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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00412
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 06-07-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00412
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Wakulla FCAT Results By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County Commissioner Alan Brock has decided to seek reelection for his seat in District 1. Brock, who was born and raised in Wakulla County, was elected to the commission in 2008. Brock said he has learned a lot from his time on the commission and has thoroughly enjoyed his experience. He said he felt he has done a good job. I want to try and help make the progress we made continue to move forward,Ž Brock said. Brock will face challengers Ralph Thomas, Republican, and Jenny Brock, NPA, in the November election. Although some projects have moved slower than he would like, such as making Crawfordville a walkable, shoppable community, Brock said he felt the commission and the community is working together a lot better than in the past. The county commission meetings are no longer the best thing on TV,Ž Brock joked. He said he has worked hard to cut back on the rhetoric, as well as bringing the environmental community and business community together. Brock said there is a way to be in the middle, to promote jobs and environmental protection. One of his biggest accomplishments, he said, was helping to find a solution for the countys solid waste problem and leading the initiative for the county to require mandatory curbside garbage pickup. We were forced to make a choice,Ž Brock said. The county was losing $500,000 in solid waste, he said. He added that illegal dumping has decreased by 50 percent and recycling has increased by 50 percent in the county. Most people seem happy with the change, he said. And most people are saving money.Ž The county has also shifted from being reactive to proactive, Brock said. Which was a radical change, he added. Now, the county is planning ahead and creating 5-year plans and budgeting for future improvements and maintenance. This helps serve the community better, he said. Brock said he was also proud of his work on the Restore Act, which sought to ensure that at least 80 percent of the penalties paid by BP and others responsible for the oil spill are returned to the Gulf, the areas that were most affected by the BP Oil Spill. Brock said he wants to help bring back the most money he can for Wakulla County. The last four years serving the citizens have been an honor, he said. I really appreciate the opportunity to serve the citizens,Ž he said. Brock is a consultant, focusing on public health advocacy, policy and community campaigns.Continued on Page 3 Alan Brock is seeking another term as county commissioner for District 1. Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 22nd Issue Thursday, June 7, 2012 O n e S e c t i o n s One Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents kll h h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyThe WakullanewsThe Opinion Page ..............................................................Page 4 Church................................................................................Page 6 Community ........................................................................Page 7 School ................................................................................Page 8 Sports ................................................................................Page 9 Outdoors .........................................................................Page 10 Water Ways.....................................................................Page 11 Sheriffs Report ................................................................Page 12 Taking Care of Business ...................................................Page 13 Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 14 Classi eds ........................................................................Page 20 Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 20 Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 23 INDEX OBITUARIES Charles ‘Chris’ Seward Allen Loran Vann Haddock Alan Brock is seeking re-election to the commission By BETH ODONNELLAssistant Superintendent Wakulla School District students placed top 10 in the state on the most recently released Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) scores. This last wave of FCAT scores was published on Tuesday, June 5, by the Florida Department of Education for grades four through eight in Reading, Math and Science. Wakulla students ranked No. 1 in the region consisting of Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla, Jefferson, Liberty, Franklin, Madison, Calhoun and Taylor counties on all 12 of the scored areas released on June 5. Wakulla ranked No. 1 alone on fourth through eighth grade Reading, “ fth through eighth grade Math, and “ fth and eighth grade Science. Wakulla tied for No. 1 with Leon County for fourth grade Math. This years test scores re” ect new, more rigorous standards coupled with higher cut scores for pro“ ciency made more dif“ cult to attain from last year. Considering the tougher standards and increase in cut scores, this may be the best all around performance Ive seen by our students in my 17 years as superintendent,Ž said Superintendent David Miller. Our students, teachers, staff and parents are to be commended for keeping the focus on student achievement, no matter what changes they are faced with.