<%BANNER%>
Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00413
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 06-14-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00413
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 23rd Issue Thursday, June 14, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents kll h h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyThe WakullanewsThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways.....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report.............................. ...............................Page 13A Green Scene ...................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Health & Fitness .............................................................. Page 3B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7B INDEX OBITUARIES Rock Solid Construction is building a home in Tallahassee that should have a zero monthly utility bill. Green Scene Page 1B BUILDING A NET-ZERO HOMEPhoto SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAarone Yvonne Bryant William Arthur ‘Bo’ Burke Robert ‘Bobby’ Stephen Oaks Margaret Louise Floyd Poole Andrew ‘Andy’ Lawrence Roberts Ralph omas is running for county commission Candidates qualify for upcoming electionBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe deadline for candidates to qualify for this years election was Friday, June 8. Two candidates quali“ ed in the race for sheriff, T.W. Maurice Langston, Republican, and Charlie Creel, NPA. The current sheriff, Donnie Crum, expressed his intent not to run for sheriff after former Sheriff David Harvey resigned last October. Two candidates also qualifed to run for superintendent of schools, Robert R. Pearce, Democrat, and Kimball KimŽ Thomas, NPA. Current Superintendent David Miller announced in April that he would not seek re-election and would retire at the end of this term. Candidates for property appraiser include incumbent Donnie Sparkman, Democrat, and challenger Jim Parham Jr., NPA. Continued on Page 3A Special to the NewsDuring the heavy rain that blanketed most of Wakulla County on Thursday, June 7, a large tree fell on a car as it was being driven west on Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Boulevard close to Coastal Highway 98. The lone driver was able to exit the vehicle and was transported to the hospital by Wakulla County EMS. The sheriffs of“ ce, Florida Highway Patrol and “ re rescue also responded to the incident. Wakulla County Public Works cleared the roadway. They also handled several other calls for trees in the road during the afternoon and evening hours. Tree falls on car on MLK Driver transported to hospital PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Staff ReportThe burned body of the man found in the national forest in late April has been identified as Tony Delacey, 84, of Bokeelia in Lee County, according to Wakulla County Sheriffs Office spokesman Keith Blackmar. A U.S. Forest Service helicopter spotted a “ re on April 27 and “ re“ ghters responding to the scene found Delaceys body outside his burning truck. A wild“ re, believed to have been started as a result of the burning vehicle, burned about 75 acres of forest land. Initially the death appeared suspicious, but Blackmar said that investigators no longer suspect foul play. Delacey was reportedly traveling from Fort Myers to visit family in Foley, Ala., at the time of his death, Blackmar said. The death is still under investigation … a toxicology report and a report from the state Fire Marshalls Of“ ce are still pending.Body of dead man in forest is identifiedWAKULLA COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICEThe then still-smoldering, burnt-out remains of the car found in the Apalachicola National Forest in late April. The body of a man, now identi“ ed as Tony Delacey, 84, was found nearby. Maurice Langston Charlie Creel By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County native Ralph Thomas is running for county commissioner District 1. Thomas will face incumbent Alan Brock and Virginia JennyŽ Brock. After sitting in on commission meetings and being involved in local government, Thomas said he reached a point where he didnt feel he and the things that were important to him were being represented by his commissioner. Thomas believes there is a disconnect between the government and its citizens and said it is time for the local government to get more in step with local families. Times are dif“ cult and many are struggling, he said. To survive, weve had no choice but to tighten our belts,Ž he said. At the same time, the local government is asking more of citizens. For example, the increase in the ad valorem tax, Communication Service Tax and the Public Service Tax and solid waste assessment being imposed, he said. The general public has been squeezed too hard,Ž Thomas said. His primary focus would be decreasing taxes and increasing the countys reserves. Failing to tighten the county budget led to drawing from reserves and furloughing county staff, he said. We broke our commitment to them,Ž he said. He said he would hold the line on non-essential spending. If we dont have the money, then its not a great idea,Ž he said. Thomas said the community center was supposed to be an asset, but became a burden after someone failed to read a federal grant. A legislative appropriation was given to the county who thought it could be used to purchase the church property. After committing to the purchase, they learned the money could not be used to purchase an existing building and had to use money from reserves, he said. Im not against the community center,Ž Thomas said. Im against throwing money at something we cant afford.Ž Last year, the auditors said the county was on the verge of a “ nancial crisis because it did not make budget adjustments, he said. The saving grace was the constitutional of“ cers bailing out the county, he added. Thomas said he would keep an eye on the bottom line of the budget and look ahead to avoid taking the county deeper into debt. We just have to get back to efficiency,Ž he said. Thomas said his analytical skills would be an asset to the county and he would look at all the issues before making a decision. The county has a tendency of getting into a situation without thinking it all the way through, he said. Thomas said the people always hear what politicians will do and he wants the citizens to know what he has already done.Continued on Page 2ASPECIAL TO THE NEWSRalph Thomas is a candidate for County Commission, District 1.

PAGE 2

Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 2A He and his wife, Cynthia, own AmeriFirst Home Mortgage in Crawfordville. They are one of the last remaining small “ nancial companies, he said. During the 14-year span of their business, Thomas said he has created jobs and helped people purchase their own home. He also shops locally personally and professionally, which brings more money to the county and supports local families and citizens. Everything we do is all tied together,Ž Thomas said. Thomas graduated from Wakulla High School in 1984 and enlisted in the U.S. Navy. After 12 years, Thomas said he came back to Wakulla County to raise his family. He has a background in electronics from the Navy and worked as an engineer for a company in Tallahassee before opening his business with his wife. He and his wife have three children, Caleb, 23, Holly, 21, and Bethany, 10. He serves on the board of directors for the Chamber of Commerce and the Value Adjustment Board. He has also served on the Onecent Sales Tax Committee, Citizens Advisory Task Force and as chairman of the Wakulla Christian School Board and Wakulla Springs Baptist Church Administrative Ministry Team. Ive always been civically minded,Ž Thomas said. I believe we have a responsibility to do so.Ž To contact Thomas or learn more visit www.ralphthomas2012.com or call 559-0608.Ralph omas is running for commissionBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe public was invited to the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council roundtable meeting held on Thursday, June 7, to provide input on how the council can improve on what it is already doing, as well as offer suggestions on how to increase tourism in the county. About 25 people attended the meeting and a majority of the conversation focused on social media and the internet. Currently, the TDC has a website, facebook page, pinterest account, twitter account and youtube page. After hearing numerous complaints and suggestions about the website at the last roundtable meeting held in September 2011, the TDC has focused on improving that site with the help of Chuck Robinson. Robinson said the new site will be up within the next week and is much more user friendly than the previous version. The site has the same look with adjustments, including different drop down menus, a TDC button, facebook update, business inventory, etc. A mobile site version will be available in two to three weeks. Pam Shields, owner of Shields Marina, suggested having a different event or story featured on the home page every so often, such as scalloping season, which opens July 1, and gag grouper. Environmental consultant and business owner, Paul Johnson, said one idea might be to include articles from the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission about different “ shing and hunting seasons. There was also an idea to send out an email weekly or daily featuring events that will be held that week in the county or focusing on a business. TDC Director Pam Portwood asked that people send in events to her so she can include them on the calendar on the website and possibly feature them in an email. Another suggestion was having the intern from Tallahassee Community College, who was hired recently to focus on and keep up with TDCs social media accounts, to post events and activities to other facebook pages, such as kayaking and birding groups. Social media is a big way to market Wakulla County, Portwood said. And people are using the internet more and more to plan their vacations, she added. Robinson suggested sending postcards and mailers to people who are in a certain group, instead of to everyone in an area. Most groups have mailing lists, he said, and there should be a way to get those. Someone also suggested putting promotional materials at parks in other areas. Shields suggested advertising in the Waterway Guide to reach boaters who are passing through the area. The area has several marinas with transient docks, she said. Artistic director of Palaver Tree Theatre, Herb Donaldson, suggested Wakulla County partnership and network with surrounding counties to gather resources and reach more people. Portwood said they are currently doing cross marketing with Franklin County because of the Big Bend Scenic Byway. Wakulla County is also a member of Natural North Florida, which covers 17 counties, she added. Shields said the TDC should really focus on marketing in Georgia. County Commissioner Jerry Moore suggested sending out a weekly “ shing report by email to people who live north of Wakulla County. Owner of Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, Jack Rudloe, said the TDC should look through their guest book and others to see where visitors are coming from. The data really helps,Ž he said. There was also some discussion about having a birding festival in January when a large number of migratory birds are in the area. Birders tend to spend money,Ž said photographer Lou Kellenberger. They will follow those birds to the end of the world.Ž Ideas that have already been implemented in regards to advertising include: ads in the 2012 Travel Guide to Florida, TV commercial on Forgotten Coast, two-page editorial in the summer edition of The Griffon and plans to advertise with Landmark Newspapers in Kentucky and Tennessee in the fall. For the promotional side, Portwood said they updated their tear maps, bought a new trade show display booth, put post cards at the Welcome Center, updated the website, established a gateway sign design which will be placed soon, hired a student intern for social media marketing, held a facebook contest, created a pinterest account and are working on getting the Welcome Center designated as a location on the Florida Birding Trail. In the 2012-13 budget, the TDC has $103,579, which is from the tourist development tax and does not include any grant funding received. Portwood said the TDC has $112,750 in grants. Some of the grant funding is being used to implement the Apalachee Bay Maritime Heritage Trail. Currently they are focused on the Panacea to St. Marks paddling trail. Other itineraries include the Inside Passage to Spring Creek, the fort to the St. Marks Lighthouse and Leon Sinks to Wakulla Springs. They are also working on implementing the Big Bend Wayshowing and Interpretive Plan. TDC holds a roundtable for ideas on increasing tourism DISCUSSION: A crowd of about 25 people, above, participated in the TDCs roundtable on Thursday, June 7. TDC Director Pam Portwood, left, gives a PowerPoint presentation on the TDCs efforts to promote tourism. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN J OIN “Father’s Day” Sunday, June 17th 11 AM – 9 PM Full menu and specials will be offered Call ahead for reservations… or priority seating Walk-ins Welcome Come Open: Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 • Sun. 11-9 850 697-9191 Three Locations to Serve You! Woodville 850 421-9191 8056 Woodville Hwy. 850 386-9191 Tallahassee Accross from Lake Ella in the Publix Shopping Center Restaurants Open Sun. Thurs. 11 A.M. 9 P.M. • Fri. & Sat. 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Thanks for your confidence and the chance to serve YOU again as Tax Collector. My goal from day one was to serve, help and benefit the citizens of Wakulla County and anyone coming to this office for service. With the assistance of my dedicated and long-standing employees, it is my desire to continue this goal with pride. How wonderful and blessed we are to live and work in Wakulla County, Florida! Thank you, Cheryll Olah Wakulla County Tax Collector Celebrating 30 years of building leaders with an appreciation for the value of working together, across our diversities, for a better Florida. bu i ld i ng o n for the e r, across e r Florida C elebrat i n leaders w v alue of our dive r www.leader shipflorida.org Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

PAGE 3

By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn an effort to “ nd ways to encourage smart growth within the Crawfordville Town Plan and along the Big Bend Scenic Byway, the county applied for an Environmental Protection Agency Technical Assistance for Sustainable Communities Building Blocks grant. On June 6, Christoper Duerksen of Clarion Associates met with key stakeholders in the community to identify ways to promote smart growth in Wakulla County, focusing on the two primary growth plans, the Crawfordville Town Plan and the Big Bend Scenic Byway. Smart Growth Fixes for Rural CommunitiesŽ focused on common barriers that can hinder the development of an attractive, walkable downtown and quick “ xes for removing these barriers. As well as ways to encourage rural commercial development that preserves the natural resources and beauty of the byway. The idea behind the town plan is to create a downtown for Wakulla County, Duerksen said. And the goal of the byway is to protect the scenic, natural and historic resources. The working group of about 20 people dug into the countys land development code and identified potential fixes for the county commission to consider. Duerksen said the idea was to present a menu of optionsŽ for the commission and ways to implement these options. Implementation is key, he said. Old planners never die, they just lose their implementation,Ž Duerksen said. His assistance is being provided to help ensure the county doesnt lose its implementation, he said. The three ways to encourage smart growth within the Crawfordville Town Plan is to remove barriers, provide incentives and “ ll regulatory gaps, he said. Ideas for the town plan are revising the C-4 downtown commercial zone district to allow residential units for mixed use development, tailor landscaping requirements for more urban development and reduce some of the parking requirements. Duerksen said Wakulla Countys parking requirements are some of the most excessive he has ever seen. Its hard to have compact parking when you are spreading it out,Ž Duerksen said. Commissioner Alan Brock said the excessive parking requirements was one of the “ rst things he tried to change when he was first elected to the commission in 2008, with no luck. They are ridiculous,Ž Brock said. Incentives include allowing on-street parking spaces adjacent to development to count towards off-street parking requirements. This saves money and allows for more compact development, Duerksen said. Another idea was to give a grant bonus landscape credit for protecting existing trees, allowing increased height if the architectural design promotes certain features and allowing the reduction of interior parking lot landscaping in the Crawfordville Town Core area if screening walls and fences are used. Regulatory gaps included requiring bicycle parking and sidewalks, enacting maximum building setbacks to create a downtown look, prohibit certain autooriented uses in downtown core, consider minimum residential densities in core area, focus urban development in Crawfordville, allow parking only to the side or rear of buildings, adopt conservation cluster subdivision requirements and adopt energy ef“ cient light standards. For the scenic byway, barriers include allowing conservation subdivisions in rural residential zone districts, expand permissible vegetation list to encourage more native trees and shrubs, adopt new county rural road sections that permit reduced drive pavement widths and include bicycle lanes and inventory and designate scenic view points. Some incentives would include a grant bonus or landscape credit for preserving trees and provide density bonuses for preserving historic sites or natural areas. To “ ll regulatory gaps, Duerksen suggested the county enact enhanced landscaping and setback standards for developments along byway. The current landscaping ordinance is very suburban oriented and does not set standards for rural areas, he said. He also suggested revising the county sign ordinance regarding billboards and electronic signage along the byway and requiring bicycle parking and pedestrian facilities. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he liked the idea of incentives instead of forcing something on new developments and businesses. You get a lot more bees with honey than you do with vinegar,Ž Merritt said. Duerksen agreed, but said sometimes a combination of incentives and regulations works best. Maybe its time for that,Ž Merritt said. Commissioner Lynn Artz, who spearheaded this project, said she agreed with the approach of addressing the barriers in place that prohibit what the commission has said it would like to see in the Crawfordville Town Plan area. Brock said, If Mayo can have a walkable downtown, we can have a walkable downtown.Ž Mayo is a small town located in Lafayette County. Commissioner Jerry Moore said some good ideas were presented, but he disagreed with some of the restrictions. He said his biggest objection was enacting the maximum building setback. That is a restriction on property rights,Ž Moore said. He added later that, maximum setbacks, that goes against my whole soul.Ž He added that restrictions like these would kill retail development within Crawfordville. Planning Commissioner Chuck Hess said without restrictions, Wakulla County will not be able to develop a town center. He added that the commission needs to say noŽ to developments within the town core that do not follow the standards set forth in the Crawfordville Town Plan. Some quick “ xes for this area would be to leave the existing zoning in place and create an overlay district which would put new standards and regulations on top of those for any new development. Planning Director Luis Serna said this would be done to ensure those people who are already in the Crawfordville Town Plan can stay. This overlay district will be presented to the commission for approval in the near future. The county commission will receive a “ nal report from Duerksen in July which will include a summary, recommendations and next steps, Artz said. Once that is received, Artz said it is up to Serna and the planning staff to draft revisions to the existing code and new land development codes and bring them to the commission for approval. This will eliminate important barriers that currently exist, create new incentives and add new requirements,Ž Artz said. It will apply to new development and change the way it looks within the town core, she added. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A Constitutional officers Clerk of Court Brent X. Thurmond, Tax Collector Cheryll Olah and Supervisor of Elections Henry BuddyŽ Wells are unopposed. Current school board member in District 4, Gregory Thomas, is also running unopposed for his seat. Seat 1 and seat 2 on the Soil & Water Conservation Commission also only have one candidate, Joe Glisson and Joseph C. Duggar. Candidates for County Commission District 1 are incumbent Alan Brock, Democrat, Ralph Thomas Jr., Republican, and Virginia JennyŽ Brock, NPA. Incumbent Michael H. Stewart, Republican, will face challenger Howard Warren Kessler, NPA, in the race for County Commission District 3. Those running for County Commissioner in District 5 are Richard Harden, Republican, John Shuff, Democrat, and Emily Turney Smith, NPA. Commissioner Lynn Artz chose not to seek reelection. Incumbent School Board Member Michael Scott will face challenger Melisa Taylor for District 2. Two candidates quali“ ed for seat 2 on the Soil & Water Conservation Committee, Charlie A. Hess and Edward E. Brimner. There were also two candidates who qualified to run for seat 5 on the Soil & Water Conservation Committee, Calvin H. Jamison and MItchell Kauffman. Tina Brimner and Anne Ahrendt are running for state committeewoman for the Republican Committee and Larry Taylor, Gordon McCleary and Kurt Ahrendt are running for state committeeman. Early voting begins for the primary election on Aug. 4 until Aug. 11. The primary election day is Aug. 14. The general election is Nov. 6. Candidates qualify for upcoming election Workshop held on promoting smart growth in CrawfordvilleCOUNTY COMMISSION Randy Merritt “You get a lot more bees with honey than you do with vinegar.” Alan Brock “If Mayo can have a walkable downtown, we can have a walkable downtown.” Jerry Moore “This is a restriction on property rights” and “goes against my whole soul.” Lynn Artz “This will eliminate important barriers that currently exist, create new incentives and add new requirements.”County commissioners on smart growth:Mike Stewart was absent from the workshop. More commission news, “Board will allow site plans to be approved by staff,” appears on Page 14A. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSThe Wakulla County Commissioners will Hold a Public Hearing Before the Planning Commission on July 9, 2012 at 7:00p.m and the Board of County Commissioners on July 16, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any nonEnglish speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201. JUNE 14, 2012 Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency (CRTPA) Notice of Public MeetingThe Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) will hold a public meeting in coordination with the Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency (CRTPA) regarding the CRTPA’s Federal Certification Review. The primary purpose of the certification is to certify that the CRTPA is satisfactorily meeting the planning requirements as defined in federal laws and regulations. The certification also provides FHWA and FTA the opportunity to share best or innovative planning practices, techniques and/or technology with the CRTPA. Representatives from the FHWA and the FTA will be present and are interested in hearing from the public. This is YOUR OPPORTUNITY to express your thoughts and comments about the transportation planning process. Please join us! DATE: Monday, June 25, 2012 TIME: 5:30 – 7:30 pm WHERE: Tallahassee City Hall, Tallahassee Room (2nd floor) 300 South Adams Street (see map below) Tallahassee, Florida, 32301 Through your attendance, you will gain information about the Federal transportation planning requirements and will be able to provide the Federal Review Team with a better understanding of the issues in your community! Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status. This meeting will be held in conformance with the Americans Disabilities Act. Persons who need special accommodations or persons who require translation services (free of charge) should contact Lynn Barr by phone at (850) 891-6801 or by email at lynn.barr@talgov.com at least seven (7) days prior to the date of the meeting to ensure reasonable accommodations are available. If hearing impaired, please contact the Florida Relay TDD Service at 711. For more information or direction, please contact the CRTPA at (850) 891-6800 or visit www.crtpa.org.

PAGE 4

Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Charles ‘Chris’ Seward Allen obituary • Tree falls on car on MLK, driver transported to hospital • Alan Brock is seeking re-election to the commission •Hunger is a problem in Wakulla County • Robert ‘Bobby’ Stephen Oaks obituary • Aarone Yvonne Bryant obituary • Political Briefs: Qualifying underway, reminder about signs, Democrat HQ to open€ thewakullanews.com Follow us onREADERS WRITE:Editor, The News: I congratulate Sandy Cook on her observation that in todays society, it is easy to sit back and complain when things dont go your way,Ž which she herself is doing in her letter attacking Gregg Stanton (Emerald Sink story was flawed,Ž letters, June 7 in response to Stantons May 24 Underwater Wakulla column). Unlike Sandy, Gregg published his weekly column Underwater Wakulla describing some of the many underwater projects that contributed to society. Unlike Sandy, who was a paid public servant, Gregg volunteered on most of these projects, as they were not directly related to his career as a professor at FSU. On many occasions during his 30plus years as a Wakulla resident he also continued to offer assistance and advice with regards to Wakulla, on his own time. I believe we can agree that Gregg never sat back, and he is also not complaining … he is offering alternatives, and stepped up to the challenge when given the chance. Sandy herself also provides flawed information and a single-sided view on details: As she points out, she was the Wakulla Springs Park Manager from 1992 to 2008. At the time it would have been her decision to follow the principle of equal access, which she did not. She names the agencies and people who worked on the Emerald committee, yet failed to mention that it was she who ultimately approved of these people. It seems that she ignored those who stood up to her pressure, or dared to disagree. Whatever details transpire, the basic premise remains: The current policy, which she implemented and is ultimately responsible for, has led to the loss in revenue of over $5 million for the community since 2007. She still has to demonstrate that restricting diving has had any benefit in protecting the groundwater, which she herself names as the reason Emerald was purchased in the first place. Out of the thousands of cave divers enjoying and contributing to other sites, she believes that 125 for Emerald are a reason to celebrate. Yet time and again the community has signaled and voiced dissatisfaction with her policies that effectively shut Emerald down to the public, despite her claiming otherwise. To perpetuate the same irresponsible policies by opening another site under the same limitations fits the definition of insanity (i.e., repeating the same action but expecting a different outcome). The diving community also offered alternatives yet was pushed aside. At other sites, the discussion of whether or not a car or other garbage in a sink needs to get removed would not have had time to even come up, because cave divers have both discovered and removed the object, almost immediately. Sandys article seems merely politically motivated to further her personal agenda, as we wait for the Florida Department of Environmental Protections next move regarding diving at Wakulla Springs Park. I hope that the future discussion remains on topic and does not get dragged into this type of politics. Looking back, whenever such political motions were implemented, it merely upped the stakes, and removed locals from the discussion table. From an outside perspective, the current situation appears worthy of a corrupt third world country. I believe Sandy should stop complaining merely because things dont go her way, and instead open her mind … or does she believe that the people (that is you, the readers) who showed up for the January public meeting to voice their interest in opening the state park to diving are irresponsible and cant be worked with? I suggest that there is a flaw in the story of Emerald Sink, but it has nothing to do with Mr. Stantons article! Dr. Joerg Hess hess…joerg@hotmail.comBy MARJ LAW Over the years, Ive seen many great cars. The trouble is, once you “ nd the car of your dreams, it changes. And that makes me feel sad. Makes me feel old. A good example of this is my mothers 1999 Honda Accord. Mom has always appreciated a “ ne car, and she loved her Honda. It had 6 cylinders and lots of pep. She sat up high in the drivers seat, and she drove all her friends in the old folks home to their errands and doctor appointments. That was 13 years ago, when Mom was 77. This year, shes going to turn 90. Four years after she bought her “ rst Honda, the newer Accord had some whiz-bang features she coveted. So Mom gave me her old Honda and bought that fancy new one. For a while she was happy with her decision. Then one day when we were talking on the phone, Mom asked me about the car. I told her it was as reliable as the day she gave it to me. I miss that car,Ž she con“ ded. I dont see so well in the new car. The top of the steering wheel obstructs my view.Ž When I visited her a few months later, she insisted on driving to all our errands. Sure enough, I could see how the top of the steering wheel was in line with her eyes. She balanced it out by using a pillow. Every time she got out of the car, the pillow ” opped on the ground. Shed brush the snow off, mutter some bad words, and slap it back onto the seat. Well, seems like every year, car manufacturers twiddle with perfectly good cars. And for someone who has always enjoyed her car, Mom fell prey to the delights of an even newer model. So Mom bought yet another Honda, exulting on its many fancy charms. But a few months later, when I asked her how the car was running, she didnt sound very happy any more. It sits even lower than the last car,Ž she complained. The dashboard gets in the way of seeing things. I liked the car I gave you the best.Ž Would you like it back?Ž I asked. The car was now 10 years old. Noooo,Ž she said mournfully. Its 10 years old now.Ž I feel really bad for Mom. 13 years later, she still mourns the car she gave me. This was the car that had pep and sat her up high so she could see everything and drive her friends everywhere. The newer models dont do that. I wish Honda would continue to make their Accords the way they used to. They can skip the multi disk CD player. And the new electronics. I just want Mom to sit tall in her seat again. Editor, The News: CHAT of Wakulla, Inc. is pleased to announce that “ nancial assistance to spay or neuter unaltered dogs is now available. It is impossible to adopt outŽ of the pet overpopulation crisesŽ, and CHAT is committed to helpŽ says Pat Ross, CHAT president. Millions of animals get euthanized across the US each year because there are just not enough homes. We are making “ nancial assistance available to families with unaltered companion dogs, to reduce the number of litters entering our local shelter. CHAT wants to prevent the senseless death of unwanted animalsŽ Pat continues. To accommodate the schedule of local veterinarian clinics, only a certain number of vouchers will be available each month. The vouchers must be used within 30 days of issuance. Spay/Neuter vouchers can be obtained at the CHAT Adoption Center, 1 Oak Street in Crawfordville on Thursdays from 3-7pm. Applicants may then schedule appointments with Crawfordville Animal Hospital, Shepherd Spring Animal Hospital, or VCA Wakulla Animal Hospital. You can call (850) 9260890 during those hours for more information and requirements. Heide Clifton CHAT WakullaEditor, The News: Renowned businessman and entrepreneur Bob Williamson will speak at NAMI Wakullas meeting on June 25 at the Crawfordville Womans Club beginning at 6:30 p.m. Williamson has founded 11 successful businesses, including one of the most successful food service technology companies in the U.S., Horizon Software International, a company that revolutionized the institutional food service market with its innovative software and which he sold in 2008 for $75 million cash. Williamsons accomplishments are all the more inspiring because of the tremendous personal challenges that he overcame in his early life which he details in his recent book, Miracle on Luckie Street.Ž His childhood was dark and by the time he was 15 he was an alcoholic; he attended 19 different schools; he graduated to intravenous meth and heroin use and became a hardcore addict. He was extremely violent, carried a .357 Magnum, and became a dangerous criminal committing armed robberies. He was kicked out of the military as a diagnosed sociopath; he spent time in Parrish Prison in New Orleans, He ended up homeless, penniless, as a loner without a single friend. He started at rock bottom, worked hard and smart, started a business, and virtually overnight accumulated a small fortune and achieved what he believed to be the absolute pinnacle of success; but the sudden mountain of cash triggered an avalanche of new problems and soon he was overwhelmed with temptation, arrogance, and sheer lust for more of everything. He was addicted to a new drug … money … but again miraculously overcame his addictions. Today, Williamson is completely drug and alcohol free, and no longer a slave to the flash and the cash.Ž He has been happily married to the woman of his dreams for 40 years and has been blessed with three successful, happily married sons and seven grandchildren. To find out more about Bobs story, visit www. MiracleOnLuckieStreet. com. NAMI Wakulla is an affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, were a non-profit, grassroots, support and advocacy organization of people with mental illness, their families, friends, and professionals. For more information, call NAMI Wakullas office at 926-1033. Cheryl Creel NAMI WakullaPetersen stresses access to information at programBy TAMMIE BARFIELDAccess to information about the workings of the government is critical to a functioning democracy. Wakulla Countys chapter of the League of Women Voters recently hosted a public records forum at the library where Florida First Amendment Foundation President Barbara Petersen was the presenter. It was apparent to anyone who attended that the publics right to access government records is her passion. Petersen and the First Amendment Foundation are dedicated to fighting for our first amendment rights. Petersen said, The right to access government records is an inalienable right established by our founding fathers,Ž and that James Madison is the father of freedom of information.Ž Florida sets the standards for open government establishing its open meetings law in 1967, before most states enacted sunshine laws. The right to access records has been a central part of our government with the constitutional right to open government law passed in 1992. Petersen said the First Amendment Foundation receives a lot of complaints about the legislature. There are 150 to 160 bills introduced each year that create exemptions to the public records law and the publics right of access. Petersen and the foundation screen every exemption request that comes through each legislative session. There are between eight and 10 new exemptions passed each year. Petersen is the chief lobbyist on behalf of the citizens of Florida. I was told by a friend and former First Amendment Foundation board member that during Governor Crists term in office, any time anyone introduced legislation or asked for an exemption to the public records law, the governor was known to tell them to first go check with Barbara to make sure it would be okay. The Florida First Amendment Foundation is a highly visible and accessible source of authoritative information, expertise, and assistance to the public and news media. It was founded as a non-profit organization in 1984 by The Florida Press Association, the Florida Society of Newspaper Editors, and the Florida Association of Broadcasters, to ensure that public commitment and progress in the areas of free speech, free press, and open government do not become checked and diluted during Floridas changing times. If you have questions about requesting public records or obtaining access to public information, call Barbara at (850) 222-3518 or visit the website: www.floridafaf.org. Tammie Barfield is general manager of The Wakulla News and serves on the Florida Press Association Board. TAMMIE BARFIELDBarbara Petersen speaking at the League of Women Voters meeting in Crawfordville last week.I’ve been thinking about changeSpay/neuter assistance for dogs available Bob Williamson will speak to NAMI Continuing discussion on Emerald Sink

PAGE 5

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 – Page 5A  Mobile vet center at senior center on Thursday The Department of Veterans Affairs Mobile Vet Center will be at Wakulla Senior Center in Crawfordville on June 14 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Vet Center provides readjustment counseling in a wide range of psycho-social services offered to eligible Veterans and their families in the effort to make a successful transition from military to civilian life. They include individual, group, bereavement, and MST counseling. Bene ts and employment counseling and referrals and information on Department of Veterans Affairs Programs. For more information, contact Danielle Dinger at danidinger@yahoo.com or call (850) 942-8810. Reminder to lock your car to stop vehicle burglaries Students are out of school for the summer and the number of Wakulla County vehicle burglaries has skyrocketed. But the crimes can be avoided by taking some simple precautions, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. "The rst thing you can do is lock your vehicle at all times," said Crum. "The second thing you can do is remove valuables from inside the vehicle when they are unattended." A number of the vehicle burglaries have involved unlocked cars and trucks where citizens have left purses, GPS units, computers and rearms that were stolen. "Our vehicle burglaries generally do not involve a forced entry, so the best way to avoid becoming a victim of a vehicle theft is to take the simple precautions," added Crum. "Lock your vehicle while it is at home and lock your vehicle while is unattended at work or while you are away from it." ‘Journey of the Tiglax’ will screen at the Refuge The First Sunday at the Refuge Presentation Series will feature "Journey of the Tiglax: One Season at the Alaska Maritime National Refuge" on Sunday, July 1, at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. This visually compelling lm was a nalist at the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival and should be a special treat for birders. An ice cream social will follow the presentation. St. Marks Refuge Association members and prospective members are invited. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, "Nature's Classroom" at the refuge. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. For more information, call (850) 925-6121.  Time to register for Sopchoppy 4th of July parade The Sopchoppy 4th of July Parade will take place on Wednesday, July 4, at 10 a.m. Lineup will begin at 9 a.m. Please visit sopchoppy orida.com for parade applications, vending applications, sponsorship forms and for detailed information about the festival. Contact Debbie Dix Bishop at posh_ faery@yahoo.com or by phone at (850) 962-1010 for details on the parade and to have an application emailed or mailed to you. Vendor applications available for Stone Crab Festival Fall will be here before we know it, and interested vendors are encouraged to send in their registrations early due to so many vendors expected this year at the popular October event. More than 12,000 visitors attended last year's festival to enjoy music, shopping, and of course, stone crabs. Space was enlarged last year and is expected to only grow more for the event. To view photos of past events, visit www.stmarksstonecrabfest.com. Interested vendors should contact Mickey Cantner at (850) 567-0157 or email info@stmarksstonecrabfest. com. For general festival information, please contact Mike or Glenda Pruitt at (850) 925-1053. Sponsors are welcome to contact Charlene or Billy Bishop at (850) 933-1718. Staff ReportsBriefs WILLIAM SNOWDENStaff ReportYoung quilter Wynter Harvey, 12, won “ rst place in the Wakulla Quilters Guilds Peoples Choice AwardsŽ after ballots were tallied last week. Harveys quilt, Just Look at the Cats in My Garden,Ž was completed when she was 10 years old. It was made for a namesake aunt, Aunt Winnie. Harvey was 10 years old when she assembled the quilt. The Wakulla County Historical Society has quilts on display at the WCHSs Museum and Archives, housed at the old jail behind the courthouse. Other winners were Jill Harvey, whose Stepping StonesŽ quilt won second place, and Anna Lopez took third place with her Running Buffaloes.Ž The awards were the result of the visitors to the museum picking their favorite quilt and casting a vote. President of the Wakulla County Quilters Guild, Anna Lopez, invites everyone to please come out and enjoy the exhibit. The Quilters Guild supports Big Bend Hospice, Cruiser Quilts, Pregnancy Center, Eden Springs and The Humane Society. Quilters meet on Friday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce in Crawfordville. Fabric donations are welcomed to support their projects. The quilts will continue to be displayed through June 30. The silent auction and the drawing for an Opportunity QuiltŽ will be held on June 30. In addition to the quilts, the museum also has an antique model car display provided by Jim Calhoun and a collection of earlier dishwares provided by Terri Gerrell. The museum is open Thursday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 12-year-old Wynter Harvey with her winning quilt, made when she was 10.Wynter Harvey, 12, wins award at quilt showWakulla County is pleased to announce the GoWakulla mobile app. The mobile app, which was developed by Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. and In“ nity Software Development, Inc. as part of the Wakulla Bicycle, Pedestrian and Blueways Master Plan, is the “ rst mobile app for the promotion of countywide ecotourism developed for a local government in Florida. The GoWakulla Mobile App is now available for download and provides users with information about bicycling, paddling, hiking and recreational activities available in Wakulla, including the location of trailheads, access points and directions. Users of the mobile app can also see photos of key destinations in the county. Additionally, the mobile app includes information about the Big Bend National Scenic Byway. The GoWakulla mobile app is currently available for Apple iOS devices, including the iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad. As funding becomes available, an Android-compatible version of the mobile app may be released and additional functionality may be incorporated for both the iOS and Android versions of the mobile app. The GoWakulla mobile app can be downloaded directly from the Apple App Store at itunes.apple.com.GoWakulla mobile app unveiled Hair Place That 850-926-6020 We Have Gift Certi“catesMiranda545-2905Robyn926-6020Linda294-2085 OOPS! Styles for Men, Women & ChildrenFULL SERVICE HAIR SALONBarber on Duty Thursday SaturdayCuts Colors Highlights Perms UpDo’s Flat Tops Special Cuts Facial WaxingYARD SALEJUNE 15 & 16 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS! SUMMERTIME all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ 1-866-742-1373 Get your business noticed One Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Don’t make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.facebook.com/AdNetFlorida HAS MOVEDOur new location is: The Barry Building, Back Building, #4 3295 Crawfordville Highway(of“ce entrance is located between the 2 buildings) Of“ce Hours: Monday … Thursday, 8:00 am … 5:00 pm (closed 12 noon … 2:00 pm) For help with your utility bill and other assistance, call us at 850-926-3122 www.cacaainc.org

PAGE 6

Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesChurch BriefsAarone Yvonne Bryant William Arthur ‘Bo’ Burke Robert ‘Bobby’ Stephen Oaks Margaret Louise Floyd Poole Andrew ‘Andy’ Lawrence Roberts Drummond Family in concert Faith Holiness upcoming eventsThe Drummond Family will perform at the Christian Worship Center on Saturday, June 16, beginning at 6 p.m. The worship center is located on U.S. Highway 98. For more information on the Drummond Family, visit their website, drummondband.com. For more information about Christian Worship Center, call Pastor Steve Taylor at 509-6031 or 926-6302. The Faith Holiness House of Prayer will be selling chicken pilau dinners on Saturday, June 16, beginning at 11 a.m. Dinner plates will be sold for $6 with proceeds to go towards the church building fund. On Sunday, June 17, morning worship at 11 a.m. will feature the Drummonds ministering in song, and the morning message. Come worship with us and be blessed. The church is located at 726 Woodville Highway. For more information, call Pastor Cris Dudley at 4211324 or Assistant Pastor Glinda Raker at 363-3294. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER Celebrating another Fathers Day without my father I cannot help thinking how much has changed since he died. If he were to return today, he would “ nd things quite different. In all reality, this is not my fathers world anymore. I might just as well say it. This is not my fathers country anymore, either. The country my father loves seems to have all but disappeared. During his time, a deep-seated patriotic pride permeated throughout our country. We were proud of what our forefathers had accomplished and we were willing to die to preserve that heritage. Today, it seems the past is simply the past and has no bearing whatsoever on the present. This may be why history books are being rewritten today. This, however, is a fallacy encouraged by those who do not know the right hand from their left hand. In our country today, you are either far right or far left and nothing in between. Whatever happened to people with common sense? Perhaps that ancient anonymous philosopher was right when he said the problem with common sense was that it really was not that common anymore. Perhaps the demise of the common man explains this phenomenon. Or it could be that most people today have been educated be on their common sensibilities. There was a time in my fathers country when people were proud of what they did. A few tried to get money without working for it. In my fathers country, there was a great deal of pride in working for what you had and not depending upon somebody with a handout. In my fathers country, there was a deep sense of accomplishment in earning what you had by the sweat of your brow. The only people sweating these days are politicians up for re-election. In my fathers country, there was no such thing as arbitrary handouts but plenty of hands out. It was considered our patriotic duty to help our neighbor when they were in trouble. Nobody looked to Uncle Sam to solve his or her problems. It was a community affair not a government mandate. In fact, if the truth were known, and an evidently it is not, they stayed as far away from Uncle Sam as possible only communicating with him once a year on April 15. In those days, they saluted the ” ag, recited the Pledge of Allegiance and were right proud to do so. Not one of them could imagine anybody ashamed of doing that in public. Today a lot is being said about the separation of church and state. My father would not understand the way some people are interpreting it. According to what is going on today they are trying to keep the church out of the state but make good and sure, the state runs the church. Isnt that why we had a revolution in the “ rst place? In my fathers country, there was a separation between government control and people pursuing life, liberty and happiness. Oh, for those good old days. Continued on Page 12A Out to PastorIt’s not my father’s world anymoreGaballi Taste Sampler is June 16 SpaceQuest VBS at First Baptist Macedonia to host VBS June 18-22 BugZone VBS at Sopchoppy UMCGaballi Food Taste Sampler will be held Saturday, June 16, from 9 a.m. to noon at Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church, 2780 Surf Road in Panacea. For more information, go to www.obayumc.com or call (850) 984-0127. The next Gaballi order deadline is Sunday, June 23, before midnight for distribution on Saturday, June 30, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Referral code is ochlockoneebayumc. Crawfordville First Baptist Church will be having their Vacation Bible School all day on Saturday, June 23. Registration will begin at 9:30 a.m. The travelers will blast off promptly at 10 a.m. and will explore the mission Jesus has for them in John 14:6. They will jet off to “ ve different space stops, and enjoy interplanetary crafts, recreation and lunch. All children entering kindergarten through completing “ fth grade are welcome to travel the galaxies with us. There will be a launchpad return celebration and program for parents at 5 p.m. For more information call the church of“ ce at 926-7896. Macedonia Church of Christ Written in Heaven will hold a Vacation Bible School the week of June 18-22 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. Breakfast and lunch will be served daily and transportation may be provided. For more information, contact Elder Alfred Nelson, pastor, at (850) 264-6621, or Elder Delores Nelson, youth minister, at (850) 933-9587. BugZone Vacation Bible School will be held at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church beginning June 25 and will be held nightly from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The VBS is for 3-year-olds through “ fth grade. Sopchoppy UMC is located at 131 Rose Street in Sopchoppy. To pre-register, contact Heather Strickland at 9621255 or stricklandheat@aol.com. William Arthur BoŽ Burke, 76, of Crawfordville, died on Tuesday June 5, in Greenville. He was born in Quincy and was a resident of this area most of his life. He loved to cook and eat seafood. He was of the Baptist faith. Family received friends on Friday, June 8, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Services were held Saturday, June 9, at 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Survivors include his companion of 30 years, Gloria Cox; two sons, Brian Buss and Vincent Cox; eight daughters, Annette Tasse, Linda Burke, Vickie Burns, Karen Cone, Tracy White, Tammy Bright, Kim Hagan and Beverly Lawson; 29 grandchildren and many great-grandchildren.William Arthur ‘Bo’ Burke Robert ‘Bobby’ Stephen Oaks Aarone Yvonne BryantAarone Yvonne Bryant, 31, of Sopchoppy, passed away on Wednesday, June 7, at her residence. She was born Aug. 24, 1980, in Tallahassee. She had lived in this area her entire life. She was a member of Mount Beasor Primitive Baptist Church. She graduated from Wakulla High School. Visitation was held on Saturday, June 9, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Services were held on Sunday, June 10, at 2 p.m. at Mount Beasor Primitive Baptist Church with burial at Revell Cemetery in Otter Creek. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to the Spina Bi“ da Association, 4590 MacArthur Boulevard NW, Suite 250, Washington DC 20007 (donations@sbaa.org) or Marzug Shriners, 1805 North Monroe Street, P.O. Box 37120, Tallahassee FL 32315-7130. Survivors include her parents, Raymond David Bryant and Yvonne Revell Bryant of Sopchoppy; a brother, Gregory Bryant of Sopchoppy; and a maternal grandmother, Darkas Revell. God gave her to us for a little while and now we give her back. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com). Robert BobbyŽ Stephen Oaks, 59, passed away Wednesday, June 6, in Lakeland. He is survived by his wife of 38 years, Rebecca Loyd Oaks. He was operations manager for Lamar Advertising and was with them for more than 30 years. He was a loving husband, father and grandfather. He was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County and of the Primitive Baptist faith. He was truly one of a kind and will be missed by all. Graveside services were held Monday, June 11, at Arran Annex Cemetery in Crawfordville. He is also survived by two sons, Christopher Oaks (wife, Joey) and Chad Oaks (Linda); three grandchildren, Conner Oaks, Mackenzie Oaks and Taylie Oaks; and “ ve brothers. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, was in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com). Obituaries continue on Page 12A

