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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00417
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 07-12-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00417
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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netLong-time resident Jenny Brock is running for County Commission, District 1. Brock, no party affiliation, will face incumbent Alan Brock, Democrat, and Republican Ralph Thomas in the November election. Brock, who previously ran for a seat on the school board in 2010 and county commission District 1 seat in 2008, said she is running for the commission because she wants to serve the people and feels many important issues arent receiving the attention they deserve from the current board. She also has some concerns with recent decisions made by the current board. One of these decisions is the implementation of the $196-solid waste assessment on all property owners for curbside garbage pickup. I was very disturbed with the Waste Pro contract,Ž she said. Some residents inherited a home from a family member and although it doesnt need service nor is it lived in, they are still required to pay the assessment, she said. Another concern was the Public Services Tax, which is a 10-percent tax on every purchase of electricity, metered or bottle gas, fuel oils and water. Brock said she understands that citizens must pay taxes for services. However, the county does not provide any of the services they are taxing, she said. She said she would try to repeal that tax. If it couldnt be repealed, the county should at least lower it. She feels the county could be more careful with its budget process so that the public services tax could be eliminated. The people of this county have been overwhelmingly taxed by the current board,Ž Brock said. There are people suffering and cant handle the extra tax, she said. Give them a break.Ž She also feels government operations should be completely open to the public. So there is no question of where our taxes go and where we are headed,Ž Brock said. In the past, it has sometimes been dif“ cult obtaining public records from the county, she said. It has gotten better and she believes the county is on its way to a better system on public records requests. Two areas she feels very passionate about is having quality activities for the children of the county and preserving the countys ecosystems. Brock said she would like to see the Wakulla County Community Center serve as a hub of quality activities for youth. Its been a long time coming,Ž she said of the community center. Brock was a high school math teacher for 32 years. She served most of her career at Leon High School. I love children,Ž Brock said. Continued on Page 3A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netTo ensure that people in Wakulla County iimpacted by Tropical Storm Debby know about the Disaster Recovery Center and the assistance available to them, the Federal Emergency Management Agencys Community Relations Team is out spreading the word. The team is comprised of six community relations specialists who break off into teams of two and go into impacted areas of the county letting people know that assistance is available to them and how they can obtain it. Our job primarily is to get them there,Ž said Stephen Huffstutler, community relations specialist. Continued on Page 2A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 26th Issue Thursday, July 12, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents kll h h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 5A Community .....................................................................Page 6A Sports .............................................................................Page 7A Outdoors ........................................................................Page 8A Water Ways .....................................................................Page 9A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 10A Health & Fitness ...............................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 3B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 5B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 5B INDEX OBITUARIES Tracy Candice Chuley Angeline Gainey ‘Plump’ Donaldson Betty Jean Freeman Dorothy Emily Gercak Eleanor Louise Reddick B. Graddick Ralph Edward GriffinJenny Brock is running for county commission, District 1 Jenny Brock is a candidate for county commission. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net A Disaster Recovery Center opened in Wakulla County on Thursday, July 5, at the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce in response to Tropical Storm Debby and the county being declared a disaster area and approved for individual assistance by the president. Those who were affected by Tropical Storm Debby can apply for federal disaster assistance through the Federal Emergency Management Agency for their home or business, which can be done at the center. It is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Immediate assistance is also available at the DRC for disaster victims who are unable to return home. FEMA can provide temporary housing assistance for them. There is a huge need for rental properties for people who have lost their homes due to the storm, said Brenda Cheek, FEMA community relations specialist. People who have rental properties available in the county are asked to contact the DRC. Prior to coming to the DRC, people are encouraged to register with FEMA. This can be done online at www.disasterassistance.gov, by calling FEMA at 1-800-621-3362 or using the FEMA app at m.fema.gov. So far, 279 people in Wakulla County have registered with FEMA, according to Tim Tyson, FEMA spokesperson. According to the Wakulla County damage assessments, there were 413 damaged structures with a total value of $8.75 million. This included 40 homes that were completely destroyed. Continued on Page 2AHe woke up just in timeDisaster Recovery Center open to help ood victimsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIt was 1:30 a.m. on Tuesday, June 26, when the loud sound of frogs croaking outside his home woke Bill Rogers from his sleep. That sound may have saved his life. Rogers says he had never heard the frogs that loud before at his home on Smokehouse Road. When he woke up, he found out why they had been so loud. His home was on the verge of being ” ooded. It was a sign from God,Ž Rogers says. They woke me up.Ž The water was rising quickly and Rogers knew he needed to evacuate. The problem was that the only way out of his driveway was impassable. A week prior, a dead tree had fallen on a power line and was blocking part of the road. Rogers says he grabbed his computer and important documents and headed to the home of his neighbors, Lt. Bruce and Nina Ashley, who were also trying to evacuate. Deputies with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce had arrived to help people get out of the area. Rogers asked the deputy if he had a chainsaw and luckily he did. Continued on Page 2A The aftermath of Tropical Storm Debby: JENNIFER JENSENRed Cross volunteers help a storm victim.Community Relations Team is out in the county SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe loudness of croaking frogs awakened Bill Rogers minutes before his house ” ooded. He says it was a sign from God. He got out, but his home was a total loss. JENNIFER JENSENBrenda Cheek of FEMA comforts Elaine Herndon of Sopchoppy. Sopchoppy 4th of July ParadeSopchoppy 4th of July Parade See Page 12A Proper mold remediation requires mold removal by a licensed certified professional. License No. MRSR390 Mold After a Flood 926-3647Under the right conditions, molds produce spor es that spread easily through the air and form new mold growths (colonies). Mold ca n damage your home, possessions and health. If you suspect mold, let the experts at Rainbow International help you.When the power goes off for several days in hot, humid climates, it is difficult to avoid an explosion of mold growth. Mold growth is common after flooding or water damage. 41 Feli Way • Crawfordville, FL 32327 We are a locally owned and oper ated Wakulla County business. Proud to assist those affected by Tropical Storm Debby.

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Continued on Page 2A Across the 11 counties, as of July 10, there have been 4,399 people who have registered with FEMA and $6,686,535 has been approved for damages, Tyson said. There are several agencies represented at the center, including FEMA, Florida Division of Emergency Management, Department of Elder Affairs, Department of Children and Families, Small Business Administration, Workforce Plus, Catholic Charities, Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Apalachee Center and others. When someone comes into the center, a FEMA representative may refer them to one of these agencies as well. Theres just about every service they might need in one place,Ž said public information of“ cer Jeff Welsh. From grief counseling to employment services and ” ood mitigation. In order to receive individual assistance, the damaged home must be the persons primary residence. If someones vacation home was damaged, it would not be eligible for assistance, Welsh said. The whole goal is to make the house safe, sanitary and habitable, Welsh said. Its about making the house livable. Welsh said the maximum amount an individual can receive is $30,200. Money for home repairs for damage from the disaster that was not covered by insurance is available for disaster victims. Welsh said if someone has insurance, FEMA needs to know what that settlement was, so it is not duplicated. When someone registers for assistance, a professional building inspector will be sent out to assess the damage to the structure. The inspector works with a certain list of criteria and looks at the size of the house, how deep the water was, etc. He added that some personal property in main living areas might be able to be replaced, if they were destroyed. Welsh said one example is a childs bedroom furniture. Once an inspection is done, an applicant will receive a letter on the status of their claim. Welsh said an applicant should receive a response within two weeks. If they have any questions, they should call FEMA, he said. Welsh said there is a lot of ” exibility across disasters. The point is to make sure it tries to help people. The system is set up so that people can get help getting help,Ž Welsh said. Welsh said it is very normal for the team to speak to everyone affected in the county at least once. There currently is no timeline for how long FEMA will be in Wakulla County, Welsh said. Its usually until the demand drops off,Ž Welsh said. As time passes, a few people from FEMA stay behind to help those with special needs. For more information, call FEMA at 1-800-621-3362 or visit www.disasterassistance.gov. Staff reportOn Monday, July 9, public assistance was approved for Wakulla County due to the impacts of Tropical Storm Debby. Public assistance provides grant assistance for debris removal and emergency protective measures. Costs for repair, replacement, or restoration of disaster-damaged, publicly-owned facilities can also be covered under public assistance. Public assistance from the federal declaration comes in conjunction with the earlier approval of individual assistance for Wakulla. State, tribal, local governments and certain types of private non-pro“ t organizations in the 20 designated counties should visit www.FloridaPA.org to create an account within 30 days of a presidential declaration to apply for Public Assistance. The federal share of assistance is not less than 75 percent of the eligible cost for emergency measures and permanent restoration. The grantee (usually the state) determines how the non-federal share, up to 25 percent, is split with the subgrantees (eligible applicants), according to FEMA. Tropical Storm Debby made landfall June 27 in Steinhatchee. Impacts from the storm were felt statewide. The primary concern from Tropical Storm Debby was the proli“ c amount of rainfall and the resulting ” ooding impacts. Six rivers across Florida reached major ” ood stage, and two rivers, the Sopchoppy and the St. Marys, reached record breaking crests. Continued from Page 1A They went back over to his house and cut the tree out of the way. Then Rogers was able to get his truck and drive out. Everything happened so fast,Ž Rogers says. He had 15 minutes to evacuate. The water was coming in so quick, he says. If he had waited any longer, he doesnt think his truck would have been able to make it. There was stuff ” oating everywhere,Ž he says. Plus, it was in the dead of night, making it dif“ cult to maneuver through the debris. Rogers drove to Tallahassee and stayed in a hotel. He returned the next day, around noon, and found his yard was now a lake. He had to wade through the water to get to his front door. Inside, the water was a foot high. I knew right then it was history,Ž Rogers says. Since then, he has been back cleaning out the mobile home, trying to save what he can. But, he says, everything was pretty much destroyed. Rogers has lived there since 1988 and says he has never seen it flood like that. He does not have insurance and is hoping assistance will be approved from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. He has already applied and is waiting on a response. He plans to start off new and build a solid home, but this time it will be 8 feet above the ground. Its too pretty of a place not to build there,Ž Rogers says. His other neighbors were also impacted, including the Ashleys, who also lost everything. He was appreciative of everyone who has been supportive, including the American Red Cross, who, he says, went out of their way to help people in Wakulla County. Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A The DRC has representation from FEMA and numerous other organizations and agencies to help those disaster victims. The DRC is invaluable,Ž said Brenda Cheek, community relations specialist. The team works from a preliminary damage assessment sheet that was compiled by the officials with FEMA prior to Wakulla County being approved for individual and public assistance. The sheet has a list of the areas in Wakulla County that sustained damage from the storm. The team goes up and down the streets, knocking on every door. We try to work the streets,Ž Cheek said. They let people know about the DRC and that federal assistance is available and they also listen to their stories and listen to their needs. A big part of the job is listening, Huffstutler said. When the team hears a special need, they write it down and bring it back to the DRC. And they also do followup visits to relay the information again and make sure the victim is getting the help they need. When you are in a shock situation, you have to go back,Ž Tim Tyson, FEMA spokesperson, said of the team. One resident who has yet to make it to the DRC, but was able to register with FEMA thanks to the team was Elaine Herndon. The team came to her home on July 4 and she used their phone to register and apply for individual assistance. Herndon has ” ood insurance, but her claim with her insurance company was denied. She was heartbroken. When FEMA representatives showed up on her front door letting her know she could apply for some federal assistance, she said it was wonderful. It helped me out with my stress level,Ž Herndon said. I was overwhelmed.Ž The community relations team had been at a neighbors house who told them they needed to check on the Herndons, Cheek said. The neighbors all take care of each other,Ž Cheek said. When the rain started from Tropical Storm Debby, Herndon and her husband kept a close eye on the Sopchoppy River levels and the amount of rain that was pouring down. After measuring 28 inches of rainfall, Herndon stopped emptying her rain gauge. We knew it was going to be a bad ” ood,Ž Herndon said. The area has ” ooded before, but never like this, she said. The water will make it to the road, but never to her yard. This time, the water made its way all the way to her home and several inches inside, destroying the entire lower level, which is where her bedrooms and bathrooms were. We lost all of that,Ž Herndon said. Herndon was only able to grab her grandchildren, puppies and kittens before evacuating. The water came really fast,Ž she says. The water rushed across her yard like a current. By the time the river was high enough to ” ow onto her property, the downstairs was already ” ooded from the large amount of rain they received. She has lived there for 33 years and said she has never seen anything like this ” ood. Herndon said a FEMA inspector came out to her home on Saturday, July 7, and she is now waiting to hear the status of her application. Herndon and her family are trying to save keepsakes and furniture and clean out the rest of the house and a mobile home on their property where her son lived. Its a terrible disaster for everyone to go through,Ž she said. She received help from the Samaritans Purse who volunteered their time to clean out the debris from Herndons home. They showed up early in the morning and worked for hours, she said. That was just a blessing,Ž Herndon said. Although Herndon suffered major damage, she pointed out that others were in far worse shape than her. I at least have my living room and kitchen,Ž she said. Some people lost their whole home.Ž She was appreciative of the volunteers and FEMA representatives and all who have helped her. The important thing was that everyone survived, she said. As long as we keep on going, we can start over with anything.Ž Upon leaving Herndons residence, she thanked the team for their help and gave one of them a hug.Community Relations Team is out He woke up just in timeThe Wakulla County Commission will hold an emergency public meeting in response to developments from Tropical Storm Debby and will be held on Thursday, July 12, at 4 p.m. at the Wakulla County Community Center, located at 318 Shadeville Highway. The emergency public meeting was called by the chairman of the Board of County Commissioners. Disaster Recovery Center is openPublic assistance available for Wakulla CountyEmergency meeting set by commission Hair Place That 850-926-6020Gift Certi“cates Available FULL SERVICE HAIR SALON Styles for Men, Women & ChildrenCutsUpDo’sFeather Locks • Color • Perms • Highlights F acial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • F lat TopsMirandaTues-Sat545-2905LindaTues-Sat294-2085 RobynThurs-Sat926-6020 MavisFriday545-2905 ULL E RVI C E A I R A L O N Happy 75th Birthday! Happy 75th Birthday! Please join us in the celebration of Nellie White’s 75th Birthday Bash and Dinner! Please join us in the celebration of Nellie White’s 75th Birthday Bash and Dinner! Saturday, July 14, 3pm at her home in Shadeville in “the hole”, (Doshn Levi Rd.) For more information contact Belinda Ross 210-7506 or Kravien White 702-6520. Saturday, July 14, 3pm at her home in Shadeville in “the hole”, (Doshn Levi Rd.) For more information contact Belinda Ross 210-7506 or Kravien White 702-6520. PANACEA FULL GOSPEL 8 Taylor Street, Panacea, FL PANACEA FULL GOSPEL ASSEMBLY VBS BIBLE JULY 23-27, 2012 5:30 PM – 8:30 PM Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper.  Disabled veterans to offer mobile service of ce So many veterans feel confused about benefits and services they’ve earned. There’s so much to know, and so many changes from one year to the next. That’s why the nonpro t Disabled American Veterans (DAV) and the HarleyDavidson Foundation have teamed up to offer help. The DAV Mobile Service Of ce will be at the Capital City Harley-Davidson, 1745 Capital Circle Northwest, Tallahassee, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, July 14, to personally provide the best counseling and claim ling assistance available. This event is part of the nationwide Harley’s Heroes tour and is free to all veterans and members of their families. For further information contact Andrew Marshall at (727) 319-7444. Group seeks donations for school suppliesBig Hearted Angels will host its fth annual Back to School Shopping Spree on Aug. 11 to give children of underprivileged families school supplies. The group was founded by Mount Olive native Trave Williams, owner of the largest wood supplier in central Florida, and includes Marylon Harvey, Sylvester Williams, Mary Jean Williams, and Rosa Feen-Harvey – all of Wakulla County. The shopping spree will be held at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. Students will shop at the Crawfordville Wal-Mart and will be traveling tby Wakulla County school buses, as approved by the school board. Each child will be given $50 to spend for their needs. Williams is sponsoring 40 children at $50 per child and is asking citizens and businesses to match his number by sponsoring one or more child via $50. To sponsor a child please contact: Marylon Harvy at (850) 962-7893 or Sylvester Williams: (850) 926-7195 Or send a deposit to Big Hearted Angels Account at Ameris Bank in Crawfordville. Any amount is accepted.  Wakulla Cattlemen’s meeting set for July 19 Sam Ard, Director of Governmental Relations for the Florida Cattlemen’s Association, will be speaking at Wakulla Cattlemen’s Association quarterly meeting on July 19 at 8 p.m. The meeting will be held at the UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 84 Cedar Avenue and is open to the public. “Florida’s cattle industry is one of the 15 largest in the United States,” said Richard Gowdy, president of the Wakulla Cattlemen’s Association. “We want to invite everyone to join us and learn about Florida’s cattlemen dedicated efforts to preserve Florida’s green ranch lands,” he said. The Wakulla Cattlemen’s Association is open to anyone with an interest in Florida agriculture, especially livestock issues. “Come join us and learn more about activities here in Wakulla County,” he said. More than 100 temporary retail stockers needed Workforce Plus and Manpower are seeking applications for more than 100 retail stocker positions available locally. On Tuesday, July 17, and Thursday, July 19, from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Workforce Plus will be hosting a recruitment to ll these positions which are scheduled to start on Aug. 1. The recruitments will be held at the Workforce Plus office located at 2525 South Monroe Street in Tallahassee. The retail stocker positions are fulltime shift work, Monday through Sunday, on a 24-hour schedule. The job assignment should last between four to six weeks with the possibility for a longer term opportunity as a result of star performance. Applicants must be willing to work weekends. Pay is guaranteed at $8 per hour. Applicants should also be able to push, pull or lift 50 pounds repeatedly throughout their shift. A drug screen and background check will be conducted at the time of interview. Job seekers who are interested in being considered for the above position and participate in the recruitment should contact Workforce Plus at (850) 414-6085 or toll free at (866) WFP–JOB1. Preregistration is required. The meeting will be held at the UF/ IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 84 Cedar Avenue and is open to the public. – Staff reportsBriefs Cookies and Candidates for Democratic hopefulsThe public is invited to attend “Cookies and Candidates” a political forum for Democratic candidates running for the House District 7 seat in the Florida legislature. The forum, sponsored by the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee, will take place at the Wakulla County Public Library on Thursday, July 12. The event will feature statements by each candidate, followed by a series of questions that each candidate will have an opportunity to answer. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting at 7 p.m., and candidate forum beginning at 7:30 p.m. Cookies and refreshments will be served. The three Democratic candidates are Robert Hill, Liberty County Clerk of Court and County Administrator; AJ Smith, Captain with the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce and Executive Director of the Florida Deputy Sheriffs Association; and Thomas Dickens, attorney, adjunct professor at TCC, and Iraq war veteran. Democratic voters will choose among these three candidates in the August 14th primary election. Due to redistricting Wakulla County has now been uni ed into House District 7.  Campaign party for Howard Kessler scheduledHoward Kessler, candidate for county commission, will hold a campaign party on Saturday, July 14, at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County extension of ce. The event will feature music by Frank Lindamood and Chelsea Kessler, and food, refreshments and campaign signs for the yard and T-shirts. For more information, email Howard@HowardKessler.com or call (850) 228-9641. Sheriff candidate political forum on July 17Political forum sponsored by the Wakulla County Christian Coalition and Concerned Citizens of Wakulla County will be held for the sheriff candidates at 7 p.m. on Saturday, July 17. Maurice Langston and Charlie Creel are invited. Doug Jones is the moderator. It will be held at New Bridge Hope Cafeteria,1282 Spring Creek Highway, across from Mack’s Meats. – Staff reportsPolitical Briefs Jensen wins news awards for reportingStaff ReportJennifer Jensen, reporter for The Wakulla News, recently won two awards for her writing: she won second place from the Florida Press Association in the category of Government Reporting, and third place from LCNI Newspapers for Excellence in Feature Writing. Winners of the Florida Press Association awards were recognized at the Florida Press Convention on Saturday, July 7, in Destin. There were more than 1,500 entries in the FPA Better Weekly Newspaper Contest this year in 45 categories. In the other contest, Jensen won for feature writing against other LCNI newspapers. Special to The NewsTallahassee Community Colleges Wakulla Environmental Institute continues to move forward. In April, Governor Rick Scotts budget included a $4.5 million investment in the construction of the Institute „ and now TCC has appointed Bob Ballard as the Institutes new executive director. Before joining TCC, Ballard served for 12 years as deputy secretary of the Florida Department of Environment Protections Land and Recreation of“ ce, and previously served as planning, budget and management coordinator and chief cabinet aide in the Florida Department of Education. Under his leadership, Floridas parks were the two-time National Gold Medal winner for best state park system in the nation, Floridas greenways and trails were awarded for best trail management in 2010 and Florida state parks achieved the donation of 1.2 million volunteer hours„ the most volunteer hours of any state park system in the nation. Additionally, Ballard was very involved in the St. Marks Trail resurfacing project, the “ rst rail-trail in the State trail system to be paved. Bobs experience in the realms of both education and environmental issues make him uniquely qualified to lead the Wakulla Environmental Institute, where those two priorities will intersect,Ž said Dr. Jim Murdaugh, president of TCC. This is an exciting time for TCC as we begin a new chapter in Wakulla County, and I look forward to the leadership Bob will bring to this project.Ž Through the Institute, TCC will offer new environmentally focused degree and certificate programs, including programs in environmental science technology, hospitality and tourism, aquaculture management and agribusiness. The Institute will highlight Wakullas natural heritage and biodiversity to offer unique science and technology education opportunities and serve as an economic driver for the region„ful“ lling a mission similar to TCCs Florida Public Safety Institute in Gadsden County. Jennifer Jensen Workshop on assessment for Wakulla Gardens set July 12By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA workshop held by the Wakulla County Commission on the proposed assessment for road improvements for Wakulla Gardens will be held on July 12 at 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Community Center. Details about the plan will be announced and there will be time for public comment. The commission voted to send a ballot to Wakulla Gardens residents to determine if they would be willing to pay an assessment to have their roads paved. The cost to pave all 21 miles of road in Wakulla Gardens and minimal stormwater drainage improvements is $5.2 million. The cost to each individual homeowner would be between $180 and $235 a year for 15 or 20 years. There are about 3,000 units in Wakulla Gardens. If a majority of residents agree to assess themselves, the commission would then vote whether to move forward. If the commission does vote to move forward, County Administrator David Edwards has said previously that paving could start next spring. There are numerous infrastructure problems located within Wakulla Gardens, including unpaved and poor roadways, stormwater drainage problems and lack of access to sewer and water. The cost to fund these improvements is astronomical and the commission has been trying to “ nd ways to pay for these improvements. Continued from Page 1A Preserving the countys natural environment is also a top priority. Our unique environment is what draws people and businesses to our county and entices them to stay,Ž Brock said. She is concerned that the current members of the commission are trying to dismantle the wetlands ordinance. I would focus on trying to preserve it as it stands,Ž Brock said. Brock feels she bring several assets to the commission, including her math skills. I can do the math,Ž she said. She has also worked with two different boards budgets, one which was signi“ cantly smaller than Wakulla County and another that was 10 times the size. She added that she wouldnt be serving as a commissioner for the salary. She has pledged to return half of her pay to the county departments of her choice. Some of these departments are the library, parks and recreation, volunteer “ re departments and community center. She also said she is a people person. I love to see people treated as they deserve to be treated, with respect and consideration,Ž Brock said. In her role as a member of the board of directors for the National Wildlife Federation, she has spoken about springs protection to the governor and cabinet, has lobbied in Congress, including her involvement with the Restore Act, which was recently passed. Brock said the NWF has worked on the issue since the idea came forth. In May Brock said she met with senior staff of the White House to discuss the Restore Act. The act will make sure that 80 percent of the “ nes imposed from the Oil Spill will be given to the “ ve Gulf states. Brock said she was also a working mother and understands that role. Her son was a special needs child and passed away at the age of 29. I understand the 24/7 caregiver issue,Ž Brock said. I have a passion for helping others to resolve their challenges, and feel their pain.Ž Brock is from Jackson County. She moved to Wakulla County 36 years ago. She has a degree in pure math and second major in education from Florida Atlantic University. She is a member of the Wakulla League of Women Voters and past president, member of the Friends of the Wakulla Springs, Friends of the Wakulla County Public Library, chair of the WIldlife Alert Committee and on the board of directors for the NWF and Florida Wildlife Federation. She can be reached at 421-6640 or by email at jbrock 43@embarqmail. com.Bob Ballard will head TCC’s Wakulla Environmental InstituteJenny Brock is running for commission City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be changing the date of the regular July, 2012 meeting from the second Monday to the third Monday in July The meeting will be held, July 16, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. at 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL.JULY 5, 12, 2012NOTICE OF MEETING CHANGE Budget and Set Millage Rate FY 2012-2013JULY 12, 2012Date: July 17, 2012 at 5:15 pm Location: 788 Port Leon Drive St. Marks, FL 32355The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM, M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of“ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Debby’s aftermath: situation update on Monday, July 9 • Update on Tropical Storm Debby on July 5 • Federal funding available for Wakulla residents affected by Debby • Replacement of food assistance available for those affected by storm • FEMA Disaster Recovery Center now open in Wakulla • Volunteers needed and available to storm cleanup thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Editor, The News: The issue of improving the airport has caused a lot of my neighbors to become less than the friendly neighbors we are accustomed to. I cannot see why there should be so much stress about this subject. At one time I “ shed about three times a week and boat ramps were very important to me, now I rarely “ sh and boat ramps are not very important. If the state said all of Wakullas boat ramps were unsafe and might be closed, the main impact on me would be my property value declining or my taxes increasing to repair the ramps. If the state said all of the ramps were unsafe but we have state funds to bring them up to code that would sound good. If the funds all came from boating taxes I would be all for it. Now if you substitute boat ramp for airport you have the same thing. There are a lot of people who dont use the airport or boat ramps and this would not directly affect them. There are also a lot of people who would have declining property values if the boat ramps and airport were deemed unsafe to use. If you live in Crawfordville this may not matter to you; if you live in Tarpine it probably is important to you. I dont live in either place but I do know that the airport and boat ramps make my property more valuable. If the State has aviation fuel tax funds and is willing to improve the airport I can see no reason to not improve it. Bill Russell Ochlockonee Bay Editor, The News: I would like to thank all my gate workers who worked July Fourth for me. Also, thank you to the sheriffs of“ ce and Mr. Tom Kilbourne and all the deputies who helped at the gate and in the park. Thanks to state troopers and emergency personnel. A special thanks goes to Junior Cantrell for his work, Joy Sharp for all her work and to the Jeff Tilley family for their golf cart. For Angela Tilley for her help also. Without all you guys helping me, we would not have been able to get this work done. May God bless all of you for your hard work. Juanita Cantrell Gate ChairmanSopchoppy Fourth of JulyEditor, The News: Friends of Gypsy Cat Rescue wish to thank all those who helped us after Tropical Storm Debby knocked down trees at our sanctuary. Talquin Electric Cooperative responded promptly, and so did Cole Oliver from Anytime Electric. Clay Bozeman from Barefoot Roo“ ng Company also assisted us in getting back to normal here very quickly. Wakulla County is lucky to have such caring people who put others ahead of themselves. Janet Thompson Editor, The News: Left off of The Wakulla News roads closed list were South Lawhon Mill Road and South West Floyd Gray Road. Both closures were on the dirt sections of these roads. In the past, I offered to take a couple of county commissioners and show them these roads are not paved. I had no takers. I seriously doubt these commissioners know where these two roads are located, unless they happen to notice the road signs when driving on Highway 319. I happen to think the county is in need of professional leadership and more integrity. Decisions should not be made due to friendships, “ nancial gain or what area of the county one lives. These are my opinions only. But if the shoe “ ts, you must wear it. Daisy E. Simpkins CrawfordvilleREADERS WRITE:Why not improve the airport? Airport is asset to the county Sopchoppy Fourth of July thanks Disaster shows nations vulnerabilities Healthcare law will be expensive Help after storm was appreciated Some dirt roads left o closure listA history of Wakulla Gardens and ‘historic subdivisions’ Editor, The News: Contrary to what you have read recently, the airport is an asset to Wakulla County. The land was given to Wakulla County by Fenton Jones, who had a vision of what an airport could mean to this county. Over the years, Wakulla County has halfheartedly supported the airport and allowed volunteers in Tarpine to maintain the airport. The grass was cut, lights were installed by a Tarpine property owner, trees were trimmed, irrigation was installed and other things were completed by volunteers who asked for nothing in return. Wakulla County has the opportunity to make the necessary improvements to the airport using grant monies generated from aviation taxes (both commercial and general aviation). These grant monies are no-match funds and the county will be paid to administer the grants. That means the improvements will be made at no cost to the citizens of Wakulla County. By the way, these improvements are needed because the Florida Department of Transportation rules have changed over the years and safety comes first. This is not an expansion so that jets can ” y in and out of the airport. The length of the runway will stay about the same and it will be realigned to meet the new requirements. Wakulla County Airport (2J0) currently serves the public in emergency response functions, use by law enforcement, forest service, military operations, disaster relief, search and rescue, ” ight instruction and tourism. There are numerous ” ights made by people who own property in Wakulla and Franklin counties for business and pleasure. Other people simply ” y in and stay at local motels, frequent the local restaurants and stores, go “ shing on a charter boat, buy local seafood and spend money while they are in the county. Just imagine your loved one or friends lost at sea while on a “ shing trip. You would see pilots jump into their airplanes and work with law enforcement to “ nd those lost. This was a reality and could be again. Fast forward to today. The Board of Commissioners are holding an airport workshop on July 17 from 2 to 4 p.m. to hear both sides of this argument. One side sees the vision of Fenton Jones and what the Wakulla County Airport could mean to the whole community and the other side wants to close the airport or relocate it even though each person knew their property was located in close proximity to the airport. Please join the Friends of Wakulla County Airport and show your support! Robert Odell Ochlockonee Bay Why are some subdivisions designated Historic SubdivisionsŽ? Wakulla Gardens, with more than 3,500 platted lots enjoys that designation. It is easy to conjecture on the legal use of such a term. They are historic by virtue of how these subdivisions were created in the 1950s and 1960s in Wakulla County. It also is the history of how year after year for the last decade at least, this history has become a big headache for our Board of Commissioners. Back then, in the 1950s and 1960s, the county accepted subdivided areas without requiring developers to provide infrastructure. In a sense then, every time the term Historic SubdivisionsŽ is used, it must bring to mind that planning regulations have changed how land is being developed during the past 50 years. Every elected official and employee in Wakulla County must be so tired of hearing the term Historic Subdivisions.Ž Why? One reason: There cannot be any successful resolution to the problems of historic proportions these subdivisions, and especially Wakulla Gardens, have wrought. Without “ rst achieving some measure of accountability for the historic behavior for those at the top, there cannot be any equitable resolution to the historic problems. When will elected of“ cials take charge of the sins of the past? What would that look like? It would mean that a majority of the board seemingly understands that if change is to happen, it must come about through a fundamental reconceptualization of our Historic Subdivisions. The Board asked for a comprehensive study and was given one in May 2008. Many, many public meetings followed. Builders provided donuts and coffee. Citizens were given examples of how infrastructure that addresses the historic problems could be achieved immediately. Thousands of dollars were spent on studies, surveys and acquisition of lots in Wakulla Gardens. A Speci“ c Flood BasinŽ ordinance passed in 2006 that requires the Planning Director to determine the elevation of housing units in Wakulla Gardens. Because most lots within Wakulla Gardens are located within the areas of the 500year ” ood zone, and some within areas of the 100-year ” ood, this historic knowledge must be taken into account. A couple of roads within Wakulla Gardens have not been opened. Trees grow, animals roam and lot owners have no access at all. That pales in comparison to the lies that real estate agents told new home owners about their concerns about the dirt roads. Realtors had no right, and no basis to tell buyers that the roads would be paved soon and that is part of the history as well. That is part of the problem of these historic subdivisions. Nobody wants to tell the bare facts as they are. Topographic maps the county commissioned are ignored. A few areas in Wakulla Gardens ” ood. Always have, always will. Wakulla Gardens, however, is a very, very large area. In other times this area might actually be considered a Community Redevelopment Area. Why not? Such a designation might stop the creation and continuation of blighted conditions that are in the making in Wakulla Gardens. Increasing the property taxes by 221 percent for all lot owners in Wakulla Gardens to pave the 21-plus miles of roads in that historic subdivision wont stop the ” ooding. (That is as far as I drive from my home to Tallahassee.) In 2008, the Board of Commissioners received a thorough study that estimated the cost of paving Wakulla Gardens at $5 million. That study also included suggested funding mechanisms. For decades some Wakul-la Gardens residents pleaded with the Board to stop issuing building permits until this historic problem could be addressed with a comprehensive revision of antiquated plats. What we are all left with is irate home owners, abandoned houses, expensive band-aids applied to stabilize roads and above all: Sleepless nights for elected of“ cials who now want the public to take over what history has made their problem.Madeleine H. Carr is a historian who lives in Wakulla Gardens. Editor, The News: Although Mr. Snowdens cartoon (Opinion Page, July 5, on the Supreme Courts healthcare ruling) was somewhat amusing, the real fact is we, the American people, were sold an expensive piece of legislation, The American people were told the cost would be $900 billion, but the Congressional Budget Of“ ce now estimates the true cost will be around $1.86 trillion. I dare anyone to show me one government program that has performed as promised … Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, Department of Education, Energy? Oh, the list goes on and on. The larger government gets, the more freedom you lose! Lets make wise choices in the upcoming November election! Jimmie Smith Spring CreekOn the Wakulla airport issue:Editor, The News: Sometimes it takes something to happen to get a person in the proper perspective of our problems. On Saturday, June 30, my wife ” ew to West Virginia to visit family. On her arrival she found that a tornado had gone through West Virginia and about “ ve other states. She found that the county where she was raised had no power, no landline phone service and no cell phone service from the “ rst or second largest cell phone companies in the country. Most of our family and friends have their own wells but unfortunately wells require electricity which made water an unobtainable commodity. To add insult to injury, the lack of electricity also made obtaining gas and diesel fuel at gas stations an impossibility. Citizens had to go at least 50 miles to get gas, ice and food supplies. At one gas station, the line was over two miles long. Another issue that was obvious was the lack of FEMA assistance. I am a person who does not cherish our bloated U.S. Government but I do expect some form of help from our government when issues like this hit any part of the country. My wife said it looked like it would be days until FEMA showed up. If it were not for this issue I would have never thought about how vulnerable this country is. I wonder if terrorists would not look at how we handled this disaster and say to themselves how a coordinated attack on our power grids across the country and especially on the east coast could bring this country to its knees. Our gas stations not having the ability to provide fuel create problems in the event that evacuation is needed or if prolonged fuel consumption is needed. FEMA needs to be more proactive and there to assist our citizens in a more expeditious manner. It is very seldom that whole counties are out of power, but this situation proved it can happen and we … as citizens, vendors and government … need to be ready to handle the issue if and when it arises. Garland W. Burdette Crawfordville