Ž Of the 22 FCAT areas tested overall, Wakulla ranked in the top 10 in the state in 19 areas. In the regional districts of Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla, Jefferson, Liberty, Franklin, Madison, Calhoun and Taylor, students in Wakulla ranked “ rst in 14 areas, second in six areas and third in the remaining two areas. All areas released June 5 were above the state average. Individual student score reports will be available at the school sites after June 20. Parents may want to call their childs school ahead of time to make sure there is someone there who can help them. Score reports are coming back from the state later this year due to testing done later in the spring to capture more of what a student learns over the course of the entire school year. Earlier released scores for Wakulla High School ninth and 10th grade students showed them performing well on FCAT Reading and on the Geometry and Biology End of Course exams. In Reading, Wakulla ninth graders came in tied for No. 1 with Leon County in the region and at 10th highest in the state. Wakulla 10th graders came in at No. 2 in the region, behind only Calhoun County, and at sixth highest in the state. Continued on Page 2KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Top 10 in final FCAT scoresClass of 2012 GraduatesNew septic tank policy sent to stateBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.comThe Wakulla County Commission is proceeding with proposed changes to septic tank regulations, that include limiting the area where performance based septic systems are required in the county. At its June 4 meeting, the commission voted, three to two, with commissioners Alan Brock and Lynn Artz opposing, to send the policy amendments of the comprehensive plan to the state for comments. The item was heard at the planning commission meeting and was unanimously rejected. The current septic tank regulations are in the infrastructure element of the comprehensive plan and require a homeowner to replace a septic tank with a performance based septic system when the existing system fails or requires replacement or modi“ cation. The regulations are enforced county-wide. The policy also mandates that the systems must be inspected every three years. Many citizens have complained about the high cost of upgrading to a performance based system. Commissioner Randy Merritt brought the idea forward because he said he felt the commission that passed the change in 2006 simply threw a blanket regulation over the whole county. He has said previously that he believes the performance based septic systems should be limited to certain environmentally sensitive areas of the county. Continued on Page 3 County Commissioner Randy Merritt The rain threatened, but stayed away during Friday nights graduation at Wakulla High School, in which the Class of 2012 turned their tassels. For more photos of the ceremony, see Page 24. Reading: 5th in state, 1st in region Math: 10th in state, tied for 1st in region Reading: 9th in state, 1st in region Math: 4th in state, 1st in region Reading: 5th in state, 1st in region Math: 7th in state, 1st in region Reading: 6th in state, 1st in region Math: 5th in state, 1st in region Science: 6th in state, 1st in region Reading: 5th in state, 1st in region Math: 7th in state, 1st in region Science: 5th in state, 1st in region4th grade 6th grade 7th grade 5th grade 8th grade T a k i n g C a r e o f Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s Business News f r o m from See Page 13Page 9 TITANS ARE CHAMPS Sports

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 Qualifying is underwayQualifying for candidates is underway this week, beginning on Monday, June 4, at noon and running through Friday, June 8 at noon. For information, contact the Supervisor of Elections of ce at 926-7575. Reminder about signsAs election season gears up across Northwest Florida, the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) is reminding all citizens that state law prohibits political signs on state right of way. In Section 479.11(8), Florida Statutes provide that no signs shall be erected, used, operated, or maintained on the right of way of any highway on the State Highway System. Political signs placed on state right of way will be removed by FDOT staff and placed at one of the department's operations centers.  Democrat HQ to openThe grand opening of the Wakulla County Democratic Party Headquarters will be held on Friday, June 8, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. The headquarters is located in the North Pointe Center, 1626-B Crawfordville Highway near Iris Anne's and Auto Trim Design. Refreshments will be served. Candidates who will be attending the event include Cheryll Olah, Tax Collector; Donnie Sparkman, Property Appraiser; Buddy Wells, Supervisor of Elections; Bobby Pearce, Superintendent of Schools Alan Brock, County Commission District 1; and John Shuff, County Commission, District 5. Retiring Superintendent of Schools David Miller will also be attending. – Staff report Page 2 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1 On the Geometry EOC, ninth and 10th graders tied at No. 2 in the region and No. 5 in the state. Biology EOC scores in 10th grade came in at No. 2 in the