PAGE 7

Find us on www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 – Page 7Ahappenings CommunityGodbolt retires from Navy Special to The NewsSenior Chief Construction Electrician Terry B. Godbolt will retire from the U.S. Navy on June 15 in Gulfport, Miss., after 22 years of service. He currently serves as the operations training chief onboard the NCTC Gulfport. He reported to the NCTC Gulfport in October 2009 “ rst serving as the Bravo Company commander and then Echo Company commander. He graduated from Wakulla High School in 1990 and enlisted in the Navy. He attended boot camp at Recruit Training Center in Orlando. Upon completion, he attended Construction Electrician AŽ School in Port Hueneme, Calif. His first tour was at NCTAMS Naples, Italy, from 1991 to 1994. His next set of orders was to Naval Construction Battalion One, deploying to Guam and Albania from 1994 to 1996. Other tours include Naval Support Activity in Misawa, Japan, from 1996 to 1999; CBU 412 in Kings Bay, Ga., from 1999 to 2002; NMCB 133 in Gulfport, Miss., from 2003 to 2006; and NMCB 11 in Gulfport, Miss., from 2006 to 2009 where he served as AOIC of Detachment Romania. He was also deployed as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom One, II and III, where he served as Al Taqaddum, Iraq Watch Of“ cer. He was promoted to Chief Petty Of“ cer in 2005 and Senior Petty Officer in 2009. He is quali“ ed as a seabee combat warfare and ” eet marine force specialist. His personal awards include the Navy Commendation Medal, Navy and Marine Achievement Medal, Presidential Unit Commendation Medal, Navy Unit Commendation Medal, Meritorious Unit Commendation Medal, Battle E, Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Iraqi Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Armed Forces Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, Navy Overseas Ribbon and Expert Rifle and Expert Pistol Marksmanship Medal. He is married to Loretta and they live in Ocean Springs, Miss., with their children, Datrianna, Diamond, Destiny and Danielle. He is the son of Diane Lindsey of Wakulla and Ben and Rosa Godbolt of Tallahassee, and the grandson of Pearlie M. Lindsey of Wakulla. Terry Godbolt Iris Garden Club wins award for project at COASTSpecial to The NewsThe Iris Garden Club of Wakulla County won a National Garden Club award of $150 for their youth gardening project at COAST Charter School in St. Marks. The garden club president and youth gardening instructor, Jeannie Brodhead, said she was very pleased that her entry was awarded second place in the National Garden Club Presidents Project, Plantings for Public and Special Places.Ž All of the students at COAST are members of FFGC youth garden clubs led by Mrs. B.Ž The pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade students meet in small groups once every four weeks throughout the school year. They grow vegetables, herbs and ” owers in the schools organic raised beds, container gardens, native plant, hydroponic and butterfly gardens. The money will be used to purchase tools, seeds and plants for next years gardening projects. Wakulla Democratic party headquarters opens By DOUG JONES Special to The NewsA crowd of nearly 100 supporters came to the grand opening of the Wakulla Democratic Headquarters on Friday, June 8th. Attendees included candidates for state and local of“ ce, members of the Democratic Executive Committee, and supporters from as far away as Suwannee County to the east and Bay County to the west. County Commission Chairman Alan Brock and Wakulla Democratic Committee Chair Rachel Sutz Pienta welcomed everyone and introduced special guests and dignitaries. Elected officials and candidates for of“ ce gave brief remarks. Tax Collector Cheryll Olah, who will be unopposed in her bid for reelection, thanked the crowd for their support. State Sen. Bill Montford asked for continued support in his bid for reelection and applauded the outstanding results that the Wakulla County Schools received in recent test results, ranking at the top in almost every category. Retiring Superintendent of Schools David Miller echoed Montfords remarks and urged voters to re-elect school board members running this fall as well as the Democratic candidate for superintendent. Bobby Pearce is the Democratic candidate for superintendant. Other candidates who spoke included Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman; County Commission candidates Alan Brock and John Shuff; and House District 7 candidates Thomas Dickens, Robert Hill and A.J. Smith. Candidates for non-partisan of“ ces, School Board member Mike Scott seeking re-election to the School Board, and Wakulla Springs Ambassador Cal Jamison, candidate for Soil and Water Conservation Board, also spoke. The Wakulla Democratic Headquarters, located at the North Point Center, 1626-B Crawfordville Highway, is open to all citizens seeking information about voting and the upcoming elections. It will also be available to all Democratic candidates as a distribution point for campaign information and yard signs and will serve as an organizational point for electing Democrats to of“ ce this fall. For additional information about the Wakulla Democratic Party, please visit the web site at www.wakullademocrats.org. The Wakulla County Democratic Party Headquarters is now open at 1626-B Crawfordville Highway.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Email news to jjensen@thewakullanews. net. News is published when space becomes available and is edited for style, clarity and grammar. the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Lorra PhillipsMay 2012 Winner Her name was drawn fromI enjoy eating at all of these local restaurants!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l l a nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! Brandy McGlamry, owner/operator850.251.5780 Cleaning Service R R New Constr 803 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 AGES 3 THROUGH 5TH GRADE WELCOME!Get ready for an Amazing Adventure that is too good to miss. Each day will include Bible stories, Worship Rally (learning new songs), crafts, snacks, and recreation. June 25-29, 2012, from 6:00 to 8:00 pm. For more information, call (850) 926-3217 or (850) 926-1034. Pre-Registration Come and Fly with Jesus on Saturday, June 23 from 1-3 pm (Ice Cream Social). Registration will begin at 9:30am. The travelers will blast off promptly at 10:00 am and will explore the mission Jesus has for them in John 14:6. They will jet off to ve different space stops, and enjoy interplanetary crafts, recreation and lunch. All children entering kindergarten through completing 5th grade are welcome to travel the galaxies with us. There will be a launchpad return celebration and program for parents at 5:00 pm. For more information call the church of ce at 926-7896. ALL DAY Sat, June 23rd Vacation Bible Schoolat PANACEA 1ST BAPTIST CHURCHMon., June 18TH – Fri., June 22ND6:00 – 8:30p.m. Come join us as we “ y” to some of the world’s greatest natural wonders and encounter our Awesome God and His Amazing Power! This Awesome Week of Fun, Food, and Exciting Learning Opportunities is open to kids ages 4 years – 6th grade. For more information, call 850-984-5206. VACATION BIBLE SCHOOLS

PAGE 8

Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolAwards ceremony is held at Riversprings MiddleSpecial to The NewsEighth graders at Riversprings Middle School gathered on Wednesday, May 30, to celebrate their accomplishments. Award recipients included those students making the highest GPA in their individual classes, along with those receiving top honors. The WAB Headstart Scholarship winners are Kurstin Douin, Carly Rudd, Yese Reyes, Libby Sutton and Oakley Ward. Each of the winners will be receiving $500 for TCC. Each year, there is an award for a girl and a boy who has made great improvement both academically and behaviorally. They compare them to a grain of sand in an oyster that has grown into something beautiful, and they call this Seed Pearls. This year, the Seed Pearl winners are LaChina Clayton and Chase Motes. Every year, Principal Dod Walker awards his Principals Leadership Award. This year, it went to Herbert BudŽ Franklin. This award goes to a well rounded student encompassing academics, athletics and behavior. Three students had perfect attendance for all three years: Karena Gay, Marquis Hutchison and Kyra Townes. Several students made all AsŽ for all three years: Mattias Gunnarsson, Caylee Cox, and Maria Parmer. At middle school, the overall highest top two students are Oracle and Laureate. This year, the second highest award, the Oracle Award, went to Caylee Cox, and the highest honors, the Laureate, went to Mattias Gunnarsson. Joining the two top winners was the honor court Blakeleigh Bolton, Chandler Hammond, Garrett Crawford, Hannah Hart, Isaac Kent, John Weber, Kyle Pearson, Maria Parmer, Nic Samlal and Oakley Ward. Members of the Riversprings Middle School honor court are recognized during the awards ceremony on May 30. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Principal Dod Walker hugs Herbert Franklin after announcing he was this years recipient of the Principals Leadership Award. Algebra 1 bootcamp o eredSpecial to The NewsThis years 2011-12 eighth and ninth graders who did not pass the Algebra 1 End-of-Course Exam will have a choice this summer. The Learning Curve Tutoring Center will offer Algebra 1 Bootcamp offered June 12 through July 19. This class is offered by Algebra 1 certi“ ed teachers and will meet Tuesday through Thursday of each week, one hour per day for a total of 15 hours of intensive preparation for the July retest date. Courses are offered with no more than three students to a class, morning, afternoon or evening, or one-on-one instruction is available. Small groups will be clustered according to similar test scores. Students who pass this July retake of the Algebra 1 EOC exam will not have to take an Intensive Math course in the fall while taking the next level math course during the students sophomore year. Taking two math classes in one year would additionally reduce the number of electives students may take next school year as well. While Wakulla High School is offering the course free to students, it may not “ t in with some families schedules, so The Learning Curve has this alternative available. The Algebra 1 EOC exam retake will be given at Wakulla High School during the week of July 23. Test results are available at Wakulla High School and students will be noti“ ed of exam scores on their report cards. Parents may call the high school at 926-7125 to learn of their childs scores. Call The Learning Curve Tutoring Center at 926-2179 for cost and time information. Algebra class available at Wakulla High School By BETH ODONNELLAssistant SuperintendentWakulla High School will offer an Algebra 1 Intensive Math course from June 26 through July 12. The course is free to eligible students and transportation and lunch are provided at no cost. Students in grades eight and nine for the 2011-2012 school year have to pass the Algebra 1 End of Course (EOC) exam in order to earn high school credit for Algebra 1. This is a state requirement for graduation. This course is for students who did not pass the Spring, 2012 Algebra 1 EOC exam. Students with an exceptional education disability may be exempt from passing the EOC if they have shown pro“ ciency in the course. They would not need to take this review session. The Algebra 1 review course will begin on Tuesday, June 26. There are no Friday classes. Dates for the nine day session are June 26, 27, 28 and July 2, 3, 9, 10, 11, and 12. Students can earn a half credit in Intensive Math if they attend every day. This will be factored into their grade point average (GPA) needed for graduation. The Algebra 1 EOC exam retake will be given at Wakulla High School during the week of July 23. Students who pass this July retake of the Algebra 1 EOC exam will not have to take an Intensive Math course in the fall. Contact Wakulla High School Assistant Principal Sunny Chancy at 926-7125/ sunny.chancy@wcsb.us or Assistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell at 926-0065 or email mary.odonnell@wcsb.us for more information. LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET? 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 – Page 9Asports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach On Saturday, June 4, the Gulf Winds Track Club held its annual Chenoweth Awards presentation in conjunction with the annual Pot Luck Bash 4-mile race held at Phipps Park in north Leon County. These awards are designed to recognize the top high school runners. The award recipients are nominated by the area coaches, with the GWTC Chenoweth Committee making the “ nal decision on the winners. All of the “ nalists for the four major awards (top female cross country and track runners and top male cross country and track runners) were recognized, with the overall winners in the four categories receiving $500 scholarships. WHS runners Stanley Linton, Madison Harris and Cora Atkinson were recognized at the awards ceremony. Senior Atkinson was one of the “ nalists for the Top Female Cross Country Award and was recognized not only for the outstanding times she posted in the 2011 season, including a school record 5K time, being the District Runner-up, qualifying individually for the State Finals and being an integral part of the “ rst WHS Cross Country team to qualify for State, but also for her leadership on the team as well as her contributions to the development and progression of the cross country program. She has also been an ambassador for the GWTC and placed in the GWTC Grand Prix series in her age group. WHS Senior Stanley Linton was selected as the overall Male Cross Country Runner of the Year and received one of the scholarships! He had an outstanding senior year excelling in both cross country and track. In cross country, he was the District Champion, Regional Runner-up and placed 8th at the State Meet. He followed that with an outstanding track season that included a District Championship at 1600 and 3200 meters, a Regional Championship at 3200 meters and placing 7th at the State Meet at 3200 meters. He was also very active in the GWTC and won numerous local races, including the “ rst three GWTC races of the year and the Tails and Trails 10K, just after the end of the track season. Linton was also recognized for his team leadership, dedication and being a local advocate for the track club. He also placed in the Grand Prix series in his age group. Sophomore Madison Harris completed the excellent showing by being named the Female Track Athlete of the Year and also earned one of the scholarships. Harris track season included some excellent performances at distances from 400 meters through 1600 meters. In the course of the season she logged school records in the 400 meters, 800 meters, 1600 meters and as the anchor leg on the girls 4x400 meter relay team. She repeated as the District and Regional 800 meter Champion and “ nished 3rd at the State Meet in the 800 meters. She also won the 800 meters and 1600 meters at the Chiles FreshmanSophomore Championships, setting a meet record in the 1600 meters. Additionally, she placed third in the ultra-competitive 800 meter run at the FSU Invitational. She recorded a season best, and National Elite Time, of 2:15.97 for 800 meters. I couldnt be prouder of this group of athletes,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. They have all contributed immensely to our program and are quality individuals.ŽStaff ReportThe Wakulla War Eagle football team did well at last weekends 7-on-7 tournament and Big Man Challenge, said Assistant Coach James Vernon. The Wakulla line won the Big Man Challenge on Saturday, June 9, at Valdosta State College, said Vernon. War Eagle Head Coach Scott Klees said he was very pleased and that it was a great start to the summer. Ten schools competed at the tournament, including three from Florida … Wakulla and Taylor counties and Crestview. The other teams represented Georgia schools, including the perennial powerhouse Valdosta High School. The Big Man Challenge is a series of events such as medicine ball toss and tug of war that tests the power and strength of linemen. Among the competitors were Wakullas Chris Grif“ n, Jonathan Chunn, Chris Damitz, John Cole, Brett Buckridge, Hunter Hurst, Tyrell Garmon, Michael Sarvis, Jerry Jordan, and Daniel Sanders. Griffin and Cole each scored fastest time in an event, while Hurst scored fastest time in two events. The War Eagles also did well in the 7-on-7 tournament, but the team was short-handed because there was also college testing going on that day. So some players were unable to play, said Coach Vernon, because they were taking the SAT or ACT. Still, the War Eagles did well in 7-on-7, Vernon said. There just were not enough guys and they got worn down,Ž he said.FOOTBALL RUNNINGWar Eagles win Big Man Challenge in Valdosta Linton, Harris and Atkinson recognized with awards FILE PHOTOSREGIONAL TITLES: Senior Stanley Linton, above, wins the 3200 meters at Regionals in Jacksonville in April, and sophomore Madi Harris, below, was never seriously challenged in the 800 meters. Linton and Harris were joined by senior Cora Atkinson in being recognized by the Gulf Winds Track Club at an awards ceremony last week. Joey Briggs named to All Big Bend Swim team SWIMMINGStaff ReportCrawfordville resident Joey Briggs was named to the All Big Bend Swim Team this week. Briggs, who attends and swims for Rickards High School, was named Swimmer of the Year, and named to the First Team. Briggs holds the all time Rickards Record € in the 50 Freestyle at 21.89, € the 100 Free at 47.94, € the 200 Free 1:42.50, € the 500 Free 4:45.58, € the 100 Butterfly 52.72, € and the 200 Individual Medley 1:58.54. The Rickards Mens 4 x 50 or 200 Free Relay of Riley Ralston-Crandall, Preston Turnage, Andrew Chen, and Briggs as Anchor holds the Rickards Record of 1:29.60 and was the fastest 200 Free relay in the Big Bend The Rickards Mens 4 x 50 or 200 Medley Relay of Preston TurnageBack, Andrew Chen-Breast, Briggs-Fly, Riley RalstonCrandall … Free, holds the Rickards Record of 1:42.47 and also was the fastest 200 Medley relay in the Big Bend. Briggs Medaled at the 2011 1A State Meet earning 6th place in the 200 Freestyle and 15th place in the 100 fly. The 200 Free Relay medaled earning 7th place and the medley relay earned 13th place Briggs was named MVP for the team and won this years High Point award scoring 212 Points for the team. The 2nd place scorer was Riley Ralston Crandall with 173. Briggs practices 24 hours a week. three days a week before school from 5 a.m. to 7 a.m., and every day after school from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., as well as Saturdays from 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. He hopes to get a Division 1 scholarship next year.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBriggs holds the school record in the 100 Butter” y. Joey Briggs WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT ADULT SOFTBALL LEAGUEEntry fee is $300 per team Teams must provide their own balls for games. Teams will play two games per night for a total of ten games. Registration Deadline is Friday, June 29th at 5:00 P.M. Rosters and entry fees are due at this time. The league will start the week of July 2nd and run for approximately “ve weeks. Game times are 6:45, 8:00 and 9:15 P.M. All games will be played at Medart Recreation Park located off U.S. 98, across the street from Wakulla High School. Mens League and Coed League will probably play on Monday and Tuesday nights. Both leagues might have games on Thursday nights depending on the number of teams that register. Homerun rule for Mens League is 3 and a foul. Homerun rule for Coed League is 3 and an out. Coed League will play with a 12 inch ball. Contact W.C.P.R.D 926-7227 or www.wcprd.com for any additional information. Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICEƒ EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r sTM Dav i d H i nsonSales Representative Author i zed F i rm Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR The Wakulla News

PAGE 10

Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsEvery spring from around April 1 to about mid-May, neo-tropics (the songbirds) come pouring out of South and Central America including Mexico and the Caribbean where they have been wintering and enter the U.S. to establish their nesting territories, breed and rear young. This migration at our latitude peaks about mid-April. On April 22, I arranged to be on St. George Island because the conditions to observe migrant songbirds were excellent, and this is why: As these birds ” y across the Gulf, ideally they hitchhike on the springs warm southly breezes, while migrating mostly to our northern states and Canada to nest. They pour out of these countries into the southern U.S. in such numbers often ” ocks of individuals are even picked up on Doppler radar. But when a cold front slams through our area and sweeps across the wide open Gulf of Mexico, these birds are literally challenged to survive. In a bad storm they will often burn out of stored energy and perish at sea, sometimes by the thousands, occasionally catastrophic to a species. Nearly all neo-tropics migrate at night and stop brie” y as they advance north during the day to feed. But if a cold fronts wind slams into them as they are crossing the Gulf, as soon as they spot land they literally Fall OutŽ of the sky by the hundreds onto the land and its vegetation to feed, as many are near exhaustion and desperately hungry. So a cold front sweeping through our region in April can produce an incredible Fall OutŽ as it is called, and April 22 and 23 had exactly those conditions with winds around 15 to 25 mph, blasting out of the north. I was at the Youth Camp in the St. George Island State Park at dawn and immediately the birds starting pouring in. In just a few hours the 20 to 40 people observing the Fall OutŽ had seen dozens of the ” ashy Rosebreasted Grosbeaks, Summer and Scarlet Tanagers, Orchard and Baltimore Orioles, Blue Grosbeaks and Indigo Buntings. There were hundreds of Catbirds, and perhaps 50 Ruby-throated Hummingbirds feeding on Coral Bean blossoms as they waited for the north wind to cease. The big attraction though was the warblers, most brilliantly patterned like twighopping butter” ies with every combination of ” ashy colors. The warblers recorded (many which I personally saw) were the Yellow, Prothonotary, Hooded, Parula, Black-throated Blue, Myrtle, Cape May, Magnolia, Tennessee, Blue-winged and Goldenwinged too. We all saw Blackpoll Warblers plus Black and White, Baybreasted, Pine, Black-throated Green, Chestnut-sided and the Blackburnian, whose head nearly glows, the orange is so intense! Palm, Ovenbirds and the Water Thrushes (warblers) were also observed, as well as the Worm-eating, another of the ground feeding warblers, and Common Yellowthroat, Kentucky and dozens of hyperactive orange and black Redstarts. In no time Id seen over 80 species even though I had to leave at 11 a.m. Soon I returned to St. George Island State Parks Youth Camp, plus stopped at the McKissick Point in Carrabelle and checked out the shorebirds at low tide. There I saw the endangered Piping Plover and the threatened Red Knots … 75 of them … some starting to get their breeding reddish undersides. Overall, I observed about 120 species!The ‘Fall Out’ of returning songbirdsWakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHBy LES HARRISONWakulla Extension AgentThe 40-day 2012 Gulf of Mexico recreational Red Snapper season began June 1, and ends on July 1. Fishermen are preparing to optimize their catch potential given a bag limit of two snapper per angler per day. Several recent studies indicate the mortality of Red Snapper increased dramatically when they were returned to the Gulf during high summer water temperatures. Complying with size limits or simply trying to catch a bigger “ sh may have unintended consequences when water temperatures approach the mid-80s. Warmer water usually holds less oxygen. Also warm water often layers above heavier cooler waters creating a thermocline. The result is temperature shock and possibly death for the “ sh which remains in warmer water too long. Red Snapper populations are considered to be recovering as stocks successfully rebuild and are re” ected by the numerous large “ sh landed. Red Snapper dominate many Gulf of Mexico arti“ cial reefs, making an unintended catch quite likely and dif“ cult to avoid after the bag-limit is reached. Red Snapper populations are considered to be recovering as stocks successfully rebuild. It is encouraging to see numerous large “ sh at the dock. Though, it is difficult to avoid catching a red snapper after the bag-limit is reached. Some tips and advice from seasoned charter guides and “ sh researchers can help bring home more “ sh while minimizing “ sh mortality during the dog days of summer. First, know the species of fish sought. This will help with correct bait and hook selection. Captain Sonny Schindler of Shore Thing Charters in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, recommends increasing the bait and hook size to catch larger “ sh. This strategy has been con“ rmed by research conducted by Will Patterson at the Dauphin Island (Alabama) Sea Lab. Use 12/0 or 15/0 hooks when “ shing for red snapper during open season, let your tackle help bring home a big one the “ rst time. Capt. Robbie Fuller of Hatitude in Panama City offers the strategy of changing from live bait to strips of Bonita or squid and “ shing in shallower water to avoid catching additional red snapper and exceeding the catch limit. Target other “ sh such as Beeliners or Vermillion Snapper which are plentiful and consistently mild ” avored. One recent headboat trip limited out on beeliners and brought home nearly 50 pounds of “ sh per person. Other prized “ sh include King Mackerel frequently caught while trolling. Black Sea Bass may be caught on different arti“ cial reef habitat, hook depth, or bait. A slight adjustment to “ shing techniques will reduce unintended Red Snapper landings and mortality during hot weather, and still get the “ sherman a full catch. Capt. Fuller also recommends using vacuum freezer bags to extend the “ sh storage well into the fall and possibly beyond. You can still have Red Snapper this October even if the season closes in July,Ž he said All reef fish released showing signs of a barotraumas, such as ” oating on the surface, should be properly vented with decompression tool. New “ shing equipment to aid in recompression and return of “ sh to cooler, deeper water are coming to market. Current regulations do not require return-todepth tools, but they do not prohibit them either. These new recompression devices can be utilized to aid in “ sh recovery only after use with a venting tool. For more information visit the website catchandrelease.org or “ shsmart. org. For more information on Red Snapper regulations, including minimum size and gear rules, visit the FWC snapper regulations page. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA red snapper caught in the Gulf.Tips for the 2012 Recreational red snapper season Linda Price of Shell Point and her husband Byron recently went Spanish Mackerel “ shing with Alan Lamarche and besides a good mess of Mackerel, Linda caught her “ rst Cobia. She had to release the Cobia because it was an inch short of legal size. Linda said that Cobia are really fun to catch on light tackle because they never give up. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFirst cobia Golf Gone WILD! A golf tournament and art auction to help injured, orphaned birds and wildlifeJune 16, 2012Come join our golf tournament with CASH PRIZESand an art auction to helpFlorida Wild Mammal Association AND ALSO ENJOY: AND ALSO ENJ O Y : Nature Photography Presentationby John Spohrer telling the stories behind the images of his award-winning work and a preview of images from his new large-format book, The Seasons of Apalachicola BayŽ. Sponsored by St. James Bay Golf Resort & Forgotten Coast TVFor more information or help registering call Lynne Cooper, Events Coordinator, at 850-697-9507Crooked River GrillA prime rib dinner buffet with all the trimmings and decadent desserts for only $30. AND PLEASE SHAREŽ •Interior Remodeling •Doors •Floors •Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling •Decks/Barns/Fences • Portable, Private, Outdoor Showers FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS NEW! Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 CA TCH MORE FISH FREE LINE WINDINGwith purchase Made in USA G BUY IN BULK & SAVE B B B B B B B B B B B B B Y Y U Y U Y U Y Y Y Y U U U U U U Y Y Y UY U U UY Y Y UY U Y I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N N B U L K B U L K U L U L K U L L K L & S A V E & S A S A V A VE A VE VE V E BUY IN BULK & SAVE 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD For many of the reading audience, it has been a very wet week. While we all need the rain and are thankful for many, the overwhelming amount of water in such a short time created problems of ” ooding and damage. However, it is also the unseen that can create problems. As many of you head out on the water, debris from upriver and areas that rarely have water will travel out into heavy traveled areas. We have retrieved fallen trees floating in the middle of the river, large obstructions and other smaller items such as coolers that can be dangerous for boaters who may not see them. Although Navigation Rule 6 was discussed several weeks ago, it addresses situations like this, that boaters must operate at safe speeds to avoid collisions. After storms or heavy rains, the hazards become obstructed and new hazards are created. Caution is a must, after all a boat is roughly 1,000 or more pounds and there are no seat belts or brakes. An abrupt stop can be dangerous and even fatal. In spite of the rain, Auxiliarists are semper paratus, always ready. Larry Kolk attended Marina Day at the Carrabelle Boat Club on Saturday. In addition to providing information on boating safety, Larry was able to talk about the Auxiliary and has several individuals interested in learning more about what we do and how they may “ t into the Auxiliary. As many of you know, we are also working hard to re-establish the Auxiliarys presence in the CarrabelleApalachicola-St. George area. In addition, he also had a nice visit with two FWC of“ cers and the manager of the Boat Club. One final note, the excessive rains are a great reminder that we are of“ cially into the Hurricane season. Last week, all of you received in The Wakulla News a hurricane preparedness guide as part of preparedness week. The National Hurricane Center reminds all of us that history teaches that a lack of hurricane awareness and preparation are common threads among all major hurricane disasters. By knowing your vulnerability and what actions you should take, you can reduce the effects of a hurricane disaster. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Neither is coming out ahead in a bad storm: Be aware and be prepared! Nobility. There is nobility when people work toward a common cause, and shame when they seek con” ict as resolution to differences. In this column I have tried to document when people came together to build our counties arti“ cial reefs, the Underwater Crime Scene Investigation Protocols, the Academic Diving Program at FSU and even a protective “ sh community nested on a patch reef in the ocean. I will continue to report on such activities, provide historic perspective and some humor I hope, in anticipation of the day when we can all recognize the contributions of everyone to the preservation and wise exploitation of our beautiful Wakulla County. I am a marine biologist by profession. My passion is science, the observation of creatures, including humans, and in particular, occupants of the aquatic realm. Since retirement from FSU, I have continued teaching the technology that permits humans to spend great amounts of time underwater. In the last two years I have also become an investor, purchasing the resources that enables us to spend quality time underwater. As an investor in this county, I have become more aware of the economic plight facing us all. Rather than sit back and ignore our plight, I support the preservation and wise exploitation of our resources such as water, forest and clean air, the very reasons I chose to raise a family here. When I moved to this area in the mid 70s, we already had identi“ ed the sinkholes of Wakulla as prime recreation, training and research sites. I met and began a long relationship with Ken McDonald of the Tallahassee Police Department because of the number of cars and other stolen property our students reported. This was back when Wakulla Springs belonged to Ed Ball, and Cherokee was the very popular public weekend swimming hole. During the summer, families would bring their dogs, kids and air mattresses, complete with drinks, to ” oat out in that cool sink. On weekdays we surveyed the ” oor, and trained for research held elsewhere, such as the Antarctic, Palau and the Florida Keys. Then Wakulla Springs was purchased by the State of Florida. With the later purchase of local sinkholes by the park, in an attempt to protect them from illegal dumping and their water from pollution, public use was curtailed, driving us out of the county to the east (Mayo and High Springs area), and the west (Marianna and Ponce de Leon area). Several years ago, the Wakulla County Dive Club formed around a preservation and safety mandate to re-open dive sites to the public. And two years ago they and others began the campaign to open Wakulla Springs to diving. This week, a new dive shop reportedly called Cave Connections, will open in Wakulla County in anticipation of increased cave diving revenue. And where am I in all of this? I anticipate that I will be writing about the noble story of Wakulla Countys public recovery and continued protection of its water resources from the deck of my sailboat in the next few years.From FWC NewsPatrol, protect, preserve.Ž The motto for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions Division of Law Enforcement was on the minds of 22 new of“ cers Friday when they graduated as the FWCs 18th of“ cer class. At a ceremony at the Florida Public Safety Institute, near Tallahassee, they pledged their efforts to patrol Floridas lands and waters and protect and preserve its people and resources. Col. Jim Brown, director of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement, mentioned how FWC of“ cers are the “ rst point of contact most people have with the agency. This privilege carries great responsibility,Ž Brown said. As they interact with the public, I know these new of“ cers will uphold our values: integrity, professionalism, dedication and adaptability.Ž As FWC officers, they will patrol Floridas lands … nearly 54,000 square miles of it … as well as more than 12,000 square miles of water. Due to their jurisdiction and specialized training and equipment, they are often the “ rst to be able to respond to boating accidents, missing boaters and lost campers, hikers and hunters. In 2011, FWC officers saved nearly 900 people during search-and-rescue missions. These of“ cers will be protecting the Fishing Capital of the World and one of the largest public hunting systems in the country,Ž said FWC Chairman Kathy Barco, the guest speaker at the ceremony. The new officers began their training in December. The beginning part of each FWC academy teaches recruits basic law enforcement techniques and skills. During the “ nal eight weeks of each academy, we focus on the unique information and skills it takes to be an FWC of“ cer,Ž Brown said. The specialized training involves “ rearms pro“ ciency, wildlife identi“ cation, vessel operation, defensive tactics, all-terrain vehicle operation, detection for boating and driving under the in” uence and a focus on state and federal wildlife, “ sheries and environmental laws. The new officers will spend the next three months with a “ eld-training of“ cer and are assigned to the following counties: Oliver Adams … Monroe; Megan Aswall … Martin; Randall Bibler … Monroe; Adam Bunker … Miami-Dade; Jacob Cocke … DeSoto; John Conlin … Monroe; Jeremy Deweese … Okeechobee; Sebastian Dri … Monroe; Matthew Grif“ s … Nassau; Bryan Little … Miami-Dade; Justin C. Miller … St. Johns; Justin W. Miller … Glades; Domingo Montalvo-Diaz … Miami-Dade; Gregory Patterson … Highlands; Paige Pestka … Miami-Dade; David Read … Broward; Nicole Rodriguez … Broward; Wayne Sapp … St. Lucie; Taylor Tison … Glades; Marcin Trawinski … Palm Beach; Joshua Troiano … Monroe; and Clint Williams … Hernando.22 new FWC officers are sworn-in FWC PHOTONew Wildlife Of“ cers are sworn-in last week. Swallow-Tailed Kites by George WeymouthA GicleeŽ Non-Fading, Signed & Numbered Call George Weymouth To Order Shipping Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Jun 14, 12 Fri Jun 15, 12 Sat Jun 16, 12 Sun Jun 17, 12 Mon Jun 18, 12 Tue Jun 19, 12 Wed Jun 20, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 12:57 AM 2.8 ft. 1:42 AM 3.0 ft. 2:20 AM 3.1 ft. 2:56 AM 3.2 ft. 3:29 AM 3.3 ft. 4:02 AM High 1.8 ft. 4:34 AM 1.9 ft. 5:33 AM 1.8 ft. 6:25 AM 1.8 ft. 7:10 AM 1.7 ft. 7:50 AM 1.6 ft. 8:29 AM 1.5 ft. 9:07 AM Low 3.2 ft. 11:05 AM 3.4 ft. 11:55 AM 3.5 ft. 12:38 PM 3.6 ft. 1:16 PM 3.8 ft. 1:50 PM 3.9 ft. 2:23 PM 3.9 ft. 2:56 PM High 0.6 ft. 6:32 PM 0.4 ft. 7:19 PM 0.1 ft. 7:59 PM -0.0 ft. 8:35 PM -0.1 ft. 9:08 PM -0.2 ft. 9:38 PM -0.3 ft. 10:07 PM Low Thu Jun 14, 12 Fri Jun 15, 12 Sat Jun 16, 12 Sun Jun 17, 12 Mon Jun 18, 12 Tue Jun 19, 12 Wed Jun 20, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 12:54 AM 2.9 ft. 1:39 AM 3.1 ft. 2:17 AM 3.2 ft. 2:53 AM 3.3 ft. 3:26 AM 3.4 ft. 3:59 AM High 2.0 ft. 4:31 AM 2.0 ft. 5:30 AM 2.0 ft. 6:22 AM 1.9 ft. 7:07 AM 1.8 ft. 7:47 AM 1.7 ft. 8:26 AM 1.6 ft. 9:04 AM Low 3.3 ft. 11:02 AM 3.4 ft. 11:52 AM 3.6 ft. 12:35 PM 3.7 ft. 1:13 PM 3.8 ft. 1:47 PM 3.9 ft. 2:20 PM 4.0 ft. 2:53 PM High 0.7 ft. 6:29 PM 0.4 ft. 7:16 PM 0.2 ft. 7:56 PM -0.0 ft. 8:32 PM -0.1 ft. 9:05 PM -0.2 ft. 9:35 PM -0.3 ft. 10:04 PM Low Thu Jun 14, 12 Fri Jun 15, 12 Sat Jun 16, 12 Sun Jun 17, 12 Mon Jun 18, 12 Tue Jun 19, 12 Wed Jun 20, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 12:35 AM 2.5 ft. 1:33 AM 2.6 ft. 2:18 AM 2.8 ft. 2:56 AM 2.9 ft. 3:32 AM 3.0 ft. 4:05 AM 3.1 ft. 4:38 AM High 1.7 ft. 5:38 AM 1.7 ft. 6:37 AM 1.7 ft. 7:29 AM 1.6 ft. 8:14 AM 1.5 ft. 8:54 AM 1.5 ft. 9:33 AM 1.4 ft. 10:11 AM Low 3.0 ft. 11:41 AM 3.1 ft. 12:31 PM 3.3 ft. 1:14 PM 3.4 ft. 1:52 PM 3.5 ft. 2:26 PM 3.6 ft. 2:59 PM 3.7 ft. 3:32 PM High 0.6 ft. 7:36 PM 0.3 ft. 8:23 PM 0.1 ft. 9:03 PM -0.0 ft. 9:39 PM -0.1 ft. 10:12 PM -0.2 ft. 10:42 PM -0.2 ft. 11:11 PM Low Thu Jun 14, 12 Fri Jun 15, 12 Sat Jun 16, 12 Sun Jun 17, 12 Mon Jun 18, 12 Tue Jun 19, 12 Wed Jun 20, 12 Date 2.0 ft. 12:49 AM 2.1 ft. 1:34 AM 2.2 ft. 2:12 AM 2.3 ft. 2:48 AM 2.4 ft. 3:21 AM 2.5 ft. 3:54 AM High 1.3 ft. 4:45 AM 1.4 ft. 5:44 AM 1.3 ft. 6:36 AM 1.3 ft. 7:21 AM 1.2 ft. 8:01 AM 1.2 ft. 8:40 AM 1.1 ft. 9:18 AM Low 2.4 ft. 10:57 AM 2.5 ft. 11:47 AM 2.6 ft. 12:30 PM 2.7 ft. 1:08 PM 2.8 ft. 1:42 PM 2.9 ft. 2:15 PM 3.0 ft. 2:48 PM High 0.5 ft. 6:43 PM 0.3 ft. 7:30 PM 0.1 ft. 8:10 PM -0.0 ft. 8:46 PM -0.1 ft. 9:19 PM -0.2 ft. 9:49 PM -0.2 ft. 10:18 PM Low Thu Jun 14, 12 Fri Jun 15, 12 Sat Jun 16, 12 Sun Jun 17, 12 Mon Jun 18, 12 Tue Jun 19, 12 Wed Jun 20, 12 Date 2.1 ft. 12:41 AM 2.2 ft. 1:26 AM 2.3 ft. 2:04 AM 2.4 ft. 2:40 AM 2.5 ft. 3:13 AM 2.6 ft. 3:46 AM High 1.8 ft. 4:13 AM 1.8 ft. 5:12 AM 1.8 ft. 6:04 AM 1.7 ft. 6:49 AM 1.7 ft. 7:29 AM 1.6 ft. 8:08 AM 1.5 ft. 8:46 AM Low 2.5 ft. 10:49 AM 2.6 ft. 11:39 AM 2.7 ft. 12:22 PM 2.8 ft. 1:00 PM 2.9 ft. 1:34 PM 3.0 ft. 2:07 PM 3.1 ft. 2:40 PM High 0.6 ft. 6:11 PM 0.4 ft. 6:58 PM 0.1 ft. 7:38 PM -0.0 ft. 8:14 PM -0.1 ft. 8:47 PM -0.2 ft. 9:17 PM -0.3 ft. 9:46 PM Low Thu Jun 14, 12 Fri Jun 15, 12 Sat Jun 16, 12 Sun Jun 17, 12 Mon Jun 18, 12 Tue Jun 19, 12 Wed Jun 20, 12 Date 1.9 ft. 1:01 AM 2.1 ft. 2:24 AM 2.3 ft. 3:16 AM 2.4 ft. 3:54 AM 2.5 ft. 4:25 AM 2.5 ft. 4:53 AM 2.6 ft. 5:19 AM High 1.5 ft. 3:18 AM 1.7 ft. 4:17 AM 1.8 ft. 5:18 AM 1.8 ft. 6:13 AM 1.9 ft. 7:00 AM 1.8 ft. 7:43 AM 1.8 ft. 8:23 AM Low 2.8 ft. 9:57 AM 2.9 ft. 10:31 AM 2.9 ft. 11:09 AM 2.9 ft. 11:48 AM 3.0 ft. 12:29 PM 3.0 ft. 1:12 PM 3.0 ft. 1:55 PM High 0.0 ft. 5:50 PM -0.1 ft. 6:37 PM -0.3 ft. 7:20 PM -0.3 ft. 7:58 PM -0.3 ft. 8:34 PM -0.3 ft. 9:05 PM -0.3 ft. 9:33 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJune 7 June 13First June 26 Full July 3 Last July 10 New June 19Major Times 9:46 AM 11:46 AM 10:09 PM 12:09 AM Minor Times 3:03 AM 4:03 AM 4:32 PM 5:32 PM Major Times 10:31 AM 12:31 PM 10:54 PM 12:54 AM Minor Times 3:39 AM 4:39 AM 5:26 PM 6:26 PM Major Times 11:18 AM 1:18 PM 11:41 PM 1:41 AM Minor Times 4:18 AM 5:18 AM 6:18 PM 7:18 PM Major Times --:---:-12:05 PM 2:05 PM Minor Times 5:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:11 PM 8:11 PM Major Times 12:30 AM 2:30 AM 12:54 PM 2:54 PM Minor Times 5:47 AM 6:47 AM 8:00 PM 9:00 PM Major Times 1:19 AM 3:19 AM 1:44 PM 3:44 PM Minor Times 6:36 AM 7:36 AM 8:48 PM 9:48 PM Major Times 2:09 AM 4:09 AM 2:34 PM 4:34 PM Minor Times 7:30 AM 8:30 AM 9:32 PM 10:32 PM Average Average Good Better Best Best Better++++6:35 am 8:39 pm 3:04 am 4:34 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:35 am 8:40 pm 3:40 am 5:27 pm 6:35 am 8:40 pm 4:19 am 6:20 pm 6:35 am 8:40 pm 5:01 am 7:11 pm 6:35 am 8:41 pm 5:48 am 8:02 pm 6:36 am 8:41 pm 6:38 am 8:49 pm 6:36 am 8:41 pm 7:31 am 9:33 pm32% 26% 20% 14% 8% 2% 4% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

