Keeping whole wheat tortillas on hand is a smart move for any parent because they are extremely versatile. When kids come home from school hungry, its easy to take a tortilla and “ ll it with their favorite nutritious “ llings. For example, spread with classic peanut butter and jelly, add some banana and honey, or fill with turkey and mozzarella for a satisfying snack that keeps kids focused through all their homework. 4. Happily hydrated Making sure your kids are hydrated is an important part of keeping them healthy and feeling great each day. When kids are busy at school and with after-school activities, they can become dehydrated quickly. Instead of sugary sodas, choose a more nutritious alternative like Tree Top reduced sugar 100 percent fruit juices. These tasty and refreshing drinks are made with hydrating coconut water and no arti“ cial sweeteners and have 25 percent less sugar than regular 100 percent juices. 5. A smooth “ nish to the school day Smoothies are a fun way for kids to get a ton of nutrients in one single drink. Its easy for parents to stock up on frozen fruit at the local grocery store. Then, when kids get home, they can choose what ” avors they want and you can blend the fruit with lowfat milk, yogurt and ice for a cool and delicious drink. You might even sneak in a few veggies by adding a splash of vegetable juice, or a couple of pre-steamed vegetables like carrots, kale or squash. The fruit ” avors are so robust, your kids wont even notice the veggies. Healthy after-school snacks dont have to be boring or bland. Try these ideas and you can feel good about what your kids eat they may love them so much theyll be requesting them every day.Creative and healthier after-school snack ideas SPECIAL TO THE NEWS(ARA) Excitement, anticipation, anxiety … backto-school time is filled with many emotions for both kids and parents. By planning ahead, parents can make gearing up for the start of the school year a fun experience that eases the transition while boosting enthusiasm. Consider the six ideas below to help position students for success before heading back to the classroom: 1. Set a schedule now New teachers, classmates, homework and other challenges may create some apprehension and nervousness during the first couple weeks of school. Stay positive and explain that some anxiety is normal and that everyone needs time to adjust to new things. Help reduce stress by creating a daily routine before school. Checklists and charts allow children to be organized and get into a schedule. For instance, a set time for homework, snack time, free time and bed time are good things to have on a schedule. 2. Shop for school supplies together Seeing all the new trends and designs that stores have to offer for back-to-school supplies can be really exciting for children. Allow them to personalize their supplies and feel excited about using them. A few new out“ ts also provide kids with a boost of encouragement and con“ dence for the new school year. 3. Hold a family celebration Start an annual tradition that celebrates the start of the school year. For example, have a family cookout with hotdogs and smores the weekend before school starts. This helps build excitement for the new school year, but also gives them a relaxed setting to talk about any back-to-school anxiety they may be feeling. 4. Set up a homework area This area should be organized, quiet and welllit. You should also allow your child to personalize this space to make it more appealing and fun, without providing distractions. Some items you might want to incorporate in this area are a dictionary, atlas, calculator, art supplies, paper and pencils. Make sure to have plenty of snacks ready for homework time to avoid the distraction of a grumbling belly. Choosing a snack that offers protein, such as cheese and crackers or an apple with peanut butter will keep them satis“ ed until dinner. 5. Stock up on sensible snacks After a long day at school, kids are hungry and need snacks that satisfy them through all their homework assignments and other after-school activities. Stock up on a variety of wholesome, non-perishable snacks that you can keep on hand year-round. 6. Review what the school requires Dont forget the basics. Review all medical documents that pertain to annual physicals and immunizations and get the information to the school for your childs “ le. Also, make the teacher and school nurse aware of any conditions your child may have such as allergies, chronic medical conditions or special learning accommodations. Doing this ahead of time helps ease back-to-school stress for mom and dad too. For additional tips on how to get your family ready for back-to-school time, visit the Lance Snacks Pinterest page.Six tips for boosting back-to-school success Where the little things Make a Difference! Where the little things Make a Difference! 2504 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32304 2504 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32304 850 765-0042 05 Cadillac STS LUXURY THROUGHOUT $10,500 06 Chevy Malibu SMOOTH RIDE! $10,990 2000 Ford Mustang TAKE YOUR TOP OFF $5,900 05 Pontiac Grand AM SEGREAT FIRST CAR! 08 Kia Sorento LX LX VALUE $13,895 02 Chevy Monte Carlo RED HOT DEAL! $9,900 850576-LOAN ( 5626 )WE HAVE THE ANSWER TO YOUR USED CAR NEEDS! OUR CREDIT SPECIALIST HOTLINE OUR CREDIT SPECIALIST HOTLINEANSWERONEMOTORS.COM 04 Chrysler Cross“re 6 SPEED MANUAL FAST! $12,995 06 Chevy Monte Carlo GORGEOUS COUPE $9,900 06 Nissan Altima SUPER VALUE! $9,900 09 Chevrolet Impala FULL SIZE $13,790 07 Nissan Altima SPORTY DRIVE $14,400 $15,495 $14,500 $7,900 05 GMC Envoy XL-SLT ROOM FOR FAMILY $13,998 06 Jeep Grand Cherokee LaredoSPORTY RIDE $12,900 02 Nissan Maxima DRIVE IN STYLE! $7,500 05 Mercedes Benz C230 LUXURY STYLE 08 Toyota Camry SHARP!We Offer Financing That Others CantŽPRICESDONOTINCLUDETAX, TAG, TITLEORDEALERFEES.



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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 30th Issue Thursday, August 9, 2012 Three Sections Three Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A News Extra! .....................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Green Scene ....................................................................Page 3B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 12B Back to School .................................................................Page 1C Classi eds ......................................................................Page 10C Legal Notices .................................................................Page 10C Comics ...........................................................................Page 13CINDEX OBITUARIES Charmayne J. Chouinard Jerry Braxton Crutchfield Joseph D. Hicks Charles C. Laughton Eula Wardene Nichols Josephine Bullock Rozar Colleen Maybee Weber By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA proposal to transfer the Wakulla County Community Center to the Wakulla County Extension Of ce by County Commissioner Jerry Moore was shot down by the other commissioners at the Aug. 6 commission meeting. Moore, who has mentioned selling the community center in the past, suggested the county use the space proposed for the community center as a government complex. The former sanctuary would have served as the commission chambers and the other building, which currently houses the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce annex, would have been used by Wakulla County Fire Rescue and Emergency Medical Services. The county acquired the 22-acre property that was previously home to New Life Church on May 24, 2010, with plans to turn it into a community center, but has yet to offer programs and services at the facility. We can consolidate all our products into one area, Moore said. The community center activities would then be transferred to the extension of ce, which, he said, already serves as somewhat of a community center. Moore said this would have saved the county $1 million. I was trying to save the county money, he said. He added that many people view the current Community Center as the Crawfordville neighborhood center. People who live in Panacea, Sopchoppy, Ochlockonee Bay, St. Marks and other areas are not going to visit the community center, he said. Transportation is a big thing, he said. The other commissioners disagreed. Commissioner Alan Brock said the majority of Wakulla County residents live within Crawfordville. Commissioner Mike Stewart said the current location, at the corner of Trice Lane and Shadeville Road, is the most prime location in the county. I think thats where it needs to be, Stewart said. The legislative appropriation of $392,000, which must go toward adding to or renovating the Community Center, could be used to make improvements to the extension of ces facilities, Moore said. The extension of ce is applying for a $255,000 grant to upgrade its kitchen, classrooms and lifestock pavilion and add a teaching pavilion in the demonstration garden. Moore said the federal money could pay for these upgrades. County Commissioner Lynn Artz said if the extension of ce gets the grant, they wouldnt need the legislative appropriation. Moore said they could still use the legislative appropriation to increase the size of the facility. Its not going to do much, Moore said. And $40,000 has already been used toward engineering, he said. Stewart said the county needs to do as much as it can with the legislative appropriation and look ahead at the possibilities for the site. Were not going to have a Taj Mahal, Stewart said. Commissioner Randy Merritt agreed and said the current site is good for a long term plan. Artz wondered if the current extension office staff could even handle the extra work of serving as the Community Center. Extension Of ce Director Les Harrison said he was doubtful. Some commissioners and members of the audience expressed concern about transferring the Community Center from a 22-acre site to a 7-acre site. If the commission were to give up the current Community Center site, it would lose the opportunity to possibly add a swimming pool and other outdoor activities in the future, Artz said. We would be giving up all the things people in our community have told us they wanted, Artz said. We bought this site for a Community Center. I think we need to keep our promise. She referenced the more than 700 surveys that were lled out by adults and students and the No. 1 want was a swimming pool. It may take 10 years, she said, but the county has the land. Other outdoor facilities were a playground, trails, basketball court and open eld. Several audience members asked the commission to think about the children of the county who do not have a place to go and hang out. Herb Donaldson, artistic director for the Palaver Tree Theater and president of Healing Arts of Wakulla County, said when he asks students what they do for fun in Wakulla County he gets three responses: Go to Tallahassee, watch TV and nothing. Give them what we promised, Donaldson said. Resident Judith Harriss agreed. Make them a priority, said Harriss. Give them a dedicated space. Community Center Advisory Group Member and Wakulla High School Assistant Principal Simeon Nelson told the commission, Man up, woman up, and do what youre supposed to do. He added that he didnt care if this proposal saves the county money, he was more concerned about the children of the county. Continued on Page 12A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhen residents of Wakulla Gardens were asked if they would be willing to pay to have their roads paved, an overwhelming majority of them answered with an emphatic, No. A ballot was sent out to each property owner in Wakulla Gardens to see if they would pay a voluntary assessment between $180 and $235 per year for 10 to 15 years for road improvements. The ballots were due on July 31 and 1,214 were received. There are five units within Wakulla Gardens and each unit was addressed separately. The majority for each unit was a no vote. For unit 1, 33 percent voted no, 67 voted yes. Unit 2 was 65 percent to 35 percent, Unit 3 was 87 percent to 13 percent, Unit 4 was 65 percent to 35 percent and Unit 5 was 62 percent to 38 percent. Well, thats that, said County Commissioner Randy Merritt at the Aug. 6 meeting. I think this is democracy in action. Continued on Page 13AWakulla Gardens roundly rejects pay for paving Community Center stays on track This concept shows possible future uses of the Community Center property, including a lap pool and wading pool, basketball and multi-use courts, playgrounds, a stage, walking trails and Frisbee elds. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA proposal by Commissioner Jerry Moore fails. He had suggested using the property for government of ces and transferring the Community Center to the Extension Of ce PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSENCommissioner Jerry Moore explains his idea for the Community Center as Commissioner Lynn Artz listens. She placed the drawing of the concept on the easel. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn an effort to address the large need of those suffering from food insecurity in the county, the Wakulla County Feeding Task Force has been revived and a new group has formed called the Hunger Team. The team started meeting to try and better serve the children of the county during the Summer Feeding Program, which provided free breakfast and lunch to all school age children. There was no requirement to receive food and it is provided through the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The concept of the program is great, but the members of the group felt not enough kids were being served. So, the team concentrated on spreading the word about the program and looking for better ways to serve children in the future. Since that time, the team has met to focus on three areas: launching Operation Santa, planning for next years Summer Feeding Program and continuing to help stock the local food pantries. Continued on Page 2AHunger Team discusses the need in Wakulla 50.6Percentage of Wakulla students on free or reduced lunch, meaning the majority of families are low income or living in poverty. Democracy in action, said Commissioner Randy Merritt. BACK TO SCHOOL SECTION See Page 1C

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Continued from Page 1A Their recent meeting was held on July 30. Our need is paramount, said Shelley Swenson, team member and Wakulla County Extension Of ce agent. In the county, 50.6 percent of students are on free or reduced lunch, meaning a majority of families with children in the county and living in poverty or low income, according to the school district. The team is made up of individuals, church leaders, businesses and agencies devoted to addressing food insecurity and hunger in Wakulla County, Swenson said. Last years Operation Santa opened the eyes of the volunteers to the huge need of food many people are experiencing in the county. Many people who were helped during the Christmas program, which gave toys, clothes, toiletries, household items and some food to 141 families in need, expressed the need for food more than anything else. There are 4,480 people in Wakulla County who live with food security, not knowing where their next meal might come from, according to Feeding America. This hunger initiative and Operation Santa go hand in hand, said Gail Campbell, executive director of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, the organization that runs Operation Santa. Campbell said the group didnt think about the huge need of food, but was trying to provide Christmas presents. But the responses from the families made it clear that the need for food was much greater than the need for presents. The team has begun to brainstorm about ways to get more food to people this year. Glenn Hamel, pastor of Promise Land Ministries, said they serve a free Christmas dinner every year. He suggested including a ticket for that dinner with the items they receive from Operation Santa. County Commissioner Lynn Artz said the team also needs to reach out to the local stores to possibly donate Christmas meals, like what was done last year. She also suggested including a yer with information about the local pantries and other aid available in each families items. She added that it would be a good idea to require members of groups such as the Hunger Team, coalition for youth and others to show up at each meeting with a non-perishable food item. The coalition has also planned a raf e to help with Operation Santa. The group will be selling $5 tickets for a chance to win a kids John Deere battery-powered tractor with trailer. SUMMER FEEDING PROGRAM Thanks to efforts by members of the Hunger Team, the Summer Feeding Program was able to feed more children this year. The group marketed the program more broadly and another site to serve food was added at Wakulla Christian School. One of the major challenges of the program is transportation, getting the students to one of the sites. There is a need for more sites and possibly mobile sites that will come to the students, Swenson said. Florida Impact has grant funding available that may help with transportation challenges, she added. There was also some discussion about having more than one sponsor in the county. Currently, the Wakulla County School District is the only sponsor. Sponsors handle the administrative and nancial responsibility for the program. Summer food sponsors can feed children at numerous sites throughout the community. The school district has three locations, plus Wakulla Christian. Lori Ciszak, assistant program manager for the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, said an organization or church or anyone who wants to become a sponsor is eligible. They would be required to ll out an application and go through training, but she said she was willing to work with anyone who was interested. Ciszak said the sponsor gets reimbursed based on the amount of children who are served. To become a sponsor, a 2-day training is required. The sponsor will then be required to train someone at each of their sites. She suggested having several churches ban together to become a sponsor. Churches that have the capacity to make and serve the food could be additional sites for next year and those churches without the capacity could deliver to those areas with a high need, Swenson said. LOCAL FOOD PANTRIES The team also addressed the status of the local food pantries, many of which are struggling to meet the needs of people in their area. The food pantries in Wakulla County are usually donation driven and some also buy food from Americas Second Harvest of the Big Bend. It costs around $1,500 a month to keep a food pantry open, Swenson said. Currently, there are 11 pantries in the county. Some who rely solely on word of mouth and do not want to be publicized. However, Hamel said it would be helpful to him to know where the other pantries are located and when they serve food. This way if he is unable to provide food to someone, he can tell them who can. Swenson said she would provide it to the members of the Hunger Team, but urged them to use it with care, as some pantries would become too overwhelmed if word got out. There was also some discussion about a meeting held in February when a software program was mentioned that would link all the pantries into one system. However, the software is currently not available. Better communication between pantries remains a need. Rick Jackley, member of Healing Arts of Wakulla County, said the biggest challenge is getting everyone to work together. Currently, they are all working independently and there is no point person to connect them. Bruce Ashley, president of the coalition for youth, said his organization is trying to get coordinators for that effort through the Hunger Team. A hunger grant from the Wal-Mart Foundation would have helped stock the pantries, but it was not awarded. Campbell said the coalition will apply for the grant again, which is due soon. Madeleine Carr agreed to re-write the grant. EMPTY BOWL PROJECT An upcoming project of Healing Arts of Wakulla was also discussed at length at the meeting. This event is called the Empty Bowl project. This is an effort to raise money for the local food pantries. The idea is to get people in the community to create and paint bowls that will hold soup. People will then purchase one of these bowls and will get soup and bread with it. They are then allowed to keep the bowl to remind them of all the empty bowls in the world and here in Wakulla County. All the money raised would go to purchase food for the pantries. It has merit because it raises funds, but it also raises awareness, Campbell said. An event is scheduled for Nov. 3 at Hudson Park from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Haydee Jackley, the organizer of the event, is looking for people to donate bowls, paint bowls and get involved in this event. The Empty Bowl Project is an international grassroots effort to ght hunger and has been successful in many communities, Jackley said. There was some discussion about getting the local students involved and Assistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell suggested Jackley reach out to the district art coordinator. This position is currently vacant, but should be lled soon, she said. This person could connect Jackley to the school ar t teachers and have them incorporate creating the bowls and painting them into class time. For more information about the Empty Bowl project, email Jackley at ribitsceramic@yahoo.com or call 567-4212. Those who would like to help fight hunger in Wakulla County, can drop off non-perishable items at the Wakulla County Extension Office, 84 Cedar Avenue, the Wakulla County Public Library and the Senior Center. Swenson encouraged people to drop off good donations, such as rice, beans, low sodium canned vegetables, whole wheat pastas and things that are low in sugar. The coalition for youth is also accepting monetary donations which will stay local. Financial donations are the very best, Swenson said. For more information, contact Swenson at 9263931. Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comHunger Team discusses the need in Wakulla County WAKULLA COUNTY SENIOR CENTER THANKS YOU FOR SPONSORING CHRISTMAS IN JULY CHRISTMAS IN JULYAir-Con of Wakulla Bevis Funeral Home Centennial Bank ESG Operations Inc. Maurice & Judy Langston James Moore & Company Wakulla Democratic Commitee Wakulla Insurance Agency Wakulla Rotary Wal-Mart is proud to announce that Dr. Chukwuma M. Okoroji is now providing Obstetrics and Gynecology services 1st & 3rd Thursday of each month CRMC Medical Group Building, 2382 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite-D, Crawfordville FL. We accept most insurance, including BCBS, CHP, Medicaid and more. To schedule your appointment or for more information Call 850-320-6054NatureCoastWomensCare.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullnews.netIn addition to preparing a budget for the next scal year, the Wakulla County Commission is also looking at approving a 5-year plan for county projects. The commission held a workshop on Aug. 6 on the proposed $40.8 million-budget which includes no new tax increases, zero position growth, no employee raises and the same millage rate of 8.5 mills. The overall budget includes an estimated ad valorem tax decrease of 3 percent. Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman said he anticipates it coming in a little lower than that, but would rather estimate too high than too low. I dont see anything out there coming in a negative direction, Sparkman said. The budget also includes a 5-percent increase in health insurance costs, which the commission chose not to pass on to county employees. They also chose not to decrease any funding to outside agencies. There is an overall increase in expenditures of 4.73 percent, or $875,940, from last year. This includes an increase in medical costs for the jail; emergency medical services increase for a third shift supervisor; a full year of salaries for county administrator, planning director and parks and recreation director; increase in retirement; and increase in library funding. There was also an increase in facilities management for preventative maintenance. County Administrator David Edwards said there are seven roofs on county buildings that are leaking and air conditioners go out on a regular basis. Weve got to maintain them, Edwards said. Commissioner Lynn Artz said preventative maintenance will save the county money in the long run. The commission also agreed to reinstitute the Fine and Forfeiture Fund, which is dedicated to capture all nes received from various court related sources and the sheriffs of ce. This will allow for more transparency, Edwards said. There are several projects included for the ve-year plan for the one-cent sales tax fund. For 2012-13, public safety will receive money from the one-cent sales tax fund to pay for the purchase of a new ambulance, vehicles for the sheriffs of ce and an animal control vehicle. For the future, there will be money budgeted for a new animal control building, new ambulance and sheriffs of ce equipment, including emergency radios. Over the next 5 years for public facilities, there is money budgeted for the new sheriffs of ce annex, roof repair of the public works building, money for the new re and EMS facility, loan payment on the courthouse renovations and development of a soccer complex. For this upcoming scal year for parks and recreation, there is money set aside to improve Azalea Park and look at extending the walking trail into Hudson Park. The public really uses these parks, Edwards said. We need to accommodate the public. In the future, there is money earmarked for Hudson Park improvements; Newport Park bathroom improvements; Medart Park improvements, including ball eld lighting, park lighting, bathrooms, ball elds and storage facilities; and Equestrian Center improvements. For roads, there is money for road striping and Upper Bridge repairs for the upcoming scal year. For the future, money will be set aside for subdivision paving and re-striping. In the solid waste fund, Edwards said the county will be completely healed in 5 years and no increases are anticipated from Waste Pro. Also discussed during the workshop was the administrative restructuring that will occur at the end of this year. Deputy Administrator Tim Barden will no longer be with the county at the end of the year and the county budget will be turned over to the clerks of ce. Edwards said there will be other personnel changes as well. The rst budget hearing is scheduled for Sept. 4.COUNTY COMMISSION$40.8M budget proposedThe proposed $40.8 million budget includes no new tax increases, zero position growth, no employee raises and the same millage rate of 8.5 mills. NOTICE OF HEARING TO IMPOSE AND PROVIDE FOR COLLECTION OF SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS IN THE NORTHWOOD SUBDIVISION MUNICIPAL SERVICES BENEFIT UNIT AUGUST 9, 2012 City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be holding a Budget Workshop, August 21, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. A second Budget workshop meeting is scheduled for August 29, 2012 at 6:30 p.m., if needed. The meetings will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. AUGUST 9, 16, 2012BUDGET WORKSHOP MEETINGSAny person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling 850-962-4611. City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be changing the date of the regular August, 2012 meeting from the second Monday to the third Monday in August. The meeting will be held, August 20, 2012 at 6:30 p.m., 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL For further information or special assistance please contact the City Clerks Ofce at 850-962-4611AUGUST 9, 16, 2012NOTICE OF MEETING CHANGE PUBLIC NOTICEThe Wakulla County Canvassing Board will begin the opening of absentee ballots for the Primary Election Monday, August 13, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. and continue to open absentee ballots on Tuesday, August 14, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. in the ballot accounting room in the supervisor of elections ofce. The public is invited to attend. Henry F. Wells Supervisor of Elections Wakulla CountyAUGUST 9, 2012 WAKULLA COUNTY SMALL CITIES COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT NOTICE OF SECOND PUBLIC HEARING Monday, August 20, 2012 at 5:00 pm Wakulla County Commission Chambers 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Activity Budget LMI % (Approximately) Housing Rehabilitation $634,500 100% Temporary Relocation $ 3,000 100% Administration $ 112,500 N/A TOTAL BUDGET $750,000AUGUST 9, 2012 EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITYA FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: School board employees will get pay raise RJ Crum obituary Loren Heath Langston obituary Juvenile arrested for vandalism of church Tornado causes damage Wakulla could receive up to $40M from oil spill fines Ann Denson Poucher obituary Sheriffs office investigating possible fraud by attorney in Panaceathewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Editor, The News: We would like to thank Ivanhoe Carroll, director of Wakulla County Animal Control, for her article in the July 26 Wakulla News about the 30 puppies left at the shelter recently. She has done an excellent job of educating the public about the importance of spaying and neutering pets. Hopefully, pet owners who have not already done so will do their part to prevent unwanted litters! As for the person(s) who allowed these 30 puppies to be born shame on you. Tom & Janet McPherson Shell Point Beach Editor, The News: Sheriff Donnie Crum has recently spoken in some detail about the extraordinary response and effort by the staff of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce and others who assisted in responding to Tropical Storm Debby. A large THANK YOU to the sheriff and members of the WCSO is warranted. Sheriff Crum, Chief Deputy Jared Miller and majors Maurice Langston and Shepard Bruner all showed before, during and after the storm their intimate knowledge, devotion to the community and understanding of the impact of a natural disaster event. The sheriff and his command staff evidenced that they are part of the heart of Wakulla County and its citizens. From early planning and response before the storm, members of the WCSO were deployed to assist citizens with evacuation and security of their property. Members worked throughout the storm answering calls, providing calm and rendering aid to citizens. Others responded to downed powerlines and manned chainsaws to remove dozens of downed trees affecting homes, roadways and safety. Numerous land and water rescues were performed. The details of each of these efforts are quite extraordinary. For many days since the storm, the sheriff and WCSO staff have continued to respond to those affected. Assistance has been provided in areas of personal and property safety, security and debris removal and clean up. The sheriff has generously coordinated efforts with other community organizations deploying members to assist citizens who were dramatically affected by Debby. This effort continues, while the WCSO continues to provide the high level of public safety and aggressive response to crime the county has come to be known for. All of this comes from the sheriff, the WCSO leadership team and its members being deeply engaged, connected to, and caring about Wakulla County. Too many times the many activities and services provided by the WCSO can be taken for granted. The WCSO is not just the public safety agency of our county. We are very fortunate to have Sheriff Crum and members of the WCSO as part of the strong ber of our community, part of its heart. I wish to personally thank the sheriff and all of the men and women of the WCSO so very much for their dedication and service. Bruce Ashley CrawfordvilleEditors Note: Bruce Ashley is a detective at the WCSO, chair of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth and lost his home in the ooding from Tropical Storm Debby.Editor, The News: I am pleased to be a candidate for the Florida House of Representatives, District 7. During my campaign, I have had the opportunity to meet with many gracious residents of Wakulla and other counties. One question that I frequently hear or am asked to respond to centers on, What I can do for the folks in Wakulla County? as I serve them in the legislature. Fortunately for me and residents of Wakulla, I can speak to the record I created when I served the small rural counties of northwest Florida a few years ago as the representative for the district also numbered at that time as District 7. While I served as representative, I worked tenaciously to keep rural hospitals viable, to get sparsity funding in education for small districts, to be sure that this areas state correctional of cers received the cost area differential (CAD) equalizing their starting salaries to the level begun for of cers in south Florida in the 1980s, to represent with aggression the fishing industry (even though Wakulla County was not speci cally my constituency at that time), to preserve the residents rights to hunting and recreational activities without undue or burdensome bureaucracy, and to work to continue to upgrade much needed roads in all rural counties in northwest Florida, Wakulla County. (The road issue in Wakulla County is one that desperately demands focused and constant attention. Many residents use these roads as they travel to work; potential customers and tourists must use them too, if they are to come to Wakulla County.) As a legislator (l996-98), I was recognized as Legislator of the Year for my support of all small counties by the Florida Sheriffs Association, the Small County Coalition, Florida Association of Counties, the Small Schools Consortium and the Fishermans Federation. I am proud of this hard-earned record just as I am honored to have served the people in rural northwest Florida. I ask that you consider all that you have seen and heard in my brochures, letters, TV and radio spots. Then VOTE for an effective legislator who is and will continue to be available to you, accessible at all times, and willing to work hard to represent the people of District 7, Jamey Westbrook. I ask for your VOTE so that I can work for YOU! Sincerely, Jamey Westbrook gayle.westbrook@jcsb.org Editor, The News: In last weeks Wakulla News, two environmental items caught my eye that warrants further discussion. Since we tout ourselves as the natural place to be and are pursuing a niche in ecotourism including bringing an environmental institute here, it is important to present information in The News accordingly. ON FISH First, in the Outdoor section, which often is my favorite to read, there was a picture of a young boy, his dad and a Gulf Sturgeon they just pulled onto the boat and were trying to hold up for the photograph. Catching some a prehistoric beast is indeed quite a feat and something to remember. Having just taken my family fishing that same weekend and seeing the excitement in my youngsters faces (and wifes for that matter) when catching even small sh, including a baby shark, is quite a joy. So I can imagine this boys and his fathers excitement. Unfortunately, the pictured fish should never have been brought onto the boat. Gulf Sturgeon are listed as threatened on the U.S. Endangered Species List due to decades of over shing and habitat degradation (i.e., damming rivers). The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission lists it as a Prohibited Species meaning it is unlawful to harvest, possess or land this species. Bringing a sh onto a boat constitutes possession and prohibited species should instead be returned immediately to the water according to FWC guidance for handling prohibited species. This guidance does not consider bringing the animal onto the boat temporarily in order to take pictures as immediate release and therefore constitutes a violation. It is up to the angler to anticipate what may be caught and how to react appropriately not only for the safety of the angler (in this case including a boy), but also for the safety of the sh. The Wakulla News should be aware of fish regulations enough as to know what type of messages will be presented when publishing pictures and sh stories. In my opinion, this type of picture of bringing prohibited species onto a boat for the sole purpose of taking photos sends the wrong message about how we should be caring for our shared public resources particularly those whose populations are severely depleted and still in trouble. ON FROGS The other article (by the Countys Extension Of cer) that caught my eye was on the Eastern Spadefoot Toads plaguing Wakulla. Calling this huge bloom of toads a plague was an unfortunate depiction as it implies widespread af iction. While I certainly appreciated the article, the negative connotation of the emergence of these wonderful toads takes away from the great public service theyve contributed to following the deluge from Tropical Storm Debby. In the days following the storm, millions upon millions of tadpoles could be seen in much of the standing water and ditches throughout Wakulla County. If one looked close enough, as me and my 7 year old did, one would see that there were also no mosquito larvae to speak of where these tadpoles ourished. These pollywogs came to our rescue! They, along with the mosquito sh if your ditches were lucky enough to have them cleaned up on the mosquito larvae helping to ensure that the inevitable mosquito explosion wouldnt be nearly as bad as it otherwise could be. So instead of referring to this toad phenomenon as a plague, I would refer to it as major boon in natural mosquito control. While these little critters can t on a dime, they sure indeed can and did eat a ton of mosquito larvae preventing countless additional mosquitoes emerging to plague us (a more appropriate use of that word). Chad Hanson CrawfordvilleREADERS WRITE:Some comments on sh and frogs Democratic Party o ers endorsements anks for story on the 30 puppies Sheri Crum, WCSO part of community Jamey Westbrook asks for support Don Curtis stands outEditor, The News: There is a ne crop of Republican primary candidates for the newly created district 7 Florida Legislature. They all are running great campaigns. When all the speeches are nished and all the postcard mailers are mailed, one candidate stands out as THE conservative candidate we all can count on Don Curtis. Don is not new to Wakulla County. Years before his run for this position, Don was in our community, supporting our local Republican committee as we sought to organize and reach out to other county Republicans. Don helped us lay the foundation and was willing to do whatever it took to help us get started. Don will always be there for us in Wakulla County. He has an impressive resume; he is a farm owner, former school board member, assistant director of the Florida Division of forestry, member of the governing board of the Suwannee River Management District and a lifetime member of the NRA, to name a few. Don Curtis believes we need to get back to the basics of governing. He believes that the U.S. and Florida Constitutions are the laws of the land and any other laws that get passed must conform with constitutional authority granted by the people to government not the other way around. He believes that in order to keep our individual tax burden low, we must have a vibrant private sector economy. That means creating private sector jobs. He believes tax dollars are your dollars. They must be spent frugally for the services that government should be providing they shouldnt be used for pork projects or wish lists. As a businessman and family man, Don is used to balancing budgets. He also worked in government for 10 years of his career. He can hit the ground running in Tallahassee as he already knows how budget, tax and spending issues work. He also knows how to spot when theyre not working. Thats part of the government oversight role a Legislator must provide. As our representative, Don will listen and stand up against special interests that seek to gain at our expense. He will work to thwart bad legislation, and support good legislation that helps our part of Florida. Don is a good conservative friend of Wakulla County. He stands out as the clear choice. Gordon McCleary Former Chairman Wakulla County Republican Party Founding Past President Wakulla County Republican Club Editor, The News: As Chair of the Wakulla Democratic Party, I would like to urge all registered voters in Wakulla to take the time to vote in the Aug. 14 primary election. All voters Democrat, Republican, and non-partisan are able to vote for the Circuit Judge 2nd Circuit Group 2, School Board District 2, and Soil and Water Seats 3 and 5. Please take the time to cast your ballot in these races. On the Democratic Party ballot, we have several races pending. U.S. Senator Bill Nelson has been endorsed by the Florida Democratic Party. I ask you to join me with your vote in returning Senator Nelson to Washington to serve Florida. There are four candidates competing to be the Democratic nominee for Congressional District 2. The Wakulla Democratic Party is not endorsing a candidate in this contested primary. Three candidates are vying to be the Democratic nominee in State House District 7. The Wakulla Democratic Party will not endorse in this primary race. We will also not be endorsing in the Circuit Judge race. For School Board District 2, the Wakulla Democratic Party supports Mike Scott. His service on the School Board has been part of the Wakulla County School District formula for success. Our status as a high performing school is known across Florida why second guess success? For Soil and Water Seat 3, the Wakulla Democratic Party supports Chuck Hess. Hess has professional experience relevant to this position and his personal advocacy for the natural resources that make Wakulla such a special place to live is widely known. For Soil and Water Seat 5, the Wakulla Democratic Party supports Cal Jamison. His work on behalf of Wakulla Springs is known far and wide. He is the right man to serve Wakulla on a board devoted to the stewardship of our precious natural resources. Finally, I would like to take the opportunity to invite Wakulla citizens to celebrate the Primary results with us at our Wakulla Democratic Party headquarters on Tuesday, Aug. 14, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Northpointe Center on Crawfordville Highway. Refreshments will be served. For more information, visit our website at wakullademocrats.org. Thank you, Rachel Sutz Pienta ChairWakulla Democratic Executive Committee