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Tracy Candice Chuley, 52, passed away unexpectedly on July 1, at her home. She was born Dec. 19, 1959, the only daughter of George and Alyce Chuley. She was a business graduate of the State University of New York at Canton in Canton, N.Y., and also attended Florida State University. She was a real estate title and closing agent in Crawfordville and was most recently with Akerman Senter“ tt of Tallahassee as a legal administrative assistant. She lived life to the fullest and had a special gift of love and kindness with everyone whose lives she touched. A memorial service will be scheduled at a later date in her home town of Seneca Falls, N.Y. It would be Tracys dearest wish that any memorials be donated to her beloved canine companion, Gussie Gus.Ž Your contribution can be sent to Debi Wilburn, 6980 Cam“ eld St., Jacksonville FL 32222. Survivors include her brothers, Mark Chuley, Lanson Chuley and Kalan Chuley, all of Seneca Falls, N.Y.; Lynn Chuley of Pompano Beach; Daryl Chuley of Blacksburg, S.C., and Aaron Chuley of Knoxville, Tenn.; and several nieces and nephews and very special friends, John and Sharon Ryan. She was predeceased by her parents, George and Alyce Chuley; and a brother, Stephen Edward Chuley. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 – Page 5AChurchreligious views and events Obituaries Church BriefsTracy Candice Chuley Angeline Gainey ‘Plump’ Donaldson Betty Jean Freeman Dorothy Emily Gercak Eleanor Louise Reddick B. Graddick Ralph Edward Griffin Tracy Candice Chuley Betty Jean Freeman OUT TO PASTORWhat happened to spankings?Mount Beasor Primitive Baptist Church, 29 Winthrop Avenue, Sopchoppy, has announced that a special five-day revival meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, July 18, through Sunday, July 22, in celebration of the churchs 159th consecutive year of Gospel ministry. Evangelist Lindon Frost, a dynamic speaker and teacher of Jasper, Ala., will minister nightly. Starting times are 7 p.m. nightly through July 21 and 11 a.m. on Sunday, July 22. There will be special singing every night and a fellowship luncheon following the Sunday morning worship service. Elder Bruce Taylor, Pastor and the congregation at Mount Beasor extend a cordial invitation to all for this special time of spiritual enrichment and fellowship. For more information, transportation or directions, call 926-1513 or 962-3711.Revival set at Mount Beasor Pilgrim Rest to host revival Pilgrim Rest Primitive Baptist Church will host a pre-anniversary musical program in honor of Elder Otis H. Walker as he celebrates eight years as pastor. The event will take place Saturday, July 14, at 6:30 p.m. Reverend Chris A. Burney, pastor of Greater Saint Mark P.B. Church of Tallahassee, will be the emcee. All local choirs, groups, and soloists are invited to attend. For additional information, please contact Sister Juliet Hunter. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDERSometimes watching the news on television gets rather disparaging. Now that we have 24/7 news, not only can we see the news any time we want to, but we can see it over and over and over again. It is particularly disheartening when there is a slowŽ news day. I think all of us can remember O.J. Simpsons mad race down a Los Angeles highway. I can remember the good old days when Uncle Walter brought us up to speed on the days news inside of a 30-minute program. Oh, for those good old days. Never has an American generation been exposed to so much and knows so little for so short a time. This all came to me recently when the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were watching the news after our evening repast. I think it was the 9,999 times this particular news story had been played. Of course, we do not watch television that often and so we may only have seen a very short portion. The short portion that we saw was just about enough and my wife said so. It was the news story, if you remember, of the bus lady who was bullied by children. I think those children,Ž my wife said and then paused while she grit her teeth violently, need a good old-fashioned spanking.Ž And with that, she crossed her arms and set her face in a de“ ant manner. Luckily, I was not one of those children or I would have received the intentions of her mind at that point. Her comment got me to thinking. There was a time, back in the day,Ž when spankings were rather normal. Someone once said that if you saw a young boy on the street you should stop what youre doing and give him a good spanking because he was either coming from trouble or headed for trouble. Raising children then was a community affair. I am not sure that ever took place, but it does have an authentic ring to it. I semi-fondly remember when I was a youngster I had the heebie-jeebies whaled out of me by my father on a regular basis. And I can testify that I have not missed those heebiejeebies. My life is better for not having them. Watching the video about the kids bullying that bus lady, I could not help but think that they were a rather spoiled bunch of little brats. Pardon my French. I think I would have taken it one step further than my wife. Not only do those youngsters need a good old-fashioned spanking but I think their parents do as well. Kids today are only a mirror of what they see and hear at home. When I was young, the only spoiled brats around were the children of the rich folk. They could afford to be spoiled brats because their parents with their money bought their way into society. The only thing those kids ever earned was a bad reputation and distain from the rest of us. The rest of us, having gone through the spanking rituals, could not afford to be spoiled brats. Good parents made sure of that. I think of what my father use to say. Son, Im going to take this Board of Education and apply it to the seat of your learning.Ž I can testify that he was very enthusiastic about his job. Continued on Page 11A By ETHEL SKIPPER On Saturday, July 21, at noon, Bishop Joseph E. Rosier and Family will render a fellowship service program at Skipper Temple Church, 159 Surf Road in Sopchoppy. Following the church service will be a birthday celebration for Bishop Rosier, who will be 70 years old. He wants all his classmates and family and friends to come celebrate with him and his family. The “ fth Sunday Union meeting of the Church of Christ Written In Heaven will be held at Shiloh Church in Quincy. Elder Mary Holloman is host pastor. Date July 27 through July 29. Elder Andrew Morris is the union director. Happy birthday to Elizabeth Clary on July 18, Pastor Ruth Easter on July 22, and Bishop Joseph Rosier on July 20. Our prayers and concern go out to all the sick and shut-in, those in nursing homes, the prisons, and all those in need.Buckhorn News Betty Jean Freeman, 73, died on Friday, July 6, in Crawfordville. She was born in Indianapolis, Ind., and had been in this area 30 years. She was a member of Oyster Bay Baptist Church and a construction worker. She was a loving mother and devoted grandmother. She is survived by three sons, Lonnie Freeman (Rhonda), Eugene Freeman (Danette) and Steven Freeman (Paula); one daughter, Malinda Barrett; 17 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements. Obituaries continue on Page 11A Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments WEDNESDAY: and Adults 10:30am 11:00am Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 New Testament Bible ChurchBible-believing Church meets at Wakulla County Public Library, large conference room. Songs, prayer and Bible teaching/preaching. The Lord Jesus described the basic meaning of a church in a very simple and yet profound way:For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.ŽCome take part in our study of Gods Word.4330 Crawfordville Hwy.

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings CommunityJohnson and Tobell to wedAshlynn Faye Tobell of Crawfordville and Robert Anthony Johnson of Tallahassee announce their upcoming wedding. She is the daughter of Bill and Vicky Tobell of Crawfordville and he is the son of Bill and Shannon Johnson of Tallahassee. The bride-elect graduated from Wakulla High School in 2008 and Aveda Institute in Tallahassee in January. The groom-elect graduated from Florida High School virtual online in 2004 and Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy in 2007 from the Department of Juvenile Justice. He served in the military from 2004 to 2010. The wedding will be held on July 14 at 3 p.m. at Freedom First Assembly of God Church. Ashley Tobell and Robert Johnson FLAG ” oat wins most original at July Fourth Special to The News Sam Ard, director of governmental relations for the Florida Cattlemens Association, will be speaking at Wakulla Cattlemens Association quarterly meeting on July 19 at 8 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, and is open to the public. Floridas cattle industry is one of the 15 largest in the United States,Ž said Richard Gowdy, president of the Wakulla Cattlemens Association. We want to invite everyone to join us and learn about Floridas cattlemen dedicated efforts to preserve Floridas green ranch lands,Ž he said. As a large industry within the state, cattle ranchers signi“ cantly support Floridas interstate economy and provide jobs as well as beef. The cattle industry supports a vast network of businesses that employ thousands of Floridians. Floridas cattlemen have been strong supporters of Floridas youth and culture,Ž said Gowdy. From displays at the North Florida Fair to college scholarship contests, Floridas cattlemen are working diligently to give back to the communities where they live and serve,Ž he said. The Wakulla Cattlemens Association is open to anyone with an interest in Florida agriculture, especially livestock issues. Come join us and learn more about activities here in Wakulla County,Ž he said. Farrah Harris recently joined the Florida Department of Law Enforcement Toastmaster Club to improve her public speaking and leadership skills. She works for FDLE as a senior criminal justice information technician in the Criminal History Services section. She has received three promotions in six months. She has an associates degree from Tallahassee Community College, an associates degree in paralegal studies from Keiser University and was recently accepted to Florida State University where she plans to major in criminalogy and criminal justice. She has also been on the Presidents List. She is the daughter of Suzanne and Dane Moses of Crawfordville and Charles Harris of Missouri. She is the granddaughter of Bettye Trites of Crawfordville. Crystal and Daniel Morris Jr. announce the birth of their son, Peyton Robert Morris, on May 31 at 6:42 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 7 pounds, 10 ounces and was 20 inches. His maternal grandparents are Robert and Carol Broome of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are Dan and Sharon Morris of Monticello. His great-grandparents are Bill and Dee Counts. Amanda Davis of Crawfordville received a Master of Theological Studies from the Candler School of Theology of Emory University in Atlanta, at its 167th commencement ceremony on May 14. Air Force Airman Rebecca L. Smith graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. She completed an intensive, eight-week program and earned four credits toward an associate in applied science degree. Smith is the daughter of Kay Bozeman of Crawfordville, and Michael Smith of Keystone Heights. She is a 2009 graduate of Wakulla High School. The winner of the most original ” oat at the Sopchoppy Fourth of July Parade was We the People.Ž The ” oat was entered by the Freedom and Liberty Advocacy Group (FLAG) of Wakulla and was designed by Bo Mixer of Crawfordville. It featured George Washington, played by Bob Allen, Ben Franklin, played by Dave Seeley, and Betsy Ross, played by Jeannie Beck, holding a discussion about the power of the We hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equalŽ clause from the Declaration of Independence. For more information about FLAG, email ” ag1776news@gmail.com or visit them on facebook. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Cattlemen meeting will be July 19 Harris continues to succeed Farrah Harris Birth announcement Peyton R. MorrisDavis graduates from Emory University Smith completes basic training 000BR6K850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 – Page 7Asports news and team views SportsThe summer conditioning program for RMS football will begin on Monday, July 9 and run through Thursday, July 26. Anyone interested in participating needs a signed consent and release form and a current physical on the FHSAA form. These forms can be obtained online at http://www.fhsaa.org/forms/general. Players should come dressed out in PE type clothes and cleats. The program will run on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the RMS practice “ eld at Riversprings Middle School. By CAREY LAWHONSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla 9u All-Stars traveled to Lake City to play in the District 6 tournament on June 22. Wakulla started the tournament playing Lake City as the visiting team and came out in the first inning with Justin Bryan and Fisher Lawhon both hitting singles and each scoring a run off of a couple of “ elders choices by Logan Bruner and Lyric Oaks Bryan would begin the game pitching and doing a great job only facing three batters, striking out one batter and having two great defensive plays by Fisher Lawhon and Trent Langley Wakulla would then start the second inning scoring three more runs with hits from Bryan and Trent Langley. Bryan would also pitch the second inning only facing four batters this time with a couple of great outfield plays by Trevor McCulley and Brayden Lawhon Fisher Lawhon would come in to pitch in the fourth inning and finish the game with three strike outs, allowing only two hits. Wakulla won the game in the “ fth inning 18-5. Wakulla played Lake City again on June 23 at 11:30 a.m. as the home team this time. Justin Bryan started the second game again allowing six runs, with Lake City hitting the ball really well. Wakulla then came out swinging the bats as well scoring eight runs off of some great hits by Fisher Lawhon (double), Lyric Oaks, Trevor McCulley and Brayden Lawhon (IPHR). Starting the second inning, Lake City was still swinging the bats getting a couple of hits scoring four more runs. Wakulla came out batting the second inning a little slow only scoring one run off of a triple by Trent Langley. Fisher Lawhon came in to pitch the third inning allowing only one run. Wakulla started the bottom of the third inning with a score of 10-11 but scored three more runs off of a single by Brayden Lawhon and a couple of walks allowed by Lake City. Lawhon was on the mound for the fourth inning and allowed only one run in the inning as well with a great catch by Ethan Atkins and a great play from the mound by Fisher Lawhon. Wakulla hit the ball well in the fourth to score six more runs off of hits by Brayden Lawhon and Lyric Oaks. Lake City came out in the “ fth swinging the bats with three singles and one double scoring seven runs. Down 18-19, Wakulla battled back with two runs from a leadoff single by Fisher Lawhon and a walk by Trent Langley. In the “ nal inning of the game, Logan Bruner came in to pitch, giving up “ ve runs with a couple great hits and a couple of defensive errors. In the bottom of the sixth, Wakulla was down 24-21, but started the inning off with a walk by Kolten Langston followed up with a couple hits by Justin Bryan and Logan Bruner. Fisher Lawhon walked putting the tying run on base. Lyric Oaks would come up to bat with two outs and the bases loaded and hit a single scoring Bryan and Bruner, and slid into second with the shortstop dropping the ball on the tag, Lawhon ran for home, the shortstop threw the ball home but Lawhon was safe, tying up the game. Oaks took off for third and, on a bad throw from the catcher, made it home to score the winning run. Wakulla won the game and the District 6 tournament 25-24.BASEBALLWakulla 9u All-Stars are district champs WAKULLA 9U ALL STARS: Front row: Logan Bruner, Tucker Grimsley, Brayden Lawhon, Justin Bryan, Lake Lawhon, Jimmy Hazen; middle: Ethan Atkins, Trevor McCulley, Fisher Lawhon, Trent Langley, Kolten Langston, Lyric Oaks; top: Assistant Coach Anthony Atkins; Manager Carey Lawhon; Assistant Coach Russel Bryan.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS FOOTBALLWakulla linemen shine at Down and Dirty CampBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netTwenty Wakulla War Eagle linemen went to the Down and Dirty Camp at Stetson University in Deland and showed off impressive skills, according to Line Coach James Vernon. Wakullas Chris Grif“ n won the entire competition in individual pass rush and pass defense. In the 3-on-3 team drill, Escape from Bagdad, Wakullas team of Bryce Beverly, Hunter Hurst and Edmund Conception won. Austin Bealeue won the underclassman board drill. In the upperclassmen division, it was an allWakulla final with Kyle Weaver winning after going head-to-head with teammate John Cole who placed second. Jonathan Chunn was recognized for bringing the highest grade point average among players to the camp, with his 6.0 GPA. He is expected to be this years valedictorian. Wakulla star lineman Chris Grif“ n has committed to play for Georgia Tech next year, coaches at Wakulla confirmed last week. Griffin had received seven Division 1 offers, and was on a trip to visit several schools including South Carolina, Kentucky and Vanderbilt but said he felt at home at Georgia Tech.Summer conditioning for RMS football underway Lineman Chris Gri n commits to Georgia TechGrif“ n We want to hear from you TCC WAKULLA CENTER PUBLIC FORUMSTallahassee Community College is interested to find out what you would like to have available at the new TCC Wakulla Center located at Centennial Bank. As we partner on future offerings and expansions, we need to know what services and programs are important to Wakulla County. Please join us to discuss the new TCC Wakulla Center and learn more about TCCs: Plus, this will be the time to find out more about the new TCC Wakulla Centers goals and: Join us for a public forum at the TCC WAKULLA CENTER 5 CRESCENT WAY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL Wednesday, July 18, 6-7:30 p.m. or Saturday, July 21, 10-11:30 a.m. If you are unable to attend but would like to share feedback, please e-mail holubb@tcc.fl.edu Open: Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 • Sun. 11-9 850 697-9191 THIS WEEKEND WILL BE EntertainingON THE DECKFEATURINGMarshall TaylorRAY WILEY

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsTime was, when guys got together and talked hunting and the virtues of black powder guns, I headed for the forest myself. To do something equally exciting, like watching trees grow. But on Friday, Joe took me to the range to let me shoot a .44-caliber Kentucky Pistol. This thing is ultra cool! The pistol is more than a foot long. The smooth thick walnut stock goes all the way to the end of the heavy octagon barrel. Its a handful of beauty. In preparing to shoot, you place your index “ nger over the tube end of a powder ” ask. You ” ip the ” ask upside down and you turn a lever to release 30 grains of black Pyrodex powder. Then you turn the ” ask right side up again. Tilting the gun away from you (of course), take your “ nger off the tube top and carefully tip the powder into the barrel of the pistol. The powder is the charge.Ž Now its time for the lead bullet ball. Place a coated round patch over the end of the barrel. Center the ball on the patch. Using a ball seater, push the ball into the barrel. Then, using a ramrod, shove the bullet all the way down the barrel until it pushes against the charge you just put in. Now that the charge and the bullet are in place, you need a primer to set the gun off. First, half cock the pistol. Take a percussion or primer cap and “ t it over the nipple located on the side above the trigger. Youre good to go. Okay. The gun is thick and longer than any pistol Id ever shot. How do you hold it?Ž I ask Joe. Any way you can!Ž he replies. I grab the stock with my left hand. Grip with the right. Its a big gun. So I close my eyes. So what? Andƒ bang! Hardly any kick. And howd I hit the target, looking at the inside of my lids? Can we do it again?Ž I ask Joe. Heck, I might even hit the bulls eye if my eyes are open. Yep. Powder power is here to stay.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and enjoys spending her retirement on the shooting range.Shooting a black powder Kentucky pistolHome on The Range BY MARJ LAWLil Daniel Lamarche, above, served as First Mate for his grandfather, Major Alan Lamarche. The Lamarches amberjack was released; but the gag grouper, below, caught by Joel Norman of Albany, Ga., was a keeper.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFishing tripSpecial to The NewsThe Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene its ABC Control Rule Working Group via a webinar. The webinar meeting will convene Tuesday, July 31, beginning at 9 a.m., concluding no later than noon eastern time. The ABC Control Rule Working Group will meet to review an alternative method of assigning appropriate risk of over“ shing levels to stocks based on the status, productivity, susceptibility, and resiliency of the stock. The working group will also review its previous recommendations for revisions to the ABC control rule, as well as evaluate other possible changes. A copy of the agenda and related materials can be obtained by calling the Council of“ ce at (813) 3481630. Materials will also be available for download from the ABC Control Rule Working Group folder on the Councils FTP site, which is accessible from the Quick Links box in the left navigation column of the Council website, www.gulfcouncil. org. Although other nonemergency issues not on the agenda may come before the group for discussion, in accordance with the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, those issues may not be the subject of formal action during this meeting. Actions of the group will be restricted to those issues specifically identified in the agenda and any issues arising after publication of this notice that require emergency action under Section 305(c) of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, provided the public has been noti“ ed of the Councils intent to take action to address the emergency. These webinars are accessible to people with disabilities. Gulf of Mexico Fishery will convene ABC Control Rule Working Group To “nd out more callJon & Karol Sheppard251-0311Dan & Mildred Sheppard544-9625 Put yourself in this picture LIMU Tas ng Party, 21 Calvary Court 5 P.M. Saturday 7/14/12 with a 50/50 Raf”e starting at 5PM Next Stop Bar GEORGES FREE BEER FRIDAY(while it lasts)2837 Coastal Hwy.926-4956 P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 www.hicksair.com 8921 Woodville Hwy. MON-WED 8AM-5PM THURS & SAT 8AM-6PM 10% OFF Good Samaritan THRIFT STORE 850-210-0089 LETS DO THIS TOGETHER! DO YOU WANT IT?Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN GET YOU MOTIVATED!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 – Page 9AThe celebration of the Fourth of July is a great time to reflect on what we all have rather than what we do not. Thanks to the men and women of our armed forces, we are able to enjoy many freedoms that others do not have. Please take a moment to thank servicemen and -women when you see them. We not only have our armed forces to thank, but many other servicemen and -women in our local areas. There are several thing we can do to help make their job a little easier, and one of them is to be sure we are safe when out on the water and know the rules and regulations. Many of us have seen FWC boats monitoring the waters of the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers as well as the ” ats. With scallop season open, there are bound to be more than the average number of boats out and about. Navigation Rule 7: Risk of Collision discusses the importance of being aware to avoid a collision on the water. It states that every boater shall use all means possible, taking into account current circumstances and weather, to determine if a risk of collision exists. This includes the use of radar and other instruments for early detection of a problem, unless there is poor information received. If there is ever a doubt a collision may happen, then act as if it will occur. In trying to determine if there is a risk for collision, it is critical to monitor the other boat or object in the water (such as an oyster bar in our area) to determine if they are moving to avoid the collision. If they are not moving, or the object is stationary, then it is your obligation to move/ change course. When the barges come into the river, they are slow to move and have very limited maneuverability due to the depth of the channel. Even if it appears they may be moving out of your way, it is still prudent for you to avoid coming close to it or blocking its path. Similarly, if you see a boat being towed by the Auxiliary, a good Samaritan or commercial towing boat, stay clear. It can be very difficult to maneuver two boats quickly and safely. The basics of Rule 7 are to avoid a collision, at all costs, by being aware of what is going on around you. With many diving for scallops, be on the lookout for people in the water. Not everyone will have a diver down ” ag displayed as required. Look for next weeks column for coverage on the federal and state laws for dive ” ags. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident … being safe is more important than being right. You can be right, dead right if you dont pay attention.a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD A visit from the past Those of you who have been following Greggs column learned long ago that he has led a very busy and in fact, full life. Back in 2000 he was just building the fourth university program, the Advanced Science Diving Program at FSU in Panama City when I joined him as a researcher. The focus of my attention was the intricate details of rebreathers, a technology that Gregg has mentioned many times in this column. Rebreathers are an old technology by concept, but have only become viable for extended diving in science and recreation in the past decade or so. They facilitate an increase in exposure time by recycling the divers breath, thus allowing the use of much smaller tanks while at the same time mixing the ideal breathing gas on the ” y. If this sounds complicated, then it is only because we still dont fully understand or appreciate the true requirements and capabilities of our own physiology. You can imagine that, as a researcher, this was (and still is) a wide open “ eld and I was having the time of my life. Gregg was instrumental in allowing me to pursue this research, and in turn I spent a lot of time and effort assisting him in building his academic program. A student joined us in our efforts by the name of Terry Jolly. While matching our enthusiasm and dedication, she also added her good looks to the formula, which undoubtedly increased the male participants interest and helped secure a large student enrolment. What kept us all focused was the common goal of what we were trying to achieve. Mind you, rebreathers were very much in their infancy (even more so than they are today). We dreamed of a time when rebreathers would become so easy to use that they required very little preparation, and allowed a diving freedom far beyond what we could do with open circuit. We used the rebreathers that were available to us at the time, with all their limitations, during numerous underwater science projects, and brought home the data to prove the rebreathers viability. While it was clear that the rebreathers at the time certainly matched open-circuit technology, their advantage was still debatable. Fast forward a decade! Terry got married, and now has three cute kids. Although she has had plans to become a scientist in the marine “ eld, she accepted a job in a marketing agency, where she spends all day in front of a computer. Family life takes up all her spare time, and her gills have dried up. Out of the blue we received an email from her informing us that she will be in the area and would like to stop by for a visit. It was certainly a pleasure to see her again after such a long time. She had not forgotten about our ideas and goals, only for us to realize that Gregg and I are where we wanted to be over a decade ago! The dives we do today far exceed what we did a back then, and is even less of a hassle with regards to preparation than we could have predicted. As we have often pointed out in this column, knowledge and the advancement of technology have progressed dramatically in the last 10 years. Terrys visit helped us put it back into perspective. Some things have not changed much (she still looks great), and we still dream of where we want our program to be in 10 years time. Some things have changed a lot (the advent of space-age technology in our diving). We should continue to believe in our own rhetoric, at least once in a while. UnderwaterWakullaBy Joerg Hess From FWC NewsSixty-seven people lost their lives in Florida last year in boating accidents, and there have already been 28 deaths so far this year, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, which has released its 2011 Boating Accident Statistical Report. The FWC is responsible for reviewing, analyzing and compiling boating accident data for the state. Its statistical report details boating accidents and their causes. The frequency of boating accidents in Florida and their causes would probably shock most people,Ž said Investigator Andy Bickel, of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. We want to reduce the number of accidents, injuries and deaths on Florida waters,Ž Bickel said. Drowning is the leading cause of death in boating accidents, statistics show. Theres an easy fix. Wear a life jacket,Ž Bickel said. There are several styles of life jackets available to boaters that wont interfere with your boating experience and may save your life.Ž Todays boaters can choose from several models of light and comfortable, inflatable belt-pack and over-the-shoulder life jackets that can be worn while “ shing or enjoying the sun, and they do not interfere with boating activities. Accidents can occur without warning, and if for some reason someone ends up in the water, quite often its too late to put on a life jacket. The leading type of accident continues to be boaters colliding with other boats or objects,Ž Bickel said. With the number of boaters in our beautiful state, its important to pay close attention to everything thats going on around your boat.Ž Statistics repeatedly show that boaters who have taken a basic boating safety class are less likely to be involved in a serious boating accident. The 2011 Boating Accident Statistical Report is now available online at MyFWC.com/Boating, click on Boating Accidents.ŽFWC releases 2011 boating statistics67 people died last year in boating accidents FWC PhotoOne of the best safety precautions while boating is to wear a life jacket, as seen on this “ sher with her catch of a Spanish mackerel. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday y Thu Jul 12, 12 Fri Jul 13, 12 Sat Jul 14, 12 Sun Jul 15, 12 Mon Jul 16, 12 Tue Jul 17, 12 Wed Jul 18, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 12:33 AM 2.8 ft. 1:23 AM 3.0 ft. 2:03 AM 3.2 ft. 2:38 AM 3.3 ft. 3:10 AM High 1.8 ft. 2:09 AM 2.0 ft. 3:15 AM 2.1 ft. 4:35 AM 2.0 ft. 5:48 AM 1.9 ft. 6:46 AM 1.8 ft. 7:33 AM 1.6 ft. 8:15 AM Low 3.1 ft. 8:35 AM 3.1 ft. 9:50 AM 3.2 ft. 11:08 AM 3.4 ft. 12:08 PM 3.6 ft. 12:55 PM 3.7 ft. 1:34 PM 3.9 ft. 2:11 PM High 1.1 ft. 4:48 PM 0.8 ft. 6:02 PM 0.6 ft. 6:57 PM 0.3 ft. 7:40 PM 0.1 ft. 8:17 PM -0.0 ft. 8:49 PM -0.1 ft. 9:18 PM Low 2.4 ft. 11:19 PM High Thu Jul 12, 12 Fri Jul 13, 12 Sat Jul 14, 12 Sun Jul 15, 12 Mon Jul 16, 12 Tue Jul 17, 12 Wed Jul 18, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 12:30 AM 2.8 ft. 1:20 AM 3.0 ft. 2:00 AM 3.2 ft. 2:35 AM 3.4 ft. 3:07 AM High 1.9 ft. 2:06 AM 2.2 ft. 3:12 AM 2.3 ft. 4:32 AM 2.2 ft. 5:45 AM 2.1 ft. 6:43 AM 1.9 ft. 7:30 AM 1.7 ft. 8:12 AM Low 3.2 ft. 8:32 AM 3.2 ft. 9:47 AM 3.3 ft. 11:05 AM 3.5 ft. 12:05 PM 3.6 ft. 12:52 PM 3.8 ft. 1:31 PM 4.0 ft. 2:08 PM High 1.1 ft. 4:45 PM 0.9 ft. 5:59 PM 0.6 ft. 6:54 PM 0.3 ft. 7:37 PM 0.1 ft. 8:14 PM -0.0 ft. 8:46 PM -0.1 ft. 9:15 PM Low 2.4 ft. 11:16 PM High Thu Jul 12, 12 Fri Jul 13, 12 Sat Jul 14, 12 Sun Jul 15, 12 Mon Jul 16, 12 Tue Jul 17, 12 Wed Jul 18, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 1:09 AM 2.6 ft. 1:59 AM 2.8 ft. 2:39 AM 2.9 ft. 3:14 AM 3.1 ft. 3:46 AM High 1.6 ft. 3:13 AM 1.8 ft. 4:19 AM 1.9 ft. 5:39 AM 1.9 ft. 6:52 AM 1.8 ft. 7:50 AM 1.6 ft. 8:37 AM 1.5 ft. 9:19 AM Low 2.9 ft. 9:11 AM 2.9 ft. 10:26 AM 3.0 ft. 11:44 AM 3.2 ft. 12:44 PM 3.3 ft. 1:31 PM 3.5 ft. 2:10 PM 3.6 ft. 2:47 PM High 1.0 ft. 5:52 PM 0.7 ft. 7:06 PM 0.5 ft. 8:01 PM 0.3 ft. 8:44 PM 0.1 ft. 9:21 PM -0.0 ft. 9:53 PM -0.1 ft. 10:22 PM Low 2.2 ft. 11:55 PM High Thu Jul 12, 12 Fri Jul 13, 12 Sat Jul 14, 12 Sun Jul 15, 12 Mon Jul 16, 12 Tue Jul 17, 12 Wed Jul 18, 12 Date 1.9 ft. 12:25 AM 2.1 ft. 1:15 AM 2.2 ft. 1:55 AM 2.4 ft. 2:30 AM 2.5 ft. 3:02 AM High 1.3 ft. 2:20 AM 1.5 ft. 3:26 AM 1.5 ft. 4:46 AM 1.5 ft. 5:59 AM 1.4 ft. 6:57 AM 1.3 ft. 7:44 AM 1.2 ft. 8:26 AM Low 2.4 ft. 8:27 AM 2.4 ft. 9:42 AM 2.4 ft. 11:00 AM 2.5 ft. 12:00 PM 2.7 ft. 12:47 PM 2.8 ft. 1:26 PM 2.9 ft. 2:03 PM High 0.8 ft. 4:59 PM 0.6 ft. 6:13 PM 0.4 ft. 7:08 PM 0.2 ft. 7:51 PM 0.1 ft. 8:28 PM -0.0 ft. 9:00 PM -0.1 ft. 9:29 PM Low 1.8 ft. 11:11 PM High Thu Jul 12, 12 Fri Jul 13, 12 Sat Jul 14, 12 Sun Jul 15, 12 Mon Jul 16, 12 Tue Jul 17, 12 Wed Jul 18, 12 Date 2.0 ft. 12:17 AM 2.2 ft. 1:07 AM 2.3 ft. 1:47 AM 2.5 ft. 2:22 AM 2.6 ft. 2:54 AM High 1.8 ft. 1:48 AM 2.0 ft. 2:54 AM 2.0 ft. 4:14 AM 2.0 ft. 5:27 AM 1.9 ft. 6:25 AM 1.7 ft. 7:12 AM 1.6 ft. 7:54 AM Low 2.5 ft. 8:19 AM 2.5 ft. 9:34 AM 2.5 ft. 10:52 AM 2.6 ft. 11:52 AM 2.8 ft. 12:39 PM 2.9 ft. 1:18 PM 3.0 ft. 1:55 PM High 1.0 ft. 4:27 PM 0.8 ft. 5:41 PM 0.5 ft. 6:36 PM 0.3 ft. 7:19 PM 0.1 ft. 7:56 PM -0.0 ft. 8:28 PM -0.1 ft. 8:57 PM Low 1.9 ft. 11:03 PM High Thu Jul 12, 12 Fri Jul 13, 12 Sat Jul 14, 12 Sun Jul 15, 12 Mon Jul 16, 12 Tue Jul 17, 12 Wed Jul 18, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 8:56 AM 3.0 ft. 9:42 AM 2.4 ft. 3:03 AM 2.5 ft. 3:29 AM 2.6 ft. 3:53 AM 2.6 ft. 4:16 AM High 1.4 ft. 12:43 AM 0.1 ft. 5:22 PM -0.0 ft. 6:14 PM 1.9 ft. 4:39 AM 1.9 ft. 5:50 AM 1.9 ft. 6:44 AM 1.8 ft. 7:29 AM Low 2.9 ft. 8:16 AM 3.0 ft. 10:34 AM 3.0 ft. 11:27 AM 3.1 ft. 12:19 PM 3.1 ft. 1:08 PM High 0.3 ft. 4:24 PM -0.1 ft. 6:59 PM -0.2 ft. 7:39 PM -0.2 ft. 8:14 PM -0.2 ft. 8:44 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJuly 12 July 18First July 25 Full Aug. 1 Last Aug. 9 New July 18Major Times 3:03 AM 5:03 AM 3:30 PM 5:30 PM Minor Times 8:40 AM 9:40 AM 10:11 PM 11:11 PM Major Times 3:55 AM 5:55 AM 4:20 PM 6:20 PM Minor Times 9:43 AM 10:43 AM 10:49 PM 11:49 PM Major Times 4:44 AM 6:44 AM 5:08 PM 7:08 PM Minor Times 10:43 AM 11:43 AM 11:24 PM 12:24 AM Major Times 5:30 AM 7:30 AM 5:53 PM 7:53 PM Minor Times 11:41 AM 12:41 PM 11:57 PM 12:57 AM Major Times 6:15 AM 8:15 AM 6:37 PM 8:37 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:36 PM 1:36 PM Major Times 6:59 AM 8:59 AM 7:20 PM 9:20 PM Minor Times 12:30 AM 1:30 AM 1:31 PM 2:31 PM Major Times 7:42 AM 9:42 AM 8:05 PM 10:05 PM Minor Times 1:03 AM 2:03 AM 2:25 PM 3:25 PM Better Average Average Average Average Average Average+6:44 am 8:40 pm 1:39 am 3:19 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:45 am 8:40 pm 2:17 am 4:12 pm 6:45 am 8:40 pm 2:58 am 5:05 pm 6:46 am 8:39 pm 3:43 am 5:56 pm 6:46 am 8:39 pm 4:32 am 6:44 pm 6:47 am 8:39 pm 5:24 am 7:30 pm 6:48 am 8:38 pm 6:19 am 8:13 pm43% 37% 31% 24% 18% 12% 6% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance The Wakulla News