PAGE 12

Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, June 11 … Criminal justice experts say they werent surprised by last weeks study showing that the time Florida prisoners spend behind bars has grown more than in any other state … a 166 percent increase in the average sentence between 1990 and 2009. Former Department of Corrections Secretary James McDonough ascribed the “ ndings of the report, Time Served: The High Cost, Low Return of Longer Prison TermsŽ by the Pew Center on the States to changes in Florida statutes during the mid-to-late 1990s. He cited 1995s Truth in SentencingŽ law, requiring inmates to serve at least 85 percent of their sentences, and two 1999 laws: Three Strikes,Ž by which a third felony conviction requires a minimum sentence of 25 years to life if someone is injured or killed, and 10-20-Life,Ž which established mandatory minimum sentences for crimes involving “ rearms. Politics in Florida has been such that public of“ cials are afraid to appear, quote, weak on crime,Ž McDonough said. And the way thats de“ ned is, Dont lighten up on the sentencing in any way whatsoever.Ž He said the states prison terms jumped so much, so fast because in 1990, Florida inmates were serving just 30 percent of their sentences. We had prison overcrowding at that time, so we came up with a parole policy and a probation policy that really let a lot of inmates out much, much too early,Ž McDonough said. So the pendulum had swung one way. And then throughout the 90s and the last ten years, we saw the pendulum swing ƒ the other way. So you came up with a series of laws and policies that brought us up to this incredible increase in length of stay.Ž The states position is that such laws have reduced crime immensely. Tough-on-crime initiatives have successfully reversed the lenient and disastrous criminal-justice policies of the early 1990s in Florida that caused so much suffering,Ž notes the DOC web site. Thanks to the dedication of our states law enforcement of“ cers, correctional of“ cers and state prosecutors who enforce tough laws like 10-20-LIFE, Floridas Index Crime rate was the lowest in 34 years and the violent crime rate is the lowest in a quarter century.Ž Crime has been dropping for decades, but Floridas inmate population has risen by a factor of “ ve over 30 years, during which time the general population has barely doubled. As of June 30, 1990, Florida prisons housed 42,733 offenders; by June 30, 2011, the “ gure was 102,319. During the period examined by the study, Florida sentences for violent crimes increased from 2.1 years to 5 years, or 137 percent, while drugrelated sentences rose 194 percent, from an average of 0.8 years to 2.3 years. The 166 percent increase in the average prison sentence cost Florida taxpayers $1.4 billion in 2009, according to Pew. Meanwhile, most states have embraced the concept of smart justice,Ž said prison chaplain Allison DeFoor, a former judge and sheriff. Smart justiceŽ is a compendium of performance measures, accountability and transparency designed to keep inmates from returning to prison after their release,Ž DeFoor said. Fully one-third of Florida offenders return to prison within “ ve years, DeFoor said. Thats not an ef“ cient systemƒWe talk about recidivism like its an intellectual concept. Well, every new [act of] recidivism is somebodys grandmothers house got broken into or their car got jacked.Ž Floridas smart justiceŽ proponents have tried, for instance, to reduce sentences for nonviolent offenders. Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale, repeatedly sponsored a measure that would have ended mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenders, who would remain in custody during the rehabilitation portion of their sentences. She said many addicts have mental health issues that cause them to self-medicate, and that with treatment, they can become taxpayers instead of inmates. But while the Senate passed Bogdanoffs bill 40-0 and the House 112-4, Gov. Rick Scott vetoed the measure, saying it would be an injustice to victims. Justice to victims of crime is not served when a criminal is permitted to be released early from a sentence imposed by the courts,Ž he wrote in his veto message. This bill would permit criminals to be released after serving 50 percent of their sentences, thus creating an unwarranted exception to the rule that inmates serve 85 percent of their imposed sentences,Ž Scott wrote. As to the Pew study, DOC spokeswoman Ann Howard said the agency wasnt involved in the research, so we will refrain from comment out of respect and etiquette to the researchers.Ž The departments only role is to execute the court orders, added DOC spokeswoman Jo Ellyn Rackleff. The judges apply the sentences according to Florida statutes, which are passed by the Legislature.Ž Pew examined nonviolent offenders released in 2004, concluding that 14 percent of all offenders released in Florida could have served shorter sentences with no threat to public safety. DeFoor said the most important thing about the study is that it measures the evidence. Its ultimately got to be about accountability,Ž he said. We need to be driven by the data, not by emotional reactions on either side,Ž DeFoor said.Continued from Page 6A Also, in my fathers country baseball was a national sport not a business. I am not quite sure when it became a business but my father never thought it was. He often took me to the ball “ eld on a Saturday afternoon to have fun, enjoy the game and eat the worlds most delicious hotdog. At least he said they were the worlds most delicious hotdogs. Our purpose in going was just to have fun. He did his share of making fun and harassing the other teams fans but it never crossed his mind to physically beat one of them nearly to death. If I remember correctly, wedgies were the order of the day. When our team won we celebrated and highfived everybody around us. When our team lost, we determined with everything within us to slaughter them the next week on the field. When we said slaughter,Ž we were talking “ guratively. Credit was something my fathers generation frowned on. As a young person, I had in my mind to buy a bicycle. I took my father to the store to look at that prized bike. Well,Ž my father stammered, as he looked the bike over. How much money youve got saved for this bike?Ž I knew the lecture that was to follow. If you could not afford to buy something, you could not afford to have it. How many times have I heard that? Perhaps if my father could come back for a day we could send him to Washington, D.C. and explain to them this whole idea that if you cannot afford something you cannot afford something. It seemed to make sense to me and I was only I young person at the time. I guess when you get older you lose a lot of that good common sense. The verse of Scripture that was very important to my father was, And let the beauty of the LORD our God be upon us: and establish thou the work of our hands upon us; yea, the work of our hands establish thou itŽ (Psalms 90:17 KJV). It may not be the same country my father loved, but I can still operate on the same principles that made him a patriotic father, and pray, Establish thou the work of our hands.Ž Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. Margaret Louise Floyd Poole, 91, passed away June 5, in Bainbridge, Ga. She was a native of Jefferson County. She was a member of numerous military support volunteer and civic organizations. She was a member the First United Methodist Church in Monticello and later Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church in Panacea. No services are planned at this time. She is survived by one daughter, Susan Wright (Brian) of Bainbridge, Ga.; and one grandson, Thomas Justus Wright. She was predeceased by her husband, Burton Thomas Poole; and a daughter, Jane Louise Poole.Its not my fathers world anymore ObituariesContinued from Page 6AMargaret Louise Floyd Poole Andrew ‘Andy’ Lawrence RobertsAndrew AndyŽ Lawrence Roberts, 75, of Sopchoppy, passed away Saturday, June 9. He passed away at home surrounded by his wife of 52 years, Christel Nowek Roberts, and his loving family. He was born in Dellwood, and had lived in this area 26 years coming from Lake City. He worked for the Florida Highway Patrol and was a retired entomologist and owner of Three Rivers Pest Control. He served in the U.S. Army. He was a deacon at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church. He was a Mason at Ashmore Masonic Lodge in Sopchoppy, and a Marzuq Shriner of Tallahassee. He loved to ” y his plane, “ sh, garden and sing in the choir. Family received friends, Tuesday, June 12, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church in Sopchoppy. Services were held Wednesday, June 13, at 10 a.m. at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. He is also survived by three daughters, Tina Bryan (Donnie) and Kathy Barrs (Mark), both of Lake City, FL and Tammy Lary (Ed) of Crawfordville, FL; “ ve brothers, Guy Hudson, Herbert Roberts, Wayne Roberts, Walter Roberts and Tommy Roberts; four grandchildren, Allison Feagle (Ryan), Cody Barrs (Whitney), Chase Barrs and Kyle Burnsed; and three great-grandchildren, Austin and Shelbie Feagle and Triston Burnsed. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements (850926-3333 or www.bevisfh.com).Minimum-mandatories have meant longer prison terms JUNE 201217 Father’s Day Subscribe Now 10 Months for $ 20 12 New Subscribers Only! Honor your Dad today by giving him a gift subscription to The Wakulla News! SALE ENDS JUNE 30, 2012 Happy Father’s Day $ 20.12 Mail or bring coupon with payment to Offer good for Wakulla County subscribers only.All major credit cards accepted. Offer expires 6/30/2012NAME _____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ CITY ________________ZIP __________________________ PHONE _________________ NEWNEW SUBSCRIBERS Call us toll free at 1-877-401-6408 Panhandle PizzaLocated Across from Ace Hardware Crawfordville850745-8797 open Mon-Sat We slice our own Turkey, Ham & Salami Fresh Cut Vegetables all on a French Hogie Roll Subs and SaladsNEW!W n  LOVE !$600 MEDIUMPepperoni PIZZAas many as you wantexpires 7/8 one per customerexpires 7/8/12TAKE & BAKE1/2 OFFANY SUBORSALAD Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate r i s Crawfordville (850) 926-2700 Also Now Open in Tallahassee Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe Wakuulanews

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 – Page 13Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn May 31, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a traf“ c crash on U.S. Highway 319 near Wal-Mart involving injuries and road blockage. Jose Manuel Alvarez-Cantor, 26, of Crawfordville was driving an Isuzu Rodeo when he struck the back of a Hyundai Santa Fe driven by Michael R. Zink, 54, of Normal, Ill. A passenger in the Hyundai, Doris J. Zink, 64, of Normal, Ill., suffered injuries in the crash. The Zinks were stopped for a construction crew when their vehicle was struck from behind by a vehicle traveling 60 miles per hour. Deputy Zimba investigated the case as a DUI along with Deputy Nick Gray. Alvarez-Cantor was charged with DUI with serious bodily injury and found at fault for the traf“ c crash. He did not possess a valid driver license. Damage to the Isuzu was estimated at $7,000 and damage to the Hyundai was estimated at $4,000. AlvarezCantor had a passenger in his vehicle, Carmona De La Cruz-Rodrigo, 22, of Crawfordville, who was not injured. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On May 30, Freeman D. Ashmore of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief to his Crawfordville property after a chain link fence was found with a hole in it. The victim repaired the damage which was estimated at $50. € On May 30, Earnest Schimkat of Crawfordville reported the theft of a large sum of money. A person of interest has been identi“ ed. € On May 30, James Ward of St. Marks reported the grand theft of work tools. The tools are valued at $1,250 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. € On May 30, Robert Miller of Crawfordville reported the theft of an advertising sign. The sign advertised a septic business on Mike Stewart Drive. The sign was valued at $150. € On May 31, Randall Mauney of Carrabelle and Snarr Enterprises reported a felony criminal mischief on Apalachicola Forest Road 350. A tractor used to maintain roads in the forest was damaged. Pellet holes were observed in the radiator. Damage is estimated at $1,000. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On May 31, Robert Baker of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at T-n-T Canoe Rental. A canoe, valued at $400, was stolen from the establishment along with a $200 paddle. The canoe and paddle were recovered and suspects were observed leaving the area. € On May 31, Kevin Parsons of Crawfordville reported the theft of a wheelbarrow and a yard cart valued at $200. A person of interest has been identi“ ed. € On May 31, Merritt Taylor of Panacea reported a grand theft of jewelry and cash, valued at $400. Additional victims included Robert Keith and Thea Cruse, both of Panacea. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On June 1, the WCSO Narcotics Unit served a search warrant at 30 KCL Road in Crawfordville. The warrant was served as a result of an ongoing narcotics investigation involving the sale of crack cocaine and marijuana. Several undercover purchases of illegal narcotics were conducted during the investigation. A suspect has been identi“ ed and 2.7 grams of crack cocaine, drug paraphernalia, two firearms and three marijuana plants were recovered. The “ rearms and contraband were seized as evidence. The suspect will be charged with possession of cocaine, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a “ rearm with altered or removed serial number and cultivation of marijuana. Additional arrests are anticipated. € On June 1, Phillip Small of St. Marks reported a grand theft of a trailer from Crawfordville. The trailer is valued at $1,100 and was entered into the NCIC/FCIC computer. The trailer is owned by Charlene Small. € On June 1, Joseph Koszela of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim “ led his tax return and discovered that someone had already submitted a return using his information. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € On June 1, Teresa Hatler of Tallahassee reported a residential burglary in Crawfordville. The air conditioning unit was reported missing and damage was created to the interior of the home where wiring was stolen. The home is owned by Wells Fargo Bank and the loss was estimated at $12,100. € On June 1, Suzan Knutson of Crawfordville reported a traffic crash. As the victim was stopped in traf“ c on U.S. Highway 319 heading southbound, she was struck by a vehicle behind her. The vehicle, a Ford Taurus, went around her and left the scene. € On June 2, Deputy Cole Wells investigated a noise complaint on Moody Lane in Crawfordville. He observed a large gathering of individuals drinking out of plastic cups. As Deputy Wells approached, many of the individuals walked away into a wooded area. Juveniles were turned over to legal guardians and alcohol that was gathered from the party and disposed of. € On June 2, a retail theft was reported at Wal-Mart after a person allegedly walked out of the garden center without paying for a buggy full of merchandise. The suspect left the scene in a 1990s model Toyota Corolla. The stolen items were valued at an estimated $450 and included clothing, two garden trees, a box fan and craft basket. A vehicle BOLO was sent to Leon County. € On June 2, a 15-year-old Panacea juvenile reported a vehicle burglary at Wakulla High School. During graduation at WHS someone stole the victims glasses, valued at $200. € On June 2, Martha Haynes of Crawfordville reported the theft of her mailbox. The Florida Gator mailbox was stolen from the post. It is valued at $100. € On June 2, John Harley of Sopchoppy reported a criminal mischief. The victim was boating on the Sopchoppy River and left his vehicle unattended near Mount Beasor Bridge. Someone smashed out the rear window. The window was valued at $150. € On June 3, Jamie Yeomans of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at Dux Discount Liquors. A suspect, who was identi“ ed, kicked the victims vehicle while an altercation was underway in the parking lot. € On June 4, Roxanne Gilbert of Crawfordville reported a business burglary at Just Fruits and Exotics. A forced entry was discovered and cash was removed from the building. Damage to the establishment was estimated at $100. € On June 4, Leonard Crum of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a boat motor. The motor, battery and battery cable were valued at $520. € On June 4, Curtis Mixon of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone attempted to create a charge on the victims bank account. A total of $139 was removed from the victims account. € On June 4, James T. Langston of Sopchoppy reported a fraud as someone opened an account and charged more than $700 using his personal information. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On June 4, John Anderton of Panacea reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of copper wire and pipes from his residence. The copper plumbing and wiring in the remodeled home is valued at $7,050. € On June 4, Heather Lane of Crawfordville reported the theft of personal items also owned by Anthony McNeal and Robert McNeal, both of Crawfordville. Lanes purse was stolen at the County Line Bar and it contained $190 worth of property belonging to all three victims. One of the victims credit cards had been used after the theft. € On June 4, Harry Raker of Hosford reported a grand theft of his mothers two air conditioning units and appliances, valued at $1,300. The residence of Josephine Raker in Crawfordville was being rented at the time of the theft and a suspect has been identi“ ed. € On June 4, Thomas Christopher Carnline, 39, of Crawfordville was stopped by Deputy Stephen Simmons for having an expired tag. Carnline did not have a valid driver license and was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked. Carnline had two previous DWLSR and was charged with felony DWLSR. € On June 5, Armando Perez of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims vehicle window was damaged while he was inside Winn-Dixie. The damage appeared to have been done with a “ st and created $500 worth of damage. € On June 5, Erika Hedl of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim noticed a $287 charge on her bank account from the Hollister Company. € On June 5, Angel Rowe of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A television and electronic games, valued at $2,400, were reported stolen. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On June 5, Randy Revell of Panacea reported a theft. A tree stand, valued at $275, was reported missing. Persons of interest were identified. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € On June 6, James Buchanan Barnes, 47, of Crawfordville was arrested for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia after Deputy Mike Zimba allegedly observed him driving recklessly in a construction zone. Deputy Zimba reportedly observed the motorist run over “ ve road cones and failed to stop. A traffic stop was conducted by Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Gibby Gibson in the Riversink area and marijuana and paraphernalia were allegedly discovered inside the vehicle. Three grams of marijuana were discovered. € On June 6, Don Ford of Tallahassee reported a grand theft in Crawfordville. A rental property owned by Bob Teel was discovered open and several items were stolen from inside. Furniture and appliances, valued at $7,950, were reported missing. Suspects have been identi“ ed. Deputy Scott Rojas and Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € On June 6, Zacherie Oaks of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. An electronic game system, valued at $198, was reported missing. Deputy Joe Page investigated. € On June 7, Christy Garrett of Crawfordville reported a structure “ re. A grease “ re was reported on the stove. The victim poured water on the grease “ re and increased the ” ames. She attempted to throw the pan outside but burned her hand. She was treated by EMS staff at the scene. A microwave and cabinet, valued at $250, were damaged. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. € On June 7, Rodney Smith of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim received information about owing $3,400 on a past due phone bill. The victim didnt know anything about the telephone or the bill. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,140 calls for service during the past week including 25 residential and business alarms; 117 citizen contacts; 13 disturbances; 39 abandoned E-911 cell calls; 10 abandoned E-911 calls; 26 regular E-911 calls; 60 investigations; 11 loud music/noise complaints; 72 medical emergencies; 280 security checks; 29 special details; 20 subpoena services; 12 suspicious people; 17 suspicious vehicles; 12 thefts; 17 traffic crashes; 75 traf“ c enforcements; 55 traffic stops; 10 trespassing complaints; 19 reckless vehicles; and 10 wanted people.Sheri s Report Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for quali“ed applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and ”oor rate of 2.5% 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) 10AM (TUE-FRI) HAIR SALON FREE HAIRCUT FEATHER LOCKS are here!!FULL SERVICE FAMILY SALON Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

PAGE 14

Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com JACK DELAUTER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS S u n r i s e i n P a n a c e a Sunrise in Panacea By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netTo speed up the site plans approval process for smaller projects, the Wakulla County Commission voted to allow more to be approved by county staff. The commission voted four to one, with Commissioner Lynn Artz opposing, to increase the threshold for review of site plans by the Planning Commission and the Wakulla County Commission to 10,000 square feet of building space and parking area to more than 20,000 square feet of building ” oor area. Those projects that are less than 20,000 square feet will be reviewed by the countys Technical Review Committee, which is made up of staff from the Building Department, Fire Department, Emergency Management, Planning Department, Public Works, Health Department and School Board. These projects would then be approved by the Planning and Community Development Department. Commissioner Randy Merritt said it is the commissions job to make regulations and not make individual decisions for development projects. Planning Commissioner Chuck Hess said he understood wanting to speed up the process, but felt the size limit was too high. In other news: € The commission agreed to remove the rumble strips on Rehwinkle Road. Commissioner Mike Stewart brought the item forward after hearing from numerous residents who have complained about the noise. Commissioner Alan Brock said the strips were put in place to make sure people stop at the stop sign. The commission voted unanimously to remove the rumble strips. € Deputy County Administrator Tim Barden gave the commission an update on the controversial House Bill 5301. The new law deals with state Medicaid billing and changes the way each countys contribution is collected. Barden said the new bill is moving forward. Barden said county staff advocated for a meeting to clear up the overpayment which needs to be done before Aug. 1. He added that the Agency for Health Care Administration is allowing the county a one time review of addresses from the overdue payments so they can be veri“ ed. Barden said they also expressed the desire for AHCA to be more stringent about what addresses are allowed. For future Medicaid billing, the state will withhold a portion of the countys revenue sharing and onecent sales tax distributions. Instead of receiving a bill, the county will receive a statement of what was taken out. Barden said they asked that the county be able to use the revenue source of its choosing. € Also on the agenda was an item requesting approval to donate surplus “ re trucks to the Tallahassee Chapter of Guardians of the Ribbon Organization Inc. This organization takes “ re trucks and paints them pink to raise awareness for cancer. Chief Michael Morgan brought the item forward. The next county commission meeting will be held June 18 at 5 p.m.Board will allow site plans to be approved by staff Expert physicians.Quality medical care.Of“ce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. … 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comFamily Practice Accepting new patients X-Ray Services Pediatric patients 2 yrs. & older Offering specialty care: Capital Regional Cardiology Associates 850-877-0216 Capital Regional Medical Group Podiatry Services 850-878-8235 Capital Regional Surgical Associates 850-219-2306 Robert Frable, DO Aida Torres, ARNPCRAWFORDVILLE

PAGE 15

Green Scene How can businesses minimize impacts? EarthTalk, Page 10B Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012Welcome to the Florida summer! Feeling the heat? No pool to cool off in? Running your air conditioner and then feeling blue when the bill arrives? Lets review some basics in energy-ef“ cient use of your air conditioner. Perhaps you and your family could make some small changes that could result in money being saved. QUICK FACTS Did you know: € Heating, ventilation and air conditioning accounts for more than 40 percent of your utility bill. € For every degree setting below 78 degrees, you spend up to 8 percent more in cooling costs. € Upgrading your system can reduce your air conditioning costs by a signi“ cant amount. Is it time to consider doing so? Short-term solutions to improve the ef“ ciency of your existing system include: € Set your thermostat at 78 degrees or higher. € Use bath and kitchen fans sparingly when the air conditioner is operating. € Inspect and clean both the indoor and outdoor coils. The indoor coil in your air conditioner acts as a magnet for dust because it is constantly wetted during the cooling season. Dirt build-up on the indoor coil is the single most common cause of poor efficiency. The outdoor coil must also be checked periodically for dirt build-up and cleaned if necessary. € Shade east and west window. € Delay heat-generating activities, such as dishwashing and drying clothes in a clothes dryer, until the evening on hot days. € Over most of the cooling season, keep the house closed tight during the day. € Try not to use a dehumidifier at the same time your air conditioner is operating. It increases the cooling load and forces the air conditioner to work harder. € Consider installing ceiling fans to circulate the air more effectively. The improved circulation will make you feel cooler. € Install a programmable thermostat. You can then schedule the time blocks during which your heating or air-conditioning system operates. As a result, you can set the equipment to more economical settings „ such as lower temperatures in winter while you are asleep or when you are away from home. Choose one that can store and repeat multiple daily settings, so that you can have both a workday and a weekend heating and cooling time table. We have such great resources from our UF/IFAS Specialists available to you. This article was adapted from an EDIS (Electronic Data Information Source) through the website www. edis.ifas.u” .edu. Request the Brochure Number FCS3262. The publication includes information on terms to understanding that are used in the industry, how to purchase a new unit, and questions that you should be prepared to ask and answer when working with a HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning) representative. Request the brochure today or give me a call at (850) 926-3931 and I will see that you obtain one. By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Energy efficient use of air conditioning Net-zero home being built by Crawfordville construction rmSpecial to The NewsCrawfordville-based Rock Solid Design & Construction is building a net-zero home in Tallahassee that will have a total of more than 16,000 square feet of living space, but should have a monthly energy bill of $0 … or even a credit. Construction for this unique custom home for Dr. Jeremy and Martha Cummings is well underway and generating quite a buzz in the Tallahassee area. The home consists of 3,301 square feet of heated and cooled living space with a 3,500 square foot basement below it, and 883 square feet of bonus space built into the trusses above the main ” oor. One of the truly unique features of the home is an underground tunnel connecting the basement to the large garage (which has another 2,269 square foot bonus room above it). With the covered porches accounted for as well, the total under roof square footage is over 16,000 square feet. The incredibly energyef“ cient shell of this home consists of ICF exterior walls (insulated concrete forms), a SIPS panel roof system and low-e windows and doors. The superior insulation of the walls and roof system alone will cut their heating and cooling costs in half. But this project goes even further by utilizing a geothermal ground loop system to heat and cool the home, and solar photovoltaic panels, resulting in a home that will generate more power than it consumes each month. Other greenŽ features include LED lighting, rainwater collection and ” ooring milled from trees that were cut onsite. Whats even more remarkable about this project is the low cost per square foot compared to other projects with aspirations of achieving that zero-dollar energy bill. The ICF wall system is also termite-proof, has a wind rating of 200 miles per hour and 4-hour “ re rating and will take a huge bite out of their annual insurance premiums. You can follow the progress of this project online at www.netzerotally.com. ARTISTS ELEVATION/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe home will have more than 16,000 square feet under roof, but is designed to be netzero energy ef“ cient. IrwinBit Sets8 Pc.SpeedborBit Set,3 Pc. SpeedborMax Boring Bit Set or 15 Pc.TurbomaxBit Set. 2195402,2365153,2114189 DeWalt18 Volt Cordless Drill/Impact Driver Combo KitIncludes drill/driver and impact driver. Compact design. Lithium-ion batteries charge in 30 minutes.223728719999 2999Craftsman19 Pc. Universal Max Access Socket & Ratchet SetAssorted sizes. Exceptional versatility,easy access to almost any fastener. 2292076 Craftsman245 Pc. Tool Set with 3-Drawer ChestIncludes sockets,drive tools, combination wrenches,midget wrenches and specialty tools.22971821499914999Craftsman8 Drawer Tool Storage Combo4 drawer chest and 4 drawer cabinet. 11,656 cu.in.total storage space.4 Drawer Tool Chest,2297307...$69.99 4 Drawer Tool Cabinet,2297265...$80 SM SM IrwinBar Clamp 2/Pk.12" opening. 2360279999YOUR CHOICE IrwinFolding Utility KnifeQuick blade change. 2190262 IrwinVise-GripLocking Pliers 2/Pk.Includes 7" curved jaw and 6" straight nose. 2365237 Black & DeckerElectric Trimmer12" cut,bump feed line advance system.7094642Assembly required.2499 SM Save$5$29.99-$30.99 ValueZero Gravity Relaxer ChairPowder coated steel frame, all-weather fabric.Folds for easy storage. 83247743999 Portable Folding HammockWeather-resistant polyester fabric,durable steel frame. Includes carry bag.83320664999 Save $30$79.99 V alue 12' x 12' Pop-Up CanopyOne-piece fully-assembled frame.No-tools assembly. Includes wheeled carry bag. 83383869999 SM Save$100$199.99 V alue SM LithiumIon Save$80$279.99 V alue Save$15$44.99 V alue SM Save$20$59.99 V alue ITS TIME TO GET YOUR JUNE BACKNOW THROUGH JUNE 30 NEW at Ace!paintfreesaturday SM SM Save$110 $259.99 V alue SM Ace stores are independently owned and operated; offers and/or Ace Rewardsbenefits are available only at participating stores. The prices in this advertisement are suggested by Ace Hardware Corporation Oak Brook, IL. Product selection/color, sale items, prices and quantities may vary by store. This advertisement may also contain cl earance and closeout items and items at Ace everyday low prices. Red Hot Buys listed in the advertisement will extend through the end of the month. Some items may require assembly. Return and “rain check” policies vary by store; please see your Ace store for details. Product selection and prices at acehardware.com vary from those in this advertisement. Ace is not responsible for printing or typographical errors. Prices are valid through June 30, 2012, while supplies last. Apply Today! Visit www.acerewardsvisa .com/ar93211 or see your loc al participating Ac e Re ward s retailer for more d etails.Th e cre ditor and iss uer of the Ac e Re wards Platinum Visa Card is U.S. B ank National Association ND. Th e b est tools for saving m on ey. S M FIND US ON: For store loc ations, hours, dire c tions and more visit ace hard ware com or download a QR code re ader app to y our smart phone and scan t his c ode. 20" Box Fan3 speeds.63858Styles may vary.KingsfordMatch LightCharcoal12-1/2 lb.,no lighter fluid needed.82863611599699Weed & Grass Killer7105141Limit3rebates.Bug Free Backyard Spray32 oz.,protects up to 5000 sq.ft. Works up to 4 weeks,even after rain.7130057Limit2rebates. Limited quantity available,while supplies last.Sorry,no rain checks.199499399 After$5 Mail-In Rebate. You Pay$6.99 After $7 Mail-In Rebate. You Pay$11.99 After$6 Mail-In Rebate. You Pay$9.99Gal. Ea. 1999Heavy Duty Garden Hose5/8" x 50'. Kink free.71954315/8" x 100' Hose, 7195456...$29.99Home Pest ControlKills ants and roaches in seconds. Indoor/outdoor.7099906Limit3rebates.299 After$7 Mail-In Rebate. You Pay$9.99Gal.Ant Bait 4/Pk.Lasts up to 3 months.7065162Limit2rebates. Limited quantity available,while supplies last.Sorry,no rain checks.49¢ After$3 Mail-In Rebate. You Pay$3.49 Char-BroilPatio Bistro Infrared Grill12,000 Btu gas or 1750 watt electric.320 sq.in. total cooking area. Compact size for patios and smaller spaces. 8269227,8269243$12999 Ea. 499Tabletop TorchBurns lamp oil or citronella.7283013Garden Torch,7283021...$9.99 Ea.Ea. SPECIAL PURCHAS SPECIAL PURCHAS SM SM SM SM SM SM SM SM Save$6AfterMail-InRebate $7.99 V alue Save $4$19.99 V alueComplete Insect Killer for Soil & Turf10 lb.granules,40 oz.concentrate (makes up to 80 gal.),or 32 oz.spray.7137441,7269343, 7137458Limit3rebates total. Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408

PAGE 16

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, June 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a las 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Hwy. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350.  WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet in the Children’s Room at the library. Doors open for refreshments at 6:30 p.m. The meeting begins at 7 p.m. Friday, June 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, June 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. Sunday, June 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, June 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, June 19  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  WAKULLA COUNTY MAH JONGG GROUP will meet from 12:45 p.m. to 3 p.m. at precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road, the rst left after Wal-Mart heading north. The “little mah jongg house” is the rst building on the left. For more information, call 926 9254. Thursday, June 21  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Special EventsThursday, June 14  DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MOBILE VET CENTER will be at the Senior Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Vet Center provides readjustment counseling in a wide range of psycho social services offered to eligible Veterans and their families in the effort to make a successful transition from military to civilian life. They include individual, group, bereavement and MST counseling. Bene ts and Employment counseling and referrals. Information on Department of Veterans Affairs Programs. For more information, call 942-8810. Friday, June 15  BLOOD DRIVE will be held at Wal-Mart from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Donors will receive a free T-shirt.  WAKULLA SUPER USER WORKSHOP will be held at 8:30 a.m. at WorkForce Plus’ Wakulla Of ce, 3278 Crawfordville Highway. A class on Microsoft Word will be from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., followed by a class on Microsoft Excel from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 16  GOLF GONE WILD to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association will be held at St. James Bay Golf Resort. There will be cash prizes, a silent art auction and a nature photography slide-show and presentation, “The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay” (which will soon be a published book), by award-winning nature photographer John Spohrer. The event will bene t the FWMA, a 501(c)3 wildlife rehabilitation center located in Wakulla County that cares for sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife in our area. Enjoy golf at the gorgeous Audubon-sanctioned St. James Bay Golf Resort (151 Laughing Gull Lane in Carrabelle, Florida). To help by sponsoring the event or donating auction items, contact Lois Swoboda at 653-5857. For more details, see the brochure on the website at www.wakullawildlife.org or call Lynne Cooper at (850) 697-9507.  GABALLI FOOD TASTE SAMPLER will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church, 2780 Surf Road, Panacea. For more information, call 984-0127.  SONGWRITERS LISTENING ROOM will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. The session will feature Ron Patrick who has played his brand of folk music and story songs in many North Florida songwriter rounds and acoustic venues, including the Florida Folk Festival, the Yellow Fever Music Festival, the Southern Music Rising Festival and the Wild Azalea Music Festival; Morty Beckman, a Florida native who has been crafting original songs and music for more than 40 years and has owned and managed a music store in the area and currently is performing locally; Jen Clark, who has been singing since grade school and was formerly with Missus and the Walking Sticks and The Wailin’ Wolves Band; George Gray, who has been playing acoustic guitar and singing since he was 8 or 9 years old. For reservations, contact (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@ gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Upcoming EventsSaturday, June 23  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at Myra Jean’s restaurant from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. This will be a farewell party for April Schreiber. They will have cake and a gift for her. This event will not be structured with activities as the past meetings have been. RSVP to Carrie Stevens by calling 274-9474 or emailing carriejstevens@comcast.net. Sunday, June 24 A GET-TOGETHER TO SUPPORT Randy Harrison, who has leukemia, will be held at the American Legion in Tallahassee from 2 to 6 p.m. There will be music and a silent auction. Money raised will help with expenses. For more information, call 962-5282 or email sopchoppyriver@ gmail.com. Monday, June 25  HEALTH FAIR will be held by the Alzheimer’s Project Wakulla Respite Program from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Various healthcare agencies will provide screenings and information for senior issues will be available. For more information call (850) 984-5277.  NAMI WAKULLA’s June Program will feature guest speaker Bob Williamson at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Woman’s Club. Williamson is the author of “Miracle on Luckie Street, From Homeless to Millionaire.” For more infromation, call the NAMI of ce at 926-1033. Thursday, June 28  RIBBON CUTTING AND OPEN HOUSE to celebrate the grand opening of the new location of Wakulla Insurance Agency and FSU Credit Union will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at 2190 Crawfordville Highway. RSVP to the Chamber ofce at (850) 926-1848 by Friday, June 22. It will be catered by Posey’s. Friday, June 29  BLOOD DRIVE will be held at the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Donors will receive a free T-shirt.  FOCUS WAKULLA will be holding its inaugural event at Posey’s Dockside at 6 p.m. Focus Wakulla is a young professionals group designed to target Chamber members 45 years of age or younger. This group will host events and special functions to meet the needs of our future leaders as they seek to grow and develop professionally as Chamber members and citizens of Wakulla County. Sunday, July 1  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature “Journey of the Tiglax: One Season at the Alaska Maritime National Refuge” at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. This visually compelling lm was a nalist at the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival and should be a special treat for birders. An ice cream social will follow the presentation. St. Marks Refuge Association members and prospective members are invited. Call 9256121 for information. Wednesday, July 4  SOPCHOPPY FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION will be held from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., beginning with a parade downtown and ending with a reworks display. The celebration will start at 11 a.m. at Sopchoppy City Park. There is a $3 donation. There will be live entertainment. For more information, email sopchoppy orida.com@gmail.com or visit www.sopchoppy orida.com. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Department of Veterans Affairs at Senior Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Blood Drive at Wal-Mart from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Golf Gone Wild Tournament for FWMA at St. James Bay Golf Resort. County Commission meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. ThursdayFridaySaturdayMonday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com By SCOTT JOYNERWCPL DirectorTutuOla Drum and Dance Company comes to WCPL On Thursday, June 14 at 7 p.m., our “ rst performance of the summer will be a “ rst time visitor to WCPL. The TutuOla Drum and Dance Company is based out of Tallahassee and states that Our show brings African culture closer to those who are not already familiar with it. Our aim is to connect the cultures of African peoples all over the world for our audiences. This is done through our dynamic blend of different genres of music and dance such as Hip Hop, Funk, Marching Band and Caribbean styles. The central point that ties it all together is that the root of it all is African.Ž For those of our patrons who remember Mama Koku and the drum circles weve had previous summer, this high energy show should be a combination of both. Lets give TutuOla a big crowd on June 14 and kick our summer series of performance off with a bang! Safari Man Rodger Tripp Returns to WCPL For our performance next week on Thursday, June 21, were proud to bring back the Safari Man Rodger Tripp to WCPL. Tripp has many fun songs, and stories and silly antics which have entertained our patrons for years. Please come out on June 21 at 7 p.m. for this fun“ lled show for the entire family. Sign up for Wakulla Adventures Boat Tour The signup sheet for the Wakulla Adventures Boat Tour of the Sopchoppy River will be available Tuesday, June 19 at 11 a.m. This 2-hour tour is run by a new family local business, Wakulla Adventures owned by Joey and Melanie Tillman and will enlighten and entertain the whole family as they see wildlife in its natural state. There will be two tours from 10 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3 p.m. and there is a limit of 18 people per boat so seats will go fast. You can sign up at the front desk or give us a call at 926-7415. New Books at WCPL There are some great new books just added to our collection. New books by Jeffery Deaver, XO,Ž Lincoln Childs The Third Gate,Ž and Laurell K. Hamiltons Kiss the Dead,Ž join new young adult novels BitterblueŽ by Kristin Cashore, The Drowned CitiesŽ by Paolo Bacigalupi, and The Serpents RainbowŽ by Rick Riordan. We also have some award winning childrens books added such as Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy ButtonsŽ by Eric Litwin and James Dean, along with Llama, Llama, Red PajamaŽ by Anne Dewdney and many more. Please come by and see all our new stuff or put items on hold! Library News... Government MeetingsThursday, June 14  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway. Call (850) 544-6133 for more information.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, June 18  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for its regular meeting.  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. at city hall.  SCHOOL BOARD will meet at 5:45 p.m. in the school administration building.

PAGE 17

Pain and stiffness in the neck and shoulders are common complaints. Forward Head Syndrome or FHS plays in the development of headaches and neck and shoulder pain. Closely related to FHS in terms of its negative effects is Forward Head Flexion. FHS is when the neck bends forward so the chin drops toward the chest. In extreme cases the neck muscles along the back of the neck have become so weak and overstretched that they can no longer perform their primary function of maintaining the neck in a neutral position. The lack of support then given to the head results in a multitude of negative physical symptoms and eventually long term muscular skeletal injures to the neck, shoulders and upper back. Common symptoms: € Rounded shoulders. € Pain and knots between the shoulder blades. € Pain along with weak and overstretched muscles along the back of the neck. € Tight muscles along the front of the neck. € Muscle fatigue in the neck. € Headaches. € Numbness and tingling in the forearms, hands and “ ngers. Here are some ways to correct Forward Head Flexion. 1. Look up! Life is more interesting this way! 2. Bring mobile devices (i.e., cell phones) up to eye level when using them. The same goes when reading the paper or your newest novel. 3. Practice gentle prone (or on your stomach) backbends, like Salambhasana or the Locust pose. Work by lifting the upper body only. Prone back bends will strengthen the mid and upper back muscles as well as those along the back of the neck. 4. Relax in supported supine (on your back) back bends where the neck muscles, front and back are allowed to relax. This will allow tight muscles along the front of the neck to stretch and release gently. Practice this release daily. Roll a mat or fold a blanket so that it is just narrow enough to place along your spine. Lay on your back on the support and ensure everything is supported from the back of your head to the buttock. In the case of the mat, use additional support like a blanket or a block under the buttock. Reach your arms out from your shoulders and rest them along the ” oor with the palms up so you are making a TŽ position. To make the stretch more intense, bend your elbows as much as 90 degrees so your hands are in line with your head. Stay for 2-5 minutes while focusing to relax the muscles along the back of the neck and shoulders. If you feel pins and needles in the arms and the hands, straighten your arms. Bad habits take hard work and time to correct, but if you follow these guidelines and practice, not only to correct your neck position, but also relax your over taxed neck muscles, you will see and feel the difference in no time. Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Yoga teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 – Page 3BHEALTH & FITNESSMost weight loss studies show that 70 percent of your weight loss or weight gain (for you hard-gainers) is diet, and 30 percent is exercise. This means big bucks for the weight loss companies, there is a lot of money to be had to help sell you the next biggest weight loss product. There are a million types of exercise products out there, and no limits to the infomercials about exercise programs or people saying that they lost tons of weight on them. These programs do work, but the reasoning behind it is that they work because the buyer DID IT.Ž The program was used and was not just put on the shelf and forgotten about. The DVD was taken out of the box and put it in the DVD player and the buyer trained along with the program instructor religiously every day. That is the reason they lost the weight. So will it work for everyone? Probably not, as it is not the right workout program for everyone. If the program doesnt “ t your lifestyle, it will become a choreŽ and it will sit on the shelf. Exercise should never be a chore … it should be something that you want to do. For example, I have clients who use their Jane Fonda workout tapes to this day and have always used them as long as they remember. They are strong and very healthy and they are happy. The “ nal decision should be, will I do this program or will it sit and get dusty along with my treadmill or rowing machine. So if you decide to buy into the INSANITY or P90X, congratulations and get moving! But always remember that the motivation should be from within you and no DVD or kettle bell will make you better if you dont stick to a daily regimen that is easy for you and your lifestyle. As always, please visit your doctor before you start any type of program regardless as to DVD, “ tness class, or outside activity. Turn on the television and there is a lady in white lab coat or a famous celebrity telling you this is the best protein shake or food plan in the world and all you have to do is drink it three times a day or use their food and you will suddenly get slimmer. A lot of what you are buying you can do by simply changing your eating habits from three meals a day to “ ve meals a day and suddenly you start to lose weight with no gimmicks. But there is a catch … you should complete some exercise, at least 30 minutes three to “ ve times a week. In other words if you change your meals to “ ve meals (three meals and two modest snacks) this will undoubtedly increase your metabolism and force your body to start dropping weight. Just like exercise, it has to fit into your lifestyle. The most important thing to remember is that changing to healthy eating habits should be life-long change, not for just a few weeks till you drop the weight. For more information on food and nutrition, please see your State of Florida Certi“ ed Nutritionist who can assist you in diets, nutrients and supplements.Pamela Chichester, CFT, SPN is manager at Body-Tek 24 Hour Gym in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTER Pain in the neck – how a techie lifestyle hurtsIt must work, I saw it on TVSpecial to The NewsResearch has shown practicing yoga can signi“ cantly reduce mental and physical stress, improve mood, and slow the aging process. Mary Jo Ricketson, an experienced yoga practitioner and nurse and author of Moving MeditationŽ (www.thegoodwithin.com recommends seven things beginners … and anyone practicing yoga … should know to maximize their bene“ ts: 1. Cardiovascular (aerobic) training: As with meditation, focused breathing is a cornerstone of mind-body training. Aerobic means with oxygenŽ and aerobic movement increases the ” ow of oxygen-rich blood throughout the body, including the brain. Cardiovascular training is the single most important aspect of the physical training because it keeps the heart open and strong. 2. Core and strength training: This includes the students abdomen and buttocks, and the lower back region, which extends to the base of the skull. Here is where strength, stability and balance originate. 3. Flexibility training (yoga postures): Stretching simply feels good, and it reminds students to not only be more flexible in ones body, but also ones mind. This step allows us to move (and live) with greater ease. 4. Adequate rest: Sleep is a necessary part of life, and suf“ cient rest is needed for energy and equilibrium. 5. Life-giving nutrition: Making the right choices in food allows yoga students to achieve an optimal, balanced state. This includes nutritional foods consumed in moderation. 6. Family/community/ church: From Epicurus to modern science, study and observation show that we “ nd greater happiness with access to friends and family. 7. Written goals and a plan of action: Goals and stated intention act as a road map to achieving balanced well-being.7 tips to maximize yoga bene“ ts www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Wakulla Respite Alzheimers Respite Program p p p g g g p p invites you to join us at our Monday, June 25, 9AM-1PMat Lake Ellen Baptist Church, 4495 Crawfordville Hwy.Various healthcare agencies and organizations will be providing screenings. Educational Services and Valuable information for seniors will also be provided.Refreshments will be served and for information you can contact Pat Ashley at 850-984-5277. ATTORNEY ADVERTISING. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. We may associate with local firms in states wherein we do not maintain an office. If no recovery, no fees or costs are charged, unless prohibited by State Law or Rule. Weitz & Luxenberg, PC is licensed by, and a member of good standing of the New York State Bar. Lawrence Goldhirsch, Esq., member, FL Bar. P.C. LAW OFFICES &WEITZ LUXENBERGASBESTOS |DRUGS/MEDICAL DEVICES | ENVIRONMENTAL |NEGLIGENCE Recent studies have indicated that use of the osteoporosis medicine Fosamaxcan lead to fractures in the femur …the hip bone. These fractures can occur in low-impact situations, such as when stepping down stairs or even just falling from a standing height or less. This significant risk has been recently added to the Warnings and Precautions section of the label. If you or your loved one has suffered a HIP fracture after taking Fosamaxit is your best interests to investigate your legal rights for possible compensation! Weitz & Luxenberg can help you understand your legal options. We are one of Americas largest trial law and products liability law firms representing injured persons with total verdicts and settlements in excess of $3 Billion and are committed to represent your interests aggressively and professionally. For a free consultation please call us today at 1-888-411-LAWS(5297) or visit us on the web at www.FosamaxFracture.com. Attention FOSAMAXVICTIMSHave you suffered a thigh bone/femur injury?1.888.411.LAWS |www.weitzlux.com700 BROADWAY| NEWYORK, NY 10003BRANCH OFFICES IN NEW JERSEY & CALIFORNIA www.FosamaxFracture.com Coastal Rehabilitation and Treatment Services, Community Mental Health Center located at The Barry Building, 3295 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville is pleased to announce the addition of another psychiatrist to our group, Dr. Susan Balk-Kradel, M.D.Dr. Balk-Kradel will be available in Crawfordville to do psychiatric evaluations and medication management. Glenn A. Graves, LCSW, who specializes in mental health and substance abuse treatment services for all ages including certi“cation for parenting and co-parenting will also be available.To call for information or for an appointment:Anne Morgan (850) 566-0037 or Reba Braswell at 850-528-4793 or email us at coastalrehabservices@gmail.com Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL ME TODAY. 1001114.1 State Farm, Home Oce, Bloomington, IL Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.comWe've Moved!Free-Flowing Text www.hicksair.com Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. THG-12901 Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Joint pain € Arthritis pain € Muscle pain € Back pain

PAGE 18

Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet By DAVID WHITE The arrival of summer means the arrival of wedding season. For many couples, the walk down the aisle is less daunting than planning the reception. Big or small? Whats the budget? Who gets invited? Will your family be offended if your crazy uncle is asked to stay home? With so many decisions, its no wonder that most couples ask their caterer to select the wines. Beware of such a move. While some caterers have great portfolios, most are guilty of outrageous markups on pedestrian wines. Fortunately, selecting the perfect wines for your wedding doesnt have to be stressful or expensive. Here are “ ve simple tips. 1. Bring Your Own Wine. Many venues will let you bring your own wine and only charge a corkage feeŽ for service and stemware. If this is an option, go for it. Carting in your own wine can save lots of money. Earlier this year, two friends whose caterer wanted to charge $25 per bottle asked me for help. We inquired about corkage, and learned that the caterers fee was just $8 per bottle. So we visited one of my favorite wine shops and selected four different wines that averaged out to about $9 each. By skipping the caterers wines, my friends saved nearly $1,000. If corkage isnt an option, dont be afraid to negotiate. Many caterers have wiggle room in their wine prices. 2. Skip the Champagne. Under European Union trade laws, wine can only be sold as ChampagneŽ if it comes from the Champagne region of France and is made in the traditional method,Ž which is a very expensive process. While real Champagne is a treat, its quite expensive … even budgetŽ options cost upwards of $35 per bottle. Fortunately, there are plenty of affordable sparkling wines from regions outside Champagne. Consider Cava, a delightful sparker from Spain thats produced just like Champagne, but using native Spanish grapes. Prosecco, a sparkling wine from Italy that tends to be a bit sweeter, is another option. Many top Cavas and Proseccos can be purchased for around $10 each. After all, no one is going to ask if theyre drinking realŽ Champagne while toasting the bride and groom. 3. Avoid the familiar. Napa Valley makes some exceptional Cabernet Sauvignon. But its nearly impossible to “ nd a decent bottle for less than $25. Sonoma Countys Russian River Valley produces some lovely Chardonnay, but most cost $20 or more. Fortunately, the world is awash in affordable, great-tasting wine. Finding such wines is as easy as opening up your palate to unheralded regions. 4. Remember the crowd. While values are found outside the wine worlds more popular regions, theres no sense in terrifying your guests. So avoid esoteric grape varieties and choose wines with wide appeal. Washington State Merlot, for example, is always a great value. Other regions for affordable reds include Chile, Frances Ctes du Rhne, and Italys Chianti. For whites, its hard to go wrong with a New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc or South African Chenin Blanc. A rough rule of thumb? Stick to wines with easy-topronounce names. Guests wont be afraid of them. 5. Taste! Most couples consider multiple venues for their reception before deciding where to celebrate. Selecting your wines might not be as important, but the process is typically more fun. If youre looking for one white and one red, try to sample at least “ ve or six of each before making your decision. Serve everything blind, pouring the wines from paper bags to mask their prices and where theyre from. Hopefully, youll be pleasantly surprised and learn the least expensive option is your favorite. Your wedding is a celebration … not a wine tasting. So stick to these five money-saving and stressreducing tips and have fun. David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the internet.Five tips for selecting the perfect wedding wines Whites WinesSpecial to The NewsThis year, well be paying more than ever for dinner. Food prices jumped a whopping 4 to 5 percent last year and are expected to continue rising this year as well, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But you can have your chocolate cake and eat it, too, without breaking the bank, says Toni House, author of Savvy Shopping: How to Reduce Your Weekly Grocery Bill to $85 Per Week … or Less!Ž (www. SaveYourMoneySaveYourFamily.com). A mom with executive-level experience in accounting and the restaurant industry, It takes savvy shopping,Ž she says. You can have great everyday meals and special-occasion feasts and trim the household budget with planning, patience and grocery shopping guardrails to keep your cart in line.Ž House offers these tips: € Be patient … wait for good deals. Save pricier purchases for double coupon days. If youre planning for a special occasion or celebration, save now so you can splurge a bit later, The more you rush, the less you save. € Be detail-oriented. There is a lot of “ ne print involved in being a savvy shopper, from expiration dates to special offers to asterisks. Know exactly when a coupon expires, how much its for, how much more it will be worth on double coupon days and whether or not its worth the price in the “ rst place. € Plan ahead. Plan a menu for at least three meals in advance; combined with leftovers, that should give you “ ve days or more of meals, depending on the meal. This puts you in control of your shopping list and not the other way around. Instead of always playing catch-up, replacing what youve run out of, you buy only when its on the menu. € Instead of making expensive foods (meat) the centerpiece of each meal, design menus that use the most expensive foods less often. For instance, from now on at least twice a week, try using meat as more of a “ ller than a main dish. Instead of making spaghetti with meat balls, or sausage, or chicken breasts, make spaghetti with a meat sauce of ground turkey, ground sausage or ground chicken breakfast sausage. € At the grocery store, buy ONLY what you can eat. That means no paper plates, toilet paper, plastic cups, Army men, toothbrushes, jar candles, greeting cards. Grocery store prices for non-food items are higher than youll pay almost anywhere else, so make a hard-and-fast rule and stick to it. € Do use coupons, but only for products you actually need. Lets say you just bought twice as many hot dog buns as you needed last week and now youve run across a two-for-one coupon forƒmore hot dog buns? Do you really have room in your freezer for all those buns? Put your grocery bill on a dietSecrets for bringing home more for less 5 Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2 Go to http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click ContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ.