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 5ANominate this years Farm FamilyNominations for the 2012 Wakulla Farm Family of the Year Award are being accepted through Aug. 24 at the Extension Of ce. The annual recognition program is a cooperative effort between the North Florida Fair and county Extension Of ces. This award acknowledgment of the contributions farmers, ranchers and other agricultural producers have made to the economy, culture and lifestyle of Wakulla County. To make a nomination contact Cathy Frank at (850) 926-3931 or at cathy52@u edu for an application. Editor, The News: Republicans in Wakulla County have four candidates to choose from during the Primary for the State House District 7 race. Of those, only candidate Halsey Beshears has never held public of- ce or run for public of ce. The other three candidates have been in the political arena for years. Folks may remember that candidate Jamey Westbrook is a former Democratic State Legislator, and that both Mike Williams and Don Curtis ran unsuccessful political campaigns to try and ll the State House seat that was ultimately won by Leonard Bembry. Wakulla County needs a representative who will put our local wants and needs ahead of his own, as well as a representative who knows what its like to run a small business. Halsey Beshears has those quali cations. Halsey and his family have owned property in Wakulla County for years and Halsey is the only candidate to open up a campaign of ce here in Wakulla County, as well as employ local citizens to work at that of ce. His commitment to Wakulla County is quite evident. Couple Halseys ties to Wakulla County with his experience as a successful small business owner, who has not spent years running for a political of- ce, but rather on running a small business that has led to economic growth, and it becomes apparent that Halsey Beshears is the best choice for Wakulla County in the House District 7 Republican Primary. I hope you will join me in voting for Halsey Beshears during the Primary. And please vote remember, early voting has begun for the Primary here in Wakulla County and I truly hope everyone is making it a priority to get out and vote. Many folks have paid dearly for us to have this right and every American should take the time to exercise this symbolic gesture of freedom. By the time this edition of The Wakulla News has been published, you will still have three days left that you can utilize to vote early in the Primary (at the Supervisor of Elections Of ce). Then you will have an additional day to vote, which is the traditional Primary Election on Aug. 14, which you do at your precinct. Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells and his team of paid and volunteer staff, do an excellent job of making it very easy for you to vote. Theres no reason we cannot achieve a 100 percent voter turnout here in Wakulla County. Voting gives each citizen an opportunity to make a difference. Please get out and exercise this cherished freedom. Chris Russell Crawfordville Editor, The News: Cal Jamison is pleased to announce his candidacy for the of ce of Soil & Water Conservation District Supervisor, Seat 5. This unpaid, non-partisan position, will be decided by the Aug. 14 Primary Election. Im running for this of- ce because I saw a need for someone with my abilities and qualification to step up and help reactivate the commission, Jamison said. The Wakulla Soil & Water Conservation District has five elected supervisors. Current Chair Joe Duggar was unopposed and will remain on the board in Seat 2. He had worked with Jamison on several projects and encouraged him to run for the vacant seat. After attending an informational meeting at the library about the duties of the position, and attending a recent meeting of the Soil & Water District, Jamison felt he was a perfect fit to carry out the duties of this job. From 2002 to 2011 Jamison served as the Wakulla Springs Ambassador, a position with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection that served to promote the protection and restoration of Wakulla Springs through education and outreach. For More than 10 years Ive been the Wakulla Springs Ambassador and during that time I have acquired what I think is an awesome education in our karst geology and the waters that ow through and under Wakulla County, Jamison said. During that time he has spent countless hours performing eld studies and has added more than 600 sinkholes to the database that covers the Wakulla Springs Basin and surrounding areas and has worked with numerous landowners, both public and private, to help preserve and protect the aquifer. Under the Florida Springs Initiative Program Jamison was able to acquire funding to assist landowners in cleaning up contaminated sinkholes and protecting our drinking water. All of the projects were done at no cost to the landowner. Jamison has led the restoration efforts at Butler Sink, Turner Sink, Indian Spring and two sinks on a tree farm off of New Light Church Road, as well as assisted with the projects at Emerald and Cherokee sinks now on Wakulla Springs property. All of the projects had speci c goals but working with farmers, landowners and others to implement best practices for land management that serve to protect the aquifer, was the ultimate goal of the projects. In the course of his job as Springs Ambassador, Jamison has developed excellent working relationships with many of the agencies that will be an asset to the position on the Soil & Water Conservation District. I have a good working rapport with Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Geological Survey and Northwest Florida Water Management District. he said. I have worked closely with the Division of State Lands to identify and acquire lands for the protection of Wakulla Spring sand I have been intimately involved with the dye traces to Wakulla Springs. Jamison is currently assisting the county planning department in developing a comprehensive plan amendment to allow for the restoration of sinkholes, a proposal he initiated to assist landowners. In discussing the impact the Soil & Water Conservation District can make in Wakulla County, Jamison said, Currently there are programs we are not taking full advantage of and I would like to bring these monies home to Wakulla. The Soil & Water Conservation Districts conserve Flor idas natural resources through a variety of programs including demonstration projects, educational workshops, conservation projects and cooperative programs. Jamison said he looks forward to helping Wakulla County landowners, both public and private, in implementing the best land management practices to preserve our world class environment. Jamison has been very active in the community for a number of years. He is a founding member of the Wakulla County Historical Society serving on its Board of Directors since its inception and is currently the director of their local History Museum and Archives. He is also a Board member of the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park. Jamison has Associate of Arts Degree as well as Bachelor and Masters degree in anthropology and archaeology from FSU and has lived in Wakulla County for more than 30 years. Cals wife, Susan, is the librarian at Shadeville Elementary School. Doug Jones Crawfordville Editor, The News: The following letter was written two weeks before our dad went to be with our Lord. In talking with my dad, this was truly the way he felt about Mr. Charlie Creel. At my dads service, we all appreciated the kind words Mr. Creel said about dad, and we will always be grateful for all that he has done for us. Sharon Wisham Crawfordville Editor, The News: I would like to take this opportunity to say its time for a change in the sheriffs of ce in Wakulla County. I started in law enforcement in 1972 and retired in 2000. I served with W.R. (Bill) Taff and David Harvey. Its time for a sheriff for all of the citizens of Wakulla County. I have known Charlie Creel for 20 years and I have found him to be an honest man and an outstanding state trooper. He will be the sheriff for everyone. I worked with him on several occasions and he was always respectful to the citizens of the county and treated them with dignity. Lets elect Charlie Creel the next sheriff of Wakulla County. He is the right man for the job. Lt. Fred Bailey Retired Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce MariannaEditors Note: Lt. Fred Bailey died in Marianna on July 10. Charlie Creel is an honest man Supporting Halsey Beshears for House Leonard Bembry is her choice for Congressreaders speak out More OpinionsEditor, The News: For those of you who do not know my dad, Leonard Bembry, I would like to give you a little personal background from a daughters perspective. I believe that when you learn more about Leonard Bembry and his values, he will be your choice for U.S. Congress. My dad is one of the most dedicated and determined people I know. I have watched him as a community leader, farmer, businessman, state representative and most importantly as a father and grandfather. He has always been the spiritual leader of our family and I know his faith and dedication to serving you in Washington will outweigh even what I have experienced in the past. He and my mom raised us on our family farm in Madison County. In those days we grew row crops and tobacco and as the youngest of three children I was always looking for a way to get out of work in the tobacco eld. I fondly remember getting to escape by going with my dad every other Friday to the tobacco warehouse in Valdosta, Ga. He would talk to me during that long ride and I remember him telling me, Our true character is judged by the degree to which we are willing to keep our commitments to others. I did not fully understand what he meant when I was a child, but I have watched him live his life by this principle. Of course dad was also running a small business in Tallahassee which he did for more than 40 years and certainly faced some tough economic times over the years. Whether it was working on the farm, running his business or representing us in the Florida House, I can honestly say with conviction that he made it because he is the hardest working man I know. That personal experience is why my dad is committed to the way of life we lead as the small business owners, farmers and middle class families of North Florida. He doesnt need a lobbyist to tell him the issues important to you, he has lived them. My dad will be dedicated to stand up for these issues and he is solidly committed to ensuring that our issues in North Florida are heard in Washington. In his four years in the Florida House, dad has often said that his position as a legislator is to loyally represent the peoples interest. He has stood up to the special interests for the communities he represents, and the people who live there. His seat in the Florida House belongs to the people of the district and his seat in the U.S. House will belong to you and all of the people he will tirelessly represent in Washington, D.C. I feel lucky to have been molded by the principles by which my dad lives, and my husband and I strive to raise our children much the same way. I know we would be fortunate to have him as our voice in the United States Congress. Sincerely, Melissa Bembry Culp missybembryculp@gmail.comJamison seeks seat on Soil & WaterBy HERB DONALDSON The Palaver Tree Theater Company is putting together a small documentary tentatively titled, The Wakulla 50 in which 50 people, over 50, tell their stories of living and working here. I had spoken with Cheryl Creel about the project. She said I should contact Miss Ruth, whose connection to Wakulla Springs, among other things, might be worth considering. Almost six weeks ago, I reached out to Miss Ruth, telling her who I was and about the project. Without hesitation she agreed to take part. Wed set a date to get together a week later. She also mentioned that she had something for me a play: Maybe you can take a look at it and do something with it, she said. I told her Id be honored to take a look. And I was, for Id no idea she even knew I existed, or was aware of the work that I did. At her house, Miss Ruths sister and brother-in-law greeted me. And there, in the threshold, stood her husband, D.P. High Sr. I put out my hand, we shook, and with a big grin he asked who I was. I told him, and he spoke my grandmother Annies name, along with her mothers, sisters and brothers. My grandma babysat his kids from his rst marriage. It was with this feeling of welcome that I looked down at the lady who sat on a small chair, just inside the doorway: Ruth McCallister Davis-High. I could tell from the smile on her face that she was ready to talk. I found that shed been having spells lately. One had occurred only a few hours earlier. I begged to come back some other time, but she asked that I stay. I thought it rude to take out my recorder to capture the moment, so I left it in my bag. It was a decision I now regret. She was born in 1926, only a few yards from the house in which we sat. An FSU graduate, she taught at schools in our area and in south Florida. Some years later she lived in Lexington because of her sons desire to attend the University of Kentucky. Her fascination with the Kentucky Derby, in Louisville, sparked impromptu meetings and lifelong friendships with a number of those who owned and raced horses. Kentucky is also where she got into fashion, which helped catapult her to New York. But it was Wakulla Springs that tingled my interest. Ruth had been hired by the big man himself, Edward Ball, to become manager of the Springs. When it came to Ruth, Ball was nothing more than a gentle giant. If there was anything he thought I needed to know, Ruth said, he made sure I learned it. She told me of Balls taste for a particular Spanish Bean soup. He sent me all the way to Louisiana so that I could learn first-hand how to make it, she recalled. He would send her on excursions around the country to nd what other resorts and natural hideaways were doing to gain customers. She meet with managers and directors abroad, then sat with Ball upon her to return to tinker with her notes and ideas; shaping them in ways to better promote the Springs. And promote it she did. She reached out to FSU and set in place something akin to a work-study program. College students worked at the Springs and earned school credit. As legislative sessions took place Ruth wrote personal letters to governors, senators and other dignitaries encouraging them to stay at the lodge, convincing them to hold events there. While attending a function in Tallahassee shed heard that Margaret Truman, daughter of Americas 33rd President, Harry S. Truman, was coming to town. She wrote Ms. Truman a letter, welcoming her to our area and extended an invitation to visit the Springs. Ms. Truman accepted. Ruth was often asked how she managed such a feat. Her response was always the same: With a 3 cent stamp, she laughed. Peter Lawford, a member of the original Rat Pack, who married a Kennedy, and is believed to be the last person to speak to Marilyn Monroe alive, visited the Springs more than once. There was a great deal more she, her husband and I talked about, including those publicity photos of her in Native of the Mysterious Waters out ts. Not to mention the infamous bottled water debacle that set a few environmentalists on edge some years back. She gave me the typed script of a play and I promised her I would read it. Just then, her sister and brotherin-law returned. They were not alone: two paramedics were in tow. I thanked her and her husband for their time and promised her I would see her in a week. Her hand was the last one I touched before I left. That day, I read the entire script. Later, I was due to call Miss Ruth and schedule our interview. It was a Thursday morning, and I decided to read the Tallahassee Democrat before the call. That was when I saw her name in the obituary column. I dropped the paper and went to the phone. I spoke to a lady who, I believe, was her stepdaughter. Overcoming my shock, I expressed my condolences. During the conversation she repeated my name and I heard Mr. High in the background say: Tell him I need to speak to him. He can stop by any time. A few days later I did so, bringing the script with me to return. Id heard often that life is short. I couldnt help being disappointed with myself for taking the gift of time for granted. It was odd, walking in, seeing the familiar things in the room, the origins of which wed discussed during my last visit. Only now, something special was missing, which I and, obviously, Mr. High, both felt. We stopped and took the time to remember it all. Herb Donaldson is a local playwright and director of Palaver Tree Theater.Remembering Ruth McCallister Davis-High

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments WEDNESDAY: and Adults 10:30am 11:00am Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Churchreligious views and events Church Briefs Mrs. Lottie Roddenberrys 101st birthday partyThe family of Mrs. Lottie Roddenberry invites friends and relatives to help celebrate her 101st birthday on Saturday, Aug. 11, at the fellowship hall of Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. Drop in between noon and 3 p.m. for refreshments and visiting. No gifts, please. Booksigning set for local author at Books-A-Million Local author John Wade, whose book, In Sketch of a Prophecy was recently published, will hold a booksigning at BooksA-Million bookstore in Tallahassee on Saturday, Aug. 11, from noon to 3 p.m. In the book, Wade illustrates many of the features of the Tabernacle of Moses and Temple of Solomon, along with the historic Old Testament rituals that took place there. Coupled with meticulous citations of scripture and intricate artwork, he uses the biblical descriptions of these buildings to show what Christians can expect in heaven. These descriptions are blueprints of the transformed Christian heart and even patterns of heaven itself, our future home. Holy Ghost Revival to be held at Charlotte FaithYoure invited to a Holy Ghost Summer Revival at Charlotte Faith and Deliverance Temple beginning Wednesday, Aug. 8, through Friday, Aug. 10. For more information, contact Alice Williams at 926-7322.Youth raise money for camp OUT TO PASTORLocal church appreciation dayBy REV. JAMES L. SNYDER It is funny where you pick up an idea. I know I was not born with a truck full of ideas like some people. Take, for example, the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. She has more ideas than you can shake a stick at, and believe me; I have shaken many a stick at her, behind her back, of course. I have to scrap around for an idea and then when I do nd one I am so exhausted from the search that I am not sure what to do with it. Then an idea comes looking for me. That is a strange phenomenon. I was watching the news with my wife when we heard the lead story of the day about the Chick- l-A appreciation day. Im not sure I know all the political ins and outs of that sort of thing. Everything seems to have some kind of political overtone to it these days. What was once a matter of morality has become a matter of policy. Politics have invaded every aspect of our life, and I am so looking forward to heaven where, someone told me and I cannot reveal the source, but the word is out, there are no politics in heaven. Whenever you have an opportunity to go out and buy some chicken, I say take it. It was not hard to convince my better half to go out for supper. We do not do it too much anymore. What with the traf c and the nances, it hardly seems worthwhile. That is why I always brag on my wifes cooking. Oh, boy, I will say after a meal, you cant get anything this good at some restaurant. She smiles, but I suspect she knows what I am saying. Well, we did try to go to Chick- l-A but we could not get within 17 blocks of it. It seems everybody and their third cousin was out getting chicken for supper. Oh well, you cannot participate in everything, but at least we tried. As we circled the block for the 19th time, the idea came to me. If we can have a Chick- l-A appreciation day because the head of the company said he believed in some traditional values, then why cant I? I believe in everything traditional. I am the most traditional person you will ever meet. Before there was a me, there was not much that was traditional. I go back so far I can remember when dirt was clean. I want the whole world to know that I believe in tradition and I am not just ddling on the roof. I know it is old fashioned but I believe in the Bible. If it is in the Bible, I believe it, although I must confess I do not understand everything in the Bible. But then, nobody understands everything in their world. The smartest person knows he does not know everything. I built my life upon the values stressed in the Bible and I take it as the Word of God. I know tradition is old-fashioned, but I still embrace it. If it is traditional, I probably believe it. Some people believe that if it is new, it is okay and if it is old, throw it away. Experience teaches us that it is the exact opposite. Take medicine for example. Sure, many people have bene ted from modern advancements in medicine. I am appreciative of every advancement. But then, if medicine has made such inroads into our culture why are more and more people sick? Why are the hospitals full and over- owing? Why are there not enough doctors to take care of all of the sick? I am thankful for what medicine has done, but for every cure it achieves, three more diseases pop up sticking out their tongue. Yes, I believe in tradition. Most people are traditional in many areas of their life. Do you realize that it was traditional for your great, great, great grandfather to drink water? It was traditional for your great, great, great grandfather to go to sleep at night... To get up in the morning... And the list goes on and on. Those things, which are traditional, are those things that have endured the wearing element of time. In light of all of this traditional headwagging, I want to propose another appreciation day. This coming Sunday I declare it to be Local Church Appreciation Day. Everybody who believes in traditional values will show up at the church of their choice and make their vote count. I know it will be a shock and we run the danger that many church ceilings will cave in, but I think it is worth the risk. Of course, there is the possibility that when many pastors see their sanctuary lled with people they will pass out in sheer shock. In the meantime, I am going to stick to what the Bible says here regardless of what happens. In everything give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus to you-ward (1 Thessalonians 5:18 KJV). Every Sunday should be local Church Appreciation Day.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. He lives with his wife, Mart ha, in Silver Spring s Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. New Testament Bible ChurchBible-believing Church meets at Wakulla County Public Library, large conference room. Songs, prayer and Bible teaching/preaching. The Lord Jesus described the basic meaning of a church in a very simple and yet profound way:For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.Come take part in our study of Gods Word.4330 Crawfordville Hwy. Special to The NewsDue to their fundraising efforts and donations, the youth group of the Wakulla United Methodist Church attended the popular Camp CrosSWILD in Panama City in early August. Youth Director Josh Hawkins said the youth of Wakulla UMC have worked hard to raise the almost $300 per person camp tuition. According to the CrosSWILD Summer Camp website, their vision is to ignite the youth to live boldly and wild for the cross of Jesus Christ. TOP: Youth Director Josh Hawkins, center, takes a few moments with Wakulla UMC youth from left to right, Hannah Barbree, Carah Cox, Cameron Sherrell, Devon Jose, Haley Barbree and Caylee Cox. BOTTOM: Barbree, Devon Jose and Gabrial Jose wash cars for dollars. Tikvat Ami Messianic SynagogueThe Hope of My PeopleRabbi Joshua Lessardrabbijosh@tikvatami.com850-364-8925 Rabbi JoshService: Saturday at 11 amwww.tikvatami.com3324 N. Monroe Street, TallahasseeLocation: 3324 N. Monroe St. Tallahassee at Gingerbread Pre-school/Heritage Academy

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 7AObituariesCharmayne J. Chouinard Jerry Braxton Crutchfield Joseph D. Hicks Charles C. Laughton Eula Wardene Nichols Josephine Bullock Rozar Colleen Maybee Weber Charmayne J. Chouinard, 69, of Crawfordville, went to be with the Lord on Monday, Aug. 6, in Tallahassee. She was born in Chicago on Nov. 15, 1942, the daughter of Edward and Esther Gabriel. She was an active member of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church in Medart. She worked for many years as a real estate agent in the Chicago area and, later in life, at WalMart of Crawfordville. She loved to travel, was an avid NASCAR fan, and always welcomed others with open arms and a warm smile. The family and friends of Charmayne have been blessed knowing she was in their lives. A memorial service will be held at a later date at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church in Medart. Call (850) 728-7925 for further details. Charmayne was predeceased by her beloved husband, Joseph Antoine Chouinard; and her sister, Gayle Gabriel. Survivors include her son and daughter-in-law, Richard and Maureen Chouinard of Crawfordville; son and girlfriend, Michael Chouinard and Danielle Ryan of Tallahassee; and grandchildren, Michael Chouinard Jr. of Orlando, Carla Chouniard, and John Brenkus Jr., both of Crawfordville. In lieu of flowers, the family requests any donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice of Tallahassee and/or the American Cancer Society. Jerry Jay Braxton Crutch- eld, 74, of Sanford, died on Thursday, Aug. 2. He was born in Alamance County, N.C., on Oct. 27, 1937, to Elisha and Leona Crutch eld. He served in the U.S. Air Force for 24 years and was a minister for more than 20 years. Visitation was held on Sunday, Aug. 5, at Central Baptist Church in Sanford, with a funeral service following. Another funeral service was held on Tuesday, Aug. 7, at 3 p.m. at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church in Crawfordville. Interment followed at Pigott Cemetery in Crawfordville with military honors. Survivors include his wife, Bertie Pigott Crutchfield of Sanford; two sisters, Val Carden of Graham, N.C., and Nettie Day (Bob) of Burlington, N.C.; one brother, Graham Crutch eld (Caroline) of Raleigh, N.C.; one son, Jay Crutchfield (Dana) of Lake Mary,; two daughters, Sandy Barnes (Randy) of Crawfordville, and Kristy Woolsey (Justin) of Sanford, as well as seven grandchildren. Besides his parents, he was predeceased by his sister, Dorothy Cates; and brother-in-law, Thomas Cates. Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay is in charge of the arrangements. Joseph D. Hicks, 76, of Panacea, died on Tuesday, July 31. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Survivors include his wife, Donna Hicks of Panacea; sons, Craig (Patsy) Hicks and Wayne Hicks, both of Knoxville, Tenn., Eddie (Angela) Hicks of Atlanta, Eldon Hicks of Panacea, and Joe (Brenda) Hicks of Madison; daughters, Dena (Charles) Hicks of Knoxville, Tenn., Patricia (Donnie) Mullens of Snellville, Ga., Tammy (Leonard) Henderson of Lawrenceville, Ga., and Dea Hicks of Panacea; a sister: Judy (Walter) Mathis of Bremen, Ga.; 20 grandchildren, 26 great-grandchildren, one great-great-grandchild; and many nieces and nephews. Arrangements under the direction of Forbes Funeral Home (850) 559-3380. Please sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome. net. Charles C. Laughton, 48, of Sopchoppy, passed away Thursday, Aug. 2. A Corrections Officer with the State of Florida, he was actively involved with the Police Benevolent Association, the K-9 team of Franklin County, and was a Field Training Of cer for the Department of Corrections. He enjoyed playing guitar, taking pictures, boating, spending time with his family and being involved in his church, Christian Worship Center. Survivors include his wife, Sarah Laughton of Sopchoppy; son, Isaiah Laughton of Sopchoppy; daughters, Tina Laughton of Eastpoint and Isabella Laughton of Sopchoppy; parents, Charles and Marilyn Laughton of Norfolk, N.Y.; brother, Kevin Laughton of Norfolk, N.Y.; sister, Penny Sue (Mike) Williams of New York; stepsons, Allen (Amy) James of Madison, Conn., and Joseph (Tonya) James of Apalachicola; and three grandchildren. Funeral Services were held on Tuesday, Aug. 7, at Christian Worship Center in Crawfordville with Pastor Steve Taylor and Rev. Nolan Kent of ciating. Burial followed at Panacea Park Cemetery in Panacea. The family received friends on Monday, Aug. 6, at Christian Worship Center. Arrangements are under the direction of Forbes Funeral Home (850) 559-3380. Please sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome.net. Eula Wardene Dene Eastman Nichols, 76, died on Sunday, July 29, at Eden Springs Rehabilitation Center in Crawfordville. She was born in Foley, but lived most of her life in Tallahassee. She was a member of the Presbyterian Church. She worked as an executive secretary for the State of Florida. A memorial service was held on Sunday, Aug. 5, at 3 p.m. at Beggs Chapel in Perry. A reception followed at the Perry Shrine Club. Survivors include her daughter, Rhonda Chapman of Tallahassee; her sister, Louise Gray of Tallahassee; one granddaughter; four great grandchildren; and her lifelong friend, Helen Harvey. Josephine Bullock Rozar, 97, was born Sept. 8, 1914. in Crawfordville and died Aug. 6, peacefully at her home in Tallahassee with her family by her side. She was the daughter of Truman Brack Thomas and Sallie Coeska Raker. Her grandparents were Edward Truman Thomas and Josephine Bullock of Gadsden County and Robert Henry Raker and Maggie Wallace of Wakulla County. She was an avid golfer, a member of Capital City Country Club, Tallahassee Garden Club and Thomasville Road Baptist Church. She lived a long and interesting life, traveled throughout the world in her younger years with her husband, Buck, and loved her home and family. She had a great appreciation for her extended family and until her most recent years, was a great family historian. She was predeceased by her husband, Hansel Singleton Buck Rozar, founder of Tallahassee Welding & Machine Shop; son-in-law, William George Jones III; and sisters, Geraldine Whaley, Margaret Revell and Anna Snooks Carroll. Survivors include her daughter, Lucki Jo Jones; granddaughters, Shannon Jones (Jeff), Elizabeth GiGi Jones, Allison Small (Kenny); and three great-grandchildren, George Jones, Lucki Jo and Hannah Small. The family wishes to celebrate Jos life with Joy at Thomasville Road Baptist Church in Tallahassee on Thursday, Aug. 9, at 3 p.m. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308 or Thomasville Road Baptist Church. Bevis Funeral Home (850 385-2193) is handling the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at www.bevisfh.com. Colleen Maybee Weber, 84, passed away on Aug. 1, in Crawfordville. She was a native of Dundalk, Ontario, Canada, and had lived in Monticello for 24 years. She was a member of the Red Hats of Monticello, Triple L of Lloyd, and the First United Methodist Church of Monticello. Survivors include her son, William John MayBee; three daughters, Sharon Ann McGuire (David), Patty Sue Bartlum (Guy), and Rebecca Whatley (William Meador); one brother, Donald Colgan; and one sister, Hazel Guerin; one grandchild, Darek James MayBee (Jennifer); and four great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by William B. Maybee, Edward Finley Maybee, John J. Weber, and William Benjamin Zuber. A private burial will be held at a later date. Charmayne J. Chouinard Jerry Braxton Crutch eld Eula Wardene E. Nichols Colleen Maybee Weber Josephine Bullock Rozar Charles C. Laughton Joseph D. Hicks CREEL FOR SHERIFF e 20,000 Florida law enforcement ocers of the Fraternal Order of Police, Florida State Lodge, have endorsed Charlie Creel as the best choice for Sheri of Wakulla County.The endorsement I value most comes from YOU, the citizens of Wakulla County on Nov. 6th election day. Integrity You Can Count On Facebook at Charlie Creel for Sheriff charlieforsheriff@gmail.com (850) 926-4712 PO Box 482, Crawfordville, FL 32326www.charliecreel.comPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Afliation, for sheriff. For A Fresh Start with a Full-Time Sheriff ELECT CHARLIE Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringLassie WilliamsJune 2012 Winner Her name was drawn from I am so appreciative of being the recipient of this nice little gift I so enjoy eating out in Wakulla and I love reading The Wakulla News. 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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings CommunityAlexander Lewis earns Eagle Scout rankSpecial to The NewsAlexander Lewis, Boy Scout from Troop 5 Crawfordville, was awarded the Eagle Scout medal during a ceremony held on July 21 in Sopchoppy. The Eagle Scout title is the highest ranking honor a scout may hold with approximately two in every 100 scouts ever earning this title. During the ceremony Lewis recognized four mentors who have encouraged and inspired him including Andy Keith and Lambert West, both Scout troopmasters, Nancy Richardson, AVID high school teacher, and Winky Jenkins Rice, church youth leader. Lewis built a playset for the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church (SUMC) as his Eagle Scout project, and is currently seeking to earn the Scout God and Country honor. He is a senior at Wakulla High School and is active in the WHS band and drama programs. He is also a youth leader for the SUMC, and will be part of the rst class of AVID graduates at the high school. He aspires to attend the University of Florida and to become a school teacher and writer. Ashley and Robert Heuring Jr. of Crawfordville announce the birth of their daughter, Blakely RaeMarie Heuring, on July 24 at 2:41 a.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She was 6 pounds, 10 ounces, and was 20.3 inches in length. She has two brothers, Hayden, 7, and Robbie, 4, and two sisters, Harley, 8, and Keeley, 6. Her maternal grandparents are the late Michael and Ronda Hurley Sr. Her paternal grandparents are Robert and Vickie Heuring Sr. of Crawfordville. Special to The NewsThe Secondary Reading Council of Florida (SRCFL) awarded its 2012 Reading Teacher of the Year designation in the veteran category to reading educator Clara Michelle McMillan Kirby of the Leon County School District. Kibry is a reading coach at James R. Rickards High School under the administration of Dr. Michelle Gayle. The award was presented at the SRCFL Annual Conference held in Deer eld Beach on May 11 and 12. Kevin Smith of Just Read, Florida!, said Kirby is a collaborative practitioner who corrals resources and leads the charge in impacting student performance. He added that she was a tireless change agent for secondary reading. Each recipient will receive a check for $250 and free registration for the spring 2013 SRCFL annual conference. She is the daughter of Finley and Jean McMillan of Ochlockonee Bay. She has four children. She currently serve as president of the Leon County Reading Council. She is a member of the R. Don McLeod Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy, located in Crawfordville, and is also active in the American Legion Auxiliary and Daughters of the American Revolution chapters in Tallahassee. She is also the State Senior Curator for the Children of the American Revolution.Kirby named reading teacher of the year by reading councilSPECIAL TO THE NEWSNancy Lewis pins an Eagle Scout medal on her son, Alexander Lewis, during a medal ceremony on July 21. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSClara Michelle McMillan Kirby and son Ren GowanHeurings welcome baby girl, Blakely, on July 24 Email community news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar. Paid for by Leonard Bembry for Congress DON CURTIS is the right man at the right time for the Florida HousePolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Don Curtis, Republican, for State Representative ENDORSED BYUnited Christians of Florida Florida Forestry Association National Federation of Independent Business Police Benevolent Association Tallahassee Democrat 7 Call me and visit our website 850-843-0520 www.ElectDonCurtis.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolBy BETH ODONNELLAssistant Superintendent On top of being named an A school district, Wakulla County School District has been designated an Academically High Performing District for the fth consecutive year. Wakulla is one of only 19 school districts to earn this recognition, and one of only six districts that has maintained it for ve or more consecutive years. More than FCAT scores are taken into consideration to be designated as Academically High Performing, a school district must meet the following requirements: 1. Earn a grade of A for at least two consecutive years and have no district-operated school that earned a grade of F. 2. Comply with the class size requirements. 3. Have no material weaknesses or instances of material noncompliance noted in the school districts annual nancial audit. This honor not only recognizes the high expectations we have for educating our students, it also recognizes the importance of being fiscally responsible with the taxpayers money, said Superintendent David Miller. It is the collaborative effort of students, teachers, parents, and administrators giving their best every day that keeps this school district high performing. We are truly a community that values our childrens education. In 2007, the Legislature created the Academically High Performing District designation to recognize school districts that were consistently doing an outstanding job educating their students. Special to The NewsWakulla Middle School eighth grader Danna Richardson was recently recognized for her exceptional scores on the ACT. She received medals for State Recognition and Grand Recognition for scoring in the top 2 percent of seventh graders who took the ACT or SAT. The Duke University Talent Identi cation Programs seventh Grade Talent Search identifies students who scored in the 95th percentile on a grade-level achievement test. As part of the program, these students take the ACT or SAT. More than 77,000 students participated this year, and the Grand Recognition Ceremony honored seventh graders who earned scores equal to or better than 90 percent of college-bound seniors who took the same tests. Richardson is on the honor roll, a member of the WMS drama club, track team, brain bowl team and band. She cofounded the Wildcat Poetry Society, and she earned a green belt in tae kwon do. By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATHE CAPITAL, Aug. 3...With Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson resigning in the wake of a series of public-relations miscues and grading mistakes surrounding Floridas high-stakes testing and accountability regime, critics are sensing an opening to change the direction of the schoolreform movement in Florida. Lawmakers and parent organizations who want the state to focus less on FCAT results in evaluating schools are trying to use the search for a replacement for Robinson -who resigned this week to spend more time with his family -as a reason to re-evaluate the system he oversaw. Its a chance to throw out the old status quo of high-stakes testing and look at what might be best for kids and make some changes, said Kathleen Oropeza, one of the founders of Fund Education Now, an advocacy group. Rep. Perry Thurston, a Plantation Democrat set to lead his party in the next legislative session, was more blunt. The FCAT has failed students, teachers, and our state, he said in a statement responding to Robinsons resignation. A new state education commissioner can help Florida install a better and broader education accountability system for every school receiving taxpayer dollars that takes into account all the things students and teachers accomplish throughout the year. Robinsons tenure was marked by a major collapse in FCAT writing scores, blamed on increased standards, and a revision to school grades that changed the marks for more than 200 schools after the grades were released. The PTA has pressed members to send emails to Gov. Rick Scott encouraging him and state Board of Education members to appoint a Commissioner of Education who values a well-rounded, high quality public education and reduces the emphasis on high-stakes testing. The emails have poured into Scotts inbox. Another form email of unclear origin that has shown up several times in Scotts inbox which can be publicly viewed on the governors Sunburst email system hits many of the same notes. Commissioner Robinsons resignation will not quiet the discontent of Floridians for current politically-driven reform efforts, the letter begins. Sen. Bill Montford, a Tallahassee Democrat who also serves as CEO of the Florida Association of District School Superintendents, is not as critical of the FCAT as some other Democrats but still said the state should re-evaluate the test regardless of Robinsons decision. Lets have a serious discussion about, is this the best approach? he said. Even Scott recently questioned in off-the-cuff remarks whether Florida might test too much, though he hasnt elaborated on that thought since, and hasnt made any suggestion that he is likely to push for a major change in that area. But Republicans seem unlikely to budge from the reform effort that has formed the backbone of their education agenda since former Gov. Jeb Bush pushed accountability during his tenure. And Bushs Foundation for Floridas Future remains in uential in school debates in the Legislature. Patricia Levesque, executive director of the foundation, praised Robinson and the states high-stakes testing model in a statement following the commissioners resignation. He kept Florida an education-reform model for the nation, Levesque said. Under his leadership, Florida pushed forward with important improvements to its standards and accountability system to better prepare students for success. An overhaul of the states testing system is already on the way as Florida and other states move toward a more standardized curriculum. But the idea of testing as a major barometer for schools is still endorsed by Republicans, and at least one key lawmaker says the state shouldnt dump the FCAT in the meantime. This is an opportunity to take a breath and renew our commitment to the FCAT done right, said Sen. David Simmons, a Maitland Republican who chairs the panel that oversees school funding. While he didnt question the reasons for Robinsons resignation, Simmons said the change gives us an opportunity to put those mistakes behind us and move on. As for what the state should look for in its next commissioner, Simmons suggested the state make sure that the person is able to ll the dual roles of running the Department of Education and advising state leaders on policy. Obviously, we need somebody with both management skills and vision, he said. And Montford said it should be someone familiar with the landscape in Florida. Were moving so fast ... we cant afford the luxury of someone coming in and learning on the job, he said.Wakulla named Academically High Performing district Richardson honored for ACT scoresDanna Richardson FCAT critics see opening in Robinson resignation School news and announcements:Email jjensen@thewakullanews.net or drop it by the of ce at 3119-A Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. Email is preferred. News is edited for style, space, clarity and grammar and runs when space becomes available. Fellowship University of FloridaTallahassee Memorial HealthCare Physician Partners Cancer & Hematology Specialists has proudly assembled the best physicians from leading cancer institutions in the nation to form the strongest cancer ghting team in the area.NOW ACCEPTING New Patients Tim Broeseker, M.D. Fellowship Winship Cancer Institute/ Emory University School of Medicine Fellowship University of Florida Fellowship Indiana University School of Medicine Fellowship University of Florida Jeannine Silberman, M.D. Janice Lawson, M.D. Amit Jain, M.D. Iman Imanirad, M.D. TMH Physician PartnersCANCER & HEMATOLOGY SPECIALISTSp (850) 431-5360 f (850) 431-5367 Tallahassee Memorial Cancer Center | 1775 One Healing Place | Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Specialized Care. 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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBy MARJ LAW Cleaning black powder guns or those old folk with the dishpan hands. Stop! says Joe. Dont use your regular gun solvents to clean my black powder Kentucky Pistol! And he grabs it to himself like Im about to murder it. You dont clean a black powder gun like you do a modern gun, he continues his lecture. Black powder and the newer smokeless black powders are very corrosive. Theres a different solution for them. Actually, I did read up on the subject. In the old days, some of the pistols had barrels that would come easily off the gun. Since no one had fancy solvents back then, they dropped the barrels into vats of soapy water. And scrubbed. Of course, if you have a gorgeous long stock like Joes Kentucky Pistol, you dont drop it in a vat of water. But you still can use soapy water to scrub it inside and out. Not only are you scrubbing out the nasty smelly black powder, but on revolvers, people often put bear grease over the cylinders to keep them from going off together in a big chain reaction explosion. Bear grease has a consistency like Crisco, so its thick. Imagine Crisco impregnated with sulfur-y smelling our, and you can feel for someone having to clean that! Like modern day pistols, the insides of the barrels have no bluing or other nishes because they would not hold up to the explosive shooting. This means the metal is bare and ripe for rust. So, after a good scrub, the barrel needs to be lubricated. If you dont plan to shoot until the next black powder season, the whole pistol, revolver or long gun needs lubricating wherever there is metal. Then careful storage in a dry place is important. Joe ended up cleaning his Kentucky Pistol himself with a modern black powder solvent. I think he saw me eyeing the Dawn.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid gunner in her retirement.Cleaning black powder guns HOME ON THE RANGE Capt. Bert Strickland with his 99-pound black grouper caught aboard the Marion J from Lynn Brothers Seafood V in St. Marks. The world record is 113.6 pounds. Brag book:Berts grouper Panacea team winsSPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPanaceas Team Reel Smoker took rst place in the King sh Shootout on Sunday, Aug. 5, in Carrabelle with a 48.5-pound King. Capt. Blake Gardner of Reel Smoker Charters in Panacea lead the team to their second win. The rst win was a record holding 50.4-pound King in 2009. Congratulations Team Reel Smoker! In my last article, I wrote about the venomous three pit vipers we are likely to encounter in the Wakulla County area, especially after tropical storms like Debby. After heavy rains, snakes wander or disperse to nd new waters and feeding areas. They can be found just about anywhere, like in your yard or storage building! And, as I wrote last time, their venom can be very toxic its a specialized saliva full of unique enzymes and proteins, similar to the white of an egg. When we have egg nog were swallowing the white of eggs no problem. But if you were to inject the albumin of an egg into your vascular system, your precious bod would respond just as if youd been bitten. Things would get serious fast! Youll recall how some stunt people do an act of swallowing snake venom? Unless you had a massive bleeding ulcer, the venom would not affect you! The three pit vipers in our region are the little Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus milarius barbouri), the large Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteurs), and medium-sized, the Florida Cottonmouth (Afkistrodonpiscivorus conanti). The Cottonmouth is a true moccasin. Many water snakes are referred to as moccasins, but they are NOT venomous! Just west of our area along the Apalachicola River basin is the other North American true moccasin, the Southern Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrixcontortrix). Ive seen them around Torreya State Park. Neither have rattles, but like all pit vipers, they have their unique vertical pupils and keeled scales giving them a rough appearance. All pit vipers give birth to live young, termed viviparous, encased in a clear watery sack which soon ruptures when they crawl out to be on their own. The young of our native Cottonmouth looks almost exactly like a Copperhead. Both have a coppery color, bands crossing over their thick (for their length) body, and a bright yellow tail, which is believe it or not, used as a lure mostly for toads and frogs! Only the young Cottonmouth though has a distinct dark streak through the eye. Copperheads do not have this dark eye streak! And, according to experts who have made extensive (exhausting would be a better word) studies of our areas herps (the study of reptile and amphibians) the Copperhead does NOT range into Wakulla County, but is thought to when people see young Cottonmouths, they look so similar. Another pit viper is found northwest of our area, but east around the Okefenokee Swamp, and that is the Canebrake Rattlesnake, a beautiful pink colorphase of the true Timber Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus). Ive seen them live in the Osceola Management Area north of Interstate 10, but they are not in the Big Bend. Yes, when snakes are about to shed their skin their eyes (which remember, dont blink) get a milky opaqueness to them. They sense they are more vulnerable and will tend to hold up in a hiding place until theyve shed. If encountered while preparing to shed they can be more nervous, and perhaps a little more likely to defend themselves by striking. This also applies to the pit vipers. If a viper has just eaten, or if its very hot or fairly cool, or if the serpent feels exposed as in the middle of a road, then they may feel threatened perhaps not. Every snake (like us) has a different temperament, so just how likely they are to stand their ground is completely unpredictable.Wakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHMore on our local pit vipers The Waku lla News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com Re-StoreShadeville Highway926-4544Open Tues. Sat. 9 a.m. 5 p.m.