region and at No. 3 in the state. On the Algebra EOC exam taken by students in grades eight and nine, the scores rated No. 9 in the state and No. 2 in the region. Although this is one snapshot of our students success, I believe that they would do well on any accountability piece as our country moves toward national Common Core Standards,Ž said Miller. I welcome the chance to see how well our students will be able to compete with other students across the nation and across the world,Ž he said.Wakulla Top 10 in “ nal FCAT scoresSpecial to The NewsFloridas students continue to exceed expectations on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT 2.0), according to a press release from the state Department of Education. The results for FCAT 2.0 Reading and Mathematics, released on Tuesday, June 5, show that students did better than expected overall when measured on more demanding standards. The 2011-12 school year is the “ rst time that new Achievement Levels are in place for FCAT 2.0 Reading and Mathematics. Florida is leading the nation by preparing our children for more challenging Common Core Standards and assessments. I applaud our students and teachers for their inspired efforts,Ž said Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson. Our state has spent more than a decade reforming public education and we know that sound transition takes time and patience,Ž he said. Floridas children will compete for the jobs of tomorrow and we must do everything possible to ensure that they are ready. We cannot be fearful of change and the ambitious goals set before us,Ž Robinson said. We will meet them together and I am confident that our students are on the path to success.Ž In both reading and mathematics, students performed better than expected based on applying the new higher standards to 2011 performance data. Results for 2012 FCAT 2.0 Reading show that 59 percent of students in grades four through eight are performing at Achievement Level 3 and above (compared to 57 percent in 2011). In FCAT 2.0 Mathematics, 2012 results show that 57 percent of students in grades four through eight are performing at Achievement Level 3 and above (compared to 56 percent in 2011). Results for 2012 FCAT 2.0 Science for grades “ ve and eight show that 51 percent of students in grade “ ve performing at or above Achievement Level 3, and 46 percent in grade eight. Results for 2012 FCAT 2.0 Science are reported as FCAT Equivalent Scores. This means that student scores were measured using the existing FCAT Achievement Level scoring table. Scores on the new FCAT 2.0 Science achievement scale will be available beginning in 2013. While the state does not base grade promotion or student progression decisions on the FCAT 2.0 results, individual districts may have progression policies tied to the scores. As a valuable indicator of student achievement, FCAT 2.0 scores give parents and educators the ability to make informed educational decisions. In December 2011, the State Board of Education reviewed data showing the impact of new achievement levels on students and schools. Based on the data and feedback from educators, parents, and community members, the State Board raised the expectations for Floridas students and set new achievement levels for FCAT 2.0. To view information about the new achievement levels for FCAT 2.0 Reading and Mathematics, visit http://fcat.” doe.org/ fcat2/pdf/spring12ffs.pdf. By DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 30 … Sometime next year, you might be watching C-Span and listening to a roll call vote from the ” oor of Congress. Mr. Van Hollen? Aye. Ms. Velazquez? Aye. Mr. Visclosky? Aye. Mr. VoteforEddie. com? No!.Ž Wait. Who? VoteforEddie.com is running for the 25th Congressional District as a no party candidate, challenging Republican Rep. Mario DiazBalart. VoteforEddie.com is the guys name on the ballot. From his website … which is the same as his name … he appears to be serious about his run. VoteforEddie. com says ending Americas addiction to oil,Ž is his top priority. He also wants to push for tax cuts. VoteforEddie.com doesnt try to hide his more conventional original name, Eddie Gonzalez, putting it at the top of a biographical sketch on his Web page. He was born in 1980, the son of Cuban immigrants. His father was a distribution manager for the Miami Herald, his mother has a dental practice. He lives in Hialeah. VoteforEddie.com says he wants to represent independent voters in Congress, noting that nobody in Congress now really does that, even though more than a third of Americans identify themselves as such. I, along with a majority of Americans ƒ. feel that career politicians have lost touch with the working class,Ž he says on his website. The 249 millionaires and 202 lawyers that are in Congress are not a true representation of this nation as a whole. They are the silver spooned elite that are guiding this country on an unsustainable course. We cannot continue to follow them into record de“ cits, crushing debt and endless dependence on oil for their own personal gains or indifference.