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn June 28, Deputy Mike Zimba was 1,000 feet south of Wal-Mart when he witnessed a two vehicle crash behind him on U.S. Highway 319. A 2007 Chevrolet Suburban driven by Randi A. Dodson, 41, of Crawfordville rear-ended a 2009 Honda Accord driven by Amy E. Brown, 34, of Crawfordville. Dodson was found at fault for rear-ending Brown at a high rate of speed. Debris was left on the roadway following the crash. Dodson was ticketed for careless driving. The Honda had three other occupants, ages 6, 8 and 9. There were no injuries. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On June 28, a theft was reported at Wal-Mart. Amanda Nicole Mitchell, 29, of Crawfordville and Terry Lynn Wells, 56, of Crawfordville were arrested for retail theft. Personal items, valued at $58, were recovered after the women failed to pay for all of the merchandise in their possession. € On June 28, Andrew Aries of Crawfordville reported recovering narcotics while in the check-out line at Wal-Mart. The marijuana weighed 1.3 grams and was turned over to Deputy Ian Dohme who turned into the Evidence Division. € On June 29, Brock L. Boyatt of Crawfordville reported a hit and run traffic crash. Johnathan Neil Piland, 18, of Crawfordville struck the victims vehicle and left the scene. Piland was ticketed for leaving the scene of a traf“ c crash. € On June 30, Deputy Cole Wells was conducting a business check on the Woodville Highway when he observed two males sitting inside a truck allegedly attempting to hide from sight. Wells discovered a plastic bag containing cocaine inside. Brandon Wayne Dukes, 26, of Crawfordville and Dillon Wade Robertson, 22, of Tallahassee were arrested for possession of cocaine and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Robertson required medical treatment for intoxication and was taken to a Tallahassee hospital for treatment. A warrant was requested for his arrest so he could receive medical treatment “ rst. The cocaine weighed 3.6 grams. € On July 1, Deputies Mike Zimba and Ryan Muse conducted a traffic stop on a suspicious vehicle. The deputies discovered a vehicle with a tag that was not assigned to it. Michelle Marie Dawson Cooksey, 25, of Crawfordville was driving without a valid driver license and three of four children in the vehicle were not properly secured in car seats. She was ticketed for driving while license suspended or revoked; tag not assigned; and no child restraints. € On July 1, Bravia Miko Paul, 35, of Tallahassee was charged with possession of cannabis under 20 grams and possession of drug paraphernalia following a traf“ c stop. Deputy Stephen Simmons stopped Paul for faulty equipmen and discovered Paul had an active warrant in Putnam County for failure to pay child support. During a search of the suspect, 2.4 grams of cannabis was discovered in a plastic bag. Drug paraphernalia was also discovered in the vehicle. € On July 1, Tonya Carter of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to her vehicle while she was at Wal-Mart. A customer keyed the victims vehicle and created $1,000 worth of damage while the victim was inside. €On July 1, Opal Adronna Kombrinck of Blountstown reported a residential burglary in Sopchoppy. The victim was contacted by her power company that their electrical meter had been stolen. The power line was cut and the meter was removed. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. € On July 1, Rhonda Miller of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim “ led her taxes in April and had not heard back from the IRS. Someone “ led taxes using the victims personal information. € On June 29, Lt. Brad Taylor was delivering supplies following Tropical Storm Debby when he discovered a marijuana plant at a Panacea home. The plant was collected and submitted into the Evidence Division for destruction. No charges were “ led. € On July 2, Christine Johnson of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from her property. A juvenile suspect was observed taking the bike and riding away with it. The bike is valued at $100. € On July 2, Sonja Moseley of Crawfordville reported the theft of an air conditioning unit and stove from a home managed by LCP Properties. The property was discovered missing after individuals were evicted from the home. The missing property is valued at $1,000. € On July 2, Scott Homan of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle tag. A tag was removed from the victims trailer while he was at a Panacea boat ramp. The tag is valued at $50. € On July 3, a 14-year-old was observed riding a stolen lawnmower down U.S. Highway 319. The mower was taken from 3Y Equipment and is valued at $500. Contact was made with the owner of the mower. The juvenile was charged with grand theft. € On July 3, Bonnie Brinson of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bank deposit from her vehicle. The bank bag contained operational funds for her Cauzican Care Rescue business. € On July 3, Frances Cook of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone cut the four tires on her vehicle while it was parked at her home. The tires are valued at $800. € On July 3, Wal-Mart assessment protection staff members allegedly observed Catherine Byrd Casey, 38, of Leesburg take swimwear and a belt and place the items in her purse. The suspect purchased other items but failed to purchase the suit and belt before leaving the store. She was arrested for retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The value of the stolen items is $32. € On July 3, Jason Coshatt of Crawfordville reported a suspicious person and residential burglary at his home. The victim reported the loss of $750 worth of tools from his property. Robert Corbelt Green, 45, of Crawfordville was arrested and charged with armed burglary, burglary, grand theft and possession of narcotics. A pocket knife allegedly waved at the victim was recovered on Green. € On July 4, Kathleen Mackie of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c incident. A large piece of metal in the middle of Highway 267 struck the bottom of her vehicle and disabled her car. The debris broke a hole in the transmission and ripped off the drivers side back bumper. € On July 4, James Timmons reported a criminal mischief to his vehicle. The vehicle suffered damage to the windows, tires, headlights, tail lights and truck bed cover. and damage was discovered on another truck as well. Sandra Lakay Jones, 44, of Crawfordville admitted burning the victims clothing and damaging the vehicle. She was arrested and charged with felony criminal mischief and arson. Damage to one truck was estimated at $5,000, damage to the second truck was estimated at $2,000 and $7,000 worth of clothing was also burned. € On July 4, Pamela Jackson of Crawfordville reported a structure “ re. Flames from a propane valve caught a mosquito machine on “ re and melted vinyl siding. The “ re was extinguished by the homeowner and the scene was turned over to the Wakulla Fire Department. € On July 4, Audrey Warnick of Crawfordville reported the loss of a wallet while at the Sopchoppy Fourth of July Fireworks. The victim lost a Passport, driver license, checkbook and credit cards. € On July 5, Cynthia Murray of Crawfordville reported the loss of her wallet at Shell Point Beach. The victim lost her wallet while watching “ reworks at the beach. She lost a phone, driver license, and credit cards. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 776 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportHomeless man arrested for robbery, agg batterySpecial to The NewsA 50-year-old homeless man was arrested Monday, July 2 after beating a 45year-old Crawfordville victim who attempted to help the man by giving him a place to stay, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. William Andrew Hadd was arrested for aggravated battery, grand theft of a vehicle and robbery with a weapon. The incident took place off Council Moore Road in Crawfordville, but sheriffs investigators apprehended their suspect near Coastal Highway 98 and Casora Drive in the Medart area after a brief vehicle chase. The victim met Hadd at a local business establishment and allowed the homeless man to sleep in his shed. After staying in the shed for two days the victim asked Hadd to leave. Hadd became angry and struck the victim in the head eight to 10 times with a pool cue ball. During the altercation Hadd demanded the keys to the victims car and drove away with the vehicle. Wakulla Sheriffs Of“ ce Communications put out a BOLO for the vehicle and Lt. Fred Nichols observed the car drive into the Medart subdivision. Hadd failed to stop for Lt. Nichols despite the lieutenant having his emergency lights and siren in operation. Eventually, Hadd crashed into a residential yard near Coastal Highway 98 where he caused damage to a childs batting cage, a fence and tree. Lt. Nichols took control of the suspect without any further incident and transported him to the Wakulla County Jail. The victim suffered a laceration and abrasions on his head, but refused medical treatment. After the arrest, additional charges of reckless driving, ” eeing and eluding and driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge were added against Hadd. Hadd remains in the Wakulla County Jail. No bond has been set for the homeless man. William A. HaddSpecial to The NewsMembers of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office Narcotics Unit went undercover June 29 to arrest an 18-year-old Tallahassee man in connection with the possession and sale of crack cocaine and marijuana, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Xavion Deandre Jackson was arrested for possession of cocaine with intent to sell; distribution of cocaine, resisting an of“ cer without violence; sale of marijuana; and possession of marijuana with intent to sell. Jackson was allegedly captured after a brief foot pursuit and deployment of a Taser. The cocaine and marijuana was recovered by the undercover unit. Two females with Jackson were interviewed and released without charges. Jackson remains in the Wakulla County Jail on a $25,500 bond.Undercover narcotics arrest Xavion D. Jackson HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 CANDIDATE FORUMSHERIFF, WAKULLA COUNTY OPEN SEATCharlie Creel Maurice Langston(Both candidates invited to appear)SPONSORED BY: WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION & CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA TUESDAY, JULY 17th, 2012 7:00 pm NEW BRIDGE HOPE CHURCH CAFETERIA 1282 SPRING CREEK HIGHWAY(ACROSS FROM MACKS MEATS)Doug Jones, moderatorMEET THE CANDIDATES HEAR THE CANDIDATES ON THE ISSUESPREPARED QUESTIONS AND QUESTIONS FROM THE FLOORAdvertisement paid for by Concerned Citizens of Wakulla, Inc. and the WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION Paid Advertisement Paid Advertisement WAKULLA AIRPORT Workshop!! Postponed due to Tropical Storm Debby WHEN: Tues. July 17, 2012 @ 2:00PM (2 hours) WHERE: BOCC Chambers (behind courthouse) ++Turn west at stoplight and go to second driveway++ WHY: Present data to the Board of County Commissioners for future involvement with airport,… or not. We will present hard data to the county to cease its support of, • accepting taxpayer grants for, and spending tax dollars on ,... the Tarpine airstrip. Come provide your input and ask questions; Commissioners do indeed count heads. Ochlockonee Bay Alliance No-Airport-Expand@Comcast.com • LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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Ralph Edward Grif“ n, 62, of Panacea, went to be with the Lord on Sunday, July 1. He is survived by his loving wife of 45 years, Theresa Rinkel Grif“ n. He was born on Oct. 26, 1949, in Tallahassee, to Leslie L. Grif“ n (who preceded him in death) and Frances Moody Griffin who now resides in Jupiter. He was a minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and along with his wife, founded Brotherly Love Ministries of Crawfordville in March of 2003 and their gospel group, Philadelphia. A memorial service will be held at Brotherly Love Ministries, 3016-D Crawfordville Highway on Saturday, July 14, beginning at 6 p.m. Brother and copastor, David Gray, Brother Larry Tucker and Sister Lucy Johnson will be in charge of the celebration of his life. Survivors include his children, Ralph Darrian Griffin (Charsie), Jennifer Grif“ n Bowden (Matt) and Eleanor Louise Reddick Braren Graddick, 85, died on June 29. She was born Oct. 20, 1926. in Moultrie, Ga. She was a resident of Wakulla County after living many years in Tallahassee. She was predeceased by her son, Ralph Durward Braren; her parents, James Durward Reddick and Lillie Mae Reddick; a sister, Ruby Lee Reddick, and three brothers, Virgil Reddick, Frank Reddick, and James Durward Reddick Jr. Survivors include three children, daughter Elma Louise Cutchin (Gene), daughter Jacqueline Dale Blanchet, and son Walter Reynold Braren III (Dianne); nine grandchildren, Teresa M. Wollschlager (Tom), J., Suzanne (Susie) Harris (Tony), Phillip W. Musgrove Jr., Debbie Howard Perry (Guy), Nikolas Blanchet, Tiffany Blanchet, Aimee Blanchet, Corey Blanchet, and A.J. Blanchet; eight great grandchildren; two great-great grandchildren, and numerous nieces. A graveside service was held Monday, July 2, at Crawfordville Cemetery. Please sign the guest book at www.culleysmeadowwood.com. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 – Page 11AWakulla County Fire Rescue responded to a van on “ re on Sommer Road in Crawfordville on Friday at 10:46 a.m. Arriving “ re“ ghters found the vehicle fully involved and located just feet from a double-wide mobile home. They were able to con“ ne the “ re to the van. It took over 10 minutes to completely extinguish the blaze as gasoline was feeding the “ re from a rupture in the fuel system. The owners had just returned from an out of state trip the night before. The van had been driven the morning before the “ re. A mechanical failure is being blamed for the “ re. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSVan “ reContinued from Page 5A With all that education, I have had multiple degrees on my posterior. Even to this day, every time I sit down I am reminded of that education. This Board of EducationŽ that my father was superintendent of, always hung by the door. Being the religious person that my father was, he had printed on this Board of EducationŽ the phrase from a favorite hymn, I Need Thee Every Hour.Ž It was a motto he lived up to all the years of my boyhood. I often prayed my father would get weary of exercising that Board,Ž but I must confess that my naughtiness wearied long before he did. Looking back, I am grateful. I will not go as far as to say that I am a good person, only that I am not a spoiled brat. I have learned through the years, thanks to the energy of my father, to extend courtesy to everybody around me and be respectful. Respecting other people is not something that comes naturally. Everybody needs to be taught that everybody deserves respect. Some people have earned more respect than others, I grant you. However, nobody deserves deliberate disrespect like those kids gave that bus lady. With all the studies are being done through our governmental grant programs, I wonder why nobody has ever, at least to my knowledge, done a study on the importance of discipline in the home. It is at this point I must agree most heartily with the scriptural injunction on this subject. Solomon, the wisest man in the world, had much to say about disciplining children. And if anybody should know about disciplining children, it was Solomon. Foolishness is bound in the heart of a child; but the rod of correction shall drive it far from himŽ (Proverbs 22:15 KJV). He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimesŽ (Proverbs 13:24 KJV). Disciplining children to ensure they grow up to be proper adults demands a whole lot of energy especially from parents. Love sometimes carries a large stick.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. What happened to spankings? Angeline G. Donaldson Eleanor Louise R. B. Graddick Ralph Edward Grif n Dorothy Emily GercakAngeline Gainey PlumpŽ Donaldson, 89, died on July 4. She was the daughter of Charlie and Rachael Gainey, and the wife of George C. Donaldson for 56 years. She was the mother of three sons, Willie G., George Patrick, and Alvin B. Donaldson, and a daugther, Juanita Staley, who all preceded her in death. She was a home care provider for 31 years. A memorial service will be Saturday, July 14, at 11 a.m. at The Greater Mount Trial P.B. Church in Sopchoppy, with burial at Buckhorn Cemetery. Viewing will be from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Friday, July 13, at Strong & Jones Funeral Home in Tallahassee and Saturday at the church from 9 a.m. until the service. Survivors include her two devoted sisters, Rosa M. Rosier and Annie Lee Carter of Tallahassee; a brother-inlaw, Roscoe Franklin of Philadelphia; 13 grandchildren, Pamela Donaldson Cotton (William), Joy Donaldson Stephens (Kenneth), Kenneth Donaldson (Reshanda) of Crawfordville, Monique and Mia Donaldson of Madison, Gregory Donaldson (Tammie) of California, Pachon Patrick (Keri), Charon Donaldson of Atlanta, Catrina Donaldson of South Carolina, Dorothy Donaldson of Boston, and Logan Donaldson of San Francisco; 30 great-grandchildren, “ ve great-great-grandchildren, nine nieces and nephews, and a host of great nieces, nephews, cousins and sorrowing friends. Strong & Jones Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Dorothy Emily Gercak, 86, of Crawfordville, died on Friday, July 6, in Tallahassee. She was born in Schenectady, N.Y., and had lived in this area seven years coming from Hollywood. She attended St. Louis Catholic Church in Tallahassee. She enjoyed knitting and crossstitch. She is survived by a son, Stephen Gercak III of Crawfordville, and a daughter, Mary Westbrook (Robert) of Crawfordville; nine grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville, is assisting the family with arrangements. ObituariesContinued from Page 5A SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! 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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Now Located Downtown on Crawfordville Hwy. y y 3038 Crawfordville Hwy. (Next to Shepard Accounting) 850-926-2700 y 12, 20 12 Sopchoppy 4th of July ParadeSopchoppy 4th of July ParadePeople lined the streets in Sopchoppy for the citys annual Fourth of July Celebration, which included a parade. And a parade means candy thrown from oats, and children scampering to pick up treats. In addition to the numerous local candidates with oats, there were antique tractors and some Founding Father-type patriots. Rose Street was also a comfortable place to sit and cool off while celebrating Independence Day. After the parade, the Myron Hodge City Park opened for arts and crafts and music from numerous entertainers on the stage. And the day concluded with reworks at dark.PHOTOS BY TAMMIE BARFIELDMore photos online at thewakullanews.com

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Are these truths self-evident?Weekly Roundup, Page 3B Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012HEALTH & FITNESS I hear people say they quit working out because they got bored with their workout. Maybe they did, if they did the same thing day after day, workout after workout. Not only is that boring, but not an ef“ cient way to workout! I know people who do the same weight workout every time they come to the gym, or do the same amount of time on the same speed on the same treadmill every day for years! Their body is on autopilot! Your body gets used a routine very quickly. You burn a lot of calories when you “ rst start a workout routine, but after a few weeks your body gets comfortable with what youre doing and gets ef“ cient at doing it. It doesnt burn the calories like it did to begin with and you “ nd yourself not as tired or sore after your workouts. If you dont feel like you are getting anything out of your workout, you probably arent! The best way to counteract this is to keep your body guessing. Do something different … completely different than you are doing now. If you are doing heavy weights and low repetitions, change it up and do light weights and lots of reps. If you are only doing weights, do some cardio or cross training. If you only do the treadmill, try the elliptical or stepper. If you only do spin class, try a Zumba or Butt and Guts … both guaranteed to kick your butt and kick your metabolism into overdrive! Never tried spin? Give it a shot, you might “ nd a new favorite class! If you only do cardio, pick up some weights! You wouldnt be happy eating the same foods over and over with no variety, would you? Your body would not respond well to that, nor does it respond well to the same workouts day after day. The important thing is to keep trying new workouts and keep changing things up. The more confused your muscles are, the more calories you burn. Try to do something different every few workouts to avoid getting in a rut or getting bored. Your body will thank you!Gena Davis is a CFT at Body-Tek 24Hour Fitness Center in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348.Use variety in your workout to boost the resultsYoga can help carpal tunnelKnowing where your carpal tunnel is and its function is important for those doing yoga and for those with occupations requiring repetitive loading of the hands and forearms. Without this knowledge, you may be causing damage to this important canal without realizing it. Many people can recognize the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, but identifying the risk factors is much more valuable. In order to do this, you must understand what the carpal tunnel is and what its function is. The carpal tunnel actually is a tunnel on the palmar side of your wrist. This tunnel houses our forearm ” exor tendons as well as our median nerve. When the space available for the median nerve is compromised, carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms appear. These symptoms can include pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, or even burning into the majority of the palm of your hand, palmar side of your index to pinkie “ ngers as well as the tips of the back side of the same “ ngers. Each of our tendons is encased in a sheath known as synovium. When our tendons are irritated from overuse, the synovium becomes in” amed. This in” ammation decreases the area of the carpal tunnel allocated for the median nerve. It has been proven that repetitive forceful contractions such as factory work or over-gripping a mouse or even a kitchen knife can lead to synovium in” ammation and subsequent carpal tunnel syndrome. Lets tie this to yoga; when you are in upward dog or plank for that matter, are your shoulders over your wrists? If your shoulders are in front of your wrists, your wrists are in too much extension and this will lead to decreased space for the median nerve over time. Most people do not know how to properly place their hands on the ground in poses such as upward and downward facing dog pose. Look at the palm of your hand and draw a line from the tip of your middle “ nger to the crease of your wrist; now do the same from your thumb to the crease of your wrist. Where these two lines intersect is the location of your carpal tunnel. Place your hand on a ” at surface and draw the meaty portions of the palm of your hand towards each other to create an arch at your carpal tunnel. Create this arch while distinctly planting each of your “ ngers into the ground instead of just resting on your carpal tunnel while in poses such as upward and downward dog; this will protect your carpal tunnel. A study written in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed yoga to be more effective than splinting in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome. Often, in such studies, the poses are modi“ ed to better suit the subjects with considerable symptoms. The idea behind yoga helping is that it can ” oss the median nerve through the carpal tunnel to help mobilize the nerve; stretching may relieve compression on the carpal tunnel; improved joint posture could diminish intermittent compression on the nerve; the effects of blood ” ow restriction on the median nerve could also be improved with increased blood ” ow; and possibly yoga could decrease the risk of double crush nerve entrapment symptoms related to nerve entrapments closer to the neck or armpit. If you DO have carpal tunnel syndrome, check with your health care practitioner to determine if yoga could be helpful for you! I wish you all the best in your practices and in your lives! Namaste.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY GET FITBy GENA DAVIS Special to The NewsSeeds can add a nutty, salty flavor to snacks and meals, but they also have health bene“ ts. Seeds offer anti-inflammatory properties, promote heart and bone health, and supply essential minerals. TOPS Club Inc. (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), the nonprofit weight-loss support organization, explains how various seeds can boost a meals nutrition. € Pumpkin seeds are rich with protein minerals, including magnesium, manganese, iron, copper, and zinc. They are thought to promote prostate health, strengthen bones, and reduce inflammation. Sprinkle pumpkin seeds over a salad, add them to trail mix, toss the seeds with pasta, or blend them into a muffin mix. € Chia seeds are high in omega-3 fatty acids, which can have a positive impact on cholesterol. Add them to yogurt, cereal, or oatmeal to get a boost of “ ber, calcium, and protein. Dr. Andrew Weil, integrated medicine expert and author, recommends soaking two tablespoons of chia seeds in water for 15 to 30 minutes, then stirring the mixture into your water or sports drink for added stamina during a workout. € Sun” ower seeds are a good source of vitamin E, which serves as an antioxidant and contains anti-in” ammatory properties. They also offer copper and selenium, protecting your muscles. Add sun” ower seeds to a fresh salad, mix into chicken salad, sprinkle over meat, or grind them up for a spread. € Sesame seeds are a rich source of copper, which may provide arthritis relief. They also contain calcium and magnesium, which may lower blood pressure, protect against osteoporosis, and more. Mix them with steamed vegetables, sauted “ sh or chicken, or add sesame seeds to homemade bread. € Flaxseed contains alpha linolenic acid (ALA), an omega-3 fat, which may positively impact cholesterol, promote bone health, protect against heart disease, and reduce in” ammation. Look for milled flaxseed, ground flaxseed, or ” ax meal, which is easier to digest, helping your body absorb more of the nutrients. Include it in muf“ n or pancake mixes, or blend ” axseed into a fruit smoothie. € Sacha Inchi nuts (Inca PeanutsŽ) contain omega-3 fatty acids and tryptophan, an amino acid, which can help the body control appetite and sleep. They are also a great source of protein. Use Sacha Inchi nuts in a trail mix or purchase roasted nuts at a health food store. Roasting tip: When purchasing these seeds, buy them raw. Roast seeds at 375 degrees … higher temperatures may diminish the bene“ cial nutrients.Seeds cultivate more than the garden SPECIAL TO THE NEWSToasted pumpkin seeds are rich with minerals, and are thought to promote prostate health, strengthen bones, and reduce in” ammation. How are reptiles faring? EarthTalk, Page 8B Caprese Pizza for summer Keep wines cool in warm weatherFood, Page 4B s B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILStop by a State Farm agents oce, or call me today to “nd out how much you can save. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL ME TODAY. Auto rates just got lower. 1001010.1 Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida THANK YOU! To the people of Wakulla County for the opportunity to serve another term as your Clerk of Court. My sta and I pledge to continue to serve you in such a way as to be worthy of your continued trust. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK THANK YOU! To the people of Wakulla County for the opportunity to serve another term as your Clerk of Court. My sta and I pledge to continue to serve you in such a way as to be worthy of your continued trust. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, July 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a las 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Hwy. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350. Friday, July 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, July 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details.  NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB, a member of the National Button Society, will meet at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594, or email bardon56@aol.com, or Linda Wood at 899-0025. A short interesting presentation about unique buttons is given at each meeting. Sunday, July 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, July 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, July 17  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, July 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  WAKULLA COUNTY MAH JONGG GROUP will meet from 12:45 p.m. to 3 p.m. at precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road, the rst left after Wal-Mart heading north. The “little mah jongg house” is the rst building on the left. For more information, call 926 9254. Thursday, July 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050.Special EventsSaturday, July 14  CAMPAIGN PARTY for county commissioner candidate Howard Kessler will be held at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. There will be music by Frank Lindamood and Chelsea Kessler, plus food, refreshments and campaign signs and T-shirts.  THE CURRYS will perform at Posh Java at 8 p.m. Tommy, Jimmy and Galen Curry, (two brothers and a cousin), perform on mandolin and guitar, with soothing vocal harmonies, incorporating elements of blues, jazz, country and bluegrass, into their unique sound. Visit their website at www.thecurrysmusic.com. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Posh Java is located at the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. in downtown Sopchoppy. Sunday, July 15  FROM THE HEART MUSIC HOUR will be held at The Moon in Tallahassee from 7 to 11 p.m. The show features the Zach Bartholomew Trio, Brook Sessions, The Currys and Mimi Hearn and Rick Ott. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $20, $10 for students. All ticket purchases support WFSU. Tickets are available from the From the Heart Recording Studio in Sopchoppy or online at The Moon Box Of ce or by calling The Moon at 878-6900. Monday, July 16  FAIR HOUSING TRAINING FOR Wakulla County will be held during a regular County Commission meeting which begins at 5 p.m. in the Wakulla County Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327.This meeting is intended to provide the public and Commissioners with information concerning fair housing requirements. Anyone interested in understanding the importance of Fair Housing should attend. Tuesday, July 17  POLITICAL FORUM will be held for the sheriff candidates, Maurice Langston and Charlie Creel, at 7 p.m. at New Bridge Hope Cafeteria, 1282 Spring Creek Highway, across from Mack’s Meats. Doug Jones will be the moderator and the forum is sponsored by the Wakulla County Christian Coalition and Concerned Citizens of Wakulla County. Thursday, July 19  WAKULLA CATTLEMEN’S QUARTERLY MEETING will be held at 8 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce with guest speaker, Sam Ard, director of Governmental Relations for the Florida Cattlemen’s Association. The meeting is open to the public.Upcoming EventsSaturday, July 21  WOMEN CAN RUN, presented by The Oasis Center for Women and Girls in partnership with Leadership Tallahassee and the League of Women Voters of Florida, will be held at Tallahassee City Hall from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Women Can Run! is a non-partisan program tailored to women who may consider running for elected of ce or working on political campaigns in the future. There is no cost. It will include sessions on campaigning, developing a platform and mastering media messaging. Program speakers will be current and former elected leaders and experts in media relations, campaigns and elections. To register, please send an email which includes your name, phone number and email address to Haley Cutler, Executive Director, The Oasis Center for Women and Girls at haley.oasis@comcast.net. Wednesday, July 25  ANNUAL CHRISTMAS IN JULY LUNCHEON will be held at noon. Come enjoy a delicious Christmas lunch. Cost is $50 per ticket. The silent auction begins at 11:30 a.m. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Emergency Public Meeting at 4 p.m. at the Community Center. The Currys at Posh Java at 8 p.m. From the Heart Music Hour at The Moon from 7 to 11 p.m. Wakulla County Commission meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. ThursdaySaturdaySundayMonday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorOur heart goes out to all our patrons affected by Tropical Storm Debby a couple weeks back. FEMA has dropped off contact information at library for those who need assistance. They suggest that you go to www.disasterassisstance.gov to apply for FEMA help of to get information. Anything that my staff and I can do to help you through this trying time, be it help with getting aid through the Internet, programs for your children to get their minds of things, or just a book of “ lm for yourself, please dont hesitate to ask. You are what keeps the library in business and the library along with any other county agency will bend over backwards to give you what you need at this time. Friday Night Movie Beat the heat this Friday, July 13, as we show a new take on the classic Snow White Tale. This family friendly telling stars Julia Roberts, Lily Collins and Armie Hammer, and shows how the princess Snow White after being banished to the forest by her evil stepmother the Queen, bands together with some rebellious dwarves to reclaim her birthright. This PG-rated film should entertain and delight the entire family. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing. One Heart Storytellers Returns next week! The husband and wife storytelling duo One Heart Storytellers returns next Thursday, July 19 to the library. This couple from Monticello will spin tales and sing songs while teaching lessons to kids of all ages. Please come out to see the Worleys as they present their family friendly program as part of our Summer Program of Events. As always this visit along with all Summer Program events is sponsored by the Friends of the Library. For information on all the Friends to or to “ nd out how to join please contact us! Sign-up for “ nal Summer Field Trip The signup sheet for our “ nal “ eld trip of the summer, a return to the Gulf Specimen Marine Lab will be available at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, July 17. Priority is given to those who were not able to attend the “ rst trip in June. If you did go the first time please wait until Thursday, July 19 to sign up so as to give those who missed the first great “ eld trip a chance to go see this Wakulla County treasure. Government Meetings Thursday, July 12  WAKULLA TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea.  WAKULLA COUNTY ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will meet at 10 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioners conference room.  EMERGENCY PUBLIC MEETING regarding Tropical Storm Debby will be held at 4 p.m. at the Community Center. If you have any questions, please contact Katie Taff at (850) 926-0919 or ktaff@mywakulla.com.  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop regarding the Wakulla Gardens proposed improvement assessment from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Community Center.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, July 16  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Tuesday, July 17  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold a special meeting at 5:15 p.m. at city hall on the budget and millage rate. Political EventsThursday, July 12  COOKIES AND CANDIDATES, a political forum for Democratic candidates running for the House District 7 seat in the Florida legislature, will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the library. The forum, sponsored by the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting at 7 p.m., and candidate forum beginning at 7:30 p.m. Cookies and refreshments will be served. The three Democratic candidates are Robert Hill, AJ Smith and Thomas Dickens. Saturday, July 14  CAMPAIGN PARTY for county commissioner candidate Howard Kessler will be held at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. There will be music by Frank Lindamood and Chelsea Kessler, plus food, refreshments and campaign signs and T-shirts. Thursday, July 17  POLITICAL FORUM will be held for the sheriff candidates, Maurice Langston and Charlie Creel, at 7 p.m. at New Bridge Hope Cafeteria, 1282 Spring Creek Highway, across from Mack’s Meats. Doug Jones will be the moderator and the forum is sponsored by the Wakulla County Christian Coalition and Concerned Citizens of Wakulla County. Library News...