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This past week, the Coast Guard celebrated its 222nd birthday. According to the Coast Guard Historians Website (www.uscg.mil/history): The Coast Guards of cial history began on 4 August 1790 when President George Washington signed the Tariff Act that authorized the construction of ten vessels, referred to as cutters, to enforce federal tariff and trade laws and to prevent smuggling. Known variously through the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as the revenue cutters, the system of cutters, and nally the Revenue Cutter Service, it expanded in size and responsibilities as the nation grew. The Coast Guard is one of the oldest organizations of the federal government and until Congress established the Navy Department in 1798 it served as the nations only armed force a oat. In honor of the celebration of Coast Guard Day, members in attendance at the Flotillas monthly meeting enjoyed a cake specially made for the occasion. We were joined by several new and prospective members. What a great opportunity to show them what we are all about and share a part of our history! During the meeting, several things were discussed including the continued progress on our communications trailer, upcoming opportunities for public education and participating in events throughout our area through public affairs. Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos passed out awards as the meeting concluded. Dave Rabon received certi cate of appointment as FSO-Detatchment and will work with Flotilla leadership in building the detachment in the Carrabelle, St. George, Apalachicola area. Mike Harrison received an award for completing more than 60 vessel safety checks/marine dealer visits so far this year. This award is usually presented at the end of the year because it usually takes a member a year to accomplish this task. As part of our member training, Mark Rosen talked about the Midgett family who has had more than 150 family members serve in the Coast Guard since it first began. For more information on the family with information on a cutter named after one family member, visit www.uscg. mil/pacarea/cgcmidgett/ history.asp. Member Susan Blake also discussed her knowledge of the 1812 re-enactment of the Coast Guard in the Great Lakes. Hopefully we will hear more from her on this in a later column as well as from Mark Rosen on the Midgett family. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident Dont become a part of history for all the wrong reasons. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAuxiliarists celebrate the Coast Guards 222nd birthday with a cake. David Rabon receiving FSO appointment. Mike Harrison receives an award. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Rules for Safe Cave Diving During discussions with leaders from Wakulla County, I became aware that many did not understand the great measures our diving community have taken to promote safe cave diving. Several decades ago, when the cave diving community was a secret society, Sheck Exley wrote of a study he conducted of 800 Florida diving fatalities. He found most were educated people, unlike how they were portrayed. Half were found to be in open water and were set aside. The remaining were then evaluated for cause of death. In this group, he found open water dive instructors, U.S. Navy divers, scientists and more people usually described as knowledgeable divers. However, the largest subset of this group was found to lack overhead environment training (Rule 1: Formal Training). The cave community turned to their training agencies and sought to correct this problem by providing a class that is an extension to open water diving called Cavern Diving. All caves have a cavern. It is de ned as the cave (overhead environment) entrance, no further than 200 feet in from the surface, no deeper than 100 feet, and always in natural daylight with a visibility of 40 feet or better. Cavern diving is not conducted at night. During the cavern class, the rules for safe cave diving are discussed, to expose people to the hazards of cave diving. Cavern diving is now offered through all of the national diving training agencies. Sheck went on to describe in his study, why people died in a cave. People became disoriented and got lost. Did you ever get lost at the mall? Caves are similar underground passages with many rooms and passages. They are easily confusing and even more dif cult if the diver stirs up the sediment on the oor. Dry cavers get lost also, but they have air all around them, unlike the diver who must carry his breathing gas. The solution is to run a continuous line to the surface, one that can be followed by touch, one with directional arrows indicating the way out. Trained cave divers ALWAYS follow or deploy a continuous line when cave diving (Rule 2). The next was a lack of breathing gas management. Yes, they ran out of air, but more importantly, they failed to carry enough air to get back out of the overhead condition. Open water divers are taught when they run low of air, just ascend, which is not possible in a cave. Cave (and cavern) air management includes turning around to exit when you reach two-thirds of your remaining breathing supply: one-third to return and one-third for emergencies that may crop up along the way (Rule 3). A room with no windows or lights is dark. A cave is even darker. The study found perished divers carried few and unreliable lights. When they fail, without cave training, the diver is left with few options to nd their way out. While a diver can never carry too many lights, the standard is for a primary (bright light) and two back up reliable lights. Cavern divers use daylight as one light so they require a total of two. The third rule for safe cave diving is a minimum of three lights (Rule 4). Back in the day of the study, air was the only gas available to divers. Narcosis was a problem when diving deeper than 130 feet. The study found divers narcotized at deeper depth, like being drunk, but underwater. The rule became limit your depth. But today, divers can be trained on a readily available helium based mix that reduces narcosis, so the new rule is called narcosis management. Divers must know their breathing mixtures (Rule 5). All cave divers are trained to follow these safe cave diving rules. Open water divers can learn to safely dive the cavern and learn the rules for safe cave diving in a weekend long class. The vast majority of people diving caves do so safely, that is with careful risk management. P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday g Thu Aug 9, 12 Fri Aug 10, 12 Sat Aug 11, 12 Sun Aug 12, 12 Mon Aug 13, 12 Tue Aug 14, 12 Wed Aug 15, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 12:54 AM 3.1 ft. 1:34 AM 3.3 ft. 2:08 AM High 1.6 ft. 12:33 AM 1.9 ft. 1:14 AM 2.1 ft. 2:19 AM 2.2 ft. 3:52 AM 2.1 ft. 5:22 AM 1.9 ft. 6:27 AM 1.7 ft. 7:16 AM Low 3.4 ft. 6:36 AM 3.2 ft. 7:19 AM 3.1 ft. 8:29 AM 3.1 ft. 10:18 AM 3.3 ft. 11:41 AM 3.5 ft. 12:35 PM 3.8 ft. 1:18 PM High 1.2 ft. 2:16 PM 1.2 ft. 3:51 PM 1.0 ft. 5:22 PM 0.8 ft. 6:25 PM 0.5 ft. 7:11 PM 0.3 ft. 7:47 PM 0.2 ft. 8:19 PM Low 2.5 ft. 8:36 PM 2.4 ft. 10:27 PM 2.6 ft. 11:58 PM High Thu Aug 9, 12 Fri Aug 10, 12 Sat Aug 11, 12 Sun Aug 12, 12 Mon Aug 13, 12 Tue Aug 14, 12 Wed Aug 15, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 12:51 AM 3.1 ft. 1:31 AM 3.3 ft. 2:05 AM High 1.7 ft. 12:30 AM 2.0 ft. 1:11 AM 2.3 ft. 2:16 AM 2.4 ft. 3:49 AM 2.3 ft. 5:19 AM 2.1 ft. 6:24 AM 1.8 ft. 7:13 AM Low 3.4 ft. 6:33 AM 3.3 ft. 7:16 AM 3.2 ft. 8:26 AM 3.2 ft. 10:15 AM 3.4 ft. 11:38 AM 3.6 ft. 12:32 PM 3.8 ft. 1:15 PM High 1.3 ft. 2:13 PM 1.3 ft. 3:48 PM 1.1 ft. 5:19 PM 0.8 ft. 6:22 PM 0.6 ft. 7:08 PM 0.3 ft. 7:44 PM 0.2 ft. 8:16 PM Low 2.5 ft. 8:33 PM 2.5 ft. 10:24 PM 2.6 ft. 11:55 PM High Thu Aug 9, 12 Fri Aug 10, 12 Sat Aug 11, 12 Sun Aug 12, 12 Mon Aug 13, 12 Tue Aug 14, 12 Wed Au g 15, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 12:34 AM 2.6 ft. 1:30 AM 2.8 ft. 2:10 AM 3.0 ft. 2:44 AM High 1.5 ft. 1:37 AM 1.7 ft. 2:18 AM 1.9 ft. 3:23 AM 2.0 ft. 4:56 AM 1.9 ft. 6:26 AM 1.8 ft. 7:31 AM 1.5 ft. 8:20 AM Low 3.1 ft. 7:12 AM 3.0 ft. 7:55 AM 2.9 ft. 9:05 AM 2.9 ft. 10:54 AM 3.1 ft. 12:17 PM 3.3 ft. 1:11 PM 3.5 ft. 1:54 PM High 1.1 ft. 3:20 PM 1.1 ft. 4:55 PM 0.9 ft. 6:26 PM 0.7 ft. 7:29 PM 0.5 ft. 8:15 PM 0.3 ft. 8:51 PM 0.2 ft. 9:23 PM Low 2.3 ft. 9:12 PM 2.3 ft. 11:03 PM High Thu Aug 9, 12 Fri Aug 10, 12 Sat Aug 11, 12 Sun Aug 12, 12 Mon Aug 13, 12 Tue Aug 14, 12 Wed Aug 15, 12 Date 2.1 ft. 12:46 AM 2.3 ft. 1:26 AM 2.4 ft. 2:00 AM High 1.2 ft. 12:44 AM 1.4 ft. 1:25 AM 1.5 ft. 2:30 AM 1.6 ft. 4:03 AM 1.5 ft. 5:33 AM 1.4 ft. 6:38 AM 1.2 ft. 7:27 AM Low 2.5 ft. 6:28 AM 2.4 ft. 7:11 AM 2.3 ft. 8:21 AM 2.4 ft. 10:10 AM 2.5 ft. 11:33 AM 2.7 ft. 12:27 PM 2.8 ft. 1:10 PM High 0.9 ft. 2:27 PM 0.9 ft. 4:02 PM 0.7 ft. 5:33 PM 0.6 ft. 6:36 PM 0.4 ft. 7:22 PM 0.2 ft. 7:58 PM 0.1 ft. 8:30 PM Low 1.9 ft. 8:28 PM 1.8 ft. 10:19 PM 1.9 ft. 11:50 PM High Thu Aug 9, 12 Fri Aug 10, 12 Sat Aug 11, 12 Sun Aug 12, 12 Mon Aug 13, 12 Tue Aug 14, 12 Wed Aug 15, 12 Date 2.2 ft. 12:38 AM 2.4 ft. 1:18 AM 2.5 ft. 1:52 AM High 1.6 ft. 12:12 AM 1.8 ft. 12:53 AM 2.0 ft. 1:58 AM 2.1 ft. 3:31 AM 2.1 ft. 5:01 AM 1.9 ft. 6:06 AM 1.7 ft. 6:55 AM Low 2.6 ft. 6:20 AM 2.5 ft. 7:03 AM 2.4 ft. 8:13 AM 2.4 ft. 10:02 AM 2.6 ft. 11:25 AM 2.8 ft. 12:19 PM 2.9 ft. 1:02 PM High 1.1 ft. 1:55 PM 1.2 ft. 3:30 PM 1.0 ft. 5:01 PM 0.8 ft. 6:04 PM 0.5 ft. 6:50 PM 0.3 ft. 7:26 PM 0.2 ft. 7:58 PM Low 1.9 ft. 8:20 PM 1.9 ft. 10:11 PM 2.0 ft. 11:42 PM High Thu Aug 9, 12 Fri Aug 10, 12 Sat Aug 11, 12 Sun Aug 12, 12 Mon Aug 13, 12 Tue Aug 14, 12 Wed Au g 15, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 6:35 AM 3.1 ft. 7:15 AM 3.1 ft. 8:05 AM 3.1 ft. 9:06 AM 2.6 ft. 2:07 AM 2.7 ft. 2:33 AM 2.7 ft. 2:56 AM High 0.6 ft. 2:24 PM 0.5 ft. 3:40 PM 0.4 ft. 4:47 PM 0.3 ft. 5:42 PM 2.0 ft. 4:29 AM 1.9 ft. 5:38 AM 1.8 ft. 6:30 AM Low 2.1 ft. 10:06 PM 3.1 ft. 10:13 AM 3.1 ft. 11:18 AM 3.2 ft. 12:18 PM High 1.7 ft. 11:51 PM 0.2 ft. 6:29 PM 0.1 ft. 7:09 PM 0.1 ft. 7:43 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacAug. 9 Aug. 15First Aug. 24 Full Aug. 31 Last Aug. 9 New Aug. 17Major Times 7:07 AM 9:07 AM 7:30 PM 9:30 PM Minor Times 12:14 AM 1:14 AM 2:02 PM 3:02 PM Major Times 7:54 AM 9:54 AM 8:18 PM 10:18 PM Minor Times 12:53 AM 1:53 AM 2:55 PM 3:55 PM Major Times 8:42 AM 10:42 AM 9:06 PM 11:06 PM Minor Times 1:37 AM 2:37 AM 3:47 PM 4:47 PM Major Times 9:31 AM 11:31 AM 9:55 PM 11:55 PM Minor Times 2:23 AM 3:23 AM 4:36 PM 5:36 PM Major Times 10:20 AM 12:20 PM 10:45 PM 12:45 AM Minor Times 3:14 AM 4:14 AM 5:23 PM 6:23 PM Major Times 11:10 AM 1:10 PM 11:35 PM 1:35 AM Minor Times 4:08 AM 5:08 AM 6:07 PM 7:07 PM Major Times --:---:-12:00 PM 2:00 PM Minor Times 5:05 AM 6:05 AM 6:48 PM 7:48 PM Average Average+ Average+ Average Average Good Better7:01 am 8:23 pm 12:15 am 2:03 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:01 am 8:22 pm 12:54 am 2:56 pm 7:02 am 8:21 pm 1:37 am 3:47 pm 7:03 am 8:20 pm 2:24 am 4:37 pm 7:03 am 8:19 pm 3:15 am 5:24 pm 7:04 am 8:18 pm 4:09 am 6:08 pm 7:04 am 8:17 pm 5:06 am 6:49 pm53% 47% 41% 35% 29% 22% 16% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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Continued from Page 1A My kid is worth a million dollars, Nelson said. The current plan for the community center site is to use the legislative appropriation to renovate the former sanctuary building to include a free weights and cardio room, tness class room, kid zone and restrooms and showers. The other building would remain as it is, with several of ces. Also included in the plans is the addition of an open oor gymnasium, which would be a high school and college regulation size basketball court. The former sanctuary building would be utilized by the YMCA, which is enteringinto a Memorandum of Understanding with the county to manage the community center. A request for proposals was sent out and the YMCA was the lone responder. We cannot afford to operate that facility, said County Administrator David Edwards. The county commission wondered if the parks and recreation department could run the community center, but Edwards said that would only be possible if more staff is hired. The YMCA would charge a fee to use the facility in order to pay for administrative costs. President of the Capital Area YMCA, Ken Franklin, said the YMCA is not trying to make money, but in order to run the center, it would need to break even. Commissioner Alan Brock said he is not in favor of transferring the community center or giving the legislative appropriation back, which has been mentioned before, but did have some concerns about the YMCA. He said he envisioned more of an open oor space for the former sanctuary building and not so much a gym. He also had concerns about the fees the YMCA will charge and people not being able to afford them. There were other concerns voiced about the YMCA competing with the local gyms and having an unfair advantage because they would be exempt from paying expenses associated with the building. Mary Walsh, co-owner of BodyTek, said this would make it dif cult for the businesses to compete. She asked the commission to have a detailed plan and know exactly what will take place at the community center. Crawl before you walk and walk before you run, Walsh said. Other residents pointed out that the RFP was sent out and none of these businesses responded. Resident David Damon compared locals gyms competing with the YMCA like Barnes and Noble competing with a public library. It doesnt seem to make sense, Damon said. If there was a need to re-bid the project, Stewart said he was ne with that, but Edwards said this project needed to get moving. The county must spend the legislative appropriation by September 2013. Artz said additional discussion may continue regarding the conceptual plans and RFP and Edwards was tasked with determining the best route. Unless the county attorney advises the county to rebid the RFP, Artz said she thinks a contract will be nalized with the YMCA and the RFP for construction will be issued. The county is currently behind its timeline for the renovation project. The RFP should have already been out to bid, Artz said. The YMCA wanted to be able to start offering programs on Jan. 1, 2013. Several of the commissioners also expressed disappointment in the Community Center Advisory Committee. Several of the members on the committee are not in support of a community center and even mentioned getting rid of the center and giving the legislative appropriation back, Artz said. She was hoping these members would be advocates for the Community Center. Stewart said, That committee is dysfunctional. Committee member Charlotte Cobb, who is in favor of the community center, said at a recent Wakulla County Coalition for Youth meeting, that thee people on the committee who oppose the Community Center dont understand the huge need of that kind of facility for the children of the county. They dont have their hand on the pulse, Cobb said, who is very active at Wakulla Christian School. Several members have also resigned from the committee, Billy Jones and Bill Versiga. The remaining committee members include Steve Brown, Senior Center Director R.H. Carter, retired art teacher Diane Perez, School Board appointee Louis Hernandez, YMCA representative Ken Franklin, WHS Assistant Principal Simeon Nelson, Sopchoppy City Commissioner Aginita Rosier and youth representative Natalie Crum. The next meeting of the committee will be Aug. 14 at 4 p.m. in the county commission conference room. Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Randy Merritt This is a good site for a long term plan. Mike Stewart On the Community Center Advisory Committee: That committee is dysfunctional. Alan Brock The YMCA makes me nervous with its proposal for the center. Jerry Moore I was trying to save the county money. Lynn Artz We bought this site for a Community Center. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 13AContinued from Page 1A The commission stated in the past that it would never impose the assessment on the residents unless the majority of residents agreed to it. So, for now, the idea of a voluntary assessment dies. The project would have costed $5.2 million and would have paid for the paving of 21.17 miles of roads in Wakulla Gardens and minimal stormwater improvements. The commission has said it will look at devoting a certain percentage of onecent sales tax revenue for roads to Wakulla Gardens. This percentage would be based on the number of roads in Wakulla Gardens versus the total number of county-owned roads. It would equate to 2.7 percent. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he would not vote for paving any road before Wakulla Gardens. He wanted Wakulla Gardens to be added to the top of the paving list. However, Merritt pointed out that many of the roads currently at the top of the list have been there for years. The county is also looking at long term options for funding infrastructure improvements. This would include the creation of a Community Redevelopment Area for an area that includes Wakulla Gardens. The CRA funds projects through tax increment nancing. After the CRA is established, the value of real property in the area is determined on a fixed date; as the value increases because of improvements, the tax revenue increases. The difference is set aside for the CRA. Commissioner Lynn Artz said the commission plans to continue the effort to get infrastructure improvements to Wakulla Gardens. There are several infrastructure improvements needed in Wakulla Gardens, including water for lots that arent on central water, stormwater treatment, sewer, fire hydrants and road paving. The county, with the leadership of Artz, applied for a technical assistance grant for Wakulla Gardens from the American Planning Associations Community Planning Assistance Team. The county was selected and a team will visit the county and make recommendations to the commission at a Sept. 11 workshop.Wakulla Gardens rejects pay for paving Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S P a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter being in Wakulla County for a month, representatives with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Small Business Administration will be moving on. The Disaster Loan Recovery Center in Crawfordville, which transitioned from a Disaster Recovery Center on Saturday, Aug. 4, will close on Thursday, Aug. 9 at 6 p.m. The Disaster Recovery Center opened on July 5 at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce in response to Tropical Storm Debby and the county being approved for individual assistance. Since that time, 802 people have visited the center. The DRC made the transition to a DLRC on Aug. 4 after FEMA and the state determined that all the needs had been met in the county, said FEMA media relation specialist, Jim Homstad. At the time of the transition, the SBA took over operation of the center and the focus shifted from the needs of homeowners and renters to businesses. However, a FEMA representative was still available to assist indivduals with assistance, such as regsitering with FEMA, lling out an application, checking the status of an application or changing an application. In Wakulla County, 596 households have contacted FEMA for assistance or information. FEMA has approved $839,000 in assistance, $738,000 of that for housing assistance and the remainder for other needs. Statewide, for all 22 counties, 14,052 households have contacted FEMA for assistance or information. FEMAs has approved $19 million for Individuals and Households Program. Once the DRC closes, people will still be able to register with FEMA and apply for assistance until Sept. 4 or 60 days from the declaration. This can be done over the phone by calling 1-800-621-3362 or going online at www. disasterassistance.gov.TROPICAL STORM DEBBY AFTERMATHDisaster Recovery Center will close JENNIFER JENSENSigns directing people to center when it opened after the ooding from Debby in July. Wakulla Gardens resident Connie Savage expresses skepticism at a July 12 county workshop on paving. 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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn July 26, Thomas Reinhardt of Crawfordville reported an animal complaint. The victim left the doors to his vehicle open to air out and returned to discover a large dog sitting in the front seat. The dog became aggressive when Reinhardt attempted to remove him from the vehicle and bit him on the hand. The Animal Control Unit responded to the scene and collected the animal. The animal control of cer suffered a dog bite collecting the animal. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On July 26, Deputy Joe Page recognized a 16-yearold inside Wal-Mart that he reportedly knew from his duties as a school resource officer. The juvenile had been issued a no trespass warning for shoplifting 10 days earlier by Deputy Scott Rojas. A warrant was issued for trespassing against the juvenile. On July 26, James McGehee of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Three unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank account. The charges totaled approximately $700 and included sporting goods from a California company. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. On July 26, Helen Posey of Crawfordville reported a fraud. An unauthorized charge of $1,400 was discovered on the victims telephone bill. A cellular account was opened by a suspect who has been identi ed. The suspect used the victims Social Security number. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. On July 26, Deputies Joe Page and Scott Rojas investigated an indecent exposure complaint at a Crawfordville business. The victims reported that a 67year-old Tallahassee man exposed his genitals at the nail treatment business. The business owner is seeking criminal charges against the man as well as a no trespass warning. On July 27, Bossie Hawkins of Tallahassee and Thessalonia Missionary Baptist Church in Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief. Someone vandalized the main sanctuary of the church with toilet paper, paper towels, painters tape, ink, food and liquid soap. Two German Swastikas were observed on the walls. Damage was estimated at $6,000. Evidence was collected at the scene and the case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. On Aug. 1, a 13-year-old Crawfordville boy was arrested for his involvement in the case. On July 28, Eric Brumby of Tallahassee reported a hit and run accident on Rock Landing Road in Panacea. The victim was struck by a motorist who pinned him between his vehicle door and vehicle door frame and left the scene. Deputy Rachel Oliver discovered the suspect vehicle nearby and determined that the vehicle had been stolen from a Tallahassee victim in Ochlockonee Bay. Dorothy Jean Stephens, 42, of Panacea was located nearby by Deputy Oliver and arrested for grand theft auto, leaving the scene of an accident with injuries, careless driving and driving while license suspended or revoked. Brumby was treated by Wakulla EMS but refused to be transported to the hospital. On July 28, Richard Swain of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The door of his vehicle was left open and the illuminated dome light drained the vehicle battery. The vehicle was left unsecured, but nothing was reported missing. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On July 28, Roy McCall of Sopchoppy reported the theft of a gasoline can. The can was taken off the victims trailer. The value of the can and contents is $31. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. On July 28, Ricky Harrell of Crawfordville found three bicycles in the woods on his property. The bikes are valued at $140 and were placed in the WCSO Impound Yard until they are claimed. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On July 28, Margaret Cooper of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. While Deputy Mike Crum was investigating, Denise Cooper Skipper, 51, of Crawfordville returned with the missing car and was arrested for vehicle theft. During the search of the suspects possessions, a small piece of crack cocaine was allegedly found in her purse along with some drug paraphernalia, which added additional charges for possession of crack cocaine. On July 29, a three vehicle traffic crash was reported at U.S. Highway 319 and Elie Carter Lane in Medart. Billy Nathaniel Porter, 65, of Crawfordville was driving a Ford truck with a 9-year-old passenger when a boat trailer he was pulling was struck by a Dodge, also traveling southbound. The impact of the crash ipped the Porter truck and it landed on its side. Porter sustained injuries and was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. The juvenile was not injured. Deborah Collins Harrell, 56, of Tallahassee was traveling northbound with a passenger, Phalacia Adams Birge, 49, when she got past the Ford truck and was struck by the Dodge. Her vehicle also ipped onto its side. Both Harrell and Birge received non-life threatening injuries and were transported to the hospital. Deputy Rachel Oliver and Deputy Cole Wells interviewed the driver of the Dodge, Sherry Renee Massey, 45, of Sopchoppy and she gave consent to the drawing of blood. She was also transported to the hospital. A witness told Deputy Wells that she observed Massey driving at a high rate of speed and swerving prior to the crash. The case is pending the results of the blood draw. On July 29, Ruby Barnes of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from her garage. The bike is valued at $100. Juveniles are suspected and have been identified. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On July 29, Wal-Mart of cials allegedly observed three black females loading carts with merchandise and departing the store without paying. The suspects got into a vehicle and sped off toward Tallahassee. Store of cials estimate the loss at $1,050. One of the suspects has been identi ed. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On July 29, Robert Bottrell of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at his home. The victim answered the door and discovered paper on re on the front door mat. The victim put out the small re with water. There was no damage to the home. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On July 27, Aaron Cosson of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim lost his bank card and later observed a $118 charge from Santa Rosa Beach on the account. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. On July 30, Julie Dennis of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense with suspicious activity on her bank card. A total of $250 worth of charges was observed at a gas station in Memphis, Tenn. An attempt to create another $92 transaction failed. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. On July 30, Wal-Mart reported a retail theft involving two female suspects who allegedly left the store without paying for items they had in their possession. They were identi- ed by Wal-Mart staff and returned to the store at a later time. Rosalyn Wvette Robinson, 25, of Tallahassee and Kanesha Lafaye Wilson, 20, of Tallahassee were charged and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The amount of the theft was $40. Robinson and Wilson were issued trespass warnings for Wal-Mart along with two other members of their party who are still being investigated to determine their involvement. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On July 31, Sara Wilkinson of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. An electric game controller was stolen. The property is valued at $50. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On July 31, Kimberly Ruiz of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victims card was charged $190 from an internet site. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. On July 31, Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated a report of a w anted person. Sgt. Harrell made contact with the 16-year-old suspect who pushed the deputy off a porch and ed from the scene on foot. In addition to facing a warrant for failure to appear, the suspect will be charged with battery on a law enforcement of cer and resisting arrest with violence. On Aug. 1, the juvenile was captured following the execution of a search warrant. The juvenile was located in the attic of the home. and allegedly resisted attempts by deputies to take him into custody reportedly physically attacking the deputies. Deputies Tasered the boy and he was transported to jail. Detectives Lorne Whaley, Nick Boutwell, Rob Giddens and Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. On July 31, Tyniqua Nicole Davis, 33, of Tallahassee was arrested for retail theft at Wal-Mart. The suspect was allegedly observed taking $477 worth of merchandise from the store without paying for it. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On July 31, Onesimo Cortes of Crawfordville reported the loss of his passport. The victim was involved in a traf c crash and was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. His vehicle was towed by a towing company after the crash. His passport was inside the vehicle at the time of the crash. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. On Aug. 1, Gary Keene of Holly Hill reported the loss of a wallet. The victim reported losing his wallet while riding a motorcycle between Edgar Poole Road and Winn-Dixie. The wallet contained the victims identification, personal items and cash. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On Aug. 1, Michael Collins of Crawfordville reported the theft of his bicycle from Huddle House. The bike is valued at $150. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On Aug. 2, George Barwick of Panacea reported a criminal mischief on Bottoms Road. Someone attempted to pull the county boat ramp fee box out of the ground. A forced entry into the box was reported and cash was removed from the box. The payment envelopes were tossed on the ground. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. On Aug. 1, Robert Reynolds of Crawfordville reported the theft of a cell phone. The phone was lost between Mike Stewart Drive and Highway 267. The phone is valued at $80. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On Aug. 1, Edward Brimner of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim discovered a Pay-Pal charge on his bank account. The victim does not have a PayPal account. Detective Matt Helms investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,056 calls for service during the past week including 19 residential and business alarms; 81 citizen contacts; 17 disturbances; 316 security checks; 153 traf c enforcements; 131 traf c stops; and 18 wanted people. As I talk with Wakulla County citizens during my campaign for sheriff, Ive found three issues that they are most concerned with; our children, our taxes and our safety. After spending the last eight years of my 30+ career as a state law enforcement officer, assigned to Wakulla County, I realized something had to be done about the rising numbers of high school students being seriously injured or killed in a vehicle crash. Thats why in my 2008 race for sheriff, and now in 2012, one of my platform issues has been and will be a teen-driving program conducted by the sheriffs ofce personnel. Is this a critical issue? You be the judge. Last week a Wakulla Area Times article submitted by the current Wakulla County sheriff said, Wakulla County ranks fth highest in the state among teenagers driving fatalities and injuries from the ve year period of 2006 to 2010. Losing one of our teenagers while driving, or having one teenager injured, is far too many. This trend can and should be turned around with a successful teen driving program, and it will be under Charlie Creels administration as sheriff. For a FRESH START with a FULL-TIME SHERIFF, I ask for your support and vote on Nov. 6th as the next sheriff of Wakulla County.Please contact me at(850) 926-4712 Post Ofce Box 482, Crawfordville, FL 32326 charlieforsheriff@gmail.comwww.charliecreel.com ADVERTISEMENTLosing one of our teenagers while driving, or having one teenager injured, is far too many. ADVERTISEMENTPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Charlie Creel, No Party Afliation, for sheriff.Charlie Creel: Wakulla Countys teen-driving injuries and fatalities report demands action 000BK7W