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 – Page 5BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, June 8 … The “ eld is set for the 2012 election after candidates made their intentions of“ cially known this week by qualifying for races including 160 legislative seats and 27 congressional spots up grabs following the once-a-decade redistricting exercise. Candidates werent the only ones stewing over the upcoming elections. Gov. Rick Scott this week took the initiative in a simmering battle over voter rolls in Florida as he continued his joust with the Department of Justice over Republicanled efforts to keep noncitizens from voting in the fall. Meanwhile, Florida A&M University President James Ammons vowed to carry on after the FAMU Board of Trustees handed him a vote of no-con“ dence, a second shot across the bow for Ammons in the wake of a long line of problems at the school, including the November hazing death of Marching 100 drum major Robert Champion. The beleaguered president kept his $300,000 a year job, but was given a not-so-subtle hint that his tenure at the university was in jeopardy. QUALIFYING ENDS The “ nal cast of characters was set for the upcoming election Friday as the deadline passed on qualifying for a host of state and federal races. Following the once-adecade redrawing of political boundaries, candidates for office filed necessary paperwork with the Florida Division of Elections, which began collecting qualifying papers Monday. The roster includes 33 House candidates (29 incumbents and four newcomers) who will run unopposed and another 12 who will face only minor party opposition. In the Senate, nine incumbents … seven Republicans and two Democrats … will return automatically with no opposition on the ballot, even though theyre running in newly drawn districts. Republicans failed to field a candidate in 23 House races, leaving either Democrats, NPA or third party candidates to win those seats. But Democrats didnt “ eld a candidate in 47 of the 120 House districts. Among those districts where Democrats chose not to challenge are more than a dozen in which it appeared they would be competitive, according to voting statistics. For example, Democrats failed to “ eld a candidate in two House districts where a majority of the current voters went for Obama in 2008 … District 36 in the Pasco County area and District 83 in Port St. Lucie. In the Senate, no Democratic candidate was entered in District 22 in the Tampa Bay area, which was won by Obama in 2008. NO, YOURE OUT OF ORDER Responding to a federal Justice Department request to explain why Gov. Rick Scotts most recent voter purge doesnt violate the National Voter Registration Act, Florida Secretary of State Ken Detzner on Wednesday fired off his own letter asking the federal elections watchdog to explain its actions in the ongoing battle over Floridas voter database, and tell Florida why the feds havent broken the law. In a letter to a DOJ election lawyer, Detzner defended the states effort to purge from its ranks the names of ineligible voters, saying federal of“ cials have been dragging their feet by not giving the state access to the Department of Homeland Security database, known as SAVE. The information, Detzner contends, would help the state remove from its voter rolls the names of noncitizens who are ineligible to vote. By denying Florida access to the SAVE database, DHS appears to have violated federal law, which provides that states may use the SAVE database for any legal purpose such as ƒ voter registration,Ž Detzner contended. State of“ cials estimate that as many as 2,600 of 11.2 million registered voters should not be there. Last week, DOJ elections lawyer T. Christian Herren said Florida could be violating federal voting laws with the purge, primarily by continuing to remove voters less than 90 days before an election. Critics have blasted Scott and Republicans for what they see as a partisan attempt to suppress voting rights. The Scott administration disagrees, saying the states efforts to clear its voter rolls of non-citizens are not only legal but necessary to ensure eligible voters choices arent diluted. FAMU BOT MEMBERS TO AMMONS: WEVE LOST CONFIDENCE Florida A&M University Board of Trustees this week gave President James Ammons collective thumbs down as the panel passed a no-con“ dence vote by an 8-4 margin. Ammons still has his $300,000 a year job. But his future is cloudy. The president faces increased scrutiny from FAMU trustees and State University System of“ cials over a growing litany of concerns ranging from fraudulent audits and “ nancial improprieties among FAMU administrators to poor freshmen retention and sexual abuse at its developmental research school. Its strike two. ... Three strikes, youre out,Ž board Chairman Solomon Badger, who voted against the noconfidence motion, said after the meeting about Ammons. Despite the public censure, Ammons said he plans to stay at the helm of the historically black university. Let me say to the board that I hear you loudly and clearly,Ž Ammons said immediately following the vote. I understand that there are some measures that I have to take as president of this university to “ x things and I am going to “ x them.Ž FAMU alumni leaders and former students came to Ammons defense, saying the university is being unfairly singled out by university system of“ cials and the media, which they contend has made FAMU a scapegoat over the hazing issue. OTHER NEWS An administrative law judge this week upheld state efforts to enact water quality standards less rigid than specific federal numeric requirements. Rejecting arguments from a coalition of environmental groups, Florida Administrative Law Judge Bram Canter ruled the Department of Environmental Protection acted within its authority when it proposed a slate of water quality criteria less rigid than federal standards preferred by environmentalists. In other election news, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement began an investigation into the “ ling of campaign papers by three Supreme Court justices … Fred Lewis, Barbara Pariente and Peggy Quince … by court employees in a last-minute scramble to “ le papers necessary to make sure the trio appeared on the ballot. Rep. Scott Plakon, RLongwood, raised the issue as conservatives unhappy with the liberal bent of the courts majority have made it clear they will try to oust the trio of jurists in November. STORIES OF THE WEEK: Candidates for of“ ce submitted paperwork to run for their respective of“ ces this week while the Scott administration sparred with Washington over who will get to vote in those races. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: I begin to see that we have a leadership that is caught in a wilderness of errors,Ž FAMU Trustee Narayan Persaud, who cast a no-con“ dence vote against FAMU President James Ammons.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)For candidates, election of cials and FAMU's president it's onBy MARGIE MENZEL THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDALONGWOOD, Fla., June 12 – Gov. Rick Scott’s appointed Task Force on Citizen Safety and Protection was set to hold its rst public hearing Tuesday morning, June 12, near Sanford, the site of the Trayvon Martin shooting that spurred the new look at the state’s self defense law. The panel is charged with studying the 2005 “Stand Your Ground,” law, which says people out in the streets have no duty to try to retreat before shooting someone to death in self defense. The committee is expected to report its ndings to Scott and the Legislature. An outpouring of public comment is expected, with passions running high on both sides. The death of Martin, an unarmed black teenager, brought national attention to Florida. His acknowledged shooter, the half-Hispanic George Zimmerman, may invoke the “Stand Your Ground” defense when he faces second degree murder charges. He initially told police he acted in self-defense, and wasn’t arrested until after a loud outcry and charges of racism. The particular self defense doctrine has broad support, generally, in many parts of Florida. Martin’s parents are expected to testify to the panel on Tuesday.Stand Your Ground Task Force to meet JUNE 201217 Father’s Day Subscribe Now 10 Months for $ 20 12 New Subscribers Only! Honor your Dad today by giving him a gift subscription to The Wakulla News! SALE ENDS JUNE 30, 2012 Happy Father’s Day $ 20.12 Mail or bring coupon with payment to Offer good for Wakulla County subscribers only.All major credit cards accepted. Offer expires 6/30/2012NAME _____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ CITY ________________ZIP __________________________ PHONE _________________ NEWNEW SUBSCRIBERS Call us toll free at 1-877-401-6408 LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Go to AnyGivenTimeJax.com to enter to win a vacation in sunny Jacksonville! SO MUCH TO DO, ANY GIVEN TIME. 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116

PAGE 20

Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com

PAGE 21

SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements Free Offers Free Kittens12 weeks old males, orange tabby & white, great barn cats (850) 251-7965 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements A DVERTISE YOUR WAYTO SUCCESS!! Call Advertising Net works of Florida for statewide & regional advertising 866-742-1373 www .florida classifieds.com Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Trades/ Skills Drivers New Refrigerated& Dry Van Freight. Daily or Weekly Pay! Quarterly Safety Bonus! Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www .driveknight.com NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! *0 Tuition Cost*No Credit Check* Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required call (866)297-8916 www .joinCRST .com General Help Help Wanted€ FT Food Service Mgr € PT Bus Drivers € FT VPK TeacherCoast Charter School St. Marks, 850-925-6344 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALLAviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline .com Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLE INSIDE YARD SALE Fri, June 15, Sat, June 16, 9am to 1pm golf clubs, bags, Holiday dinnerware, dolls, knic-nacs, antique piano rolls, endurance saddle w/access and more CASH ONLY 13 Harry Morrison Rd-near Walmart General Let us sell your items for you at our next auction. Well do the work, move & sell for you! www.Gallery319.biz or 850 926 7355 Pets DOG Max is a hound/border collie mix, appx 3 years old, male, weighs 55 lbs. Gentle, quiet dog, gets along with dogs and loves people. Desperately needs a loving home. Call 352-795-1288 Happy Jack LiquivicRecognize safe & effecitive against hook & roundworms by US Center for Ventinary Medicine.PET SHOP(850) 926-7949 www.happy jackinc.com Happy Jack LiquivicRecognize safe & effecitive against hook & roundworms by US Center for Ventinary Medicine.ACE HARDWARE(850) 926-3141 www.happy jackinc.com Pets Stop Scratching & Gnawing.Promote healing & hair growth. Stamp out ITCHAMCALLITS! Shampoo with Happy Jack Itch no More, Apply Skin Balm add Tonekote to diet.Ashley Feed & Hardware(850) 421-7703 www.happy jackinc.com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Near Georgous Lake Ellen quiet neighborhood completely rennovated, New Central AC, 1,400 sf, 33 John David Drive $595. mo. (850) 443-3300 Apartments $99. Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Sopchoppy RiverCharming, Partially furnished 2story loft on private pond. Custom features, 1.5BA, walk-in-closet, W/D, D/W, TV w/ satellite. Very private. $650/month. 850-962-2849. Efficiencies/ Cottages Large room/bath, microwave, fridge, with deck, on Wakulla River, $90 week or $400 month, includes utilities 850-926-2783 Rental Houses OYSTER BAY2/1 on the canal with boat ramp. Refurbished, furnished or Not $960 mo + Utilities + dep. 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLESmall 2/1,$ $600 /mo+ $500 dep. minimum 6 months lease, no pets applications/ refers required (850) 524-3164 Out of Town Real Estate 20 Acres-Live on Land NOW!! Only $99/mo $0 Down, Owner Finance.NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure. 800-755-8953www. sunsetranches.com 5252-0614 PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTYANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE: Monday, June 18, 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE : School Board Room, 69 Arran Board, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL32326, 850-926-0065 Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News June 14, 2012 5249-0614 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Vehicle will be sold for towing and storage. Charges pursuant to Meeting Notices F.S. 713.78 Date of Sale 6-20-12 Time 9:00 AM Vehicle 06 HONDADIRT BIKE VIN# 9C2KE0105R000451 Meeting Notices All sales by Hobbys Towing & Recovery 1498 Shadeville Rd Crawfordville, FL32327 850-926-7698 Meeting Notices 5254-0621 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULLACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS and the WAKULLACOUNTYAUDITING COMMITTEE PROFESSIONALAUDITING SERVICES Request for Qualifications No. 2012-09 Advertisement Begin Date/Time: June 8, 2012 @ 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 Sealed responses for Professional Auditing Services will be received until 2:00 p.m. on June 29, 2012. Responses should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Office, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, at which time all proposals will be publicly opened. Responses received after the time and date specified will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. Please direct all questions to: Deborah DuBose, Phone: 850.926.9500 x 410, FAX: 850.926.9006 e-mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com RFQ documents will be available at www .mywakulla.com or can be picked up at Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administrative Office at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 after 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, May 29, 2012. The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Alan Brock, Chairman Deborah DuBose, Administration/Purchasing Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News June 14 & 21, 2012 5254-0621 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5255-0621 Vs. Carmichael, Melissa, 2010 CA-298 Amended Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2010 CA-298 FLORIDACOMMERCE CREDITUNION Plaintiff, v. MELISSANICHOLE CARMICHAELa/k/a Melissa Carmichael and James Lee Carmichael a/k/a James L. Carmichael, et al. Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 – Page 7B Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432“we sell and service most makes and models” Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan Strickland’s POOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE S S S S S S Licensed & InsuredGreen Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469 Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC HURLEY’S ROOF Construction, Inc.Roof Inspection Repair CleaningNEW ROOF • RE-ROOFING • SHINGLES • METAL850-544-1217FREE ESTIMATES Local, experienced and dependable management for Condo and Homeowners Associations.925-9911Kelly’s Association Management Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053887408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONS RE-ROOFING REPAIRS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980Will help you make the most of your outdoor space. Wood and Metal buildings, carports, barns, swings, gazebos & More! Sizes and Pricing to “t your needs. RENT-TO-OWN options. $25 credit on a new building with this ad! See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care 850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $475mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $700 + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker SUMMERTIME YARD SALE! NO EARLY BIRDSNO EARLY BIRDS

PAGE 22

Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSelling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 TO WHOM IT MAYCONCERN: Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the amended final judgment of foreclosure entered on May 3, 2012, in Case No. 2010 CA298, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Wakulla County, Florida, in which FLORIDACOMMERCE CREDITUNION is plaintiff and Melissa Carmichael and James Lee Carmichael are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, in Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Florida at 11 a.m. on the 28th day of June, 2012, the following described real property: Parcel AC@ Commence at the Southeast corner of the Northeast quarter of Section 32, township 2 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida and run North 89 degrees 15 minutes 57 seconds West 1471.39 feet to a concrete monument (marked #2929), thence run North 00 degrees 19 minutes 17 seconds West 1309.79 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 43 minutes 50 seconds West 1293.91 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Easterly maintained right-of-way of Lonnie Raker Road, thence leaving said Easterly maintained right-of-way continue North 89 degrees 43 minutes 50 seconds West 30.00 feet to a concrete monument (marked #7160) lying on the Westerly maintained right-of-way of Lonnie Raker Road, thence run South 01 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West along said Westerly maintained right-of-way 263.85 feet to a concrete monument (marked #7160), thence leaving said Westerly maintained right-of-way South 89 degrees 54 minutes 32 seconds West 1164.43 feet to an iron pipe, thence run North 00 degrees 30 minutes 47 seconds East 896.19 feet to a concrete monument (marked #7160) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 00 degrees 30 minutes 47 seconds East 671.04 feet to an old axle, thence run South 89 degrees 55 minutes 02 seconds East 322.50 feet to an old axle, thence run North 88 degrees 15 minutes 14 seconds East 59.61 feet to a concrete monument (marked #2919), thence run South 00 degrees 31 minutes 55 seconds West 658.20 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 43 minutes 45 seconds East 758.57 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Easterly maintained right-of-way of Lonnie Raker Road, thence run South 11 degrees 13 minutes 03 seconds East along said maintained right-of-way 16.33 feet to a concrete monument (marked #7160), thence leaving said maintained right-of-way run North 89 degrees 43 minutes 45 seconds West 1143.73 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and seal of this Court on this 6th day of June, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF COURT BY: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) Published two (2)times in The Wakulla News June 14 and 21, 2012 5255-0621 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5151-0614 TWN vs. Harrell, Tracy N. Case No. 65-2010-CA-000282 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000282 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. TRACYN. HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELLAND BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES, et. al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in 65-2010-CA-000282 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LPF/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and TRACYN HARRELL A/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELL; BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; JOHN DOE; AMYDENISE LALONDE; BRYAN DOLPHIS LALONDE; WAKULLABANK are the Defendants.Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., lobby Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. on August 2, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22, WALKERS CROSSING COMMENCING AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 360.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 198.19 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT ; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 212.39 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLYALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITHA RADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU ACENTRAL ANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 31 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.19 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST, 229.82 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 330.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AROADWAYEASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. THE ABOVE LEGALDESCRIPTION BEING MORE RECENTLYSURVEYED BYTHURMAN RODDENBERRYAND ASSOCIATES, DATED 5241-0614 TWN Vs. Parker, Brittany Rachelle Case No. 65-2012-CANotice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE FIFTH JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.65-2012-CA U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v. BRITTANYRACHELLE PARKER, ETAL., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: BRITTANYRACHELLE PARKER, and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants Current Residence Unknown, but whose last known address was: 187 ROCHELSIE RD., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-2719 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: LOT 24, BLOCK 22, WAKULLAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL33716, on or before June 7th, 2012 or within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327-0337, either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 18 day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTLETHA WELLS, (850)926-0905 EXT222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPTOF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. June 7 and 14, 2012. 665112464 5243-0614 vs. Dana Carter Case No. 65-2012-CA-000093 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000093, DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. : DANA CARTER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ANDREW T. CARTER LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:: 1951 Woodville Hwy Crawfordville, FL 32327 1710 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLIAM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 101 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 1748.95 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 903.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 142.62 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 617.33 FEET TO POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 60.29 FEET TO A POINT THENCE RUN SOUTH 14 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 145.67 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 03 SECONDS 5247-0614 TWN Vs. Burke, Terrence M. Case No. CACE12-0032439(11) Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SEVENTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. CACE12-0032439(11) DANNYDANIELS and LINDADANIELS, his wife Plaintiff, vs. TERRANCE M. BURKE, et all, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 22, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. CACE 12-003243(11) of the Circuit Court of the17th Judicial Circuit in and for Broward County, Florida, whereinDANNYDANIELS and Linda DANIELS are Plaintiff and TERRANCE M. BURKE; et al., are Defendant(s). I will sell to the highest bidder for cash, online at www.broward.realforeclose.com at 10:00 oclock a.m. on the 21 day ofJune, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: See Attached Exhibit AŽ Broward County Property: 17431 SW 54th Street, Southwest Ranches, FL33331 Wakulla County Property: 276 Fox Hollow Lane, Crawfordville, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 23 day of May, 2012. HOWARD FORMAN,Clerk of Circuit Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ W. Jackson, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commence at an Iron pipe marking the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and thence run South 88 degrees 45 minutes 42 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, a distance of 240.89 feet to a concrete monument for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run North 89 degrees 11 minutes 25 seconds East along said North boundary 479.39 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 00 minutes 11 second East 701.89 feet to the centerline of a 60.00 foot roadway easement, said point lying on a curve concave to the Northeasterly, thence run Northwesterly along said centerline and along said curve with a radius of 994.14 feet thru a central angle of 31 degrees 57 minutes 52 seconds for an arc distance of 554.62 feet, the chord of said arc being North 75 degrees 53 minutes 53 seconds West 542.83 feet, thence run North 04 degrees 45 minutes 58 seconds East 563.47 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 7.67 acres, more or less. SUBJECT TO a roadway easement over and across the Southerly 30.00 feet thereof. TOGETHER WITH ANON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO WIT: A60.00 foot roadway easement lying 30.00 feet on each side of the following described centerline: Commence at an Iron pipe marking the Southeast corner of Section 28, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 00 degrees 08 minutes East along the East boundary of said Section 28, a distance of 342.70 feet to the Southerly maintained right-of-way boundary of a graded county road, thence run South 57 degrees 49 minutes 36 seconds West along said Southerly maintained right-of-way boundary 451.09 to the POINT OF BEGINNING of said centerline. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run South 27 degrees 24 minutes 55 seconds East 59.67 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Southeasterly along said curve with a radius of 823.79 fee feet thru a central angle of 09 degrees 42 minutes 50 seconds for an arc distance of 139.66 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 07 minutes 45 seconds East 300.67 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Southeasterly along said curve with a radius of 994.14 feet thru a central angle of 60 degrees 00 minutes 52 seconds for an arc distance of 1041.32 feet, thence run North 82 degrees 51 minutes 23 seconds East 169.24 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Easterly along said curve with a radius of 551.21 feet thru a central angle of 14 degrees 28 minutes 30 seconds for an arc distance of 139.25 feet, thence run South 82 degrees 40 minutes 7 seconds East 489.65 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Easterly along said curve with a radius of 928.78 feet thru a central angle of 09 degrees 14 minutes 00 seconds for an arc distance of 149.67 feet, thence run North 88 degrees 05 minutes 53 seconds East 199.47 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Easterly along said curve with a radius of 2695.04 feet thru a central angle of 04 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds for an arc distance of 199.91 feet, thence run South 87 degrees 39 minutes 07 seconds East 308.37 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Northeasterly along said curve with a radius of 126.91 feet thru a central angle of 54 degrees 14 minutes 20 seconds for an arc distance of 120.14 feet, thence run North 38 degrees 06 minutes 33 seconds East 1525.20 feet to the termination point of said centerline. Daniel S. Mandel, Esq. DANIELS. MANDEL, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff, 2700 N. Military Trail, Ste. 355, Boca Raton, FL33431 Tel: (561) 826-1740 Fax: (561) 626-1741 Published in The Wakulla News June 7 & 14, 2012 5247-0614 5250-0614 vs. Vaillancourt, Debra Case No:2012CA000083 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 2012CA000083 FEDERALNATIONALMORTGAGE ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, DEBRAVAILLANCOURT, et, al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAELT BRACKIN LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 30 CHICKATTRL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 ALSO ATTEMPTED AT: 2142 HIGHWAY98 E, CARRIABLLE, FL32322 AND 1349 BRANCH HILLCT, APOPKA, FL32712 CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOTS 63 AND 64, BLOCK 48Ž, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT V, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address i is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL33309 on or before June 7th, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in The Wakulla Times and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. I f you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoo rdinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled Court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or Voiice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 25th day of May, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News June 7 and 14, 2012 5250-0614 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices EAST 684.28 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 30.00 FEET WIDE EXCLUSIVE PERPETUAL, INGRESS, EGRESS, AND UTILITY EASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 92 OF THE HARTSFIELD, SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 629.81 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 74 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 13 SEC OND EAST 1783.13, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 565.46 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 627.91 FEET TO A 3 INCHES ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT 9MARKED NO. 2919),THENCE RUN SOUTH 14 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 115.66 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED $4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 14 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 30.01 FEET TO A 4 INCHES BY 4 INCHES CONCRETE MONUMENT ,THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 300.07 FEET TO A 3 INCHES ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO.2919) LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE NORTHEASTERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT -OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF PURIFY BAY ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 33 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OFWAY 31.42 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED NO. 4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 310.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1997 RDMNŽ DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME, ID#11430190A TITLE # 90701645 AND ID# 11430190B, TITLE # 90701714 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for therelief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 22nd of May, 2012. Brent. X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, as Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News June 7 and 14, 2012 5243-0614 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $1,000 Mo. • 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets • 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok • 64 Blackfoot 3BR/2BA Pets ok w/ non refundable Deposit. • 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets • 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced • 239 Magnolia Ridge 3 BR/2BA $1,200 mo., $1,200 Deposit • 67 Cochise 2BR/2BA $825. mo., Available July 1 • 145 Rochelsie 2BR/2BA $700. mo., Pets okay up to 40lbs with non-refundable $250. Deposit. Available July 1 • 165 Sam Smith Circle 2BR/1BA $450. mo. • 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595. mo. $595. Deposit Lynn Cole-Eddinger David Hoover “Open House”SUNDAY, JUNE 17TH, 1-4PM127 PARKSIDE CIRCLE Reduced price, bank wants offer. 3 bedroom, 2 bath 1535 square foot home in The Park. Freshly painted, new carpet, screened porch, spacious rooms. All on one acre. Priced to sell at $144,900. Call Lynn for more details. 545-8284 Dir.: From Crawfordville, east on Martin Luther King, right on Spring Creek Hwy., Right on Parkland, Right on Parkside, home on left.NEW LISTINGS 184 MARIE CIRCLE Doll house located in established family neighborhood near downtown Crawfordville. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths on 1/2 acre. Brick front, all kitchen appliances, plus RV shed / carport and chain link fenced backyard. Covered Porch gives this home some added outdoor living space. Great rst home and payments are cheaper than rent! Asking $92,900 Call David. 519-7944 213 MILL CREEK Charming 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 1 acre in Mill Creek subdivision. 1560 square feet, spacious living room, combo kitchen/dining room. Inside uitility room, large extra room could be used ar 4th bedroom, of ce, or family room. Screened-in porch leads to 1 car garage. 1 acre is fenced with gates. National Forest in walking distance. Asking $134,900. Call Lynn for more info. 545-8284 Coastwise Realty,Inc. We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Diekson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets.

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 – Page 9B APRIL4, 2002, UNDER JOB NO. 01-034, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST, 360.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 200.49 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF CHANCE COURT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE ADISTANCE OF 212.88 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET, THROUGH ACENTRAL ANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 38 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 61.66 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 11 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 61.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 232.20 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919); THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 330.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A1998 OR 1999 HOMES OF LEGEND SINGLE -WIDE VIN #HL9774AL. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 24th day of May, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News June 7 & 14, 2012 11-05421 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5230-0614 TWN Heirs of Martinson Kenneth H., Case No. 12-158CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-158CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN MARTINSON, husband and wife, and as Trustee of THE MARTINSON REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN H. MARTINSON, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 25, Block E. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10972-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. 5231-0614 TWN heirs of Arnold, Bert C. Case No. 12-159CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-159CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U.ARNOLDHUSBAND AND WIFE, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U. ARNOLD, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 53, BlockD. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10951-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the compliaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5231-0531 5235-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-130-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-130-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 22, Block K of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11131-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5235-0614 5236-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-131-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-131-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: 5237-0614 vs. Matthews Dorothy C. Case No: 12-124-CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-124-CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DOROTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, IF DECEASED OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DECEASED OR ALIVE, HER UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HER; OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PARTIES; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DORTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 142, Block A of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10859-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a de-fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: /s/ Glenda Porter, AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5237-0614 5253-0621 Estate of John D. Saunders, File No.12-44-CP, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION File Number 12-44-CP IN RE : ESTATE OF JOHN D. SAUNDERS, Deceased. NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The administration of the Estate of JOHN D. SAUNDERS, deceased, whose date of death was May 6, 2012, File Number 12-44-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida Probate Division, the address of which is Clerk of Court, Probate Division, Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALLINTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate,including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBA TE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHST ANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO YEARS OR MORE AFTER DECEDENTS DEA TH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of the Notice is June 14, 2012 Personal Representative /s/ ALFRED LAGRAN SAUNDERS 2010 Old Fort Drive, Tallahassee, Florida, 32301 Attorney for Personal Representative /s/ Robert S. Hightower, Florida Bar No. 199801, P.O. Box 4165, Tallahassee, Florida 32315 Telephone: (850) 222-3363 Facsimile:(850) 222-0992 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, June 14 & 21, 2012 5253-0621 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5246-0614 Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida StatuesŽ, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, June 22, 2012 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Heather Simmons Before the sale date of June 22, 2012, the owner may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the StowAway Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 June 7 and 14th, 2012. 5246-0614 5256-0621 Seminole Self StorageTWN PUBLIC NOTICE LEGALNOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON JUNE 29, 2012 A T 1 1:00 A.M AT2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONALPROPERTYOF: ALFONSO GUERRA CHRISTINE SURDAKOWSKI WES CROLEY BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF JUNE 29, 2012 THE OWNERS MAYREDEEM THEIR PROPERTYBYPAYMENTOF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COSTBYMAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON ATTHE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. June 14 and 21st, 2012 5256-0621 5245-0614 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART 1V Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Self Storage Notices Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, Saturday, June 23, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-W arehouse containing personal property of: Sara E. Skipper Wendy Gray Evelyn Green Self Storage Notices Before the sale date of Saturday,June 23, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. June 7 & June 14, 2012 5245-0614 Self Storage Notices Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5230-0531 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Lot 19, Block L of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11178-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5236-0614 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 27 33 39 42 49 53 61 64 67 2 28 50 3 29 45 4 23 46 5 24 43 18 21 40 54 62 65 68 6 15 30 34 51 7 31 47 55 8 25 35 56 9 32 48 52 26 44 63 66 69 10 16 19 22 41 57 11 36 58 12 37 59 13 38 60 ACROSS 1. Winter annoyance 6. Narcotic shrub 10. Quatrain scheme 14. Congregation divider 15. A Ponderosa son 16. Kirk's helmsman 17. Two balls, and a diner mishap 19. Swizzle 20. Bring home 21. Mortise mate 22. Lone Star State sch. 23. Pointillist's stroke 25. Infertile stretch of land 27. Slugger of 714 homers 32. Max, Buddy or Bugs 33. Really go for 34. Lunar valley 36. Try for apples 39. Works on a quilt 40. Bacall mate, familiarly 41. An amoeba has one 42. Serpentine swimmer 43. Invaders of the Roman Empi re 44. Aussie marsupial 45. __ uproar 47. Georgia's oldest city 49. Like a finished basement, perhaps 52. TGIF part 53. Competitive advantage 54. Buy alternative 57. Historic times 61. Sgt. Friday's force 62. Two balls, and a tape 64. Gilels or Jannings 65. Really steamed 66. Sheep-related 67. Heredity determinant 68. Take a short cut? 69. CSA notableDOWN1. Stuffing seasoning 2. The euro replaced it in Italy 3. Surfer, so to speak 4. Casts aspersions on 5. "I'm Dickens, __ Fenster" 6. Shop with urns 7. Val halla VIP 8. Chocolate substitute 9. Open to suggestion 10. Give confidence to 11. Two balls, and a morsel of food 12. From Mars, say 13. Post-pablum sounds 18. Rebuke to Brutus 24. Smelter input 26. Actress __ Dawn Chong 27. Pyramid's bottom 28. "Zip-__-Doo-Dah" 29. Two balls, and a juggler's prop 30. Track pace 31. Euphoric states 35. Kudrow or Bonet 37. Stewpot, or its contents 38. Not very interesting 40. Like a fillet 41. Forestall a shortage, perhaps 43. Eight pts. 44. Herriman's "Krazy" critter 46. Conifer leaf 48. __ Cong 49. Pequod co-owner, in "Mo by-Dick" 50. What "there is nothin' like" 51. Two-sport pro Sanders 55. Introduction to culture? 56. Good name for a herding dog 58. Tout's spot 59. Prom night woe 60. __-Ball (arcade game) 63. Anderson's "High __" American Prole Hometown Content 5/20/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 12 345 364 473 2 451 38 7629 9 26 537 68143 200 9 HometownContent 612 9345 7 8 387652149 495187263 829 346751 534791682 761528394 943 275816 158463927 276819435 S A G E B A S E P E L E G L I R A A D E E A D A M E U S E R B O W L I N G P I N S L A N D E R S N E E D L E H E S O R E G A L E T T U B O N E L E S S C A F E T R O T D E I O N O D I N H I G H S A G R I C A R O B L I S A S H E P A M E N A B L E V I E T R A E K A T T O R A S S U R E C O N S E R V E B U T T E R B E A N R A I L A L I E N O L L A A C N E B U R P S B L A H S K E E

PAGE 24

Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear EarthTalk: I own a small business and would like to do what I can to minimize its impact on the environment. Can you help me? Jacob Levinson, New York, N.Y. There are many ways to green up any business, large or small „ and an added bene“ t might just be saving money. Just like individuals, businesses can measure their carbon footprints to get a sense of where they are starting from and to get some initial ideas of areas to focus on to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency offers a free Simpli“ ed GHG [greenhouse gas] Emissions CalculatorŽ to help small businesses get started. Another option is to enroll in TerraPasss Carbon Balanced BusinessŽ program, which helps commercial entities measure and then offset the greenhouse gas emissions they are responsible for generating. Beyond carbon footprints, there are many other things businesses can do to minimize their environmental impacts. The non-profit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) reports that, first and foremost, businesses should shift the paper paradigm „ the average of“ ce tosses out about 350 pounds of paper per year per employee. Reducing your waste and purchasing paper with post-consumer recycled content can help save trees and nudge the pulp and paper industry, one of the most environmentally destructive industries in the world, toward a less damaging path,Ž NRDC reports. Some easy ways to do this include setting printers to use both sides of a page (or designating a draft trayŽ “ lled with paper thats blank on one side); buying copy paper with a 30 percent or more post-consumer recycled content; collecting used paper separately for recycling; and stocking bathrooms with post-consumer recycled tissue products. Getting more energy efficient is another way to save the Earth while saving money too. NRDC recommends taking advantage of the fact that most utilities offer free or inexpensive energy audits, whereby an engineer examines operations and provides a report about how to save on energy costs. Turning off lights and electronics at the end of the work day can save bundles of energy. Plug all your appliances into a power strip and youll only have to ” ip one switch at the end of the day,Ž suggests NRDC. Also, setting computers to sleepŽ or hibernateŽ when inactive will further reduce a businesss footprint. And NRDC says to lose the screensavers: Flying toasters and slideshows can use up about $50 of electricity in a year.Ž Lastly, when shopping for new of“ ce appliances, look for the EnergyStar label which means that the federal government has rated the particular unit highly in terms of energy ef“ ciency. Cutting water waste will also make a business run greener. The group says to install faucet aerators and low-” ow toilets, check for and fix leaks, landscape with water efficiency in mind and recycle gray water where applicable for nonpotable uses such as watering gardens. Lastly, NRDC suggests creating a greener work environment, given that employees are on the front lines of any sustainability initiativesŽ a business chooses to make „ perhaps by creating a green team with members from all divisions of the organization to help implement plans and bring new ideas to the table.Ž Those looking to take their businesses down a green path should consult any of the free Greening Your BusinessŽ guides on NRDCs website. Dear EarthTalk: Diesel exhaust from trucks, buses, large ships and farm equipment is especially unhealthy. What progress has been made in curbing diesel pollution? Jackie Mitchell Barre, Mass. Gasoline-powered passenger cars plying American roads have been subject to strict pollution limits for some three decades already, but only recently have tougher standards for diesel-powered trucks, trains, barges and other soot-belching vehicles gone on the books across the country. Traditionally, older diesel engines produce less carbon dioxide per mile driven than gasoline-powered vehicles, but they produce more of the pollution associated with localized environmental trauma „ such as smog and soot in the air „ that can trigger respiratory and cardiovascular problems and have been linked to lung and other cancers. Thanks to the work of the Environmental Defense Fund, American Lung Association (ALA) and others, though the U.S. government has adopted increasingly stringent rules governing how much particulate pollution and other toxins are allowed to come out of diesel engines. In 2001, these groups convinced Congress to pass strict new pollution limits on heavy-duty trucks and buses. Three years later similar standards were applied for non-road vehicles, including construction and farm equipment. These laws were designed to clean up new diesel engines, but the millions of older diesel engines still on American roads, work sites and waterways continue to cause pollution problems. Newer state laws in California, Texas and New York calling on owners of older diesel vehicles to retrofit their engines with emissions reduction equipment has helped clean the air in those states. And regional public-private partnerships administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Clean Diesel Campaign have also helped put a dent in diesel emissions from the trucking, rail and shipping sectors. Even though the clean-up of diesel engines has only been mandated in the U.S. within the last 10 years, the positive effects are already noticeable. A recent report (State of the Air: 2012Ž) issued by the ALA found that, in urban areas across the U.S., ozonecausing smog is down 13 percent, soot levels are 24 percent lower and shortterm particulate pollution is down some 28 percent over the last decade. Meanwhile, Californias Diesel Risk Reduction Plan, which calls for cleaner-burning diesel fuels, retro“ tting of older engines with particle-trapping “ lters, and the use in new diesel engines of advanced technologies that yield some 90 percent fewer particle emissions, has already cut diesel particle emissions by 75 percent there, with 10 more percentage points worth of clean-up expected by 2020. Together, these regulations will prevent tens of thousands of deaths and hospitalizations each year,Ž reports EDF. The billions of dollars in public health bene“ ts far outweigh the costs of controlling pollution.Ž Green leaders concede we still have lots of work to do on the issue, given that 40 percent of the U.S. population still lives in areas with unsafe levels of smog and soot pollution. But there is optimism that pollution reduction policies like Californias will soon be standard elsewhere as well, making our air even cleaner and reducing the percentage of Americans living in areas with compromised air quality. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine, www.emagazine.com. How can businesses minimize their environmental impact? The average of“ ce tosses out about 350 pounds of paper per year per employee. Reducing paper usage and buying paper with post-consumer recycled content can go a long way to reduce any companys carbon footprint.PHOTO BY FOGSTOCK/THINKSTOCK e Natural Resources Defense Council reports that, “ rst and foremost, businesses should shift the paper paradigm „ the average o ce tosses out about 350 pounds of paper per year per employee. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle SNAPPER SEASON Sopchoppy Wednesday, July 4, 2012 10:00 am Downtown Parade 11:00 am Myron B. Hodge City Park Gates Open Noon Opening Ceremonies 12:30 pm Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Quartet from Sopchoppy1:00 pm Say On from Wakulla County2:00 pm Brook Sessions from Gadsden County3:00 pm The Currys from Gulf County4:30 pm Steve Leslie Nashville Songwriter6:00 pm “Hits & Grins Trio” Nashville Songwriters Lisa Shaffer Bill Whyte Steve Dean 7:30 pm Harvest Gypsies from Leon CountyNightfall Fabulous Fireworks “ around 9pm” SilverBest Western-Wakulla Inns & Suites Bill & Bobbie Stephens From The Heart Recording Studio GoldCapital City Bank PlatinumCity of Sopchoppy Centennial Bank The Wakulla News Bronze Air-Con • Gene Lambert • Wakulla.com C & L Construction • Wakulla News • Nisey’s Bait and Tackle Baskerville-Donovan Roddenberry Surveying Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church Honorable Mention NoShoe Firearms Many Thanks to our Sponsors________________________________________________ Myron B Hodge City Park Festival Myron B. Hodge City Park FestivalGr e at V endors • S uper En t e r t a inm e n t • F a bu l ou s Fi r e w ork s Gr e at V endors • S uper En t e r t a inm e n t • F a bu l ou s Fi r e w ork s Downtown Parade Downtown ParadeReal Amer i cana Real Amer i cana I ndependence Day C eleb r a t io n Independence Day Celebration



PAGE 1

Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 23rd Issue Thursday, June 14, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents kll h h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyThe WakullanewsThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways.....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report.............................. ...............................Page 13A Green Scene ...................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Health & Fitness .............................................................. Page 3B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7BINDEX OBITUARIES Rock Solid Construction is building a home in Tallahassee that should have a zero monthly utility bill. Green Scene Page 1BBUILDING A NET-ZERO HOMEPhoto SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAarone Yvonne Bryant William Arthur Bo Burke Robert Bobby Stephen Oaks Margaret Louise Floyd Poole Andrew Andy Lawrence Roberts Ralph omas is running for county commission Candidates qualify for upcoming electionBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe deadline for candidates to qualify for this years election was Friday, June 8. Two candidates quali ed in the race for sheriff, T.W. Maurice Langston, Republican, and Charlie Creel, NPA. The current sheriff, Donnie Crum, expressed his intent not to run for sheriff after former Sheriff David Harvey resigned last October. Two candidates also qualifed to run for superintendent of schools, Robert R. Pearce, Democrat, and Kimball Kim Thomas, NPA. Current Superintendent David Miller announced in April that he would not seek re-election and would retire at the end of this term. Candidates for property appraiser include incumbent Donnie Sparkman, Democrat, and challenger Jim Parham Jr., NPA. Continued on Page 3A Special to the NewsDuring the heavy rain that blanketed most of Wakulla County on Thursday, June 7, a large tree fell on a car as it was being driven west on Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Boulevard close to Coastal Highway 98. The lone driver was able to exit the vehicle and was transported to the hospital by Wakulla County EMS. The sheriffs of ce, Florida Highway Patrol and re rescue also responded to the incident. Wakulla County Public Works cleared the roadway. They also handled several other calls for trees in the road during the afternoon and evening hours. Tree falls on car on MLKDriver transported to hospitalPHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Staff ReportThe burned body of the man found in the national forest in late April has been identified as Tony Delacey, 84, of Bokeelia in Lee County, according to Wakulla County Sheriffs Office spokesman Keith Blackmar. A U.S. Forest Service helicopter spotted a re on April 27 and re ghters responding to the scene found Delaceys body outside his burning truck. A wild re, believed to have been started as a result of the burning vehicle, burned about 75 acres of forest land. Initially the death appeared suspicious, but Blackmar said that investigators no longer suspect foul play. Delacey was reportedly traveling from Fort Myers to visit family in Foley, Ala., at the time of his death, Blackmar said. The death is still under investigation a toxicology report and a report from the state Fire Marshalls Of ce are still pending.Body of dead man in forest is identifiedWAKULLA COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICEThe then still-smoldering, burnt-out remains of the car found in the Apalachicola National Forest in late April. The body of a man, now identi ed as Tony Delacey, 84, was found nearby. Maurice Langston Charlie Creel By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County native Ralph Thomas is running for county commissioner District 1. Thomas will face incumbent Alan Brock and Virginia Jenny Brock. After sitting in on commission meetings and being involved in local government, Thomas said he reached a point where he didnt feel he and the things that were important to him were being represented by his commissioner. Thomas believes there is a disconnect between the government and its citizens and said it is time for the local government to get more in step with local families. Times are dif cult and many are struggling, he said. To survive, weve had no choice but to tighten our belts, he said. At the same time, the local government is asking more of citizens. For example, the increase in the ad valorem tax, Communication Service Tax and the Public Service Tax and solid waste assessment being imposed, he said. The general public has been squeezed too hard, Thomas said. His primary focus would be decreasing taxes and increasing the countys reserves. Failing to tighten the county budget led to drawing from reserves and furloughing county staff, he said. We broke our commitment to them, he said. He said he would hold the line on non-essential spending. If we dont have the money, then its not a great idea, he said. Thomas said the community center was supposed to be an asset, but became a burden after someone failed to read a federal grant. A legislative appropriation was given to the county who thought it could be used to purchase the church property. After committing to the purchase, they learned the money could not be used to purchase an existing building and had to use money from reserves, he said. Im not against the community center, Thomas said. Im against throwing money at something we cant afford. Last year, the auditors said the county was on the verge of a nancial crisis because it did not make budget adjustments, he said. The saving grace was the constitutional of cers bailing out the county, he added. Thomas said he would keep an eye on the bottom line of the budget and look ahead to avoid taking the county deeper into debt. We just have to get back to efficiency, he said. Thomas said his analytical skills would be an asset to the county and he would look at all the issues before making a decision. The county has a tendency of getting into a situation without thinking it all the way through, he said. Thomas said the people always hear what politicians will do and he wants the citizens to know what he has already done.Continued on Page 2ASPECIAL TO THE NEWSRalph Thomas is a candidate for County Commission, District 1.