Ž The candidate formerly known as Eddie Gonzalez legally changed his name to VoteforEddie.com, according to a document “ led with the circuit court in Miami that he provided to state elections of“ cials after they initially noti“ ed him that he appeared to have forgotten to include his name when he “ rst signed up to run … instead giving them only a web address. Ah, but it wasnt a mistake, he told them. State of“ cials also sent VoteforEddie.com a copy of a Division of Elections opinion saying he couldnt use a nickname … so he sent them a copy of the court order from January in which he legally changed his name. The next day, the Division of Elections sent him a letter back, beginning, Dear Mr. VoteforEddie.com,Ž that acknowledged receipt of his request to be listed on the states candidate website, which he now is. VoteforEddie.com, who didnt immediately respond to a request for comment, seems to have some grassroots support … he will qualify for the ballot by having turned in petition signatures.State FCAT scores show better than expected results overall The Wakul la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com VoteforEddie.com wants you to vote for VoteforEddie.comPolitical Briefs JUNE 201217 Father’s Day Subscribe Now 10 Months for $ 20 12 New Subscribers Only! Honor your Dad today by giving him a gift subscription to The Wakulla News! SALE ENDS JUNE 30, 2012 Happy Father’s Day $ 20.12 Mail or bring coupon with payment to Offer good for Wakulla County subscribers only.All major credit cards accepted. Offer expires 6/30/2012NAME _____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ CITY ________________ZIP __________________________ PHONE _________________ NEWNEW SUBSCRIBERS

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Special to The NewsThe clear morning air around Wakulla Correctional Institution split with the crackling of a 21-gun salute on Thursday, May 31, as the culmination of a ceremony to fallen of“ cers who had died in the line of duty. Bereaved family members, Florida Department of Corrections of“ cers and members and other public safety professionals gathered to pay homage to the men of the department who had fallen in the course of the past year. This memorial service is important because our people are important,Ž said DOC Secretary Ken Tucker. Dedicated does not begin to explain the men and women of the Department,Ž Tucker said during the ceremony that also honored the families of the fallen. Deputy DOC Secretary Mike Crews echoed that thought: Not a day goes by that Secretary Tucker and I arent proud of your dedication and service to Florida,Ž he told the assembly of more than 500 men and women at the ceremony. Those honored included 24-year-old Sergeant Ruben Thomas III, who was stabbed to death by a Columbia Correctional Institution inmate on March 18, Behavioral Specialist Kirk Cummings, who died from a heart attack while on duty at Union Correctional Institution and Colonel Greg Malloy of Holmes Correctional Institution, who died in an ambush set by a ” eeing suspect. The ceremony included speeches from Tucker and Crews and Assistant Secretary of Institutions Tim Cannon as well as Wakulla CI Warden Ricky Dixon. The names of all of those honored over the years were read off. The ceremony ended with a playing of Taps.Ž We can never repay our brothers and sisters for what theyve given us,Ž Tucker said. They kept our families safe. They exempli“ ed bravery in their sel” ess actions. And they are missed. While we cannot repay them, it behooves all of us to learn from them and to remember those employees who have sacri“ ced everything … for us,Ž he said. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 – Page 3 PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1His main years in of“ ce, he has spent the majority of his time focused on being a commissioner. It gives me the ” exibility to serve the people of Wakulla County,Ž Brock said.He serves on the Big Bend Homeless Coalition Board and is a commission representative on the Small County Coalition of Florida and Wakulla County Tourist Development Council. He has also served as chairman for the last year, voted in by his fellow commissioners. He is also active with the United Way of the Big Bend, being named the volunteer of the year. He is also very involved with Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend and is a member of Wakulla United Methodist Church.Brock seeks re-electionContinued from Page 1Commissioner Mike Stewart agreed and said the policy was too far reaching. The nitrogen reducing systems would be required to be installed for new development that are smaller than 5 contiguous acres and located within Bloxham Cutoff at the county line traveling east to Crawfordville Highway; from Crawfordville Highway from Bloxham Cutoff to East Ivan Road; East Ivan Road to Wakulla Arran Road; Wakulla Arran Road west to Cajer Posey Road; Cajer Posey Road south to Shadeville Highway; Shadeville Highway from Cajer Posey Road to Bloxham Cutoff; Bloxham Cuttoff from Shadeville Highway to Woodville Highway; Woodville Highway to the county line; from the county line back to the beginning point at Bloxham Cutoff. They will also be required within 150 feet of the high water level of any surface water, wet sink, swallet or within 300 feet of a “ rst or second magnitude spring, as well as properties where the total acreage is less than 0.229 contiguous acres of deeded property. Some residents have expressed their desire to see the protection zone expanded. Cal Jamison, former Wakulla Springs Ambassador, said, This is a very fragile, highly vulnerable area.