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 15ASpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Office detectives arrested a juvenile involved with the vandalism of Thessalonia Missionary Baptist Church in Crawfordville on July 27, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. On July 31, a 13-year-old Crawfordville male was arrested and charged with two counts of burglary of a dwelling and felony criminal mischief related to the vandalism of the church. The juvenile was also arrested and charged with two counts of burglary of an occupied structure and two counts of felony theft related to an incident unrelated to the church vandalism that occurred on Ann Circle. Charges of burglary of a conveyance and petit theft were leveled in reference to a second incident that occurred at another Ann Circle residence. He was also arrested and charged with burglary and petit theft for a third incident at an Old Woodville Highway location. When deputies investigated the church vandalism they observed a forced entry, two swastikas on the walls, food and ketchup splattered on walls and painters tape spread through the facility. Liquid soap, toilet paper and paper towels were also spread around the sanctuary. Detectives learned that the juvenile went to an Ann Circle residence and removed a mountain bicycle, returned it and took it a second time the same day. The bike was recovered in a wooded area near the St. Marks Rail Trail. A second bicycle was recovered at the bike trail location. The bikes were returned to their owners on Ann Circle and Old Woodville Highway. In addition, the juvenile admitted entering an unlocked vehicle at a second address on Ann Circle and removing cigarettes, soft drinks and a bag of change from the vehicle. The value of the stolen items is less than $100. The value of the two bicycles is $100 and $80. The juvenile was transported to the juvenile detention center in Tallahassee where he was later released to parents. The case investigation continues. Detective Nick Boutwell and Detective Lorne Whaley investigated.Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Office Deputy Billy Metcalf saved the life of a 69-year-old Crawfordville woman Wednesday, Aug. 1 on Sanders Cemetery Road in Sopchoppy, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Deputy Metcalf was dispatched to a downed power line when he arrived and discovered the victim inside a vehicle in a driveway. A tree had fallen across the power lines. The complainant, William Raker of Sopchoppy, checked on the victim who told him that this incident scared her very badly. A Progress Energy work crew arrived on the scene to x the power lines when a member of the crew observed the victim experiencing health issues. Deputy Metcalf arrived at the vehicle and observed that she was no longer breathing. He requested Wakulla EMS and Fire Rescue to come to the scene and went to his patrol vehicle to retrieve his AED Heart De brillator. Deputy Metcalf administered an AED shock and began CPR with the help of Mr. Raker and one of the Progress Energy linemen until Fire Rescue and EMS arrived on scene. Deputy Metcalfs presence of mind to rapidly deploy the Automatic External De brillator was a direct cause of the successful resuscitation of this citizen. Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Joey Tillman answered the call for additional help from his home just a few blocks away. Tillman also serves as a paramedic with Wakulla EMS. Together this team of rst responders was able to successfully treat this victim until Advanced Life Service paramedics could arrive. The men got the victim breathing again and EMS transported the woman to a medical helicopter where she was transported to a Tallahassee hospital. The woman survived the ordeal. The AED equipment was purchased using grant money from the State of Florida EMS Division several years ago and is carried in all of the Wakulla Sheriffs Of ce road patrol vehicles.Special to The NewsA Tallahassee man saved the lives of two dogs that were trapped under a capsized boat in the Wakulla River on Saturday, July 28, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. Nigel and Paige Forshay Safe were enjoying a leisurely day canoeing on the Wakulla River when their tranquility was shattered by sounds on the river in front of them. They witnessed a large motor boat with ve or six people on board badly listing in the water. The occupants were in a state of panic and jumping off the boat, said Paige Safe. As we approached, the boat completely capsized, leaving only a small portion of the hull exposed. Concerned boaters at the scene determined that all of the humans were safe but that two dogs were unaccounted for. Either paralyzed by the incident or shock, the occupants of the boat were unable to dive for their dogs, said Safe. We tied our canoe to a cypress tree and Nigel jumped into the water and began to dive under the capsized boat to retrieve and save the two dogs. The capsized boat continued to oat down the river at the same time Nigel was attempting to locate the rst missing dog. He grabbed the scared and frantic animal despite getting scratched by the animals claws and brought him to safety. The second dog was smaller and more dif cult to locate and Nigel did not know the layout of the vessel. But after a few more minutes passed, the second dog was brought to the surface. The humans and animals were reunited and wet, cold and scared, the dog owners were very relieved and thankful about the outcome, said Paige Safe. I think the whole ordeal was probably over in about 15 minutes, but it felt like it took an eternity.13-year-old charged with church vandalismMan saves dogs trapped in capsized boat PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSANIMAL RESCUE: The capsized boat oating in the Wakulla River, above. Nigel Safe, below, with the second dog he saved. Deputy credited with saving womans life Deputy Billy Metcalf www.NFMC.org Family Medicine Well Care Adults / Pediatrics School Physicals, Sports Physicals Immunizations Vaccines Quality Affordable Healthcare for the Entire Family PREVENTION PREVENTION PREVENTION IS THE KEY TO IS THE KEY TO IS THE KEY TO HEALTHY HAPPY FAMILIES HEALTHY HAPPY FAMILIES HEALTHY HAPPY FAMILIES WE WANT TO BE YOUR FAMILYS HEALTHCARE HOME Medicare / Medicaid CHP / BCBS & Most Other Insurance Accepted Slide Fee Program Available www.NFMC.org Celebrating National Health Center Week August 5th 11th Chitra Mony, MD Wakulla Medical Center Celebrates National Health Center Week We are proud to serve every member of the community, including those that have insurance such as CHP, Blue Cross / Blue Shield, Medicare, Medicaid, and we offer a sliding fee scale. We serve the needs of our community, where every patient is treated as individuals, with dignity and respect. This is what health care should be, and what we celebrate during National Health Center Week. We extend an open invitation to visit us to find out what being a Community Health Center is all about. Wakulla Medical Center 1328 Coastal Highway, Panacea Florida (850) 984-4735 Wakulla Medical Center 1328 Coastal Highway, Panacea Florida (850) 984-4735 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com At 3Y You Get MOW For Your Money!Chris Hindle, Jimmy Wheeler, Calvin Graves, Richard Taylor, Chad Smith, Skip Young & Brian Young 850926-3300Chris Hindle, Jimmy Wheeler, Calvin Graves, Richard Taylor, Chad Smith, Skip Young & Brian Young THIS SEASON I WANT SOMETHINGRELIABLE $15999BG 55 HANDHELD BLOWERProven handheld blower at an affordable price Great for quickly cleaning driveways, sidewalks and hard-to-reach places STIHL has you covered with protective apparel and accessories. $17999MS 170 CHAIN SAWDesigned for occasional wood-cutting tasks around the home Includes many of the excellent design features of our professional models Bar lengths may vary by region. STIHLusa.comAvailable at participating dealers while supplies last. 2011 STIHL$15999FS 45 TRIMMER Easy-to-use, well-balanced trimmer for homeowner use Lightweight, reliable and fast starting Chris Hindle, Jimmy Wheeler, Calvin Graves, Richard Taylor, Chad Smith, Skip Young & Brian Young

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012The Wakulla news EXTRA! Republicans, Democrats hold local forumsPage 6-7BRobinson leaves, but Greer, Crist dont go awayWeekly Roundup, Page 12BWakulla seafood is safeGreen Scene, Page 3B Back to School OutreachIt was a rainy morning in Crawfordville on Saturday, Aug. 4, but despite the drizzle, there was a good size crowd at Hudson Park for the second annual Back to School Outreach Event. There was free food, free school supplies, music and fun. Sponsored by the Back to School Outreach Ministry and Generation NOW Ministries, made up of churches and organizations from Wakulla. Glenda Washington of Little Salem Church, who serves on the event committee, said with a smile that she hadnt expected such a big crowd. John Bird, 4, blows bubbles at an activity center at the Back to School rally. Sgt. Ray Johnson of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce lets kids check out the sheriffs Search and Rescue boat. 4-H Agent Sherri Kraeft shows off a Jam 4 Camp Tshirt and talks about the clubs activities. Information was available on the planned Empty Bowls fundraiser to create handcrafted bowls and have a meal of soup and bread in exchange for a donation. Pictured at left are Rick Jackley of Ribits Ceramics, Charlean Lanier, Gaballi host site director at Harvest Fellowship Church, and Dianne Coleman. Below, Centennial Bank gave out popcorn and held a drawing for a piggy bank. Expert physicians.Quality medical care.Ofce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comFamily Practice Accepting new patients X-Ray Services Pediatric patients 2 yrs. & older Offering specialty care: Capital Regional Cardiology Associates 850-877-0216 Capital Regional Medical Group Podiatry Services 850-878-8235 Capital Regional Surgical Associates 850-219-2306 Robert Frable, DO Aida Torres, ARNPCRAWFORDVILLE

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Aug. 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Aug. 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 5451853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Aug. 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. Sunday, Aug. 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call (850) 545-1853. Monday, Aug. 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Aug. 14 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Wednesday, Aug. 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Aug. 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Special EventsThursday, Aug. 9 TALLAHASSEE ORCHID SOCIETY will host renowned orchid grower, world traveler and internationally recognized speaker Francisco Miranda at their meeting at 7 p.m. The location is the Jubilee Cottage at the Goodwood Museum and Gardens. His presentations will be Orchids from the Brazilian Amazon. Special plants from Brazil will be offered for sale. Please go to www.mirandaorchids.com for photos and pre-orders. DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at the library. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for refreshments with the meeting scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. Local Democratic candidates Donnie Sparkman, property appraiser; Bobby Pearce, superintendent of schools; Alan Brock, county commission District 1; John Shuff, county commission District 5; and Mike Scott, school board District 2, will be the special guests. The public is cordially invited to come out and meet their local Democratic candidates. For more information please contact Doug Jones at 926-1177 for more information. Saturday, August 11 TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet from 10 a.m. to noon at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road, Crawfordville. RSVP to Carrie Stevens at 274-9474 or carriejstevens@ comcast.net. This is not a therapy session, this is social interaction for Spectrum Children. Children need to bring a good, wholesome snack and drink. Children must be accompanied by a parent at all times. BABYSITTERS TRAINING CLASS will be held at the Capital Area Chapter of the American Red Cross, 1115 Easterwood Drive, Tallahassee, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This training class provides youth ages (11 years and older) with the skills and con dence to safely and responsibly care for children and infants. Students will learn how to supervise children and infants, how to perform basic child care skills such as diapering and feeding, how to choose safe, ageappropriate games and toys, among other babysitting staples and tips. Course attendees also receive their certi cation of Adult Infant and Child CPR/AED with First Aid. The $85 fee for the Babysitters Training Class includes the American Red Cross Babysitters Training Handbook and CD-ROM, Emergency Reference Guide, and Certi cation in Adult Infant and Child CPR/AED with First Aid. Monday, Aug. 13 TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE PROGRAM will feature Tonier Cain at 4 p.m. at the Wakulla Education Center. She will speak about devastation of trauma and the hope of recovery. She is the team leader for the National Center for Trauma Informed Care. The Wakulla Education Center is located at 87 Andrew Hargrett Sr. Road, Crawfordville.Upcoming EventsSaturday, Aug. 18 EDEN SPRINGS NURSING AND REHAB CENTER FUNDRAISER will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Hudson Park. All proceeds go into the special activity fund for events such as Senior Prom. There will be a bake sale, yard sale, hot dogs, hamburgers, chips and soda. Free school supplies will be given out. There will also be free blood pressure screenings. Donations of yard sale items and baked goods needed, as well as cooking supplies and volunteers. For more information, call Kathy Edel at 631-0689 or Margie Hamilton at 274-2111 or 726-7181 Thursday, Aug. 23 POLITICAL FORUM FOR the superintendent of schools candidates will be held at 7 p.m. at the library. POLITICAL FORUM for the candidates for property appraiser will be held at 8 p.m. at the library. Friday, Aug. 24 THIRD ANNUAL BIG CHAMPAGNE BASH for Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend will be held from 8 p.m. to midnight at Hotel Duval in Tallahassee. All proceeds bene t Big Brothers Big Sisters. The theme is the Roaring 20s. Costumes are encouraged. Enjoy music, dancing appetizers and unlimited champagne. Until Aug. 6, tickets are $70 per person, $130 per couple and group rate at $600 for 10 tickets. To purchase tickets, visit www. bbbs.org/bigbash or call 386-6002. Tuesday, Aug. 28 55 ALIVE SAFETY DRIVER CLASS will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the library. To register call Ernie Conte at 926-4605. WAKULLA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT WORKSHOP will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the health department, 48 Oak Street, Crawfordville. During this session, the health department will review all the data and reports generated in the Community Health Improvement process, identify health priorities which impact Wakulla County residents and develop goals and strategies for each priority. A working lunch will be provided during this workshop. RSVP to Tonya Hobby at (850)926-0401 ext. 217 by Aug. 23. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com St. Marks City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Train Cub for Spectrum Children at 10 a.m. at Harvest Fellowship. Trauma-Informed Care Team Leader Tonier Cain speaks at 4 p.m. at WEC. Community Center Advisory Group meeting at 4 p.m. at administration of ce.ThursdaySaturdayMondayTuesday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Government Meetings Thursday, Aug. 9 ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, Aug. 13 WAKULLA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION will hold its meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, Aug. 14 COMMUNITY CENTER ADVISORY GROUP will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room.By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director With the summer winding down wed like to thank everyone who participated in our Summer Program this year. We had dozens of families take part in our reading programs, performances and eld trips. Our rst talent show was a great success and we look forward to making it an annual end to the summer event. Special thanks go out to Molly Clore who stepped in for Leilania Nichols, our childrens coordinator, while she was on maternity leave this summer and did a great job with the reading programs. WCPL is lucky to have two great assets to tap to continue to grow and improve our childrens programs year around. Lastly wed like to thank the Friends of the Library for once again funding our Summer Program. Book Extravaganza Another Success! Wed also like to thank everyone who came out to our Book Extravaganza Fundraiser last Saturday. Your generous donations raised more than $500 for the Friends of the Library. As always, these funds will go directly toward supporting our childrens programs, collection management, along with other needed expenses. Remember that the Friends have saved the taxpayers of Wakulla County more than $70,000 the past 3 years but continue to need your help and support. For more information, please contact us and be sure to come to the second Annual Silent Auction on Sept. 14. More information will be coming on the auction in the coming weeks. Friday Night Movie This Friday, Aug. 10, were showing the animated lm based upon the Dr. Seuss classic book, The Lorax. Starring the voices of Danny DeVito, Zac Efron and Taylor Swift among others, the film tells the story of a 12-year-old boy who searches for the one thing that will enable him to win the affection of the girl of his dreams. To nd it he must discover the story of the Lorax, the grumpy yet charming creature who fights to protect his world. This lm will make the whole family laugh, while sending an important message about the environment. Door open at 6:45 p.m. for this PG-rated lm and popcorn will be provided by Capital City Bank. Library News... FILE PHOTOPelicans are captured sunbathing near the water.

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Green Scene Genetically engineered mosquitoes?EarthTalk, Page 14B www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 3BRead the newspaper, listen to the news? If you have, you are aware of what is happening in the Midwest where much of the corn grows. Its dry there; the corn is being plowed under due to the conditions. Corn has been the number one eld crop in America in value and production for many years. Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and Minnesota produce more than 50 percent of the corn grown in the United States. When Florida corn becomes available, usually from December through May, higher demand for it may raise the prices. Les Harrison, UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Small Farms agent, reminded me that Florida produces less than 1 percent of the corn grown in the United States. It is highly dependent upon nitrogen-based fertilizer which has gone up in cost in recent years. At the moment only 24 percent of the nations corn crop is rated good or excellent, while 48 percent of the crop is rated poor to very poor. Corn is a major component in many food items like cereals, snack foods and even soft drinks. When considering MYPlates food classi cation, is corn considered a vegetable or grain? USDA Food Patterns categorize food based on tradition, nutritional value, and its use at meals. The maturity level of corn at harvest may affect the use at meals and the nutritional value. For these reasons fresh corn is considered a starchy vegetable and (milled) dried corn (e.g. cornmeal, tortillas) is considered a grain. Due to the anticipated rising costs of corn, include it often on your menu in the next few months. Choose fresh corn ears with green husks, fresh silks and tight rows of kernels. Store it in the refrigerator with husks on for use as soon as possible or within 1 to 2 days. Nutritionally, corn is considered low fat (90 calories in 1 medium ear), has no saturated fat, is sodium and cholesterol free, if left in its original form, and is a good source of vitamin C. The national campaign to encourage the increased consumption of more fruits and vegetables is called Fruits and Veggies More Matters. The campaign offers this list of the Top 10 Ways to Enjoy Corn: 10. Beef Up Your Soup! Add corn to soup, whether it is chili or chowder. Corn enhances the soups hardiness as well as its nutritional pro le. 9. Add a Little Crunch to Your Guacamole. Add corn kernels and diced tomatoes to guacamole or salsa. 8. Corn in Cornbread? Imagine That! For a little different texture, add corn to your cornbread or corn muf ns in addition to using corn meal. 7. Relish Your Corn. Make a corn relish to serve as a side dish or salad by combining chopped vegetables and beans mixed with vinaigrette. Continued on Page 6BCorn: Eat it now, preserve it for later By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING By TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar eld@thewakullanews.netRepresentatives from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Department of Environmental Protection and the Wakulla County Health Department met with a gathering of Wakulla residents to discuss seafood safety and water quality. The town hall meeting was held on Tuesday, July 31, at the Panacea Welcome Center in response to a possible fraud involving a woman, who met with Panacea shermen on July 20 and 21 claiming she was representing a Texas law rm handling Deepwater Horizon claims.The representatives from each agency made presentations and answered questions about DEPs response to the Deep Water Horizon Oil Spill in 2010 with speci c interest in the impact on locally harvested seafood. Jo Marie Cook, with the division of food safety, presented a slideshow featuring the chemicals contained in the the Corexit dispersant. The chemicals listed on the slide were propylene glycol, petroleum distillates, DOSS and sorbitan oleate emulsi ers. According to Cook and the other representatives the dispersant was not toxic to animals including humans at the levels that were dispersed. Jack Rudloe, owner of the Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea, asked why then was there so much toxicity in the water and dead sh were still being found. Timothy Fitzpatrick, a representative from DEP, responded that oil and water together is actually more toxic to certain members of the food chain. He also said that lack of oxygen and indigenous bacteria can also result in toxicity. He said that plumes of bacteria and the colder weather in late spring could result in some dolphin deaths. Rudloe reported that late one night in May of 2010 he was outside his home when an airplane ew over spraying something and he felt the toxic effects and continued to observe them in gulf marine life after that. Martin May with the bureau of seafood told the group no dispersant was sprayed in Floridas state waters in 2010 in response to the oil spill. An employee with the EPA was present as a member of the audience and con rmed there was no spraying reported. Continued on Page 6BWakulla seafood is safeSpecial to The News Representatives of seven Florida Panhandle counties met last week in Tallahassee to launch the Panhandle Wildflower Alliance and discuss strategies for positioning the regions profuse wildflowers as a primary focus of the states 2013 Viva Florida 500 commemoration. The Alliance is a loosely structured group focused on education and marketing efforts that will increase conservation as well as awareness of potential wild ower ecotourism opportunities. Hosted by the Florida Wild ower Foundation and facilitated by Pam Portwood and Diane Delaney, the meeting brought together stakeholders to learn about establishing wildflower ecotourism in Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla, Franklin, Jackson and Jefferson counties. Almost 50 people attended, representing county commissions, tourism agencies, chambers of commerce, environmental organizations, national and state lands and state agencies. The Panhandle is widely acknowledged as the place in Florida to view wild owers due to the fantastic seasonal displays along its roadsides and in natural and rural areas, Lisa Roberts, the Foundations executive director, told participants. Some of the best displays in the Southeastern United States are at your doorstep. By next year, every resident of the state should know that La Florida means land of owers, said DOT State Landscape Architect Jeff Caster, who heads DOTs wild ower program. Caster suggested meeting participants help make government and business leaders aware of Floridas constitutional policy to protect the states natural resources and scenic beauty. Ask leaders to spend less money, not more, he said, referring to reduced mowing regimes that can save taxpayers money while promoting wild ower growth. Continued on Page 9BPanhandle Wildflower Alliance holds meeting TAMMIE BARFIELDPANEL: Pad Juarez of Wakulla Health Department; Timothy Fitzpatrick of DEP; and Chris Brooks and Martin May of state Department of Agriculture. FILE PHOTO 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 Please Recycle

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTH & FITNESSIf you have spent considerable time at the gym, you have probably witnessed the dreaded rounded shoulder inwardly rotated arm position on one of your muscled gym mates. Or maybe you have seen it in yourself: a slouched shoulder slumping that no bit of correcting seems to help long term. Like the person at the gym, maybe you need to start taking better care of your chest. Doing so will not only improve your posture but also set you up for success in many yoga poses that require exible chest muscles. The pectorals are a set of chest muscles that originate on the sternum (breastbone) and collarbones and insert on the humerus (upper arm bones). The job of your chest muscles is to, among other things, internally rotate and extend the arms, and depress and protract (move away from each other) the scapula (shoulder blades). When chest muscles become tight, what can result is the dreaded rounded shoulder position I mentioned earlier. Even more, the muscles along the front of the neck become short and tight which can lead to neck and upper back pain. Tight pectoral muscles limit shoulder exion, the ability to raise the arm up overhead. Think of how dif cult it would be to do Urdhva Hastasana, Downward-Facing Dog, or Handstand without being able to lift your arms overhead! Tight pecs also strongly draw the shoulders into internal rotation. Most yoga poses ask for external rotation. Think of the upper arm in Cow-Faced Pose (Gomukasana). The upper arm must move into shoulder exion and externally rotate so the palm faces inwards to allow for a safe practice of the pose. Chest muscles can become short and tight because of weight training, lifestyle and a lack of stretching. A desk job, poor posture, a shoulder injury or the simple fact that we never perform activities that release the chest muscles can all lead to tight pecs. Here is an easy way to release the pectoral muscles. Practice two minutes a day to see results. 1. Fold a firm blanket (think Indian or Mexican) into a tri-fold so it is half as narrow as the width of your upper back. 2. Roll onto the folded blanket, lay on your back on the support with everything from the back of your head to your buttocks supported. If you feel any discomfort in the low back or tension in the front of the neck, place a second thinner blanket under the buttocks. 3. Reach your arms out along the oor in line with your shoulders. Externally rotate the arms so the shoulders roll to the oor and the palms face up to the ceiling. 4. For a deeper stretch, bend the elbows and slide the forearms and hands along the oor up to your head until you feel a comfortable release in the chest. Dont go further than 90 degrees at the elbows! If your hands and forearms come off the oor, you are still good to go as long as you dont feel any shoulder pain. Enjoy the gentle pull of gravity on the arms. If you feel any pulling through the backs of the shoulders, support the underside of the arms with additional folded blankets. 5. Variations: Use a thinner blanket to create less height under the back and hence a gentler stretch. If you dont have a blanket to use, a rolled mat and block for under the buttocks can do the trick. Play around with the size of the roll as you would with the blanket to give yourself more or less height. 6. Hold for two to ve minutes, focus on your breath and let go. If you experience pins and needles in the ngers, hands, and arms, straighten the arms until feeling returns. There you have it! The perfect pecs stretch you can practice daily that wont hurt the back, neck or shoulders. Your posture will thank you for it.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Yoga teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140 or by email at Focusyoga@ yahoo.com. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY There are a lot of different opinions on stretching out there today. Some people think you need to stretch before and after exercise, some only before, some only after, and some think you dont need to do it at all! Stretching is a wonderful tool that is very helpful in many ways. As we age, stretching can help our muscles stay limber. This is very bene cial to prevent injury and to help with our balance. I believe a lot of broken hips and injuries such as that could be avoided if people worked on exibility, strength and balance as they got older. Stretching increases a muscles function which increases our range of motion. Functional strength is the ability to do everyday tasks such as taking out the garbage, loading groceries into your car or climbing the stairs to the attic or even tying your shoes. These things are made easier, and sometimes even possible, by exible muscles. A muscle that wont move is not a very strong muscle. As people age, being able to do things like put your shoes and socks on and tie your shoes without assistance is often the difference between staying in your home if you live alone, or having to live with a family member or in an assisted living facility. Stretching is also a valuable tool for muscle injuries. A supervised and doctor recommended stretching program can reduce the length of the healing process, giving you back your range of motion and reducing your pain. Stretching is as important for young people and people who workout moderately as it is for older people or for athletes. There are a great range of stretching exercises and programs for almost any situation or problem. From simply being able to touch your toes, to easing workout soreness and injury recovery, stretching is a great asset to almost anyone. As always, get your doctors approval before you stretch, workout or treat any injury.Gena Davis is a CFT at Body-Tek 24-Hour Fitness Center in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348. GET FITBy GENA DAVIS Your pecs avoid the slump The importance of stretching The Skin Cancer Foundation offers these sun safety tips for those with an active, outdoor lifestyle: Seek the shade, especially between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. whenever possible. Schedule training, practices and games for the early morning or late afternoon. Do not burn. A persons risk for melanoma doubles if he or she has had more than ve sunburns over the course of a lifetime. Cover up with clothing, including a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses. Clothing can be your most effective form of sun protection, so make the most of it with tightly woven or knit, darkor brightcolored fabrics, which offer the best defense. For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant, broad spectrum (UVA/ UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes before going outside. Reapply sunscreen every two hours or immediately after swimming or excessive sweating. Be careful to cover often-missed exposed spots such as the hands, ears and the back of the neck.Sun safety to avoid burn Are yARE YOUR EARS "BLURRY"? DO YOU TURN THE TV UP LOUD? ASK PEOPLE TO REPEAT THEMSELVES? STRAIN TO UNDERSTAND WHAT'S BEING SAID?Now you see it...Now you don'tOPEN FIT TECHNOLOGYONCE A YEAR NOW $1,050Retail Price $2,100.00SAVE50%CRAWFORDVILLE3295 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY THE LOG CABIN, BARRY BUILDINGTALLAHASSEESEARS MIRACLE EAR GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL 1500 Apalachee ParkwayANN HENNESSY, MA, CCC-A CERTIFIED & LICENSED AUDIOLOGISTCall for an appointment 850-942-4007 Find Out Now Whether it's Hearing Loss or Just Ear Wax with a FREE Hearing Evaluation* and FREE Video Ear Inspection*SUMMER SALESUMMER SALE Toll Free 1-866-942-4007*Hearing evaluation and video otoscope inspection are always free. Hearing evaluation is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnosis, nor are they intended to replace a physician's care. If you suspect a medical problem, please seek treatment from your doctor.Now through August 31st PER AID ME4 MODELHUNTERS ACT NOW & ORDER HEARING PROTECTION Miracle Ear Guardian

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 5B DR. DAVID A. KEEN, M.D., M.P.H. BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PRACTICEELIZABETH HEULER, ARNP-C VALERIE RUSSELL, ARNP-C2615 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, SUITE 103, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327PH 850-926-3140 FX 850-926-3163 (Next to the Winn-Dixie Shopping Plaza) www.wakullaurgentcare.com Medically Supervised Weight LossCOME VISIT US FOR ALL OF YOUR HEALTHCARE NEEDSFamily Primary Care/Urgent Care/Walk Ins School/Bus/DOT/Sports Physicals Pulmonary Function Testing Pediatrics/Immunizations X-Ray, EKG, Labs Sleep Study Ultrasound DEXA Bone Density Testing Workers Comp Injury Overnight Pulse Ox Holter/Event Monitor Pre-Employment Drug ScreeningOur program is simple to follow and teaches you new healthy habits, safe and effective weight loss. Get in tune with your body. Call today for a weight loss program customized to t you. We Now AcceptWe are an approved drawing site for all insurances!