PAGE 2

Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 2A He and his wife, Cynthia, own AmeriFirst Home Mortgage in Crawfordville. They are one of the last remaining small nancial companies, he said. During the 14-year span of their business, Thomas said he has created jobs and helped people purchase their own home. He also shops locally personally and professionally, which brings more money to the county and supports local families and citizens. Everything we do is all tied together, Thomas said. Thomas graduated from Wakulla High School in 1984 and enlisted in the U.S. Navy. After 12 years, Thomas said he came back to Wakulla County to raise his family. He has a background in electronics from the Navy and worked as an engineer for a company in Tallahassee before opening his business with his wife. He and his wife have three children, Caleb, 23, Holly, 21, and Bethany, 10. He serves on the board of directors for the Chamber of Commerce and the Value Adjustment Board. He has also served on the Onecent Sales Tax Committee, Citizens Advisory Task Force and as chairman of the Wakulla Christian School Board and Wakulla Springs Baptist Church Administrative Ministry Team. Ive always been civically minded, Thomas said. I believe we have a responsibility to do so. To contact Thomas or learn more visit www.ralphthomas2012.com or call 559-0608.Ralph omas is running for commissionBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe public was invited to the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council roundtable meeting held on Thursday, June 7, to provide input on how the council can improve on what it is already doing, as well as offer suggestions on how to increase tourism in the county. About 25 people attended the meeting and a majority of the conversation focused on social media and the internet. Currently, the TDC has a website, facebook page, pinterest account, twitter account and youtube page. After hearing numerous complaints and suggestions about the website at the last roundtable meeting held in September 2011, the TDC has focused on improving that site with the help of Chuck Robinson. Robinson said the new site will be up within the next week and is much more user friendly than the previous version. The site has the same look with adjustments, including different drop down menus, a TDC button, facebook update, business inventory, etc. A mobile site version will be available in two to three weeks. Pam Shields, owner of Shields Marina, suggested having a different event or story featured on the home page every so often, such as scalloping season, which opens July 1, and gag grouper. Environmental consultant and business owner, Paul Johnson, said one idea might be to include articles from the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission about different shing and hunting seasons. There was also an idea to send out an email weekly or daily featuring events that will be held that week in the county or focusing on a business. TDC Director Pam Portwood asked that people send in events to her so she can include them on the calendar on the website and possibly feature them in an email. Another suggestion was having the intern from Tallahassee Community College, who was hired recently to focus on and keep up with TDCs social media accounts, to post events and activities to other facebook pages, such as kayaking and birding groups. Social media is a big way to market Wakulla County, Portwood said. And people are using the internet more and more to plan their vacations, she added. Robinson suggested sending postcards and mailers to people who are in a certain group, instead of to everyone in an area. Most groups have mailing lists, he said, and there should be a way to get those. Someone also suggested putting promotional materials at parks in other areas. Shields suggested advertising in the Waterway Guide to reach boaters who are passing through the area. The area has several marinas with transient docks, she said. Artistic director of Palaver Tree Theatre, Herb Donaldson, suggested Wakulla County partnership and network with surrounding counties to gather resources and reach more people. Portwood said they are currently doing cross marketing with Franklin County because of the Big Bend Scenic Byway. Wakulla County is also a member of Natural North Florida, which covers 17 counties, she added. Shields said the TDC should really focus on marketing in Georgia. County Commissioner Jerry Moore suggested sending out a weekly shing report by email to people who live north of Wakulla County. Owner of Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, Jack Rudloe, said the TDC should look through their guest book and others to see where visitors are coming from. The data really helps, he said. There was also some discussion about having a birding festival in January when a large number of migratory birds are in the area. Birders tend to spend money, said photographer Lou Kellenberger. They will follow those birds to the end of the world. Ideas that have already been implemented in regards to advertising include: ads in the 2012 Travel Guide to Florida, TV commercial on Forgotten Coast, two-page editorial in the summer edition of The Griffon and plans to advertise with Landmark Newspapers in Kentucky and Tennessee in the fall. For the promotional side, Portwood said they updated their tear maps, bought a new trade show display booth, put post cards at the Welcome Center, updated the website, established a gateway sign design which will be placed soon, hired a student intern for social media marketing, held a facebook contest, created a pinterest account and are working on getting the Welcome Center designated as a location on the Florida Birding Trail. In the 2012-13 budget, the TDC has $103,579, which is from the tourist development tax and does not include any grant funding received. Portwood said the TDC has $112,750 in grants. Some of the grant funding is being used to implement the Apalachee Bay Maritime Heritage Trail. Currently they are focused on the Panacea to St. Marks paddling trail. Other itineraries include the Inside Passage to Spring Creek, the fort to the St. Marks Lighthouse and Leon Sinks to Wakulla Springs. They are also working on implementing the Big Bend Wayshowing and Interpretive Plan. TDC holds a roundtable for ideas on increasing tourism DISCUSSION: A crowd of about 25 people, above, participated in the TDCs roundtable on Thursday, June 7. TDC Director Pam Portwood, left, gives a PowerPoint presentation on the TDCs efforts to promote tourism. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN J OINFathers Day Sunday, June 17th 11 AM 9 PM Full menu and specials will be offeredCall ahead for reservations or priority seating Walk-ins Welcome Come Open: Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 Sun. 11-9 850 697-9191 Three Locations to Serve You! Woodville 850 421-9191 8056 Woodville Hwy. 850 386-9191 Tallahassee Accross from Lake Ella in the Publix Shopping Center Restaurants Open Sun. Thurs. 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Fri. & Sat. 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Thanks for your confidence and the chance to serve YOU again as Tax Collector. My goal from day one was to serve, help and benefit the citizens of Wakulla County and anyone coming to this office for service. With the assistance of my dedicated and long-standing employees, it is my desire to continue this goal with pride. How wonderful and blessed we are to live and work in Wakulla County, Florida! Thank you, Cheryll Olah Wakulla County Tax Collector Celebrating 30 years of building leaders with an appreciation for the value of working together, across our diversities, for a better Florida. bu i ld i ng o n for the e r, across e r Florida C elebrat i n leaders w v alue of our dive r www.leader shipflorida.org Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

PAGE 3

By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn an effort to nd ways to encourage smart growth within the Crawfordville Town Plan and along the Big Bend Scenic Byway, the county applied for an Environmental Protection Agency Technical Assistance for Sustainable Communities Building Blocks grant. On June 6, Christoper Duerksen of Clarion Associates met with key stakeholders in the community to identify ways to promote smart growth in Wakulla County, focusing on the two primary growth plans, the Crawfordville Town Plan and the Big Bend Scenic Byway. Smart Growth Fixes for Rural Communities focused on common barriers that can hinder the development of an attractive, walkable downtown and quick xes for removing these barriers. As well as ways to encourage rural commercial development that preserves the natural resources and beauty of the byway. The idea behind the town plan is to create a downtown for Wakulla County, Duerksen said. And the goal of the byway is to protect the scenic, natural and historic resources. The working group of about 20 people dug into the countys land development code and identified potential fixes for the county commission to consider. Duerksen said the idea was to present a menu of options for the commission and ways to implement these options. Implementation is key, he said. Old planners never die, they just lose their implementation, Duerksen said. His assistance is being provided to help ensure the county doesnt lose its implementation, he said. The three ways to encourage smart growth within the Crawfordville Town Plan is to remove barriers, provide incentives and ll regulatory gaps, he said. Ideas for the town plan are revising the C-4 downtown commercial zone district to allow residential units for mixed use development, tailor landscaping requirements for more urban development and reduce some of the parking requirements. Duerksen said Wakulla Countys parking requirements are some of the most excessive he has ever seen. Its hard to have compact parking when you are spreading it out, Duerksen said. Commissioner Alan Brock said the excessive parking requirements was one of the rst things he tried to change when he was first elected to the commission in 2008, with no luck. They are ridiculous, Brock said. Incentives include allowing on-street parking spaces adjacent to development to count towards off-street parking requirements. This saves money and allows for more compact development, Duerksen said. Another idea was to give a grant bonus landscape credit for protecting existing trees, allowing increased height if the architectural design promotes certain features and allowing the reduction of interior parking lot landscaping in the Crawfordville Town Core area if screening walls and fences are used. Regulatory gaps included requiring bicycle parking and sidewalks, enacting maximum building setbacks to create a downtown look, prohibit certain autooriented uses in downtown core, consider minimum residential densities in core area, focus urban development in Crawfordville, allow parking only to the side or rear of buildings, adopt conservation cluster subdivision requirements and adopt energy ef cient light standards. For the scenic byway, barriers include allowing conservation subdivisions in rural residential zone districts, expand permissible vegetation list to encourage more native trees and shrubs, adopt new county rural road sections that permit reduced drive pavement widths and include bicycle lanes and inventory and designate scenic view points. Some incentives would include a grant bonus or landscape credit for preserving trees and provide density bonuses for preserving historic sites or natural areas. To ll regulatory gaps, Duerksen suggested the county enact enhanced landscaping and setback standards for developments along byway. The current landscaping ordinance is very suburban oriented and does not set standards for rural areas, he said. He also suggested revising the county sign ordinance regarding billboards and electronic signage along the byway and requiring bicycle parking and pedestrian facilities. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he liked the idea of incentives instead of forcing something on new developments and businesses. You get a lot more bees with honey than you do with vinegar, Merritt said. Duerksen agreed, but said sometimes a combination of incentives and regulations works best. Maybe its time for that, Merritt said. Commissioner Lynn Artz, who spearheaded this project, said she agreed with the approach of addressing the barriers in place that prohibit what the commission has said it would like to see in the Crawfordville Town Plan area. Brock said, If Mayo can have a walkable downtown, we can have a walkable downtown. Mayo is a small town located in Lafayette County. Commissioner Jerry Moore said some good ideas were presented, but he disagreed with some of the restrictions. He said his biggest objection was enacting the maximum building setback. That is a restriction on property rights, Moore said. He added later that, maximum setbacks, that goes against my whole soul. He added that restrictions like these would kill retail development within Crawfordville. Planning Commissioner Chuck Hess said without restrictions, Wakulla County will not be able to develop a town center. He added that the commission needs to say no to developments within the town core that do not follow the standards set forth in the Crawfordville Town Plan. Some quick xes for this area would be to leave the existing zoning in place and create an overlay district which would put new standards and regulations on top of those for any new development. Planning Director Luis Serna said this would be done to ensure those people who are already in the Crawfordville Town Plan can stay. This overlay district will be presented to the commission for approval in the near future. The county commission will receive a nal report from Duerksen in July which will include a summary, recommendations and next steps, Artz said. Once that is received, Artz said it is up to Serna and the planning staff to draft revisions to the existing code and new land development codes and bring them to the commission for approval. This will eliminate important barriers that currently exist, create new incentives and add new requirements, Artz said. It will apply to new development and change the way it looks within the town core, she added. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A Constitutional officers Clerk of Court Brent X. Thurmond, Tax Collector Cheryll Olah and Supervisor of Elections Henry Buddy Wells are unopposed. Current school board member in District 4, Gregory Thomas, is also running unopposed for his seat. Seat 1 and seat 2 on the Soil & Water Conservation Commission also only have one candidate, Joe Glisson and Joseph C. Duggar. Candidates for County Commission District 1 are incumbent Alan Brock, Democrat, Ralph Thomas Jr., Republican, and Virginia Jenny Brock, NPA. Incumbent Michael H. Stewart, Republican, will face challenger Howard Warren Kessler, NPA, in the race for County Commission District 3. Those running for County Commissioner in District 5 are Richard Harden, Republican, John Shuff, Democrat, and Emily Turney Smith, NPA. Commissioner Lynn Artz chose not to seek reelection. Incumbent School Board Member Michael Scott will face challenger Melisa Taylor for District 2. Two candidates quali ed for seat 2 on the Soil & Water Conservation Committee, Charlie A. Hess and Edward E. Brimner. There were also two candidates who qualified to run for seat 5 on the Soil & Water Conservation Committee, Calvin H. Jamison and MItchell Kauffman. Tina Brimner and Anne Ahrendt are running for state committeewoman for the Republican Committee and Larry Taylor, Gordon McCleary and Kurt Ahrendt are running for state committeeman. Early voting begins for the primary election on Aug. 4 until Aug. 11. The primary election day is Aug. 14. The general election is Nov. 6. Candidates qualify for upcoming election Workshop held on promoting smart growth in CrawfordvilleCOUNTY COMMISSION Randy Merritt You get a lot more bees with honey than you do with vinegar. Alan Brock If Mayo can have a walkable downtown, we can have a walkable downtown. Jerry Moore This is a restriction on property rights and goes against my whole soul. Lynn Artz This will eliminate important barriers that currently exist, create new incentives and add new requirements.County commissioners on smart growth:Mike Stewart was absent from the workshop.More commission news, Board will allow site plans to be approved by staff, appears on Page 14A. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSThe Wakulla County Commissioners will Hold a Public Hearing Before the Planning Commission on July 9, 2012 at 7:00p.m. and the Board of County Commissioners on July 16, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any nonEnglish speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201. JUNE 14, 2012 Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency (CRTPA) Notice of Public MeetingThe Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) will hold a public meeting in coordination with the Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency (CRTPA) regarding the CRTPAs Federal Certification Review. The primary purpose of the certification is to certify that the CRTPA is satisfactorily meeting the planning requirements as defined in federal laws and regulations. The certification also provides FHWA and FTA the opportunity to share best or innovative planning practices, techniques and/or technology with the CRTPA. Representatives from the FHWA and the FTA will be present and are interested in hearing from the public. This is YOUR OPPORTUNITY to express your thoughts and comments about the transportation planning process. Please join us! DATE: Monday, June 25, 2012 TIME: 5:30 7:30 pm WHERE: Tallahassee City Hall, Tallahassee Room (2nd floor) 300 South Adams Street (see map below) Tallahassee, Florida, 32301 Through your attendance, you will gain information about the Federal transportation planning requirements and will be able to provide the Federal Review Team with a better understanding of the issues in your community! Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status. This meeting will be held in conformance with the Americans Disabilities Act. Persons who need special accommodations or persons who require translation services (free of charge) should contact Lynn Barr by phone at (850) 891-6801 or by email at lynn.barr@talgov.com at least seven (7) days prior to the date of the meeting to ensure reasonable accommodations are available. If hearing impaired, please contact the Florida Relay TDD Service at 711. For more information or direction, please contact the CRTPA at (850) 891-6800 or visit www.crtpa.org.

PAGE 4

Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Charles Chris Seward Allen obituary Tree falls on car on MLK, driver transported to hospital Alan Brock is seeking re-election to the commission Hunger is a problem in Wakulla County Robert Bobby Stephen Oaks obituary Aarone Yvonne Bryant obituary Political Briefs: Qualifying underway, reminder about signs, Democrat HQ to open thewakullanews.com Follow us onREADERS WRITE:Editor, The News: I congratulate Sandy Cook on her observation that in todays society, it is easy to sit back and complain when things dont go your way, which she herself is doing in her letter attacking Gregg Stanton (Emerald Sink story was flawed, letters, June 7 in response to Stantons May 24 Underwater Wakulla column). Unlike Sandy, Gregg published his weekly column Underwater Wakulla describing some of the many underwater projects that contributed to society. Unlike Sandy, who was a paid public servant, Gregg volunteered on most of these projects, as they were not directly related to his career as a professor at FSU. On many occasions during his 30plus years as a Wakulla resident he also continued to offer assistance and advice with regards to Wakulla, on his own time. I believe we can agree that Gregg never sat back, and he is also not complaining he is offering alternatives, and stepped up to the challenge when given the chance. Sandy herself also provides flawed information and a single-sided view on details: As she points out, she was the Wakulla Springs Park Manager from 1992 to 2008. At the time it would have been her decision to follow the principle of equal access, which she did not. She names the agencies and people who worked on the Emerald committee, yet failed to mention that it was she who ultimately approved of these people. It seems that she ignored those who stood up to her pressure, or dared to disagree. Whatever details transpire, the basic premise remains: The current policy, which she implemented and is ultimately responsible for, has led to the loss in revenue of over $5 million for the community since 2007. She still has to demonstrate that restricting diving has had any benefit in protecting the groundwater, which she herself names as the reason Emerald was purchased in the first place. Out of the thousands of cave divers enjoying and contributing to other sites, she believes that 125 for Emerald are a reason to celebrate. Yet time and again the community has signaled and voiced dissatisfaction with her policies that effectively shut Emerald down to the public, despite her claiming otherwise. To perpetuate the same irresponsible policies by opening another site under the same limitations fits the definition of insanity (i.e., repeating the same action but expecting a different outcome). The diving community also offered alternatives yet was pushed aside. At other sites, the discussion of whether or not a car or other garbage in a sink needs to get removed would not have had time to even come up, because cave divers have both discovered and removed the object, almost immediately. Sandys article seems merely politically motivated to further her personal agenda, as we wait for the Florida Department of Environmental Protections next move regarding diving at Wakulla Springs Park. I hope that the future discussion remains on topic and does not get dragged into this type of politics. Looking back, whenever such political motions were implemented, it merely upped the stakes, and removed locals from the discussion table. From an outside perspective, the current situation appears worthy of a corrupt third world country. I believe Sandy should stop complaining merely because things dont go her way, and instead open her mind or does she believe that the people (that is you, the readers) who showed up for the January public meeting to voice their interest in opening the state park to diving are irresponsible and cant be worked with? I suggest that there is a flaw in the story of Emerald Sink, but it has nothing to do with Mr. Stantons article! Dr. Joerg Hess hessjoerg@hotmail.comBy MARJ LAW Over the years, Ive seen many great cars. The trouble is, once you nd the car of your dreams, it changes. And that makes me feel sad. Makes me feel old. A good example of this is my mothers 1999 Honda Accord. Mom has always appreciated a ne car, and she loved her Honda. It had 6 cylinders and lots of pep. She sat up high in the drivers seat, and she drove all her friends in the old folks home to their errands and doctor appointments. That was 13 years ago, when Mom was 77. This year, shes going to turn 90. Four years after she bought her rst Honda, the newer Accord had some whiz-bang features she coveted. So Mom gave me her old Honda and bought that fancy new one. For a while she was happy with her decision. Then one day when we were talking on the phone, Mom asked me about the car. I told her it was as reliable as the day she gave it to me. I miss that car, she con- ded. I dont see so well in the new car. The top of the steering wheel obstructs my view. When I visited her a few months later, she insisted on driving to all our errands. Sure enough, I could see how the top of the steering wheel was in line with her eyes. She balanced it out by using a pillow. Every time she got out of the car, the pillow opped on the ground. Shed brush the snow off, mutter some bad words, and slap it back onto the seat. Well, seems like every year, car manufacturers twiddle with perfectly good cars. And for someone who has always enjoyed her car, Mom fell prey to the delights of an even newer model. So Mom bought yet another Honda, exulting on its many fancy charms. But a few months later, when I asked her how the car was running, she didnt sound very happy any more. It sits even lower than the last car, she complained. The dashboard gets in the way of seeing things. I liked the car I gave you the best. Would you like it back? I asked. The car was now 10 years old. Noooo, she said mournfully. Its 10 years old now. I feel really bad for Mom. 13 years later, she still mourns the car she gave me. This was the car that had pep and sat her up high so she could see everything and drive her friends everywhere. The newer models dont do that. I wish Honda would continue to make their Accords the way they used to. They can skip the multi disk CD player. And the new electronics. I just want Mom to sit tall in her seat again. Editor, The News: CHAT of Wakulla, Inc. is pleased to announce that nancial assistance to spay or neuter unaltered dogs is now available. It is impossible to adopt out of the pet overpopulation crises, and CHAT is committed to help says Pat Ross, CHAT president. Millions of animals get euthanized across the US each year because there are just not enough homes. We are making nancial assistance available to families with unaltered companion dogs, to reduce the number of litters entering our local shelter. CHAT wants to prevent the senseless death of unwanted animals Pat continues. To accommodate the schedule of local veterinarian clinics, only a certain number of vouchers will be available each month. The vouchers must be used within 30 days of issuance. Spay/Neuter vouchers can be obtained at the CHAT Adoption Center, 1 Oak Street in Crawfordville on Thursdays from 3-7pm. Applicants may then schedule appointments with Crawfordville Animal Hospital, Shepherd Spring Animal Hospital, or VCA Wakulla Animal Hospital. You can call (850) 9260890 during those hours for more information and requirements. Heide Clifton CHAT WakullaEditor, The News: Renowned businessman and entrepreneur Bob Williamson will speak at NAMI Wakullas meeting on June 25 at the Crawfordville Womans Club beginning at 6:30 p.m. Williamson has founded 11 successful businesses, including one of the most successful food service technology companies in the U.S., Horizon Software International, a company that revolutionized the institutional food service market with its innovative software and which he sold in 2008 for $75 million cash. Williamsons accomplishments are all the more inspiring because of the tremendous personal challenges that he overcame in his early life which he details in his recent book, Miracle on Luckie Street. His childhood was dark and by the time he was 15 he was an alcoholic; he attended 19 different schools; he graduated to intravenous meth and heroin use and became a hardcore addict. He was extremely violent, carried a .357 Magnum, and became a dangerous criminal committing armed robberies. He was kicked out of the military as a diagnosed sociopath; he spent time in Parrish Prison in New Orleans, He ended up homeless, penniless, as a loner without a single friend. He started at rock bottom, worked hard and smart, started a business, and virtually overnight accumulated a small fortune and achieved what he believed to be the absolute pinnacle of success; but the sudden mountain of cash triggered an avalanche of new problems and soon he was overwhelmed with temptation, arrogance, and sheer lust for more of everything. He was addicted to a new drug money but again miraculously overcame his addictions. Today, Williamson is completely drug and alcohol free, and no longer a slave to the flash and the cash. He has been happily married to the woman of his dreams for 40 years and has been blessed with three successful, happily married sons and seven grandchildren. To find out more about Bobs story, visit www. MiracleOnLuckieStreet. com. NAMI Wakulla is an affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, were a non-profit, grassroots, support and advocacy organization of people with mental illness, their families, friends, and professionals. For more information, call NAMI Wakullas office at 926-1033. Cheryl Creel NAMI WakullaPetersen stresses access to information at programBy TAMMIE BARFIELDAccess to information about the workings of the government is critical to a functioning democracy. Wakulla Countys chapter of the League of Women Voters recently hosted a public records forum at the library where Florida First Amendment Foundation President Barbara Petersen was the presenter. It was apparent to anyone who attended that the publics right to access government records is her passion. Petersen and the First Amendment Foundation are dedicated to fighting for our first amendment rights. Petersen said, The right to access government records is an inalienable right established by our founding fathers, and that James Madison is the father of freedom of information. Florida sets the standards for open government establishing its open meetings law in 1967, before most states enacted sunshine laws. The right to access records has been a central part of our government with the constitutional right to open government law passed in 1992. Petersen said the First Amendment Foundation receives a lot of complaints about the legislature. There are 150 to 160 bills introduced each year that create exemptions to the public records law and the publics right of access. Petersen and the foundation screen every exemption request that comes through each legislative session. There are between eight and 10 new exemptions passed each year. Petersen is the chief lobbyist on behalf of the citizens of Florida. I was told by a friend and former First Amendment Foundation board member that during Governor Crists term in office, any time anyone introduced legislation or asked for an exemption to the public records law, the governor was known to tell them to first go check with Barbara to make sure it would be okay. The Florida First Amendment Foundation is a highly visible and accessible source of authoritative information, expertise, and assistance to the public and news media. It was founded as a non-profit organization in 1984 by The Florida Press Association, the Florida Society of Newspaper Editors, and the Florida Association of Broadcasters, to ensure that public commitment and progress in the areas of free speech, free press, and open government do not become checked and diluted during Floridas changing times. If you have questions about requesting public records or obtaining access to public information, call Barbara at (850) 222-3518 or visit the website: www.floridafaf.org. Tammie Barfield is general manager of The Wakulla News and serves on the Florida Press Association Board. TAMMIE BARFIELDBarbara Petersen speaking at the League of Women Voters meeting in Crawfordville last week.Ive been thinking about changeSpay/neuter assistance for dogs available Bob Williamson will speak to NAMI Continuing discussion on Emerald Sink

PAGE 5

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Page 5A Mobile vet center at senior center on Thursday The Department of Veterans Affairs Mobile Vet Center will be at Wakulla Senior Center in Crawfordville on June 14 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Vet Center provides readjustment counseling in a wide range of psycho-social services offered to eligible Veterans and their families in the effort to make a successful transition from military to civilian life. They include individual, group, bereavement, and MST counseling. Bene ts and employment counseling and referrals and information on Department of Veterans Affairs Programs. For more information, contact Danielle Dinger at danidinger@yahoo.com or call (850) 942-8810. Reminder to lock your car to stop vehicle burglaries Students are out of school for the summer and the number of Wakulla County vehicle burglaries has skyrocketed. But the crimes can be avoided by taking some simple precautions, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. The rst thing you can do is lock your vehicle at all times, said Crum. The second thing you can do is remove valuables from inside the vehicle when they are unattended. A number of the vehicle burglaries have involved unlocked cars and trucks where citizens have left purses, GPS units, computers and rearms that were stolen. Our vehicle burglaries generally do not involve a forced entry, so the best way to avoid becoming a victim of a vehicle theft is to take the simple precautions, added Crum. Lock your vehicle while it is at home and lock your vehicle while is unattended at work or while you are away from it. Journey of the Tiglax will screen at the Refuge The First Sunday at the Refuge Presentation Series will feature Journey of the Tiglax: One Season at the Alaska Maritime National Refuge on Sunday, July 1, at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. This visually compelling lm was a nalist at the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival and should be a special treat for birders. An ice cream social will follow the presentation. St. Marks Refuge Association members and prospective members are invited. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures Classroom at the refuge. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. For more information, call (850) 925-6121. Time to register for Sopchoppy 4th of July parade The Sopchoppy 4th of July Parade will take place on Wednesday, July 4, at 10 a.m. Lineup will begin at 9 a.m. Please visit sopchoppy orida.com for parade applications, vending applications, sponsorship forms and for detailed information about the festival. Contact Debbie Dix Bishop at posh_ faery@yahoo.com or by phone at (850) 962-1010 for details on the parade and to have an application emailed or mailed to you. Vendor applications available for Stone Crab Festival Fall will be here before we know it, and interested vendors are encouraged to send in their registrations early due to so many vendors expected this year at the popular October event. More than 12,000 visitors attended last years festival to enjoy music, shopping, and of course, stone crabs. Space was enlarged last year and is expected to only grow more for the event. To view photos of past events, visit www.stmarksstonecrabfest.com. Interested vendors should contact Mickey Cantner at (850) 567-0157 or email info@stmarksstonecrabfest. com. For general festival information, please contact Mike or Glenda Pruitt at (850) 925-1053. Sponsors are welcome to contact Charlene or Billy Bishop at (850) 933-1718. Staff ReportsBriefs WILLIAM SNOWDENStaff ReportYoung quilter Wynter Harvey, 12, won rst place in the Wakulla Quilters Guilds Peoples Choice Awards after ballots were tallied last week. Harveys quilt, Just Look at the Cats in My Garden, was completed when she was 10 years old. It was made for a namesake aunt, Aunt Winnie. Harvey was 10 years old when she assembled the quilt. The Wakulla County Historical Society has quilts on display at the WCHSs Museum and Archives, housed at the old jail behind the courthouse. Other winners were Jill Harvey, whose Stepping Stones quilt won second place, and Anna Lopez took third place with her Running Buffaloes. The awards were the result of the visitors to the museum picking their favorite quilt and casting a vote. President of the Wakulla County Quilters Guild, Anna Lopez, invites everyone to please come out and enjoy the exhibit. The Quilters Guild supports Big Bend Hospice, Cruiser Quilts, Pregnancy Center, Eden Springs and The Humane Society. Quilters meet on Friday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce in Crawfordville. Fabric donations are welcomed to support their projects. The quilts will continue to be displayed through June 30. The silent auction and the drawing for an Opportunity Quilt will be held on June 30. In addition to the quilts, the museum also has an antique model car display provided by Jim Calhoun and a collection of earlier dishwares provided by Terri Gerrell. The museum is open Thursday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 12-year-old Wynter Harvey with her winning quilt, made when she was 10.Wynter Harvey, 12, wins award at quilt showWakulla County is pleased to announce the GoWakulla mobile app. The mobile app, which was developed by Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. and In nity Software Development, Inc. as part of the Wakulla Bicycle, Pedestrian and Blueways Master Plan, is the rst mobile app for the promotion of countywide ecotourism developed for a local government in Florida. The GoWakulla Mobile App is now available for download and provides users with information about bicycling, paddling, hiking and recreational activities available in Wakulla, including the location of trailheads, access points and directions. Users of the mobile app can also see photos of key destinations in the county. Additionally, the mobile app includes information about the Big Bend National Scenic Byway. The GoWakulla mobile app is currently available for Apple iOS devices, including the iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad. As funding becomes available, an Android-compatible version of the mobile app may be released and additional functionality may be incorporated for both the iOS and Android versions of the mobile app. The GoWakulla mobile app can be downloaded directly from the Apple App Store at itunes.apple.com.GoWakulla mobile app unveiled Hair Place That 850-926-6020 We Have Gift CerticatesMiranda545-2905Robyn926-6020Linda294-2085 OOPS! Styles for Men, Women & ChildrenFULL SERVICE HAIR SALONBarber on Duty Thursday SaturdayCuts Colors Highlights Perms UpDos Flat Tops Special Cuts Facial WaxingYARD SALEJUNE 15 & 16 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS! SUMMERTIME all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor 1-866-742-1373 Get your business noticed One Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Dont make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.facebook.com/AdNetFlorida HAS MOVEDOur new location is: The Barry Building, Back Building, #4 3295 Crawfordville Highway(ofce entrance is located between the 2 buildings) Ofce Hours: Monday Thursday, 8:00 am 5:00 pm (closed 12 noon 2:00 pm) For help with your utility bill and other assistance, call us at 850-926-3122 www.cacaainc.org

PAGE 6

Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesChurch BriefsAarone Yvonne Bryant William Arthur Bo Burke Robert Bobby Stephen Oaks Margaret Louise Floyd Poole Andrew Andy Lawrence Roberts Drummond Family in concert Faith Holiness upcoming eventsThe Drummond Family will perform at the Christian Worship Center on Saturday, June 16, beginning at 6 p.m. The worship center is located on U.S. Highway 98. For more information on the Drummond Family, visit their website, drummondband.com. For more information about Christian Worship Center, call Pastor Steve Taylor at 509-6031 or 926-6302. The Faith Holiness House of Prayer will be selling chicken pilau dinners on Saturday, June 16, beginning at 11 a.m. Dinner plates will be sold for $6 with proceeds to go towards the church building fund. On Sunday, June 17, morning worship at 11 a.m. will feature the Drummonds ministering in song, and the morning message. Come worship with us and be blessed. The church is located at 726 Woodville Highway. For more information, call Pastor Cris Dudley at 4211324 or Assistant Pastor Glinda Raker at 363-3294. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER Celebrating another Fathers Day without my father I cannot help thinking how much has changed since he died. If he were to return today, he would nd things quite different. In all reality, this is not my fathers world anymore. I might just as well say it. This is not my fathers country anymore, either. The country my father loves seems to have all but disappeared. During his time, a deep-seated patriotic pride permeated throughout our country. We were proud of what our forefathers had accomplished and we were willing to die to preserve that heritage. Today, it seems the past is simply the past and has no bearing whatsoever on the present. This may be why history books are being rewritten today. This, however, is a fallacy encouraged by those who do not know the right hand from their left hand. In our country today, you are either far right or far left and nothing in between. Whatever happened to people with common sense? Perhaps that ancient anonymous philosopher was right when he said the problem with common sense was that it really was not that common anymore. Perhaps the demise of the common man explains this phenomenon. Or it could be that most people today have been educated be on their common sensibilities. There was a time in my fathers country when people were proud of what they did. A few tried to get money without working for it. In my fathers country, there was a great deal of pride in working for what you had and not depending upon somebody with a handout. In my fathers country, there was a deep sense of accomplishment in earning what you had by the sweat of your brow. The only people sweating these days are politicians up for re-election. In my fathers country, there was no such thing as arbitrary handouts but plenty of hands out. It was considered our patriotic duty to help our neighbor when they were in trouble. Nobody looked to Uncle Sam to solve his or her problems. It was a community affair not a government mandate. In fact, if the truth were known, and an evidently it is not, they stayed as far away from Uncle Sam as possible only communicating with him once a year on April 15. In those days, they saluted the ag, recited the Pledge of Allegiance and were right proud to do so. Not one of them could imagine anybody ashamed of doing that in public. Today a lot is being said about the separation of church and state. My father would not understand the way some people are interpreting it. According to what is going on today they are trying to keep the church out of the state but make good and sure, the state runs the church. Isnt that why we had a revolution in the rst place? In my fathers country, there was a separation between government control and people pursuing life, liberty and happiness. Oh, for those good old days. Continued on Page 12A Out to PastorIts not my fathers world anymoreGaballi Taste Sampler is June 16 SpaceQuest VBS at First Baptist Macedonia to host VBS June 18-22 BugZone VBS at Sopchoppy UMCGaballi Food Taste Sampler will be held Saturday, June 16, from 9 a.m. to noon at Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church, 2780 Surf Road in Panacea. For more information, go to www.obayumc.com or call (850) 984-0127. The next Gaballi order deadline is Sunday, June 23, before midnight for distribution on Saturday, June 30, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Referral code is ochlockoneebayumc. Crawfordville First Baptist Church will be having their Vacation Bible School all day on Saturday, June 23. Registration will begin at 9:30 a.m. The travelers will blast off promptly at 10 a.m. and will explore the mission Jesus has for them in John 14:6. They will jet off to ve different space stops, and enjoy interplanetary crafts, recreation and lunch. All children entering kindergarten through completing fth grade are welcome to travel the galaxies with us. There will be a launchpad return celebration and program for parents at 5 p.m. For more information call the church of ce at 926-7896. Macedonia Church of Christ Written in Heaven will hold a Vacation Bible School the week of June 18-22 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. Breakfast and lunch will be served daily and transportation may be provided. For more information, contact Elder Alfred Nelson, pastor, at (850) 264-6621, or Elder Delores Nelson, youth minister, at (850) 933-9587. BugZone Vacation Bible School will be held at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church beginning June 25 and will be held nightly from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The VBS is for 3-year-olds through fth grade. Sopchoppy UMC is located at 131 Rose Street in Sopchoppy. To pre-register, contact Heather Strickland at 9621255 or stricklandheat@aol.com. William Arthur Bo Burke, 76, of Crawfordville, died on Tuesday June 5, in Greenville. He was born in Quincy and was a resident of this area most of his life. He loved to cook and eat seafood. He was of the Baptist faith. Family received friends on Friday, June 8, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Services were held Saturday, June 9, at 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Survivors include his companion of 30 years, Gloria Cox; two sons, Brian Buss and Vincent Cox; eight daughters, Annette Tasse, Linda Burke, Vickie Burns, Karen Cone, Tracy White, Tammy Bright, Kim Hagan and Beverly Lawson; 29 grandchildren and many great-grandchildren.William Arthur Bo Burke Robert Bobby Stephen Oaks Aarone Yvonne BryantAarone Yvonne Bryant, 31, of Sopchoppy, passed away on Wednesday, June 7, at her residence. She was born Aug. 24, 1980, in Tallahassee. She had lived in this area her entire life. She was a member of Mount Beasor Primitive Baptist Church. She graduated from Wakulla High School. Visitation was held on Saturday, June 9, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Services were held on Sunday, June 10, at 2 p.m. at Mount Beasor Primitive Baptist Church with burial at Revell Cemetery in Otter Creek. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to the Spina Bi da Association, 4590 MacArthur Boulevard NW, Suite 250, Washington DC 20007 (donations@sbaa.org) or Marzug Shriners, 1805 North Monroe Street, P.O. Box 37120, Tallahassee FL 32315-7130. Survivors include her parents, Raymond David Bryant and Yvonne Revell Bryant of Sopchoppy; a brother, Gregory Bryant of Sopchoppy; and a maternal grandmother, Darkas Revell. God gave her to us for a little while and now we give her back. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com). Robert Bobby Stephen Oaks, 59, passed away Wednesday, June 6, in Lakeland. He is survived by his wife of 38 years, Rebecca Loyd Oaks. He was operations manager for Lamar Advertising and was with them for more than 30 years. He was a loving husband, father and grandfather. He was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County and of the Primitive Baptist faith. He was truly one of a kind and will be missed by all. Graveside services were held Monday, June 11, at Arran Annex Cemetery in Crawfordville. He is also survived by two sons, Christopher Oaks (wife, Joey) and Chad Oaks (Linda); three grandchildren, Conner Oaks, Mackenzie Oaks and Taylie Oaks; and ve brothers. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, was in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com). Obituaries continue on Page 12A