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By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, July 6 … The United States turned 236 years old this week and Americans celebrated the founding of a nation, an annual summer hiatus that translated into a slow week in Floridas capital city. But the week was not totally relegated to barbecues and corn on the cob, producing some “ reworks as the debate over Obamacare continued and the courts weighed in on a host of issues from guns to insurance. OBAMACARE: WEEK 1 Gov. Rick Scott started off the week vowing Florida wont expand its health care system for the poor because it will hurt the states effort to create jobs, a contention that was quickly contested by groups that said the governor was overreaching. A week after the U.S. Supreme Court upheld key provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act but left it up to the states to decide if they want to expand their Medicaid rolls, the governor remained defiant, telling different groups throughout the week that the state wouldnt play. Floridians are interested in jobs and economic growth, a quality education for their children, and keeping the cost of living low,Ž Scott said in a statement. Neither of these major provisions in ObamaCare will achieve those goals, and since Florida is legally allowed to opt out, thats the right decision for our citizens.Ž Along with not expanding Medicaid, Scott said the state would not participate in the so-called exchangesŽ that are part of the ACA, a stance that would mean, in all likelihood, that the insurance clearinghouses would be federally run affairs. Health exchanges are key components of the ACA, providing individuals not covered by their employers a way to choose from a list of approved insurance plans. If states dont implement them, the federal government will. Were not going to implement the health care exchanges because its not going to drive down the cost of health care, its going to raise the cost,Ž Scott said while speaking at the Southeastern Press Convention near Destin on Friday. Republican legislative leaders were less intransigent, but not much, as they too chafed at the idea of implementing a program they find anathematic to their political beliefs. But they also left open some doors. House Speaker-designate Will Weatherford predicted the House would take a rational, deliberativeŽ approach to deciding whether to expand coverage. I was no big fan of ObamaCare, thats for sure,Ž Weatherford said. But we also have to recognize that it has been upheld by the court.Ž Key members of the Senate also gave measured responses. My general guiding principal is that I prefer state programs over a cookie-cutter federal model, but thats an issue were going to have to explore,Ž said Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart, and chairman of the Senate health care budget committee. Democrats, meanwhile, touted the other side of the equation, saying the system of near universal health care would result in economic bene“ ts for the nation and the state. Spending money … mostly federal dollars … as part of the Medicaid expansion would put more money into a health care industry that has been among the leading growth industries. Medicaid is jobs,Ž said Senate Democratic Leader Nan Rich, D-Weston. And health care is one of the few areas that didnt suffer job losses during the recession.Ž COURTS WEIGH IN A federal court in Miami this week struck down (again) a state law backers say is needed to protect gun owners from unreasonable queries from health care practitioners. Following up on a temporary ruling made in September, U.S. District Court Judge Marcia Cooke barred enforcement of a 2011 law that restricted doctors from asking their patients whether they owned guns. Cooke ruled the state had failed to make its case that gun owners were being unduly burdened by the law, which restricted doctors and other medical providers from asking questions about gun ownership during medical visits. In a 25-page ruling, Cook permanently barred the state from enforcing the law, known of“ cially as the Firearm Owners Privacy Act. The ruling brought an immediate response from Second Amendment supporters, who said the decision was especially disturbing given the U.S. Supreme Courts ruling on health insurance. The general feeling is that keeping the law is especially important now that ObamaCare has been upheld,Ž said Marion Hammer, former national NRA president and the groups Florida lobbyist. The Florida Supreme Court rejected a provision in a 2008 law restricting the ability of public insurance adjusters to contact homeowners immediately after a storm. In a unanimous ruling, the court struck down the insurance industry-backed effort to prevent public adjusters from visiting clients within 48 hours following a storm. The law was written in response to claims that public adjusters were taking advantage of distraught homeowners following the 2004 and 2005 hurricane seasons. The justices upheld an appellate court ruling that the state could not prevent public adjustors from visiting potential clients immediately after a storm, saying such a prohibition violated the adjusters First Amendment rights. Speaking of the Florida Supreme Court, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement this week closed its investigation into criminal allegations that three justices used state employees to “ le campaign paperwork. The FDLE said it found no wrongdoing on the part of Justices Fred Lewis, Barbara Pariente and Peggy Quince. who had court staff notarize documents necessary for them to seek retention on the court. The investigation was closed after State Attorney Willie Meggs, a Democrat, wrote a letter to FDLE saying the justices might technically have violated a law, but the law does not concern itself with tri” es.Ž But the issue is not settled. The Southeastern Legal Foundation, a conservative legal group, has “ led a lawsuit in Leon County circuit court on behalf of two state residents, arguing that the three justices would not have made the ballot if they hadnt used state employees. The suit asks for the justices to be booted from the ballot. In a statement issued shortly the FDLE announcement, Gov. Rick Scott suggested that the outcome of the investigation was far from a clean bill of health for the three. According to FDLE “ ndings, it appears using state employees to complete and file campaign forms and other documents is common practice,Ž Scott said. Now this case is before the courts where a determination will be made as to whether this common practice is legal.Ž STORY OF THE WEEK: Obamacare reverberates across the state. Gov. Rick Scott remains de“ ant while legislative leaders take more measured approach. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: (Obama) does not want you to have the self-esteem of getting up and earning and having that title of American. Hed rather you be his slave and be economically dependent upon him.Ž … U.S. Rep. Allen West, R-Florida, speaking to supporters during a campaign event. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 – Page 3BWEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Are these truths self-evident?Gov. Rick Scott is concerned about the possibility of defense cuts and their effect on Florida, which is dotted with military bases and defense contractors. Speaking at the Farnborough International Airshow in England on Monday, Scott said he hopes Florida will escape cuts. “No movement on [defense cuts] yet, and we’re worried about jobs in our state...there’s a lot of pressure on congressional delegates to do the right thing,” he said, according to The Wall Street Journal’s Market Watch. The Journal noted, however, that industry analysts say a long term drop in the size of the defense budget looks unavoidable and that defense industry sales are expected to drop. – News Service of FloridaScott: Defense Jobs Are Concern 000ARJV 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) 10AM (TUE-FRI) HAIR SALON FREE Eyebrow Waxing when you get a haircut! FEATHER LOCKS for the SummerFULL SERVICE FAMILY SALON the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Lassie WilliamsJune 2012 Winner Her name was drawn from I am so appreciative of being the recipient of this nice little gift I so enjoy eating out in Wakulla and I love reading The Wakulla News. Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l l a nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much!

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet By DAVID WHITE Most of the nation is still recovering from a brutal heat wave that shattered thousands of records and forced millions to stay indoors and crank up the air conditioning. The impact of such weather on wine was on full effect last weekend, when I attended an outdoor party on a 100-degree day. I arrived to the event a few hours early, as my friend had asked if I could bring a few cases of wine. When I pulled in, I was thrilled to spot the caterer, who was already filling large coolers with ice. She quickly took the white wines and threw them in the coolers. The reds, though, remained on a table, baking under the hot sun. So I asked how I could help, offering to put the reds in a refrigerator or toss them in a different cooler. She looked at me like I was insane. Ive been doing this for years, and Ive never heard of chilling reds,Ž she declared, incredulously. I politely noted the sweltering heat, and suggested that guests would prefer cool wine -which would quickly warm once poured -to wine that had been sitting in the hot sun all day. Well, youre the expert,Ž she answered, proceeding to put the reds on ice. But Ive always been told that red wines are served at room temperature.Ž And there it was, the worlds most pervasive wine myth. The notion that reds should be served at room temperature is why most people … and even most bars, restaurants, and caterers … serve red wines too warm. Before the advent of thermostats, homes were much cooler than they are today. So serving red wine at room temperatureŽ made sense -it still made for a refreshing beverage. Today, most Americans keep their homes at about 72 degrees. At this temperature, alcohol is more obvious, which distorts the aromas and flavors of a wine. Warm wines generally seem rough, unstructured, and alcoholic. These traits only get worse as a wine heats up. Conversely, most white wines are consumed when theyre too cold. Most consumers serve whites straight from the refrigerator, and most restaurants serve them straight from an ice bucket. Serving any wine at such low temperatures will mask its ” avors. Fortunately, you dont need a fancy wine refrigerator to serve wine at its optimal temperature. If youre drinking a red wine, pop it in the fridge for 20-30 minutes. If youre drinking a white wine, pull it out of the fridge about 20-30 minutes before youre going to drink it. As wine critic Bill Ward recently explained, Basically, all wine should be chilled, but not too much, and served between 43 degrees (sweet or crisp whites, bubbles) and 65 degrees (hearty reds). Richer whites (Chardonnay) and lighter reds (Pinot Noir, Gamay, Cabernet Franc) fall in between.Ž Temperature doesnt just matter when serving wine, it also matters when storing it. If youre looking to hold onto a special bottle for a long time, most experts agree that it should be stored somewhere cool and dark -wine cellars are typically kept at about 55 degrees. This allows a wine to develop slowly and predictably, hopefully becoming more complex and interesting over time. Wines stored at higher temperatures will age more quickly and can develop off ” avors and aromas. Its also worth noting that wine is perishable and can spoil very quickly when exposed to extreme heat. This was another concern of mine last weekend. Like ice cream, wine can be destroyed when left outside -or even worse, in a car -on a hot summer day. If a wine is just slightly cooked,Ž the damage will be hard to perceive -it will just seem a bit dull. When a wine is more noticeably heat-damaged, its marked by aromas of stewed fruit and burnt sugar. When heat damage is severe, the wine will expand inside the bottle -pushing out the cork and breaking its seal, thus spoiling the wine by exposing it to too much oxygen. Already, it looks like this might be the hottest summer in history. So keep cool. And dont forget to chill your wines. David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the internet. Whites WinesWhen the weather warms, keep wines cool Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. •Interior Remodeling •Doors •Floors •Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling •Decks/Barns/Fences • Portable, Private, Outdoor Showers FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS NEW! Celebrating 30 years of building leaders with an appreciation for the value of working together, across our diversities, for a better Florida. bu i ld i ng o n for the e r, across e r Florida. C elebrat i n leaders w v alue of our dive r www.leader shipflorida.org . . a n d o u t g r o w y o u r c o m p e t i t i o n Display.Classified.Online.Daily Call now to diversify your advertising. 866.742.1373 www.AdNetworksFlorida.com G e t y o u r b u s i n e s s n o t i c e d . Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICEƒ EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r sTM Dav i d H i nsonSales Representative Author i zed F i rm

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SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements Todays New Ads CRAWFORDVILLE3 bedroom. 2-1/2 bath 1850 sqft end unit townhome 3 br 2.5 ba, 1 car gar, SS appl. $1150 rent / $1150 deposit 850-509-3439 or 850-212-5565 Lost Lost Basset Hound, Female Wakulla Springs Rd, Area REWARD (850) 421-1277 Pomchi,Male Black with white markings, Wakulla Gardens Area $100 Reward (850) 566-4487 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Found Found set of keys on county road 61 on Saturday June 30th. It has a Minney Mouse letter BŽ decoration. If these are your keys, please contact Jackie Turner 850-561-7281 or Bonnie Allen 850-561-7276 General Help DriversNew Refrigerated and Dry Van freight. Daily or Weekly pay! Quarterly Safety Bonus! Flexible Hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800)414-9569 www. driveknight.com HELPWANTED € FT ESE Teacher € PT Bus DriversCoast Charter School St. Marks, 850-925-6344 Schools/ Instruction MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDEDTrain online to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Training & Local Job Placement assistance. thru SC Training.HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Mobile Homes For Rent WAKULLA COUNTYRural 2 Bedroom 1 Bath Mobile Home $500 mo. + security Available Immediately (850) 745-8526. Efficiencies/ Cottages CRAWFORDVILLELarge room/bath, microwave, fridge, with deck, on Wakulla River, $90 week or $400 month, includes utilities. Long Term Rental 850-926-2783 Rental Houses OYSTER BAY2 Bedroom, 1 Bath With private dock, Furnished or Not $1,000. mo. FREE Utilities, cable & WiFi 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE3 bedroom. 2-1/2 bath 1850 sqft end unit townhome 3 br 2.5 ba, 1 car gar, SS appl. $1150 rent / $1150 deposit 850-509-3439 or 850-212-5565 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEConvient Locations 2 BEDROOM on 3 Acres, Nice Oak Trees $625 mo. 2 BEDROOM on 2 Fenced Acres $700. moBrenda Hicks Realy (850) 251-1253 NORTH WAKULLA COUNTY3 bedroom. 2 bath. Brick home with 2 car garage, Florida room, located on 5 acres. High and Dry. $1200/month. Requires deposit and background check 850-508-1302 Rent: Houses Unfurnished 5290-0719 PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT T O CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE:School Board Plicy 2.25 School Board Adopted PlansCode of Student Conduct and Elementary, Middle and High School Attendance Policies to include the Corporal Punishment Policy. PURPOSE AND EFFECT:To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures. LEGALAUTHORITY:1001.41, 1001.42, Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED:1001.41, 1001.43, Florida Statutes ECONOMIC IMPACT:None REVISION ORIGINATED BY:Beth ODonnell Assistant Superintendent for Instruction REVISION APPROVED BY: David Miller, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, AHEARING WILL BE HELD TIME:5:45 p.m. PLACE:Administrative Offices Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE:August 20, 2012 ACOPYOF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAYBE OBTAINED ATCOSTFROM: Wakulla County School Board Post Office Box 100 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, FL32326-0100 Published One (1) time in The Wakulla News July 12, 2012 5290-0719 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5265-0628 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201202078 TO: Brandon M. Tabler ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. June 21, 28 and July 5,12, 2012. Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5287-0719 TWN Vs. Parker, Brittany Rachelle Case No. 65-2012-CA-000037 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE FIFTH JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.65-2012-CA-000037 U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v. BRITTANYRACHELLE PARKER, ETAL., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: BRITTANYRACHELLE PARKER, and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants Current Residence Unknown, but whose last known address was: 187 ROCHELSIE RD., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-2719 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: LOT 24, BLOCK 22, WAKULLAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL33716, on or before Augusy 10, 2012 or within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327-0337, either before service on Plaintiff s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 18 day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTLETHA WELLS, (850)926-0905 EXT222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPTOF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. July 12 and 19, 2012. 665112464 5289-0719 v. NORTHWESTFLORIDAOPERATIONS, INC. Case No. 2011-CA-000235 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-CA-000235 PREMIER BANK a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff v. NORTHWEST FLORIDAOPERATIONS, INC, a Florida Corporation, R. RICHARD YATES, JR ., individually, DANNYR. MCCLELLAN individually, and HOME PLACEMENT, INC. a Florida Corporation Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to-wit: Lots 93 and 94, Block A; Lots 52 and 81, Block D; and Lots 18, 21, and 22, Block E. of Magnolia Gardens, as per map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door of the Clerks office in the Courthouse of Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 26th day of July, 2012. Dated this 28th day of June, 2012. Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News July 12 and 19, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5286-0719 Vs Mark Anthony, Case No.:10-000235-CA, Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILACTION CASE NO. 10-000235-CA CU MEMBERS MORTGAGE, ADIVISION OF COLONIALSAVINGS, F.A. Plaintiff, vs. MARK ANTHONY, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated 21st day of June, 2012, entered in Civil Case Number in the Circuit Court for Wakulla, Florida, wherein CU MEMBERS MORTGAGE, ADIVISION OF COLONIALSAVINGS, F.A. the Plaintiff, and MARK ANTHONY, et al, are the Defendants, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla Florida, described as: www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 – Page 5B AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan Strickland’s POOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE S S S S S S Licensed & InsuredGreen Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469 Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairs 850-926-9760 850-509-1013Bryant’sCARPET AND UPHOLSTERY CAREProfessional carpet, upholstery, tile/grout and area rug cleaning.IICRC/CLEANTRUST CERTIFIED TECHNICIANBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Local, experienced and dependable management for Condo and Homeowners Associations.925-9911Kelly’s Association Management Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Be ds, Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r S yst ems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSUREDWill help you make the most of your outdoor space. Wood and Metal buildings, carports, barns, swings, gazebos & More! Sizes and Pricing to “t your needs. RENT-TO-OWN options. $25 credit on a new building with this ad! See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care 850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOATHealthy, single, white male, 62 looking for female. I have a nice home in Panacea. Live-in free (room-&-board). Light housekeeping and companionship. Lets meet! Wes 984-5733. No large women, please. ::: PERSONAL ::: ESTATE SALE !Saturday, July 14, 8AM-1PM, 1119 Shadeville Hwy. Mens clothes, suits, ties, womens clothes, shoes, arts & crafts and lots of miscellaneous items. 4Br 2Ba hs $850 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba hs $850 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba hs w/carport $850 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba hs 2 car garage $1,250 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba hs 1 car garage $950 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba hs. 1 car garage $1100 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba Twnhs garage $1000 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $700 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $675 mo. + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba hs w/carport $750 mo. + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker

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Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices LOT 8, BLOCK CŽ, WOODVILLE SOUTH, ASUBDIVISION, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 31 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA at a public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327 at 11:00 AM. on the 26th day of July 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any prodeeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, telephone (850) 926-0905, TDD 1 800 955 8771 or 1 800 955 8770 via Florida Relay ServiceŽ. Dated: June 29, 2012 BRETTX. THURMOND WAKULLACOUNTYCLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk July 12 and 19, 2012 in The Wakulla News. File No:CT-T05410/KK 5276-0712 Vs. Beckman III, William George Case No. 65-2010-CA000197 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000197 US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION. Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM GEORGE BECKMAN III; JACQUELINE BECKMAN; JOHN DOE UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; FLORIDAHOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 20, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOT 58, BLOCK 7, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT TWO, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGE 42 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 68 CHINOOK TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 at public sale on July 26 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 21st day of June, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTLETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL1-800-955-8771. July 5 & 12, 2012 5276-0712. 5277-0712 Vs. Richard Stephen Weems Case No. 65-2010-CA000205 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000205 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.. Plaintiff, vs. RICHARD STEPHEN WEEMS; LONALISAWEEMS; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 12, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOT 11, OF DOE FOREST, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1994 DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ATTACHED THERETO HAVING VIN #47620322 GA, TITLE #66714392 AND VIN # 47620322 GB, TITLE #66714391. WHICH IS NOW RETIRED. a/k/a 9 WHITE TAILDR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-1644 at public sale on January 10, 2013, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 20th day of June, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTLETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL1-800-955-8771. July 5 & 12, 2012 5277-0712. 5278-0712 TWN Vs. Farmer, Claudette Case No. 11-174-FC Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 11-174-FC UCN:0652011CA000174XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. CLAUDETTE L. FARMER A/K/ACLAUDETTE FARMER; EARLE W. MURPHY; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIED CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 20, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11-174-FC UCN:652011CA0000174XXXXXX if the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and CLAUDETTE L. FARMER A/K/ACLAUDETTE FARMER; EARLE W. MURPHY; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL.32327 at Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 10th day of January 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 16, WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 39, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE, DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on June 20, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News July 5 & 12 2012 5278-0712 1183-96619 5279-0712 vs. Miller, Edward A. Case No.65-2012-CA-000153 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000153, DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. : EDWARD A. MILLER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MARIAN L. MILLER LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 45 EDGEWOOD DRIVE, Crawfordville, FL32327 5284-0719 vs. PHILLIPS, JOYCE Case No.65-2011-CA-000121 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000121 DIVISION: JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. : JOYCE H. PHILLIPS, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated June 20, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000121 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANYis the Plaintiff and JOYCE H. PHILLIPS; UNITED STATE OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF US DEPARTMENTOF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 26th day of JULY, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: ALLOF LOTS 4, 5, 19 AND 20, OF BLOCK A, OF HAMMOCK HAVEN SUBDIVISION, TUCKERS SUBDIVISION IN THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, AS SHOWN BYPLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 33 OF PLAT BOOK 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTYFLORIDA A/K/A48 LESLIE ANNE STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on JUNE 22nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News July 12 and 19, 2012 F11015090 5285-0719 vs. Smith, James R. Case No. 11-324 CA IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTION CASE NO. 11-324-CA CADENCE BANK, N.A, successor by merger with SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JAMES R. SMITH, CAPITALONE BANK and FLORIDACOMMERCE CREDITUNION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure darted the 20th day of June, 2012, in Case Number 2011-324 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff and JAMES R. SMITH, CAPITALONE BANK, and FLORIDACOMMERCE CREDIT UNION are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidders, in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 A.M. Eastern Time on the 26th day of July, 2012, the following described parcels of real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgement of Foreclosure, to-wit: LOTS & R, VILLAGES OF ST. MARKS, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 70, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida ATTHE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFULHIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAYBE, SHALLPOSTWITH THE CLERK ADEPOSITEQUALTO 5 PERCENTOF THE FINALBID. THE DEPOSITSHALLBE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE ATTHE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSITSHALLBE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFULBIDDER OR BIDDERS, ATTHE SALE WILLBE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARYSTAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. Dated this 27th day of June, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk (SEAL) Wakulla County By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News July 12 and 19, 2012 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLACounty, Florida: LOT 5, EDGEWOOD, ACCORDING TO MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 83, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates, P.L. Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in The W akulla News. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on 25th day of June, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News July 5 & 12, 2012 F10125164 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5275-0712 Hazel L. Imperiale estate of,12-37 CP, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 12-37CP IN RE: ESTATE OF HAZELL. IMPERIALE A/K/A, HAZELLOUISE 5280-0712 Dease Jr., George L., File No. 12-54-CP, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-54-CP IN RE; ESTATE OF GEORGE L. DEASE, JR. a/k/a GEORGE LEAONARD DEASE a/k/a GEORGE DEASE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of GEORGE L. DEASE, JR. a/k/a GEORGE LEONARD DEASE a/k/a GEORGE DEASE, deceased, whose date of death was May 16, 2012; File Number 12-54-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must be file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is July 5, 2012. Personal Representative /s/ Janice Walters-Smith, 1670 Pershing Avenue #B, Pahrump, NV 89048 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Gary S. Wright, Esq. Florida Bar No. 0509655 Gary S. Wright, P.A. 465 Summerhaven Dr. # C, DeBary, FL 32713, Telephone 386-753-0280 FAX: 386-668-5880 Published two times in the Wakulla News on July 5 and 12,2012 5280-0712 5282-0719 TWN Ladd, Newell H. 12-47-CP Public Notice IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTYPROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 12-47-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF NEWELLH. LADD, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of NEWELLH. LADD, deceased, Case Number 12-47CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. ALLCREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents Estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTYDAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents Estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is July 12, 2012. Personal Representative /s/Mary Susan Miller 30 Covington Circle, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for the Personal Representative /s/MARYELLEN DAVIS, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No.949884 MARYELLEN DAVIS LAW OFFICE Post Office Box 1720, Crawfordville, FL32327 July 12 and 19, 2012. Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available • 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $700/Mo. First and Last Mo. Deposit • 5 Susquehanna 2BR/1BA $750 Mo. $750/Deposit. Washer/Dryer Fenced yard, Pets okay • 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $1,000 Mo. • 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets • 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok • 64 Blackfoot 3BR/2BA Pets ok w/ non refundable Deposit. $850 Mo. $850 Deposit • 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced • 145 Rochelsie 2BR/2BA $700 Mo. Pets okay up to 40lbs with non-refundable $250 Deposit. Available July 1 • 14 Windy Ct 3BR/2BA $850mo./$850 Deposit. Available Aug. 1 • 67 Cochise 2BR/2BA, Screened back porch $825 Mo./$825 Deposit • 46 Gulf Breeze (Oyster Bay) 3BR/BA $1,200 Mo./1,200 Deposit • 178 Parkside Circle 4BR/2BA $1,400 Mo./$1,400 Deposit Pets allowed with deposit We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!27 Brentwood Lane 4 Bdr. 3 1/2 ba In-Ground Pool includes Maintenance, Double car garage, replace, large master bedroom, screen porch. $1,050. per month. No Pets, No smoking50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 – Page 7BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 32 37 42 47 51 59 64 67 2 33 60 3 29 61 4 30 48 56 21 24 38 43 5 15 18 34 44 65 68 6 35 39 62 7 31 57 8 25 52 9 22 45 49 19 40 50 10 16 41 46 58 63 66 69 11 26 36 53 12 27 54 13 28 55 ACROSS 1. New-__ hay 5. Synthetic fiber 10. Alka-Seltzerlanding-in-water sound 14. Indy winner Luyendyk 15. Bobby of the Black Panthers 16. Ready to pluck 17. Greek Z 18. Recap giver 20. Monroe __ (1823 pronouncement) 22. Churchillian gesture 23. Blond shade 24. Basis for discrimination 25. Is so minded 29. Goldie of "LaughIn" 31. In an evasive manner 32. Ibn __ (Arabia's founder) 34. It has 100 seats 36. Beau Brummell 37. De Mille or Moorehead 39. Signed like an illiterate 40. Dustin's "Midnig ht Cowboy" role 42. "Welcome" giver 43. Think highly of 46. Vintner's dregs 47. Lily Tomlin's Ernestine, for one 49. Irish Rose's man 51. Like some deodorants 52. Bearded beast 53. "Platoon" war zone, informally 56. Part of SSN: Abbr. 57. Not invincible 59. Sparsely distributed amount 63. Shaker stuff 64. Hammer head 65. Like a King story 66. Ballet bend 67. Capp or Gump 68. Rationed, with "out" 69. Malamute's towDOWN1. Miata maker 2. Stackable cookies 3. "Red Scare" fanatic, so to speak 4. Clutter-free 5. Hands out 6. See the old gang 7. Partner of rank and serial number 8. "Slippery" tree 9. Ultimatum alternative 10. Blesser of holy water 11SithClib 12. Unlock, poetically 13. __ annum 19. "__ Madness" (anti-marijuana film) 21. Like steak tartare 25. Lamp cover 26. Highest-numbered item in a rack 27. "How can __?" (gambler's query) 28. Proofreader's finds 30. Suffix with cannon or block 31. Look from Snidely 32. Pago Pago's place 33. Slack-jawed 35. Sing the praises of 38. One surrounds each the me entry in this puzzle 41. "Rope-a-dope" pugilist 44Placedininventory 45. Acted the field general 48. Like a ready-to-use violin bow 50. On the other hand 52. Bottled spirit 54. Kate's TV roommate 55. Allotted, with "out" 57. Compete in logrolling 58. Krait cousins 59. Therapeutic spot 60. Relief pitcher's locale 61. Checkers color 62. Writer Rosten American Prole Hometown Content 7/8/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 12 34 561 678 8 751 4579 6234 4 59 692 8437 200 9 HometownContent 182 3594 7 6 573486291 946127835 829 745613 435861729 761293584 314 572968 657938142 298614357 M A Z D A S A M O A S P A O R E O S A G A P E P E N W I T C H H U N T E R R E D N E A T A D E R O S I N Y R A W S E A S O N A S S I G N S S T O C K E D R E U N E E X T O L L E O N A M E S N E E R B I R L E L M S H A D E G E N I E L E A V E I T M A N A G E D R E E F E R B U T P R I E S T A L I A S P S L I Z F I F T E E N B A L L O P E I L O S E A L L I E P E R T Y P O S M E T E D Approximately Argue Atlas Avoid Blame Borrows Built Cannot Cheeks Coral Dimly Drink Dusty Dying Early Finds Floors Forces Harness Insure Knight Laughs Lawns Loyalty Maids Mails Movie Obtained Peach Pistol Poets Rates Rescue Resign Reveal Rigid Rough Salads Solving Stable Stalk Stays Steak Stream Stripes Tasks Warmly Wheelbarrows Winds You’veWord Find IMPERIALE A/K/AHAZELSTANLEYIMPERIALE, DECEASED, NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS (SUMMAR Y ADMINISTRA TION) TO ALLPERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINSTTHE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of Hazel L. Imperiale a/k/a Hazel Louise Imperiale a/k/a Hazel Stanley Imperiale, deceased, File Number 12-37CP, by the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Community Center, 322 Shadeville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327; that the decedents date of death was September 20, 2011; that the total value of the estate is Less than$75,000.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Geraldine Harvey 69 Anna Drive Crawfordville, FL32327 Nancy Imperiale 106 E. Cottesmre Circle, Longwood, FL32779 ALLINTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE. Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5283-0719 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGALNOTICE Self Storage Notices 5288-0719 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Auction Under the authority of the Florida StorageFacility Act the property described below has been seized for non payment of Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices rent and other accrued expenses. The property will be sold at auction to the highest bidder as provided by the Self Storage Facility Act 83.806 Double D Storage LLC reserves the right to refuse any and all bids. Cash only. Mike Jones unit 06 household items, auction to be held @ Double D StorageLLC 289 Cajer Posey Rd Crawfordville FL32327 July 25, 2012 @12:00 pm Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration ALLCLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANYOTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is July 5, 2012. Person Giving Notice /s/ Geraldine Harvey 69 Anna Drive, Crawfordville, FL32327 Attorney for Person Giving Notice:/s/ Lauchlin Tench Waldoch Florida Bar Number: 0262749 Waldoch & Mc Connaughhay, P.A. 1709 Hermitage Blvd, Suite 102, Tallahassee, FL32308 Telephone: (850) 385-1246 Published two (2) times in the WAKULLANEWS on July 5 and 12, 2012 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON JUL Y 27, 2012 at 1 1:00a.m AT2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONALPROPERTYOF: CARYMILLER STEPHEN BOND THERESAWRIGHT Before the sale date of July 27, 2012, The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. TO RUN IN THE WALULLANEWS JULY12 AND 19. The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s v i s i t u s o n l i n e For local news and photos visit us online w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear EarthTalk: How are the worlds reptile species faring in terms of population numbers and endangered status? Whats being done, if anything, to help them? Vicky Desmond Troy, N.Y. The worlds reptiles „ turtles, snakes, lizards, alligators and crocodiles „ are indeed in trouble. The International Union for Conservation of Nature, which publishes an annual global roster of threatened and endangered species called the Red List, considers some 664 species of reptiles „ representing more than 20 percent of known reptile species worldwide „ as endangered or facing extinction. Meanwhile, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service considers about 10 percent of American reptiles threatened or endangered. Why care? The non-pro“ t Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) considers reptiles amazing creaturesŽ with clever adaptations that have helped them survive for millions of years. CBD also points out that reptiles are valuable indicators of wider ecological health. Because many reptile species are long-lived and relatively slow-moving, they suffer from disturbances like habitat loss or pollution for extended periods,Ž the group reports, adding that a diverse community of reptiles living in a given area is evidence of a healthy ecosystem that can support the plant and animal life they and other species need for food and cover. So whats causing the reptiles decline? While habitat loss is the most obvious cause of endangerment, declines are even even occurring in pristine areas from threats such as disease, UV radiation and climate change,Ž reports CBD. Overcollecting and unregulated hunting also are taking a toll on reptile populations. In order to help stem the tide of reptile loss, CBD leverages the court system to pressure the federal government to protect at-risk species. For instance, back in 2004 the group worked with the Coalition for Sonoran Desert Protection in “ ling a petition to add the Tucson shovel-nosed snake, which dwells in the quickly disappearing wild desert around fast-growing cities like Tucson and Phoenix, to the federal list of endangered species. Finally in 2011 the federal government agreed that it would add the snake to its list of endangered species which will help it get the habitat protection needed to ensure long term survival. CBD also works on other fronts for reptiles. The groups campaign to outlaw rattlesnake round-upsŽ „ contests in which hunters collect and kill as many snakes as they can „ has helped stem population declines of eastern diamondback rattlesnakes. And CBDs efforts to educate the public about the plight of freshwater turtles, which are overcollectedŽ for food and the pet trade in the southern and midwestern parts of the U.S., helped convince several states for the “ rst time to regulate turtle harvests. One way everyone can help reptile species in decline is to make our backyards friendly to them. The U.S. Geological Surveys Patuxent Wildlife Research Center offers tips on what to plant and how to arrange a landscape to encourage reptiles and other wildlife. Landowners that take these steps may be rewarded with fewer pests, given reptiles taste for large numbers of mosquitoes and other insects as well as small rodents. Other pro-reptile tips include driving carefully (road mortality is a big issue for snakes, turtles and other species) and keeping outside areas around your property free of garbage that might attract raccoons, crows and other pests that also prey on reptiles. Dear EarthTalk: Whats the deal with New York City buildings switching over from heating oil to natural gas? Is this a trend in other U.S. cities as well? Mitchell Branecke Yonkers, N.Y. Anyone who has lived in New York City knows that particulate matter is omnipresent there. Commonly referred to as soot, such particulate pollution is comprised of “ ne black particles derived of carbon from coal, oil, wood or other fuels that have not combusted completely. Due to this preponderance of soot in the air, asthma rates in some parts of the Big Apple (like Harlem and parts of the Bronx) are sky high. Environmentalists have been pointing the “ nger for years at the dirty residential heating oil used by so many New York City buildings, many of which were built before natural gas was widely available. According to the nonprofit Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), just one percent of the buildings across the “ ve boroughs of New York City burn noxious heating oils, but those structures send more particulate matter airborne than all of the citys cars and trucks combined. Thats why mayor Michael Bloomberg announced this past June that an innovative public-private partnership (known as NYC Clean Heat) between the citys government and leading banks, energy providers and environmental groups would be putting up $100 million in financing and other new resources to help buildings there make the switch to cleaner fuels. NYC Clean Heat kicked off last year when the city ordered the phase-out of the dirtiest home heating fuels: No. 4 and No. 6 oils that are still used in some 10,000 New York City buildings and which create a significant air pollution hazard. Switching out those fuels with cleaner burning oil (such as No. 2), biodiesel or natural gas will go a long way toward meeting Bloombergs aggressive new PlaNYCŽ goal of reducing soot pollution some 50 percent by 2013. The mayors of“ ce reports that the new restrictions will save 120 lives and prevent 300 asthma-related hospital visits a year, while generating some $300 million in construction activity in the short term. Property owners interested in a clean heat conversion can access the funding, which is coming from a combination of city coffers and “ nancial institutions including Chase, Deutsche Bank, Hudson Valley Bank, Citi and the Community Preservation Corporation. On the environmental side, EDF is offering technical assistance and outreach to buildings that are undergoing fuel conversions by making available a team of trained energy professional to help evaluate conversion options, coordinate with utilities and beef up energy ef“ ciency measures. As for the utilities, Con Edison and National Grid, the two primary providers for the New York City metro area, have agreed to upgrade their natural gas infrastructure to make it easier and cheaper for buildings to make the switch. And Hess Corporation, the citys largest residential heating oil provider, has begun to offer customers new incentives to switch to natural gas, ultra-low sulfur No. 2 heating oil and biodiesel. But no doubt individual property owners who can make the switch are doing it of their own accord due to the low price of natural gas versus oil. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com.EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine. How are reptiles species faring? The International Union for Conservation of Nature considers some 664 species of reptiles, including turtles, snakes, lizards, alligators and crocodiles, as endangered or facing extinction. Pictured: A freshwater turtle destined for the pet trade.iStockPhoto e U.S. Fish & Wildlife Servie estimates about 10 percent of American reptiles threatened or endangered. Expert physicians.Quality medical care.Of“ce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. … 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comFamily Practice Accepting new patients X-Ray Services Pediatric patients 2 yrs. & older Offering specialty care: Capital Regional Cardiology Associates 850-877-0216 Capital Regional Medical Group Podiatry Services 850-878-8235 Capital Regional Surgical Associates 850-219-2306 Robert Frable, DO Aida Torres, ARNPCRAWFORDVILLE