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy ED BRIMNERWakulla Republican Party Following weeks of researching candidates, listening to debates and forums, and meeting and talking with candidates, it is time to vote. Wakulla Republicans encourage you to get out and vote. Leading up to this primary, local Republicans have held both debates and forums so voters could meet and discuss issues of importance with all Republican candidates. There was a debate featuring all the candidates running for State Representative District 7. For the first time in years, Wakulla County will be represented by a single representative in the State House of Representatives. House District 7 is the largest district in the state in terms of geography and Wakulla County is in the center of the district. Candidate Mike Williams, a small business owner, called for simpler government with fewer regulations, better secondary and college education, and a judicious use of natural resources especially water. Candidate Don Curtis, a farmer and professional forester from Taylor County stressed his belief in limited, constitutionally based government; balanced budgets; and lower taxes. Candidate Jamey Westbrook, a professional well driller from Port St. Joe, spent time talking about his experience as a past representative and his desire to defend small counties in the State House. Candidate Halsey Beshears, a plant nursery owner from Jefferson County, did not make the debate but has been conspicuous in Wakulla County throughout this campaign and is the only candidate to open a campaign of ce in Wakulla County. There was also a forum open to all Republican candidates held in Azalea Park on July 28. In addition to the House candidates, all local Republican contenders were welcome to speak. Other than the House Candidates, there were no other contested Republican primary candidates that spoke in Wakulla County. Other local Republicans running for of ce include: Pete Williams, State Attorney, 2nd Judicial Circuit Maurice Langston, Wakulla County Sheriff Ralph Thomas, Wakulla County Commissioner, District 1 Mike Stewart, Wakulla County Commissioner, District 3 Richard Harden, Wakulla County Commissioner, District 5 Other races of interest to local Republicans include the non-partisan District 2 School Board Race. Melisa Taylor, a long-time Republican, is hoping to join the School Board to help lead Wakulla County Schools into the future. Mitchell Kauffman and Ed Brimner are running for seats on the Soil and Water Board. The primary duty of the Soil and Water Board is to advocate and educate local farmers on water conservation and soil erosion issues. Kauffman has experience in large-scale ranching in Australia. Brimner owns and is improving a small local farm. Of interest to strictly Republican voters are the Republican State Committeewoman and Committeeman races: Tina Brimner and Anne Ahrendt are vying for Wakulla County State Committeewoman. Larry Taylor, Kurt Ahrendt and Gordon McCleary are competing to represent Wakulla County as State Committeeman. None of the candidates for Floridas Senate seat have visited Wakulla County.Wakulla Republicans hold debate with candidatesContinued from Page 3B It was reported that less than 5 percent of the samples were found to contain any detectable level of the dispersant. That was 89 of some 1,700 samples more or less. Cook said the highest level found during the testing was 0.043 ppm and the level of concern is 100 ppm in pin sh. Cook said there is funding for testing Gulf seafood until October 2013 which will result in having tested more than 3,000 samples. Rudloe asked whether they had tested Royal Reds, a deep water shrimp. He was told they test them when they can nd them and that when they do the testing they only test the edible parts of the seafood. Rudloe was assured they would make a conscious effort to test more shrimp in the future. Wakulla County Health Department Director Pad Juarez told the group his department researches the more human factor side of the issue of oil spill effects. Juarez said Material Safety Data Sheets provide the products that were used during and after the oil spill and that the CDC is conducting a study on the people who worked on the rigs and those who were involved in the cleanup. Juarez encouraged anyone who has a concern about their health or the health of their children to call the health department at 926-0400, and for mosquito control, call 926-0410. Fitzpatrick addressed DEPs response to the oil spill and presented a chronology of events beginning with the day the rig exploded. He said beach monitoring and sampling continues with the following sampling objectives: baseline conditions were established for the National Resources Damage Assessment (NRDA); assess safety of bathing beaches; characterize petroleum products; monitor air quality. He said the departments analytical objectives were more technical in nature tracking petro hydrocarbons (C8-C40 Aliphatics); polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS); biomarkers; dispersant markers (DOSS) DPBE or DPnB; trace metals; and air toxics. Rudloe asked what impact the volumes of oil sitting on the ocean oor in frigid temperatures could have in the future. Fitzpatrick said there are still studies going on for ways to address that question. Florida beaches are still being monitored every couple of weeks in eight coastal counties from Escambia to Wakulla. There are two monitoring sites in Wakulla County, one at Mashes Sands and the other at Shell Point. DEPs website contains a section on the Deep Water Horizon spill which can be found at www.dep.state. .us/deepwaterhorizon.Panel reports Wakulla seafood is safeSwenson: CornContinued from Page 3B Try this combination: corn, chopped red onion, chopped red and green peppers, pinto beans and tomatoes. 6. Say Cheese! Add cheese and corn to your potatoes and put a smile on the faces of your family members. 5. Corn is Perfect in Dips, Sides or Toppings! Try adding corn to these items. They will be great with low-fat tortilla chips, as a side to grilled meat or as a topping for your burger. Roasted corn kernels are also great in quesadillas! 4. A Taco Salad without Corn? No Way. Adding corn will take you south of the border! 3. A Healthy Saut. Saut cooked corn in a small amount of oil with green chilies and onions. Serve hot; it makes a wonderful side dish. 2. Quick corn for lunch? Microwave It! Open husk but do not remove leaves. Remove silk and wash the corn kernels. Close leaves around corn and microwave for 1-2 minutes until cooked. 1. Veer from the Usual Ear. Sprinkle your corn-onthe-cob with a little Parmesan cheese or some of your favorite herbs and spices, such as chili powder, parsley, and chives. You might even try chili powder-lime butter spread. It is also time to consider preserving corn for future use. This will save you money as you see the prices climb. Corn can be preserved in the following ways: cream-style (no quart size jars, please) and whole kernel canning, drying, freezing and in a relish. If you need researchbased, tested recipes for any of the preservation methods, please contact me and I will make sure you receive them. When canning corn, realize that you are preserving a low acid vegetable. A pressure canner is required for its safe preservation. Shelley Swenson can be reached at (850) 926-3931. TAMMIE BARFIELDJack Rudloe asks about seafood safety. Mitchell Kauffman, Seat 3-Local Businessman --Small Farmer -Protect our Soil and Water and our Property RightsEd Brimner, Seat 5Small Local Farmer Small Businessman Proven Advocate of Wakulla Water Committed Conservative Believes in Property and Water RightsSOIL and WATERLarry Taylor as State CommitteemanTina Brimner as State CommitteewomanPolitical advertisment paid for and approved by Ed Brimner for soil and water and Mitchell Kauffman, paid in-kind for by Ed Brimner, for soil and water.ELECT FOUR CONSERVATIVES Jon Kilpatrick, Ralph Thomas, Larry Taylor, Ed Brimner, Melisa Taylor, and Tina Brimner with Senator Marco Rubio Tina Brimner with Governor Rick Scott

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 7BBy DOUG JONESWakulla Democratic PartyThe three Democratic candidates for the House District 7 seat recently attended a forum held at the Wakulla County Public Library, elding a series of challenging questions and expressing their views on a variety of topics. Sponsored by the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee, nearly 50 members of the public were present and questions were posed by Committee members as well as from the audience on July 12. Candidates began by introducing themselves and stating the three top issues for their campaigns. Thomas Dickens was rst and said that he was a father, husband, attorney, teacher, and Iraq War Veteran. His top three issues were rst, energy independence protecting our democracy by having energy security at home. Secondly he would stand up for jobs. And third was to stand up for education and provide adequate funding for education. He said he was a consensus builder while in Iraq and wanted to take those skills to the Florida Legislature. The next candidate was Robert Hill. He stated that his career began as a math teacher and coach which led to becoming Superintendant of Schools in Liberty County. In 2000 he was elected to Clerk of Court for Liberty County and is now completing his third term as Clerk while also serving as Liberty County Administrator. His top three priority issues were economic growth and job development, education, and championing the State operated rural prison program. He stated that he was against prison privatization of the states rural prisons. He also stated that he wanted to help state and local government employees and that he was a strong advocate of 2nd amendment rights. Due to a schedule con- ict, A.J. Smith was not able to join the forum until later in the evening. The rst question posed by moderator Rachel Sutz Pienta, Chair of the Wakulla DEC, concerned the restoration of civil rights for convicted felons after they have served their time. First to respond was Hill, who believes those incarcerated should have more educational opportunities while in prison and that programs could be set up by the Department of Corrections to start the burdensome paperwork needed for rights restoration. He would try to streamline this process. Dickens said that he celebrated former Governor Charlie Crists efforts to restore the civil rights of those who have served their time. The goal of prison is to rehabilitate and bring them back as contributing members of society. He felt that an onerous process for completing the requirements for restoration was not necessarily a bad thing as it would provide a sense of accomplishment for those who complete the process. The next question was how should the State of Florida address the water needs of its citizens protecting their water rights over the profit-driven corporations who want to sell this precious commodity or pipe it elsewhere? Dickens responded rst saying that any policy should protect everyones right to the reasonable uses of water. If practices are going to cut into anothers livelihood, if it does them harm, then it should not be allowed. On the other hand, if the use is within certain reasonable parameters that it could be permitted. Hill responded that when it comes to preserving the water flow of the Apalachicola River, a ght that has been ongoing for years, we must do everything we can to protect our coastal seafood industry. Our local needs are more important than the building of new subdivisions in Atlanta and that if negotiations to maintain adequate water flow fail, lawsuits would be an appropriate response. He also stated he would restrict the piping of water to south Florida citing an example of water being trucked out of Liberty County that may have adversely affected the water levels of the lake from which it was drawn. The next question concerned the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Noting that Governor Scott, in response to the recent ruling upholding ACA, said he would not implement several of the Acts provisions in Florida. Candidates were asked their opinion on this issue and how they would help citizens receive affordable health care. Hill responded that he disagreed with the governor on a number of issues and this was certainly one point of disagreement. He stated we are in a crisis mode in this country on affordable health care, something needs to be done about it, and the ACA was a step in the right direction. He liked the provisions of not discriminating against those with pre-existing conditions and the provisions to allow children to remain on their familys coverage to age 26. He stated the ACA is not perfect but throwing up our hands and turning our back on the issue was not a solution either. Dickens agreed with Hill especially concerning the provisions of pre-existing conditions. He commented that the ACA is very new and very complex legislation, not everybody understands it right now but overall it is an extraordinarily important law. He cited a personal case of a young child with severe medical problems and how the existing rules and health care system prevents the family involved from making decisions about their future without jeopardizing them from losing critically needed health care for the child due to a pre-existing condition. He believes that ACA must move forward. The next question asked the candidates what three issues were most important to the citizens of their district. Dickens responded that rst was jobs and to have adequate funding for government employees, teachers, and law enforcement. Second, was the economy, stating that his plan for energy independence will create a lot of jobs for citizens in this district. Third, was education, citing this as a security issue. He said the bottom line is that to provide security for our nation you have to a highly educated populace and that education has to be adequately funded so that we will have the educated trained work force needed. Hill responded that the top issue was jobs. He proposed a remedy to cut down on red tape for businesses to establish in our communities. Those compatible with our community and lifestyle should get incentives. For this to be successful, we also need a properly prepared workforce. The second issue was education and adequate funding to ensure its success, Hill said. He suggested looking at school districts that are successful, like Wakulla which is second to none, and model other programs around the state based on what works here. Thirdly, citizens in his district want to see adequate funding for local and state government employees. He does not want to balance state and local budgets on the back of these employees. The next question concerned water bottling. Candidates were asked if they have a plan for protecting natural resources such as Wakulla Springs from plans to come in and bottle the spring water. Hill stated he did not have an answer to this question but said he would consult with experts at TCC and Florida State University to help get a grasp on this issue. Dickens stated that we have a good model in the District with the Nestle plant in Madison. He would want some robust studies and clear data concerning potential issues that water bottling might bring forth. Citing his degree in Biology he further stated it would be absolutely imperative that proper precautions be taken should water bottling be instituted. The next question asked candidates their position on the proposed Amendment 6 to the Florida Constitution, Prohibition on Public Funding of Abortions; Construction of Abortion Rights. Pienta read the candidates the summary of the proposed amendment. At this point candidate A.J. Smith arrived at the meeting and the candidates took turns discussing the meaning of the language in the amendment but all confessing they were unfamiliar with the proposal. Pienta told the candidates that this and 10 other amendments are slated to be on the ballot in November and stressed that candidates and citizens have a duty to study and be informed on these very complex issues before casting their ballots in November. She said that the amendment process is very dif cult for the average citizen to understand without becoming educated on the issues. In the next question, candidates were asked what would be there rst action as a newly elected member to the Florida House. Dickens was rst to respond saying that his rst act would be to thank his constituents, those who elected him to office. He said he would do what he could to restore respect to the institution of state employment. He cited his own employment as an attorney with the Department of Health prior to being deployed to Iraq in 2010. By law his job was held open for him but when he got back, his bene ts had been stripped and his case load had been doubled. He said it was shameful how he and other state workers, highly educated individuals who have worked tirelessly for the citizens of Florida, are being treated. Smith was next to respond and he stated that his rst act following election would be to set up town hall meetings across the district to get to know his constituents better, nd out what they expect from him and let them know how they can contact him. He stated that although many issues were similar district wide, each community had its own special needs and he wanted to be aware of what those issues are and let citizens in his district know that he would be accessible by phone, email and in person. Hill said that the first thing he would do is say a thank you prayer. He would t hen call the Speaker of the House and ask to be put on the Appropriations Committee, to play a role in how funds are allocated. The next question concerned womens reproductive rights. Pienta said that since Governor Scott had been elected there have been major attacks on womens rights in the Florida Legislature with over 20 anti-choice bills in 2011, another 20 in 2012, and a similar number expected in 2013. She asked the candidates how they felt about this issue. Hill responded that he spent much time thinking about this issue. He felt that this should be a decision made by a woman and the family involved. If the decision came down to his family, and it was up to him to decide, he would choose life. Dickens said that the law on this issue has been clear for 40 years. The question posed opens up the door to a broader discussion on womens rights and equality. He applauds efforts to push for equal pay for equal work and flexible work schedules for women and their families. He wants to see the discussion broadened to include relaxing adoption laws and better health care choices for women making sure that every choice is truly theirs. Smith said it was pretty simple, when it comes to a womans right to choose, she has the right to choose. For the final question of the evening, candidates were asked to summarize the issues of importance to them or discuss or revisit other topics of their choice. Hill began by thanking the crowd for the opportunity to meet them or for them to meet him. He asked for their con dence in him as a candidate and for their vote on Aug. 14. He encouraged voters to contact him and that he was available and accessible by phone or email on any topic of importance to them. Dickens also thanked the crowd for coming and said that he viewed this race as a privilege and an opportunity. He said only in this country can a 37-year -old man, with little more than his name, do what he has the chance to do on a dayto-day basis. In this country we can discuss all of the issues. He asked the voters to think about the privileges our democracy affords as they vote in August and November and to thank God that we have these inalienable rights. Smith had the final words for the evening. He apologized for missing the beginning of the forum. He said District 7 was a massive district and its going to take somebody who works very hard, long hours to represent the district and that was the commitment he would make. He stated that he was from Apalachicola and was a retired law enforcement of cer. He has worked to serve people all of his life and thats what he would continue to do. He further stated that its very important as we go forward that a strong candidate emerge from the primary. The Republican party is doing all it can do to defeat us and we will have to work together to defeat them in November. We must come together to support whatever candidate wins the primary. The Cookies and Candidates Forum was held on July 12.Forum for Democratic candidates is held on July 12Democratic candidates for state House District 7 omas Dickens, Robert Hill, A.J. Smith share their views on issues with voters.

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy NATALIE REVELSSpecial to The NewsTrey Young from HRTV and American Competitive Trail Horse Association (ACTHA) have partnered together to host The American Horseman Competition scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 11, at 3Y Ranch in Crawfordville. All horseback riding disciplines are welcome. This competition consists of six miles and six judged obstacles. Young will have a demo for audit and Dr. Stephen Fisch DVM from AVS Equine Hospital will be the guest speaker. In addition, there will be over-night boarding for Friday night arrivals, amazing prizes, ribbons, and of course wonderful fellowship with fellow horse people and their family and friends throughout the day. Registration is limited to 100 riders. This is also a Cash Jackpot Ride. Contestant registration on-line is required. Registration closes at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 8. 3Y Ranch is a beautiful ranch, in the heart of Wakulla County and home of Trey Young of The American Horseman from HRTV. The ranch is approximately 900 acres, consisting of a state of the art covered and lighted arena, loping pen, round pen, two large barns, plenty of cattle and horses and of course, miles of trails. The ranch is typical Florida terrain; therefore, horseshoes for the ride are not necessary. Chason Photos will be the photographer for the event and Dr. Fisch will speak on equine dehydration and use of electrolytes. There will also be great prizes. If you plan on camping out Friday night please make sure you call Natalie Revels at (504) 905-9493 to reserve your spot. There are limited 30-amp connections and limited 110 connections. If you wish to bring a generator as your power source, you are encouraged to do so. If you would like primitive camping, please call to reserve. Payment for camping is due upon arrival. Breakfast and lunch will be provided by a local horse rescue. The proceeds from the meals will bene t Cauzican Animal Rescue (cauzican.org). Payment for meals is cash at the ride. Breakfast is $5 and includes breakfast casserole, fresh fruit, breakfast breads, bagels and cream cheese, yogurt, coffee and fruit juices. Lunch is $7 and consists of barbecue sandwiches, cold nger sandwiches, potato salad, slaw, brownies, dessert, lemonade and water. To learn more about the ACTHA please visit www. actha.us Or visit Trey Young at treyyoung.com. ACTHAs Mission is to provide an enjoyable venue showcasing the wonderful attributes of the great American Trail Horse, granting them the recognition they so richly deserve. Trail ride competition set at 3Y Ranch on Aug. 11 PHOTO BY KIMBERLY CHASON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTrey Young shows how to cross water on a horse. e six-mile trail ride competition is hosted by 3Ys Trey Young, host of e American Horseman on HRTV www.RobertHill4House.com http://twitter.com/hill4house www.facebook.com/RobertHill4House Political advertisement paid for and approved by Robert Hill, Democrat, for Florida House of Representatives District 7 Wakulla Countycan count on Robert Hill... to ght Prison Privatization I will oppose any eorts to privatize the state-operated prisons in our area and put our local people out of work. to oppose New Taxes You will not nd me advocating for any new taxes. I will ght the state budget cuts that endanger the vulnerable and put our friends and neighbors out of work, but this is one Democrat that will not ask you to pay more in taxes. to support Public Education Im a former teacher and I know public education is important. I intend to support our teachers, administrators and public schools as a member of the legislature. to listen to the People I will advocate for the working people and their families like the people who live o the land and the water, retirees, police ocers and small business owners who labor every day and make up the rural communities in our district. to create Jobs We need jobs and economic development that are compatible with our rural communities and lifestyle. I have brought jobs into my community as an elected ocial and I will bring jobs into our district as your State Rep. to preserve our Heritage I have hunted and shed in the rivers, bays and woods around these parts for a very long time. I want those same opportunities for my children and grandchildren. That is why I will ght against those who seek to damage the environment, dry up our rivers, scar our landscape and change the way of life in our area.Robert Hill is a public servant we can trust and a leader who will listen!For Real Experience, Sound Judgment and Proven Leadership you can Count on Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 9BContinued from Page 3B State Department Marketing Director Kerri Post told the audience that more than 100 Viva Florida 500 events are planned for 2013, which marks 500 years since European arrival. Wild owers and the states beauty its a natural, she said, explaining that wildflower tourism crosses boundaries into many niche markets, such as photography and birdwatching. A wildflower ecotourism marketing plan, funded in part by Visit Florida, also was discussed during the meeting. With partner input, the plan will serve as a roadmap for the Panhandle effort. Six of the counties represented have resolutions to preserve and conserve wildflowers, and participants had many ideas on how to achieve those goals. Eleanor Dietrich, who is leading a protection and awareness effort in Leon County, told the group that Leon commissioners modi- ed the countys original resolution on July 10 to eliminate references to speci c roads. The move will allow more exibility to work with the county and FDOT to choose roads as options become available, she said. Dietrich, who continuously monitors Leon Countys roadsides, is also working on presentations for Leon County commissioners to help them understand what is taking place. Were trying to move slowly to make sure of our base of support, she said. Wakulla County Commissioner Lynn Artz told the group her county has made progress protecting roadside wild owers, but not without concerns from residents about safety. To address concerns, Wakulla increased the six-foot strip being mowed along roadsides to 12 feet, she said. To learn more about Floridas wild owers or to request a brochure on Eastern Panhandle wild ower sites, visit www.FlaWild- owers.org/learn.php. To learn about Viva Florida 500 events, visit www. VivaFlorida.org. Wild ower resolutions can be viewed at www. FlaWild owers.org/resolution.php.Panhandle Wild ower Alliance holds meetingBy JO ANN PALMERKWCB DirectorAnother Saturday, another cleanup. KWCB worked again this past Saturday helping a helper. Several KWCB board members and NJROTC cadets cleaned up debris caused by Tropical Storm Debby, which was not your typical storm. As Scott Nelson explained at Green Drinks recently, Debby was the kind of storm you could not be prepared for. That was obvious by the damage caused to the Sopchoppy community and closer to town, at the home of Bruce and Nina Ashley. I am always amazed at how many hands can make a difference in a short period of time. I put out a call for help, and Saturday morning, Lt. Mike Stewart and the Wakulla High School NKJROTC Cadets showed up, ready and willing to work. These young men and women are awesome. Its impressive to see the commitment, respect and loyalty they have to their fellow cadets, community and especially to their leaders, Capt. Ron Huddleston and Lt. Stewart. The cadets sprayed repellent by the can, donned gloves, grasped pickers, bags, shovels, rakes and wheelbarrows and began walking around the perimeter of the Ashley property. They slogged through swamp waters, from where I heard a couple of screams, but never saw the alert. I suspect there was a snake or two involved. They dragged chairs, tables, loose wood, plastic containers, paint cans and a refrigerator to the clearings. From the clearing they skillfully used a tractor with a front-end loader to scoop up the debris and deliver it to the dumpster. Lessons in driving a tractor are always good. Woody Palmer directed the cadet driver who was at times unsure about the balance of the load, but made the exact control movements to drop the load on the mark every time. As KWCB Board Members Ray Cade, Lori Gilbertson, Nancy Paul, two of her grandsons, Durene Gilbert, Marc Dickieson, Jo Ann and Woody Palmer and friend, Gail Campbell, did their own share of picking, separating and sorting, the piles of debris got smaller. At the end of the day, I know we made a difference for Bruce and Nina. Thanks to everyone who came out to work. I am proud to be part of an organization that cares about this community. JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBruce Ashley poses with volunteers, including NJROTC cadets, who helped him clean his property.KEEP WAKULLA COUNTY BEAUTIFULKWCB helps a helper FILE PHOTOWild owers blooming on the roadside right-of-way in Wakulla County last year. Special to The NewsAdd color to your landscape year-round by joining the Arbor Day Foundation in August. Everyone who joins the nonpro t Arbor Day Foundation with a $10 donation will receive 10 free white owering dogwood trees through the Foundations Trees for America campaign. The trees will be shipped postpaid at the right time for planting in each members area, which falls between Oct. 15 and Dec. 10. The 6to 12-inch trees are guaranteed to grow or they will be replaced free of charge. Planting instructions are enclosed with each shipment of trees. Dogwood trees will add color and beauty to your yard throughout the year, with their showy spring owers, scarlet autumn foliage and red berries that attract songbirds in the winter, said John Rosenow, founder and chief executive of the Arbor Day Foundation. New members of the Arbor Day Foundation also receive The Tree Book, which includes information about tree planting and care, and Arbor Day, the Foundations bimonthly publication. To receive the free white owering dogwood trees, by Aug. 31 send a $10 membership contribution to: Ten Dogwoods Arbor Day Foundation 100 Arbor Ave. Nebraska City NE 68410 Or join online at arborday.org/august.Receive 10 dogwood trees free Our Small County Defender! Jamey Westbrook REPUBLICAN for FLORIDA HOUSE, DISTRICT 7 I promise Ill be available in your community with offices set up throughout the district to meet with you one-on-one. I understand the many issues facing us today like job creation, high food and gas prices, the condition of our roads, clean water & environmental issues, government over-regulation, education, immigration and, of course, healthcare. Other issues include the high cost of homeownership, insurance and taxes. I pledge to fight for our Second Amendment rights, and I will work to see that a hunter is appointed to the Florida Wildlife Commission. I have owned & operated the same well drilling business for 35 years and farmed for 25 years. I am a member of the NRA, and have been married for 31 years to Dr. Gayle Westbrook, a school principal. Too many of the folks in Tallahassee dont care about our small counties Jamey will set them straight! F F earless Leadership For Our Small Counties! Calhoun | Franklin | Gulf | Jefferson | Lafayette Leon* | Liberty | Madison | Taylor | Wakulla just a small part! Call Jamey at 8 8 50-526-8450 Political advertisement paid for and approved by Jamey Westbrook, Republican, for Florida House, District 7 1 1-866-742-1373 www.florida-classifieds.com The key to advertising success Classified Display Metro Daily Online Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC.Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Back pain Muscle pain Arthritis pain Joint pain THG-11909 BANKRUPTCY SOVEREIGN OAKS 119 ACRE HORSE FARM CR E HO RS OCALA, FLFriday August 24th 11 a.m. RowellAuctions.comRowell Auctions, Inc. | 800-323-8388Auction To Be Held Onsite, Online Bidding AvailableA MarkNet Alliance MemberAU 479 AB 3109 10% Buyers Premium 2% Broker Participation (*2% of Bid Price) 30 Day Closing Corporate Office with Beautiful Views 3 Bedroom/ 2 Bath Newly Renovated Home for Guest/Manager House 6 Stall Stallion Barn w/Breeding Shed and Office/Apartment 18 Stall Custom Show Stable w/Apartment, Air Conditioned Tack Room, Saddling Station & Arena, 60 Covered Round Pen w/Viewing StandFor Property Information Contact: Joan Pletcher, Realtor, 352-266-910012871 South Highway 475, Ocala, FL (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs.

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The News Aiming to provide a stable, dedicated funding source for the acquisition of conservation and recreation lands in Florida, a coalition of leading defenders of the states environment today launched a Constitutional amendment petition drive to ask voters to guarantee support for this long-term state priority. This will be the most signi cant vote in Florida for our environment in our lifetimes, said Will Abberger, the campaigns chair and the director of conservation nance for the Trust for Public Land. We are launching a grassroots effort to let the people decide if clean water and natural land are a legacy we want to leave for our children and grandchildren and generations to come. The amendment would take effect July 1, 2015, and for 20 years would dedicate one-third of the net revenues from the existing excise tax on documents to restore the Everglades, protect drinking water sources, and revive the states historic commitment to protecting natural lands and wildlife habitat through the Florida Forever Program. Under the amendment, the monies deposited into the Land Acquisition Trust Fund will remain separate from the States General Revenue Fund. The amendment would provide more than $5 billion for water and land conservation in Florida over the next 10 years and $10 billion over the 20-year life of the measure, without any tax increase. The Florida Water and Land Legacy Campaign brings together the Trust for Public Land, Audubon Florida, the Florida Wildlife Federation, the Sierra Club, the Nature Conservancy, 1000 Friends of Florida, Defenders of Wildlife, and others. The campaign will reach out to gain signatures of at least 676,811 registered voters to put the issue on the 2014 ballot. The Coalition notes that since 2009, the Florida Legislature has provided only $23 million for the landmark Florida Forever program. This is a 97.5 percent reduction in previous funding. State appropriations for land management and ecological restoration, including the Everglades, have suffered similar declines. In 2012, the Legislature allocated $8.5 million to safeguard important water protection areas and conservation lands. In light of a state budget of $60 billion, that means that for every dollar the state spends in 2012, less than two-hundredths of one penny will go to water and land conservation less than $1 for each Floridian. We are reaching out across our state to business leaders, conservationists, people of every age, ethnicity, creed, and political stripe, to ask them to protect what is fundamental to our economy and our quality of life in Florida the land and water that makes this such a special place, added Eric Draper, executive director of Audubon Florida. Florida Forever has been cut drastically since 2009. We cant protect this state on less than a dollar per year per Floridian. It just wont work. The Coalition sees the proposed amendment as a responsible remedy to counter the dramatic reduction in funding for environmental protection and preservation, without having to raise taxes. When it comes to dedicating funding to protect Floridas environment, the Great Recession has led to a complete depression. State funding to protect our most precious natural resources has slowed to a trickle, said Manley Fuller, president of the Florida Wildlife Federation, and a leader in the effort. This amendment is not a tax increase. It is the dedication of an existing funding source back to its historic purpose. Passing this amendment will ensure Floridas longterm traditional conservation values are secure and protected from short-term political pressures. The amendment would create Article X, Section 28, of the Florida Constitution. Under the amendment, Floridas Land Acquisition Trust Fund would receive a guaranteed 33 percent of net revenues from the existing excise tax on documents. These funds would be dedicated to support financing or re nancing the acquisition and improvement of: Land, water areas, and related property interests and resources for conservation lands including wetlands, forests, and sh and wildlife habitat; Lands that protect signi cant water resources and drinking water sources, including lands protecting the water quality and quantity of rivers, lakes, streams, springsheds, and lands providing recharge for groundwater and aquifer systems; Lands in the Everglades Agricultural Area and the Everglades Protection Area, as de ned in Section 7(b) of Article II of the Florida Constitution; Beaches and shores; outdoor recreation lands, including recreational trails, parks, and urban open space; rural landscapes; historic, archaeological, or geologic sites as well as management of lands acquired; Restoration of natural systems related to the enhancement of public access and recreational enjoyment; and Payment of the debt service on bonds issued pursuant to Article VII, Section 11(e) of the Florida Constitution. The Coalition says support for environmental protection remains strong in Florida and is solidly nonpartisan. Since 1994, Florida voters have approved ve of the six amendments proposed to the state Constitution related to conservation and the environment an 83 percent passage rate. Regardless of political party and in good times and bad, for more than 20 years Legislatures and Governors have supported these programs. Since the recent economic downturn, our water and land, our beaches and springs, have suffered greater cuts and more damage than almost any other area of statewide concern, said Abberger. The campaign will rely on volunteer signature gatherers and donors from across the state, and is urging supporters to sign up at FloridaWaterLandLegacy. org, or call (850) 629-4656, or e-mail to campaign@ FloridaWaterLandLegacy. org.ENVIRONMENTAL NEWSGroups seek amendment to guarantee funding for environmentBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE An audit of the state of ce charged with administering grants meant to encourage energy efciency and alternative fuels turned up nearly $3 million in potential fraud along with other nancial mismanagement, according to a report issued recently by the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. The inspector generals report, which comes a little more than a year after the department took control of the Of ce of Energy, also says nearly $200,000 had been awarded to a company that had led for bankruptcy. Most of the funds were stopped before they reached their destinations, including almost $2.3 million in the alleged fraud cases; the bankrupt company also didnt get the $198,000. And auditors found that the Of ce of Energy didnt have invoices for $800,000 in reimbursements from $17 million in requests they examined. Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam blamed a lack of leadership at the of ce, which has been housed at various times in the current Department of Management Services, what is now the Department of Economic Opportunity, the Department of Environmental Protection and the governors of ce before going to Putnams department. This audit really reveals the consequences of an agency that has bounced around ve different places in the course of its existence, Putnam said. That became an even greater issue when almost $176 million came pouring into the states energy initiatives from President Barack Obamas stimulus package. Combined with state funding, the of ce was charged with spending more than $219.7 million in a bit more than three years. You had a limited staff with a lack of training and absolutely no direction, who were inundated in a very short period of time by $200 million and orders to get it out the door as fast as possible, Putnam said. State of cials said two companies were under investigation for the fraud, though company names were not released Tuesday. One of the projects was purportedly to manufacture and store equipment for wind and solar energy systems; $700,000 of the $2.5 million awarded to the program had already been given to the initiative before ofcials stopped it. The other program, aimed at farm equipment using biodiesel, never received the $500,000 allocated for it. But those were not the only failures, Putnam said. A drive to install new gas stations using ethanol-heavy fuel around the state has stalled; of the 20 grants for E-85 sites, 12 have already been terminated. The audit also knocked the office for not sending grant administrators to renewable energy sites often enough to check up on the projects they were overseeing. In a response to the audit, Of ce of Energy Director Patrick Sheehan -who was appointed by Putnam after the of ces transfer -said former Gov. Charlie Crist barred staff members from traveling when he oversaw the of ce. Sheehan said the of ce has already carried out 120 site visits over the last year.Audit: fraud in energy programs 5 Acres Sweetwater Ridge Crawfordville, Owner Financing $44,999 5 Acres Brook Forest Crawfordville, Owner Financing $44,999 5.7 Acres Old Plank Rd, SE Tallahassee, Owner Financing $24,900 5 Acres MaryAnn Circle, Crawfordville, $55,000 2.67 Acres Lawhon Mill Rd, Crawfordville, $29,900 lots & landJR Milton3/2 Ranch in Wakulla Gardens. Short Sale Price to sell fast $83,000Woodville Hwy.Home, Cottage, Cook House, Shop and more nestled on 12 acres $249,900Mill Hollow Charmer, Great location, mature landscape, inground pool, 2 car garage, 1 acre lot. $174,900Boynton Ct.Large 5/3 on one acre in North Crawfordville. Bank Owned Just reduced $114,000Two Houses(1 DWMH & 1 SWMH) Two Acres. Main home nice kitchen newly remodeled, second is rented. Only $134,900Dixie DriveLarge 5/3 on 7 acres, close to Shadeville Elem. Short Sale $89,000Ponderosa PlusLocated on Wakulla Springs Rd. 3/2, 5 acres, 2,083 sq. ft., partly fenced for horses, etc. Only $149,900New ConstructionReady to move in Lots of special features w/ city water and sewer. New Low Price, $104,900. GuinevereCome see this beauty, a 2 story townhome, private back yard, community features a pool $88,900 MUST SEE! let us get you home all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtorWe would like to WELCOME;MARY APPLEGATE to Rossetti Realty, She has recently relocated to Wakulla County from Ft Myers via Tallahassee. She has been licensed in Real estate for over 7 years and has demonstrated a high level of service to clients and community. We are very pleased to have her join our team. Please call her directly for any and all your real Estate needs: 850-926-3787 or TMapplegate@ymail.com. our ome own ealtorRossetti Realty would be willing to speak to any perspective agent, experienced, or newly licensed, or just thinking about a new career. Call David Rossetti today for your condential interview. 850-591-6161