PAGE 7

Find us on www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Page 7Ahappenings CommunityGodbolt retires from Navy Special to The NewsSenior Chief Construction Electrician Terry B. Godbolt will retire from the U.S. Navy on June 15 in Gulfport, Miss., after 22 years of service. He currently serves as the operations training chief onboard the NCTC Gulfport. He reported to the NCTC Gulfport in October 2009 rst serving as the Bravo Company commander and then Echo Company commander. He graduated from Wakulla High School in 1990 and enlisted in the Navy. He attended boot camp at Recruit Training Center in Orlando. Upon completion, he attended Construction Electrician A School in Port Hueneme, Calif. His first tour was at NCTAMS Naples, Italy, from 1991 to 1994. His next set of orders was to Naval Construction Battalion One, deploying to Guam and Albania from 1994 to 1996. Other tours include Naval Support Activity in Misawa, Japan, from 1996 to 1999; CBU 412 in Kings Bay, Ga., from 1999 to 2002; NMCB 133 in Gulfport, Miss., from 2003 to 2006; and NMCB 11 in Gulfport, Miss., from 2006 to 2009 where he served as AOIC of Detachment Romania. He was also deployed as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom One, II and III, where he served as Al Taqaddum, Iraq Watch Of cer. He was promoted to Chief Petty Of cer in 2005 and Senior Petty Officer in 2009. He is quali ed as a seabee combat warfare and eet marine force specialist. His personal awards include the Navy Commendation Medal, Navy and Marine Achievement Medal, Presidential Unit Commendation Medal, Navy Unit Commendation Medal, Meritorious Unit Commendation Medal, Battle E, Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Iraqi Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Armed Forces Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, Navy Overseas Ribbon and Expert Rifle and Expert Pistol Marksmanship Medal. He is married to Loretta and they live in Ocean Springs, Miss., with their children, Datrianna, Diamond, Destiny and Danielle. He is the son of Diane Lindsey of Wakulla and Ben and Rosa Godbolt of Tallahassee, and the grandson of Pearlie M. Lindsey of Wakulla. Terry Godbolt Iris Garden Club wins award for project at COASTSpecial to The NewsThe Iris Garden Club of Wakulla County won a National Garden Club award of $150 for their youth gardening project at COAST Charter School in St. Marks. The garden club president and youth gardening instructor, Jeannie Brodhead, said she was very pleased that her entry was awarded second place in the National Garden Club Presidents Project, Plantings for Public and Special Places. All of the students at COAST are members of FFGC youth garden clubs led by Mrs. B. The pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade students meet in small groups once every four weeks throughout the school year. They grow vegetables, herbs and owers in the schools organic raised beds, container gardens, native plant, hydroponic and butterfly gardens. The money will be used to purchase tools, seeds and plants for next years gardening projects. Wakulla Democratic party headquarters opens By DOUG JONES Special to The NewsA crowd of nearly 100 supporters came to the grand opening of the Wakulla Democratic Headquarters on Friday, June 8th. Attendees included candidates for state and local of ce, members of the Democratic Executive Committee, and supporters from as far away as Suwannee County to the east and Bay County to the west. County Commission Chairman Alan Brock and Wakulla Democratic Committee Chair Rachel Sutz Pienta welcomed everyone and introduced special guests and dignitaries. Elected officials and candidates for of ce gave brief remarks. Tax Collector Cheryll Olah, who will be unopposed in her bid for reelection, thanked the crowd for their support. State Sen. Bill Montford asked for continued support in his bid for reelection and applauded the outstanding results that the Wakulla County Schools received in recent test results, ranking at the top in almost every category. Retiring Superintendent of Schools David Miller echoed Montfords remarks and urged voters to re-elect school board members running this fall as well as the Democratic candidate for superintendent. Bobby Pearce is the Democratic candidate for superintendant. Other candidates who spoke included Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman; County Commission candidates Alan Brock and John Shuff; and House District 7 candidates Thomas Dickens, Robert Hill and A.J. Smith. Candidates for non-partisan of ces, School Board member Mike Scott seeking re-election to the School Board, and Wakulla Springs Ambassador Cal Jamison, candidate for Soil and Water Conservation Board, also spoke. The Wakulla Democratic Headquarters, located at the North Point Center, 1626-B Crawfordville Highway, is open to all citizens seeking information about voting and the upcoming elections. It will also be available to all Democratic candidates as a distribution point for campaign information and yard signs and will serve as an organizational point for electing Democrats to of ce this fall. For additional information about the Wakulla Democratic Party, please visit the web site at www.wakullademocrats.org. The Wakulla County Democratic Party Headquarters is now open at 1626-B Crawfordville Highway.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Email news to jjensen@thewakullanews. net. News is published when space becomes available and is edited for style, clarity and grammar. the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringLorra PhillipsMay 2012 Winner Her name was drawn fromI enjoy eating at all of these local restaurants! OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l l a nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlorank You So Much! Brandy McGlamry, owner/operator850.251.5780 Cleaning Service R R N ew Constr 803 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327AGES 3 THROUGH 5TH GRADE WELCOME!Get ready for an Amazing Adventure that is too good to miss. Each day will include Bible stories, Worship Rally (learning new songs), crafts, snacks, and recreation. June 25-29, 2012, from 6:00 to 8:00 pm. For more information, call (850) 926-3217 or (850) 926-1034. Pre-Registration Come and Fly with Jesus on Saturday, June 23 from 1-3 pm (Ice Cream Social). Registration will begin at 9:30am. The travelers will blast off promptly at 10:00 am and will explore the mission Jesus has for them in John 14:6. They will jet off to ve different space stops, and enjoy interplanetary crafts, recreation and lunch. All children entering kindergarten through completing 5th grade are welcome to travel the galaxies with us. There will be a launchpad return celebration and program for parents at 5:00 pm. For more information call the church of ce at 926-7896. ALL DAY Sat, June 23rd Vacation Bible Schoolat PANACEA 1ST BAPTIST CHURCHMon., June 18TH Fri., June 22ND6:00 8:30p.m. Come join us as we y to some of the worlds greatest natural wonders and encounter our Awesome God and His Amazing Power! This Awesome Week of Fun, Food, and Exciting Learning Opportunities is open to kids ages 4 years 6th grade. For more information, call 850-984-5206. VACATION BIBLE SCHOOLS

PAGE 8

Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolAwards ceremony is held at Riversprings MiddleSpecial to The NewsEighth graders at Riversprings Middle School gathered on Wednesday, May 30, to celebrate their accomplishments. Award recipients included those students making the highest GPA in their individual classes, along with those receiving top honors. The WAB Headstart Scholarship winners are Kurstin Douin, Carly Rudd, Yese Reyes, Libby Sutton and Oakley Ward. Each of the winners will be receiving $500 for TCC. Each year, there is an award for a girl and a boy who has made great improvement both academically and behaviorally. They compare them to a grain of sand in an oyster that has grown into something beautiful, and they call this Seed Pearls. This year, the Seed Pearl winners are LaChina Clayton and Chase Motes. Every year, Principal Dod Walker awards his Principals Leadership Award. This year, it went to Herbert Bud Franklin. This award goes to a well rounded student encompassing academics, athletics and behavior. Three students had perfect attendance for all three years: Karena Gay, Marquis Hutchison and Kyra Townes. Several students made all As for all three years: Mattias Gunnarsson, Caylee Cox, and Maria Parmer. At middle school, the overall highest top two students are Oracle and Laureate. This year, the second highest award, the Oracle Award, went to Caylee Cox, and the highest honors, the Laureate, went to Mattias Gunnarsson. Joining the two top winners was the honor court Blakeleigh Bolton, Chandler Hammond, Garrett Crawford, Hannah Hart, Isaac Kent, John Weber, Kyle Pearson, Maria Parmer, Nic Samlal and Oakley Ward. Members of the Riversprings Middle School honor court are recognized during the awards ceremony on May 30. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Principal Dod Walker hugs Herbert Franklin after announcing he was this years recipient of the Principals Leadership Award. Algebra 1 bootcamp o eredSpecial to The NewsThis years 2011-12 eighth and ninth graders who did not pass the Algebra 1 End-of-Course Exam will have a choice this summer. The Learning Curve Tutoring Center will offer Algebra 1 Bootcamp offered June 12 through July 19. This class is offered by Algebra 1 certi ed teachers and will meet Tuesday through Thursday of each week, one hour per day for a total of 15 hours of intensive preparation for the July retest date. Courses are offered with no more than three students to a class, morning, afternoon or evening, or one-on-one instruction is available. Small groups will be clustered according to similar test scores. Students who pass this July retake of the Algebra 1 EOC exam will not have to take an Intensive Math course in the fall while taking the next level math course during the students sophomore year. Taking two math classes in one year would additionally reduce the number of electives students may take next school year as well. While Wakulla High School is offering the course free to students, it may not t in with some families schedules, so The Learning Curve has this alternative available. The Algebra 1 EOC exam retake will be given at Wakulla High School during the week of July 23. Test results are available at Wakulla High School and students will be noti ed of exam scores on their report cards. Parents may call the high school at 926-7125 to learn of their childs scores. Call The Learning Curve Tutoring Center at 926-2179 for cost and time information. Algebra class available at Wakulla High School By BETH ODONNELLAssistant SuperintendentWakulla High School will offer an Algebra 1 Intensive Math course from June 26 through July 12. The course is free to eligible students and transportation and lunch are provided at no cost. Students in grades eight and nine for the 2011-2012 school year have to pass the Algebra 1 End of Course (EOC) exam in order to earn high school credit for Algebra 1. This is a state requirement for graduation. This course is for students who did not pass the Spring, 2012 Algebra 1 EOC exam. Students with an exceptional education disability may be exempt from passing the EOC if they have shown pro ciency in the course. They would not need to take this review session. The Algebra 1 review course will begin on Tuesday, June 26. There are no Friday classes. Dates for the nine day session are June 26, 27, 28 and July 2, 3, 9, 10, 11, and 12. Students can earn a half credit in Intensive Math if they attend every day. This will be factored into their grade point average (GPA) needed for graduation. The Algebra 1 EOC exam retake will be given at Wakulla High School during the week of July 23. Students who pass this July retake of the Algebra 1 EOC exam will not have to take an Intensive Math course in the fall. Contact Wakulla High School Assistant Principal Sunny Chancy at 926-7125/ sunny.chancy@wcsb.us or Assistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell at 926-0065 or email mary.odonnell@wcsb.us for more information. LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926 or 510 HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET? 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Page 9Asports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach On Saturday, June 4, the Gulf Winds Track Club held its annual Chenoweth Awards presentation in conjunction with the annual Pot Luck Bash 4-mile race held at Phipps Park in north Leon County. These awards are designed to recognize the top high school runners. The award recipients are nominated by the area coaches, with the GWTC Chenoweth Committee making the nal decision on the winners. All of the nalists for the four major awards (top female cross country and track runners and top male cross country and track runners) were recognized, with the overall winners in the four categories receiving $500 scholarships. WHS runners Stanley Linton, Madison Harris and Cora Atkinson were recognized at the awards ceremony. Senior Atkinson was one of the nalists for the Top Female Cross Country Award and was recognized not only for the outstanding times she posted in the 2011 season, including a school record 5K time, being the District Runner-up, qualifying individually for the State Finals and being an integral part of the rst WHS Cross Country team to qualify for State, but also for her leadership on the team as well as her contributions to the development and progression of the cross country program. She has also been an ambassador for the GWTC and placed in the GWTC Grand Prix series in her age group. WHS Senior Stanley Linton was selected as the overall Male Cross Country Runner of the Year and received one of the scholarships! He had an outstanding senior year excelling in both cross country and track. In cross country, he was the District Champion, Regional Runner-up and placed 8th at the State Meet. He followed that with an outstanding track season that included a District Championship at 1600 and 3200 meters, a Regional Championship at 3200 meters and placing 7th at the State Meet at 3200 meters. He was also very active in the GWTC and won numerous local races, including the rst three GWTC races of the year and the Tails and Trails 10K, just after the end of the track season. Linton was also recognized for his team leadership, dedication and being a local advocate for the track club. He also placed in the Grand Prix series in his age group. Sophomore Madison Harris completed the excellent showing by being named the Female Track Athlete of the Year and also earned one of the scholarships. Harris track season included some excellent performances at distances from 400 meters through 1600 meters. In the course of the season she logged school records in the 400 meters, 800 meters, 1600 meters and as the anchor leg on the girls 4x400 meter relay team. She repeated as the District and Regional 800 meter Champion and nished 3rd at the State Meet in the 800 meters. She also won the 800 meters and 1600 meters at the Chiles FreshmanSophomore Championships, setting a meet record in the 1600 meters. Additionally, she placed third in the ultra-competitive 800 meter run at the FSU Invitational. She recorded a season best, and National Elite Time, of 2:15.97 for 800 meters. I couldnt be prouder of this group of athletes, said Coach Paul Hoover. They have all contributed immensely to our program and are quality individuals.Staff ReportThe Wakulla War Eagle football team did well at last weekends 7-on-7 tournament and Big Man Challenge, said Assistant Coach James Vernon. The Wakulla line won the Big Man Challenge on Saturday, June 9, at Valdosta State College, said Vernon. War Eagle Head Coach Scott Klees said he was very pleased and that it was a great start to the summer. Ten schools competed at the tournament, including three from Florida Wakulla and Taylor counties and Crestview. The other teams represented Georgia schools, including the perennial powerhouse Valdosta High School. The Big Man Challenge is a series of events such as medicine ball toss and tug of war that tests the power and strength of linemen. Among the competitors were Wakullas Chris Grif- n, Jonathan Chunn, Chris Damitz, John Cole, Brett Buckridge, Hunter Hurst, Tyrell Garmon, Michael Sarvis, Jerry Jordan, and Daniel Sanders. Griffin and Cole each scored fastest time in an event, while Hurst scored fastest time in two events. The War Eagles also did well in the 7-on-7 tournament, but the team was short-handed because there was also college testing going on that day. So some players were unable to play, said Coach Vernon, because they were taking the SAT or ACT. Still, the War Eagles did well in 7-on-7, Vernon said. There just were not enough guys and they got worn down, he said.FOOTBALL RUNNINGWar Eagles win Big Man Challenge in Valdosta Linton, Harris and Atkinson recognized with awards FILE PHOTOSREGIONAL TITLES: Senior Stanley Linton, above, wins the 3200 meters at Regionals in Jacksonville in April, and sophomore Madi Harris, below, was never seriously challenged in the 800 meters. Linton and Harris were joined by senior Cora Atkinson in being recognized by the Gulf Winds Track Club at an awards ceremony last week. Joey Briggs named to All Big Bend Swim team SWIMMINGStaff ReportCrawfordville resident Joey Briggs was named to the All Big Bend Swim Team this week. Briggs, who attends and swims for Rickards High School, was named Swimmer of the Year, and named to the First Team. Briggs holds the all time Rickards Record in the 50 Freestyle at 21.89, the 100 Free at 47.94, the 200 Free 1:42.50, the 500 Free 4:45.58, the 100 Butterfly 52.72, and the 200 Individual Medley 1:58.54. The Rickards Mens 4 x 50 or 200 Free Relay of Riley Ralston-Crandall, Preston Turnage, Andrew Chen, and Briggs as Anchor holds the Rickards Record of 1:29.60 and was the fastest 200 Free relay in the Big Bend The Rickards Mens 4 x 50 or 200 Medley Relay of Preston TurnageBack, Andrew Chen-Breast, Briggs-Fly, Riley RalstonCrandall Free, holds the Rickards Record of 1:42.47 and also was the fastest 200 Medley relay in the Big Bend. Briggs Medaled at the 2011 1A State Meet earning 6th place in the 200 Freestyle and 15th place in the 100 fly. The 200 Free Relay medaled earning 7th place and the medley relay earned 13th place Briggs was named MVP for the team and won this years High Point award scoring 212 Points for the team. The 2nd place scorer was Riley Ralston Crandall with 173. Briggs practices 24 hours a week. three days a week before school from 5 a.m. to 7 a.m., and every day after school from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., as well as Saturdays from 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. He hopes to get a Division 1 scholarship next year.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBriggs holds the school record in the 100 Butter y. Joey Briggs WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT ADULT SOFTBALL LEAGUEEntry fee is $300 per team Teams must provide their own balls for games. Teams will play two games per night for a total of ten games. Registration Deadline is Friday, June 29th at 5:00 P.M. Rosters and entry fees are due at this time. The league will start the week of July 2nd and run for approximately ve weeks. Game times are 6:45, 8:00 and 9:15 P.M. All games will be played at Medart Recreation Park located off U.S. 98, across the street from Wakulla High School. Mens League and Coed League will probably play on Monday and Tuesday nights. Both leagues might have games on Thursday nights depending on the number of teams that register. Homerun rule for Mens League is 3 and a foul. Homerun rule for Coed League is 3 and an out. Coed League will play with a 12 inch ball. Contact W.C.P.R.D 926-7227 or www.wcprd.com for any additional information. Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR The Wakulla News

PAGE 10

Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsEvery spring from around April 1 to about mid-May, neo-tropics (the songbirds) come pouring out of South and Central America including Mexico and the Caribbean where they have been wintering and enter the U.S. to establish their nesting territories, breed and rear young. This migration at our latitude peaks about mid-April. On April 22, I arranged to be on St. George Island because the conditions to observe migrant songbirds were excellent, and this is why: As these birds y across the Gulf, ideally they hitchhike on the springs warm southly breezes, while migrating mostly to our northern states and Canada to nest. They pour out of these countries into the southern U.S. in such numbers often ocks of individuals are even picked up on Doppler radar. But when a cold front slams through our area and sweeps across the wide open Gulf of Mexico, these birds are literally challenged to survive. In a bad storm they will often burn out of stored energy and perish at sea, sometimes by the thousands, occasionally catastrophic to a species. Nearly all neo-tropics migrate at night and stop brie y as they advance north during the day to feed. But if a cold fronts wind slams into them as they are crossing the Gulf, as soon as they spot land they literally Fall Out of the sky by the hundreds onto the land and its vegetation to feed, as many are near exhaustion and desperately hungry. So a cold front sweeping through our region in April can produce an incredible Fall Out as it is called, and April 22 and 23 had exactly those conditions with winds around 15 to 25 mph, blasting out of the north. I was at the Youth Camp in the St. George Island State Park at dawn and immediately the birds starting pouring in. In just a few hours the 20 to 40 people observing the Fall Out had seen dozens of the ashy Rosebreasted Grosbeaks, Summer and Scarlet Tanagers, Orchard and Baltimore Orioles, Blue Grosbeaks and Indigo Buntings. There were hundreds of Catbirds, and perhaps 50 Ruby-throated Hummingbirds feeding on Coral Bean blossoms as they waited for the north wind to cease. The big attraction though was the warblers, most brilliantly patterned like twighopping butter ies with every combination of ashy colors. The warblers recorded (many which I personally saw) were the Yellow, Prothonotary, Hooded, Parula, Black-throated Blue, Myrtle, Cape May, Magnolia, Tennessee, Blue-winged and Goldenwinged too. We all saw Blackpoll Warblers plus Black and White, Baybreasted, Pine, Black-throated Green, Chestnut-sided and the Blackburnian, whose head nearly glows, the orange is so intense! Palm, Ovenbirds and the Water Thrushes (warblers) were also observed, as well as the Worm-eating, another of the ground feeding warblers, and Common Yellowthroat, Kentucky and dozens of hyperactive orange and black Redstarts. In no time Id seen over 80 species even though I had to leave at 11 a.m. Soon I returned to St. George Island State Parks Youth Camp, plus stopped at the McKissick Point in Carrabelle and checked out the shorebirds at low tide. There I saw the endangered Piping Plover and the threatened Red Knots 75 of them some starting to get their breeding reddish undersides. Overall, I observed about 120 species!The Fall Out of returning songbirdsWakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHBy LES HARRISONWakulla Extension AgentThe 40-day 2012 Gulf of Mexico recreational Red Snapper season began June 1, and ends on July 1. Fishermen are preparing to optimize their catch potential given a bag limit of two snapper per angler per day. Several recent studies indicate the mortality of Red Snapper increased dramatically when they were returned to the Gulf during high summer water temperatures. Complying with size limits or simply trying to catch a bigger sh may have unintended consequences when water temperatures approach the mid-80s. Warmer water usually holds less oxygen. Also warm water often layers above heavier cooler waters creating a thermocline. The result is temperature shock and possibly death for the sh which remains in warmer water too long. Red Snapper populations are considered to be recovering as stocks successfully rebuild and are re ected by the numerous large sh landed. Red Snapper dominate many Gulf of Mexico arti- cial reefs, making an unintended catch quite likely and dif cult to avoid after the bag-limit is reached. Red Snapper populations are considered to be recovering as stocks successfully rebuild. It is encouraging to see numerous large sh at the dock. Though, it is difficult to avoid catching a red snapper after the bag-limit is reached. Some tips and advice from seasoned charter guides and sh researchers can help bring home more sh while minimizing sh mortality during the dog days of summer. First, know the species of fish sought. This will help with correct bait and hook selection. Captain Sonny Schindler of Shore Thing Charters in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, recommends increasing the bait and hook size to catch larger sh. This strategy has been con rmed by research conducted by Will Patterson at the Dauphin Island (Alabama) Sea Lab. Use 12/0 or 15/0 hooks when shing for red snapper during open season, let your tackle help bring home a big one the rst time. Capt. Robbie Fuller of Hatitude in Panama City offers the strategy of changing from live bait to strips of Bonita or squid and shing in shallower water to avoid catching additional red snapper and exceeding the catch limit. Target other sh such as Beeliners or Vermillion Snapper which are plentiful and consistently mild avored. One recent headboat trip limited out on beeliners and brought home nearly 50 pounds of sh per person. Other prized sh include King Mackerel frequently caught while trolling. Black Sea Bass may be caught on different arti cial reef habitat, hook depth, or bait. A slight adjustment to shing techniques will reduce unintended Red Snapper landings and mortality during hot weather, and still get the sherman a full catch. Capt. Fuller also recommends using vacuum freezer bags to extend the sh storage well into the fall and possibly beyond. You can still have Red Snapper this October even if the season closes in July, he said All reef fish released showing signs of a barotraumas, such as oating on the surface, should be properly vented with decompression tool. New shing equipment to aid in recompression and return of sh to cooler, deeper water are coming to market. Current regulations do not require return-todepth tools, but they do not prohibit them either. These new recompression devices can be utilized to aid in sh recovery only after use with a venting tool. For more information visit the website catchandrelease.org or shsmart. org. For more information on Red Snapper regulations, including minimum size and gear rules, visit the FWC snapper regulations page. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA red snapper caught in the Gulf.Tips for the 2012 Recreational red snapper season Linda Price of Shell Point and her husband Byron recently went Spanish Mackerel shing with Alan Lamarche and besides a good mess of Mackerel, Linda caught her rst Cobia. She had to release the Cobia because it was an inch short of legal size. Linda said that Cobia are really fun to catch on light tackle because they never give up. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFirst cobia Golf Gone WILD! A golf tournament and art auction to help injured, orphaned birds and wildlifeJune 16, 2012Come join our golf tournament with CASH PRIZESand an art auction to helpFlorida Wild Mammal Association AND ALSO ENJOY: AND ALSO ENJ O Y : Nature Photography Presentationby John Spohrer telling the stories behind the images of his award-winning work and a preview of images from his new large-format book, The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay. Sponsored by St. James Bay Golf Resort & Forgotten Coast TVFor more information or help registering call Lynne Cooper, Events Coordinator, at 850-697-9507Crooked River GrillA prime rib dinner buffet with all the trimmings and decadent desserts for only $30. AND PLEASE SHARE Interior Remodeling Doors Floors Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling Decks/Barns/Fences Portable, Private, Outdoor ShowersFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS NEW! Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 CA TCH MORE FISH FREE LINE WINDINGwith purchase Made in USA G BUY IN BULK & SAVE B B B B B B B B B B B B B Y Y U Y U Y U Y Y Y Y U U U U U U Y Y Y UY U U UY Y Y UY U Y I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N N B U L K B U L K U L U L K U L L K L & S A V E & S A S A V A VE A VE VE V E BUY IN BULK & SAVE 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD For many of the reading audience, it has been a very wet week. While we all need the rain and are thankful for many, the overwhelming amount of water in such a short time created problems of ooding and damage. However, it is also the unseen that can create problems. As many of you head out on the water, debris from upriver and areas that rarely have water will travel out into heavy traveled areas. We have retrieved fallen trees floating in the middle of the river, large obstructions and other smaller items such as coolers that can be dangerous for boaters who may not see them. Although Navigation Rule 6 was discussed several weeks ago, it addresses situations like this, that boaters must operate at safe speeds to avoid collisions. After storms or heavy rains, the hazards become obstructed and new hazards are created. Caution is a must, after all a boat is roughly 1,000 or more pounds and there are no seat belts or brakes. An abrupt stop can be dangerous and even fatal. In spite of the rain, Auxiliarists are semper paratus, always ready. Larry Kolk attended Marina Day at the Carrabelle Boat Club on Saturday. In addition to providing information on boating safety, Larry was able to talk about the Auxiliary and has several individuals interested in learning more about what we do and how they may t into the Auxiliary. As many of you know, we are also working hard to re-establish the Auxiliarys presence in the CarrabelleApalachicola-St. George area. In addition, he also had a nice visit with two FWC of cers and the manager of the Boat Club. One final note, the excessive rains are a great reminder that we are of- cially into the Hurricane season. Last week, all of you received in The Wakulla News a hurricane preparedness guide as part of preparedness week. The National Hurricane Center reminds all of us that history teaches that a lack of hurricane awareness and preparation are common threads among all major hurricane disasters. By knowing your vulnerability and what actions you should take, you can reduce the effects of a hurricane disaster. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Neither is coming out ahead in a bad storm: Be aware and be prepared! Nobility. There is nobility when people work toward a common cause, and shame when they seek con ict as resolution to differences. In this column I have tried to document when people came together to build our counties arti cial reefs, the Underwater Crime Scene Investigation Protocols, the Academic Diving Program at FSU and even a protective sh community nested on a patch reef in the ocean. I will continue to report on such activities, provide historic perspective and some humor I hope, in anticipation of the day when we can all recognize the contributions of everyone to the preservation and wise exploitation of our beautiful Wakulla County. I am a marine biologist by profession. My passion is science, the observation of creatures, including humans, and in particular, occupants of the aquatic realm. Since retirement from FSU, I have continued teaching the technology that permits humans to spend great amounts of time underwater. In the last two years I have also become an investor, purchasing the resources that enables us to spend quality time underwater. As an investor in this county, I have become more aware of the economic plight facing us all. Rather than sit back and ignore our plight, I support the preservation and wise exploitation of our resources such as water, forest and clean air, the very reasons I chose to raise a family here. When I moved to this area in the mid 70s, we already had identi ed the sinkholes of Wakulla as prime recreation, training and research sites. I met and began a long relationship with Ken McDonald of the Tallahassee Police Department because of the number of cars and other stolen property our students reported. This was back when Wakulla Springs belonged to Ed Ball, and Cherokee was the very popular public weekend swimming hole. During the summer, families would bring their dogs, kids and air mattresses, complete with drinks, to oat out in that cool sink. On weekdays we surveyed the oor, and trained for research held elsewhere, such as the Antarctic, Palau and the Florida Keys. Then Wakulla Springs was purchased by the State of Florida. With the later purchase of local sinkholes by the park, in an attempt to protect them from illegal dumping and their water from pollution, public use was curtailed, driving us out of the county to the east (Mayo and High Springs area), and the west (Marianna and Ponce de Leon area). Several years ago, the Wakulla County Dive Club formed around a preservation and safety mandate to re-open dive sites to the public. And two years ago they and others began the campaign to open Wakulla Springs to diving. This week, a new dive shop reportedly called Cave Connections, will open in Wakulla County in anticipation of increased cave diving revenue. And where am I in all of this? I anticipate that I will be writing about the noble story of Wakulla Countys public recovery and continued protection of its water resources from the deck of my sailboat in the next few years.From FWC NewsPatrol, protect, preserve. The motto for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions Division of Law Enforcement was on the minds of 22 new of cers Friday when they graduated as the FWCs 18th of cer class. At a ceremony at the Florida Public Safety Institute, near Tallahassee, they pledged their efforts to patrol Floridas lands and waters and protect and preserve its people and resources. Col. Jim Brown, director of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement, mentioned how FWC of cers are the rst point of contact most people have with the agency. This privilege carries great responsibility, Brown said. As they interact with the public, I know these new of cers will uphold our values: integrity, professionalism, dedication and adaptability. As FWC officers, they will patrol Floridas lands nearly 54,000 square miles of it as well as more than 12,000 square miles of water. Due to their jurisdiction and specialized training and equipment, they are often the rst to be able to respond to boating accidents, missing boaters and lost campers, hikers and hunters. In 2011, FWC officers saved nearly 900 people during search-and-rescue missions. These of cers will be protecting the Fishing Capital of the World and one of the largest public hunting systems in the country, said FWC Chairman Kathy Barco, the guest speaker at the ceremony. The new officers began their training in December. The beginning part of each FWC academy teaches recruits basic law enforcement techniques and skills. During the nal eight weeks of each academy, we focus on the unique information and skills it takes to be an FWC of cer, Brown said. The specialized training involves rearms pro ciency, wildlife identi cation, vessel operation, defensive tactics, all-terrain vehicle operation, detection for boating and driving under the in uence and a focus on state and federal wildlife, sheries and environmental laws. The new officers will spend the next three months with a eld-training of cer and are assigned to the following counties: Oliver Adams Monroe; Megan Aswall Martin; Randall Bibler Monroe; Adam Bunker Miami-Dade; Jacob Cocke DeSoto; John Conlin Monroe; Jeremy Deweese Okeechobee; Sebastian Dri Monroe; Matthew Grif s Nassau; Bryan Little Miami-Dade; Justin C. Miller St. Johns; Justin W. Miller Glades; Domingo Montalvo-Diaz Miami-Dade; Gregory Patterson Highlands; Paige Pestka Miami-Dade; David Read Broward; Nicole Rodriguez Broward; Wayne Sapp St. Lucie; Taylor Tison Glades; Marcin Trawinski Palm Beach; Joshua Troiano Monroe; and Clint Williams Hernando.22 new FWC officers are sworn-in FWC PHOTONew Wildlife Of cers are sworn-in last week. Swallow-Tailed Kites by George WeymouthA Giclee Non-Fading, Signed & Numbered Call George Weymouth To Order Shipping Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Jun 14, 12 Fri Jun 15, 12 Sat Jun 16, 12 Sun Jun 17, 12 Mon Jun 18, 12 Tue Jun 19, 12 Wed Jun 20, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 12:57 AM 2.8 ft. 1:42 AM 3.0 ft. 2:20 AM 3.1 ft. 2:56 AM 3.2 ft. 3:29 AM 3.3 ft. 4:02 AM High 1.8 ft. 4:34 AM 1.9 ft. 5:33 AM 1.8 ft. 6:25 AM 1.8 ft. 7:10 AM 1.7 ft. 7:50 AM 1.6 ft. 8:29 AM 1.5 ft. 9:07 AM Low 3.2 ft. 11:05 AM 3.4 ft. 11:55 AM 3.5 ft. 12:38 PM 3.6 ft. 1:16 PM 3.8 ft. 1:50 PM 3.9 ft. 2:23 PM 3.9 ft. 2:56 PM High 0.6 ft. 6:32 PM 0.4 ft. 7:19 PM 0.1 ft. 7:59 PM -0.0 ft. 8:35 PM -0.1 ft. 9:08 PM -0.2 ft. 9:38 PM -0.3 ft. 10:07 PM Low Thu Jun 14, 12 Fri Jun 15, 12 Sat Jun 16, 12 Sun Jun 17, 12 Mon Jun 18, 12 Tue Jun 19, 12 Wed Jun 20, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 12:54 AM 2.9 ft. 1:39 AM 3.1 ft. 2:17 AM 3.2 ft. 2:53 AM 3.3 ft. 3:26 AM 3.4 ft. 3:59 AM High 2.0 ft. 4:31 AM 2.0 ft. 5:30 AM 2.0 ft. 6:22 AM 1.9 ft. 7:07 AM 1.8 ft. 7:47 AM 1.7 ft. 8:26 AM 1.6 ft. 9:04 AM Low 3.3 ft. 11:02 AM 3.4 ft. 11:52 AM 3.6 ft. 12:35 PM 3.7 ft. 1:13 PM 3.8 ft. 1:47 PM 3.9 ft. 2:20 PM 4.0 ft. 2:53 PM High 0.7 ft. 6:29 PM 0.4 ft. 7:16 PM 0.2 ft. 7:56 PM -0.0 ft. 8:32 PM -0.1 ft. 9:05 PM -0.2 ft. 9:35 PM -0.3 ft. 10:04 PM Low Thu Jun 14, 12 Fri Jun 15, 12 Sat Jun 16, 12 Sun Jun 17, 12 Mon Jun 18, 12 Tue Jun 19, 12 Wed Jun 20, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 12:35 AM 2.5 ft. 1:33 AM 2.6 ft. 2:18 AM 2.8 ft. 2:56 AM 2.9 ft. 3:32 AM 3.0 ft. 4:05 AM 3.1 ft. 4:38 AM High 1.7 ft. 5:38 AM 1.7 ft. 6:37 AM 1.7 ft. 7:29 AM 1.6 ft. 8:14 AM 1.5 ft. 8:54 AM 1.5 ft. 9:33 AM 1.4 ft. 10:11 AM Low 3.0 ft. 11:41 AM 3.1 ft. 12:31 PM 3.3 ft. 1:14 PM 3.4 ft. 1:52 PM 3.5 ft. 2:26 PM 3.6 ft. 2:59 PM 3.7 ft. 3:32 PM High 0.6 ft. 7:36 PM 0.3 ft. 8:23 PM 0.1 ft. 9:03 PM -0.0 ft. 9:39 PM -0.1 ft. 10:12 PM -0.2 ft. 10:42 PM -0.2 ft. 11:11 PM Low Thu Jun 14, 12 Fri Jun 15, 12 Sat Jun 16, 12 Sun Jun 17, 12 Mon Jun 18, 12 Tue Jun 19, 12 Wed Jun 20, 12 Date 2.0 ft. 12:49 AM 2.1 ft. 1:34 AM 2.2 ft. 2:12 AM 2.3 ft. 2:48 AM 2.4 ft. 3:21 AM 2.5 ft. 3:54 AM High 1.3 ft. 4:45 AM 1.4 ft. 5:44 AM 1.3 ft. 6:36 AM 1.3 ft. 7:21 AM 1.2 ft. 8:01 AM 1.2 ft. 8:40 AM 1.1 ft. 9:18 AM Low 2.4 ft. 10:57 AM 2.5 ft. 11:47 AM 2.6 ft. 12:30 PM 2.7 ft. 1:08 PM 2.8 ft. 1:42 PM 2.9 ft. 2:15 PM 3.0 ft. 2:48 PM High 0.5 ft. 6:43 PM 0.3 ft. 7:30 PM 0.1 ft. 8:10 PM -0.0 ft. 8:46 PM -0.1 ft. 9:19 PM -0.2 ft. 9:49 PM -0.2 ft. 10:18 PM Low Thu Jun 14, 12 Fri Jun 15, 12 Sat Jun 16, 12 Sun Jun 17, 12 Mon Jun 18, 12 Tue Jun 19, 12 Wed Jun 20, 12 Date 2.1 ft. 12:41 AM 2.2 ft. 1:26 AM 2.3 ft. 2:04 AM 2.4 ft. 2:40 AM 2.5 ft. 3:13 AM 2.6 ft. 3:46 AM High 1.8 ft. 4:13 AM 1.8 ft. 5:12 AM 1.8 ft. 6:04 AM 1.7 ft. 6:49 AM 1.7 ft. 7:29 AM 1.6 ft. 8:08 AM 1.5 ft. 8:46 AM Low 2.5 ft. 10:49 AM 2.6 ft. 11:39 AM 2.7 ft. 12:22 PM 2.8 ft. 1:00 PM 2.9 ft. 1:34 PM 3.0 ft. 2:07 PM 3.1 ft. 2:40 PM High 0.6 ft. 6:11 PM 0.4 ft. 6:58 PM 0.1 ft. 7:38 PM -0.0 ft. 8:14 PM -0.1 ft. 8:47 PM -0.2 ft. 9:17 PM -0.3 ft. 9:46 PM Low Thu Jun 14, 12 Fri Jun 15, 12 Sat Jun 16, 12 Sun Jun 17, 12 Mon Jun 18, 12 Tue Jun 19, 12 Wed Jun 20, 12 Date 1.9 ft. 1:01 AM 2.1 ft. 2:24 AM 2.3 ft. 3:16 AM 2.4 ft. 3:54 AM 2.5 ft. 4:25 AM 2.5 ft. 4:53 AM 2.6 ft. 5:19 AM High 1.5 ft. 3:18 AM 1.7 ft. 4:17 AM 1.8 ft. 5:18 AM 1.8 ft. 6:13 AM 1.9 ft. 7:00 AM 1.8 ft. 7:43 AM 1.8 ft. 8:23 AM Low 2.8 ft. 9:57 AM 2.9 ft. 10:31 AM 2.9 ft. 11:09 AM 2.9 ft. 11:48 AM 3.0 ft. 12:29 PM 3.0 ft. 1:12 PM 3.0 ft. 1:55 PM High 0.0 ft. 5:50 PM -0.1 ft. 6:37 PM -0.3 ft. 7:20 PM -0.3 ft. 7:58 PM -0.3 ft. 8:34 PM -0.3 ft. 9:05 PM -0.3 ft. 9:33 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJune 7 June 13First June 26 Full July 3 Last July 10 New June 19Major Times 9:46 AM 11:46 AM 10:09 PM 12:09 AM Minor Times 3:03 AM 4:03 AM 4:32 PM 5:32 PM Major Times 10:31 AM 12:31 PM 10:54 PM 12:54 AM Minor Times 3:39 AM 4:39 AM 5:26 PM 6:26 PM Major Times 11:18 AM 1:18 PM 11:41 PM 1:41 AM Minor Times 4:18 AM 5:18 AM 6:18 PM 7:18 PM Major Times --:---:-12:05 PM 2:05 PM Minor Times 5:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:11 PM 8:11 PM Major Times 12:30 AM 2:30 AM 12:54 PM 2:54 PM Minor Times 5:47 AM 6:47 AM 8:00 PM 9:00 PM Major Times 1:19 AM 3:19 AM 1:44 PM 3:44 PM Minor Times 6:36 AM 7:36 AM 8:48 PM 9:48 PM Major Times 2:09 AM 4:09 AM 2:34 PM 4:34 PM Minor Times 7:30 AM 8:30 AM 9:32 PM 10:32 PM Average Average Good Better Best Best Better++++6:35 am 8:39 pm 3:04 am 4:34 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:35 am 8:40 pm 3:40 am 5:27 pm 6:35 am 8:40 pm 4:19 am 6:20 pm 6:35 am 8:40 pm 5:01 am 7:11 pm 6:35 am 8:41 pm 5:48 am 8:02 pm 6:36 am 8:41 pm 6:38 am 8:49 pm 6:36 am 8:41 pm 7:31 am 9:33 pm32% 26% 20% 14% 8% 2% 4% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