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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netLong-time resident Jenny Brock is running for County Commission, District 1. Brock, no party affiliation, will face incumbent Alan Brock, Democrat, and Republican Ralph Thomas in the November election. Brock, who previously ran for a seat on the school board in 2010 and county commission District 1 seat in 2008, said she is running for the commission because she wants to serve the people and feels many important issues arent receiving the attention they deserve from the current board. She also has some concerns with recent decisions made by the current board. One of these decisions is the implementation of the $196-solid waste assessment on all property owners for curbside garbage pickup. I was very disturbed with the Waste Pro contract, she said. Some residents inherited a home from a family member and although it doesnt need service nor is it lived in, they are still required to pay the assessment, she said. Another concern was the Public Services Tax, which is a 10-percent tax on every purchase of electricity, metered or bottle gas, fuel oils and water. Brock said she understands that citizens must pay taxes for services. However, the county does not provide any of the services they are taxing, she said. She said she would try to repeal that tax. If it couldnt be repealed, the county should at least lower it. She feels the county could be more careful with its budget process so that the public services tax could be eliminated. The people of this county have been overwhelmingly taxed by the current board, Brock said. There are people suffering and cant handle the extra tax, she said. Give them a break. She also feels government operations should be completely open to the public. So there is no question of where our taxes go and where we are headed, Brock said. In the past, it has sometimes been dif cult obtaining public records from the county, she said. It has gotten better and she believes the county is on its way to a better system on public records requests. Two areas she feels very passionate about is having quality activities for the children of the county and preserving the countys ecosystems. Brock said she would like to see the Wakulla County Community Center serve as a hub of quality activities for youth. Its been a long time coming, she said of the community center. Brock was a high school math teacher for 32 years. She served most of her career at Leon High School. I love children, Brock said. Continued on Page 3A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netTo ensure that people in Wakulla County iimpacted by Tropical Storm Debby know about the Disaster Recovery Center and the assistance available to them, the Federal Emergency Management Agencys Community Relations Team is out spreading the word. The team is comprised of six community relations specialists who break off into teams of two and go into impacted areas of the county letting people know that assistance is available to them and how they can obtain it. Our job primarily is to get them there, said Stephen Huffstutler, community relations specialist. Continued on Page 2A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 26th Issue Thursday, July 12, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents kll h h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 5A Community .....................................................................Page 6A Sports .............................................................................Page 7A Outdoors ........................................................................Page 8A Water Ways .....................................................................Page 9A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 10A Health & Fitness ...............................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 3B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 5B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 5BINDEX OBITUARIES Tracy Candice Chuley Angeline Gainey Plump Donaldson Betty Jean Freeman Dorothy Emily Gercak Eleanor Louise Reddick B. Graddick Ralph Edward GriffinJenny Brock is running for county commission, District 1 Jenny Brock is a candidate for county commission. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net A Disaster Recovery Center opened in Wakulla County on Thursday, July 5, at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce in response to Tropical Storm Debby and the county being declared a disaster area and approved for individual assistance by the president. Those who were affected by Tropical Storm Debby can apply for federal disaster assistance through the Federal Emergency Management Agency for their home or business, which can be done at the center. It is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Immediate assistance is also available at the DRC for disaster victims who are unable to return home. FEMA can provide temporary housing assistance for them. There is a huge need for rental properties for people who have lost their homes due to the storm, said Brenda Cheek, FEMA community relations specialist. People who have rental properties available in the county are asked to contact the DRC. Prior to coming to the DRC, people are encouraged to register with FEMA. This can be done online at www.disasterassistance.gov, by calling FEMA at 1-800-621-3362 or using the FEMA app at m.fema.gov. So far, 279 people in Wakulla County have registered with FEMA, according to Tim Tyson, FEMA spokesperson. According to the Wakulla County damage assessments, there were 413 damaged structures with a total value of $8.75 million. This included 40 homes that were completely destroyed. Continued on Page 2AHe woke up just in timeDisaster Recovery Center open to help ood victimsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIt was 1:30 a.m. on Tuesday, June 26, when the loud sound of frogs croaking outside his home woke Bill Rogers from his sleep. That sound may have saved his life. Rogers says he had never heard the frogs that loud before at his home on Smokehouse Road. When he woke up, he found out why they had been so loud. His home was on the verge of being ooded. It was a sign from God, Rogers says. They woke me up. The water was rising quickly and Rogers knew he needed to evacuate. The problem was that the only way out of his driveway was impassable. A week prior, a dead tree had fallen on a power line and was blocking part of the road. Rogers says he grabbed his computer and important documents and headed to the home of his neighbors, Lt. Bruce and Nina Ashley, who were also trying to evacuate. Deputies with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce had arrived to help people get out of the area. Rogers asked the deputy if he had a chainsaw and luckily he did. Continued on Page 2A The aftermath of Tropical Storm Debby: JENNIFER JENSENRed Cross volunteers help a storm victim.Community Relations Team is out in the county SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe loudness of croaking frogs awakened Bill Rogers minutes before his house ooded. He says it was a sign from God. He got out, but his home was a total loss. JENNIFER JENSENBrenda Cheek of FEMA comforts Elaine Herndon of Sopchoppy. Sopchoppy 4th of July ParadeSopchoppy 4th of July ParadeSee Page 12A Proper mold remediation requires mold removal by a licensed certified professional. License No. MRSR390 Mold After a Flood 926-3647Under the right conditions, molds produce spor es that spread easily through the air and form new mold growths (colonies). Mold ca n damage your home, possessions and health. If you suspect mold, let the experts at Rainbow International help you.When the power goes off for several days in hot, humid climates, it is difficult to avoid an explosion of mold growth. Mold growth is common after flooding or water damage. 41 Feli Way Crawfordville, FL 32327 We are a locally owned and operated Wakulla County business. Proud to assist those affected by Tropical Storm Debby.

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Continued on Page 2A Across the 11 counties, as of July 10, there have been 4,399 people who have registered with FEMA and $6,686,535 has been approved for damages, Tyson said. There are several agencies represented at the center, including FEMA, Florida Division of Emergency Management, Department of Elder Affairs, Department of Children and Families, Small Business Administration, Workforce Plus, Catholic Charities, Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Apalachee Center and others. When someone comes into the center, a FEMA representative may refer them to one of these agencies as well. Theres just about every service they might need in one place, said public information of cer Jeff Welsh. From grief counseling to employment services and ood mitigation. In order to receive individual assistance, the damaged home must be the persons primary residence. If someones vacation home was damaged, it would not be eligible for assistance, Welsh said. The whole goal is to make the house safe, sanitary and habitable, Welsh said. Its about making the house livable. Welsh said the maximum amount an individual can receive is $30,200. Money for home repairs for damage from the disaster that was not covered by insurance is available for disaster victims. Welsh said if someone has insurance, FEMA needs to know what that settlement was, so it is not duplicated. When someone registers for assistance, a professional building inspector will be sent out to assess the damage to the structure. The inspector works with a certain list of criteria and looks at the size of the house, how deep the water was, etc. He added that some personal property in main living areas might be able to be replaced, if they were destroyed. Welsh said one example is a childs bedroom furniture. Once an inspection is done, an applicant will receive a letter on the status of their claim. Welsh said an applicant should receive a response within two weeks. If they have any questions, they should call FEMA, he said. Welsh said there is a lot of exibility across disasters. The point is to make sure it tries to help people. The system is set up so that people can get help getting help, Welsh said. Welsh said it is very normal for the team to speak to everyone affected in the county at least once. There currently is no timeline for how long FEMA will be in Wakulla County, Welsh said. Its usually until the demand drops off, Welsh said. As time passes, a few people from FEMA stay behind to help those with special needs. For more information, call FEMA at 1-800-621-3362 or visit www.disasterassistance.gov. Staff reportOn Monday, July 9, public assistance was approved for Wakulla County due to the impacts of Tropical Storm Debby. Public assistance provides grant assistance for debris removal and emergency protective measures. Costs for repair, replacement, or restoration of disaster-damaged, publicly-owned facilities can also be covered under public assistance. Public assistance from the federal declaration comes in conjunction with the earlier approval of individual assistance for Wakulla. State, tribal, local governments and certain types of private non-pro t organizations in the 20 designated counties should visit www.FloridaPA.org to create an account within 30 days of a presidential declaration to apply for Public Assistance. The federal share of assistance is not less than 75 percent of the eligible cost for emergency measures and permanent restoration. The grantee (usually the state) determines how the non-federal share, up to 25 percent, is split with the subgrantees (eligible applicants), according to FEMA. Tropical Storm Debby made landfall June 27 in Steinhatchee. Impacts from the storm were felt statewide. The primary concern from Tropical Storm Debby was the proli c amount of rainfall and the resulting ooding impacts. Six rivers across Florida reached major ood stage, and two rivers, the Sopchoppy and the St. Marys, reached record breaking crests. Continued from Page 1A They went back over to his house and cut the tree out of the way. Then Rogers was able to get his truck and drive out. Everything happened so fast, Rogers says. He had 15 minutes to evacuate. The water was coming in so quick, he says. If he had waited any longer, he doesnt think his truck would have been able to make it. There was stuff oating everywhere, he says. Plus, it was in the dead of night, making it dif cult to maneuver through the debris. Rogers drove to Tallahassee and stayed in a hotel. He returned the next day, around noon, and found his yard was now a lake. He had to wade through the water to get to his front door. Inside, the water was a foot high. I knew right then it was history, Rogers says. Since then, he has been back cleaning out the mobile home, trying to save what he can. But, he says, everything was pretty much destroyed. Rogers has lived there since 1988 and says he has never seen it flood like that. He does not have insurance and is hoping assistance will be approved from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. He has already applied and is waiting on a response. He plans to start off new and build a solid home, but this time it will be 8 feet above the ground. Its too pretty of a place not to build there, Rogers says. His other neighbors were also impacted, including the Ashleys, who also lost everything. He was appreciative of everyone who has been supportive, including the American Red Cross, who, he says, went out of their way to help people in Wakulla County. Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A The DRC has representation from FEMA and numerous other organizations and agencies to help those disaster victims. The DRC is invaluable, said Brenda Cheek, community relations specialist. The team works from a preliminary damage assessment sheet that was compiled by the officials with FEMA prior to Wakulla County being approved for individual and public assistance. The sheet has a list of the areas in Wakulla County that sustained damage from the storm. The team goes up and down the streets, knocking on every door. We try to work the streets, Cheek said. They let people know about the DRC and that federal assistance is available and they also listen to their stories and listen to their needs. A big part of the job is listening, Huffstutler said. When the team hears a special need, they write it down and bring it back to the DRC. And they also do followup visits to relay the information again and make sure the victim is getting the help they need. When you are in a shock situation, you have to go back, Tim Tyson, FEMA spokesperson, said of the team. One resident who has yet to make it to the DRC, but was able to register with FEMA thanks to the team was Elaine Herndon. The team came to her home on July 4 and she used their phone to register and apply for individual assistance. Herndon has ood insurance, but her claim with her insurance company was denied. She was heartbroken. When FEMA representatives showed up on her front door letting her know she could apply for some federal assistance, she said it was wonderful. It helped me out with my stress level, Herndon said. I was overwhelmed. The community relations team had been at a neighbors house who told them they needed to check on the Herndons, Cheek said. The neighbors all take care of each other, Cheek said. When the rain started from Tropical Storm Debby, Herndon and her husband kept a close eye on the Sopchoppy River levels and the amount of rain that was pouring down. After measuring 28 inches of rainfall, Herndon stopped emptying her rain gauge. We knew it was going to be a bad ood, Herndon said. The area has ooded before, but never like this, she said. The water will make it to the road, but never to her yard. This time, the water made its way all the way to her home and several inches inside, destroying the entire lower level, which is where her bedrooms and bathrooms were. We lost all of that, Herndon said. Herndon was only able to grab her grandchildren, puppies and kittens before evacuating. The water came really fast, she says. The water rushed across her yard like a current. By the time the river was high enough to ow onto her property, the downstairs was already ooded from the large amount of rain they received. She has lived there for 33 years and said she has never seen anything like this ood. Herndon said a FEMA inspector came out to her home on Saturday, July 7, and she is now waiting to hear the status of her application. Herndon and her family are trying to save keepsakes and furniture and clean out the rest of the house and a mobile home on their property where her son lived. Its a terrible disaster for everyone to go through, she said. She received help from the Samaritans Purse who volunteered their time to clean out the debris from Herndons home. They showed up early in the morning and worked for hours, she said. That was just a blessing, Herndon said. Although Herndon suffered major damage, she pointed out that others were in far worse shape than her. I at least have my living room and kitchen, she said. Some people lost their whole home. She was appreciative of the volunteers and FEMA representatives and all who have helped her. The important thing was that everyone survived, she said. As long as we keep on going, we can start over with anything. Upon leaving Herndons residence, she thanked the team for their help and gave one of them a hug.Community Relations Team is out He woke up just in timeThe Wakulla County Commission will hold an emergency public meeting in response to developments from Tropical Storm Debby and will be held on Thursday, July 12, at 4 p.m. at the Wakulla County Community Center, located at 318 Shadeville Highway. The emergency public meeting was called by the chairman of the Board of County Commissioners. Disaster Recovery Center is openPublic assistance available for Wakulla CountyEmergency meeting set by commission Hair Place That 850-926-6020Gift Certicates Available FULL SERVICE HAIR SALON Styles for Men, Women & ChildrenCutsUpDosFeather Locks Color Perms Highlights F acial Waxings Specialty Cuts F lat TopsMirandaTues-Sat545-2905LindaTues-Sat294-2085 RobynThurs-Sat926-6020 MavisFriday545-2905 ULL E RVI C E A I R A L O N Happy 75th Birthday! Happy 75th Birthday! Please join us in the celebration of Nellie Whites 75th Birthday Bash and Dinner! Please join us in the celebration of Nellie Whites 75th Birthday Bash and Dinner! Saturday, July 14, 3pm at her home in Shadeville in the hole, (Doshn Levi Rd.) For more information contact Belinda Ross 210-7506 or Kravien White 702-6520. Saturday, July 14, 3pm at her home in Shadeville in the hole, (Doshn Levi Rd.) For more information contact Belinda Ross 210-7506 or Kravien White 702-6520. PANACEA FULL GOSPEL 8 Taylor Street, Panacea, FL PANACEA FULL GOSPEL ASSEMBLY VBS BIBLE JULY 23-27, 2012 5:30 PM 8:30 PM Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Disabled veterans to offer mobile service of ce So many veterans feel confused about benefits and services theyve earned. Theres so much to know, and so many changes from one year to the next. Thats why the nonpro t Disabled American Veterans (DAV) and the HarleyDavidson Foundation have teamed up to offer help. The DAV Mobile Service Of ce will be at the Capital City Harley-Davidson, 1745 Capital Circle Northwest, Tallahassee, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, July 14, to personally provide the best counseling and claim ling assistance available. This event is part of the nationwide Harleys Heroes tour and is free to all veterans and members of their families. For further information contact Andrew Marshall at (727) 319-7444. Group seeks donations for school suppliesBig Hearted Angels will host its fth annual Back to School Shopping Spree on Aug. 11 to give children of underprivileged families school supplies. The group was founded by Mount Olive native Trave Williams, owner of the largest wood supplier in central Florida, and includes Marylon Harvey, Sylvester Williams, Mary Jean Williams, and Rosa Feen-Harvey all of Wakulla County. The shopping spree will be held at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. Students will shop at the Crawfordville Wal-Mart and will be traveling tby Wakulla County school buses, as approved by the school board. Each child will be given $50 to spend for their needs. Williams is sponsoring 40 children at $50 per child and is asking citizens and businesses to match his number by sponsoring one or more child via $50. To sponsor a child please contact: Marylon Harvy at (850) 962-7893 or Sylvester Williams: (850) 926-7195 Or send a deposit to Big Hearted Angels Account at Ameris Bank in Crawfordville. Any amount is accepted. Wakulla Cattlemens meeting set for July 19 Sam Ard, Director of Governmental Relations for the Florida Cattlemens Association, will be speaking at Wakulla Cattlemens Association quarterly meeting on July 19 at 8 p.m. The meeting will be held at the UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 84 Cedar Avenue and is open to the public. Floridas cattle industry is one of the 15 largest in the United States, said Richard Gowdy, president of the Wakulla Cattlemens Association. We want to invite everyone to join us and learn about Floridas cattlemen dedicated efforts to preserve Floridas green ranch lands, he said. The Wakulla Cattlemens Association is open to anyone with an interest in Florida agriculture, especially livestock issues. Come join us and learn more about activities here in Wakulla County, he said. More than 100 temporary retail stockers needed Workforce Plus and Manpower are seeking applications for more than 100 retail stocker positions available locally. On Tuesday, July 17, and Thursday, July 19, from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Workforce Plus will be hosting a recruitment to ll these positions which are scheduled to start on Aug. 1. The recruitments will be held at the Workforce Plus office located at 2525 South Monroe Street in Tallahassee. The retail stocker positions are fulltime shift work, Monday through Sunday, on a 24-hour schedule. The job assignment should last between four to six weeks with the possibility for a longer term opportunity as a result of star performance. Applicants must be willing to work weekends. Pay is guaranteed at $8 per hour. Applicants should also be able to push, pull or lift 50 pounds repeatedly throughout their shift. A drug screen and background check will be conducted at the time of interview. Job seekers who are interested in being considered for the above position and participate in the recruitment should contact Workforce Plus at (850) 414-6085 or toll free at (866) WFPJOB1. Preregistration is required. The meeting will be held at the UF/ IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 84 Cedar Avenue and is open to the public. Staff reportsBriefs Cookies and Candidates for Democratic hopefulsThe public is invited to attend Cookies and Candidates a political forum for Democratic candidates running for the House District 7 seat in the Florida legislature. The forum, sponsored by the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee, will take place at the Wakulla County Public Library on Thursday, July 12. The event will feature statements by each candidate, followed by a series of questions that each candidate will have an opportunity to answer. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting at 7 p.m., and candidate forum beginning at 7:30 p.m. Cookies and refreshments will be served. The three Democratic candidates are Robert Hill, Liberty County Clerk of Court and County Administrator; AJ Smith, Captain with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce and Executive Director of the Florida Deputy Sheriffs Association; and Thomas Dickens, attorney, adjunct professor at TCC, and Iraq war veteran. Democratic voters will choose among these three candidates in the August 14th primary election. Due to redistricting Wakulla County has now been uni ed into House District 7. Campaign party for Howard Kessler scheduledHoward Kessler, candidate for county commission, will hold a campaign party on Saturday, July 14, at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County extension of ce. The event will feature music by Frank Lindamood and Chelsea Kessler, and food, refreshments and campaign signs for the yard and T-shirts. For more information, email Howard@HowardKessler.com or call (850) 228-9641. Sheriff candidate political forum on July 17Political forum sponsored by the Wakulla County Christian Coalition and Concerned Citizens of Wakulla County will be held for the sheriff candidates at 7 p.m. on Saturday, July 17. Maurice Langston and Charlie Creel are invited. Doug Jones is the moderator. It will be held at New Bridge Hope Cafeteria,1282 Spring Creek Highway, across from Macks Meats. Staff reportsPolitical Briefs Jensen wins news awards for reportingStaff ReportJennifer Jensen, reporter for The Wakulla News, recently won two awards for her writing: she won second place from the Florida Press Association in the category of Government Reporting, and third place from LCNI Newspapers for Excellence in Feature Writing. Winners of the Florida Press Association awards were recognized at the Florida Press Convention on Saturday, July 7, in Destin. There were more than 1,500 entries in the FPA Better Weekly Newspaper Contest this year in 45 categories. In the other contest, Jensen won for feature writing against other LCNI newspapers. Special to The NewsTallahassee Community Colleges Wakulla Environmental Institute continues to move forward. In April, Governor Rick Scotts budget included a $4.5 million investment in the construction of the Institute and now TCC has appointed Bob Ballard as the Institutes new executive director. Before joining TCC, Ballard served for 12 years as deputy secretary of the Florida Department of Environment Protections Land and Recreation of- ce, and previously served as planning, budget and management coordinator and chief cabinet aide in the Florida Department of Education. Under his leadership, Floridas parks were the two-time National Gold Medal winner for best state park system in the nation, Floridas greenways and trails were awarded for best trail management in 2010 and Florida state parks achieved the donation of 1.2 million volunteer hours the most volunteer hours of any state park system in the nation. Additionally, Ballard was very involved in the St. Marks Trail resurfacing project, the rst rail-trail in the State trail system to be paved. Bobs experience in the realms of both education and environmental issues make him uniquely qualified to lead the Wakulla Environmental Institute, where those two priorities will intersect, said Dr. Jim Murdaugh, president of TCC. This is an exciting time for TCC as we begin a new chapter in Wakulla County, and I look forward to the leadership Bob will bring to this project. Through the Institute, TCC will offer new environmentally focused degree and certificate programs, including programs in environmental science technology, hospitality and tourism, aquaculture management and agribusiness. The Institute will highlight Wakullas natural heritage and biodiversity to offer unique science and technology education opportunities and serve as an economic driver for the regionful lling a mission similar to TCCs Florida Public Safety Institute in Gadsden County. Jennifer Jensen Workshop on assessment for Wakulla Gardens set July 12By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA workshop held by the Wakulla County Commission on the proposed assessment for road improvements for Wakulla Gardens will be held on July 12 at 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Community Center. Details about the plan will be announced and there will be time for public comment. The commission voted to send a ballot to Wakulla Gardens residents to determine if they would be willing to pay an assessment to have their roads paved. The cost to pave all 21 miles of road in Wakulla Gardens and minimal stormwater drainage improvements is $5.2 million. The cost to each individual homeowner would be between $180 and $235 a year for 15 or 20 years. There are about 3,000 units in Wakulla Gardens. If a majority of residents agree to assess themselves, the commission would then vote whether to move forward. If the commission does vote to move forward, County Administrator David Edwards has said previously that paving could start next spring. There are numerous infrastructure problems located within Wakulla Gardens, including unpaved and poor roadways, stormwater drainage problems and lack of access to sewer and water. The cost to fund these improvements is astronomical and the commission has been trying to nd ways to pay for these improvements. Continued from Page 1A Preserving the countys natural environment is also a top priority. Our unique environment is what draws people and businesses to our county and entices them to stay, Brock said. She is concerned that the current members of the commission are trying to dismantle the wetlands ordinance. I would focus on trying to preserve it as it stands, Brock said. Brock feels she bring several assets to the commission, including her math skills. I can do the math, she said. She has also worked with two different boards budgets, one which was signi cantly smaller than Wakulla County and another that was 10 times the size. She added that she wouldnt be serving as a commissioner for the salary. She has pledged to return half of her pay to the county departments of her choice. Some of these departments are the library, parks and recreation, volunteer re departments and community center. She also said she is a people person. I love to see people treated as they deserve to be treated, with respect and consideration, Brock said. In her role as a member of the board of directors for the National Wildlife Federation, she has spoken about springs protection to the governor and cabinet, has lobbied in Congress, including her involvement with the Restore Act, which was recently passed. Brock said the NWF has worked on the issue since the idea came forth. In May Brock said she met with senior staff of the White House to discuss the Restore Act. The act will make sure that 80 percent of the nes imposed from the Oil Spill will be given to the ve Gulf states. Brock said she was also a working mother and understands that role. Her son was a special needs child and passed away at the age of 29. I understand the 24/7 caregiver issue, Brock said. I have a passion for helping others to resolve their challenges, and feel their pain. Brock is from Jackson County. She moved to Wakulla County 36 years ago. She has a degree in pure math and second major in education from Florida Atlantic University. She is a member of the Wakulla League of Women Voters and past president, member of the Friends of the Wakulla Springs, Friends of the Wakulla County Public Library, chair of the WIldlife Alert Committee and on the board of directors for the NWF and Florida Wildlife Federation. She can be reached at 421-6640 or by email at jbrock 43@embarqmail. com.Bob Ballard will head TCCs Wakulla Environmental InstituteJenny Brock is running for commission City of Sopchoppy The City of Sopchoppy will be changing the date of the regular July, 2012 meeting from the second Monday to the third Monday in July The meeting will be held, July 16, 2012 at 6:30 p.m., at 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL.JULY 5, 12, 2012NOTICE OF MEETING CHANGE Budget and Set Millage Rate FY 2012-2013JULY 12, 2012Date: July 17, 2012 at 5:15 pm Location: 788 Port Leon Drive St. Marks, FL 32355The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM, M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Ofce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Debbys aftermath: situation update on Monday, July 9 Update on Tropical Storm Debby on July 5 Federal funding available for Wakulla residents affected by Debby Replacement of food assistance available for those affected by storm FEMA Disaster Recovery Center now open in Wakulla Volunteers needed and available to storm cleanup thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Editor, The News: The issue of improving the airport has caused a lot of my neighbors to become less than the friendly neighbors we are accustomed to. I cannot see why there should be so much stress about this subject. At one time I shed about three times a week and boat ramps were very important to me, now I rarely sh and boat ramps are not very important. If the state said all of Wakullas boat ramps were unsafe and might be closed, the main impact on me would be my property value declining or my taxes increasing to repair the ramps. If the state said all of the ramps were unsafe but we have state funds to bring them up to code that would sound good. If the funds all came from boating taxes I would be all for it. Now if you substitute boat ramp for airport you have the same thing. There are a lot of people who dont use the airport or boat ramps and this would not directly affect them. There are also a lot of people who would have declining property values if the boat ramps and airport were deemed unsafe to use. If you live in Crawfordville this may not matter to you; if you live in Tarpine it probably is important to you. I dont live in either place but I do know that the airport and boat ramps make my property more valuable. If the State has aviation fuel tax funds and is willing to improve the airport I can see no reason to not improve it. Bill Russell Ochlockonee Bay Editor, The News: I would like to thank all my gate workers who worked July Fourth for me. Also, thank you to the sheriffs of ce and Mr. Tom Kilbourne and all the deputies who helped at the gate and in the park. Thanks to state troopers and emergency personnel. A special thanks goes to Junior Cantrell for his work, Joy Sharp for all her work and to the Jeff Tilley family for their golf cart. For Angela Tilley for her help also. Without all you guys helping me, we would not have been able to get this work done. May God bless all of you for your hard work. Juanita Cantrell Gate ChairmanSopchoppy Fourth of JulyEditor, The News: Friends of Gypsy Cat Rescue wish to thank all those who helped us after Tropical Storm Debby knocked down trees at our sanctuary. Talquin Electric Cooperative responded promptly, and so did Cole Oliver from Anytime Electric. Clay Bozeman from Barefoot Roo ng Company also assisted us in getting back to normal here very quickly. Wakulla County is lucky to have such caring people who put others ahead of themselves. Janet Thompson Editor, The News: Left off of The Wakulla News roads closed list were South Lawhon Mill Road and South West Floyd Gray Road. Both closures were on the dirt sections of these roads. In the past, I offered to take a couple of county commissioners and show them these roads are not paved. I had no takers. I seriously doubt these commissioners know where these two roads are located, unless they happen to notice the road signs when driving on Highway 319. I happen to think the county is in need of professional leadership and more integrity. Decisions should not be made due to friendships, nancial gain or what area of the county one lives. These are my opinions only. But if the shoe ts, you must wear it. Daisy E. Simpkins CrawfordvilleREADERS WRITE:Why not improve the airport? Airport is asset to the county Sopchoppy Fourth of July thanks Disaster shows nations vulnerabilities Healthcare law will be expensive Help after storm was appreciated Some dirt roads left o closure listA history of Wakulla Gardens and historic subdivisions Editor, The News: Contrary to what you have read recently, the airport is an asset to Wakulla County. The land was given to Wakulla County by Fenton Jones, who had a vision of what an airport could mean to this county. Over the years, Wakulla County has halfheartedly supported the airport and allowed volunteers in Tarpine to maintain the airport. The grass was cut, lights were installed by a Tarpine property owner, trees were trimmed, irrigation was installed and other things were completed by volunteers who asked for nothing in return. Wakulla County has the opportunity to make the necessary improvements to the airport using grant monies generated from aviation taxes (both commercial and general aviation). These grant monies are no-match funds and the county will be paid to administer the grants. That means the improvements will be made at no cost to the citizens of Wakulla County. By the way, these improvements are needed because the Florida Department of Transportation rules have changed over the years and safety comes first. This is not an expansion so that jets can y in and out of the airport. The length of the runway will stay about the same and it will be realigned to meet the new requirements. Wakulla County Airport (2J0) currently serves the public in emergency response functions, use by law enforcement, forest service, military operations, disaster relief, search and rescue, ight instruction and tourism. There are numerous ights made by people who own property in Wakulla and Franklin counties for business and pleasure. Other people simply y in and stay at local motels, frequent the local restaurants and stores, go shing on a charter boat, buy local seafood and spend money while they are in the county. Just imagine your loved one or friends lost at sea while on a shing trip. You would see pilots jump into their airplanes and work with law enforcement to nd those lost. This was a reality and could be again. Fast forward to today. The Board of Commissioners are holding an airport workshop on July 17 from 2 to 4 p.m. to hear both sides of this argument. One side sees the vision of Fenton Jones and what the Wakulla County Airport could mean to the whole community and the other side wants to close the airport or relocate it even though each person knew their property was located in close proximity to the airport. Please join the Friends of Wakulla County Airport and show your support! Robert Odell Ochlockonee Bay Why are some subdivisions designated Historic Subdivisions? Wakulla Gardens, with more than 3,500 platted lots enjoys that designation. It is easy to conjecture on the legal use of such a term. They are historic by virtue of how these subdivisions were created in the 1950s and 1960s in Wakulla County. It also is the history of how year after year for the last decade at least, this history has become a big headache for our Board of Commissioners. Back then, in the 1950s and 1960s, the county accepted subdivided areas without requiring developers to provide infrastructure. In a sense then, every time the term Historic Subdivisions is used, it must bring to mind that planning regulations have changed how land is being developed during the past 50 years. Every elected official and employee in Wakulla County must be so tired of hearing the term Historic Subdivisions. Why? One reason: There cannot be any successful resolution to the problems of historic proportions these subdivisions, and especially Wakulla Gardens, have wrought. Without rst achieving some measure of accountability for the historic behavior for those at the top, there cannot be any equitable resolution to the historic problems. When will elected of cials take charge of the sins of the past? What would that look like? It would mean that a majority of the board seemingly understands that if change is to happen, it must come about through a fundamental reconceptualization of our Historic Subdivisions. The Board asked for a comprehensive study and was given one in May 2008. Many, many public meetings followed. Builders provided donuts and coffee. Citizens were given examples of how infrastructure that addresses the historic problems could be achieved immediately. Thousands of dollars were spent on studies, surveys and acquisition of lots in Wakulla Gardens. A Speci c Flood Basin ordinance passed in 2006 that requires the Planning Director to determine the elevation of housing units in Wakulla Gardens. Because most lots within Wakulla Gardens are located within the areas of the 500year ood zone, and some within areas of the 100-year ood, this historic knowledge must be taken into account. A couple of roads within Wakulla Gardens have not been opened. Trees grow, animals roam and lot owners have no access at all. That pales in comparison to the lies that real estate agents told new home owners about their concerns about the dirt roads. Realtors had no right, and no basis to tell buyers that the roads would be paved soon and that is part of the history as well. That is part of the problem of these historic subdivisions. Nobody wants to tell the bare facts as they are. Topographic maps the county commissioned are ignored. A few areas in Wakulla Gardens ood. Always have, always will. Wakulla Gardens, however, is a very, very large area. In other times this area might actually be considered a Community Redevelopment Area. Why not? Such a designation might stop the creation and continuation of blighted conditions that are in the making in Wakulla Gardens. Increasing the property taxes by 221 percent for all lot owners in Wakulla Gardens to pave the 21-plus miles of roads in that historic subdivision wont stop the ooding. (That is as far as I drive from my home to Tallahassee.) In 2008, the Board of Commissioners received a thorough study that estimated the cost of paving Wakulla Gardens at $5 million. That study also included suggested funding mechanisms. For decades some Wakulla Gardens residents pleaded wit h the Board to stop issuing building permits until this historic problem could be addressed with a comprehensive revision of antiquated plats. What we are all left with is irate home owners, abandoned houses, expensive band-aids applied to stabilize roads and above all: Sleepless nights for elected of cials who now want the public to take over what history has made their problem.Madeleine H. Carr is a historian who lives in Wakulla Gardens. Editor, The News: Although Mr. Snowdens cartoon (Opinion Page, July 5, on the Supreme Courts healthcare ruling) was somewhat amusing, the real fact is we, the American people, were sold an expensive piece of legislation, The American people were told the cost would be $900 billion, but the Congressional Budget Of ce now estimates the true cost will be around $1.86 trillion. I dare anyone to show me one government program that has performed as promised Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, Department of Education, Energy? Oh, the list goes on and on. The larger government gets, the more freedom you lose! Lets make wise choices in the upcoming November election! Jimmie Smith Spring CreekOn the Wakulla airport issue:Editor, The News: Sometimes it takes something to happen to get a person in the proper perspective of our problems. On Saturday, June 30, my wife ew to West Virginia to visit family. On her arrival she found that a tornado had gone through West Virginia and about ve other states. She found that the county where she was raised had no power, no landline phone service and no cell phone service from the rst or second largest cell phone companies in the country. Most of our family and friends have their own wells but unfortunately wells require electricity which made water an unobtainable commodity. To add insult to injury, the lack of electricity also made obtaining gas and diesel fuel at gas stations an impossibility. Citizens had to go at least 50 miles to get gas, ice and food supplies. At one gas station, the line was over two miles long. Another issue that was obvious was the lack of FEMA assistance. I am a person who does not cherish our bloated U.S. Government but I do expect some form of help from our government when issues like this hit any part of the country. My wife said it looked like it would be days until FEMA showed up. If it were not for this issue I would have never thought about how vulnerable this country is. I wonder if terrorists would not look at how we handled this disaster and say to themselves how a coordinated attack on our power grids across the country and especially on the east coast could bring this country to its knees. Our gas stations not having the ability to provide fuel create problems in the event that evacuation is needed or if prolonged fuel consumption is needed. FEMA needs to be more proactive and there to assist our citizens in a more expeditious manner. It is very seldom that whole counties are out of power, but this situation proved it can happen and we as citizens, vendors and government need to be ready to handle the issue if and when it arises. Garland W. Burdette Crawfordville