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 11BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 1 More than 13,000 ex-felons may be eligible to vote but dont know it, the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida said Wednesday, citing data it obtained from the Florida Parole Commission. The ACLU said the commission is sitting on more than 17,000 Restoration of Civil Rights certi cates that would notify former felons that they can now register to vote, but which have not reached their intended recipients. The civil rights group cross-checked the names on those certi cates with voter registration lists and found that 13,571 of them are not registered voters, presumably because many of them dont know theyve been cleared to register. Florida is one of a minority of U.S. states that does not automatically restore civil rights once a felon has completed a sentence. The certi cates were sent between 2007 and March 2011, during which time a change in policy spearheaded by former Gov. Charlie Crist allowed nonviolent exfelons to have their rights automatically restored. The policy was repealed in March 2011 after Florida Gov. Rick Scott and newly elected members of the Florida Cabinet voted to eliminate automatic restoration and again make it more dif cult for ex-felons to get their civil rights, including the right to vote, restored. Scott has been aggressively pursuing efforts to clean up the states voter rolls because, he says, there are some non-citizens who are ineligible to vote who are registered. Following a legal battle, the state last month gained access to a federal Department of Homeland Security database to continue the effort to remove ineligible voters. An initial effort stalled when local supervisors of elections balked because of possible inaccuracies on an earlier list of potentially ineligible voters sent to the counties by the state. The parole commissions website fpcweb.fpc.state. .us allows a search to see if an ex-offenders rights have been restored. F T s t l M 1 2 F ree for fa T his 12 we s upport in d t rained N A iving with M exico ha v Clas 2 W mily mem P a ek educat i d ividuals w A MI family one of th e v e gradua t ses st a Myra 266 9 To regNAMI eek bers, part Majo r Schizop h B o nic Disord P o i onal cour s w ith seriou member v e se brain il t ed from t h a rt Th u Jeans 9 Cra w ister, c or e m Wakulla F R Edu ners, signi r Depressi o h renia an d o rderline P er, Obses s o st traum a s e is struc t s mental d v olunteers lnesses. O v h is outsta n u rsday, Resta u w fordvil c all NA M m ail namiw is a (501 R E E cati Fa m ficant oth e o n and Bip o d Schizoaff e P ersonality s ive Comp u a tic Stress t ured to h e d isorders. T who kno w v er 300,0 0 n ding progAugu s u rant C le Hw y M I Waakulla@c e (C) 3) no E ona m ily t ers, and f r olar Disor d e ctive Dis o y Disorder u lsive Dis o Disorder e lp caregi v T his cours e w what it i s 0 0 people i ram. s t 16, 2 C onfer e y Cra w kulla a e nturylink. o n profit o l Co u t o Fa r iends of i n d er o rder o rder, and v ers under s e is taught s like to h a i n the U.S. 2 012, 5 e nce R o w fordvi t 926 1 net o rganiza t u rs e mily n dividuals s tand and by a tea m a ve a love d Canada, a 5 :30 p. m o om lle 1 033 t ion e with m of d one a nd m PARTNER E R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy 926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of ConnieMack MikeMcCalister MarielenaStuart DaveWeldonUNITEDSTATESENATOR (VoteforOne) HalseyBeshears DonCurtis JameyWestbrook MikeWilliamsSTATEREPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT7 (VoteforOne) KrisDunn BarbaraHobbs JosefinaM.TamayoCIRCUITJUDGE2NDCIRCUIT GROUP2 (VoteforOne) MikeScott MelisaTaylorSCHOOLBOARD DISTRICT2 (VoteforOne) EdBrimner ChuckHessSOILANDWATER SEAT3 (VoteforOne) DEMOCRATICPARTY REPUBLICANPARTYNONPARTISAN GlennA.Burkett BillNelson UNITEDSTATESENATOR (VoteforOne) LeonardBembry AlLawson AlvinL.Peters MarkSchlakman REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT2 (VoteforOne) ThomasDickens RobertHill A.J.Smith STATEREPRESENTATIVE District7 (VoteforOne) KrisDunn BarbaraHobbs JosefinaM.Tamayo CIRCUITJUDGE2NDCIRCUIT GROUP2 (VoteforOne) MikeScott MelisaTaylor SCHOOLBOARD DISTRICT2 (VoteforOne) INCONGRESS EdBrimner ChuckHessSOILANDWATER SEAT3 (VoteforOne) CalJamison MitchellKauffmanSEAT5 SOILANDWATER (VoteforOne) SOILANDWATER SEAT5 (VoteforOne) CalJamison MitchellKauffmanPARTYOFFICES KurtAhrendt GordonMcCleary LarryTaylorSTATECOMMITTEEMAN (VoteforOne) AnneAhrendt TinaBrimnerSTATECOMMITTEEWOMAN (VoteforOne) KrisDunn BarbaraHobbs JosefinaM.TamayoCIRCUITJUDGE2NDCIRCUIT GROUP2 (VoteforOne) MikeScott MelisaTaylorSCHOOLBOARD DISTRICT2 (VoteforOne) EdBrimner ChuckHessSOILANDWATER SEAT3 (VoteforOne) CalJamison MitchellKauffmanSOILANDWATER SEAT5 (VoteforOne) OFFICIALPRIMARYSAMPLE BALLOT WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAUGUST 14, 2012 M A K E I T C O U N T V o t e f o r O N E Y O U R C H O I C E N O T Y o u r C h o i c e M A R K Y O U R B A L L O T C O R R E C T L Y C O MP L E T E L Y F I L L I N T H E O V A L N E X T T O Y O U R C H O I C E ELECTION DAY POLLS OPEN 7:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.OFFICIAL SAMPLE BALLOTPRIMARY ELECTION WAKULLA COUNTY AUGUST 14, 2012 Henry F.BuddyWells Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P.O. Box 305 Crawfordville, FL32326 THIS SAMPLE BALLOT MAYBE TAKEN TO THE POLLS FOR REFERENCE.EARLYVOTING SCHEDULE August 4th throughAugust 11th8:00 am to 6:00 pm August 5th1:00 pm to 7 pm Please study this ballot before going to vote. Your precinct number is designated on your Voter Information Card. Please vote in the Primary ElectionAugust 14, 2012Please have Photo & Signature Identification ready -even if the poll wor k er knows you. (Florida Statute 101.043) Vote early this year & avoid the large crowds of election day!You no longer have to wait until election day to make your vote count! Florida now allows voters to cast their ballot up to 10 days prior to each Election Day. Just bring your signature & photo ID to the Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections office at 3115-B Crawfordville Hwy. in Crawfordville EachRegisteredvoterinthisstate should: 1.Familiarizehimselforherself withthecandidatesandissues. 2.Maintainwiththeofficeofthe supervisorofelectionsacurrent address. 3.Knowthelocationofhisorher pollingplaceanditshoursof operation. 4.Bringproperidentificationto thepollingstation. 5.Familiarizehimselforherself withtheoperationofthevoting equipmentinhisorherprecinct. 6.Treatprecinctworkerswith courtesy. 7.Respecttheprivacyofother voters. 8.Report any problems orviolationsofelectionlawstothesupervisorofelections. 9.Askquestions,ifneeded. 10.Makesurethathisorhercompletedballotiscorrectbefore leavingthepollingstation. NOTETOVOTER:Failuretoperformanyoftheseresponsibilities doesnotprohibitavoterfromvoting.F.S.101.031(2) FORADDITIONAL INFORMATION CONTACT THE WAKULLACOUNTY ELECTIONS OFFICEATP.O. Box 305 Crawfordville, FL32326-0305 Phone: (850) 926-7575 Website: www.wakullaelection.com:M A K E I T C O U N T .V o t ef o r O N E Y OU R C H OI C E N O T Y o u r C h o i c e MA R K Y O U R B A LL O T C O R R E C T LY C O MP LE T E LY F I L L I N T H E O V A L N E X T T O Y O U R C H O I C E CANDIDATE Voter's Bill of RightsEach registered voterin this state has the right to: 1.Vote and have his orhervote accurately counted. 2.Cast a vote if he orshe is in line at the official closing of the polls in that county. 3.Ask forand receive assistance in voting. 4.Receive up to two replacement ballots if he orshe makes a mistake priorto the ballot being cast. 5.An explanation if his orher registration oridentity is in question. 6.If his orherregistration or identity is in question, cast a provisional ballot. 7.Written instructions to use when voting, and, upon request, oral instruction in voting from elections officers. 8.Vote free from coercion or intimidation by elections officers orany otherperson. 9.Vote on a voting system that is in working condition and that will allow votes to be accurately cast.Voter Responsibilities 12 13,000 quali ed ex-felons are not registered to vote

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 3 When Gerard Robinson was chosen in June 2011 to become Florida education commissioner, Gov. Rick Scott hailed the newcomers leadership as exactly what Florida needs to reach the next level of education reforms that will bene t both our students and the businesses of our state. But with Robinsons resignation this week, someone else will have to help lead Florida to that next level. In announcing his resignation, Robinson said he wanted to spend more time with his family in Virginia. But the departure also came after the department found itself embroiled recently in back-to-back controversies about its handling of Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test scores and school grades. Robinsons tenure was short enough that he might leave little impression in Tallahassee political circles. But the same cant be said for two other once-close gures former Gov. Charlie Crist and former state Republican Chairman Jim Greer who drew headlines this week. Crist looks like he might get back into campaign mode, possibly as a Democrat. Greer, meanwhile, continues a legal battle with the state Republican Party about a severance agreement from his time as chairman. MR. ROBINSON, WE HARDLY KNEW YE Scott and Kathleen Shanahan, chairwoman of the state Board of Education, praised Robinson after he announced his resignation. He has worked with the board as we have raised standards for our students and our schools, Shanahan said in a statement released by the Department of Education. He is a leader who embodies and understands the importance of education reform. We wish him the best as he makes the decision that is best for his own young children. Under Robinson, however, the department gave fuel to critics of Floridas heavy emphasis on the FCAT and school grades. The Board of Education held an emergency meeting in May to lower passing scores on FCAT writing tests, after the department saw plummeting percentages of students meeting new, tougher standards. In July, the department had to revise grades for 213 elementary and middle schools and nine school districts because of problems in the grading process. Robinsons resignation spurred further calls from Democrats to place less emphasis on standardized testing. The FCAT has failed students, teachers and our state, said Plantation Rep. Perry Thurston, who is expected to become the House Democratic leader after this falls elections. A new state education commissioner can help Florida install a better and broader education accountability system for every school receiving taxpayer dollars that takes into account all the things students and teachers accomplish throughout the year. With many Republicans invested politically in the FCAT, it remains to be seen whether the state will make changes to the accountability system. The Board of Education chose Public Schools Chancellor Pam Stewart to serve as interim commissioner while it searches for Robinsons replacement. GREER, CRIST SEND MESSAGES TO THE GOP Greer and Crist once were close allies atop the Florida GOP. Now, they are vili ed by the party. But both in far different ways keep coming back to give Republicans reasons to curse them. Greer, who faces criminal money-laundering and fraud charges because of an alleged fund-raising scheme while he was chairman, is locked in a messy civil lawsuit with the party about a severance agreement. The case took a bizarre turn this week when Greers attorney released a document to reporters that indicated the party has been involved in settlement talks. Weve been talking about a settlement this whole time, Greer attorney Damon Chase said. But Stephen Dobson, a lawyer for the party, denied that talks are ongoing. While Dobson said discussions had been held in the past, he said the GOP does not plan to pay Greer to make the case vanish. While I dont want to get into speci cs, I will tell you that the Republican Party has never made an offer to pay Jim Greer any money to settle his lawsuit not one dollar, not one red cent, Dobson said. Crist, meanwhile, continued to add to speculation that he will become a Democrat and run for governor in 2014. He appeared this week at an Orlando fund-raiser for Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson a fund-raiser that also included former President Bill Clinton. Crist, who left the GOP in 2010 to run unsuccessfully as an independent for the U.S. Senate, is backing Nelson over Republican U.S. Rep. Connie Mack. Senator Nelson has been a friend, he and Grace both, Crist told the Associated Press, referring to Nelsons wife. Its no knock on Connie. AP also reported that Mack campaign spokesman David James had a three-word response to the news. Is anyone surprised? James said. FINALLY, ITS TIME TO VOTE Bombarded by nasty mail pieces and television ads, Florida voters nally are getting their chance to have a say in this years elections. Early voting starts this weekend in most of the state, though it was allowed to start Monday in Collier, Hardee, Hendry, Hillsborough and Monroe counties. Those ve counties are treated differently than the rest of the state because of a history of discrimination. State lawmakers last year changed an election law to reduce the number of days for early voting. But that change will not take effect for the five counties until the federal government signs off on it ---something that has not happened. The start of early voting, however, has not eliminated the steady stream of lawsuits and assertions that the state is hindering people from voting. The latest example came this week when the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida said more than 13,000 ex-felons might be eligible to vote but dont know it. The ACLU said the Florida Parole Commission has more than 17,000 Restoration of Civil Rights certi cates that would notify former felons they can now register to vote. But the civil-liberties group said the certificates have not reached their intended recipients. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gerard Robinson resigns as Florida education commissioner. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: I think its important to remember that only one person in this lawsuit has been arrested and charged with six felony charges, and thats Jim Greer, Stephen Dobson, an attorney for the state Republican Party, in dismissing the possibility of a settlement agreement that would involve the GOP paying former Chairman Greer.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Robinson leaves, but Greer, Crist dont go away Dawn Reed, GRI, SFR, RealtorCell (850) 294-3468dawnjreed@yahoo.com www.WakullaInfo.comCheryl Swift, CLG, CHP, RealtorCell (850) 766-3218cswiftrealtor@yahoo.comwww.CrawfordvilleProperties.com SHORT SALE VS. FORECLOSUREwww.WakullaShortSales.com Your Local Short Sale Specialists!!! It allows a more digni ed exit from the home. In a foreclosure, an of cial eventually comes to the home and tells the occupants to leave-immediately. In a short sale, the seller knows the closing date and can prepare in advance for the move. The seller could possibly avoid a de ciency judgment. Most banks will release the seller from this obligation in a short sale process. A short sale has less of a negative impact on sellers credit report. Once a short sale is completed, the sellers begin to clean-up their credit report. The timeline can be much longer as a foreclosure proceeds through the process. There is a ticking clock on tax relief. There is currently legislation, the Mortgage Forgiveness Relief Act of 2007, ensuring that homeowners who received principal reductions or other forms of debt forgiveness on their primary residence do not have to pay taxes on the amount forgiven. This legislation is set to expire at the end of the year. 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 13B -Janet (ARA) When you think of baking, your mind probably goes right to warm cookies, fruit- lled cobblers or pies and savory bread. While those are all the happy results of spending some time in the kitchen, when children, tweens and teens get involved in baking, theyll come away from the experience with a lot more than just happy taste buds. Its no secret that kids learn while theyre at play, but baking is a particularly great way to make learning interactive, effective and fun. With so many positive outcomes wrapped up into one activity, teachers, parents and others responsible for helping young people learn can use baking to create hands-on experiences that relate to everything from science to managing money. Consider all of the ways that baking can apply to school subjects, everyday life skills and a richer food future: Science Chemistry goes hand in hand with baking. A range of results can be clearly seen when including or leaving out key ingredients. Biology, agriculture and local food production become real when kids learn where ingredients like our, butter, sugar, and leavening come from, or the physical changes that occur in a product when substituting ingredients to meet health and nutritional needs. Math Baking is an activity that applies sequencing, ordering, fractions, weights, measures, dimensions, temperatures, adding, subtracting, dividing and multiplying. Children can learn at all ages, from the early days when they can stack measuring cups, count out the number of ingredients that go into a recipe to more complex tasks for older kids, like working with fractions and calculating the costs, and savings of do-it-yourself (DIY) baking. Health As you pick out recipes and ingredients for baked goods, its the perfect opportunity to talk about the nutritional value and function of the grains, milk, eggs, fruits, veggies, sugars, butter, leavening and salt used in baking. Theres sometimes a misperception that baking cant be healthy, but teaching kids how to divide and control portion sizes, and to bake using a wide variety of ingredients actually helps young people try new foods and ingredients. Personal economics Learning about managing household resources is a skill that will bene t kids throughout their lives. Baking not only teaches kids how to make delicious foods for themselves, but it also includes lessons about how much it costs when others prepare food for you, how much you can save with a few DIY food skills, saving and managing money. The economics of an active lifestyle includes food skills that save money and time all while burning calories and building traditions. Literacy Another critical skill comes with reading ingredient lists, recipe directions and sequencing preparation steps. Combining reading with baking emphasizes comprehension, because kids apply what theyre reading to an activity. If you miss a step in the instructions or dont read it properly, it can have a dramatic effect on what youre baking. But all is not lost this leads to evaluating the results, problem solving and critical thinking to improve the product. Baking at home was far more common, if not essential, in past generations. Many adults have lost those skills. However, research conducted in 2011 by Mintel for the Home Baking Association showed that adults still know baking brings value to life 33 percent say they would bake from scratch, if only they knew how. Because no ones too old, or young, to learn to bake, it can be a great way for parents and kids to share a learning experience. And if you try out some of grandmas or great-grandmas baking recipes, it can be a tradition-rich, multi-generational family affair.How baking serves up a batch of skills for children, tweens and teens SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for qualied applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and oor rate of 2.5% TRINITY LUTHERAN PRESCHOOLContinuously providing a high quality Christian early learning program for more than two decades NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for 2012-2013 VPK AND 3KFull and Part-time C o Call (850) 926-5557 for information and to enroll your childLocated on Coastal Highway across from Wakulla High School Tallahassees Champagne Party -Beneting Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend-Dust o your dancing shoes and get ready for a smashing good time cuz the 3rd Annual BIG Champagne Bash is just around the corner. Save the date for this spectacular evening of dancing, dinner by-the-bite, free-owing bubbly, and unforgettable fun. Were celebrating the Roaring 20s once again an era of silent lm, speakeasies, and sensational parties!Who: 300+, community-minded, fun-loving Fellas and Flappers from across the Big Bend come together for the event of the season to make a BIG, positive, and lasting impact in the lives of children in our area. Why: Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend believes all children have the ability to achieve success in life. When: Friday, August 24, 8:00 p.m. 12:00 a.m. Venue: Hotel Duval, 415 North Monroe Street (Reserve your special $99 BIG Bash hotel guest rate by calling 850.224.6000 with the code BBSBBSI by Friday, August 10th.) Attire: Get all dolled-up for the 1920s silent movie theme Hosted by: Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bends BIG Alliance (www.bbbs.org/ bigalliance) T icket Info: INCLUDES UNLIMITED CHAMPAGNE! Pre-Sale (expires August 17): $70/single, $130/couple, $600/group rate-10 tickets Standard Rate (August 18 Sold-Out): $75/single, $150/couple Purchase tickets at www.bbbs.org/bigbash.

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Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear EarthTalk: I couldnt believe my ears: genetically engineered mosquitoes? Why on Earth would they be created? And I understand there are plans to release them into the wild? Marissa Abingdon Sumter, SC Yes its true, genetically engineered mosquitoes, which were bred in the lab to transmit a gene during the reproductive process that kills their offspring, have already been used on an experimental basis in three countries the Cayman Islands, Malaysia and Brazil to counteract the quickly spreading mosquitoborne viral infection dengue fever. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that as many as 100 million cases of humans infected with dengue fever which causes a severe u-like illness and can in certain instances be fatal occur annually in more than 100 tropical and sub-tropical countries. The British company behind the project, Oxitec, is focusing initially on dengue fever, given that the particular virus which causes it is only carried by one subspecies of mosquito. This makes the illness easier to target than malaria, for instance, which is carried by many different types of mosquitoes. Oxitec first released some of the genetically modified mosquitoes in the Cayman Island in the Caribbean in 2009, much to the surprise of the international community and environmental advocates, many of whom are opposed to genetic engineering in any of its forms due to the unknown and unintended side effects that unleashing transgenic organisms into the world could cause. In Brazil, where the largest experiments have been carried out to date, the government is backing a new facility designed to breed millions of genetically engineered mosquitoes to help keep dengue fever at bay. Dengue fever isnt considered to be a big problem in the U.S. as yet. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that most of the dengue fever cases showing up in the continental U.S. are among those who have travelled to sub-tropical and tropical areas of the world. Still, WHO reports that the incidence of dengue fever in the U.S. has increased some thirty-fold over the last half century. A proposal by Oxitec to test its transgenic mosquitoes in the Florida Keys has some locals upset. In April 2012, the town of Key West passed an ordinance prohibiting the release of the mosquitoes pending further testing on possible implications for the environment. In the meantime, Oxitec has applied to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a patent on their mosquito and permission to release them in the U.S. Some 80,000 people have signed onto a campaign on the Change.org website calling on the FDA to deny Oxitecs application. Mila de Mier, the Key West mother who launched the campaign, is concerned about the potential consequences of releasing an experimental organism on a delicate ecosystem. Oxitecs business goal is to sell genetically modi ed mosquitoes in the United States, said de Mier. Weve already said we dont want these mosquitoes in our backyards, but Oxitec isnt listening. More de nitive scienti c study is needed, she says, that looks at the long-term impacts. Dear EarthTalk: Commercial whaling was banned around the world years ago, but some nations continue to hunt whales. Why is this and whats being done about it? Jackie ONeill Hershey, PA Sadly for our world and its biodiversity, whales are still being killed despite an international ban on commercial whaling. Indeed, rampant whaling over the last two centuries has decimated just about every whale population around the globe. According to Greenpeace, many whale species are down to around one percent of their estimated former abundance before the days of commercial whaling. Fourteen whaling nations came together in 1946 to form the International Whaling Commission (IWC) to manage whale stocks and recommend hunting limits where appropriate. But the continuing decline of populations forced the IWC to call for an outright ban on all commercial whaling in 1986. Japan, Norway and Iceland continue to defy the ban, each harvesting hundreds if not more whales every year. The Japanese invented the concept of scienti c whaling in 1987 as a way around the moratorium on commercial whaling, reports Greenpeace. Their research is not really research. It is an excuse for supplying whale meat on the Japanese market. The research consists, among other things, of analysis of the contents of the digestive tract. The data on what the animals eat is then used to argue that whales eat too much commercially important fish and that the populations should be culled to save the sh, argues Greenpeace, and that the Japanese selectively release data on certain species and ignore data on others. Norway resumed whaling in 1993 as an attempt by the political party in power at the time to gain popularity in northern Norway, says Greenpeace. And Iceland increased its whaling dramatically in recent years. In 2010 alone, Icelandic whalers killed hundreds of whales including endangered n whales and shipped more than 750 tons of whale meat and products to Japan, whose market is already glutted with whale meat from its own scienti c research whaling program, reports the non-pro t Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). Several green groups including NRDC recently petitioned the Obama administration to take action against Iceland under the Pelly Amendment to the Fishermans Protective Act. The Amendment allows the President to impose trade sanctions against a country that is diminishing the effectiveness of a conservation agreement in Icelands case the whaling moratorium and another international treaty that prohibits trade in endangered species, says NRDC. Greenpeace has been pressuring Japan to not only end its own whaling but also its support of whaling by other nations not abiding by the IWC moratorium. We are working around the world to increase the pressure put on Japan by conservation-minded governments at the IWC to close the political loopholes that allow the reckless hunt to continue, says Greenpeace. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com.EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Genetically modi ed mosquitoes released to ght disease In a very controversial experiment, genetically engineered mosquitoes, which were bred to transmit a gene during the reproductive process that kills their offspring, have been used in three countries the Cayman Islands, Malaysia and Brazil to counteract the quickly spreading mosquito-borne viral infection dengue fever.PHOTO USDA e World Health Organization estimates that as many as 100 million cases of humans infected with dengue fever occur annually. A STRONG VOICEFOR OUR VALUESfor StateREPRESENTATIVEAJ SMITH A STRONG VOICEThe people of North Florida deserve a strong voice with strong values someone who will stand up for our families and our way of life. Rising from the most humble of beginnings right here at home, A. J.s legacy is one of fighting for the people of North Florida. Whether as a SWAT commander or as the co-founder of Cops for Kids, A. J. Smith is a leader who has devoted his career to defending our values and our families.A DECISION MAKERNorth Floridas citizens deserve someone in Tallahassee who can make tough decisions. The ability to make wise decisions in difficult situations is something A. J. has learned to do in almost 30 years of serving people at the local and state level. A. J. Smith understands that now is a time to not only work hard, but to work smart.SMALL TOWN VALUESBeing raised in our district, and having worked most of my career locally, I understand the importance we hold for family and service to this country.FISCAL RESTRAINT, LOCAL CONTROLTallahassee does not understand what is best for us. With more budget cuts looming, we need someone who will stand up and say enough is enough. I will demand the state return local control to local leaders.RESPECT FOR FAMILY AND THE VALUE OF HARD WORKThis districts citizens appreciate the value of a hard days work and a family to come home to. I have dedicated my life to protecting these needs, as well as being an active leader in building stronger families and giving back to our community.AJSmithCampaign.com facebook.com/AJSmithCampaign twitter.com/AJSmithCampaignPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by A.J. Smith, Democrat for State Representative, District 7. nd er st st an an ds ds t t ha ha t no w i s a ti me t o no t on l y wor k h ar d b u t t o wor k smar t l h /h ENDORSED BY THE FLORIDA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE FLORIDA RETAIL FEDERATION.

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Section C THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012BACK TO SCHOOLWakulla County public schools are hosting their annual open houses for parents, guardians and students to attend. Students can nd out their teachers, schedules, bus routes, and requirements for many of their classes. Riversprings Middle School and Wakulla Middle School open houses are Monday, Aug. 13 from 4:30 p.m. until 7 p.m. Wakulla High Schools is from 5:30 until 8 p.m. the same day. On Tuesday, Aug. 14, Wakulla Pre-K sites in Crawfordville and Sopchoppy will host open houses from 3 p.m. until 5 p.m. Elementary schools Crawfordville, Medart, Riversink, and Shadeville will have their open houses from 4:30 p.m. until 7 p.m. The rst day of school for students is Thursday, Aug. 16. It is an Early Release day in order to get students familiar with their travel routes and school schedules. Middle and high school students will be released around 12:15 p.m. Pre-K and elementary students will be nished around 1:15 p.m. BUS ROUTES Bus routes are posted on the district website, wakullaschooldistrict.org. They are also posted in Wal-Mart and are available at the open houses. The rst day of school is Thursday, Aug. 16Open houses will be held at the schools on Monday, Aug. 13, and Tuesday, Aug. 14COAST Charter School in St. Marks will hold its open house on Tuesday, Aug. 14, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The Charter School for Arts, Science and Technology serves students VPK-4 and grades Kindergarten through 8th grade. Bus transportation is available. For more information, call 925-6344. Wakulla Christian School is excited about the 201213 school year, which will begin Thursday, Aug. 16. Orientation will be held on Tuesday, Aug. 14, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. After a brief assembly in the auditorium, parents and students will then visit the classrooms to meet with their teachers. Enrollment is still open for students in 4K 8th grade. WCS is an approved providers for the Step Up for Students Scholarship and 4K-VPK program. For more information or questions, please contact the school of ce at 926-5583.Coast Charter School Wakulla Christian Our Dad has always instilled in us, that our education is of the highest priority in our lives and he has worked hard to make sure that we have had the best education possible. As he is committed to our success, he will be COMMITTED TO THE SUCCESS of all students in our school district. His proven leadership and experience will allow our school district to maintain the recognition it deserves as a High Performing School District.Our Dad has:PROVEN LEADERSHIP, EXPERIENCE, and is COMMITTED TO SUCCESS OF ALL STUDENTS.ON AUGUST 14TH PLEASE VOTE FOR AND RE-ELECTOUR DAD, MIKE SCOTTSchool Board District 2Paid Political Advertisement Approved by Mike Scott Campaign Fund, Non-Partisan Hello, I am Corban Scott an 11th grade student at Wakulla High School and I am Connor Scott a 7th grade student at Riversprings Middle School. 2nd Annual Landon Greene Memorial Scholarship CHARITY Golf Tournament Saturday Aug. 11, 2012 at 8:15 A.M.Hole Sponsors are $100 per holeAll Proceeds go to WAKULLA PRE-KFor more information or to sign up call Jared Greene (850-556-8982) or Amber Greene (850-556-6109) or email amber@famb.org. $220 Per Team (4 person team) or $55 per personThank You for Your Support!!! Donations can be made to Landon Greene Scholarship Fund via Cash or Check Mail to: 988 Wakulla Arran Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB, GOLF COURSE 3870 Coastal Hwy 98, Crawfordville, FL

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Page 2C THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comCRAWFORDVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL School day: 8:55 a.m. to 3:25 p.m. Angie Walker, Principal, angela. walker@wcsb.us Laura Kelley, Assistant Principal, laura.kelley@wcsb.us 379 Arran Road, Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850)926-3641 Fax: (850) 926-4304 Grades: K-5 MEDART ELEMENTARY SCHOOL School day: 8:55 a.m. to 3:25 p.m. Sharon Kemp, Principal, sharon. kemp@wcsb.us Belinda McElroy, Assistant Principal, belinda.mcelroy@wcsb.us 2558 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 962-4881 Fax: (850) 962-3953 Grades: K-5 RIVERSINK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL School day: 8:55 a.m. to 3:25 p.m. Jackie High, Principal, jackie. high@wcsb.us Melinda Young, Assistant Principal, melinda.young@wcsb.us 530 Lonnie Raker Lane, Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 926-2664 Fax: (850) 926-9462 Grades: K-5 SHADEVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL School day: 8:55 a.m. to 3:25 p.m. Susan Brazier, Principal, susan. brazier@wcsb.us Dee Ann Hughes, Assistant Principal, deeann.hughes@wcsb.us 45 Warrior Way, Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 926.7155 Fax: (850) 926.5044 Grades: K-5 RIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL School day: 7:40 a.m. to 2:25 p.m. Dod Walker, Principal, william. walker@wcsb.us Michele Baggett, Assistant Principal, sabrina.baggett@wcsb.us 800 Spring Creek Hwy., Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 926-2300 Fax: (850) 926-2111 Grades: 6-8 WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL School day: 7:40 a.m. to 2:20 p.m. Mike Barwick, Principal, michael.barwick@wcsb.us Tolar Grif n, Assistant Principal, tolar.grif n@wcsb.us 22 Jean Drive, Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 926-7143 Fax: (850) 926-3752 Grades: 6-8 WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL School day: 7:40 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mike Crouch, Principal, michael.crouch@wcsb.us Sunny Chancy, Assistant Principal, sunny.chancy@wcsb.us Simeon Nelson, Assistant Principal, simeon.nelson@wcsb.us 3237 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 926-7125 Fax: (850) 926-8571 Grades: 9-12 SOPCHOPPY EDUCATION CENTER Tom Askins, Principal/Site Administrator, thomas.askins@wcsb. us 164 Yellow Jacket Ave., Sopchoppy FL 32358 Phone: (850) 962-2151 Fax: (850) 962-1005 Multi Purpose Campus Dropout Programs Second Chance Alternative High School Pre-Kindergarten Program Adult/Community Education WAKULLA EDUCATION CENTER PRE-K CENTER School day: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Kim Dutton, Principal/Site Administrator, kimberly.dutton@ wcsb.us 87 Andrew Hargrett Sr. Road, Crawfordville FL 32327 Phone: (850) 926-8111 Fax: (850) 926-1964 Multi Purpose Campus Pre-Kindergarten ProgramSchoolsWelcome back to all Wakulla students for the 2012-13 school year. e teachers, administrators and sta are all looking forward to seeing our returning students and to welcoming the new ones to our system in pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, and other grades where students have just moved into our school district. I look forward to another successful year with the best students, parents, and educators in the state. e teamwork we have contributes to making our school system one of the best in Florida and in the nation. Wakulla County School District was the only school district in the Big Bend that earned an A rating for 2011-12 in the combined areas of Reading, Math, Writing and Science. We are proud to keep our A designation for the seventh year in a row. Wakulla was also one of 19 districts named an Academically High Performing District for 2011-12. is means that in addition to earning an A rating, we met the Class Size requirement and had a good nancial audit outcome. I am con dent that we will continue this tradition of excellence in 2012-13. In addition, the Wakulla County School System very successfully passed its district-wide accreditation for all public schools from prekindergarten through grade 12 in 2011-12. Accreditation is vital to a school district and its community so that a high level of education is maintained, plus only a diploma from an accredited high school is accepted by accredited colleges and universities. e involvement from our parents and community makes Wakulla a special place to teach our children. With such a value placed on education and a motto of Committed to Success, we hope that 2012-13 is your best year yet. Sincerely, David Miller Superintendent, Wakulla County SchoolsWelcome back from Superintendent of Schools David Miller Tallahassee Community College The College of Choice # 1 transfer college to neighboring Florida State University In-state tuition and fees under $100 per credit hour TCC is a smart investment for students planning to transfer to a university or advance directly into the workforce.www.GoToTCC.com | (850)201-TCC1 TCC is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access campus. Visit www.tcc..edu for full statement. announcingTCCs new location at the Centennial Bank building is opening for Fall classesJoin us at our new location for testing, advising and registration:August 14 and 15 from 3-5 p.m. August 21 and 22 from 4-6 p.m.2932 Crawfordville Highway Find out more details at:www.tcc.fl.edu/Wakullaor call 922-2416