PAGE 12

Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, June 11 Criminal justice experts say they werent surprised by last weeks study showing that the time Florida prisoners spend behind bars has grown more than in any other state a 166 percent increase in the average sentence between 1990 and 2009. Former Department of Corrections Secretary James McDonough ascribed the ndings of the report, Time Served: The High Cost, Low Return of Longer Prison Terms by the Pew Center on the States to changes in Florida statutes during the mid-to-late 1990s. He cited 1995s Truth in Sentencing law, requiring inmates to serve at least 85 percent of their sentences, and two 1999 laws: Three Strikes, by which a third felony conviction requires a minimum sentence of 25 years to life if someone is injured or killed, and 0-20-Life, which established mandatory minimum sentences for crimes involving rearms. Politics in Florida has been such that public of- cials are afraid to appear, quote, weak on crime, McDonough said. And the way thats de- ned is, Dont lighten up on the sentencing in any way whatsoever. He said the states prison terms jumped so much, so fast because in 1990, Florida inmates were serving just 30 percent of their sentences. We had prison overcrowding at that time, so we came up with a parole policy and a probation policy that really let a lot of inmates out much, much too early, McDonough said. So the pendulum had swung one way. And then throughout the 90s and the last ten years, we saw the pendulum swing the other way. So you came up with a series of laws and policies that brought us up to this incredible increase in length of stay. The states position is that such laws have reduced crime immensely. Tough-on-crime initiatives have successfully reversed the lenient and disastrous criminal-justice policies of the early 1990s in Florida that caused so much suffering, notes the DOC web site. Thanks to the dedication of our states law enforcement of cers, correctional of cers and state prosecutors who enforce tough laws like 10-20-LIFE, Floridas Index Crime rate was the lowest in 34 years and the violent crime rate is the lowest in a quarter century. Crime has been dropping for decades, but Floridas inmate population has risen by a factor of ve over 30 years, during which time the general population has barely doubled. As of June 30, 1990, Florida prisons housed 42,733 offenders; by June 30, 2011, the gure was 102,319. During the period examined by the study, Florida sentences for violent crimes increased from 2.1 years to 5 years, or 137 percent, while drugrelated sentences rose 194 percent, from an average of 0.8 years to 2.3 years. The 166 percent increase in the average prison sentence cost Florida taxpayers $1.4 billion in 2009, according to Pew. Meanwhile, most states have embraced the concept of smart justice, said prison chaplain Allison DeFoor, a former judge and sheriff. Smart justice is a compendium of performance measures, accountability and transparency designed to keep inmates from returning to prison after their release, DeFoor said. Fully one-third of Florida offenders return to prison within ve years, DeFoor said. Thats not an ef cient systemWe talk about recidivism like its an intellectual concept. Well, every new [act of] recidivism is somebodys grandmothers house got broken into or their car got jacked. Floridas smart justice proponents have tried, for instance, to reduce sentences for nonviolent offenders. Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale, repeatedly sponsored a measure that would have ended mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenders, who would remain in custody during the rehabilitation portion of their sentences. She said many addicts have mental health issues that cause them to self-medicate, and that with treatment, they can become taxpayers instead of inmates. But while the Senate passed Bogdanoffs bill 40-0 and the House 112-4, Gov. Rick Scott vetoed the measure, saying it would be an injustice to victims. Justice to victims of crime is not served when a criminal is permitted to be released early from a sentence imposed by the courts, he wrote in his veto message. This bill would permit criminals to be released after serving 50 percent of their sentences, thus creating an unwarranted exception to the rule that inmates serve 85 percent of their imposed sentences, Scott wrote. As to the Pew study, DOC spokeswoman Ann Howard said the agency wasnt involved in the research, so we will refrain from comment out of respect and etiquette to the researchers. The departments only role is to execute the court orders, added DOC spokeswoman Jo Ellyn Rackleff. The judges apply the sentences according to Florida statutes, which are passed by the Legislature. Pew examined nonviolent offenders released in 2004, concluding that 14 percent of all offenders released in Florida could have served shorter sentences with no threat to public safety. DeFoor said the most important thing about the study is that it measures the evidence. Its ultimately got to be about accountability, he said. We need to be driven by the data, not by emotional reactions on either side, DeFoor said.Continued from Page 6A Also, in my fathers country baseball was a national sport not a business. I am not quite sure when it became a business but my father never thought it was. He often took me to the ball eld on a Saturday afternoon to have fun, enjoy the game and eat the worlds most delicious hotdog. At least he said they were the worlds most delicious hotdogs. Our purpose in going was just to have fun. He did his share of making fun and harassing the other teams fans but it never crossed his mind to physically beat one of them nearly to death. If I remember correctly, wedgies were the order of the day. When our team won we celebrated and highfived everybody around us. When our team lost, we determined with everything within us to slaughter them the next week on the field. When we said slaughter, we were talking guratively. Credit was something my fathers generation frowned on. As a young person, I had in my mind to buy a bicycle. I took my father to the store to look at that prized bike. Well, my father stammered, as he looked the bike over. How much money youve got saved for this bike? I knew the lecture that was to follow. If you could not afford to buy something, you could not afford to have it. How many times have I heard that? Perhaps if my father could come back for a day we could send him to Washington, D.C. and explain to them this whole idea that if you cannot afford something you cannot afford something. It seemed to make sense to me and I was only I young person at the time. I guess when you get older you lose a lot of that good common sense. The verse of Scripture that was very important to my father was, And let the beauty of the LORD our God be upon us: and establish thou the work of our hands upon us; yea, the work of our hands establish thou it (Psalms 90:17 KJV). It may not be the same country my father loved, but I can still operate on the same principles that made him a patriotic father, and pray, Establish thou the work of our hands. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. Margaret Louise Floyd Poole, 91, passed away June 5, in Bainbridge, Ga. She was a native of Jefferson County. She was a member of numerous military support volunteer and civic organizations. She was a member the First United Methodist Church in Monticello and later Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church in Panacea. No services are planned at this time. She is survived by one daughter, Susan Wright (Brian) of Bainbridge, Ga.; and one grandson, Thomas Justus Wright. She was predeceased by her husband, Burton Thomas Poole; and a daughter, Jane Louise Poole.Its not my fathers world anymore ObituariesContinued from Page 6AMargaret Louise Floyd Poole Andrew Andy Lawrence RobertsAndrew Andy Lawrence Roberts, 75, of Sopchoppy, passed away Saturday, June 9. He passed away at home surrounded by his wife of 52 years, Christel Nowek Roberts, and his loving family. He was born in Dellwood, and had lived in this area 26 years coming from Lake City. He worked for the Florida Highway Patrol and was a retired entomologist and owner of Three Rivers Pest Control. He served in the U.S. Army. He was a deacon at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church. He was a Mason at Ashmore Masonic Lodge in Sopchoppy, and a Marzuq Shriner of Tallahassee. He loved to y his plane, sh, garden and sing in the choir. Family received friends, Tuesday, June 12, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church in Sopchoppy. Services were held Wednesday, June 13, at 10 a.m. at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. He is also survived by three daughters, Tina Bryan (Donnie) and Kathy Barrs (Mark), both of Lake City, FL and Tammy Lary (Ed) of Crawfordville, FL; ve brothers, Guy Hudson, Herbert Roberts, Wayne Roberts, Walter Roberts and Tommy Roberts; four grandchildren, Allison Feagle (Ryan), Cody Barrs (Whitney), Chase Barrs and Kyle Burnsed; and three great-grandchildren, Austin and Shelbie Feagle and Triston Burnsed. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements (850926-3333 or www.bevisfh.com).Minimum-mandatories have meant longer prison terms JUNE 201217 Fathers Day Subscribe Now 10 Months for $ 20 12New Subscribers Only! Honor your Dad today by giving him a gift subscription to The Wakulla News! SALE ENDS JUNE 30, 2012 Happy Fathers Day $ 20.12Mail or bring coupon with payment to Offer good for Wakulla County subscribers only.All major credit cards accepted. Offer expires 6/30/2012NAME _____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ CITY ________________ZIP __________________________ PHONE _________________ NEWNEW SUBSCRIBERS Call us toll free at 1-877-401-6408 Panhandle PizzaLocated Across from Ace Hardware Crawfordville850745-8797 open Mon-Sat We slice our own Turkey, Ham & Salami Fresh Cut Vegetables all on a French Hogie Roll Subs and SaladsNEW!W n bt LOVE n!$600 MEDIUMPepperoni PIZZAas many as you wantexpires 7/8 one per customerexpires 7/8/12TAKE & BAKE1/2 OFFANY SUBORSALAD Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate r i s Crawfordville (850) 926-2700 Also Now Open in Tallahassee Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Page 13Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn May 31, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a traf c crash on U.S. Highway 319 near Wal-Mart involving injuries and road blockage. Jose Manuel Alvarez-Cantor, 26, of Crawfordville was driving an Isuzu Rodeo when he struck the back of a Hyundai Santa Fe driven by Michael R. Zink, 54, of Normal, Ill. A passenger in the Hyundai, Doris J. Zink, 64, of Normal, Ill., suffered injuries in the crash. The Zinks were stopped for a construction crew when their vehicle was struck from behind by a vehicle traveling 60 miles per hour. Deputy Zimba investigated the case as a DUI along with Deputy Nick Gray. Alvarez-Cantor was charged with DUI with serious bodily injury and found at fault for the traf c crash. He did not possess a valid driver license. Damage to the Isuzu was estimated at $7,000 and damage to the Hyundai was estimated at $4,000. AlvarezCantor had a passenger in his vehicle, Carmona De La Cruz-Rodrigo, 22, of Crawfordville, who was not injured. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On May 30, Freeman D. Ashmore of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief to his Crawfordville property after a chain link fence was found with a hole in it. The victim repaired the damage which was estimated at $50. On May 30, Earnest Schimkat of Crawfordville reported the theft of a large sum of money. A person of interest has been identi- ed. On May 30, James Ward of St. Marks reported the grand theft of work tools. The tools are valued at $1,250 and a suspect has been identi ed. On May 30, Robert Miller of Crawfordville reported the theft of an advertising sign. The sign advertised a septic business on Mike Stewart Drive. The sign was valued at $150. On May 31, Randall Mauney of Carrabelle and Snarr Enterprises reported a felony criminal mischief on Apalachicola Forest Road 350. A tractor used to maintain roads in the forest was damaged. Pellet holes were observed in the radiator. Damage is estimated at $1,000. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On May 31, Robert Baker of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at T-n-T Canoe Rental. A canoe, valued at $400, was stolen from the establishment along with a $200 paddle. The canoe and paddle were recovered and suspects were observed leaving the area. On May 31, Kevin Parsons of Crawfordville reported the theft of a wheelbarrow and a yard cart valued at $200. A person of interest has been identi ed. On May 31, Merritt Taylor of Panacea reported a grand theft of jewelry and cash, valued at $400. Additional victims included Robert Keith and Thea Cruse, both of Panacea. A suspect has been identi ed. On June 1, the WCSO Narcotics Unit served a search warrant at 30 KCL Road in Crawfordville. The warrant was served as a result of an ongoing narcotics investigation involving the sale of crack cocaine and marijuana. Several undercover purchases of illegal narcotics were conducted during the investigation. A suspect has been identi ed and 2.7 grams of crack cocaine, drug paraphernalia, two firearms and three marijuana plants were recovered. The rearms and contraband were seized as evidence. The suspect will be charged with possession of cocaine, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a rearm with altered or removed serial number and cultivation of marijuana. Additional arrests are anticipated. On June 1, Phillip Small of St. Marks reported a grand theft of a trailer from Crawfordville. The trailer is valued at $1,100 and was entered into the NCIC/FCIC computer. The trailer is owned by Charlene Small. On June 1, Joseph Koszela of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim led his tax return and discovered that someone had already submitted a return using his information. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. On June 1, Teresa Hatler of Tallahassee reported a residential burglary in Crawfordville. The air conditioning unit was reported missing and damage was created to the interior of the home where wiring was stolen. The home is owned by Wells Fargo Bank and the loss was estimated at $12,100. On June 1, Suzan Knutson of Crawfordville reported a traffic crash. As the victim was stopped in traf c on U.S. Highway 319 heading southbound, she was struck by a vehicle behind her. The vehicle, a Ford Taurus, went around her and left the scene. On June 2, Deputy Cole Wells investigated a noise complaint on Moody Lane in Crawfordville. He observed a large gathering of individuals drinking out of plastic cups. As Deputy Wells approached, many of the individuals walked away into a wooded area. Juveniles were turned over to legal guardians and alcohol that was gathered from the party and disposed of. On June 2, a retail theft was reported at Wal-Mart after a person allegedly walked out of the garden center without paying for a buggy full of merchandise. The suspect left the scene in a 1990s model Toyota Corolla. The stolen items were valued at an estimated $450 and included clothing, two garden trees, a box fan and craft basket. A vehicle BOLO was sent to Leon County. On June 2, a 15-year-old Panacea juvenile reported a vehicle burglary at Wakulla High School. During graduation at WHS someone stole the victims glasses, valued at $200. On June 2, Martha Haynes of Crawfordville reported the theft of her mailbox. The Florida Gator mailbox was stolen from the post. It is valued at $100. On June 2, John Harley of Sopchoppy reported a criminal mischief. The victim was boating on the Sopchoppy River and left his vehicle unattended near Mount Beasor Bridge. Someone smashed out the rear window. The window was valued at $150. On June 3, Jamie Yeomans of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at Dux Discount Liquors. A suspect, who was identi ed, kicked the victims vehicle while an altercation was underway in the parking lot. On June 4, Roxanne Gilbert of Crawfordville reported a business burglary at Just Fruits and Exotics. A forced entry was discovered and cash was removed from the building. Damage to the establishment was estimated at $100. On June 4, Leonard Crum of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a boat motor. The motor, battery and battery cable were valued at $520. On June 4, Curtis Mixon of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone attempted to create a charge on the victims bank account. A total of $139 was removed from the victims account. On June 4, James T. Langston of Sopchoppy reported a fraud as someone opened an account and charged more than $700 using his personal information. A suspect has been identi ed. On June 4, John Anderton of Panacea reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of copper wire and pipes from his residence. The copper plumbing and wiring in the remodeled home is valued at $7,050. On June 4, Heather Lane of Crawfordville reported the theft of personal items also owned by Anthony McNeal and Robert McNeal, both of Crawfordville. Lanes purse was stolen at the County Line Bar and it contained $190 worth of property belonging to all three victims. One of the victims credit cards had been used after the theft. On June 4, Harry Raker of Hosford reported a grand theft of his mothers two air conditioning units and appliances, valued at $1,300. The residence of Josephine Raker in Crawfordville was being rented at the time of the theft and a suspect has been identi ed. On June 4, Thomas Chr istopher Carnline, 39, of Crawfordville was stopped by Deputy Stephen Simmons for having an expired tag. Carnline did not have a valid driver license and was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked. Carnline had two previous DWLSR and was charged with felony DWLSR. On June 5, Armando Perez of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims vehicle window was damaged while he was inside Winn-Dixie. The damage appeared to have been done with a st and created $500 worth of damage. On June 5, Erika Hedl of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim noticed a $287 charge on her bank account from the Hollister Company. On June 5, Angel Rowe of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A television and electronic games, valued at $2,400, were reported stolen. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On June 5, Randy Revell of Panacea reported a theft. A tree stand, valued at $275, was reported missing. Persons of interest were identified. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. On June 6, James Buchanan Barnes, 47, of Crawfordville was arrested for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia after Deputy Mike Zimba allegedly observed him driving recklessly in a construction zone. Deputy Zimba reportedly observed the motorist run over ve road cones and failed to stop. A traffic stop was conducted by Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Gibby Gibson in the Riversink area and marijuana and paraphernalia were allegedly discovered inside the vehicle. Three grams of marijuana were discovered. On June 6, Don Ford of Tallahassee reported a grand theft in Crawfordville. A rental property owned by Bob Teel was discovered open and several items were stolen from inside. Furniture and appliances, valued at $7,950, were reported missing. Suspects have been identi ed. Deputy Scott Rojas and Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. On June 6, Zacherie Oaks of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. An electronic game system, valued at $198, was reported missing. Deputy Joe Page investigated. On June 7, Christy Garrett of Crawfordville reported a structure re. A grease re was reported on the stove. The victim poured water on the grease re and increased the ames. She attempted to throw the pan outside but burned her hand. She was treated by EMS staff at the scene. A microwave and cabinet, valued at $250, were damaged. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. On June 7, Rodney Smith of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim received information about owing $3,400 on a past due phone bill. The victim didnt know anything about the telephone or the bill. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,140 calls for service during the past week including 25 residential and business alarms; 117 citizen contacts; 13 disturbances; 39 abandoned E-911 cell calls; 10 abandoned E-911 calls; 26 regular E-911 calls; 60 investigations; 11 loud music/noise complaints; 72 medical emergencies; 280 security checks; 29 special details; 20 subpoena services; 12 suspicious people; 17 suspicious vehicles; 12 thefts; 17 traffic crashes; 75 traf c enforcements; 55 traffic stops; 10 trespassing complaints; 19 reckless vehicles; and 10 wanted people.Sheri s Report Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for qualied applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and oor rate of 2.5% 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) 10AM (TUE-FRI) HAIR SALON FREE HAIRCUT FEATHER LOCKS are here!!FULL SERVICE FAMILY SALON Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

PAGE 14

Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com JACK DELAUTER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSunrise in Panacea Sunrise in PanaceaBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netTo speed up the site plans approval process for smaller projects, the Wakulla County Commission voted to allow more to be approved by county staff. The commission voted four to one, with Commissioner Lynn Artz opposing, to increase the threshold for review of site plans by the Planning Commission and the Wakulla County Commission to 10,000 square feet of building space and parking area to more than 20,000 square feet of building oor area. Those projects that are less than 20,000 square feet will be reviewed by the countys Technical Review Committee, which is made up of staff from the Building Department, Fire Department, Emergency Management, Planning Department, Public Works, Health Department and School Board. These projects would then be approved by the Planning and Community Development Department. Commissioner Randy Merritt said it is the commissions job to make regulations and not make individual decisions for development projects. Planning Commissioner Chuck Hess said he understood wanting to speed up the process, but felt the size limit was too high. In other news: The commission agreed to remove the rumble strips on Rehwinkle Road. Commissioner Mike Stewart brought the item forward after hearing from numerous residents who have complained about the noise. Commissioner Alan Brock said the strips were put in place to make sure people stop at the stop sign. The commission voted unanimously to remove the rumble strips. Deputy County Administrator Tim Barden gave the commission an update on the controversial House Bill 5301. The new law deals with state Medicaid billing and changes the way each countys contribution is collected. Barden said the new bill is moving forward. Barden said county staff advocated for a meeting to clear up the overpayment which needs to be done before Aug. 1. He added that the Agency for Health Care Administration is allowing the county a one time review of addresses from the overdue payments so they can be veri ed. Barden said they also expressed the desire for AHCA to be more stringent about what addresses are allowed. For future Medicaid billing, the state will withhold a portion of the countys revenue sharing and onecent sales tax distributions. Instead of receiving a bill, the county will receive a statement of what was taken out. Barden said they asked that the county be able to use the revenue source of its choosing. Also on the agenda was an item requesting approval to donate surplus re trucks to the Tallahassee Chapter of Guardians of the Ribbon Organization Inc. This organization takes re trucks and paints them pink to raise awareness for cancer. Chief Michael Morgan brought the item forward. The next county commission meeting will be held June 18 at 5 p.m.Board will allow site plans to be approved by staff Expert physicians.Quality medical care.Ofce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comFamily Practice Accepting new patients X-Ray Services Pediatric patients 2 yrs. & older Offering specialty care: Capital Regional Cardiology Associates 850-877-0216 Capital Regional Medical Group Podiatry Services 850-878-8235 Capital Regional Surgical Associates 850-219-2306 Robert Frable, DO Aida Torres, ARNPCRAWFORDVILLE

PAGE 15

Green Scene How can businesses minimize impacts?EarthTalk, Page 10B Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012Welcome to the Florida summer! Feeling the heat? No pool to cool off in? Running your air conditioner and then feeling blue when the bill arrives? Lets review some basics in energy-ef cient use of your air conditioner. Perhaps you and your family could make some small changes that could result in money being saved. QUICK FACTS Did you know: Heating, ventilation and air conditioning accounts for more than 40 percent of your utility bill. For every degree setting below 78 degrees, you spend up to 8 percent more in cooling costs. Upgrading your system can reduce your air conditioning costs by a signi cant amount. Is it time to consider doing so? Short-term solutions to improve the ef ciency of your existing system include: Set your thermostat at 78 degrees or higher. Use bath and kitchen fans sparingly when the air conditioner is operating. Inspect and clean both the indoor and outdoor coils. The indoor coil in your air conditioner acts as a magnet for dust because it is constantly wetted during the cooling season. Dirt build-up on the indoor coil is the single most common cause of poor efficiency. The outdoor coil must also be checked periodically for dirt build-up and cleaned if necessary. Shade east and west window. Delay heat-generating activities, such as dishwashing and drying clothes in a clothes dryer, until the evening on hot days. Over most of the cooling season, keep the house closed tight during the day. Try not to use a dehumidifier at the same time your air conditioner is operating. It increases the cooling load and forces the air conditioner to work harder. Consider installing ceiling fans to circulate the air more effectively. The improved circulation will make you feel cooler. Install a programmable thermostat. You can then schedule the time blocks during which your heating or air-conditioning system operates. As a result, you can set the equipment to more economical settings such as lower temperatures in winter while you are asleep or when you are away from home. Choose one that can store and repeat multiple daily settings, so that you can have both a workday and a weekend heating and cooling time table. We have such great resources from our UF/IFAS Specialists available to you. This article was adapted from an EDIS (Electronic Data Information Source) through the website www. edis.ifas.u .edu. Request the Brochure Number FCS3262. The publication includes information on terms to understanding that are used in the industry, how to purchase a new unit, and questions that you should be prepared to ask and answer when working with a HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning) representative. Request the brochure today or give me a call at (850) 926-3931 and I will see that you obtain one. By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Energy efficient use of air conditioning Net-zero home being built by Crawfordville construction rmSpecial to The NewsCrawfordville-based Rock Solid Design & Construction is building a net-zero home in Tallahassee that will have a total of more than 16,000 square feet of living space, but should have a monthly energy bill of $0 or even a credit. Construction for this unique custom home for Dr. Jeremy and Martha Cummings is well underway and generating quite a buzz in the Tallahassee area. The home consists of 3,301 square feet of heated and cooled living space with a 3,500 square foot basement below it, and 883 square feet of bonus space built into the trusses above the main oor. One of the truly unique features of the home is an underground tunnel connecting the basement to the large garage (which has another 2,269 square foot bonus room above it). With the covered porches accounted for as well, the total under roof square footage is over 16,000 square feet. The incredibly energyef cient shell of this home consists of ICF exterior walls (insulated concrete forms), a SIPS panel roof system and low-e windows and doors. The superior insulation of the walls and roof system alone will cut their heating and cooling costs in half. But this project goes even further by utilizing a geothermal ground loop system to heat and cool the home, and solar photovoltaic panels, resulting in a home that will generate more power than it consumes each month. Other green features include LED lighting, rainwater collection and ooring milled from trees that were cut onsite. Whats even more remarkable about this project is the low cost per square foot compared to other projects with aspirations of achieving that zero-dollar energy bill. The ICF wall system is also termite-proof, has a wind rating of 200 miles per hour and 4-hour re rating and will take a huge bite out of their annual insurance premiums. You can follow the progress of this project online at www.netzerotally.com. ARTISTS ELEVATION/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe home will have more than 16,000 square feet under roof, but is designed to be netzero energy ef cient. IrwinBit Sets8 Pc.SpeedborBit Set,3 Pc. SpeedborMax Boring Bit Set or 15 Pc.TurbomaxBit Set. 2195402,2365153,2114189 DeWalt18 Volt Cordless Drill/Impact Driver Combo KitIncludes drill/driver and impact driver. Compact design. Lithium-ion batteries charge in 30 minutes.223728719999 2999Craftsman19 Pc. Universal Max Access Socket & Ratchet SetAssorted sizes. Exceptional versatility,easy access to almost any fastener. 2292076 Craftsman245 Pc. Tool Set with 3-Drawer ChestIncludes sockets,drive tools, combination wrenches,midget wrenches and specialty tools.22971821499914999Craftsman8 Drawer Tool Storage Combo4 drawer chest and 4 drawer cabinet. 11,656 cu.in.total storage space.4 Drawer Tool Chest,2297307...$69.99 4 Drawer Tool Cabinet,2297265...$80 SM SM IrwinBar Clamp 2/Pk.12" opening. 2360279999YOUR CHOICE IrwinFolding Utility KnifeQuick blade change. 2190262 IrwinVise-GripLocking Pliers 2/Pk.Includes 7" curved jaw and 6" straight nose. 2365237 Black & DeckerElectric Trimmer12" cut,bump feed line advance system.7094642Assembly required.2499 SM Save$5$29.99-$30.99 ValueZero Gravity Relaxer ChairPowder coated steel frame, all-weather fabric.Folds for easy storage. 83247743999 Portable Folding HammockWeather-resistant polyester fabric,durable steel frame. Includes carry bag.83320664999 Save$30$79.99 V alue 12' x 12' Pop-Up CanopyOne-piece fully-assembled frame.No-tools assembly. Includes wheeled carry bag. 83383869999 SM Save$100$199.99 V alue SM LithiumIon Save$80$279.99 V alue Save$15$44.99 V alue SM Save$20$59.99 V alueITS TIME TO GET YOUR JUNE BACKNOW THROUGH JUNE 30 NEW at Ace!paintfreesaturday SM SM Save$110$259.99 V alue SM Ace stores are independently owned and operated; offers and/or Ace Rewardsbenefits are available only at participating stores. The prices in this advertisement are suggested by Ace Hardware Corporation Oak Brook, IL. Product selection/color, sale items, prices and quantities may vary by store. This advertisement may also contain clearance and closeout items and items at Ace everyday low prices. Red Hot Buys listed in the advertisement will extend through the end of the month. Some items may require assembly. Return and rain check policies vary by store; please see your Ace store for details. Product selection and prices at acehardware.com vary from those in this advertisement. Ace is not responsible for printing or typographical errors. Prices are valid through June 30, 2012, while supplies last. Apply Today! Visit www.acerewardsvisa .com/ar93211 or see your loc al participating Ac e Re ward s retailer for more d etails.Th e cre ditor and iss uer of the Ac e Re wards Platinum Visa Card is U.S. B ank National Association ND.Th e b est tools for saving m on ey.SM FIND US ON: For store loc ations, hours, dire c tions and more visit ace hard ware com or download a QR code re ader app to y our smart phone and scan t his c ode. 20" Box Fan3 speeds.63858Styles may vary.KingsfordMatch LightCharcoal12-1/2 lb.,no lighter fluid needed.82863611599699Weed & Grass Killer7105141Limit3rebates.Bug Free Backyard Spray32 oz.,protects up to 5000 sq.ft. Works up to 4 weeks,even after rain.7130057Limit2rebates. Limited quantity available,while supplies last.Sorry,no rain checks.199499399 After$5 Mail-In Rebate. You Pay$6.99 After $7 Mail-In Rebate. You Pay$11.99 After$6 Mail-In Rebate. You Pay$9.99Gal. Ea. 1999Heavy Duty Garden Hose5/8" x 50'. Kink free.71954315/8" x 100' Hose, 7195456...$29.99Home Pest ControlKills ants and roaches in seconds. Indoor/outdoor.7099906Limit3rebates.299 After$7 Mail-In Rebate. You Pay$9.99Gal.Ant Bait 4/Pk.Lasts up to 3 months.7065162Limit2rebates. Limited quantity available,while supplies last.Sorry,no rain checks.49 After$3 Mail-In Rebate. You Pay$3.49 Char-BroilPatio Bistro Infrared Grill12,000 Btu gas or 1750 watt electric.320 sq.in. total cooking area. Compact size for patios and smaller spaces. 8269227,8269243$12999 Ea.499Tabletop TorchBurns lamp oil or citronella.7283013Garden Torch,7283021...$9.99 Ea.Ea. SPECIAL PURCHAS SPECIAL PURCHAS SM SM SM SM SM SM SM SM Save$6AfterMail-InRebate $7.99 V alue Save$4$19.99 V alueComplete Insect Killer for Soil & Turf10 lb.granules,40 oz.concentrate (makes up to 80 gal.),or 32 oz.spray.7137441,7269343, 7137458Limit3rebates total. Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408

PAGE 16

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, June 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a las 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Hwy. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350. WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet in the Childrens Room at the library. Doors open for refreshments at 6:30 p.m. The meeting begins at 7 p.m. Friday, June 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, June 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. Sunday, June 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, June 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, June 19 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. WAKULLA COUNTY MAH JONGG GROUP will meet from 12:45 p.m. to 3 p.m. at precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road, the rst left after Wal-Mart heading north. The little mah jongg house is the rst building on the left. For more information, call 926 9254. Thursday, June 21 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Special EventsThursday, June 14 DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MOBILE VET CENTER will be at the Senior Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Vet Center provides readjustment counseling in a wide range of psycho social services offered to eligible Veterans and their families in the effort to make a successful transition from military to civilian life. They include individual, group, bereavement and MST counseling. Bene ts and Employment counseling and referrals. Information on Department of Veterans Affairs Programs. For more information, call 942-8810. Friday, June 15 BLOOD DRIVE will be held at Wal-Mart from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Donors will receive a free T-shirt. WAKULLA SUPER USER WORKSHOP will be held at 8:30 a.m. at WorkForce Plus Wakulla Of ce, 3278 Crawfordville Highway. A class on Microsoft Word will be from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., followed by a class on Microsoft Excel from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 16 GOLF GONE WILD to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association will be held at St. James Bay Golf Resort. There will be cash prizes, a silent art auction and a nature photography slide-show and presentation, The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay (which will soon be a published book), by award-winning nature photographer John Spohrer. The event will bene t the FWMA, a 501(c)3 wildlife rehabilitation center located in Wakulla County that cares for sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife in our area. Enjoy golf at the gorgeous Audubon-sanctioned St. James Bay Golf Resort (151 Laughing Gull Lane in Carrabelle, Florida). To help by sponsoring the event or donating auction items, contact Lois Swoboda at 653-5857. For more details, see the brochure on the website at www.wakullawildlife.org or call Lynne Cooper at (850) 697-9507. GABALLI FOOD TASTE SAMPLER will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church, 2780 Surf Road, Panacea. For more information, call 984-0127. SONGWRITERS LISTENING ROOM will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. The session will feature Ron Patrick who has played his brand of folk music and story songs in many North Florida songwriter rounds and acoustic venues, including the Florida Folk Festival, the Yellow Fever Music Festival, the Southern Music Rising Festival and the Wild Azalea Music Festival; Morty Beckman, a Florida native who has been crafting original songs and music for more than 40 years and has owned and managed a music store in the area and currently is performing locally; Jen Clark, who has been singing since grade school and was formerly with Missus and the Walking Sticks and The Wailin Wolves Band; George Gray, who has been playing acoustic guitar and singing since he was 8 or 9 years old. For reservations, contact (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@ gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Upcoming EventsSaturday, June 23 TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at Myra Jeans restaurant from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. This will be a farewell party for April Schreiber. They will have cake and a gift for her. This event will not be structured with activities as the past meetings have been. RSVP to Carrie Stevens by calling 274-9474 or emailing carriejstevens@comcast.net. Sunday, June 24 A GET-TOGETHER TO SUPPORT Randy Harrison, who has leukemia, will be held at the American Legion in Tallahassee from 2 to 6 p.m. There will be music and a silent auction. Money raised will help with expenses. For more information, call 962-5282 or email sopchoppyriver@ gmail.com. Monday, June 25 HEALTH FAIR will be held by the Alzheimers Project Wakulla Respite Program from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Various healthcare agencies will provide screenings and information for senior issues will be available. For more information call (850) 984-5277. NAMI WAKULLAs June Program will feature guest speaker Bob Williamson at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club. Williamson is the author of Miracle on Luckie Street, From Homeless to Millionaire. For more infromation, call the NAMI of ce at 926-1033. Thursday, June 28 RIBBON CUTTING AND OPEN HOUSE to celebrate the grand opening of the new location of Wakulla Insurance Agency and FSU Credit Union will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at 2190 Crawfordville Highway. RSVP to the Chamber ofce at (850) 926-1848 by Friday, June 22. It will be catered by Poseys. Friday, June 29 BLOOD DRIVE will be held at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Donors will receive a free T-shirt. FOCUS WAKULLA will be holding its inaugural event at Poseys Dockside at 6 p.m. Focus Wakulla is a young professionals group designed to target Chamber members 45 years of age or younger. This group will host events and special functions to meet the needs of our future leaders as they seek to grow and develop professionally as Chamber members and citizens of Wakulla County. Sunday, July 1 FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Journey of the Tiglax: One Season at the Alaska Maritime National Refuge at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. This visually compelling lm was a nalist at the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival and should be a special treat for birders. An ice cream social will follow the presentation. St. Marks Refuge Association members and prospective members are invited. Call 9256121 for information. Wednesday, July 4 SOPCHOPPY FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION will be held from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., beginning with a parade downtown and ending with a reworks display. The celebration will start at 11 a.m. at Sopchoppy City Park. There is a $3 donation. There will be live entertainment. For more information, email sopchoppy orida.com@gmail.com or visit www.sopchoppy orida.com. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Department of Veterans Affairs at Senior Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Blood Drive at Wal-Mart from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Golf Gone Wild Tournament for FWMA at St. James Bay Golf Resort. County Commission meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. ThursdayFridaySaturdayMonday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.comBy SCOTT JOYNERWCPL DirectorTutuOla Drum and Dance Company comes to WCPL On Thursday, June 14 at 7 p.m., our rst performance of the summer will be a rst time visitor to WCPL. The TutuOla Drum and Dance Company is based out of Tallahassee and states that Our show brings African culture closer to those who are not already familiar with it. Our aim is to connect the cultures of African peoples all over the world for our audiences. This is done through our dynamic blend of different genres of music and dance such as Hip Hop, Funk, Marching Band and Caribbean styles. The central point that ties it all together is that the root of it all is African. For those of our patrons who remember Mama Koku and the drum circles weve had previous summer, this high energy show should be a combination of both. Lets give TutuOla a big crowd on June 14 and kick our summer series of performance off with a bang! Safari Man Rodger Tripp Returns to WCPL For our performance next week on Thursday, June 21, were proud to bring back the Safari Man Rodger Tripp to WCPL. Tripp has many fun songs, and stories and silly antics which have entertained our patrons for years. Please come out on June 21 at 7 p.m. for this fun- lled show for the entire family. Sign up for Wakulla Adventures Boat Tour The signup sheet for the Wakulla Adventures Boat Tour of the Sopchoppy River will be available Tuesday, June 19 at 11 a.m. This 2-hour tour is run by a new family local business, Wakulla Adventures owned by Joey and Melanie Tillman and will enlighten and entertain the whole family as they see wildlife in its natural state. There will be two tours from 10 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3 p.m. and there is a limit of 18 people per boat so seats will go fast. You can sign up at the front desk or give us a call at 926-7415. New Books at WCPL There are some great new books just added to our collection. New books by Jeffery Deaver, XO, Lincoln Childs The Third Gate, and Laurell K. Hamiltons Kiss the Dead, join new young adult novels Bitterblue by Kristin Cashore, The Drowned Cities by Paolo Bacigalupi, and The Serpents Rainbow by Rick Riordan. We also have some award winning childrens books added such as Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons by Eric Litwin and James Dean, along with Llama, Llama, Red Pajama by Anne Dewdney and many more. Please come by and see all our new stuff or put items on hold! Library News... Government MeetingsThursday, June 14 WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway. Call (850) 544-6133 for more information. ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, June 18 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for its regular meeting. SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. SCHOOL BOARD will meet at 5:45 p.m. in the school administration building.

PAGE 17

Pain and stiffness in the neck and shoulders are common complaints. Forward Head Syndrome or FHS plays in the development of headaches and neck and shoulder pain. Closely related to FHS in terms of its negative effects is Forward Head Flexion. FHS is when the neck bends forward so the chin drops toward the chest. In extreme cases the neck muscles along the back of the neck have become so weak and overstretched that they can no longer perform their primary function of maintaining the neck in a neutral position. The lack of support then given to the head results in a multitude of negative physical symptoms and eventually long term muscular skeletal injures to the neck, shoulders and upper back. Common symptoms: Rounded shoulders. Pain and knots between the shoulder blades. Pain along with weak and overstretched muscles along the back of the neck. Tight muscles along the front of the neck. Muscle fatigue in the neck. Headaches. Numbness and tingling in the forearms, hands and ngers. Here are some ways to correct Forward Head Flexion. 1. Look up! Life is more interesting this way! 2. Bring mobile devices (i.e., cell phones) up to eye level when using them. The same goes when reading the paper or your newest novel. 3. Practice gentle prone (or on your stomach) backbends, like Salambhasana or the Locust pose. Work by lifting the upper body only. Prone back bends will strengthen the mid and upper back muscles as well as those along the back of the neck. 4. Relax in supported supine (on your back) back bends where the neck muscles, front and back are allowed to relax. This will allow tight muscles along the front of the neck to stretch and release gently. Practice this release daily. Roll a mat or fold a blanket so that it is just narrow enough to place along your spine. Lay on your back on the support and ensure everything is supported from the back of your head to the buttock. In the case of the mat, use additional support like a blanket or a block under the buttock. Reach your arms out from your shoulders and rest them along the oor with the palms up so you are making a T position. To make the stretch more intense, bend your elbows as much as 90 degrees so your hands are in line with your head. Stay for 2-5 minutes while focusing to relax the muscles along the back of the neck and shoulders. If you feel pins and needles in the arms and the hands, straighten your arms. Bad habits take hard work and time to correct, but if you follow these guidelines and practice, not only to correct your neck position, but also relax your over taxed neck muscles, you will see and feel the difference in no time. Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Yoga teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Page 3BHEALTH & FITNESSMost weight loss studies show that 70 percent of your weight loss or weight gain (for you hard-gainers) is diet, and 30 percent is exercise. This means big bucks for the weight loss companies, there is a lot of money to be had to help sell you the next biggest weight loss product. There are a million types of exercise products out there, and no limits to the infomercials about exercise programs or people saying that they lost tons of weight on them. These programs do work, but the reasoning behind it is that they work because the buyer DID IT. The program was used and was not just put on the shelf and forgotten about. The DVD was taken out of the box and put it in the DVD player and the buyer trained along with the program instructor religiously every day. That is the reason they lost the weight. So will it work for everyone? Probably not, as it is not the right workout program for everyone. If the program doesnt t your lifestyle, it will become a chore and it will sit on the shelf. Exercise should never be a chore it should be something that you want to do. For example, I have clients who use their Jane Fonda workout tapes to this day and have always used them as long as they remember. They are strong and very healthy and they are happy. The nal decision should be, will I do this program or will it sit and get dusty along with my treadmill or rowing machine. So if you decide to buy into the INSANITY or P90X, congratulations and get moving! But always remember that the motivation should be from within you and no DVD or kettle bell will make you better if you dont stick to a daily regimen that is easy for you and your lifestyle. As always, please visit your doctor before you start any type of program regardless as to DVD, tness class, or outside activity. Turn on the television and there is a lady in white lab coat or a famous celebrity telling you this is the best protein shake or food plan in the world and all you have to do is drink it three times a day or use their food and you will suddenly get slimmer. A lot of what you are buying you can do by simply changing your eating habits from three meals a day to ve meals a day and suddenly you start to lose weight with no gimmicks. But there is a catch you should complete some exercise, at least 30 minutes three to ve times a week. In other words if you change your meals to ve meals (three meals and two modest snacks) this will undoubtedly increase your metabolism and force your body to start dropping weight. Just like exercise, it has to fit into your lifestyle. The most important thing to remember is that changing to healthy eating habits should be life-long change, not for just a few weeks till you drop the weight. For more information on food and nutrition, please see your State of Florida Certi ed Nutritionist who can assist you in diets, nutrients and supplements.Pamela Chichester, CFT, SPN is manager at Body-Tek 24 Hour Gym in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTER Pain in the neck how a techie lifestyle hurtsIt must work, I saw it on TVSpecial to The NewsResearch has shown practicing yoga can signi cantly reduce mental and physical stress, improve mood, and slow the aging process. Mary Jo Ricketson, an experienced yoga practitioner and nurse and author of Moving Meditation (www.thegoodwithin.com recommends seven things beginners and anyone practicing yoga should know to maximize their bene ts: 1. Cardiovascular (aerobic) training: As with meditation, focused breathing is a cornerstone of mind-body training. Aerobic means with oxygen and aerobic movement increases the ow of oxygen-rich blood throughout the body, including the brain. Cardiovascular training is the single most important aspect of the physical training because it keeps the heart open and strong. 2. Core and strength training: This includes the students abdomen and buttocks, and the lower back region, which extends to the base of the skull. Here is where strength, stability and balance originate. 3. Flexibility training (yoga postures): Stretching simply feels good, and it reminds students to not only be more flexible in ones body, but also ones mind. This step allows us to move (and live) with greater ease. 4. Adequate rest: Sleep is a necessary part of life, and suf cient rest is needed for energy and equilibrium. 5. Life-giving nutrition: Making the right choices in food allows yoga students to achieve an optimal, balanced state. This includes nutritional foods consumed in moderation. 6. Family/community/ church: From Epicurus to modern science, study and observation show that we nd greater happiness with access to friends and family. 7. Written goals and a plan of action: Goals and stated intention act as a road map to achieving balanced well-being.7 tips to maximize yoga bene ts www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Wakulla Respite Alzheimers Respite Program p p p g g g p p invites you to join us at our Monday, June 25, 9AM-1PMat Lake Ellen Baptist Church, 4495 Crawfordville Hwy.Various healthcare agencies and organizations will be providing screenings. Educational Services and Valuable information for seniors will also be provided.Refreshments will be served and for information you can contact Pat Ashley at 850-984-5277. ATTORNEY ADVERTISING. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. We may associate with local firms in states wherein we do not maintain an office. If no recovery, no fees or costs are charged, unless prohibited by State Law or Rule. Weitz & Luxenberg, PC is licensed by, and a member of good standing of the New York State Bar. Lawrence Goldhirsch, Esq., member, FL Bar. P.C. LAW OFFICES &WEITZ LUXENBERGASBESTOS |DRUGS/MEDICAL DEVICES | ENVIRONMENTAL |NEGLIGENCERecent studies have indicated that use of the osteoporosis medicine Fosamaxcan lead to fractures in the femur the hip bone. These fractures can occur in low-impact situations, such as when stepping down stairs or even just falling from a standing height or less. This significant risk has been recently added to the Warnings and Precautions section of the label. If you or your loved one has suffered a HIP fracture after taking Fosamaxit is your best interests to investigate your legal rights for possible compensation! Weitz & Luxenberg can help you understand your legal options. We are one of Americas largest trial law and products liability law firms representing injured persons with total verdicts and settlements in excess of $3 Billion and are committed to represent your interests aggressively and professionally. For a free consultation please call us today at 1-888-411-LAWS(5297) or visit us on the web at www.FosamaxFracture.com. Attention FOSAMAXVICTIMSHave you suffered a thigh bone/femur injury?1.888.411.LAWS |www.weitzlux.com700 BROADWAY| NEWYORK, NY 10003BRANCH OFFICES IN NEW JERSEY & CALIFORNIA www.FosamaxFracture.com Coastal Rehabilitation and Treatment Services, Community Mental Health Center located at The Barry Building, 3295 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville is pleased to announce the addition of another psychiatrist to our group, Dr. Susan Balk-Kradel, M.D.Dr. Balk-Kradel will be available in Crawfordville to do psychiatric evaluations and medication management. Glenn A. Graves, LCSW, who specializes in mental health and substance abuse treatment services for all ages including certication for parenting and co-parenting will also be available.To call for information or for an appointment:Anne Morgan (850) 566-0037 or Reba Braswell at 850-528-4793 or email us at coastalrehabservices@gmail.com Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL ME TODAY.1001114.1 State Farm, Home Oce, Bloomington, IL Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.comWe've Moved!Free-Flowing Text www.hicksair.com Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. THG-12901Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Joint pain Arthritis pain Muscle pain Back pain

PAGE 18

Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet By DAVID WHITE The arrival of summer means the arrival of wedding season. For many couples, the walk down the aisle is less daunting than planning the reception. Big or small? Whats the budget? Who gets invited? Will your family be offended if your crazy uncle is asked to stay home? With so many decisions, its no wonder that most couples ask their caterer to select the wines. Beware of such a move. While some caterers have great portfolios, most are guilty of outrageous markups on pedestrian wines. Fortunately, selecting the perfect wines for your wedding doesnt have to be stressful or expensive. Here are ve simple tips. 1. Bring Your Own Wine. Many venues will let you bring your own wine and only charge a corkage fee for service and stemware. If this is an option, go for it. Carting in your own wine can save lots of money. Earlier this year, two friends whose caterer wanted to charge $25 per bottle asked me for help. We inquired about corkage, and learned that the caterers fee was just $8 per bottle. So we visited one of my favorite wine shops and selected four different wines that averaged out to about $9 each. By skipping the caterers wines, my friends saved nearly $1,000. If corkage isnt an option, dont be afraid to negotiate. Many caterers have wiggle room in their wine prices. 2. Skip the Champagne. Under European Union trade laws, wine can only be sold as Champagne if it comes from the Champagne region of France and is made in the traditional method, which is a very expensive process. While real Champagne is a treat, its quite expensive even budget options cost upwards of $35 per bottle. Fortunately, there are plenty of affordable sparkling wines from regions outside Champagne. Consider Cava, a delightful sparker from Spain thats produced just like Champagne, but using native Spanish grapes. Prosecco, a sparkling wine from Italy that tends to be a bit sweeter, is another option. Many top Cavas and Proseccos can be purchased for around $10 each. After all, no one is going to ask if theyre drinking real Champagne while toasting the bride and groom. 3. Avoid the familiar. Napa Valley makes some exceptional Cabernet Sauvignon. But its nearly impossible to nd a decent bottle for less than $25. Sonoma Countys Russian River Valley produces some lovely Chardonnay, but most cost $20 or more. Fortunately, the world is awash in affordable, great-tasting wine. Finding such wines is as easy as opening up your palate to unheralded regions. 4. Remember the crowd. While values are found outside the wine worlds more popular regions, theres no sense in terrifying your guests. So avoid esoteric grape varieties and choose wines with wide appeal. Washington State Merlot, for example, is always a great value. Other regions for affordable reds include Chile, Frances Ctes du Rhne, and Italys Chianti. For whites, its hard to go wrong with a New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc or South African Chenin Blanc. A rough rule of thumb? Stick to wines with easy-topronounce names. Guests wont be afraid of them. 5. Taste! Most couples consider multiple venues for their reception before deciding where to celebrate. Selecting your wines might not be as important, but the process is typically more fun. If youre looking for one white and one red, try to sample at least ve or six of each before making your decision. Serve everything blind, pouring the wines from paper bags to mask their prices and where theyre from. Hopefully, youll be pleasantly surprised and learn the least expensive option is your favorite. Your wedding is a celebration not a wine tasting. So stick to these five money-saving and stressreducing tips and have fun. David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the internet.Five tips for selecting the perfect wedding wines Whites WinesSpecial to The NewsThis year, well be paying more than ever for dinner. Food prices jumped a whopping 4 to 5 percent last year and are expected to continue rising this year as well, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But you can have your chocolate cake and eat it, too, without breaking the bank, says Toni House, author of Savvy Shopping: How to Reduce Your Weekly Grocery Bill to $85 Per Week or Less! (www. SaveYourMoneySaveYourFamily.com). A mom with executive-level experience in accounting and the restaurant industry, It takes savvy shopping, she says. You can have great everyday meals and special-occasion feasts and trim the household budget with planning, patience and grocery shopping guardrails to keep your cart in line. House offers these tips: Be patient wait for good deals. Save pricier purchases for double coupon days. If youre planning for a special occasion or celebration, save now so you can splurge a bit later, The more you rush, the less you save. Be detail-oriented. There is a lot of ne print involved in being a savvy shopper, from expiration dates to special offers to asterisks. Know exactly when a coupon expires, how much its for, how much more it will be worth on double coupon days and whether or not its worth the price in the rst place. Plan ahead. Plan a menu for at least three meals in advance; combined with leftovers, that should give you ve days or more of meals, depending on the meal. This puts you in control of your shopping list and not the other way around. Instead of always playing catch-up, replacing what youve run out of, you buy only when its on the menu. Instead of making expensive foods (meat) the centerpiece of each meal, design menus that use the most expensive foods less often. For instance, from now on at least twice a week, try using meat as more of a ller than a main dish. Instead of making spaghetti with meat balls, or sausage, or chicken breasts, make spaghetti with a meat sauce of ground turkey, ground sausage or ground chicken breakfast sausage. At the grocery store, buy ONLY what you can eat. That means no paper plates, toilet paper, plastic cups, Army men, toothbrushes, jar candles, greeting cards. Grocery store prices for non-food items are higher than youll pay almost anywhere else, so make a hard-and-fast rule and stick to it. Do use coupons, but only for products you actually need. Lets say you just bought twice as many hot dog buns as you needed last week and now youve run across a two-for-one coupon formore hot dog buns? Do you really have room in your freezer for all those buns? Put your grocery bill on a dietSecrets for bringing home more for less 5Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2Go to http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click Continue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click Continue.