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Tracy Candice Chuley, 52, passed away unexpectedly on July 1, at her home. She was born Dec. 19, 1959, the only daughter of George and Alyce Chuley. She was a business graduate of the State University of New York at Canton in Canton, N.Y., and also attended Florida State University. She was a real estate title and closing agent in Crawfordville and was most recently with Akerman Senter tt of Tallahassee as a legal administrative assistant. She lived life to the fullest and had a special gift of love and kindness with everyone whose lives she touched. A memorial service will be scheduled at a later date in her home town of Seneca Falls, N.Y. It would be Tracys dearest wish that any memorials be donated to her beloved canine companion, Gussie Gus. Your contribution can be sent to Debi Wilburn, 6980 Cam eld St., Jacksonville FL 32222. Survivors include her brothers, Mark Chuley, Lanson Chuley and Kalan Chuley, all of Seneca Falls, N.Y.; Lynn Chuley of Pompano Beach; Daryl Chuley of Blacksburg, S.C., and Aaron Chuley of Knoxville, Tenn.; and several nieces and nephews and very special friends, John and Sharon Ryan. She was predeceased by her parents, George and Alyce Chuley; and a brother, Stephen Edward Chuley. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 Page 5AChurchreligious views and events Obituaries Church BriefsTracy Candice Chuley Angeline Gainey Plump Donaldson Betty Jean Freeman Dorothy Emily Gercak Eleanor Louise Reddick B. Graddick Ralph Edward Griffin Tracy Candice Chuley Betty Jean Freeman OUT TO PASTORWhat happened to spankings?Mount Beasor Primitive Baptist Church, 29 Winthrop Avenue, Sopchoppy, has announced that a special five-day revival meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, July 18, through Sunday, July 22, in celebration of the churchs 159th consecutive year of Gospel ministry. Evangelist Lindon Frost, a dynamic speaker and teacher of Jasper, Ala., will minister nightly. Starting times are 7 p.m. nightly through July 21 and 11 a.m. on Sunday, July 22. There will be special singing every night and a fellowship luncheon following the Sunday morning worship service. Elder Bruce Taylor, Pastor and the congregation at Mount Beasor extend a cordial invitation to all for this special time of spiritual enrichment and fellowship. For more information, transportation or directions, call 926-1513 or 962-3711.Revival set at Mount Beasor Pilgrim Rest to host revival Pilgrim Rest Primitive Baptist Church will host a pre-anniversary musical program in honor of Elder Otis H. Walker as he celebrates eight years as pastor. The event will take place Saturday, July 14, at 6:30 p.m. Reverend Chris A. Burney, pastor of Greater Saint Mark P.B. Church of Tallahassee, will be the emcee. All local choirs, groups, and soloists are invited to attend. For additional information, please contact Sister Juliet Hunter. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDERSometimes watching the news on television gets rather disparaging. Now that we have 24/7 news, not only can we see the news any time we want to, but we can see it over and over and over again. It is particularly disheartening when there is a slow news day. I think all of us can remember O.J. Simpsons mad race down a Los Angeles highway. I can remember the good old days when Uncle Walter brought us up to speed on the days news inside of a 30-minute program. Oh, for those good old days. Never has an American generation been exposed to so much and knows so little for so short a time. This all came to me recently when the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were watching the news after our evening repast. I think it was the 9,999 times this particular news story had been played. Of course, we do not watch television that often and so we may only have seen a very short portion. The short portion that we saw was just about enough and my wife said so. It was the news story, if you remember, of the bus lady who was bullied by children. I think those children, my wife said and then paused while she grit her teeth violently, need a good old-fashioned spanking. And with that, she crossed her arms and set her face in a de ant manner. Luckily, I was not one of those children or I would have received the intentions of her mind at that point. Her comment got me to thinking. There was a time, back in the day, when spankings were rather normal. Someone once said that if you saw a young boy on the street you should stop what youre doing and give him a good spanking because he was either coming from trouble or headed for trouble. Raising children then was a community affair. I am not sure that ever took place, but it does have an authentic ring to it. I semi-fondly remember when I was a youngster I had the heebie-jeebies whaled out of me by my father on a regular basis. And I can testify that I have not missed those heebiejeebies. My life is better for not having them. Watching the video about the kids bullying that bus lady, I could not help but think that they were a rather spoiled bunch of little brats. Pardon my French. I think I would have taken it one step further than my wife. Not only do those youngsters need a good old-fashioned spanking but I think their parents do as well. Kids today are only a mirror of what they see and hear at home. When I was young, the only spoiled brats around were the children of the rich folk. They could afford to be spoiled brats because their parents with their money bought their way into society. The only thing those kids ever earned was a bad reputation and distain from the rest of us. The rest of us, having gone through the spanking rituals, could not afford to be spoiled brats. Good parents made sure of that. I think of what my father use to say. Son, Im going to take this Board of Education and apply it to the seat of your learning. I can testify that he was very enthusiastic about his job. Continued on Page 11A By ETHEL SKIPPER On Saturday, July 21, at noon, Bishop Joseph E. Rosier and Family will render a fellowship service program at Skipper Temple Church, 159 Surf Road in Sopchoppy. Following the church service will be a birthday celebration for Bishop Rosier, who will be 70 years old. He wants all his classmates and family and friends to come celebrate with him and his family. The fth Sunday Union meeting of the Church of Christ Written In Heaven will be held at Shiloh Church in Quincy. Elder Mary Holloman is host pastor. Date July 27 through July 29. Elder Andrew Morris is the union director. Happy birthday to Elizabeth Clary on July 18, Pastor Ruth Easter on July 22, and Bishop Joseph Rosier on July 20. Our prayers and concern go out to all the sick and shut-in, those in nursing homes, the prisons, and all those in need.Buckhorn News Betty Jean Freeman, 73, died on Friday, July 6, in Crawfordville. She was born in Indianapolis, Ind., and had been in this area 30 years. She was a member of Oyster Bay Baptist Church and a construction worker. She was a loving mother and devoted grandmother. She is survived by three sons, Lonnie Freeman (Rhonda), Eugene Freeman (Danette) and Steven Freeman (Paula); one daughter, Malinda Barrett; 17 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements. Obituaries continue on Page 11A Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments WEDNESDAY: and Adults 10:30am 11:00am Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 New Testament Bible ChurchBible-believing Church meets at Wakulla County Public Library, large conference room. Songs, prayer and Bible teaching/preaching. The Lord Jesus described the basic meaning of a church in a very simple and yet profound way:For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.Come take part in our study of Gods Word.4330 Crawfordville Hwy.

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings CommunityJohnson and Tobell to wedAshlynn Faye Tobell of Crawfordville and Robert Anthony Johnson of Tallahassee announce their upcoming wedding. She is the daughter of Bill and Vicky Tobell of Crawfordville and he is the son of Bill and Shannon Johnson of Tallahassee. The bride-elect graduated from Wakulla High School in 2008 and Aveda Institute in Tallahassee in January. The groom-elect graduated from Florida High School virtual online in 2004 and Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy in 2007 from the Department of Juvenile Justice. He served in the military from 2004 to 2010. The wedding will be held on July 14 at 3 p.m. at Freedom First Assembly of God Church. Ashley Tobell and Robert Johnson FLAG oat wins most original at July Fourth Special to The News Sam Ard, director of governmental relations for the Florida Cattlemens Association, will be speaking at Wakulla Cattlemens Association quarterly meeting on July 19 at 8 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, and is open to the public. Floridas cattle industry is one of the 15 largest in the United States, said Richard Gowdy, president of the Wakulla Cattlemens Association. We want to invite everyone to join us and learn about Floridas cattlemen dedicated efforts to preserve Floridas green ranch lands, he said. As a large industry within the state, cattle ranchers signi cantly support Floridas interstate economy and provide jobs as well as beef. The cattle industry supports a vast network of businesses that employ thousands of Floridians. Floridas cattlemen have been strong supporters of Floridas youth and culture, said Gowdy. From displays at the North Florida Fair to college scholarship contests, Floridas cattlemen are working diligently to give back to the communities where they live and serve, he said. The Wakulla Cattlemens Association is open to anyone with an interest in Florida agriculture, especially livestock issues. Come join us and learn more about activities here in Wakulla County, he said. Farrah Harris recently joined the Florida Department of Law Enforcement Toastmaster Club to improve her public speaking and leadership skills. She works for FDLE as a senior criminal justice information technician in the Criminal History Services section. She has received three promotions in six months. She has an associates degree from Tallahassee Community College, an associates degree in paralegal studies from Keiser University and was recently accepted to Florida State University where she plans to major in criminalogy and criminal justice. She has also been on the Presidents List. She is the daughter of Suzanne and Dane Moses of Crawfordville and Charles Harris of Missouri. She is the granddaughter of Bettye Trites of Crawfordville. Crystal and Daniel Morris Jr. announce the birth of their son, Peyton Robert Morris, on May 31 at 6:42 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 7 pounds, 10 ounces and was 20 inches. His maternal grandparents are Robert and Carol Broome of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are Dan and Sharon Morris of Monticello. His great-grandparents are Bill and Dee Counts. Amanda Davis of Crawfordville received a Master of Theological Studies from the Candler School of Theology of Emory University in Atlanta, at its 167th commencement ceremony on May 14. Air Force Airman Rebecca L. Smith graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. She completed an intensive, eight-week program and earned four credits toward an associate in applied science degree. Smith is the daughter of Kay Bozeman of Crawfordville, and Michael Smith of Keystone Heights. She is a 2009 graduate of Wakulla High School. The winner of the most original oat at the Sopchoppy Fourth of July Parade was We the People. The oat was entered by the Freedom and Liberty Advocacy Group (FLAG) of Wakulla and was designed by Bo Mixer of Crawfordville. It featured George Washington, played by Bob Allen, Ben Franklin, played by Dave Seeley, and Betsy Ross, played by Jeannie Beck, holding a discussion about the power of the We hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal clause from the Declaration of Independence. For more information about FLAG, email ag1776news@gmail.com or visit them on facebook. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Cattlemen meeting will be July 19 Harris continues to succeed Farrah Harris Birth announcement Peyton R. MorrisDavis graduates from Emory University Smith completes basic training 000BR6K850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 Page 7Asports news and team views SportsThe summer conditioning program for RMS football will begin on Monday, July 9 and run through Thursday, July 26. Anyone interested in participating needs a signed consent and release form and a current physical on the FHSAA form. These forms can be obtained online at http://www.fhsaa.org/forms/general. Players should come dressed out in PE type clothes and cleats. The program will run on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the RMS practice eld at Riversprings Middle School. By CAREY LAWHONSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla 9u All-Stars traveled to Lake City to play in the District 6 tournament on June 22. Wakulla started the tournament playing Lake City as the visiting team and came out in the first inning with Justin Bryan and Fisher Lawhon both hitting singles and each scoring a run off of a couple of elders choices by Logan Bruner and Lyric Oaks. Bryan would begin the game pitching and doing a great job only facing three batters, striking out one batter and having two great defensive plays by Fisher Lawhon and Trent Langley. Wakulla would then start the second inning scoring three more runs with hits from Bryan and Trent Langley. Bryan would also pitch the second inning only facing four batters this time with a couple of great outfield plays by Trevor McCulley and Brayden Lawhon. Fisher Lawhon would come in to pitch in the fourth inning and finish the game with three strike outs, allowing only two hits. Wakulla won the game in the fth inning 18-5. Wakulla played Lake City again on June 23 at 11:30 a.m. as the home team this time. Justin Bryan started the second game again allowing six runs, with Lake City hitting the ball really well. Wakulla then came out swinging the bats as well scoring eight runs off of some great hits by Fisher Lawhon (double), Lyric Oaks, Trevor McCulley and Brayden Lawhon (IPHR). Starting the second inning, Lake City was still swinging the bats getting a couple of hits scoring four more runs. Wakulla came out batting the second inning a little slow only scoring one run off of a triple by Trent Langley. Fisher Lawhon came in to pitch the third inning allowing only one run. Wakulla started the bottom of the third inning with a score of 10-11 but scored three more runs off of a single by Brayden Lawhon and a couple of walks allowed by Lake City. Lawhon was on the mound for the fourth inning and allowed only one run in the inning as well with a great catch by Ethan Atkins and a great play from the mound by Fisher Lawhon. Wakulla hit the ball well in the fourth to score six more runs off of hits by Brayden Lawhon and Lyric Oaks. Lake City came out in the fth swinging the bats with three singles and one double scoring seven runs. Down 18-19, Wakulla battled back with two runs from a leadoff single by Fisher Lawhon and a walk by Trent Langley. In the nal inning of the game, Logan Bruner came in to pitch, giving up ve runs with a couple great hits and a couple of defensive errors. In the bottom of the sixth, Wakulla was down 24-21, but started the inning off with a walk by Kolten Langston, followed up with a couple hits by Justin Bryan and Logan Bruner. Fisher Lawhon walked putting the tying run on base. Lyric Oaks would come up to bat with two outs and the bases loaded and hit a single scoring Bryan and Bruner, and slid into second with the shortstop dropping the ball on the tag, Lawhon ran for home, the shortstop threw the ball home but Lawhon was safe, tying up the game. Oaks took off for third and, on a bad throw from the catcher, made it home to score the winning run. Wakulla won the game and the District 6 tournament 25-24.BASEBALLWakulla 9u All-Stars are district champs WAKULLA 9U ALL STARS: Front row: Logan Bruner, Tucker Grimsley, Brayden Lawhon, Justin Bryan, Lake Lawhon, Jimmy Hazen; middle: Ethan Atkins, Trevor McCulley, Fisher Lawhon, Trent Langley, Kolten Langston, Lyric Oaks; top: Assistant Coach Anthony Atkins; Manager Carey Lawhon; Assistant Coach Russel Bryan.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS FOOTBALLWakulla linemen shine at Down and Dirty CampBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netTwenty Wakulla War Eagle linemen went to the Down and Dirty Camp at Stetson University in Deland and showed off impressive skills, according to Line Coach James Vernon. Wakullas Chris Grif n won the entire competition in individual pass rush and pass defense. In the 3-on-3 team drill, Escape from Bagdad, Wakullas team of Bryce Beverly, Hunter Hurst and Edmund Conception won. Austin Bealeue won the underclassman board drill. In the upperclassmen division, it was an allWakulla final with Kyle Weaver winning after going head-to-head with teammate John Cole, who placed second. Jonathan Chunn was recognized for bringing the highest grade point average among players to the camp, with his 6.0 GPA. He is expected to be this years valedictorian. Wakulla star lineman Chris Grif n has committed to play for Georgia Tech next year, coaches at Wakulla confirmed last week. Griffin had received seven Division 1 offers, and was on a trip to visit several schools including South Carolina, Kentucky and Vanderbilt but said he felt at home at Georgia Tech.Summer conditioning for RMS football underway Lineman Chris Gri n commits to Georgia TechGrif n We want to hear from you TCC WAKULLA CENTER PUBLIC FORUMSTallahassee Community College is interested to find out what you would like to have available at the new TCC Wakulla Center located at Centennial Bank. As we partner on future offerings and expansions, we need to know what services and programs are important to Wakulla County. Please join us to discuss the new TCC Wakulla Center and learn more about TCCs: Plus, this will be the time to find out more about the new TCC Wakulla Centers goals and: Join us for a public forum at the TCC WAKULLA CENTER 5 CRESCENT WAY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL Wednesday, July 18, 6-7:30 p.m. or Saturday, July 21, 10-11:30 a.m.If you are unable to attend but would like to share feedback, please e-mail holubb@tcc.fl.edu Open: Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 Sun. 11-9 850 697-9191THIS WEEKEND WILL BE EntertainingON THE DECKFEATURINGMarshall TaylorRAY WILEY

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsTime was, when guys got together and talked hunting and the virtues of black powder guns, I headed for the forest myself. To do something equally exciting, like watching trees grow. But on Friday, Joe took me to the range to let me shoot a .44-caliber Kentucky Pistol. This thing is ultra cool! The pistol is more than a foot long. The smooth thick walnut stock goes all the way to the end of the heavy octagon barrel. Its a handful of beauty. In preparing to shoot, you place your index nger over the tube end of a powder ask. You ip the ask upside down and you turn a lever to release 30 grains of black Pyrodex powder. Then you turn the ask right side up again. Tilting the gun away from you (of course), take your nger off the tube top and carefully tip the powder into the barrel of the pistol. The powder is the charge. Now its time for the lead bullet ball. Place a coated round patch over the end of the barrel. Center the ball on the patch. Using a ball seater, push the ball into the barrel. Then, using a ramrod, shove the bullet all the way down the barrel until it pushes against the charge you just put in. Now that the charge and the bullet are in place, you need a primer to set the gun off. First, half cock the pistol. Take a percussion or primer cap and t it over the nipple located on the side above the trigger. Youre good to go. Okay. The gun is thick and longer than any pistol Id ever shot. How do you hold it? I ask Joe. Any way you can! he replies. I grab the stock with my left hand. Grip with the right. Its a big gun. So I close my eyes. So what? And bang! Hardly any kick. And howd I hit the target, looking at the inside of my lids? Can we do it again? I ask Joe. Heck, I might even hit the bulls eye if my eyes are open. Yep. Powder power is here to stay.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and enjoys spending her retirement on the shooting range.Shooting a black powder Kentucky pistolHome on The Range BY MARJ LAWLil Daniel Lamarche, above, served as First Mate for his grandfather, Major Alan Lamarche. The Lamarches amberjack was released; but the gag grouper, below, caught by Joel Norman of Albany, Ga., was a keeper.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFishing tripSpecial to The NewsThe Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene its ABC Control Rule Working Group via a webinar. The webinar meeting will convene Tuesday, July 31, beginning at 9 a.m., concluding no later than noon eastern time. The ABC Control Rule Working Group will meet to review an alternative method of assigning appropriate risk of over shing levels to stocks based on the status, productivity, susceptibility, and resiliency of the stock. The working group will also review its previous recommendations for revisions to the ABC control rule, as well as evaluate other possible changes. A copy of the agenda and related materials can be obtained by calling the Council of ce at (813) 3481630. Materials will also be available for download from the ABC Control Rule Working Group folder on the Councils FTP site, which is accessible from the Quick Links box in the left navigation column of the Council website, www.gulfcouncil. org. Although other nonemergency issues not on the agenda may come before the group for discussion, in accordance with the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, those issues may not be the subject of formal action during this meeting. Actions of the group will be restricted to those issues specifically identified in the agenda and any issues arising after publication of this notice that require emergency action under Section 305(c) of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, provided the public has been noti ed of the Councils intent to take action to address the emergency. These webinars are accessible to people with disabilities. Gulf of Mexico Fishery will convene ABC Control Rule Working Group To nd out more callJon & Karol Sheppard251-0311Dan & Mildred Sheppard544-9625 Put yourself in this picture LIMU Tas ng Party, 21 Calvary Court 5 P.M. Saturday 7/14/12 with a 50/50 Rafe starting at 5PM Next Stop Bar GEORGES FREE BEER FRIDAY(while it lasts)2837 Coastal Hwy.926-4956 P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 www.hicksair.com 8921 Woodville Hwy. MON-WED 8AM-5PM THURS & SAT 8AM-6PM 10% OFF Good Samaritan THRIFT STORE850-210-0089 LETS DO THIS TOGETHER! DO YOU WANT IT?Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN GET YOU MOTIVATED!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 Page 9AThe celebration of the Fourth of July is a great time to reflect on what we all have rather than what we do not. Thanks to the men and women of our armed forces, we are able to enjoy many freedoms that others do not have. Please take a moment to thank servicemen and -women when you see them. We not only have our armed forces to thank, but many other servicemen and -women in our local areas. There are several thing we can do to help make their job a little easier, and one of them is to be sure we are safe when out on the water and know the rules and regulations. Many of us have seen FWC boats monitoring the waters of the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers as well as the ats. With scallop season open, there are bound to be more than the average number of boats out and about. Navigation Rule 7: Risk of Collision discusses the importance of being aware to avoid a collision on the water. It states that every boater shall use all means possible, taking into account current circumstances and weather, to determine if a risk of collision exists. This includes the use of radar and other instruments for early detection of a problem, unless there is poor information received. If there is ever a doubt a collision may happen, then act as if it will occur. In trying to determine if there is a risk for collision, it is critical to monitor the other boat or object in the water (such as an oyster bar in our area) to determine if they are moving to avoid the collision. If they are not moving, or the object is stationary, then it is your obligation to move/ change course. When the barges come into the river, they are slow to move and have very limited maneuverability due to the depth of the channel. Even if it appears they may be moving out of your way, it is still prudent for you to avoid coming close to it or blocking its path. Similarly, if you see a boat being towed by the Auxiliary, a good Samaritan or commercial towing boat, stay clear. It can be very difficult to maneuver two boats quickly and safely. The basics of Rule 7 are to avoid a collision, at all costs, by being aware of what is going on around you. With many diving for scallops, be on the lookout for people in the water. Not everyone will have a diver down ag displayed as required. Look for next weeks column for coverage on the federal and state laws for dive ags. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident being safe is more important than being right. You can be right, dead right if you dont pay attention.a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD A visit from the past Those of you who have been following Greggs column learned long ago that he has led a very busy and in fact, full life. Back in 2000 he was just building the fourth university program, the Advanced Science Diving Program at FSU in Panama City when I joined him as a researcher. The focus of my attention was the intricate details of rebreathers, a technology that Gregg has mentioned many times in this column. Rebreathers are an old technology by concept, but have only become viable for extended diving in science and recreation in the past decade or so. They facilitate an increase in exposure time by recycling the divers breath, thus allowing the use of much smaller tanks while at the same time mixing the ideal breathing gas on the y. If this sounds complicated, then it is only because we still dont fully understand or appreciate the true requirements and capabilities of our own physiology. You can imagine that, as a researcher, this was (and still is) a wide open eld and I was having the time of my life. Gregg was instrumental in allowing me to pursue this research, and in turn I spent a lot of time and effort assisting him in building his academic program. A student joined us in our efforts by the name of Terry Jolly. While matching our enthusiasm and dedication, she also added her good looks to the formula, which undoubtedly increased the male participants interest and helped secure a large student enrolment. What kept us all focused was the common goal of what we were trying to achieve. Mind you, rebreathers were very much in their infancy (even more so than they are today). We dreamed of a time when rebreathers would become so easy to use that they required very little preparation, and allowed a diving freedom far beyond what we could do with open circuit. We used the rebreathers that were available to us at the time, with all their limitations, during numerous underwater science projects, and brought home the data to prove the rebreathers viability. While it was clear that the rebreathers at the time certainly matched open-circuit technology, their advantage was still debatable. Fast forward a decade! Terry got married, and now has three cute kids. Although she has had plans to become a scientist in the marine eld, she accepted a job in a marketing agency, where she spends all day in front of a computer. Family life takes up all her spare time, and her gills have dried up. Out of the blue we received an email from her informing us that she will be in the area and would like to stop by for a visit. It was certainly a pleasure to see her again after such a long time. She had not forgotten about our ideas and goals, only for us to realize that Gregg and I are where we wanted to be over a decade ago! The dives we do today far exceed what we did a back then, and is even less of a hassle with regards to preparation than we could have predicted. As we have often pointed out in this column, knowledge and the advancement of technology have progressed dramatically in the last 10 years. Terrys visit helped us put it back into perspective. Some things have not changed much (she still looks great), and we still dream of where we want our program to be in 10 years time. Some things have changed a lot (the advent of space-age technology in our diving). We should continue to believe in our own rhetoric, at least once in a while. UnderwaterWakullaBy Joerg Hess From FWC NewsSixty-seven people lost their lives in Florida last year in boating accidents, and there have already been 28 deaths so far this year, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, which has released its 2011 Boating Accident Statistical Report. The FWC is responsible for reviewing, analyzing and compiling boating accident data for the state. Its statistical report details boating accidents and their causes. The frequency of boating accidents in Florida and their causes would probably shock most people, said Investigator Andy Bickel, of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. We want to reduce the number of accidents, injuries and deaths on Florida waters, Bickel said. Drowning is the leading cause of death in boating accidents, statistics show. Theres an easy fix. Wear a life jacket, Bickel said. There are several styles of life jackets available to boaters that wont interfere with your boating experience and may save your life. Todays boaters can choose from several models of light and comfortable, inflatable belt-pack and over-the-shoulder life jackets that can be worn while shing or enjoying the sun, and they do not interfere with boating activities. Accidents can occur without warning, and if for some reason someone ends up in the water, quite often its too late to put on a life jacket. The leading type of accident continues to be boaters colliding with other boats or objects, Bickel said. With the number of boaters in our beautiful state, its important to pay close attention to everything thats going on around your boat. Statistics repeatedly show that boaters who have taken a basic boating safety class are less likely to be involved in a serious boating accident. The 2011 Boating Accident Statistical Report is now available online at MyFWC.com/Boating, click on Boating Accidents.FWC releases 2011 boating statistics67 people died last year in boating accidents FWC PhotoOne of the best safety precautions while boating is to wear a life jacket, as seen on this sher with her catch of a Spanish mackerel. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday y Thu Jul 12, 12 Fri Jul 13, 12 Sat Jul 14, 12 Sun Jul 15, 12 Mon Jul 16, 12 Tue Jul 17, 12 Wed Jul 18, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 12:33 AM 2.8 ft. 1:23 AM 3.0 ft. 2:03 AM 3.2 ft. 2:38 AM 3.3 ft. 3:10 AM High 1.8 ft. 2:09 AM 2.0 ft. 3:15 AM 2.1 ft. 4:35 AM 2.0 ft. 5:48 AM 1.9 ft. 6:46 AM 1.8 ft. 7:33 AM 1.6 ft. 8:15 AM Low 3.1 ft. 8:35 AM 3.1 ft. 9:50 AM 3.2 ft. 11:08 AM 3.4 ft. 12:08 PM 3.6 ft. 12:55 PM 3.7 ft. 1:34 PM 3.9 ft. 2:11 PM High 1.1 ft. 4:48 PM 0.8 ft. 6:02 PM 0.6 ft. 6:57 PM 0.3 ft. 7:40 PM 0.1 ft. 8:17 PM -0.0 ft. 8:49 PM -0.1 ft. 9:18 PM Low 2.4 ft. 11:19 PM High Thu Jul 12, 12 Fri Jul 13, 12 Sat Jul 14, 12 Sun Jul 15, 12 Mon Jul 16, 12 Tue Jul 17, 12 Wed Jul 18, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 12:30 AM 2.8 ft. 1:20 AM 3.0 ft. 2:00 AM 3.2 ft. 2:35 AM 3.4 ft. 3:07 AM High 1.9 ft. 2:06 AM 2.2 ft. 3:12 AM 2.3 ft. 4:32 AM 2.2 ft. 5:45 AM 2.1 ft. 6:43 AM 1.9 ft. 7:30 AM 1.7 ft. 8:12 AM Low 3.2 ft. 8:32 AM 3.2 ft. 9:47 AM 3.3 ft. 11:05 AM 3.5 ft. 12:05 PM 3.6 ft. 12:52 PM 3.8 ft. 1:31 PM 4.0 ft. 2:08 PM High 1.1 ft. 4:45 PM 0.9 ft. 5:59 PM 0.6 ft. 6:54 PM 0.3 ft. 7:37 PM 0.1 ft. 8:14 PM -0.0 ft. 8:46 PM -0.1 ft. 9:15 PM Low 2.4 ft. 11:16 PM High Thu Jul 12, 12 Fri Jul 13, 12 Sat Jul 14, 12 Sun Jul 15, 12 Mon Jul 16, 12 Tue Jul 17, 12 Wed Jul 18, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 1:09 AM 2.6 ft. 1:59 AM 2.8 ft. 2:39 AM 2.9 ft. 3:14 AM 3.1 ft. 3:46 AM High 1.6 ft. 3:13 AM 1.8 ft. 4:19 AM 1.9 ft. 5:39 AM 1.9 ft. 6:52 AM 1.8 ft. 7:50 AM 1.6 ft. 8:37 AM 1.5 ft. 9:19 AM Low 2.9 ft. 9:11 AM 2.9 ft. 10:26 AM 3.0 ft. 11:44 AM 3.2 ft. 12:44 PM 3.3 ft. 1:31 PM 3.5 ft. 2:10 PM 3.6 ft. 2:47 PM High 1.0 ft. 5:52 PM 0.7 ft. 7:06 PM 0.5 ft. 8:01 PM 0.3 ft. 8:44 PM 0.1 ft. 9:21 PM -0.0 ft. 9:53 PM -0.1 ft. 10:22 PM Low 2.2 ft. 11:55 PM High Thu Jul 12, 12 Fri Jul 13, 12 Sat Jul 14, 12 Sun Jul 15, 12 Mon Jul 16, 12 Tue Jul 17, 12 Wed Jul 18, 12 Date 1.9 ft. 12:25 AM 2.1 ft. 1:15 AM 2.2 ft. 1:55 AM 2.4 ft. 2:30 AM 2.5 ft. 3:02 AM High 1.3 ft. 2:20 AM 1.5 ft. 3:26 AM 1.5 ft. 4:46 AM 1.5 ft. 5:59 AM 1.4 ft. 6:57 AM 1.3 ft. 7:44 AM 1.2 ft. 8:26 AM Low 2.4 ft. 8:27 AM 2.4 ft. 9:42 AM 2.4 ft. 11:00 AM 2.5 ft. 12:00 PM 2.7 ft. 12:47 PM 2.8 ft. 1:26 PM 2.9 ft. 2:03 PM High 0.8 ft. 4:59 PM 0.6 ft. 6:13 PM 0.4 ft. 7:08 PM 0.2 ft. 7:51 PM 0.1 ft. 8:28 PM -0.0 ft. 9:00 PM -0.1 ft. 9:29 PM Low 1.8 ft. 11:11 PM High Thu Jul 12, 12 Fri Jul 13, 12 Sat Jul 14, 12 Sun Jul 15, 12 Mon Jul 16, 12 Tue Jul 17, 12 Wed Jul 18, 12 Date 2.0 ft. 12:17 AM 2.2 ft. 1:07 AM 2.3 ft. 1:47 AM 2.5 ft. 2:22 AM 2.6 ft. 2:54 AM High 1.8 ft. 1:48 AM 2.0 ft. 2:54 AM 2.0 ft. 4:14 AM 2.0 ft. 5:27 AM 1.9 ft. 6:25 AM 1.7 ft. 7:12 AM 1.6 ft. 7:54 AM Low 2.5 ft. 8:19 AM 2.5 ft. 9:34 AM 2.5 ft. 10:52 AM 2.6 ft. 11:52 AM 2.8 ft. 12:39 PM 2.9 ft. 1:18 PM 3.0 ft. 1:55 PM High 1.0 ft. 4:27 PM 0.8 ft. 5:41 PM 0.5 ft. 6:36 PM 0.3 ft. 7:19 PM 0.1 ft. 7:56 PM -0.0 ft. 8:28 PM -0.1 ft. 8:57 PM Low 1.9 ft. 11:03 PM High Thu Jul 12, 12 Fri Jul 13, 12 Sat Jul 14, 12 Sun Jul 15, 12 Mon Jul 16, 12 Tue Jul 17, 12 Wed Jul 18, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 8:56 AM 3.0 ft. 9:42 AM 2.4 ft. 3:03 AM 2.5 ft. 3:29 AM 2.6 ft. 3:53 AM 2.6 ft. 4:16 AM High 1.4 ft. 12:43 AM 0.1 ft. 5:22 PM -0.0 ft. 6:14 PM 1.9 ft. 4:39 AM 1.9 ft. 5:50 AM 1.9 ft. 6:44 AM 1.8 ft. 7:29 AM Low 2.9 ft. 8:16 AM 3.0 ft. 10:34 AM 3.0 ft. 11:27 AM 3.1 ft. 12:19 PM 3.1 ft. 1:08 PM High 0.3 ft. 4:24 PM -0.1 ft. 6:59 PM -0.2 ft. 7:39 PM -0.2 ft. 8:14 PM -0.2 ft. 8:44 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJuly 12 July 18First July 25 Full Aug. 1 Last Aug. 9 New July 18Major Times 3:03 AM 5:03 AM 3:30 PM 5:30 PM Minor Times 8:40 AM 9:40 AM 10:11 PM 11:11 PM Major Times 3:55 AM 5:55 AM 4:20 PM 6:20 PM Minor Times 9:43 AM 10:43 AM 10:49 PM 11:49 PM Major Times 4:44 AM 6:44 AM 5:08 PM 7:08 PM Minor Times 10:43 AM 11:43 AM 11:24 PM 12:24 AM Major Times 5:30 AM 7:30 AM 5:53 PM 7:53 PM Minor Times 11:41 AM 12:41 PM 11:57 PM 12:57 AM Major Times 6:15 AM 8:15 AM 6:37 PM 8:37 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:36 PM 1:36 PM Major Times 6:59 AM 8:59 AM 7:20 PM 9:20 PM Minor Times 12:30 AM 1:30 AM 1:31 PM 2:31 PM Major Times 7:42 AM 9:42 AM 8:05 PM 10:05 PM Minor Times 1:03 AM 2:03 AM 2:25 PM 3:25 PM Better Average Average Average Average Average Average+6:44 am 8:40 pm 1:39 am 3:19 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:45 am 8:40 pm 2:17 am 4:12 pm 6:45 am 8:40 pm 2:58 am 5:05 pm 6:46 am 8:39 pm 3:43 am 5:56 pm 6:46 am 8:39 pm 4:32 am 6:44 pm 6:47 am 8:39 pm 5:24 am 7:30 pm 6:48 am 8:38 pm 6:19 am 8:13 pm43% 37% 31% 24% 18% 12% 6% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance The Wakulla News