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 3CSpecial to The NewsWhen the rst bell rings at the start of school on Thursday, Aug. 16, Wakulla County classrooms will be staffed with educators at a fill rate of 100 percent throughout the district. Although the economy of our state and nation still face a number of challenges, and employee workloads continue to increase with unfunded state mandates, the Wakulla County School District continues to thrive as a high performing school district, said Superintendent of Schools David Miller. We just recently received our 7th consecutive A school district designation from Florida DOE, the only A district in the Big Bend, Miller said. There has been unprecedented change in public education in Florida, he added. We have experienced more policy changes in the last nine months (in education) than weve seen in 10 years. Florida is one of 45 states that have adopted Common Core Standards a set of educational benchmarks that will prepare students for college and career. Human Resources Executive Director Karen Wells adds, In light of the changes and to help ease the transition for Wakullas newest teachers, all new hires attended two days of New Educator Boot Camp the rst of August. Each new educator also has an assigned peer teacher/mentor who will assist with the acclimation and acculturation at their school site. Throughout the rst semester, New Educator seminars are provided with topics including ethics, progress monitoring, classroom management, recognizing indicators of child abuse and learning dif culties and assistive technology. Twenty-two new teachers have been hired to date for the 2012-13 school year as a result of retirements, relocations, and resignations. Sixty-two percent of new instructional hires were from those who were already serving as a paraprofessional, as a substitute teacher, in a time-limited position or as an intern. Of the new teachers hired, 45 percent are secondary school teachers and 86 percent are Wakulla residents. Eighteen additional classi ed positions were also lled including, school bus drivers, custodians, food service workers, and paraprofessionals. Because of the positive reputation of our school district, we maintain a rich pool of applicants for all positions., Wells said. We continually attract strong quali ed applicants. The New Educator Boot Camp was facilitated by veteran teachers Cindy Loney and Mollie Robinson. Topics such as Floridas Educator Accomplished Practices, classroom management, ethics, the rst day of school, lesson planning, technology, constructive criticism and instructional strategies were included in the training. When asked what they are most excited about as the opening day of school approaches, most new educators responded with meeting my students and building relationships with them and teaching in Wakulla County. The positive energy from the new hires was evident even in orientation, Wells said. Over and over again, we heard (comments such as): I wanted to be a part of this spectacular team. Wakulla is an excellent district with a kids rst attitude and a desire to see every student succeed. I heard that Wakulla was a great district to work for and that the students are a pleasure to teach. I grew up in Wakulla and now I want to give back. Wakulla County has wonderful schools, amazing teachers and awesome students. I moved here so that my children would have the chance to be a part of a world-class school district. A quick glimpse at the new teachers by school site follows: MEDART ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Lindsey Pafford (5th Grade Teacher) Her hometown is Crawfordville. She enjoys spending time with her family and friends, going to the beach, reading, shing, and boating. She graduated from Florida State University with a major in Elementary Education. Deana Davis (3rd grade teacher) Her hometown is Crawfordville. Deana graduated from Flagler College with a degree in Elementary Education and ESE Education She enjoys reading, baking, and being a baseball mom. Jill Prisco (4th grade teacher) Jill comes to Wakulla from St. Lucie County. She graduated from Florida Atlantic University with a degree in Elementary Education. She is a National Board Certi ed Teacher. Her interests include traveling, bike riding, and spending time with her family. Kendall Watson (5th Grade Teacher) Her hometown is Norfolk, Va. She earned a bachelors degree from University of West Florida. Interests include cooking and spending time on the water. RIVERSINK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Lauren Miller (Kindergarten teacher) Her hometown is Crawfordville. Married to Casey and has one daughter, Emma. She enjoys spending time with her family, shing, hunting and gardening. She graduated with a major in Education from Flagler College. Amber Boutwell (Kindergarten teacher) Her hometown is Marietta, Ga. She graduated from Flagler College with a degree in Elementary Education. Amber enjoys spending time outdoors with her family, cooking, and scrapbooking. Jessica Yarbrough (ESE Teacher) Her home is Wakulla. She earned a bachelors degree in Elementary Education and ESE Education. Jessica enjoys running, kayaking, watching FSU football, and spending time with family and friends. SHADEVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Continued on next pageNew teachers set for the first day of schoolLindsey Pafford Deana Davis Jill Prisco Kendall Watson Lauren Miller Amber Boutwell Jessica Yarbrough Meagan Thurmond ENROLL NOW!CALL 925-6344 2012-2013 REGISTRATION OPENINGS AVAILABLE Serving VPK-4 Full Day at no cost Grades K-8 Free Public School & VPK Strong Academic Support Serving Leon and Wakulla County Students Buttery Gardens Junior Garden Club National School Lunch Program Free or Reduced Breakfast & Lunch WAKULLAS COAST CHARTER SCHOOL48 Shell Island Rd. P.O. Box 338 St. Marks, FL. 32355Open House August 14, 2012 5 to 7 PM Wakullas C.O.A.S.T. Charter School A Winning Team! August 10th from 5:00 7:00pm (No appt. necessary) August 14th from 1:00 4:00pm (Appt. only) August 15th from 2:00 4:00pm (No appt. necessary) August 16th from 8:30 11:30am and 2:00 4:00pm. (No appt necessary) Must bring copy of childs immunization record* For more information please call 850-926-0400The Wakulla County Health Department, 48 Oak Street, will be providing Back to School Immunizations for students kindergarten 12th grade on the following dates: LETS DO THIS TOGETHER! DO YOU WANT IT?Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN GET YOU MOTIVATED! 850 926-2312 Mon-Thurs 3 11p.m. Fri & Sat 11a.m. Midnight Sun 11a.m. 11p.m. CALL NOW! 1 1BUY ONEGET FREEmon & tueBuy any large at menu price get one of equal or lesser value Free! Beat the Clock WednesdaysTHE TIME YOU CALL IS THE PRICE YOU PAYfor a LARGE 1-Topping Pizza 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays Call at 5:07 p.m. and pay $5.07! Plus Tax. Not Valid with other offers or specials. Drivers carry less than $20. Delivery Charges may apply. Expires 12/31/12. Any Way up to 5 Toppings TWO LARGE PIZZAS1 for 2 for (Add $1. for Rock Pile. No Double Portions) Plus Tax. Not Valid with other offers or specials. Drivers carry less than $20. Delivery Charges may apply. Expires 12/31/12. Carry Out Special One topping pizza Medium Large Plus Tax. Not Valid with other offers or specials. Drivers carry less than $20. Delivery Charges may apply. Expires 12/31/12. Family FeastTwo Large 2 Topping Pizzas, 10 Chicken Wings, Bread Side Item, 2-Liter Soda & Garden Fresh Salad or Caesar Salad Plus Tax. Not Valid with other offers or specials. Drivers carry less than $20. Delivery Charges may apply. Expires 12/31/12. 2+2+2 Deal Two med two topping pizzas and two liter of soda Plus Tax. Not Valid with other offers or specials. Drivers carry less than $20. Delivery Charges may apply. Expires 12/31/12.One Large Any Way Pizza with up to 5 Toppings One Order of Wings & One Bread Side Plus Tax. Not Valid with other offers or specials. Drivers carry less than $20. Delivery Charges may apply. Expires 12/31/12. 12 2 3 4 5$1199 $2000 $499 $599$2899 $1499 $1999or27 C Azalea Dr., Crawfordville FLAny Way Package & 10 Wings School Meal PricesDaily Lunch Price Pre-K & Elementary: Full Pay $2.10, Reduce $.40 Middle & High School: Full Pay $2.35, Reduce $.40 Daily Breakfast Price Pre-K & Elementary: Full Pay $1.35, Reduce $.30(Breakfast not provided at middle & high school)

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Meagan Thurmond (3rd grade teacher) Hometown is Crawfordville. Earned a bachelors degree in Psychology and Child Development. She enjoys spending time with family and friends, shopping, and traveling. Jenny Duggar (Speech Pathologist) Her hometown is Crawfordville. She earned a masters degree in Speech Language Pathology from Florida State University. She loves FSU football and baseball. Elena Myhre (Shadeville/Medart Art Teacher) Her home is Wakulla. She has a Masters in Fine Arts from Florida State University. Elena enjoys all art, art history, baseball, hunting, shing, and golf. She is married to Rick and they have one son, Bobby. WAKULLA PRE-K Tina Fleming (Pre-K Teacher) Hometown Headland, Ala. A Troy State and FSU graduate who enjoys kayaking, sailing, hiking and playing tennis. She is married to James Fleming and has one son, Russell. Whitnee Wood (Pre-K Teacher) Hometown Tallahassee. She earned her degree from Flagler College. Whitnee enjoys shopping, running, and FSU Football. RIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL Terri Brooks (8th grade language arts) Terris hometown is Titusville. She is a graduate of Florida State University. Interests include reading, cycling, Bible studies, and gardening. SOPCHOPPY EDUCATIONAL CENTER Brenda Eaton (Second chance teacher) Brendas hometown is Hookdale, Ill. A graduate of Eastern Illinois University and Greenville College. Her interests include gardening, reading, cooking, learning to knit, and watching her youngest daughter play softball. WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL Farrah Donaldson (English EBD Teacher) His hometown is Crawfordville. A graduate of FSU. He enjoys writing, sports and shing. Served as a paraprofessional at WHS last school year. Freebeau Swindle (Carpentry Teacher) His hometown is Crawfordville and he is an FSU graduate. He enjoys water skiing, wake boarding, wrestling, shing and scuba diving. A lifelong War Eagle. Susan Bistrican (English Teacher) Originally from St. Petersburg. A graduate of Syracuse University and FSU. She enjoys reading, writing and taking care of her cats. Sara Lovestrand (Math Teacher) Attended and graduated from Wakulla High School, Chipola College and Florida Southern College. She enjoys softball and church activities. Continued on next page Page 4C THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Elena Myhre Farrah Doonaldson Susan Bistrican Brianna Fordham Brenda Eaton Whitnee Wood Sara Lovestrand Freebeau Swindle Terri Brooks Tina Fleming Jenny Duggar New teachers set for the first day of school Our After School hours are: Monday Friday from 3 pm to 9pm.We are open daily: MondayThursday 3 PM 9 PM, Friday and Saturday 12 PM 11 PM and Sunday 1 PM 8 PM Parents will have to meet us at our location to register. We are located at 635 BWakulla Arran Road Children will have to get off at the bus stop on the corner of the store and will be picked up by staff.facebook.comjGamerZParadiseFor more information please call us at (850) 926-9100. We look forward to serving our schools and the Crawfordville/Wakulla County community! Find us onFacebook Jet Cadets... ying high for Christ! Providence Christian AcademyA Ministry of Central Baptist ChurchGrades K-12 Enroll Today! Call today to schedule an appointment.(850) 926-2456, 926-1326, or 933-0046 710 Shadeville Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327Providence Christian Academy grades K-12 with small pupil-to-staff ratio fully-funded scholarships hrist! r r r r i r r r r i r r r r r r i r i i r r r r r r r r r ist i i ris r r ri ri i i i is t! ! t! r at i o ratio ointment. o in ntm in n t m tm en e n t nt. t 3 3-004 6 villeFL32327 Michelle Snow School of Music926-7627Welcomes You Back to SchoolLessons of all types... For ALL AGES.Toddler/Pre-School Introduction to Music Starts Friday, September 7 NOW OFFERING Private/Small Group Music Therapywww.MichelleSnowSchoolOfMusic.com Coastal Hwy. 98, Medart CALL TODAY! MELISA TAYLOR OWNER/OPERATOR926-21791616 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. SUITE-C NORTH POINTE CENTERK 5Intro to new Skills Individual Tutoring Improve Reading & Math SkillsHomework Help Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 5CNew teachers set for the first day of schoolBriana Fordham (Math Teacher) A Wakulla native, she graduated from TCC and Flagler College. She always dreamed of becoming a teacher. She enjoys playing and coaching softball. WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL Lindsay Sparkman (Uni ed Arts Teacher) Her hometown is Sopchoppy and she is an FSU graduate. She is a talented musician and is married to Troy. Priscilla Tucker (Algebra/Science Teacher) Her hometown is Sylvester, Ga. and she is a graduate of Georgia Southwestern. She is married to Bo and has three children Aleyah, Lane and Jack. Her hobbies include diving and spear shing. Alexandra Kauffman (Language Arts Teacher) Originally from Wakulla County, she is a graduate of FSU with a major in creative writing. Lindsay Sparkman Priscilla Tucker Alexandra Kauffman PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBOOT CAMP FOR NEW RECRUITS : New Wakulla educators participated in two days of New Teacher Boot Camp Aug. 1 and Aug. 2 to prepare for their rst day of school. e camp was facilitated by veteran teachers Cindy Loney and Mollie Robinson. E CALL TODAY! MELISA TAYLOR OWNER/OPERATOR926-21791616 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. SUITE-C NORTH POINTE CENTERGrades 6-8Intro to New Skills Study Skills & Organization Courses FCAT Prep Intro to Algebra 1 Algebra 1 EOC Prep

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Page 6C THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comFrom Florida DOEParents and Students: Please discuss these safety tips together and be sure to follow them: Discuss and practice the safest way to get to and from school or the assigned school bus stop. Never run out into the street or cross between parked cars. At the School Bus Stop: Arrive at the bus stop about ve minutes before the bus is scheduled to arrive. Follow instructions from your bus driver or the school district about where to wait at your assigned bus stop. Wait in a safe place away from the road. Do not run and play while waiting for the bus to arrive. Never sit on the roadway while waiting for your bus. Never speak to strangers at the bus stop and never get into the car with a stranger. Always tell your parents, the bus driver, or another responsible adult as soon as possible if a stranger tries to talk to you or pick you up. Loading or Unloading from the Bus: As the bus is approaching, watch for the red ashing lights and the stop arms to extend. When the bus stops, wait for the drivers signal that it is safe to cross the road or board the bus. If crossing the street, look left, right, and left again. When the driver signals that it is safe, walk at least 12 feet in front of the bus where the driver can see you. Never walk behind the school bus. Never run after the bus. Hold the handrail while going up and down the stairs. Go directly to your bus seat and remain seated during the entire ride. Exit the bus only at your assigned bus stop. If you drop something near the bus, tell the bus driver. Never try to pick it up rst, because the driver may not be able to see you. Parents or guardians of small children should wait with them in the morning and meet them at the bus stop in the afternoon. Riding in the School Bus: Keep hands, arms, and head inside bus. Always buckle up properly if your school bus has safety belts. Stay in your seat and obey the driver. Remain seated at all times and keep the aisle clear. Stop talking and remain silent when the bus comes to a railroad crossing so the driver can hear if a train is approaching. Avoid any loud or disruptive behavior that could distract the bus driver from safely operating the bus. Be courteous and respectful to your driver. Safely getting you to and from school is a tremendous responsibility that the driver takes very seriously. Motorists: Please exercise patience and caution, especially around children and school buses. Follow these safety practices: When approaching a school bus that is stopped with its red lights ashing and its stop arms extended, motorists are required to STOP in nearly every instance. For more information on Floridas school bus stop law and penalties, go to www.FloridaSchoolBusSafety.gov. Be alert and watch for children at all times, but especially near schools, bus stops, school buses, and in school parking lots. Obey all traf c laws and speed limits, paying extra attention to the lower speed limits in school zones. Do not pass other vehicles in school zones or at crosswalks. Do not change lanes or make U-turns in school zones. Watch for and obey signals from school crossing guards. Do not text or use a cell phone while driving. Only drive or park in authorized areas to drop off or pick up children at school. (ARA) The back to school season can be bittersweet. Parents may miss having their youngsters around the house when summer of cially ends, but its also fun for parents to watch kids partake in all that school has to offer. One of the things few parents look forward come the end of summer vacation is back-to-school shopping. Such shopping can be costly, especially when its time to out t kids with new wardrobes. While a complete wardrobe overhaul might not be necessary, kids typically need to replace a few items theyve outgrown since the start of summer break. There are several ways parents can save on backto-school clothes. Get a head start. Parents can save themselves some money by shopping early for their childrens back-to-school wardrobes. Though kids may experience a growth spurt during the summer, shop for items, like socks, that they arent likely to grow out of before the back-to-school season begins. This affords you time to comparison shop and spread out the cost of replacing your childs wardrobe instead of being hit with one big bill all at once. Establish a budget. Without a budget, its easy for parents to overspend on back-to-school clothing, especially for those parents who wait until the last minute and simply buy the rst things they see. Establish a budget, ideally several weeks before your childs rst day of school. Having a budget in place reduces the likelihood that you will overspend, and developing the budget early helps you spread out your spending. Shop at consignment stores. Consignment stores offer name-brand clothing at discounted prices, something parents of ever-growing youngsters can appreciate. Kids will like the name-brand gear, while Moms and Dads will enjoying not having to pay name-brand prices. A consignment store with significant inventory might sell anything from blue jeans and T-shirts to sneakers, shoes and jackets. Swap clothes with other families. Clothing swaps between families have grown increasingly popular as more and more parents look to save money on rising clothing costs for their kids. Typically, families will swap clothes, including jackets, if their kids are similar in age and one youngster has outgrown his or her clothes. If you cant nd a family to swap with, visit your local community center or church to see if it has a clothing swap program. Shop discount stores. If the local consignment store has already been raided, consider a discount store like Marshalls or TJ Maxx. These stores typically sell items at heavily discounted prices and often have similar inventories to mall department stores. Shop online. A relatively new way for parents to save on back to school clothing is to shop online. A popular stores Web site might offer discounts that their brick-and-mortar store does not. Parents can also scour a host of coupon Web sites to nd special codes they can use at checkout. These codes might offer free shipping or a percentage off the bill when consumers spend a certain amount of money. School bus safety tips Some tips to save on back-to-school clothes shopping Parents can visit department store Web sites to nd great deals on back to school clothing for their kids.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS FILE PHOTO South East Eye Specialists Sagar Amin, O.D. Eye ExaminationsGlasses-Contact Lenses Walk-ins Welcome, Appointments Recommended 926-9213 2140 Crawfordville Hwy. Monday Friday 8:30-5 Most Insurance Plans Accepted Now accepting Care Credit on qualified purchases BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL Selection of frames up to $129 with prescription lenses, polycarbonate and service agreement for $149 Save up to $98 TRINITY LUTHERAN PRESCHOOLContinuously providing a high quality Christian early learning program for more than two decades NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for 2012-2013 VPK AND 3KFull and Part-time C o Call (850) 926-5557 for information and to enroll your childLocated on Coastal Highway across from Wakulla High School 850-274-8000 Modern Communications Modern CommunicationsNEXT TO EL JALISCOS2481 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY.CRAWFORDVILLENATIONWIDE PRE-PAID UNLIMITED TALK/UNLIMITED TEXT U NLIMITED TALK & TEXT$4000 PER MO DATA CHARGES MAY APPLY

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 7CJuly 4 Independence Day Holiday August 9 Pre-Planning (10 & 9 1/2 Month Personnel) 10 Staff Development Day 16 Students & Nine Month Personnel Return/ Early Release September 3 Labor Day Holiday 26 Early Release for Staff Development October 18 End of 1st Nine Weeks 19 Teacher Planning Day 26 Report Cards Issued 31 Early Release for Staff Development November 12 Veterans Day Holiday 21-23 Thanksgiving Holidays December 20 Early Release Day/End of 2nd Nine Weeks/ End of Semester 1 21 Christmas Holidays Begin January 7 Teacher Planning Day/10 & 9 1/2 Month Personnel Return 8 Students & 9 Month Personnel Return 14 Report Cards Issued 21 Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday 30 Early Release for Staff Development February 18 Presidents Day Holiday (10, 9 1/2 & 9 mo.) March 14 End of 3rd Nine Weeks 15 Teacher Planning Day 18-22 Spring Break 29 Report Cards Issued May 27 Memorial Day Holiday 30 Semester Exams/Early Release 31 Semester Exams/Early Release/End of 4th Nine Weeks/ End of Semester 2/GRADUATION June 3 Post Planning 4 Post Planning 12 MONTH PERSONNEL HOLIDAYS Independence Day 7/4 Labor Day 9/3 Veterans Day 11/12 Thanksgiving 11/21-23 Christmas 12/24, 12/25 New Years 12/31, 1/1 Martin L. King, Jr. 1/21 Memorial Day 5/27 PAID TEACHER HOLIDAYS Labor Day Holiday 9/3 Veterans Day 11/12 Thanksgiving 11/22 Christmas 12/25 New Years 1/1 Martin L. King Jr. 1/21 EARLY RELEASE FIRST DAY: 8/16 EARLY RELEASE STAFF DEVELOPMENT: 9/26, 10/31, 1/30 EARLY RELEASE FOR CHRISTMAS BREAK: 12/20 EXAM EARLY RELEASE DAYS: 5/30, 5/31 TEACHER PLANNING: 10/19, 1/7, 3/15 STAFF DEVELOPMENT: 8/10Wakulla County School CalendarFrom Florida DOEThe 2012-13 school year kicked off Aug. 7 in Florida with seven of the states 67 school districts beginning classes. Charlotte County leads the way by opening then, with Brevard, Citrus, Lee, Nassau, and Walton counties beginning Aug. 8, and Sumter County on Aug. 9. A new school year is always exciting and brings the promise of high expectations, said Commissioner of Education Gerard Robinson. Florida teachers and district leaders have done phenomenal work increasing student achievement and I am con dent they will continue to build on that success in the coming year. My wish for the new school year is for a healthy, safe, and productive environment that gives students the opportunity to excel. For a complete list of Floridas public school district opening and closing dates, see the 2012-13 School District Calendar. The beginning of the school year also brings a reminder of school bus safety. According to a survey conducted earlier this year, more than 21,000 motorists illegally passed stopped school buses on one day in April. By learning about and observing school bus safety laws, citizens can help keep children safe while they travel to and from school on the yellow school bus.Florida School Districts begin the school year Special to The NewsParents of students who prefer to bring their own lunches from home may be left wondering how they can create healthy lunches their kids will eat. Considering school lunches must compete with far less healthy yet widely available alternatives, parents will need to be creative in xing homemade lunches. Here are some ideas to get you started. Purchase a new lunch container. There are many different new and innovative lunch containers that can make separating school lunches easy. Few kids want to dig into a brown paper sack and pull out something that has been so squashed its unrecognizable. Partitioned lunch boxes enable you to pack different items together where they can be stored separately. The divisions also help you remember to include foods from the basic food groups, such as a fruit, vegetable, protein, starch and dairy item. Have your child make a list of his or her favorite foods. Once the list has been made, see how you can make the foods healthier. For example, if chicken nuggets make the list, prepare your own nuggets with white meat chunks that are baked, not fried. Get creative. Children may not be inclined to eat loose pieces of fruit. But if the fruit is stuck on skewers or served with a low-fat dipping sauce or caramel, it may look more appealing. Look to mini foods, which tend to be more fun as well. Little sandwiches and little burgers may present an optical illusion, where kids think theyre eating only a small amount, but actually its a full serving. Hide healthy foods within others. There are entire recipe books that teach you how to mix fruits and vegetables into desserts to increase nutritive value. Everything from spinach to tofu to beets have been included in items like cake, cookies and brownies. Cut foods into fun shapes. Kids may be more inclined to eat a turkey and cheese sandwich if its cut into star shapes or their favorite cartoon characters. Invest in a few cookie cutters so that lunchtime becomes fun time. Dont let the time of day dictate what you serve. As long as kids are eating healthy items, it doesnt matter when they eat them. If a child loves bagels, choose whole wheat bagels and add an egg on top for a nutritious lunch. Serve with a gelatin dessert that contains chunks of fruit and low-fat milk, and youre set.How to make healthy school lunches WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARDAnnounces its policy for Free and Reduced-Price Meals for students under theNATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH AND BREAKFAST PROGRAMSAny interested person may review a copy of the policy by contacting Gail Mathers, Director School Food Service,Wakulla School Board Administrative Of ce,69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, (850) 926-0065. Household size and income criteria will be used to determine eligibility. An applica on c an not be approved unless it contains complete eligibility informaon. Once approved, meal bene ts are good for an en re year. You need not no fy the organiza on of changes in income and household size. Applica on forms are being sent to all homes with a le er to parents or guardians. To apply for Free or Reduced-Price Meals, households must complete the applica on and return it to the school. Addi onal copies are available at the principals o ce in each school. The informa on provided on the applica on will be used for the purpose of determining eligibility and may be veri ed at any me during the school year. Applica ons may be submi ed at any me during the year. Households that receive SNAP (Supplemental Nutri on Assistance Program) or TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) are required to list on the applica on only the childs name, SNAP/ TANF case number, and signature of adult household member. Foster children will receive free bene ts regardless of the childs personal income or the income of the household. Households with children who are considered migrants, homeless, or runaway should contact the district liaison Tanya English at (850)926-0065. F or the purpose of determining household size, deployed service members are considered a part of the household. Families should include the names of the deployed service members on their applica on. Report only that por on of the deployed service members income made available to them or on their behalf to the family. Addi onally, a housing allowance that is part of the Military Housing Priva za on Ini a ve is not to be included as income. All other households must provide the following informa on listed on the applica on: Total household income listed by gross amount received, type of income (e.g., wages, child support, etc.) and how o en the income is received by each household member; Names of all household members check the no income box if applicable; if household member is a child, list school name for each; Signature of an adult household member cer fying the informa on provided is correct; and Social security number of the adult signing the applica on or the word NONE for this house- hold member if he or she does not have a social security number. If a household member becomes unemployed or if the household size changes, the school should be contacted. Children of parents or guardians who become unemployed should also contact the school. Under the provisions of the Free and Reduced-Price meal policy the Director of Food Service will review applications and determine eligibility If a parent or guardian is dissatis ed with the ruling of the of cial, he or she may wish to discuss the decision with the determining of cial on an informal basis. If the parent wishes to make a formal appeal, he or she may make a request either orally or in writing to Randy Beach, Chief Financial Of cer P. O. Box 100, Crawfordville, FL 32326, (850) 926-0065. Unless indicated otherwise on the application, the information on the Free and Reduced-Price Meal application may be used by the school system in determining eligibility for other educational programs. FLORIDA INCOME ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR FREE AND REDUCED-PRICE MEALS E ec ve from July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013 FREE MEAL SCALE Household Size AnnualMonthlyTwice Per Month Every Two Weeks Weekly 114,5211,211606559280 219,6691,640820757379 324,8172,0691,035955478 429,9652,4981,2491,153577 535,1132,9271,4641,351676 640,2613,3561,6781,549775 745,4093,7851,8931,747874 850,5574,2142,1071,945973For each addi onal family member, add5,14842921519899 REDUCED-PRICE MEAL SCALE Household Size AnnualMonthlyTwice Per Month Every Two Weeks Weekly 120,6651,723862795398 227,9912,3331,1671,077539 335,3172,9441,4721,359680 442,6433,5541,7771,641821 549,9694,1652,0831,922961 657,2954,7752,3882,2041,102 764,6215,3862,6932,4861,243 871,9475,9962,9982,7681,384For each addi onal family member, add7,326611306282141To determine annual income: If you receive the income every week, mul ply the total gross income by 52. If you receive the income every two weeks, mul ply the total gross income by 26. If you receive the income twice a month, mulply the total gross income by 24. If you receive the income monthly, mul ply the total gross income by 12. Remember: The total income before taxes, social security, health bene ts, union dues, or other deduc ons must be reported. In accordance with Federal Law, and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this ins tu on is prohibited from discrimina ng on the basis of race, color, na onal origin, sex, age, or disability. To le a complaint of discrimina on write USDA, Director, Oce of Adjudica on, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call toll free (866) 632-9992 (Voice). Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabili es may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339; or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Anyone interested in coaching any of the youth sports are encouraged to contact WPRD at 926-7227. All volunteer coaches are required and subjected to a Florida Department of Law Enforcement Criminal history background check to ensure the safety of our youth participants.SATURDAY 8/11/12 and SATURDAY 8/18/12 8:00 am TO 12:00 NOON SATURDAY 8/18/12, 12:00 PM MEDART RECREATION PARK OFF US 98 SEPTEMBER 1st FOR ALL SPORTSExample: A participant must turn 5 before September 1, 2012 in order to be eligible to participate, NO EXCEPTIONS.WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT2012 FALL SPORTS REGISTRATION REGISTRATION DATES: REGISTRATION TIMES: REGISTRATION DEADLINE: REGISTRATION PLACE: AGE DETERMINING DATE: 1. FLAG FOOTBALL: AGES 5 7 DIVISION AND 8 10 DIVISION COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD. Player must be 5 prior to 9/1/12 to be eligible.2. TACKLE FOOTBALL BANTAM DIVISION AGES 6 8. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 90 LBS. MAXPEE WEE DIVISION AGES 9 11. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 145 LBS. MAX JUNIOR DIVISION AGES 12 14. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 170 LBS. MAXCOST FOR TACKLE FOOTBALL IS $85.00 PER CHILD A COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED. 3. TACKLE CHEERLEADING BANTAM DIVISION AGES 5 8 PEE WEE DIVISION AGES 9-11 COST FOR TACKLE CHEERLEADING IS $45.00 PER CHILD (Includes shirt and pom poms) A COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED.All players must provide proof of health insurance or purchase a policy for $10.00. For more information contact WCPRD at 926-7227 or our web page at www.WCPRD.com CALL TODAY! MELISA TAYLOR OWNER/OPERATOR926-21791616 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. SUITE-C NORTH POINTE CENTERGrades 9-12Study Skills & Organization Courses ACT & SAT Prep FCAT Prep College Admissions Consulting Algebra 1, Geometry, Biology EOC PrepIndividual or Small Group Tutoring available in all subjects

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Page 8C THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com A: Striped pajamas. What do you call an elephant that flies?A: A jumbo jet.What do tigers wear to bed?Jokes and Riddles Q: Q: List 10 words that rhyme with zoo. 1. ____________ 2. ____________ 3. ____________ 4. ____________ 5. ___________ 6. ____________ 7. ____________ 8. ___________ 9. ____________ 10. ___________What Rhymes withSome answers: blue, boo, coo, do, goo, lieu, moo, pooh, too, who 1) You should follow all of the rules posted. Fact or Fiction?2) If you see an animal that looks lonely, you should give it a toy. Fact or Fiction?3) If you see an animal that looks friendly, you should pet it. Fact or Fiction?4) You should wash your hands after touching any animal. Fact or Fiction?5) If you cant get an animals attention, you should knock on its cage or toss a rock at it. Fact or Fiction?6) If you see an animal trying to get out of its pen, you should help it. Fact or Fiction?7) If you see animals fighting, you should climb into their pen and make them stop. Fact or Fiction?8) If you see an animal that looks hungry, you should give it some food. Fact or Fiction?9) You should eat only in areas set aside at the zoo for eating. Fact or Fiction?10) You should toss your leftovers to any birds wandering around the zoo. Fact or Fiction?Fact or Fiction?Zoo Rules ChallengeZoos are fun to go to, as long as you follow the rules. Here are some questions about zoo rules. How many can you answer correctly?Answers: 1) Fact, 2)Fiction, the animal could try to eat the toy and choke on it, 3) Fiction, you could get bitten, 4) Fact, 5) Fiction, you could irritate or hurt the animal, 6) Fiction, you could get bitten and should tell an adult instead, 7) Fiction, you could get attacked and should tell an adult instead, 8) Fiction, you could get bitten, 9) Fact, 10) Fiction, some foods arent good for birds COLORING PICTURE 1) S __ A K __ S2) B __ __ R S3) L __ __ N S4) B __ R __ S5) G I __ A __ __ E S6) M __ N K __ Y S7) H I __ __ O SName That AnimalZoos are home to many animals. Fill in the blanks to name some of the animals found at a zoo. Answers: 1) Snakes, 2) Bears, 3) Lions, 4) Birds, 5) Giraffes, 6) Monkeys, 7) Hippos In the late 1700s, America didnt have any zoos. Anytime an exotic animal like a tiger or elephant was put on display, however, people would pay to see it. This gave Dr. William Camac in Philadelphia the idea to create a zoo. Camac and others worked hard to get a zoo up and running in Philadelphia. First, they created the Zoological Society of Philadelphia in the 1850s. The Civil War soon started after that, however, and the society would not get the zoo open until July 1, 1874. Over 3,000 people visited the Philadelphia Zoo that day. Adults paid a quarter to get in, and children, a dime. At the time, the zoo had 813 animals. Today the zoo has over 1,300 animals and a million visitors each year. Americas First Americas First This page sponsored in part by:

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 9C 1. LANGUAGE: What does the Greek prefix crypto mean? 2. MEASUREMENTS: If the outside temperature is 10 degrees on the Celsius scale, what temperature is it on the Fahrenheit scale? 3. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: The Julian calendar was named for whom? 4. ASTRONOMY: What is perihelion? 5. CHEMISTRY: What is the symbol for the element magnesium? 6. LAW: Legally speaking, what does a testament do? 7. GEOGRAPHY: What modern-day country is in an area known in ancient times as Lusitania? 8. MEDICINE: What disease is caused by deficiency of vitamin A? 9. LITERATURE: Who wrote the novel The Swiss Family Robinson? 10. MATH: What does the symbol r stand for in geometry? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Hidden 2. 50 degrees F 3. Julius Caesar 4. Point in orbit where an object is closest to the Sun 5. Mg 6. Indicates how a persons personal property should be distributed 7. Portugal 8. Night blindness 9. Johann David Wyss 10. Radius of a circle YOUR AD HERE