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Page 5BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, June 8 The eld is set for the 2012 election after candidates made their intentions of- cially known this week by qualifying for races including 160 legislative seats and 27 congressional spots up grabs following the once-a-decade redistricting exercise. Candidates werent the only ones stewing over the upcoming elections. Gov. Rick Scott this week took the initiative in a simmering battle over voter rolls in Florida as he continued his joust with the Department of Justice over Republicanled efforts to keep noncitizens from voting in the fall. Meanwhile, Florida A&M University President James Ammons vowed to carry on after the FAMU Board of Trustees handed him a vote of no-con dence, a second shot across the bow for Ammons in the wake of a long line of problems at the school, including the November hazing death of Marching 100 drum major Robert Champion. The beleaguered president kept his $300,000 a year job, but was given a not-so-subtle hint that his tenure at the university was in jeopardy. QUALIFYING ENDS The nal cast of characters was set for the upcoming election Friday as the deadline passed on qualifying for a host of state and federal races. Following the once-adecade redrawing of political boundaries, candidates for office filed necessary paperwork with the Florida Division of Elections, which began collecting qualifying papers Monday. The roster includes 33 House candidates (29 incumbents and four newcomers) who will run unopposed and another 12 who will face only minor party opposition. In the Senate, nine incumbents seven Republicans and two Democrats will return automatically with no opposition on the ballot, even though theyre running in newly drawn districts. Republicans failed to field a candidate in 23 House races, leaving either Democrats, NPA or third party candidates to win those seats. But Democrats didnt eld a candidate in 47 of the 120 House districts. Among those districts where Democrats chose not to challenge are more than a dozen in which it appeared they would be competitive, according to voting statistics. For example, Democrats failed to eld a candidate in two House districts where a majority of the current voters went for Obama in 2008 District 36 in the Pasco County area and District 83 in Port St. Lucie. In the Senate, no Democratic candidate was entered in District 22 in the Tampa Bay area, which was won by Obama in 2008. NO, YOURE OUT OF ORDER Responding to a federal Justice Department request to explain why Gov. Rick Scotts most recent voter purge doesnt violate the National Voter Registration Act, Florida Secretary of State Ken Detzner on Wednesday fired off his own letter asking the federal elections watchdog to explain its actions in the ongoing battle over Floridas voter database, and tell Florida why the feds havent broken the law. In a letter to a DOJ election lawyer, Detzner defended the states effort to purge from its ranks the names of ineligible voters, saying federal of cials have been dragging their feet by not giving the state access to the Department of Homeland Security database, known as SAVE. The information, Detzner contends, would help the state remove from its voter rolls the names of noncitizens who are ineligible to vote. By denying Florida access to the SAVE database, DHS appears to have violated federal law, which provides that states may use the SAVE database for any legal purpose such as voter registration, Detzner contended. State of cials estimate that as many as 2,600 of 11.2 million registered voters should not be there. Last week, DOJ elections lawyer T. Christian Herren said Florida could be violating federal voting laws with the purge, primarily by continuing to remove voters less than 90 days before an election. Critics have blasted Scott and Republicans for what they see as a partisan attempt to suppress voting rights. The Scott administration disagrees, saying the states efforts to clear its voter rolls of non-citizens are not only legal but necessary to ensure eligible voters choices arent diluted. FAMU BOT MEMBERS TO AMMONS: WEVE LOST CONFIDENCE Florida A&M University Board of Trustees this week gave President James Ammons collective thumbs down as the panel passed a no-con dence vote by an 8-4 margin. Ammons still has his $300,000 a year job. But his future is cloudy. The president faces increased scrutiny from FAMU trustees and State University System of cials over a growing litany of concerns ranging from fraudulent audits and nancial improprieties among FAMU administrators to poor freshmen retention and sexual abuse at its developmental research school. Its strike two. ... Three strikes, youre out, board Chairman Solomon Badger, who voted against the noconfidence motion, said after the meeting about Ammons. Despite the public censure, Ammons said he plans to stay at the helm of the historically black university. Let me say to the board that I hear you loudly and clearly, Ammons said immediately following the vote. I understand that there are some measures that I have to take as president of this university to x things and I am going to x them. FAMU alumni leaders and former students came to Ammons defense, saying the university is being unfairly singled out by university system of cials and the media, which they contend has made FAMU a scapegoat over the hazing issue. OTHER NEWS An administrative law judge this week upheld state efforts to enact water quality standards less rigid than specific federal numeric requirements. Rejecting arguments from a coalition of environmental groups, Florida Administrative Law Judge Bram Canter ruled the Department of Environmental Protection acted within its authority when it proposed a slate of water quality criteria less rigid than federal standards preferred by environmentalists. In other election news, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement began an investigation into the ling of campaign papers by three Supreme Court justices Fred Lewis, Barbara Pariente and Peggy Quince by court employees in a last-minute scramble to le papers necessary to make sure the trio appeared on the ballot. Rep. Scott Plakon, R Longwood, raised the issue as conservatives unhappy with the liberal bent of the courts majority have made it clear they will try to oust the trio of jurists in November. STORIES OF THE WEEK: Candidates for of ce submitted paperwork to run for their respective of ces this week while the Scott administration sparred with Washington over who will get to vote in those races. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: I begin to see that we have a leadership that is caught in a wilderness of errors, FAMU Trustee Narayan Persaud, who cast a no-con dence vote against FAMU President James Ammons.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)For candidates, election of cials and FAMUs president its onBy MARGIE MENZEL THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDALONGWOOD, Fla., June 12 Gov. Rick Scotts appointed Task Force on Citizen Safety and Protection was set to hold its rst public hearing Tuesday morning, June 12, near Sanford, the site of the Trayvon Martin shooting that spurred the new look at the states self defense law. The panel is charged with studying the 2005 Stand Your Ground, law, which says people out in the streets have no duty to try to retreat before shooting someone to death in self defense. The committee is expected to report its ndings to Scott and the Legislature. An outpouring of public comment is expected, with passions running high on both sides. The death of Martin, an unarmed black teenager, brought national attention to Florida. His acknowledged shooter, the half-Hispanic George Zimmerman, may invoke the Stand Your Ground defense when he faces second degree murder charges. He initially told police he acted in self-defense, and wasnt arrested until after a loud outcry and charges of racism. The particular self defense doctrine has broad support, generally, in many parts of Florida. Martins parents are expected to testify to the panel on Tuesday.Stand Your Ground Task Force to meet JUNE 201217 Fathers Day Subscribe Now 10 Months for $ 20 12New Subscribers Only! Honor your Dad today by giving him a gift subscription to The Wakulla News! SALE ENDS JUNE 30, 2012 Happy Fathers Day $ 20.12Mail or bring coupon with payment to Offer good for Wakulla County subscribers only.All major credit cards accepted. Offer expires 6/30/2012NAME _____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ CITY ________________ZIP __________________________ PHONE _________________ NEWNEW SUBSCRIBERS Call us toll free at 1-877-401-6408 LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Go to AnyGivenTimeJax.com to enter to win a vacation in sunny Jacksonville! SO MUCH TO DO, ANY GIVEN TIME. 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926

PAGE 20

Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com

PAGE 21

SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEmploymentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements Free Offers Free Kittens12 weeks old males, orange tabby & white, great barn cats (850) 251-7965 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements ADVERTISE YOUR WAYTO SUCCESS!! Call Advertising Networks of Florida for statewide & regional advertising 866-742-1373 www .florida classifieds.com Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Trades/ Skills Drivers New Refrigerated& Dry Van Freight. Daily or Weekly Pay! Quarterly Safety Bonus! Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www .driveknight.com NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! *0 Tuition Cost*No Credit Check* Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required call (866)297-8916 www .joinCRST .com General Help Help Wanted FT Food Service Mgr PT Bus Drivers FT VPK TeacherCoast Charter School St. Marks, 850-925-6344 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALLAviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline .com Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLE INSIDE YARD SALE Fri, June 15, Sat, June 16, 9am to 1pm golf clubs, bags, Holiday dinnerware, dolls, knic-nacs, antique piano rolls, endurance saddle w/access and more CASH ONLY 13 Harry Morrison Rd-near Walmart General Let us sell your items for you at our next auction. Well do the work, move & sell for you! www.Gallery319.biz or 850 926 7355 Pets DOG Max is a hound/border collie mix, appx 3 years old, male, weighs 55 lbs. Gentle, quiet dog, gets along with dogs and loves people. Desperately needs a loving home. Call 352-795-1288 Happy Jack LiquivicRecognize safe & effecitive against hook & roundworms by US Center for Ventinary Medicine.PET SHOP(850) 926-7949 www.happy jackinc.com Happy Jack LiquivicRecognize safe & effecitive against hook & roundworms by US Center for Ventinary Medicine.ACE HARDWARE(850) 926-3141 www.happy jackinc.com Pets Stop Scratching & Gnawing.Promote healing & hair growth. Stamp out ITCHAMCALLITS! Shampoo with Happy Jack Itch no More, Apply Skin Balm add Tonekote to diet.Ashley Feed & Hardware(850) 421-7703 www.happy jackinc.com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Near Georgous Lake Ellen quiet neighborhood completely rennovated, New Central AC, 1,400 sf, 33 John David Drive $595. mo. (850) 443-3300 Apartments $99. Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Sopchoppy RiverCharming, Partially furnished 2story loft on private pond. Custom features, 1.5BA, walk-in-closet, W/D, D/W, TV w/ satellite. Very private. $650/month. 850-962-2849. Efficiencies/ Cottages Large room/bath, microwave, fridge, with deck, on Wakulla River, $90 week or $400 month, includes utilities 850-926-2783 Rental Houses OYSTER BAY2/1 on the canal with boat ramp. Refurbished, furnished or Not $960 mo + Utilities + dep. 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLESmall 2/1,$ $600 /mo+ $500 dep. minimum 6 months lease, no pets applications/ refers required (850) 524-3164 Out of Town Real Estate 20 Acres-Live on Land NOW!! Only $99/mo $0 Down, Owner Finance.NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure. 800-755-8953www. sunsetranches.com 5252-0614 PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTYANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE: Monday, June 18, 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE : School Board Room, 69 Arran Board, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL32326, 850-926-0065 Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News June 14, 2012 5249-0614 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Vehicle will be sold for towing and storage. Charges pursuant to Meeting Notices F.S. 713.78 Date of Sale 6-20-12 Time 9:00 AM Vehicle 06 HONDADIRT BIKE VIN# 9C2KE0105R000451 Meeting Notices All sales by Hobbys Towing & Recovery 1498 Shadeville Rd Crawfordville, FL32327 850-926-7698 Meeting Notices 5254-0621 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULLACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS and the WAKULLACOUNTYAUDITING COMMITTEE PROFESSIONALAUDITING SERVICES Request for Qualifications No. 2012-09 Advertisement Begin Date/Time: June 8, 2012 @ 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 Sealed responses for Professional Auditing Services will be received until 2:00 p.m. on June 29, 2012. Responses should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Office, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, at which time all proposals will be publicly opened. Responses received after the time and date specified will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. Please direct all questions to: Deborah DuBose, Phone: 850.926.9500 x 410, FAX: 850.926.9006 e-mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com RFQ documents will be available at www .mywakulla.com or can be picked up at Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administrative Office at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 after 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, May 29, 2012. The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Alan Brock, Chairman Deborah DuBose, Administration/Purchasing Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News June 14 & 21, 2012 5254-0621 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5255-0621 Vs. Carmichael, Melissa, 2010 CA-298 Amended Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2010 CA-298 FLORIDACOMMERCE CREDITUNION Plaintiff, v. MELISSANICHOLE CARMICHAELa/k/a Melissa Carmichael and James Lee Carmichael a/k/a James L. Carmichael, et al. Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Page 7B Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S S S S A A&WA-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432we sell and service most makes and models Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan StricklandsPOOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE S S S S S S Licensed & InsuredGreen Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC HURLEYS ROOF Construction, Inc.Roof Inspection Repair CleaningNEW ROOF RE-ROOFING SHINGLES METAL850-544-1217FREE ESTIMATES Local, experienced and dependable management for Condo and Homeowners Associations.925-9911Kellys Association Management Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053887408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONS RE-ROOFING REPAIRS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980Will help you make the most of your outdoor space. Wood and Metal buildings, carports, barns, swings, gazebos & More! Sizes and Pricing to t your needs. RENT-TO-OWN options. $25 credit on a new building with this ad! See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care 850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $475mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $700 + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker SUMMERTIME YARD SALE! NO EARLY BIRDSNO EARLY BIRDS

PAGE 22

Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSelling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 TO WHOM IT MAYCONCERN: Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the amended final judgment of foreclosure entered on May 3, 2012, in Case No. 2010 CA298, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Wakulla County, Florida, in which FLORIDACOMMERCE CREDITUNION is plaintiff and Melissa Carmichael and James Lee Carmichael are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, in Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Florida at 11 a.m. on the 28th day of June, 2012, the following described real property: Parcel AC@ Commence at the Southeast corner of the Northeast quarter of Section 32, township 2 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida and run North 89 degrees 15 minutes 57 seconds West 1471.39 feet to a concrete monument (marked #2929), thence run North 00 degrees 19 minutes 17 seconds West 1309.79 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 43 minutes 50 seconds West 1293.91 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Easterly maintained right-of-way of Lonnie Raker Road, thence leaving said Easterly maintained right-of-way continue North 89 degrees 43 minutes 50 seconds West 30.00 feet to a concrete monument (marked #7160) lying on the Westerly maintained right-of-way of Lonnie Raker Road, thence run South 01 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West along said Westerly maintained right-of-way 263.85 feet to a concrete monument (marked #7160), thence leaving said Westerly maintained right-of-way South 89 degrees 54 minutes 32 seconds West 1164.43 feet to an iron pipe, thence run North 00 degrees 30 minutes 47 seconds East 896.19 feet to a concrete monument (marked #7160) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 00 degrees 30 minutes 47 seconds East 671.04 feet to an old axle, thence run South 89 degrees 55 minutes 02 seconds East 322.50 feet to an old axle, thence run North 88 degrees 15 minutes 14 seconds East 59.61 feet to a concrete monument (marked #2919), thence run South 00 degrees 31 minutes 55 seconds West 658.20 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 43 minutes 45 seconds East 758.57 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Easterly maintained right-of-way of Lonnie Raker Road, thence run South 11 degrees 13 minutes 03 seconds East along said maintained right-of-way 16.33 feet to a concrete monument (marked #7160), thence leaving said maintained right-of-way run North 89 degrees 43 minutes 45 seconds West 1143.73 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and seal of this Court on this 6th day of June, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF COURT BY: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) Published two (2)times in The Wakulla News June 14 and 21, 2012 5255-0621 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5151-0614 TWN vs. Harrell, Tracy N. Case No. 65-2010-CA-000282 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000282 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. TRACYN. HARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELLAND BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES, et. al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in 65-2010-CA-000282 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LPF/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and TRACYN HARRELL A/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYHARRELLA/K/ATRACYNICOLE HARRELL; BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/ABRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; JOHN DOE; AMYDENISE LALONDE; BRYAN DOLPHIS LALONDE; WAKULLABANK are the Defendants.Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., lobby Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 a.m. on August 2, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22, WALKERS CROSSING COMMENCING AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 360.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 198.19 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT ; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 212.39 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLYALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITHA RADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU ACENTRAL ANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 31 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.19 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST, 229.82 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 330.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AROADWAYEASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. THE ABOVE LEGALDESCRIPTION BEING MORE RECENTLYSURVEYED BYTHURMAN RODDENBERRYAND ASSOCIATES, DATED 5241-0614 TWN Vs. Parker, Brittany Rachelle Case No. 65-2012-CANotice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE FIFTH JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.65-2012-CA U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v. BRITTANYRACHELLE PARKER, ETAL., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: BRITTANYRACHELLE PARKER, and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants Current Residence Unknown, but whose last known address was: 187 ROCHELSIE RD., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-2719 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: LOT 24, BLOCK 22, WAKULLAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL33716, on or before June 7th, 2012 or within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327-0337, either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 18 day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, ATNO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTLETHA WELLS, (850)926-0905 EXT222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPTOF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. June 7 and 14, 2012. 665112464 5243-0614 vs. Dana Carter Case No. 65-2012-CA-000093 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000093, DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. : DANA CARTER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ANDREW T. CARTER LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:: 1951 Woodville Hwy Crawfordville, FL 32327 1710 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLIAM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 101 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 1748.95 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 903.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 142.62 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 617.33 FEET TO POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 60.29 FEET TO A POINT THENCE RUN SOUTH 14 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 145.67 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 03 SECONDS 5247-0614 TWN Vs. Burke, Terrence M. Case No. CACE12-0032439(11) Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SEVENTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. CACE12-0032439(11) DANNYDANIELS and LINDADANIELS, his wife Plaintiff, vs. TERRANCE M. BURKE, et all, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 22, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. CACE 12-003243(11) of the Circuit Court of the17th Judicial Circuit in and for Broward County, Florida, whereinDANNYDANIELS and Linda DANIELS are Plaintiff and TERRANCE M. BURKE; et al., are Defendant(s). I will sell to the highest bidder for cash, online at www.broward.realforeclose.com at 10:00 oclock a.m. on the 21 day ofJune, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: See Attached Exhibit A Broward County Property: 17431 SW 54th Street, Southwest Ranches, FL33331 Wakulla County Property: 276 Fox Hollow Lane, Crawfordville, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 23 day of May, 2012. HOWARD FORMAN,Clerk of Circuit Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ W. Jackson, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commence at an Iron pipe marking the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and thence run South 88 degrees 45 minutes 42 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, a distance of 240.89 feet to a concrete monument for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run North 89 degrees 11 minutes 25 seconds East along said North boundary 479.39 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 00 minutes 11 second East 701.89 feet to the centerline of a 60.00 foot roadway easement, said point lying on a curve concave to the Northeasterly, thence run Northwesterly along said centerline and along said curve with a radius of 994.14 feet thru a central angle of 31 degrees 57 minutes 52 seconds for an arc distance of 554.62 feet, the chord of said arc being North 75 degrees 53 minutes 53 seconds West 542.83 feet, thence run North 04 degrees 45 minutes 58 seconds East 563.47 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 7.67 acres, more or less. SUBJECT TO a roadway easement over and across the Southerly 30.00 feet thereof. TOGETHER WITH ANON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO WIT: A60.00 foot roadway easement lying 30.00 feet on each side of the following described centerline: Commence at an Iron pipe marking the Southeast corner of Section 28, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 00 degrees 08 minutes East along the East boundary of said Section 28, a distance of 342.70 feet to the Southerly maintained right-of-way boundary of a graded county road, thence run South 57 degrees 49 minutes 36 seconds West along said Southerly maintained right-of-way boundary 451.09 to the POINT OF BEGINNING of said centerline. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run South 27 degrees 24 minutes 55 seconds East 59.67 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Southeasterly along said curve with a radius of 823.79 fee feet thru a central angle of 09 degrees 42 minutes 50 seconds for an arc distance of 139.66 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 07 minutes 45 seconds East 300.67 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Southeasterly along said curve with a radius of 994.14 feet thru a central angle of 60 degrees 00 minutes 52 seconds for an arc distance of 1041.32 feet, thence run North 82 degrees 51 minutes 23 seconds East 169.24 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Easterly along said curve with a radius of 551.21 feet thru a central angle of 14 degrees 28 minutes 30 seconds for an arc distance of 139.25 feet, thence run South 82 degrees 40 minutes 7 seconds East 489.65 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Easterly along said curve with a radius of 928.78 feet thru a central angle of 09 degrees 14 minutes 00 seconds for an arc distance of 149.67 feet, thence run North 88 degrees 05 minutes 53 seconds East 199.47 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Easterly along said curve with a radius of 2695.04 feet thru a central angle of 04 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds for an arc distance of 199.91 feet, thence run South 87 degrees 39 minutes 07 seconds East 308.37 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Northeasterly along said curve with a radius of 126.91 feet thru a central angle of 54 degrees 14 minutes 20 seconds for an arc distance of 120.14 feet, thence run North 38 degrees 06 minutes 33 seconds East 1525.20 feet to the termination point of said centerline. Daniel S. Mandel, Esq. DANIELS. MANDEL, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff, 2700 N. Military Trail, Ste. 355, Boca Raton, FL33431 Tel: (561) 826-1740 Fax: (561) 626-1741 Published in The Wakulla News June 7 & 14, 2012 5247-0614 5250-0614 vs. Vaillancourt, Debra Case No:2012CA000083 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVILDIVISION: CASE NO: 2012CA000083 FEDERALNATIONALMORTGAGE ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, DEBRAVAILLANCOURT, et, al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAELT BRACKIN LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: 30 CHICKATTRL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 ALSO ATTEMPTED AT: 2142 HIGHWAY98 E, CARRIABLLE, FL32322 AND 1349 BRANCH HILLCT, APOPKA, FL32712 CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOTS 63 AND 64, BLOCK WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT V, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address i is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL33309 on or before June 7th, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in The Wakulla Times and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoo rdinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled Court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or Voiice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 25th day of May, 2012 BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News June 7 and 14, 2012 5250-0614 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices EAST 684.28 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 30.00 FEET WIDE EXCLUSIVE PERPETUAL, INGRESS, EGRESS, AND UTILITY EASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 92 OF THE HARTSFIELD, SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 629.81 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 74 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 13 SEC OND EAST 1783.13, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 565.46 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 627.91 FEET TO A 3 INCHES ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT 9MARKED NO. 2919),THENCE RUN SOUTH 14 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 115.66 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED $4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 14 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 30.01 FEET TO A 4 INCHES BY 4 INCHES CONCRETE MONUMENT ,THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 300.07 FEET TO A 3 INCHES ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO.2919) LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE NORTHEASTERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT -OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF PURIFY BAY ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 33 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OFWAY 31.42 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED NO. 4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 310.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1997 RDMN DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME, ID#11430190A TITLE # 90701645 AND ID# 11430190B, TITLE # 90701714 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for therelief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 22nd of May, 2012. Brent. X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, as Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News June 7 and 14, 2012 5243-0614 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $1,000 Mo. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 64 Blackfoot 3BR/2BA Pets ok w/ non refundable Deposit. 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 239 Magnolia Ridge 3 BR/2BA $1,200 mo., $1,200 Deposit 67 Cochise 2BR/2BA $825. mo., Available July 1 145 Rochelsie 2BR/2BA $700. mo., Pets okay up to 40lbs with non-refundable $250. Deposit. Available July 1 165 Sam Smith Circle 2BR/1BA $450. mo. 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595. mo. $595. Deposit Lynn Cole-Eddinger David Hoover Open HouseSUNDAY, JUNE 17TH, 1-4PM127 PARKSIDE CIRCLE Reduced price, bank wants offer. 3 bedroom, 2 bath 1535 square foot home in The Park. Freshly painted, new carpet, screened porch, spacious rooms. All on one acre. Priced to sell at $144,900. Call Lynn for more details. 545-8284 Dir.: From Crawfordville, east on Martin Luther King, right on Spring Creek Hwy., Right on Parkland, Right on Parkside, home on left.NEW LISTINGS 184 MARIE CIRCLE Doll house located in established family neighborhood near downtown Crawfordville. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths on 1/2 acre. Brick front, all kitchen appliances, plus RV shed / carport and chain link fenced backyard. Covered Porch gives this home some added outdoor living space. Great rst home and payments are cheaper than rent! Asking $92,900 Call David. 519-7944 213 MILL CREEK Charming 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 1 acre in Mill Creek subdivision. 1560 square feet, spacious living room, combo kitchen/dining room. Inside uitility room, large extra room could be used ar 4th bedroom, ofce, or family room. Screened-in porch leads to 1 car garage. 1 acre is fenced with gates. National Forest in walking distance. Asking $134,900. Call Lynn for more info. 545-8284 Coastwise Realty,Inc. We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Diekson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets.

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 Page 9B APRIL4, 2002, UNDER JOB NO. 01-034, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, ADISTANCE OF 1697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST, 360.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 200.49 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF CHANCE COURT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE ADISTANCE OF 212.88 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 231.49 FEET, THROUGH ACENTRAL ANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 38 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 61.66 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 11 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 61.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 232.20 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919); THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 330.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A1998 OR 1999 HOMES OF LEGEND SINGLE -WIDE VIN #HL9774AL. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 24th day of May, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News June 7 & 14, 2012 11-05421 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5230-0614 TWN Heirs of Martinson Kenneth H., Case No. 12-158CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-158CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN MARTINSON, husband and wife, and as Trustee of THE MARTINSON REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN H. MARTINSON, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 25, Block E. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10972-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. 5231-0614 TWN heirs of Arnold, Bert C. Case No. 12-159CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-159CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U.ARNOLDHUSBAND AND WIFE, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U. ARNOLD, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 53, BlockD. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10951-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the compliaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5231-0531 5235-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-130-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-130-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 22, Block K of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11131-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5235-0614 5236-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-131-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-131-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: 5237-0614 vs. Matthews Dorothy C. Case No: 12-124-CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-124-CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DOROTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, IF DECEASED OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DECEASED OR ALIVE, HER UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HER; OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PARTIES; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DORTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 142, Block A of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10859-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a de-fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: /s/ Glenda Porter, AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5237-0614 5253-0621 Estate of John D. Saunders, File No.12-44-CP, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION File Number 12-44-CP IN RE : ESTATE OF JOHN D. SAUNDERS, Deceased. NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The administration of the Estate of JOHN D. SAUNDERS, deceased, whose date of death was May 6, 2012, File Number 12-44-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida Probate Division, the address of which is Clerk of Court, Probate Division, Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALLINTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate,including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBA TE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHST ANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO YEARS OR MORE AFTER DECEDENTS DEA TH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of the Notice is June 14, 2012 Personal Representative /s/ ALFRED LAGRAN SAUNDERS 2010 Old Fort Drive, Tallahassee, Florida, 32301 Attorney for Personal Representative /s/ Robert S. Hightower, Florida Bar No. 199801, P.O. Box 4165, Tallahassee, Florida 32315 Telephone: (850) 222-3363 Facsimile:(850) 222-0992 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, June 14 & 21, 2012 5253-0621 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5246-0614 Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida Statues, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, June 22, 2012 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Heather Simmons Before the sale date of June 22, 2012, the owner may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the StowAway Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 June 7 and 14th, 2012. 5246-0614 5256-0621 Seminole Self StorageTWN PUBLIC NOTICE LEGALNOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON JUNE 29, 2012 A T 1 1:00 A.M AT2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONALPROPERTYOF: ALFONSO GUERRA CHRISTINE SURDAKOWSKI WES CROLEY BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF JUNE 29, 2012 THE OWNERS MAYREDEEM THEIR PROPERTYBYPAYMENTOF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COSTBYMAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON ATTHE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. June 14 and 21st, 2012 5256-0621 5245-0614 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART 1V Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Self Storage Notices Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, Saturday, June 23, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-W arehouse containing personal property of: Sara E. Skipper Wendy Gray Evelyn Green Self Storage Notices Before the sale date of Saturday,June 23, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. June 7 & June 14, 2012 5245-0614 Self Storage Notices Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5230-0531 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Lot 19, Block L of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11178-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5236-0614 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 27 33 39 42 49 53 61 64 67 2 28 50 3 29 45 4 23 46 5 24 43 18 21 40 54 62 65 68 6 15 30 34 51 7 31 47 55 8 25 35 56 9 32 48 52 26 44 63 66 69 10 16 19 22 41 57 11 36 58 12 37 59 13 38 60 ACROSS 1. Winter annoyance 6. Narcotic shrub 10. Quatrain scheme 14. Congregation divider 15. A Ponderosa son 16. Kirk's helmsman 17. Two balls, and a diner mishap 19. Swizzle 20. Bring home 21. Mortise mate 22. Lone Star State sch. 23. Pointillist's stroke 25. Infertile stretch of land 27. Slugger of 714 homers 32. Max, Buddy or Bugs 33. Really go for 34. Lunar valley 36. Try for apples 39. Works on a quilt 40. Bacall mate, familiarly 41. An amoeba has one 42. Serpentine swimmer 43. Invaders of the Roman Empi re 44. Aussie marsupial 45. __ uproar 47. Georgia's oldest city 49. Like a finished basement, perhaps 52. TGIF part 53. Competitive advantage 54. Buy alternative 57. Historic times 61. Sgt. Friday's force 62. Two balls, and a tape 64. Gilels or Jannings 65. Really steamed 66. Sheep-related 67. Heredity determinant 68. Take a short cut? 69. CSA notableDOWN1. Stuffing seasoning 2. The euro replaced it in Italy 3. Surfer, so to speak 4. Casts aspersions on 5. "I'm Dickens, __ Fenster" 6. Shop with urns 7. Val halla VIP 8. Chocolate substitute 9. Open to suggestion 10. Give confidence to 11. Two balls, and a morsel of food 12. From Mars, say 13. Post-pablum sounds 18. Rebuke to Brutus 24. Smelter input 26. Actress __ Dawn Chong 27. Pyramid's bottom 28. "Zip-__-Doo-Dah" 29. Two balls, and a juggler's prop 30. Track pace 31. Euphoric states 35. Kudrow or Bonet 37. Stewpot, or its contents 38. Not very interesting 40. Like a fillet 41. Forestall a shortage, perhaps 43. Eight pts. 44. Herriman's "Krazy" critter 46. Conifer leaf 48. __ Cong 49. Pequod co-owner, in "Mo by-Dick" 50. What "there is nothin' like" 51. Two-sport pro Sanders 55. Introduction to culture? 56. Good name for a herding dog 58. Tout's spot 59. Prom night woe 60. __-Ball (arcade game) 63. Anderson's "High __"American Prole Hometown Content 5/20/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 12 345 364 473 2 451 38 7629 9 26 537 68143 2009 HometownContent 612 9345 7 8 387652149 495187263 829 346751 534791682 761528394 943 275816 158463927 276819435 S A G E B A S E P E L E G L I R A A D E E A D A M E U S E R B O W L I N G P I N S L A N D E R S N E E D L E H E S O R E G A L E T T U B O N E L E S S C A F E T R O T D E I O N O D I N H I G H S A G R I C A R O B L I S A S H E P A M E N A B L E V I E T R A E K A T T O R A S S U R E C O N S E R V E B U T T E R B E A N R A I L A L I E N O L L A A C N E B U R P S B L A H S K E E

PAGE 24

Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 14, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear EarthTalk: I own a small business and would like to do what I can to minimize its impact on the environment. Can you help me? Jacob Levinson, New York, N.Y. There are many ways to green up any business, large or small and an added bene t might just be saving money. Just like individuals, businesses can measure their carbon footprints to get a sense of where they are starting from and to get some initial ideas of areas to focus on to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency offers a free Simpli ed GHG [greenhouse gas] Emissions Calculator to help small businesses get started. Another option is to enroll in TerraPasss Carbon Balanced Business program, which helps commercial entities measure and then offset the greenhouse gas emissions they are responsible for generating. Beyond carbon footprints, there are many other things businesses can do to minimize their environmental impacts. The non-profit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) reports that, first and foremost, businesses should shift the paper paradigm the average of ce tosses out about 350 pounds of paper per year per employee. Reducing your waste and purchasing paper with post-consumer recycled content can help save trees and nudge the pulp and paper industry, one of the most environmentally destructive industries in the world, toward a less damaging path, NRDC reports. Some easy ways to do this include setting printers to use both sides of a page (or designating a draft tray lled with paper thats blank on one side); buying copy paper with a 30 percent or more post-consumer recycled content; collecting used paper separately for recycling; and stocking bathrooms with post-consumer recycled tissue products. Getting more energy efficient is another way to save the Earth while saving money too. NRDC recommends taking advantage of the fact that most utilities offer free or inexpensive energy audits, whereby an engineer examines operations and provides a report about how to save on energy costs. Turning off lights and electronics at the end of the work day can save bundles of energy. Plug all your appliances into a power strip and youll only have to ip one switch at the end of the day, suggests NRDC. Also, setting computers to sleep or hibernate when inactive will further reduce a businesss footprint. And NRDC says to lose the screensavers: Flying toasters and slideshows can use up about $50 of electricity in a year. Lastly, when shopping for new of ce appliances, look for the EnergyStar label which means that the federal government has rated the particular unit highly in terms of energy ef ciency. Cutting water waste will also make a business run greener. The group says to install faucet aerators and low- ow toilets, check for and fix leaks, landscape with water efficiency in mind and recycle gray water where applicable for nonpotable uses such as watering gardens. Lastly, NRDC suggests creating a greener work environment, given that employees are on the front lines of any sustainability initiatives a business chooses to make perhaps by creating a green team with members from all divisions of the organization to help implement plans and bring new ideas to the table. Those looking to take their businesses down a green path should consult any of the free Greening Your Business guides on NRDCs website. Dear EarthTalk: Diesel exhaust from trucks, buses, large ships and farm equipment is especially unhealthy. What progress has been made in curbing diesel pollution? Jackie Mitchell Barre, Mass. Gasoline-powered passenger cars plying American roads have been subject to strict pollution limits for some three decades already, but only recently have tougher standards for diesel-powered trucks, trains, barges and other soot-belching vehicles gone on the books across the country. Traditionally, older diesel engines produce less carbon dioxide per mile driven than gasoline-powered vehicles, but they produce more of the pollution associated with localized environmental trauma such as smog and soot in the air that can trigger respiratory and cardiovascular problems and have been linked to lung and other cancers. Thanks to the work of the Environmental Defense Fund, American Lung Association (ALA) and others, though the U.S. government has adopted increasingly stringent rules governing how much particulate pollution and other toxins are allowed to come out of diesel engines. In 2001, these groups convinced Congress to pass strict new pollution limits on heavy-duty trucks and buses. Three years later similar standards were applied for non-road vehicles, including construction and farm equipment. These laws were designed to clean up new diesel engines, but the millions of older diesel engines still on American roads, work sites and waterways continue to cause pollution problems. Newer state laws in California, Texas and New York calling on owners of older diesel vehicles to retrofit their engines with emissions reduction equipment has helped clean the air in those states. And regional public-private partnerships administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Clean Diesel Campaign have also helped put a dent in diesel emissions from the trucking, rail and shipping sectors. Even though the clean-up of diesel engines has only been mandated in the U.S. within the last 10 years, the positive effects are already noticeable. A recent report (State of the Air: 2012) issued by the ALA found that, in urban areas across the U.S., ozonecausing smog is down 13 percent, soot levels are 24 percent lower and shortterm particulate pollution is down some 28 percent over the last decade. Meanwhile, Californias Diesel Risk Reduction Plan, which calls for cleaner-burning diesel fuels, retro tting of older engines with particle-trapping lters, and the use in new diesel engines of advanced technologies that yield some 90 percent fewer particle emissions, has already cut diesel particle emissions by 75 percent there, with 10 more percentage points worth of clean-up expected by 2020. Together, these regulations will prevent tens of thousands of deaths and hospit alizations each year, reports EDF. The billions of dollars in public health bene ts far outweigh the costs of controlling pollution. Green leaders concede we still have lots of work to do on the issue, given that 40 percent of the U.S. population still lives in areas with unsafe levels of smog and soot pollution. But there is optimism that pollution reduction policies like Californias will soon be standard elsewhere as well, making our air even cleaner and reducing the percentage of Americans living in areas with compromised air quality. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine, www.emagazine.com. How can businesses minimize their environmental impact? The average of ce tosses out about 350 pounds of paper per year per employee. Reducing paper usage and buying paper with post-consumer recycled content can go a long way to reduce any companys carbon footprint.PHOTO BY FOGSTOCK/THINKSTOCK e Natural Resources Defense Council reports that, rst and foremost, businesses should shift the paper paradigm the average o ce tosses out about 350 pounds of paper per year per employee. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle SNAPPER SEASON Sopchoppy Wednesday, July 4, 2012 10:00 am Downtown Parade 11:00 am Myron B. Hodge City Park Gates Open Noon Opening Ceremonies 12:30 pm Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Quartet from Sopchoppy1:00 pm Say On from Wakulla County2:00 pm Brook Sessions from Gadsden County3:00 pm The Currys from Gulf County4:30 pm Steve Leslie Nashville Songwriter6:00 pm Hits & Grins Trio Nashville Songwriters Lisa Shaffer Bill Whyte Steve Dean 7:30 pm Harvest Gypsies from Leon CountyNightfall Fabulous Fireworks around 9pm SilverBest Western-Wakulla Inns & Suites Bill & Bobbie Stephens From The Heart Recording Studio GoldCapital City Bank PlatinumCity of Sopchoppy Centennial Bank The Wakulla News Bronze Air-Con Gene Lambert Wakulla.com C & L Construction Wakulla News Niseys Bait and Tackle Baskerville-Donovan Roddenberry Surveying Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church Honorable Mention NoShoe FirearmsMany Thanks to our Sponsors________________________________________________ Myron B Hodge City Park Festival Myron B. Hodge City Park FestivalGr e at V endors S uper En t e r t a inm e n t F a bu l ou s Fi r e w ork s Gr e at V endors S uper En t e r t a inm e n t F a bu l ou s Fi r e w ork s Downtown Parade Downtown ParadeReal Amer i cana Real Amer i cana I ndependence Day C eleb r a t io n Independence Day Celebration