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn June 28, Deputy Mike Zimba was 1,000 feet south of Wal-Mart when he witnessed a two vehicle crash behind him on U.S. Highway 319. A 2007 Chevrolet Suburban driven by Randi A. Dodson, 41, of Crawfordville rear-ended a 2009 Honda Accord driven by Amy E. Brown, 34, of Crawfordville. Dodson was found at fault for rear-ending Brown at a high rate of speed. Debris was left on the roadway following the crash. Dodson was ticketed for careless driving. The Honda had three other occupants, ages 6, 8 and 9. There were no injuries. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On June 28, a theft was reported at Wal-Mart. Amanda Nicole Mitchell, 29, of Crawfordville and Terry Lynn Wells, 56, of Crawfordville were arrested for retail theft. Personal items, valued at $58, were recovered after the women failed to pay for all of the merchandise in their possession. On June 28, Andrew Aries of Crawfordville reported recovering narcotics while in the check-out line at Wal-Mart. The marijuana weighed 1.3 grams and was turned over to Deputy Ian Dohme who turned into the Evidence Division. On June 29, Brock L. Boyatt of Crawfordville reported a hit and run traffic crash. Johnathan Neil Piland, 18, of Crawfordville struck the victims vehicle and left the scene. Piland was ticketed for leaving the scene of a traf c crash. On June 30, Deputy Cole Wells was conducting a business check on the Woodville Highway when he observed two males sitting inside a truck allegedly attempting to hide from sight. Wells discovered a plastic bag containing cocaine inside. Brandon Wayne Dukes, 26, of Crawfordville and Dillon Wade Robertson, 22, of Tallahassee were arrested for possession of cocaine and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Robertson required medical treatment for intoxication and was taken to a Tallahassee hospital for treatment. A warrant was requested for his arrest so he could receive medical treatment rst. The cocaine weighed 3.6 grams. On July 1, Deputies Mike Zimba and Ryan Muse conducted a traffic stop on a suspicious vehicle. The deputies discovered a vehicle with a tag that was not assigned to it. Michelle Marie Dawson Cooksey, 25, of Crawfordville was driving without a valid driver license and three of four children in the vehicle were not properly secured in car seats. She was ticketed for driving while license suspended or revoked; tag not assigned; and no child restraints. On July 1, Bravia Miko Paul, 35, of Tallahassee was charged with possession of cannabis under 20 grams and possession of drug paraphernalia following a traf c stop. Deputy Stephen Simmons stopped Paul for faulty equipmen and discovered Paul had an active warrant in Putnam County for failure to pay child support. During a search of the suspect, 2.4 grams of cannabis was discovered in a plastic bag. Drug paraphernalia was also discovered in the vehicle. On July 1, Tonya Carter of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to her vehicle while she was at Wal-Mart. A customer keyed the victims vehicle and created $1,000 worth of damage while the victim was inside. On July 1, Opal Adronna Kombrinck of Blountstown reported a residential burglary in Sopchoppy. The victim was contacted by her power company that their electrical meter had been stolen. The power line was cut and the meter was removed. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. On July 1, Rhonda Miller of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim led her taxes in April and had not heard back from the IRS. Someone led taxes using the victims personal information. On June 29, Lt. Brad Taylor was delivering supplies following Tropical Storm Debby when he discovered a marijuana plant at a Panacea home. The plant was collected and submitted into the Evidence Division for destruction. No charges were led. On July 2, Christine Johnson of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from her property. A juvenile suspect was observed taking the bike and riding away with it. The bike is valued at $100. On July 2, Sonja Moseley of Crawfordville reported the theft of an air conditioning unit and stove from a home managed by LCP Properties. The property was discovered missing after individuals were evicted from the home. The missing property is valued at $1,000. On July 2, Scott Homan of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle tag. A tag was removed from the victims trailer while he was at a Panacea boat ramp. The tag is valued at $50. On July 3, a 14-year-old was observed riding a stolen lawnmower down U.S. Highway 319. The mower was taken from 3Y Equipment and is valued at $500. Contact was made with the owner of the mower. The juvenile was charged with grand theft. On July 3, Bonnie Brinson of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bank deposit from her vehicle. The bank bag contained operational funds for her Cauzican Care Rescue business. On July 3, Frances Cook of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone cut the four tires on her vehicle while it was parked at her home. The tires are valued at $800. On July 3, Wal-Mart assessment protection staff members allegedly observed Catherine Byrd Casey, 38, of Leesburg take swimwear and a belt and place the items in her purse. The suspect purchased other items but failed to purchase the suit and belt before leaving the store. She was arrested for retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The value of the stolen items is $32. On July 3, Jason Coshatt of Crawfordville reported a suspicious person and residential burglary at his home. The victim reported the loss of $750 worth of tools from his property. Robert Corbelt Green, 45, of Crawfordville was arrested and charged with armed burglary, burglary, grand theft and possession of narcotics. A pocket knife allegedly waved at the victim was recovered on Green. On July 4, Kathleen Mackie of Crawfordville reported a traf c incident. A large piece of metal in the middle of Highway 267 struck the bottom of her vehicle and disabled her car. The debris broke a hole in the transmission and ripped off the drivers side back bumper. On July 4, James Timmons reported a criminal mischief to his vehicle. The vehicle suffered damage to the windows, tires, headlights, tail lights and truck bed cover. and damage was discovered on another truck as well. Sandra Lakay Jones, 44, of Crawfordville admitted burning the victims clothing and damaging the vehicle. She was arrested and charged with felony criminal mischief and arson. Damage to one truck was estimated at $5,000, damage to the second truck was estimated at $2,000 and $7,000 worth of clothing was also burned. On July 4, Pamela Jackson of Crawfordville reported a structure re. Flames from a propane valve caught a mosquito machine on re and melted vinyl siding. The re was extinguished by the homeowner and the scene was turned over to the Wakulla Fire Department. On July 4, Audrey Warnick of Crawfordville reported the loss of a wallet while at the Sopchoppy Fourth of July Fireworks. The victim lost a Passport, driver license, checkbook and credit cards. On July 5, Cynthia Murray of Crawfordville reported the loss of her wallet at Shell Point Beach. The victim lost her wallet while watching reworks at the beach. She lost a phone, driver license, and credit cards. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 776 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportHomeless man arrested for robbery, agg batterySpecial to The NewsA 50-year-old homeless man was arrested Monday, July 2 after beating a 45year-old Crawfordville victim who attempted to help the man by giving him a place to stay, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. William Andrew Hadd was arrested for aggravated battery, grand theft of a vehicle and robbery with a weapon. The incident took place off Council Moore Road in Crawfordville, but sheriffs investigators apprehended their suspect near Coastal Highway 98 and Casora Drive in the Medart area after a brief vehicle chase. The victim met Hadd at a local business establishment and allowed the homeless man to sleep in his shed. After staying in the shed for two days the victim asked Hadd to leave. Hadd became angry and struck the victim in the head eight to 10 times with a pool cue ball. During the altercation Hadd demanded the keys to the victims car and drove away with the vehicle. Wakulla Sheriffs Of ce Communications put out a BOLO for the vehicle and Lt. Fred Nichols observed the car drive into the Medart subdivision. Hadd failed to stop for Lt. Nichols despite the lieutenant having his emergency lights and siren in operation. Eventually, Hadd crashed into a residential yard near Coastal Highway 98 where he caused damage to a childs batting cage, a fence and tree. Lt. Nichols took control of the suspect without any further incident and transported him to the Wakulla County Jail. The victim suffered a laceration and abrasions on his head, but refused medical treatment. After the arrest, additional charges of reckless driving, eeing and eluding and driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge were added against Hadd. Hadd remains in the Wakulla County Jail. No bond has been set for the homeless man. William A. HaddSpecial to The NewsMembers of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office Narcotics Unit went undercover June 29 to arrest an 18-year-old Tallahassee man in connection with the possession and sale of crack cocaine and marijuana, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Xavion Deandre Jackson was arrested for possession of cocaine with intent to sell; distribution of cocaine, resisting an of cer without violence; sale of marijuana; and possession of marijuana with intent to sell. Jackson was allegedly captured after a brief foot pursuit and deployment of a Taser. The cocaine and marijuana was recovered by the undercover unit. Two females with Jackson were interviewed and released without charges. Jackson remains in the Wakulla County Jail on a $25,500 bond.Undercover narcotics arrest Xavion D. Jackson HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 CANDIDATE FORUMSHERIFF, WAKULLA COUNTY OPEN SEATCharlie Creel Maurice Langston(Both candidates invited to appear)SPONSORED BY: WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION & CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA TUESDAY, JULY 17th, 2012 7:00 pm NEW BRIDGE HOPE CHURCH CAFETERIA 1282 SPRING CREEK HIGHWAY(ACROSS FROM MACKS MEATS)Doug Jones, moderatorMEET THE CANDIDATES HEAR THE CANDIDATES ON THE ISSUESPREPARED QUESTIONS AND QUESTIONS FROM THE FLOORAdvertisement paid for by Concerned Citizens of Wakulla, Inc. and the WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION Paid Advertisement Paid Advertisement WAKULLA AIRPORT Workshop!! Postponed due to Tropical Storm Debby WHEN: Tues. July 17, 2012 @ 2:00PM (2 hours) WHERE: BOCC Chambers (behind courthouse) ++Turn west at stoplight and go to second driveway++ WHY: Present data to the Board of County Commissioners for future involvement with airport, or not. We will present hard data to the county to cease its support of, accepting taxpayer grants for, and spending tax dollars on ,... the Tarpine airstrip. Come provide your input and ask questions; Commissioners do indeed count heads. Ochlockonee Bay Alliance No-Airport-Expand@Comcast.com LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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Ralph Edward Grif n, 62, of Panacea, went to be with the Lord on Sunday, July 1. He is survived by his loving wife of 45 years, Theresa Rinkel Grif n. He was born on Oct. 26, 1949, in Tallahassee, to Leslie L. Grif n (who preceded him in death) and Frances Moody Griffin who now resides in Jupiter. He was a minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and along with his wife, founded Brotherly Love Ministries of Crawfordville in March of 2003 and their gospel group, Philadelphia. A memorial service will be held at Brotherly Love Ministries, 3016-D Crawfordville Highway on Saturday, July 14, beginning at 6 p.m. Brother and copastor, David Gray, Brother Larry Tucker and Sister Lucy Johnson will be in charge of the celebration of his life. Survivors include his children, Ralph Darrian Griffin (Charsie), Jennifer Grif n Bowden (Matt) and Eleanor Louise Reddick Braren Graddick, 85, died on June 29. She was born Oct. 20, 1926. in Moultrie, Ga. She was a resident of Wakulla County after living many years in Tallahassee. She was predeceased by her son, Ralph Durward Braren; her parents, James Durward Reddick and Lillie Mae Reddick; a sister, Ruby Lee Reddick, and three brothers, Virgil Reddick, Frank Reddick, and James Durward Reddick Jr. Survivors include three children, daughter Elma Louise Cutchin (Gene), daughter Jacqueline Dale Blanchet, and son Walter Reynold Braren III (Dianne); nine grandchildren, Teresa M. Wollschlager (Tom), J., Suzanne (Susie) Harris (Tony), Phillip W. Musgrove Jr., Debbie Howard Perry (Guy), Nikolas Blanchet, Tiffany Blanchet, Aimee Blanchet, Corey Blanchet, and A.J. Blanchet; eight great grandchildren; two great-great grandchildren, and numerous nieces. A graveside service was held Monday, July 2, at Crawfordville Cemetery. Please sign the guest book at www.culleysmeadowwood.com. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 Page 11AWakulla County Fire Rescue responded to a van on re on Sommer Road in Crawfordville on Friday at 10:46 a.m. Arriving re ghters found the vehicle fully involved and located just feet from a double-wide mobile home. They were able to con ne the re to the van. It took over 10 minutes to completely extinguish the blaze as gasoline was feeding the re from a rupture in the fuel system. The owners had just returned from an out of state trip the night before. The van had been driven the morning before the re. A mechanical failure is being blamed for the re. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSVan reContinued from Page 5A With all that education, I have had multiple degrees on my posterior. Even to this day, every time I sit down I am reminded of that education. This Board of Education that my father was superintendent of, always hung by the door. Being the religious person that my father was, he had printed on this Board of Education the phrase from a favorite hymn, I Need Thee Every Hour. It was a motto he lived up to all the years of my boyhood. I often prayed my father would get weary of exercising that Board, but I must confess that my naughtiness wearied long before he did. Looking back, I am grateful. I will not go as far as to say that I am a good person, only that I am not a spoiled brat. I have learned through the years, thanks to the energy of my father, to extend courtesy to everybody around me and be respectful. Respecting other people is not something that comes naturally. Everybody needs to be taught that everybody deserves respect. Some people have earned more respect than others, I grant you. However, nobody deserves deliberate disrespect like those kids gave that bus lady. With all the studies are being done through our governmental grant programs, I wonder why nobody has ever, at least to my knowledge, done a study on the importance of discipline in the home. It is at this point I must agree most heartily with the scriptural injunction on this subject. Solomon, the wisest man in the world, had much to say about disciplining children. And if anybody should know about disciplining children, it was Solomon. Foolishness is bound in the heart of a child; but the rod of correction shall drive it far from him (Proverbs 22:15 KJV). He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes (Proverbs 13:24 KJV). Disciplining children to ensure they grow up to be proper adults demands a whole lot of energy especially from parents. Love sometimes carries a large stick.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. What happened to spankings? Angeline G. Donaldson Eleanor Louise R. B. Graddick Ralph Edward Grif n Dorothy Emily GercakAngeline Gainey Plump Donaldson, 89, died on July 4. She was the daughter of Charlie and Rachael Gainey, and the wife of George C. Donaldson for 56 years. She was the mother of three sons, Willie G., George Patrick, and Alvin B. Donaldson, and a daugther, Juanita Staley, who all preceded her in death. She was a home care provider for 31 years. A memorial service will be Saturday, July 14, at 11 a.m. at The Greater Mount Trial P.B. Church in Sopchoppy, with burial at Buckhorn Cemetery. Viewing will be from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Friday, July 13, at Strong & Jones Funeral Home in Tallahassee and Saturday at the church from 9 a.m. until the service. Survivors include her two devoted sisters, Rosa M. Rosier and Annie Lee Carter of Tallahassee; a brother-inlaw, Roscoe Franklin of Philadelphia; 13 grandchildren, Pamela Donaldson Cotton (William), Joy Donaldson Stephens (Kenneth), Kenneth Donaldson (Reshanda) of Crawfordville, Monique and Mia Donaldson of Madison, Gregory Donaldson (Tammie) of California, Pachon Patrick (Keri), Charon Donaldson of Atlanta, Catrina Donaldson of South Carolina, Dorothy Donaldson of Boston, and Logan Donaldson of San Francisco; 30 great-grandchildren, ve great-great-grandchildren, nine nieces and nephews, and a host of great nieces, nephews, cousins and sorrowing friends. Strong & Jones Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Dorothy Emily Gercak, 86, of Crawfordville, died on Friday, July 6, in Tallahassee. She was born in Schenectady, N.Y., and had lived in this area seven years coming from Hollywood. She attended St. Louis Catholic Church in Tallahassee. She enjoyed knitting and crossstitch. She is survived by a son, Stephen Gercak III of Crawfordville, and a daughter, Mary Westbrook (Robert) of Crawfordville; nine grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville, is assisting the family with arrangements. ObituariesContinued from Page 5A SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for qualied applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and oor rate of 2.5% Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 YOURE INVITED!HOWARD KESSLERPlease join us for a Campaign PartyHOWARD KESSLERPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Howard Kessler, NPA, for County Commissioner. FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONERBring your family and friendsGreat food & great music by F rank Lindamood and by Chelsea Kessler. Hear how I will work for you. SATURDAY, JULY 14TH 7:00 P M I look forward to seeing you there. all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor Please Recycle

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Now Located Downtown on Crawfordville Hwy. y y 3038 Crawfordville Hwy. (Next to Shepard Accounting) 850-926-2700 y 12, 20 12 Sopchoppy 4th of July ParadeSopchoppy 4th of July ParadePeople lined the streets in Sopchoppy for the citys annual Fourth of July Celebration, which included a parade. And a parade means candy thrown from oats, and children scampering to pick up treats. In addition to the numerous local candidates with oats, there were antique tractors and some Founding Father-type patriots. Rose Street was also a comfortable place to sit and cool off while celebrating Independence Day. After the parade, the Myron Hodge City Park opened for arts and crafts and music from numerous entertainers on the stage. And the day concluded with reworks at dark.PHOTOS BY TAMMIE BARFIELDMore photos online at thewakullanews.com

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Are these truths self-evident?Weekly Roundup, Page 3BSection B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012HEALTH & FITNESS I hear people say they quit working out because they got bored with their workout. Maybe they did, if they did the same thing day after day, workout after workout. Not only is that boring, but not an ef cient way to workout! I know people who do the same weight workout every time they come to the gym, or do the same amount of time on the same speed on the same treadmill every day for years! Their body is on autopilot! Your body gets used a routine very quickly. You burn a lot of calories when you rst start a workout routine, but after a few weeks your body gets comfortable with what youre doing and gets ef cient at doing it. It doesnt burn the calories like it did to begin with and you nd yourself not as tired or sore after your workouts. If you dont feel like you are getting anything out of your workout, you probably arent! The best way to counteract this is to keep your body guessing. Do something different completely different than you are doing now. If you are doing heavy weights and low repetitions, change it up and do light weights and lots of reps. If you are only doing weights, do some cardio or cross training. If you only do the treadmill, try the elliptical or stepper. If you only do spin class, try a Zumba or Butt and Guts both guaranteed to kick your butt and kick your metabolism into overdrive! Never tried spin? Give it a shot, you might nd a new favorite class! If you only do cardio, pick up some weights! You wouldnt be happy eating the same foods over and over with no variety, would you? Your body would not respond well to that, nor does it respond well to the same workouts day after day. The important thing is to keep trying new workouts and keep changing things up. The more confused your muscles are, the more calories you burn. Try to do something different every few workouts to avoid getting in a rut or getting bored. Your body will thank you!Gena Davis is a CFT at Body-Tek 24Hour Fitness Center in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348.Use variety in your workout to boost the resultsYoga can help carpal tunnelKnowing where your carpal tunnel is and its function is important for those doing yoga and for those with occupations requiring repetitive loading of the hands and forearms. Without this knowledge, you may be causing damage to this important canal without realizing it. Many people can recognize the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, but identifying the risk factors is much more valuable. In order to do this, you must understand what the carpal tunnel is and what its function is. The carpal tunnel actually is a tunnel on the palmar side of your wrist. This tunnel houses our forearm exor tendons as well as our median nerve. When the space available for the median nerve is compromised, carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms appear. These symptoms can include pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, or even burning into the majority of the palm of your hand, palmar side of your index to pinkie ngers as well as the tips of the back side of the same ngers. Each of our tendons is encased in a sheath known as synovium. When our tendons are irritated from overuse, the synovium becomes in amed. This in ammation decreases the area of the carpal tunnel allocated for the median nerve. It has been proven that repetitive forceful contractions such as factory work or over-gripping a mouse or even a kitchen knife can lead to synovium in ammation and subsequent carpal tunnel syndrome. Lets tie this to yoga; when you are in upward dog or plank for that matter, are your shoulders over your wrists? If your shoulders are in front of your wrists, your wrists are in too much extension and this will lead to decreased space for the median nerve over time. Most people do not know how to properly place their hands on the ground in poses such as upward and downward facing dog pose. Look at the palm of your hand and draw a line from the tip of your middle nger to the crease of your wrist; now do the same from your thumb to the crease of your wrist. Where these two lines intersect is the location of your carpal tunnel. Place your hand on a at surface and draw the meaty portions of the palm of your hand towards each other to create an arch at your carpal tunnel. Create this arch while distinctly planting each of your ngers into the ground instead of just resting on your carpal tunnel while in poses such as upward and downward dog; this will protect your carpal tunnel. A study written in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed yoga to be more effective than splinting in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome. Often, in such studies, the poses are modi ed to better suit the subjects with considerable symptoms. The idea behind yoga helping is that it can oss the median nerve through the carpal tunnel to help mobilize the nerve; stretching may relieve compression on the carpal tunnel; improved joint posture could diminish intermittent compression on the nerve; the effects of blood ow restriction on the median nerve could also be improved with increased blood ow; and possibly yoga could decrease the risk of double crush nerve entrapment symptoms related to nerve entrapments closer to the neck or armpit. If you DO have carpal tunnel syndrome, check with your health care practitioner to determine if yoga could be helpful for you! I wish you all the best in your practices and in your lives! Namaste.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY GET FITBy GENA DAVIS Special to The NewsSeeds can add a nutty, salty flavor to snacks and meals, but they also have health bene ts. Seeds offer anti-inflammatory properties, promote heart and bone health, and supply essential minerals. TOPS Club Inc. (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), the nonprofit weight-loss support organization, explains how various seeds can boost a meals nutrition. Pumpkin seeds are rich with protein minerals, including magnesium, manganese, iron, copper, and zinc. They are thought to promote prostate health, strengthen bones, and reduce inflammation. Sprinkle pumpkin seeds over a salad, add them to trail mix, toss the seeds with pasta, or blend them into a muffin mix. Chia seeds are high in omega-3 fatty acids, which can have a positive impact on cholesterol. Add them to yogurt, cereal, or oatmeal to get a boost of ber, calcium, and protein. Dr. Andrew Weil, integrated medicine expert and author, recommends soaking two tablespoons of chia seeds in water for 15 to 30 minutes, then stirring the mixture into your water or sports drink for added stamina during a workout. Sun ower seeds are a good source of vitamin E, which serves as an antioxidant and contains anti-in ammatory properties. They also offer copper and selenium, protecting your muscles. Add sun ower seeds to a fresh salad, mix into chicken salad, sprinkle over meat, or grind them up for a spread. Sesame seeds are a rich source of copper, which may provide arthritis relief. They also contain calcium and magnesium, which may lower blood pressure, protect against osteoporosis, and more. Mix them with steamed vegetables, sauted sh or chicken, or add sesame seeds to homemade bread. Flaxseed contains alpha linolenic acid (ALA), an omega-3 fat, which may positively impact cholesterol, promote bone health, protect against heart disease, and reduce in- ammation. Look for milled flaxseed, ground flaxseed, or ax meal, which is easier to digest, helping your body absorb more of the nutrients. Include it in muf n or pancake mixes, or blend axseed into a fruit smoothie. Sacha Inchi nuts (Inca Peanuts) contain omega-3 fatty acids and tryptophan, an amino acid, which can help the body control appetite and sleep. They are also a great source of protein. Use Sacha Inchi nuts in a trail mix or purchase roasted nuts at a health food store. Roasting tip: When purchasing these seeds, buy them raw. Roast seeds at 375 degrees higher temperatures may diminish the bene cial nutrients.Seeds cultivate more than the garden SPECIAL TO THE NEWSToasted pumpkin seeds are rich with minerals, and are thought to promote prostate health, strengthen bones, and reduce in ammation. How are reptiles faring? EarthTalk, Page 8BCaprese Pizza for summer Keep wines cool in warm weatherFood, Page 4B s B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILStop by a State Farm agents oce, or call me today to nd out how much you can save. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL ME TODAY. Auto rates just got lower.1001010.1 Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida THANK YOU! To the people of Wakulla County for the opportunity to serve another term as your Clerk of Court. My sta and I pledge to continue to serve you in such a way as to be worthy of your continued trust. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK THANK YOU! To the people of Wakulla County for the opportunity to serve another term as your Clerk of Court. My sta and I pledge to continue to serve you in such a way as to be worthy of your continued trust. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, July 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a las 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Hwy. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350. Friday, July 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, July 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB, a member of the National Button Society, will meet at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594, or email bardon56@aol.com, or Linda Wood at 899-0025. A short interesting presentation about unique buttons is given at each meeting. Sunday, July 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, July 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, July 17 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, July 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. WAKULLA COUNTY MAH JONGG GROUP will meet from 12:45 p.m. to 3 p.m. at precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road, the rst left after Wal-Mart heading north. The little mah jongg house is the rst building on the left. For more information, call 926 9254. Thursday, July 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050.Special EventsSaturday, July 14 CAMPAIGN PARTY for county commissioner candidate Howard Kessler will be held at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. There will be music by Frank Lindamood and Chelsea Kessler, plus food, refreshments and campaign signs and T-shirts. THE CURRYS will perform at Posh Java at 8 p.m. Tommy, Jimmy and Galen Curry, (two brothers and a cousin), perform on mandolin and guitar, with soothing vocal harmonies, incorporating elements of blues, jazz, country and bluegrass, into their unique sound. Visit their website at www.thecurrysmusic.com. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Posh Java is located at the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. in downtown Sopchoppy. Sunday, July 15 FROM THE HEART MUSIC HOUR will be held at The Moon in Tallahassee from 7 to 11 p.m. The show features the Zach Bartholomew Trio, Brook Sessions, The Currys and Mimi Hearn and Rick Ott. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $20, $10 for students. All ticket purchases support WFSU. Tickets are available from the From the Heart Recording Studio in Sopchoppy or online at The Moon Box Of ce or by calling The Moon at 878-6900. Monday, July 16 FAIR HOUSING TRAINING FOR Wakulla County will be held during a regular County Commission meeting which begins at 5 p.m. in the Wakulla County Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327.This meeting is intended to provide the public and Commissioners with information concerning fair housing requirements. Anyone interested in understanding the importance of Fair Housing should attend. Tuesday, July 17 POLITICAL FORUM will be held for the sheriff candidates, Maurice Langston and Charlie Creel, at 7 p.m. at New Bridge Hope Cafeteria, 1282 Spring Creek Highway, across from Macks Meats. Doug Jones will be the moderator and the forum is sponsored by the Wakulla County Christian Coalition and Concerned Citizens of Wakulla County. Thursday, July 19 WAKULLA CATTLEMENS QUARTERLY MEETING will be held at 8 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce with guest speaker, Sam Ard, director of Governmental Relations for the Florida Cattlemens Association. The meeting is open to the public.Upcoming EventsSaturday, July 21 WOMEN CAN RUN, presented by The Oasis Center for Women and Girls in partnership with Leadership Tallahassee and the League of Women Voters of Florida, will be held at Tallahassee City Hall from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Women Can Run! is a non-partisan program tailored to women who may consider running for elected of ce or working on political campaigns in the future. There is no cost. It will include sessions on campaigning, developing a platform and mastering media messaging. Program speakers will be current and former elected leaders and experts in media relations, campaigns and elections. To register, please send an email which includes your name, phone number and email address to Haley Cutler, Executive Director, The Oasis Center for Women and Girls at haley.oasis@comcast.net. Wednesday, July 25 ANNUAL CHRISTMAS IN JULY LUNCHEON will be held at noon. Come enjoy a delicious Christmas lunch. Cost is $50 per ticket. The silent auction begins at 11:30 a.m. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Emergency Public Meeting at 4 p.m. at the Community Center. The Currys at Posh Java at 8 p.m. From the Heart Music Hour at The Moon from 7 to 11 p.m. Wakulla County Commission meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. ThursdaySaturdaySundayMonday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary DirectorOur heart goes out to all our patrons affected by Tropical Storm Debby a couple weeks back. FEMA has dropped off contact information at library for those who need assistance. They suggest that you go to www.disasterassisstance.gov to apply for FEMA help of to get information. Anything that my staff and I can do to help you through this trying time, be it help with getting aid through the Internet, programs for your children to get their minds of things, or just a book of lm for yourself, please dont hesitate to ask. You are what keeps the library in business and the library along with any other county agency will bend over backwards to give you what you need at this time. Friday Night Movie Beat the heat this Friday, July 13, as we show a new take on the classic Snow White Tale. This family friendly telling stars Julia Roberts, Lily Collins and Armie Hammer, and shows how the princess Snow White after being banished to the forest by her evil stepmother the Queen, bands together with some rebellious dwarves to reclaim her birthright. This PG-rated film should entertain and delight the entire family. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing. One Heart Storytellers Returns next week! The husband and wife storytelling duo One Heart Storytellers returns next Thursday, July 19 to the library. This couple from Monticello will spin tales and sing songs while teaching lessons to kids of all ages. Please come out to see the Worleys as they present their family friendly program as part of our Summer Program of Events. As always this visit along with all Summer Program events is sponsored by the Friends of the Library. For information on all the Friends to or to nd out how to join please contact us! Sign-up for nal Summer Field Trip The signup sheet for our nal eld trip of the summer, a return to the Gulf Specimen Marine Lab will be available at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, July 17. Priority is given to those who were not able to attend the rst trip in June. If you did go the first time please wait until Thursday, July 19 to sign up so as to give those who missed the first great eld trip a chance to go see this Wakulla County treasure. Government Meetings Thursday, July 12 WAKULLA TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea. WAKULLA COUNTY ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will meet at 10 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioners conference room. EMERGENCY PUBLIC MEETING regarding Tropical Storm Debby will be held at 4 p.m. at the Community Center. If you have any questions, please contact Katie Taff at (850) 926-0919 or ktaff@mywakulla.com. COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop regarding the Wakulla Gardens proposed improvement assessment from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Community Center. ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, July 16 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Tuesday, July 17 ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold a special meeting at 5:15 p.m. at city hall on the budget and millage rate. Political EventsThursday, July 12 COOKIES AND CANDIDATES, a political forum for Democratic candidates running for the House District 7 seat in the Florida legislature, will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the library. The forum, sponsored by the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting at 7 p.m., and candidate forum beginning at 7:30 p.m. Cookies and refreshments will be served. The three Democratic candidates are Robert Hill, AJ Smith and Thomas Dickens. Saturday, July 14 CAMPAIGN PARTY for county commissioner candidate Howard Kessler will be held at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. There will be music by Frank Lindamood and Chelsea Kessler, plus food, refreshments and campaign signs and T-shirts. Thursday, July 17 POLITICAL FORUM will be held for the sheriff candidates, Maurice Langston and Charlie Creel, at 7 p.m. at New Bridge Hope Cafeteria, 1282 Spring Creek Highway, across from Macks Meats. Doug Jones will be the moderator and the forum is sponsored by the Wakulla County Christian Coalition and Concerned Citizens of Wakulla County. Library News...