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Page 10C THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEmploymentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements ADVERTISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS!! Call now to grow your business. Get your classified ad in 119 newspapers with one order. Advertising Networks of Florida. 866-742-1373 Medical MEDICAL CAREERSBEGIN HERE GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877)206-6559 MEDICAL CAREERSbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www. 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Southeast Regional, Earn up to 39c/mi. 1 year OTR Flatbed experience required, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, LLC EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERSearn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE MARINA HELPERNeeded immediately. Miscellaneous duties to include bagging ice, emptying trash containers, assisting with boat launches, washing boats, etc. Full time position Employee benefits. Drug free work place. Apply at Shields Marina/St. Marks Resume with references required. General Help MARINE PARTS CLERKNeeded immediately. Must be computer literate. Hours: 7-5:30, Tuesday-Friday. Duties include: Phone, restock inventory, counter sales. Drug free work place. Employee benefits. 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Call now (888)744-4426 Furniture DINING ROOM TABLE AND FOUR CHAIRS Light oak 42 round $125.00 850 926 9283 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLEFri. & Sat. 9am-Until BIG SALE 8th Ave. off Rewinkle to Tatflinger, Look for Signs Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLEEvery Friday, Saturday and Sunday Until Gone 8am-dark Clothes, Misc. Items, furniture, Hospital Equip AND MORE 799 Rehwinkel Road (850) 926-7064 PANACEA Fri. 10 & Sat. 11 MOVING SALE196 Otter Lake Road Pets AKC Registered CHOCOLATE LAB 170 lb + FOR STUD Price Negotiable (850)766-5666 HAPPY JACK DuraSpot:latest technology in flea, tick, mosquito & mite control on dogs. Patented. At farm, feed & hardware stores. Distributed by Fuller Supply (205)343-3341. www. happyjackinc.com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLENewly renovated 3 bedroom/2 bath. on 3 acres in Kirkland Estates. $850 Mo. 1st/last&sec. req. Tina Ryan 352-325-0494 Rental Houses 3/2 dbl. wide mobile home, Panacea, near coast, $800/mo. + dep. and 3/2 House, in Songbird $1100/mo. + dep. (850) 544-1051 PanaceaCottage, for Rent 2/1, Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Rennovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, covered front proch & open back deck, Small pets acceptable Excellent fishing! $585/month 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/1BA, $750/month +$60/month water Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-251-1935 Palm Harbor2 bedroom, one bath Palm Harbor Mobile Home. Pristine condition, energy efficiency build. Off Old Bethel Road on quiet acreage. No pets. $675 per month for year long lease. Damage Deposit of $675 plus first month rent due on signing agreement. 850-926.352 6 5330-0809 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Veronica Wold Doing business as: Fictitious Name Notices Effortless Travel at 32 Shar Mel Re Ln, Crawfordville, FL32327, with a mailing address of 32 Shar Mel Re Ln, Crawfordville, FL32327 desiring to engage in business under a fictitious Fictitious Name Notices name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News. August 9, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices 5313-0816 TWN Wakulla County Code Enforcement Case No. CE2011-205 PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULLACOUNTYCODE ENFORCEMENTBOARD CASE NO. CE2011-205 Parcel No. 20-2s-01e-142-04917-D07 Property Address: 157 Finner Drive Crawfordville, Florida 32327 WAKULLACOUNTY, a political subdivision of the State of Florida Petitioner, v. The Estate of Sherrol Wilson, David Wilson, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Sherrol Wilson; Brianna Donaldson, as an heir of he Estate of Sherrol D. Wilson; and the heirs, Devisees, grantees, assignees, or other claimants of the Estate of Sherrol D. Wilson, Respondents. FINDINGS OF FACT, CONCLUSIONS OF LAW AND ORDER THIS CAUSE came for public hearing before the Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board 5332-0830 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201202746 TO: Richard A. Greene ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. August 9, 16, 23 & 30 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices (the Board) on July 11, 2012 and having heard testimony under oath and received evidence, the Board issues its Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law, and enters its Order in this case as follows: FINDINGS OF F ACT 1. Respondents are the owners of the subject property. 2. On August 15, 2011, the Code Enforcement Office conducted an inspection in response to a complaint received regarding the subject property, located at 157 Finner Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Parcel ID No 20-2S-01E-142-0491 7-D07, and observed the storage ofa large amount of tires in an unenclosed area in violation of section 8 .042, Wakulla County Code of Ordinances. 3. Pursuant to s 162.06, Fla. Stat. and s. 8065, Wakulla County Code, the Code Enforcement Officer issued an initial Notice of Violation to Respondents on August 22, 2011, by way of regular mail and certified mail, providing notice of the violation and also providing a reasonable time for correction of the violation and a date for compliance of September 15, 2011 4. On January 6, 2012, the Code Enforcement Office conducted a follow-up inspection to determine whether the violations were corrected by the date for compliance. The inspection revealed that the violations had not been corrected, The Code Enforcement Office issued a new Notice of Violation to Respondents by way of regular mail and certified mail, providing notice of the violation and a new date for compliance of February 6, 2012. An additional notice was mailed on March 26, 2012, providing a compliance date of April 10, 2012. 5. Additional notice of the violation and the hearing on the violation was given by way of publication in the Wakulla News once a week each week from May 17, 2012 through June 7, 2012, for four consecutive weeks, 6. Respondents failed to provide written notice of the correction of the violations to the Code Enforcement Office on or before the date for compliance, and the violations were not actually corrected. 7. Respondents were served with proper notice of the public hearing and Respondents, or their representative, failed to appear at the hearing. 8. Code Enforcement staffs testimony expresses concern that the tires constitute a health hazard due to the accumulation of water within the tires. CONCLUSIONS OF LA W The subject property is alleged to be in violation of section 8.042, of the Wakulla County Code of Ordinances Sections 8.042, states: All property shall remain free from any nuisance accumulation of rubbish or garbage other than that placed in an approved, and enclosed receptacle. Anuisance accumulation of rubbish or garbage in violation of this section shall be deemed to have occured if an owner or occupant of property allows garbage to remain on the property beyond a period of seven days or rubbish to remain on the property beyond a period of 15 days. 8,042(a), Wakulla County Code. For the purposes of section 8.042, rubbish is defined to include combustible and non-combustible waste materials, including, but not limited to: the residue from the burning of wood, coal, coke and other combustiblematerials, paper, rags, cartons, boxes, wood, excelsior, rubber, leather, tree branches, yard trimmings, tin cans, disconnected or inoperable appliances, metals, mineral matter, glass, crockery and dust, construction debris, and other similar materials. 8.041, Wakulla County Code. An accumulation of tires would be included within the definition of rubbish Section 8 .042 further requires that property owners dispose of rubbish in a safe and sanitary manner by placing such rubbish in approved containers, if possible, and removing it to an approved disposal facility within the County Pursuant to the above stated provision of the Wakulla County Code, and based on the evidence and testimony presented at the public hearing, the Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board finds by clear and convincing evidence that the Respondents have allowed items meeting the definition of rubbish to remain on the subject property for a period in excess of fifteen days, Furthermore, this violation presents a serious risk to the public health due to the potential for standing water which may contribute to an increased number of mosquitos and the spread of mosquito-born illnesses. ORDER Based upon the foregoing Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law, and pursuant to the authority granted in Chapter 162, Florida Statutes, and Chapter 8, Wakulla County Land Development Code, by motion made and duly seconded and passed by the Board by a majority vote of at least four (4) members, it is hereby ORDERED: 1:. Respondents shaIl correct said violations on or before August 11, 2012 (the Compliance Date), by which date Respondents must correct the violations of the Code described herein by disposing of all rubbish material, including the tires. Small rubbish items may be separated into the containers provided by the Countys solid waste hauler and left curbside for pickup on the day designated for solid waste collection for the property, or it may disposed of at the Wakulla County transfer station at the landfill. Other materials, including the tires, must be removed to the Wakulla County transfer station during its hours of operation, In addition, Respondents shall pay an administrative charge in the amount of $150.00 for administrative costs associated with inspecting the subject property and presenting this Case to the Board on or before the Compliance Date., 2, In the event that Respondents comply with this Order, as verified in an Affidavit of Compliance filed with the Board by the Code Enforcement Officer, the Chairman shall be authorized to enter an Order Acknowledging Compliance on behalf of the Board, a certified copy of which shall be recorded in the public records of Wakulla County, and provided by certified mail to Respondents, Ahearing is not required for issuance of the Order Acknowledging Compliance. 3 In the event that Respondents fail to comply with this Order on or before the Compliance Date, as verified in an Affidavit of Non-Compliance filed with the Board by the Code Enforcement Officer, the Board hereby authorizes the Chairman to enter an Order Imposing Fines, a certified copy of which shall be recorded in the public records of Wakulla County, and provided by certified mail to Respondents. Such fines shall be imposed in the amount of $150.00 for the first day and $50.00 for each and every day thereafter that the violation continues past the Compliance Date. Ahearing is not required for issuance of the Order Imposing Fines. 4. Upon recordation in the public records, the Order Imposing Fines shall constitute a lien against the land on which the violation exists and upon any other real or personal property owned by Respondents. Upon petition to the circuit court, such Order shall be enforceable in the same manner as a court judgment. The fines imposed in the Order shall continue Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432we sell and service most makes and models Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 850-926-9760 850-509-1013BryantsCARPET AND UPHOLSTERY CAREProfessional carpet, upholstery, tile/grout and area rug cleaning.IICRC/CLEANTRUST CERTIFIED TECHNICIANBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 11C RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $750/Mo./ $900 Security Deposit 455 Old Bethel 3BR/2BA Home on one acre north of Crawfordville. $900 Mo./$900 Security Deposit No Pets/ No Smoking 14 Cutchins 3BR/2BA off of E. Ivan Rd. No Pets, No Smoking $675 Mo./$675 Deposit 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of ofce space, fenced 14 Windy Ct 3BR/2BA $850mo./$850 Deposit. Available Aug. 1 2086 Spring Creek Hwy. 3BR/2BA MH on 2 acres $750 Mo./$750 Deposit. Lease w/option to buy. We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!27 Brentwood Lane 4 Bdr. 3 1/2 ba In-Ground Pool includes Maintenance, Double car garage, replace, large master bedroom, screen porch. $1,050. per month. No Pets, No smoking50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets. to accrue until Respondents come into compliance or until judgment is rendered, whichever occurs first. 5, In addition, if Respondent fails to comply with this Order, the Board hereby directs Wakulla County, through the Code Enforcement Officer to obtain quotes from the vendors on the Countys approved vendor list for removal of the tires and disposal at an appropriate location. Quotes shall be brought back to the Code Enforcement Board at its next meeting for consideration by the Board due to the public health threat created by the existence of the tires. 6. It is the Respondentsobligation to provide written notice to the Code Enforcement Officer of compliance with this Order or the Order Imposing Fines. Upon providing such written notice, the Code Enforcement Officer shall perform an inspection of the subject property for the purposes of determining whether Respondents have obtained compliance with the Order. 7 Respondents may appeal this Order to the circuit court within 30 days of its execution. DONE AND ORDERED this 16th day of July, 2012. By:/s/ Jeffrey Ewaldt, Vice-Chairman STATE OF FLORIDA COUNTYOF WAKULLA SWORN TO AND SUBSCRIBED before me this 16th day of July, 2012, by Jeffrey Ewaldt, who is personally know to me /s/ Sarah Ion Blalock / Notary Public(Seal) Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News July 26, August 2, 9 & 16, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5325-0816 TWN v. Melissa Foote Case No.: 2011-CA-000225 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION CASE NO: 2011-CA-000225 SCORE FEDERALCREDITUNION, Plaintiff, v. MELISSAFOOTE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MELISSAFOOTE; RICHARD D. FOOTE, PEARLE. FOOTE; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; COMDATANETWORK, INC.; SUMMERWOOD ROADOWNERS MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATION; WACHOVIA, a division of Wells Fargo, N.A. Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F .S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVENthat, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, at 11:00 a.m. oclock on September 6, 2012, the following described property: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREE 22 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 1323.21 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 1315.89 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 330.99 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 330.99 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 657.77 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60 FOOT ROADWAY, UTILITYAND DRAINAGE EASMENT, THENCE RUN 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID EASEMENT 331.29 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 657.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING (A.P.N. R 05-3S-01E-205-05021-013) ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: July 18, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court By;/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) 5329-0816 TWN vs. William Miller Case No. 65-2012-CA-000179 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTYCIVILDIVISION Case No.65-2012-CA-000179 Division BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANY Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM L. MILLER, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WILLIAM L. MILLER CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN LASTKNOWN ADDRESS 228 BOB MILLER RD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY OF BOB MILLER ROAD 991.70 FEET TO AROD AND CAPFOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY406.24 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 660.11 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 406.24 FEET TO AROD AND CAP,THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 660.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. commonly known as: 228 BOB MILLER RD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Paul M. Messina, Jr. of Kass Shuler, P.A., plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813) 229-0900, on or before September 7, 2012, (or 30 days from the first date of publication, whichever is later) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. 5331-0816 TWN Vs. Gentry, Laura Etta Case #65-2010-CA-000087CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000087CA ONE WESTBANK,FSB Plaintiff(s) vs. LAURAETTAGENTRY; et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 5333-0816 TWN vs. Nall, Andrea M., Case No:65-2008-CA-000152FC Notice of Foreclosure Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 65-2008-CA-000152FC TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP., Plaintiff, ANDREAM. NALLA/KA/ ANDREANALL; GEOFFREYNALL; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to Final Judgement of Foreclosure dated the 29th day of May, 2009, and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000152FC, of the Circuit Court of the 2NDJudicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORPORATION is the Plaintiff and ANDREAM. NALLA/K/AANDREANALL, GEOFFREYNALL, JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONTLOBBYof WAKULLA COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 4th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 69, BLOCK A, MAGNOLIAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 59, PAGE 261, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDATOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2007 FLEETWOOD MOBILE HOME, SER. NO.GAFL675AB78594-CD2. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 25th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News August 9 & 16, 2012 5333-0816 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Dated:July 25, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Honorable J. H. Thurmond 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301: (850) 577-4401 within 7 working days of your receipt of this notice: if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. August 9 & 16, 2012 5329-0816 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July. 26, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000087CAof the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for County, Florida, wherein One West Bank, FSB is the Plaintiff and LAURAETTAGENTRYand MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. FOR AMERICAS WHOLESALE LENDER, are the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 27th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 23, BLOCK D OF SHELLPOINT BEACH, UNIT V, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES 47 AND 48 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 11 PEBBLE CT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIMING ARIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTNO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE ENTITLED TO ANYREMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAYCLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at County, Florida this 26th day of July, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk, County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, County, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 -County Phone: 850-926-0905 EXT. 223 TDD 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. August 9 & 16, 2012. 800669.000606 Wakulla RealtyKaren Williams Broker Associate850-926-5084 850-567-8279khwilliams@earthlink.netPrivate Oasis in Your Backyard: Exceptionally Maintained 3/2 House with lots of extras and 1 Car Garage. Privacy Fenced Backyard beholds Screened Porch w/ Beautiful Landscaping, Fruit Trees, and Patio with Built in Fire Pit Area and Playground Equipment. Reduced to $139,900 Ochlockonee River Front: Totally Remodeled 2/1 House on Pilings with Dock & Floating Dock. Improvements include totally New Kitchen, Ceramic Tile Floors, Vinyl Siding, & Metal Roof. Screened Porch and Decks from which you can Enjoy Nature and the River. $230,000 Great Location Close to Coast: 5 Bdrm/2Ba Singlewide Mobile Home with 2 Site Built Additions on each side. Numerous Recent Upgrades but still in need of some TLC. Located on 1 acre of land that has three sheds and beautiful Live Oak Trees. Sold As Is. $49,900 Great Home in Gated Subdivision: 3 Bdrm/2 Ba House w/Separate Ofce Area on acre in Gated Community. Kitchen w/Bar & Eat in Dining Area, Formal Dining Room, Living Room w/Gas Fireplace & Separate Ofce Area. Back Deck & Patio Ideal for Entertaining & Overlooks Large Backyard with Beautiful Mature Landscaping & Large Shed. $164,900 Heron Creek Subdivision: This Nature Based Subdivision offers 13 lots from 10-16 Acres in Size. Beautiful Sinkhole, Established Pasture and Woods make for a Diverse Offering of land for any Buyer. Deer, Turkey, and other Wildlife call this spot in Wakulla County Home and You can too. Horses Welcome. Seller Offering Great Financing Terms. Lots start at $59,900. www.wakullarealty.com

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Page 12C THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com CER TIFICA TE OF SER VICE I CERTIFYthat a true and correct copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale under F.S. Chapter 45 has been furnished by United States Mail on July 18, 2012, to each of the following: Henry L. Miller, Jr., Attorney for Score Federal Credit Union, Mathews Law Firm, P. A., 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; Jason Guevara, Collections Manager, Score Federal Credit Union, 3218 N. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; and William R. Pfeiffer, The Pfeiffer Law Group, LLC, attorney for Defendants, Melissa Foote, Richard D. Foote, and Pearl E. Foote, 2910 Kerry Forest Parkway, Suite D4-276, Tallahassee, Florida 32309 By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Court Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 9 & 16, 2012 5325-0816 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5300-0809 TWN vs. NADER, MARIE L. Case No.65-2008-CA-000110 Notice of Foreclosure Sale IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000110, DIVISION: AURORALOAN SERVICES, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. : MARIE L. NADER A/K/AMARIE NADER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated 5314-0809 Vs. Gowdy, Richard L. Case No. 11-281-CANotice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-281-CA FARM CREDITOF NORTHWESTFLORIDA, ACA Plaintiff, v. RICHARD L. GOWDY, a/k/a RICHARD GOWDY, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RICHARD L. GOWDY, a/k/a RICHARD GOWDYand UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT T O CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment dated April 30, 2012 and Order Reopening Case and Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 30, 2012 and order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale Dated July 19, 2012 all entered in Case No. 11-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, in which FARM CREDITOF NORTHWESTFLORIDA, ACAis the Plaintiff and RICHARD L. GOWDYa/k/a RICHARD L. GOWDY, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RICHARD L. GOWDY, a/k/a RICHARD GOWDYand UNKNOWN TENANT(S),are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at THE FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAat 11:00 a.m. on August 16, 2012, the property, set forth in the Final Judgment, and more particularly described as follows: Commence at a point marking the Southeast corner of Section 7, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 43 seconds West 37.55 feet to an iron pipe lying on the Westerly right of way line of U.S. Highway Number 319, also known as State Road Number 369; thence run along said right of way line as follows: North 00 degrees 03 minutes 25 seconds West 700.60 feet to a rebar for the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING run North 00 degrees 03 minutes 27 seconds West 661.41 feet to a rebar lying on the North boundary line of the South half of the Southeast quarter of said Section 7; thence leaving said right of way line run along said North boundary line of the South half of the Southeast quarter as monumented as follows: South 89 degrees 13 minutes 51 seconds West 1937.50 feet to an old axle; thence South 89 degrees 13 minutes 51 seconds West 670.63 feet to an old axle marking the Northwest Corner of the South half of the Southeast quarter of said Section 7; thence leaving said North boundary line of the South half of the Southeast quarter run South 00 degrees 26 minutes 56 seconds West 1326.82 feet to a concrete monument marking the Southwest corner of the Southeast quarter of said Section 7; thence South 89 degrees 59 minutes 43 seconds East 1713.00 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 seconds West 564.24 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds East 231.05 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 seconds West 100.00 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds West 286.25 feet; thence North 02 degrees 17 minutes 31 seconds West 476.54 feet; thence North 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds East 262.21 feet; thence South 05 degrees 10 minutes 51 seconds East 477.14 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds East 676.30 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 63.993 acres more or less.. Together with and Subject to a 30 foot wide ingress/egress and utility easement lying over and across a portion of the above described property being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a point marking the Southeast corner of the Section 7, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 43 seconds West 37.55 feet to an iron pipe lying on the Westerly right of way line of U.S. Highway Number 319, also known as State Road Number 369; thence run along said right of way line as follows: North 00 degrees 03 minutes 25 seconds West 700.60 feet to a rebar for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING run North 00 degrees 03 minutes 27 seconds West 30.02 feet; thence leaving said right of way line run South 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds West 678.98 feet; thence South 05 degrees 10 minutes 51 seconds East 30.04 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds East 676.30 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: July 18, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) /s/ BY: Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Michael P. Bist, Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia, & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Drive Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Published on August 2 & 9, 2012 5314-0809 5316-0809 TWN Vs. Colburn, Sheliah Case #: 2011CA-000095 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2011-CA-000095 CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, -vs.Sheliah D.Colburn a/k/a Sheliah Colburn and Jeffery Scott Colburn, Wife and Husband; Florida Commerce Credit Union; Household Finance Corporation, III; Eagles Ridge Phase II Homeowners Association Inc.; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA-000095 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff and Sheliah D.Colburn a/k/a Sheliah Colburn and Jeffery Scott Colburn, Wife and Husband are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONT LOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED ATCHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M. on August 30, 2012. the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 26 OF EAGLES RIDGE PHASE II, ASUBDIVISION PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 60, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled 5317-0809 TWN Vs. Dudley, Michael Case #: 2012-CA-000166 Notice of Action Foreclosure PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000166 U.S. Bank, National Association, as Trustee for SG Mortgage Securities Trust 2006-FRE2, Asset Backed Certificates, Series 2006-FRE2 Plaintiff, -vs.Michael S. Dudley a/k/a Michael Shane Dudley and Sherry P. Dudley, Husband and Wife; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPERTY TO: Michael S. Dudley; ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUTWHOSE LASTKNOWN ADDRESS IS: 135 Roddenberry Sink Road, Crawfordville, FL32327 and Sherry P. Dudley; ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUTWHOSE LASTKNOWN ADDRESS IS: 135 Roddenberry Sink Road, 5320-0809 TWN vs. Dekle, Bryan Case No.: 11-207-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-207-CA THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUSTCOMPANY, N.A., by and through its sub-servicing agent, VANDERBILTMORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. BRYAN A. DEKLE and PEGGYSUE DEKLE, husband and sife; MIDLAND FUNDING LLC, a Delaware limited liability company authorized to transact business in Florida, as successor in interest to Household Finance; FAMILYDOLLAR STORES OF FLORIDA, INC., a Florida corporation; UNIDENTIFIED JOHN DOE(S) and/or UNIDENTIFIED JANE DOE(S), Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on July 18, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32326, at 11:00 A.M. on August 30, 2012, the following described property: Lot 24 Millers Way South Commence at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of Lot 52 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 72 degrees 50 minutes 52 seconds West 915.00 feet, thence run North 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds West 402.50 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING. From said POINTOF BEGINNING continue North 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds West 524.40 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way of State Road No. S-368, said point lying on a curve concave to the Northerly, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 1091.74 feet thru a central angle of 01 degrees 34 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 30.07 feet (chord of said arc being South 77 degrees 12 minutes 43 seconds West 30.04 feet), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds East 291.97 feet to a point on a curve concave to the Northerly, thence run Northwesterly along said curve having a radius of 1382.74 feet thru a central angle of 31 degrees 08 minutes 57 seconds for an arc distance of 751.73 feet (the chord of said arc being North 87 degrees 31 minutes 55 seconds West 742.51 feet), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds East 484.05 feet, thence run North 72 degrees 50 minutes 52 seconds East 728.96 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING. SUBJECTTO a roadway easement over and across the Southerly and Easterly 30 feet thereof. ALSO SUBJECTTO a 50.00 foot cul-de-sac easement in the Southwest corner thereof. TOGETHER WITH that certain 1996 Cougar General Doublewide Mobile Home bearing I.D. Nos: GMHGA409968932Aand GMHGA409968932B. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERSTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated July 18, 2012 (seal) Brent X. Thurmond,Clerk of Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Quintairos, Prieto, Wood & Boyer, P.A., Attn: Erin Gordon 215 S. Monroe St., Suite 510 Tallahassee, FL32301 Phone: 850-412-1042 Fax: 850-412-1043 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News August 2 & 9, 2012 Crawfordville, FL32327 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendants(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Wakulla County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 105, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 105, ADISTANCE OF 1438.19 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY479.39 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 682.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 479.39 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 682.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 105, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EASTERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 105 ADISTANCE OF 1183.25 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 30.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST ALONG ALINE 30.00 FEET WESTERLYOF AND PARALLELTO THE EASTERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 105 ADISTANCE OF 1153.17 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST ALONG ALINE 30.00 FEET SOUTHERLYOF AND PARALLELTO THE NORTHERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 105 ADISTANCE OF 1562.14 FEET TO THE EASTERLYBOUNDARYOF THE 100.00 FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAYOF STATE ROAD NO. 365, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY37.38 FEET TO THE NORTHERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 105, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID BOUNDARY1569.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH RIGHTS OF INGRESS AND EGRESS AS MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED IN THAT CERTAIN ACCESS EASEMENT DATED AUGUST 27, 1980, AND RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 77, PAGE 499 AND RE-RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 78, PAGE 97 BOTH IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as 135 Roddenberry Sink Road, Crawfordville, FL32327 This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, upon SHIPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL33614, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENTX. THURMOND, Circuit and County Courts (SEAL) By: /s/ Becky Whaley, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 2 & 9 Wakulla News 11-238319 FC01 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ DESIREE D. WILLIS, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEYFOR THE PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100, Tampa, FL33614 (813)880-8888, (813)880-8800 August 2 & 9, 2012. 10-209781 FC01 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON JULY 19, 2012

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 13C July 18, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000110 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuitin and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein AURORALOAN SERVICES, LLC is the Plaintiff and MARIE L. NADER A/K/AMARIE NADER; WILLIAM CESAR; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WILLIAM CESAR; MARC NADER A/K/AMARC A. NADER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARIE L. NADER A/K/A/ MARIE NADER; WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION; THE FARM HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION INC; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 13thday of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 7 BLOCK H THE FARM SUBDIVISION, PHASE I, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 PAGE 93, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A64 CARRIAGE DR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on July 18, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 2 & 9, 2012 F10105998 5300-0809 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5278-0816 TWN Vs. Farmer, Claudette Case No. 11-174-FC Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 11-174-FC UCN:0652011CA000174XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. CLAUDETTE L. FARMER A/K/ACLAUDETTE FARMER; EARLE W. MURPHY; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 20, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11-174-FC UCN:652011CA0000174XXXXXX if the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and CLAUDETTE L. FARMER A/K/ACLAUDETTE FARMER; EARLE W. MURPHY; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR 5318-0809 TWN estate Smith, Rodger Stephen Case No: 12-62 CPNotice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-62 CP IN RE : ESTATE OF R. STEPHEN SMITH a/k/a RODGER STEPHEN SMITH a/k/a STEPHEN SMITH Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of R. Stephen Smith, deceased, File 12-62 CPis pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is August 2, 2012. Personal Representative: Ruby L. Smith, 64 Lake Ellen Shores Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville, FL32327 (850)926-8245 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 2 & 9, 2012 5319-0809 estate Ventry, Joice Case # 12-59 CPNotice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-59 CP. IN RE : ESTATE OF JOICE J. VENTRY Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Joice J. Ventry, deceased, File 12-59 CPis pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is August 2, 2012. Personal Representative: Rebecca Jane Moore, 148 Longleaf Drive Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5315-0809 TWN 8/18 sale Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will Self Storage Notices hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, August18,2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: MIKE ROBERTS MARANDACOX Before the sale date of SatSelf Storage Notices urday, August 18, 2012, the owners my redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. August 2 & 9, 2012 Self Storage Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL.32327 at Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 10th day of January 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 16, BLOCK 1, WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 39, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE, DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on June 20, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 9 & 16, 2012 5278-0712 1183-96619 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville, FL32327 (850)926-8245 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News August 2 & 9, 2012 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 25 32 37 40 46 49 56 59 62 2 26 47 3 27 43 4 28 44 5 23 41 57 60 63 18 38 50 6 15 33 58 7 29 51 8 30 48 9 21 31 45 10 24 42 61 64 22 39 52 11 16 19 34 53 12 35 54 13 36 55 ACROSS 1. Ankle bones 6. Bernhardt or Vaughan 11. An NCO 14. __ Jack (British flag) 15. It was acquired by BP 16. Make haste 17. Indian drum? 19. __-Locka, Florida 20. Not saturated 21. The ear's "stirrup" 23. Cleanse 24. Wield, as authority 25. Strip bare 29. About 3.26 lightyears 32. Dungeon restraints 33. Four-star reviews 34. Letters for the Pinafore 37. Grackle or grosbeak 38. Witches' assembly 39. Inside info 40. "Told you so!" 41. Be indecisive 42. Former Oldsmobile Cutlass model 43. Like matched socks 45. Mull over 46. Ballplayer's rep 48. Comfy room 49. Left Bank cash, once 51. Just okay 56. Romper room habitu 57. Top-secret? 59. Night before 60. Went for congers 61. Sierra __ (African nation) 62. Bolshevik 63. Unfeeling 64. Grand __ (Wyoming peak)DOWN1. "Swan Lake" skirt 2. Author unknown: Abbr. 3. Lens holders 4. Explorer Hernando de __ 5. Approaching the center 6. Filled completely 7. In the thick of 8. CD-__ 9. Breezes through 10. Twinkies maker 11. On the double? 12. Kilted musician 13. Tiniest bit 18. "__ from Muskogee" 22. Bunyan's tool 25. Claimant's cry 26. Toledo's lake 27. Taboo? 28. Sturm __ Drang 29. Unlike many country roads 30. State positively 31. Cartoon Chihuahua 33. Gad about 35. "Encore!" 36. Work with a pug 38. Mercury or Saturn 39. Jesse Ventura victory, once 41. Brew makers? 42. Seek the advice of 44. Shakers founder Lee 45. South-of-theborder simoleon 46. Fairy tale closer 47. Lemons' locale 48. __-longlegs (wispy arachnid) 50. Fatty tissue 51. Fen-__ (withdrawn diet treatment) 52. "... sting like __" 53. Reputation tarnisher 54. Lantern-jawed Jay 55. Genesis site 58. __-mo replayAmerican Prole Hometown Content 8/5/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 1 23 4 5 63 748 23 169 96 57913 9 12 54 16587 2009 HometownContent 918 7236 4 5 426958137 573416892 237 164958 891235764 645879213 789 341526 352697481 164582379 T U T U D I B S A F T E R A N O N E R I E G R O V E R I M S N O R E P E A T E D S O T O U N D A N N I N W A R D S W I T C H E S O K I E C A R S U E T S A T E D R O V E S L O A M I D P A V E D P H E N R O M A V E R D A D D Y A C E S R E N P E S O H O S T E S S C O N S U L T A X E P I N A B E E C H O P E C H O E D B L O T P I P E R M O R E L E N O L E A S T S P A R E D E N Am Arc Away Axle Bar Be Bug Buy By Cat Coral Dads Date Debt Deliver Far Fed Fly Form Fox Frown God Got Hay He Hi Home How Hunter In Is Leg Lid Male My Net No Nut Oaks Oar Of Onions Pegs Pet Pigeon Rent Run Sea See Send Slot So Style Tea Tended To Tug Up Vary Vase Wax We Why Wood Wounded Yawn YogaWord Find

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Page 14C THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com(ARA) When school starts, kids schedules ll up fast, and that means they need the right fuel to keep their growing bodies and minds satis ed. After a long day of learning, kids require a snack that will get them through homework, after-school sports and other activities until dinner is served. Before you reach for the default bag of chips, consider these healthier alternatives that are just as easy and convenient. Creative, healthier afterschool snack ideas that your kids will gobble up: 1. Refresh with frozen apple sauce Apple sauce has been a snacking staple for years, but now you can add a little excitement to those prepackaged apple packs. Simply buy Tree Top apple sauce cups, made with 100 percent USA apples, and place them in the freezer for a tasty treat similar to sorbet, and a healthier alternative to most ice cream and frozen snacks. Kids can grab them on their own when they get home from school so mom and dad dont have to lift a nger. Stock up on Tree Top apple juice boxes, too, for a complementary, easy grab-and-go drink option. 2. Delight in dip Its no secret kids love to dip, so make afterschool snacking more interesting by providing dip along with fresh fruit, veggies and crackers. Instead of salad dressing, change things up by mixing a single serve apple sauce cup with two tablespoons of peanut butter for a healthier dip alternative. Watch as your little ones wolf down their carrots, celery, apples, pretzels and more. Parents love that this dip option has many nutritional bene ts the apple sauce in it is a good source of vitamin C and peanut butter is packed with protein. 3. Wrap it up Keeping whole wheat tortillas on hand is a smart move for any parent because they are extremely versatile. When kids come home from school hungry, its easy to take a tortilla and ll it with their favorite nutritious llings. For example, spread with classic peanut butter and jelly, add some banana and honey, or fill with turkey and mozzarella for a satisfying snack that keeps kids focused through all their homework. 4. Happily hydrated Making sure your kids are hydrated is an important part of keeping them healthy and feeling great each day. When kids are busy at school and with after-school activities, they can become dehydrated quickly. Instead of sugary sodas, choose a more nutritious alternative like Tree Top reduced sugar 100 percent fruit juices. These tasty and refreshing drinks are made with hydrating coconut water and no arti cial sweeteners and have 25 percent less sugar than regular 100 percent juices. 5. A smooth nish to the school day Smoothies are a fun way for kids to get a ton of nutrients in one single drink. Its easy for parents to stock up on frozen fruit at the local grocery store. Then, when kids get home, they can choose what avors they want and you can blend the fruit with lowfat milk, yogurt and ice for a cool and delicious drink. You might even sneak in a few veggies by adding a splash of vegetable juice, or a couple of pre-steamed vegetables like carrots, kale or squash. The fruit avors are so robust, your kids wont even notice the veggies. Healthy after-school snacks dont have to be boring or bland. Try these ideas and you can feel good about what your kids eat they may love them so much theyll be requesting them every day.Creative and healthier after-school snack ideas SPECIAL TO THE NEWS(ARA) Excitement, anticipation, anxiety backto-school time is filled with many emotions for both kids and parents. By planning ahead, parents can make gearing up for the start of the school year a fun experience that eases the transition while boosting enthusiasm. Consider the six ideas below to help position students for success before heading back to the classroom: 1. Set a schedule now New teachers, classmates, homework and other challenges may create some apprehension and nervousness during the first couple weeks of school. Stay positive and explain that some anxiety is normal and that everyone needs time to adjust to new things. Help reduce stress by creating a daily routine before school. Checklists and charts allow children to be organized and get into a schedule. For instance, a set time for homework, snack time, free time and bed time are good things to have on a schedule. 2. Shop for school supplies together Seeing all the new trends and designs that stores have to offer for back-to-school supplies can be really exciting for children. Allow them to personalize their supplies and feel excited about using them. A few new out ts also provide kids with a boost of encouragement and con dence for the new school year. 3. Hold a family celebration Start an annual tradition that celebrates the start of the school year. For example, have a family cookout with hotdogs and smores the weekend before school starts. This helps build excitement for the new school year, but also gives them a relaxed setting to talk about any back-to-school anxiety they may be feeling. 4. Set up a homework area This area should be organized, quiet and welllit. You should also allow your child to personalize this space to make it more appealing and fun, without providing distractions. Some items you might want to incorporate in this area are a dictionary, atlas, calculator, art supplies, paper and pencils. Make sure to have plenty of snacks ready for homework time to avoid the distraction of a grumbling belly. Choosing a snack that offers protein, such as cheese and crackers or an apple with peanut butter will keep them satis ed until dinner. 5. Stock up on sensible snacks After a long day at school, kids are hungry and need snacks that satisfy them through all their homework assignments and other after-school activities. Stock up on a variety of wholesome, non-perishable snacks that you can keep on hand year-round. 6. Review what the school requires Dont forget the basics. Review all medical documents that pertain to annual physicals and immunizations and get the information to the school for your childs le. Also, make the teacher and school nurse aware of any conditions your child may have such as allergies, chronic medical conditions or special learning accommodations. Doing this ahead of time helps ease back-to-school stress for mom and dad too. For additional tips on how to get your family ready for back-to-school time, visit the Lance Snacks Pinterest page.Six tips for boosting back-to-school success Where the little things Make a Difference! Where the little things Make a Difference! 2504 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee FL 32304 2504 W. 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