Ž He told the commission of the hundreds of sinkholes located within the county and said the proposed area does not even include all of the Wakulla Springs protection zone. Brock was concerned about Spring Creek not being included in the protection area. Thats the part that gives me great pause,Ž Brock said. The proposed revisions will also delete the countys requirement that nitrogen levels must be reduced by 90 percent. The county would then fall under state standards, which is 50 percent. I still cant find science to tell me that the performance based septic systems work as well as they advertise it does,Ž Stewart said. At a previous meeting, Health Department Administrator Padraic Juarez said most of the systems in the county did not reduce the nitrogen levels by 90 percent. There were a few that did obtain 90 percent, he said, but most were reaching the national average of 50 percent. Artz said if the systems are only reducing levels by 50 percent, that was still signi“ cant. Its cutting the risk to our countys health,Ž Artz said. Stewart said recent studies have shown that septic tanks in Wakulla County are responsible for less than 1 percent of the pollution in Wakulla Springs. We arent generating it,Ž Stewart said. Commissioner Jerry Moore said the percentage Wakulla County contributes is .76 percent. He demonstrated this by stacking three cases of bottled water, which represented the pollution coming from Tallahassee, and pouring the .76 percent of water into a glass showing Wakullas amount. Requiring everyone in the county to have a performance based system is just bull,Ž he said. Artz urged the board to look at the “ nancial aspect of the regulations if money was the issue instead of going backward and decreasing the protection zone, but her plea would not sway Moore, Stewart or Merritt. Its just short-sighted,Ž Artz said. Once the areas are heavily polluted, it will be hard to correct it, she said. Previously, the commission was looking at taking out the speci“ c septic tank language in the comprehensive plan and incorporating general protection language. The more speci“ c requirements would be made in the land Development code. However, the Florida Legislature adopted House Bill 1263 which repealed the requirement for septic tank inspections and limited the area where performance based systems can be required. The countys comprehensive plan provisions are grandfathered in and to ensure that the county is in the best legal position, County Attorney Heather Encinosa suggested instead to propose a separate policy that includes these revisions and narrows the policy already in the comprehensive plan. The policy amendments will be sent to the state for its comments and then will appear before the county commission one last time for a “ nal vote.By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netSeveral transportation projects are proposed in the Wakulla 2020 plan and former Chamber president John Shuff, who is leading the charge, gave the Wakulla County Commission an overview of those projects at its June 4 meeting. Previously, the idea was to focus solely on Highway 319. The Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee has now broadened its scope to include all areas in the county. However, Shuff said the “ rst project would be improving six intersections along Highway 319. The intersections would start at Bloxham Cuttoff and go up to U.S. Highway 98. There were also plans to include sidewalks in Crawfordville, Medart, Panacea, St. Marks and Sopchoppy. However, it isnt clear whether the money generated from the half-cent sales tax would be allowed to be used for sidewalks, under Florida Statutes. County Attorney Heather Encinosa said she believes sidewalks can only be included if work is being done on that road, but planned to delve a little deeper. It was Shuffs understanding that it was allowed for small counties, as long as an ordinance was adopted by the county commission. Other projects include adding a couple of turn lanes in Medart and a few in Panacea for better traf“ c ” ow, as well as paving Tower Road near Panacea for hurricane evacuation safety. There were two road resurfacing projects suggested in St. Marks, paving Old Woodville Highway in Wakulla Station and widening the shoulder on Shell Point Road and Smith Creek Road. Extending the Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail into Sopchoppy was also on the list. Currently, the trail stops right outside the city. That trail goes from Mashes Sands to Highway 319 near the city limits. The committee also added a bike path that would extend to Wakulla Springs in Wakulla Station. Shuff said there was also an idea to have transportation for those people who live in Wakulla County and commute to Tallahassee for work. Wakulla is destined to be a retirement, bedroom community, Shuff said. All these priorities were established by the Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee, who have been meeting since it was created by the board in February. It is Shuffs hope that if the citizens decide to move forward with the Wakulla 2020 plan and vote for the half-cent sales tax on the November ballot, that fourlaning Highway 319 would move up on the priority list. Shuff, County Commissioner Randy Merritt and County Administrator David Edwards were meeting with representatives from DOT this week to discuss Wakulla 2020. The whole idea for Wakulla 2020 began because of several citizens frustration with the 20-year delay of