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By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, July 6 The United States turned 236 years old this week and Americans celebrated the founding of a nation, an annual summer hiatus that translated into a slow week in Floridas capital city. But the week was not totally relegated to barbecues and corn on the cob, producing some reworks as the debate over Obamacare continued and the courts weighed in on a host of issues from guns to insurance. OBAMACARE: WEEK 1 Gov. Rick Scott started off the week vowing Florida wont expand its health care system for the poor because it will hurt the states effort to create jobs, a contention that was quickly contested by groups that said the governor was overreaching. A week after the U.S. Supreme Court upheld key provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act but left it up to the states to decide if they want to expand their Medicaid rolls, the governor remained defiant, telling different groups throughout the week that the state wouldnt play. Floridians are interested in jobs and economic growth, a quality education for their children, and keeping the cost of living low, Scott said in a statement. Neither of these major provisions in ObamaCare will achieve those goals, and since Florida is legally allowed to opt out, thats the right decision for our citizens. Along with not expanding Medicaid, Scott said the state would not participate in the so-called exchanges that are part of the ACA, a stance that would mean, in all likelihood, that the insurance clearinghouses would be federally run affairs. Health exchanges are key components of the ACA, providing individuals not covered by their employers a way to choose from a list of approved insurance plans. If states dont implement them, the federal government will. Were not going to implement the health care exchanges because its not going to drive down the cost of health care, its going to raise the cost, Scott said while speaking at the Southeastern Press Convention near Destin on Friday. Republican legislative leaders were less intransigent, but not much, as they too chafed at the idea of implementing a program they find anathematic to their political beliefs. But they also left open some doors. House Speaker-designate Will Weatherford predicted the House would take a rational, deliberative approach to deciding whether to expand coverage. I was no big fan of ObamaCare, thats for sure, Weatherford said. But we also have to recognize that it has been upheld by the court. Key members of the Senate also gave measured responses. My general guiding principal is that I prefer state programs over a cookie-cutter federal model, but thats an issue were going to have to explore, said Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart, and chairman of the Senate health care budget committee. Democrats, meanwhile, touted the other side of the equation, saying the system of near universal health care would result in economic bene ts for the nation and the state. Spending money mostly federal dollars as part of the Medicaid expansion would put more money into a health care industry that has been among the leading growth industries. Medicaid is jobs, said Senate Democratic Leader Nan Rich, D-Weston. And health care is one of the few areas that didnt suffer job losses during the recession. COURTS WEIGH IN A federal court in Miami this week struck down (again) a state law backers say is needed to protect gun owners from unreasonable queries from health care practitioners. Following up on a temporary ruling made in September, U.S. District Court Judge Marcia Cooke barred enforcement of a 2011 law that restricted doctors from asking their patients whether they owned guns. Cooke ruled the state had failed to make its case that gun owners were being unduly burdened by the law, which restricted doctors and other medical providers from asking questions about gun ownership during medical visits. In a 25-page ruling, Cook permanently barred the state from enforcing the law, known of cially as the Firearm Owners Privacy Act. The ruling brought an immediate response from Second Amendment supporters, who said the decision was especially disturbing given the U.S. Supreme Courts ruling on health insurance. The general feeling is that keeping the law is especially important now that ObamaCare has been upheld, said Marion Hammer, former national NRA president and the groups Florida lobbyist. The Florida Supreme Court rejected a provision in a 2008 law restricting the ability of public insurance adjusters to contact homeowners immediately after a storm. In a unanimous ruling, the court struck down the insurance industry-backed effort to prevent public adjusters from visiting clients within 48 hours following a storm. The law was written in response to claims that public adjusters were taking advantage of distraught homeowners following the 2004 and 2005 hurricane seasons. The justices upheld an appellate court ruling that the state could not prevent public adjustors from visiting potential clients immediately after a storm, saying such a prohibition violated the adjusters First Amendment rights. Speaking of the Florida Supreme Court, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement this week closed its investigation into criminal allegations that three justices used state employees to le campaign paperwork. The FDLE said it found no wrongdoing on the part of Justices Fred Lewis, Barbara Pariente and Peggy Quince. who had court staff notarize documents necessary for them to seek retention on the court. The investigation was closed after State Attorney Willie Meggs, a Democrat, wrote a letter to FDLE saying the justices might technically have violated a law, but the law does not concern itself with tri es. But the issue is not settled. The Southeastern Legal Foundation, a conservative legal group, has led a lawsuit in Leon County circuit court on behalf of two state residents, arguing that the three justices would not have made the ballot if they hadnt used state employees. The suit asks for the justices to be booted from the ballot. In a statement issued shortly the FDLE announcement, Gov. Rick Scott suggested that the outcome of the investigation was far from a clean bill of health for the three. According to FDLE ndings, it appears using state employees to complete and file campaign forms and other documents is common practice, Scott said. Now this case is before the courts where a determination will be made as to whether this common practice is legal. STORY OF THE WEEK: Obamacare reverberates across the state. Gov. Rick Scott remains de ant while legislative leaders take more measured approach. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: (Obama) does not want you to have the self-esteem of getting up and earning and having that title of American. Hed rather you be his slave and be economically dependent upon him. U.S. Rep. Allen West, R-Florida, speaking to supporters during a campaign event. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 Page 3BWEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Are these truths self-evident?Gov. Rick Scott is concerned about the possibility of defense cuts and their effect on Florida, which is dotted with military bases and defense contractors. Speaking at the Farnborough International Airshow in England on Monday, Scott said he hopes Florida will escape cuts. No movement on [defense cuts] yet, and were worried about jobs in our state...theres a lot of pressure on congressional delegates to do the right thing, he said, according to The Wall Street Journals Market Watch. The Journal noted, however, that industry analysts say a long term drop in the size of the defense budget looks unavoidable and that defense industry sales are expected to drop. News Service of FloridaScott: Defense Jobs Are Concern 000ARJV 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) 10AM (TUE-FRI) HAIR SALON FREE Eyebrow Waxing when you get a haircut! FEATHER LOCKS for the SummerFULL SERVICE FAMILY SALON the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringLassie WilliamsJune 2012 Winner Her name was drawn from I am so appreciative of being the recipient of this nice little gift I so enjoy eating out in Wakulla and I love reading The Wakulla News. OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l l a nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlorank You So Much!

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet By DAVID WHITE Most of the nation is still recovering from a brutal heat wave that shattered thousands of records and forced millions to stay indoors and crank up the air conditioning. The impact of such weather on wine was on full effect last weekend, when I attended an outdoor party on a 100-degree day. I arrived to the event a few hours early, as my friend had asked if I could bring a few cases of wine. When I pulled in, I was thrilled to spot the caterer, who was already filling large coolers with ice. She quickly took the white wines and threw them in the coolers. The reds, though, remained on a table, baking under the hot sun. So I asked how I could help, offering to put the reds in a refrigerator or toss them in a different cooler. She looked at me like I was insane. Ive been doing this for years, and Ive never heard of chilling reds, she declared, incredulously. I politely noted the sweltering heat, and suggested that guests would prefer cool wine -which would quickly warm once poured -to wine that had been sitting in the hot sun all day. Well, youre the expert, she answered, proceeding to put the reds on ice. But Ive always been told that red wines are served at room temperature. And there it was, the worlds most pervasive wine myth. The notion that reds should be served at room temperature is why most people and even most bars, restaurants, and caterers serve red wines too warm. Before the advent of thermostats, homes were much cooler than they are today. So serving red wine at room temperature made sense -it still made for a refreshing beverage. Today, most Americans keep their homes at about 72 degrees. At this temperature, alcohol is more obvious, which distorts the aromas and flavors of a wine. Warm wines generally seem rough, unstructured, and alcoholic. These traits only get worse as a wine heats up. Conversely, most white wines are consumed when theyre too cold. Most consumers serve whites straight from the refrigerator, and most restaurants serve them straight from an ice bucket. Serving any wine at such low temperatures will mask its avors. Fortunately, you dont need a fancy wine refrigerator to serve wine at its optimal temperature. If youre drinking a red wine, pop it in the fridge for 20-30 minutes. If youre drinking a white wine, pull it out of the fridge about 20-30 minutes before youre going to drink it. As wine critic Bill Ward recently explained, Basically, all wine should be chilled, but not too much, and served between 43 degrees (sweet or crisp whites, bubbles) and 65 degrees (hearty reds). Richer whites (Chardonnay) and lighter reds (Pinot Noir, Gamay, Cabernet Franc) fall in between. Temperature doesnt just matter when serving wine, it also matters when storing it. If youre looking to hold onto a special bottle for a long time, most experts agree that it should be stored somewhere cool and dark -wine cellars are typically kept at about 55 degrees. This allows a wine to develop slowly and predictably, hopefully becoming more complex and interesting over time. Wines stored at higher temperatures will age more quickly and can develop off avors and aromas. Its also worth noting that wine is perishable and can spoil very quickly when exposed to extreme heat. This was another concern of mine last weekend. Like ice cream, wine can be destroyed when left outside -or even worse, in a car -on a hot summer day. If a wine is just slightly cooked, the damage will be hard to perceive -it will just seem a bit dull. When a wine is more noticeably heat-damaged, its marked by aromas of stewed fruit and burnt sugar. When heat damage is severe, the wine will expand inside the bottle -pushing out the cork and breaking its seal, thus spoiling the wine by exposing it to too much oxygen. Already, it looks like this might be the hottest summer in history. So keep cool. And dont forget to chill your wines. David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the internet. Whites WinesWhen the weather warms, keep wines cool Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. Interior Remodeling Doors Floors Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling Decks/Barns/Fences Portable, Private, Outdoor ShowersFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS NEW! Celebrating 30 years of building leaders with an appreciation for the value of working together, across our diversities, for a better Florida. bu i ld i ng o n for the e r, across e r Florida. C elebrat i n leaders w v alue of our dive r www.leader shipflorida.org ...and outgrow your competition Display.Classified.Online.Daily Call now to diversify your advertising. 866.742.1373 www.AdNetworksFlorida.com Get your business noticed... Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm

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SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEmploymentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements Todays New Ads CRAWFORDVILLE3 bedroom. 2-1/2 bath 1850 sqft end unit townhome 3 br 2.5 ba, 1 car gar, SS appl. $1150 rent / $1150 deposit 850-509-3439 or 850-212-5565 Lost Lost Basset Hound, Female Wakulla Springs Rd, Area REWARD (850) 421-1277 Pomchi,Male Black with white markings, Wakulla Gardens Area $100 Reward (850) 566-4487 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Found Found set of keys on county road 61 on Saturday June 30th. It has a Minney Mouse letter B decoration. If these are your keys, please contact Jackie Turner 850-561-7281 or Bonnie Allen 850-561-7276 General Help DriversNew Refrigerated and Dry Van freight. Daily or Weekly pay! Quarterly Safety Bonus! Flexible Hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800)414-9569 www. driveknight.com HELPWANTED FT ESE Teacher PT Bus DriversCoast Charter School St. Marks, 850-925-6344 Schools/ Instruction MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDEDTrain online to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Training & Local Job Placement assistance. thru SC Training.HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Mobile Homes For Rent WAKULLA COUNTYRural 2 Bedroom 1 Bath Mobile Home $500 mo. + security Available Immediately (850) 745-8526. Efficiencies/ Cottages CRAWFORDVILLELarge room/bath, microwave, fridge, with deck, on Wakulla River, $90 week or $400 month, includes utilities. Long Term Rental 850-926-2783 Rental Houses OYSTER BAY2 Bedroom, 1 Bath With private dock, Furnished or Not $1,000. mo. FREE Utilities, cable & WiFi 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE3 bedroom. 2-1/2 bath 1850 sqft end unit townhome 3 br 2.5 ba, 1 car gar, SS appl. $1150 rent / $1150 deposit 850-509-3439 or 850-212-5565 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEConvient Locations 2 BEDROOM on 3 Acres, Nice Oak Trees $625 mo. 2 BEDROOM on 2 Fenced Acres $700. moBrenda Hicks Realy (850) 251-1253 NORTH WAKULLA COUNTY3 bedroom. 2 bath. Brick home with 2 car garage, Florida room, located on 5 acres. High and Dry. $1200/month. Requires deposit and background check 850-508-1302 Rent: Houses Unfurnished 5290-0719 PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT T O CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE: School Board Plicy 2.25 School Board Adopted PlansCode of Student Conduct and Elementary, Middle and High School Attendance Policies to include the Corporal Punishment Policy. PURPOSE AND EFFECT:To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures. LEGALAUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED: 1001.41, 1001.43, Florida Statutes ECONOMIC IMPACT: None REVISION ORIGINATED BY: Beth ODonnell Assistant Superintendent for Instruction REVISION APPROVED BY: David Miller, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, AHEARING WILL BE HELD TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: Administrative Offices Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE: August 20, 2012 ACOPYOF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAYBE OBTAINED ATCOSTFROM: Wakulla County School Board Post Office Box 100 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, FL32326-0100 Published One (1) time in The Wakulla News July 12, 2012 5290-0719 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5265-0628 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201202078 TO: Brandon M. Tabler ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. June 21, 28 and July 5,12, 2012. Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5287-0719 TWN Vs. Parker, Brittany Rachelle Case No. 65-2012-CA-000037 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE FIFTH JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.65-2012-CA-000037 U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v. BRITTANYRACHELLE PARKER, ETAL., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: BRITTANYRACHELLE PARKER, and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants Current Residence Unknown, but whose last known address was: 187 ROCHELSIE RD., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-2719 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: LOT 24, BLOCK 22, WAKULLAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL33716, on or before Augusy 10, 2012 or within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327-0337, either before service on Plaintiff s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 18 day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTLETHA WELLS, (850)926-0905 EXT222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPTOF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. July 12 and 19, 2012. 665112464 5289-0719 v. NORTHWESTFLORIDAOPERATIONS, INC. Case No. 2011-CA-000235 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-CA-000235 PREMIER BANK a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff v. NORTHWEST FLORIDAOPERATIONS, INC, a Florida Corporation, R. RICHARD YATES, JR ., individually, DANNYR. MCCLELLAN individually, and HOME PLACEMENT, INC. a Florida Corporation Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to-wit: Lots 93 and 94, Block A; Lots 52 and 81, Block D; and Lots 18, 21, and 22, Block E. of Magnolia Gardens, as per map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door of the Clerks office in the Courthouse of Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 26th day of July, 2012. Dated this 28th day of June, 2012. Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News July 12 and 19, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5286-0719 Vs Mark Anthony, Case No.:10-000235-CA, Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILACTION CASE NO. 10-000235-CA CU MEMBERS MORTGAGE, ADIVISION OF COLONIALSAVINGS, F.A. Plaintiff, vs. MARK ANTHONY, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated 21st day of June, 2012, entered in Civil Case Number in the Circuit Court for Wakulla, Florida, wherein CU MEMBERS MORTGAGE, ADIVISION OF COLONIALSAVINGS, F.A. the Plaintiff, and MARK ANTHONY, et al, are the Defendants, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla Florida, described as: www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 Page 5B AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan StricklandsPOOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE S S S S S S Licensed & InsuredGreen Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairs 850-926-9760 850-509-1013BryantsCARPET AND UPHOLSTERY CAREProfessional carpet, upholstery, tile/grout and area rug cleaning.IICRC/CLEANTRUST CERTIFIED TECHNICIANBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Local, experienced and dependable management for Condo and Homeowners Associations.925-9911Kellys Association Management Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Be ds, Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r S yst ems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSUREDWill help you make the most of your outdoor space. Wood and Metal buildings, carports, barns, swings, gazebos & More! Sizes and Pricing to t your needs. RENT-TO-OWN options. $25 credit on a new building with this ad! See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care 850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOATHealthy, single, white male, 62 looking for female. I have a nice home in Panacea. Live-in free (room-&-board). Light housekeeping and companionship. Lets meet! Wes 984-5733. No large women, please. ::: PERSONAL ::: ESTATE SALE !Saturday, July 14, 8AM-1PM, 1119 Shadeville Hwy. Mens clothes, suits, ties, womens clothes, shoes, arts & crafts and lots of miscellaneous items. 4Br 2Ba hs $850 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba hs $850 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba hs w/carport $850 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba hs 2 car garage $1,250 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba hs 1 car garage $950 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba hs. 1 car garage $1100 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba Twnhs garage $1000 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $700 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $675 mo. + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba hs w/carport $750 mo. + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker

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Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices LOT 8, BLOCK C, WOODVILLE SOUTH, ASUBDIVISION, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 31 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA at a public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327 at 11:00 AM. on the 26th day of July 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any prodeeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, telephone (850) 926-0905, TDD 1 800 955 8771 or 1 800 955 8770 via Florida Relay Service. Dated: June 29, 2012 BRETTX. THURMOND WAKULLACOUNTYCLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk July 12 and 19, 2012 in The Wakulla News. File No:CT-T05410/KK 5276-0712 Vs. Beckman III, William George Case No. 65-2010-CA000197 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000197 US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION. Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM GEORGE BECKMAN III; JACQUELINE BECKMAN; JOHN DOE UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; FLORIDAHOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 20, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOT 58, BLOCK 7, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT TWO, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGE 42 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 68 CHINOOK TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 at public sale on July 26 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 21st day of June, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTLETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL1-800-955-8771. July 5 & 12, 2012 5276-0712. 5277-0712 Vs. Richard Stephen Weems Case No. 65-2010-CA000205 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000205 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.. Plaintiff, vs. RICHARD STEPHEN WEEMS; LONALISAWEEMS; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 12, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOT 11, OF DOE FOREST, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1994 DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ATTACHED THERETO HAVING VIN #47620322 GA, TITLE #66714392 AND VIN # 47620322 GB, TITLE #66714391. WHICH IS NOW RETIRED. a/k/a 9 WHITE TAILDR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-1644 at public sale on January 10, 2013, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 20th day of June, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTLETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL1-800-955-8771. July 5 & 12, 2012 5277-0712. 5278-0712 TWN Vs. Farmer, Claudette Case No. 11-174-FC Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 11-174-FC UCN:0652011CA000174XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. CLAUDETTE L. FARMER A/K/ACLAUDETTE FARMER; EARLE W. MURPHY; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIED CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 20, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11-174-FC UCN:652011CA0000174XXXXXX if the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and CLAUDETTE L. FARMER A/K/ACLAUDETTE FARMER; EARLE W. MURPHY; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL.32327 at Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 10th day of January 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 16, WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 39, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE, DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on June 20, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News July 5 & 12 2012 5278-0712 1183-96619 5279-0712 vs. Miller, Edward A. Case No.65-2012-CA-000153 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000153, DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. : EDWARD A. MILLER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MARIAN L. MILLER LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 45 EDGEWOOD DRIVE, Crawfordville, FL32327 5284-0719 vs. PHILLIPS, JOYCE Case No.65-2011-CA-000121 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000121 DIVISION: JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. : JOYCE H. PHILLIPS, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated June 20, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000121 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANYis the Plaintiff and JOYCE H. PHILLIPS; UNITED STATE OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF US DEPARTMENTOF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 26th day of JULY, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: ALLOF LOTS 4, 5, 19 AND 20, OF BLOCK A, OF HAMMOCK HAVEN SUBDIVISION, TUCKERS SUBDIVISION IN THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, AS SHOWN BYPLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 33 OF PLAT BOOK 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTYFLORIDA A/K/A48 LESLIE ANNE STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on JUNE 22nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News July 12 and 19, 2012 F11015090 5285-0719 vs. Smith, James R. Case No. 11-324 CA IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTION CASE NO. 11-324-CA CADENCE BANK, N.A, successor by merger with SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JAMES R. SMITH, CAPITALONE BANK and FLORIDACOMMERCE CREDITUNION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure darted the 20th day of June, 2012, in Case Number 2011-324 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff and JAMES R. SMITH, CAPITALONE BANK, and FLORIDACOMMERCE CREDIT UNION are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidders, in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 A.M. Eastern Time on the 26th day of July, 2012, the following described parcels of real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgement of Foreclosure, to-wit: LOTS & R, VILLAGES OF ST. MARKS, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 70, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida ATTHE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFULHIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAYBE, SHALLPOSTWITH THE CLERK ADEPOSITEQUALTO 5 PERCENTOF THE FINALBID. THE DEPOSITSHALLBE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE ATTHE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSITSHALLBE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFULBIDDER OR BIDDERS, ATTHE SALE WILLBE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARYSTAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. Dated this 27th day of June, 2012. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk (SEAL) Wakulla County By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News July 12 and 19, 2012 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLACounty, Florida: LOT 5, EDGEWOOD, ACCORDING TO MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 83, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates, P.L. Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in The W akulla News. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on 25th day of June, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News July 5 & 12, 2012 F10125164 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5275-0712 Hazel L. Imperiale estate of,12-37 CP, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 12-37CP IN RE: ESTATE OF HAZELL. IMPERIALE A/K/A, HAZELLOUISE 5280-0712 Dease Jr., George L., File No. 12-54-CP, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-54-CP IN RE; ESTATE OF GEORGE L. DEASE, JR. a/k/a GEORGE LEAONARD DEASE a/k/a GEORGE DEASE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of GEORGE L. DEASE, JR. a/k/a GEORGE LEONARD DEASE a/k/a GEORGE DEASE, deceased, whose date of death was May 16, 2012; File Number 12-54-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must be file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is July 5, 2012. Personal Representative /s/ Janice Walters-Smith, 1670 Pershing Avenue #B, Pahrump, NV 89048 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Gary S. Wright, Esq. Florida Bar No. 0509655 Gary S. Wright, P.A. 465 Summerhaven Dr. # C, DeBary, FL 32713, Telephone 386-753-0280 FAX: 386-668-5880 Published two times in the Wakulla News on July 5 and 12,2012 5280-0712 5282-0719 TWN Ladd, Newell H. 12-47-CP Public Notice IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTYPROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 12-47-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF NEWELLH. LADD, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of NEWELLH. LADD, deceased, Case Number 12-47CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. ALLCREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents Estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTYDAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents Estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is July 12, 2012. Personal Representative /s/Mary Susan Miller 30 Covington Circle, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for the Personal Representative /s/MARYELLEN DAVIS, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No.949884 MARYELLEN DAVIS LAW OFFICE Post Office Box 1720, Crawfordville, FL32327 July 12 and 19, 2012. Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA on Wakulla River. Short term lease available $1500/Mo. Nightly rates available 43 Squaw DWMH 3BR/2BA $700/Mo. First and Last Mo. Deposit 5 Susquehanna 2BR/1BA $750 Mo. $750/Deposit. Washer/Dryer Fenced yard, Pets okay 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $1,000 Mo. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 64 Blackfoot 3BR/2BA Pets ok w/ non refundable Deposit. $850 Mo. $850 Deposit 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of ofce space, fenced 145 Rochelsie 2BR/2BA $700 Mo. Pets okay up to 40lbs with non-refundable $250 Deposit. Available July 1 14 Windy Ct 3BR/2BA $850mo./$850 Deposit. Available Aug. 1 67 Cochise 2BR/2BA, Screened back porch $825 Mo./$825 Deposit 46 Gulf Breeze (Oyster Bay) 3BR/BA $1,200 Mo./1,200 Deposit 178 Parkside Circle 4BR/2BA $1,400 Mo./$1,400 Deposit Pets allowed with deposit We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!27 Brentwood Lane 4 Bdr. 3 1/2 ba In-Ground Pool includes Maintenance, Double car garage, replace, large master bedroom, screen porch. $1,050. per month. No Pets, No smoking50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 Page 7BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 32 37 42 47 51 59 64 67 2 33 60 3 29 61 4 30 48 56 21 24 38 43 5 15 18 34 44 65 68 6 35 39 62 7 31 57 8 25 52 9 22 45 49 19 40 50 10 16 41 46 58 63 66 69 11 26 36 53 12 27 54 13 28 55 ACROSS 1. New-__ hay 5. Synthetic fiber 10. Alka-Seltzerlanding-in-water sound 14. Indy winner Luyendyk 15. Bobby of the Black Panthers 16. Ready to pluck 17. Greek Z 18. Recap giver 20. Monroe __ (1823 pronouncement) 22. Churchillian gesture 23. Blond shade 24. Basis for discrimination 25. Is so minded 29. Goldie of "LaughIn" 31. In an evasive manner 32. Ibn __ (Arabia's founder) 34. It has 100 seats 36. Beau Brummell 37. De Mille or Moorehead 39. Signed like an illiterate 40. Dustin's "Midnig ht Cowboy" role 42. "Welcome" giver 43. Think highly of 46. Vintner's dregs 47. Lily Tomlin's Ernestine, for one 49. Irish Rose's man 51. Like some deodorants 52. Bearded beast 53. "Platoon" war zone, informally 56. Part of SSN: Abbr. 57. Not invincible 59. Sparsely distributed amount 63. Shaker stuff 64. Hammer head 65. Like a King story 66. Ballet bend 67. Capp or Gump 68. Rationed, with "out" 69. Malamute's towDOWN1. Miata maker 2. Stackable cookies 3. "Red Scare" fanatic, so to speak 4. Clutter-free 5. Hands out 6. See the old gang 7. Partner of rank and serial number 8. "Slippery" tree 9. Ultimatum alternative 10. Blesser of holy water 11SithClib 12. Unlock, poetically 13. __ annum 19. "__ Madness" (anti-marijuana film) 21. Like steak tartare 25. Lamp cover 26. Highest-numbered item in a rack 27. "How can __?" (gambler's query) 28. Proofreader's finds 30. Suffix with cannon or block 31. Look from Snidely 32. Pago Pago's place 33. Slack-jawed 35. Sing the praises of 38. One surrounds each the me entry in this puzzle 41. "Rope-a-dope" pugilist 44Placedininventory 45. Acted the field general 48. Like a ready-to-use violin bow 50. On the other hand 52. Bottled spirit 54. Kate's TV roommate 55. Allotted, with "out" 57. Compete in logrolling 58. Krait cousins 59. Therapeutic spot 60. Relief pitcher's locale 61. Checkers color 62. Writer RostenAmerican Prole Hometown Content 7/8/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 12 34 561 678 8 751 4579 6234 4 59 692 8437 00 9 HometownContent 182 3594 7 6 573486291 946127835 829 745613 435861729 761293584 314 572968 657938142 298614357 M A Z D A S A M O A S P A O R E O S A G A P E P E N W I T C H H U N T E R R E D N E A T A D E R O S I N Y R A W S E A S O N A S S I G N S S T O C K E D R E U N E E X T O L L E O N A M E S N E E R B I R L E L M S H A D E G E N I E L E A V E I T M A N A G E D R E E F E R B U T P R I E S T A L I A S P S L I Z F I F T E E N B A L L O P E I L O S E A L L I E P E R T Y P O S M E T E D Approximately Argue Atlas Avoid Blame Borrows Built Cannot Cheeks Coral Dimly Drink Dusty Dying Early Finds Floors Forces Harness Insure Knight Laughs Lawns Loyalty Maids Mails Movie Obtained Peach Pistol Poets Rates Rescue Resign Reveal Rigid Rough Salads Solving Stable Stalk Stays Steak Stream Stripes Tasks Warmly Wheelbarrows Winds YouveWord Find IMPERIALE A/K/AHAZELSTANLEYIMPERIALE, DECEASED, NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS (SUMMAR Y ADMINISTRA TION) TO ALLPERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINSTTHE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of Hazel L. Imperiale a/k/a Hazel Louise Imperiale a/k/a Hazel Stanley Imperiale, deceased, File Number 12-37CP, by the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Community Center, 322 Shadeville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327; that the decedents date of death was September 20, 2011; that the total value of the estate is Less than$75,000.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Geraldine Harvey 69 Anna Drive Crawfordville, FL32327 Nancy Imperiale 106 E. Cottesmre Circle, Longwood, FL32779 ALLINTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE. Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5283-0719 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGALNOTICE Self Storage Notices 5288-0719 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Auction Under the authority of the Florida StorageFacility Act the property described below has been seized for non payment of Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices rent and other accrued expenses. The property will be sold at auction to the highest bidder as provided by the Self Storage Facility Act 83.806 Double D Storage LLC reserves the right to refuse any and all bids. Cash only. Mike Jones unit 06 household items, auction to be held @ Double D StorageLLC 289 Cajer Posey Rd Crawfordville FL32327 July 25, 2012 @12:00 pm Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration ALLCLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANYOTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is July 5, 2012. Person Giving Notice /s/ Geraldine Harvey 69 Anna Drive, Crawfordville, FL32327 Attorney for Person Giving Notice:/s/ Lauchlin Tench Waldoch Florida Bar Number: 0262749 Waldoch & Mc Connaughhay, P.A. 1709 Hermitage Blvd, Suite 102, Tallahassee, FL32308 Telephone: (850) 385-1246 Published two (2) times in the WAKULLANEWS on July 5 and 12, 2012 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON JUL Y 27, 2012 at 1 1:00a.m AT2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONALPROPERTYOF: CARYMILLER STEPHEN BOND THERESAWRIGHT Before the sale date of July 27, 2012, The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. TO RUN IN THE WALULLANEWS JULY12 AND 19. The Waku l la News For local news and photos visit us online For local news and photos visit us online www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear EarthTalk: How are the worlds reptile species faring in terms of population numbers and endangered status? Whats being done, if anything, to help them? Vicky Desmond Troy, N.Y. The worlds reptiles turtles, snakes, lizards, alligators and crocodiles are indeed in trouble. The International Union for Conservation of Nature, which publishes an annual global roster of threatened and endangered species called the Red List, considers some 664 species of reptiles representing more than 20 percent of known reptile species worldwide as endangered or facing extinction. Meanwhile, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service considers about 10 percent of American reptiles threatened or endangered. Why care? The non-pro t Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) considers reptiles amazing creatures with clever adaptations that have helped them survive for millions of years. CBD also points out that reptiles are valuable indicators of wider ecological health. Because many reptile species are long-lived and relatively slow-moving, they suffer from disturbances like habitat loss or pollution for extended periods, the group reports, adding that a diverse community of reptiles living in a given area is evidence of a healthy ecosystem that can support the plant and animal life they and other species need for food and cover. So whats causing the reptiles decline? While habitat loss is the most obvious cause of endangerment, declines are even even occurring in pristine areas from threats such as disease, UV radiation and climate change, reports CBD. Overcollecting and unregulated hunting also are taking a toll on reptile populations. In order to help stem the tide of reptile loss, CBD leverages the court system to pressure the federal government to protect at-risk species. For instance, back in 2004 the group worked with the Coalition for Sonoran Desert Protection in ling a petition to add the Tucson shovel-nosed snake, which dwells in the quickly disappearing wild desert around fast-growing cities like Tucson and Phoenix, to the federal list of endangered species. Finally in 2011 the federal government agreed that it would add the snake to its list of endangered species which will help it get the habitat protection needed to ensure long term survival. CBD also works on other fronts for reptiles. The groups campaign to outlaw rattlesnake round-ups contests in which hunters collect and kill as many snakes as they can has helped stem population declines of eastern diamondback rattlesnakes. And CBDs efforts to educate the public about the plight of freshwater turtles, which are overcollected for food and the pet trade in the southern and midwestern parts of the U.S., helped convince several states for the rst time to regulate turtle harvests. One way everyone can help reptile species in decline is to make our backyards friendly to them. The U.S. Geological Surveys Patuxent Wildlife Research Center offers tips on what to plant and how to arrange a landscape to encourage reptiles and other wildlife. Landowners that take these steps may be rewarded with fewer pests, given reptiles taste for large numbers of mosquitoes and other insects as well as small rodents. Other pro-reptile tips include driving carefully (road mortality is a big issue for snakes, turtles and other species) and keeping outside areas around your property free of garbage that might attract raccoons, crows and other pests that also prey on reptiles. Dear EarthTalk: Whats the deal with New York City buildings switching over from heating oil to natural gas? Is this a trend in other U.S. cities as well? Mitchell Branecke Yonkers, N.Y. Anyone who has lived in New York City knows that particulate matter is omnipresent there. Commonly referred to as soot, such particulate pollution is comprised of ne black particles derived of carbon from coal, oil, wood or other fuels that have not combusted completely. Due to this preponderance of soot in the air, asthma rates in some parts of the Big Apple (like Harlem and parts of the Bronx) are sky high. Environmentalists have been pointing the nger for years at the dirty residential heating oil used by so many New York City buildings, many of which were built before natural gas was widely available. According to the nonprofit Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), just one percent of the buildings across the ve boroughs of New York City burn noxious heating oils, but those structures send more particulate matter airborne than all of the citys cars and trucks combined. Thats why mayor Michael Bloomberg announced this past June that an innovative public-private partnership (known as NYC Clean Heat) between the citys government and leading banks, energy providers and environmental groups would be putting up $100 million in financing and other new resources to help buildings there make the switch to cleaner fuels. NYC Clean Heat kicked off last year when the city ordered the phase-out of the dirtiest home heating fuels: No. 4 and No. 6 oils that are still used in some 10,000 New York City buildings and which create a significant air pollution hazard. Switching out those fuels with cleaner burning oil (such as No. 2), biodiesel or natural gas will go a long way toward meeting Bloombergs aggressive new PlaNYC goal of reducing soot pollution some 50 percent by 2013. The mayors of ce reports that the new restrictions will save 120 lives and prevent 300 asthma-related hospital visits a year, while generating some $300 million in construction activity in the short term. Property owners interested in a clean heat conversion can access the funding, which is coming from a combination of city coffers and nancial institutions including Chase, Deutsche Bank, Hudson Valley Bank, Citi and the Community Preservation Corporation. On the environmental side, EDF is offering technical assistance and outreach to buildings that are undergoing fuel conversions by making available a team of trained energy professional to help evaluate conversion options, coordinate with utilities and beef up energy ef ciency measures. As for the utilities, Con Edison and National Grid, the two primary providers for the New York City metro area, have agreed to upgrade their natural gas infrastructure to make it easier and cheaper for buildings to make the switch. And Hess Corporation, the citys largest residential heating oil provider, has begun to offer customers new incentives to switch to natural gas, ultra-low sulfur No. 2 heating oil and biodiesel. But no doubt individual property owners who can make the switch are doing it of their own accord due to the low price of natural gas versus oil. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com.EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine. How are reptiles species faring? The International Union for Conservation of Nature considers some 664 species of reptiles, including turtles, snakes, lizards, alligators and crocodiles, as endangered or facing extinction. Pictured: A freshwater turtle destined for the pet trade.iStockPhoto e U.S. Fish & Wildlife Servie estimates about 10 percent of American reptiles threatened or endangered. 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