four-laning Highway 318 from DOT. An ad-hoc committee of chamber members and economic development council members started meeting more than a year ago to “ nd a solution. Their idea came from Tallahassees BluePrint 2000 concept. If the referendum is approved by voters in November, the county commission would then create an interlocal authority that would oversee Wakulla 2020. Shuff said the tax is estimated to generate about $20 million over the next 15 years, and with a bonding stream and debt service estimate, it would leave them with a total between $14 million and $15 million to spend. The committee will also seek out grant funding. There is also the hope that DOT would help fund projects. Commissioner Randy Merritt again stated his concern that this referendum might jeopardize the extension of the one-cent sales tax in 2014. Sixty percent goes to transportation and roads and the remaining goes to the library, parks and recreation, public facilities and public safety. Commissioner Mike Stewart said he hopes it passes in November, but reiterated Merritts concerns about the one-cent sales tax not being renewed. If we lose it, were up the creek,Ž Stewart said. In a previous vote, Stewart and Merritt voted against the measure moving forward. While Commissioners Alan Brock, Lynn Artz and Jerry Moore voted in favor of adding it to the ballot. The ballot language will come before the board to approve at the July meeting.COUNTY COMMISSIONProposed projects for Wakulla 2020 announcedBoards new septic tank policy is sent to stateDOC remembers its fallen in ceremony ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: CITY OF ST. MARKS CDBG STREETSCAPE PROJECT (C.D.B.G. #:11DB-C5-02-75-02-C02) JUNE 7, 2012 PUBLIC NOTIFICATION MAY 17, 24, 31 JUNE 7, 2012 000ARJS 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET?

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Page 4 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Wakulla Gardens residents face pay for paving • A DOG’S LIFE: Abandoned at the animal shelter, today Geist is training for DOC • Coast Guard Auxiliary for June 7 •Charles ‘Chris’ Seward Allen obituary • Conference covered important issues (Letter) • Loran Vann Haddock obituary • From the Dock for June 7• Good News About Aging: Dreaming of deep sleep € thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Clarifying Emerald Sink incident Sheri s work crew were heroes Law-abiding gun owners under attack Were boat launch fees advertised? Emerald Sink story was ” awedEditor, The News:The May 24 Underwater Wakulla article by Gregg Stanton regarding Emerald Sink includes several incorrect statements. The story implies the Wakulla Springs State Park staff was irresponsible and unconcerned with protecting resources such as Emerald Sink. When it was discovered there was a car in the privately owned Emerald Sink, it was quickly removed. Staff from Wakulla Springs State Park, DEP, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce, St. Joe and volunteers worked together to quickly remove the car and put measures in place to prevent another car from being dumped in the sink. As people became aware of the importance of protecting sinkholes there were more requests for assistance with cleaning up privately owned sinkholes. Tons of debris have been removed from Wakulla Countys karst windows that lead to our drinking water. It would be another 7 years before Emerald Sink was acquired by the state. During that 7-year period, several parcels of land that contained sinkholes, including Emerald, were leased by the Woodville Karst Plain Project, an exploration cave diving team, from the St. Joe Company. These leases were much like those by hunt clubs and resulted in restricted access to these private lands. This in turn protected the resources from further vandalism. In 2003, Emerald Sink, along with numerous other sinks, was purchased with funds from the Florida Forever program. The primary purpose of the acquisition was groundwater protection. There were no funds or staff provided for park development or adding recreational activities. Johnny Richards did in fact rally the troops and because of his efforts $8,900 was donated by divers and dive organizations. Wakulla Diving Center contributed $100. The funds were managed by the Friends of Wakulla Springs. Park staff obtained the required state and county permits. State funds and staff were used to install fencing and to construct an access road and parking lot. Vince Ferris, a diver from Panama City, donated his professional services to produce the drawings and manage the project. It was a great group of volunteers who worked four weekends to construct the “ rst class facility. I was impressed and thoroughly enjoyed being with the group. The next challenge was to determine how best to allow recreational diving without serious injuries or causing damage to the resource. Representatives from the following organizations developed the criteria for allowing dive access to Emerald Sink: Global Underwater Explorers, International Association of Nitrox and Technical Divers Inc., National Association for Cave Diving, National Speleological Society-Cave Diving Section and Technical Diving International. Because of the highly technical nature of the activity, park staff did not vote on the criteria. After much discussion the criteria were accepted and a reservation procedure was put in place. In April 2007, Emerald Sink was once again open for recreational diving. In 2011, another site, Clear Cut, was opened using the same criteria. Since being established 125 divers have met the criteria and are currently authorized to dive Emerald and Clear Cut Sinks. In todays society, it is easy to sit back and complain when things dont go your way. It is never easy working through issues where there is disagreement. People like Jason Ottinger, Kelly Jessop and several others who worked on the Emerald Sink project showed that we could work together. Sandy Cook Wakulla Springs Park Manager 1992-2008 Editor, The News: In response to Gregg Stantons column of May 24 about a stolen car dumped in Emerald Sink, I would like to provide clari“ cation on the matter of protecting Emerald Sink. Mr. Stanton states, ŽI called friends I knew in state government to get the car out as soon as possible, but found little interest. I “ nally threatened to go to the press.Ž There is more to this story than Mr. Stanton knows. In December 1994, the Wakulla Springs Basin Working Group had begun working with the county commission and public and private landowners along the route of the Wakulla Springs cave system to protect the sinks on their properties. Three weeks before the car was dumped in Emerald Sink, The Wakulla News ran a news release prepared by the Working Group and the Wakulla County planning of“ ce to raise local awareness about protecting sinkholes so as to protect drinking water and Wakulla Springs. On Sunday, April 30, 1995, divers discovered the car in Emerald Sink. The Wakulla County and the Leon County sheriffs departments began coordinating the removal of the car … which occurred three days later on May 3. The Tallahassee Democrat ran an article about the incident that day having interviewed staff of the Florida Department of Health, the Department of Environmental Protection and the Wakulla Springs State Park manager. On June 13, 1995, I met with the manager of St Joe Development, which owned Emerald Sink, and asked him to block the roads to Emerald and Split Sinks to protect them from further vandalism. Within two weeks St Joe blocked the roads. We installed signs in the area to keep vehicles away from the sinks in a cooperative effort by the DEP, Northwest Florida Water Management District, Wakulla County Sheriff and St Joe. We also printed lea” ets to educate the public, including divers, about keeping their vehicles away from sinks. The lea” ets were distributed by the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce, and at the Coral Reef and the Scuba Discovery dive shops in Tallahassee. Fortunately, Emerald and several other sinks connected to the cave system have been acquired by the state and added to Wakulla Springs State Park for management. This action has protected the sinks, Wakulla Springs and the drinking water of Wakulla County citizens. It is all the same water. It is clear that federal, state and local government agencies and private landowners have been responsive and provided leadership to protect our water.Jim Stevenson Coordinator, Wakulla Springs Basin Working Group 1992-2010 Editor, The News: Ive been a subscriber almost always since I arrived in this beautiful county in 1995. I have just reviewed completely the last issue of The Wakulla News to make sure of something I wasnt aware of. There was no notice given, at least in your newspaper, of the county now charging $5 for a boat launch fee at Mashes Sands. I was informed by a gentleman living there at county expense that this was made effective on May 1. Hmmm? The previous week, the county had a collection booth set up beyond the boat launch to collect a fee from people brave enough to go to Mashes Sands Beach. In my opinion, that beach should be declared a disaster area and an area waiting for a lawsuit to happen. Its full of stumps, rocks, stones and the beach itself has all but disappeared. The county, if anything, should be paying people to go there and not charging them for the privilege!Ž There was no fee for entering the boat launch at that time because the collection point was set up further down the road. So much for the May 1 declaration unless he was talking about the beach collection? With that being said, I approached the collection point on Sunday, June 3. with my pontoon boat in tow. I did see the boothŽ and a young gentleman standing nearby. I thought that they had just decided, for some reason, to move the booth inward to where it was now at the boat launch area. I gave it no more thought than that as I moved pass the collection point and entered the launch area. I was approached shortly thereafter by a gentleman telling me that I had blown pastŽ the collection point (at a whopping 3 mph). I replied, What collection point, I thought that was for the foolhardy braving the so-called beach?Ž He said we are now collecting for the boat launch too. I said Ive lived here for 18 years and this launch was always free as far as I could recall. He said things are changing.Ž Indeed. I think we are witnessing the Wakulla version of the Obama Administration. Talking to a fellow boater who arrived after me, he said that he didnt have to pay the $5, that the collector gentleman had run out of orange tabsŽ that they used to identify who had entered. Then another boater told me he didnt have to pay either because he was a veteran! I am too, I just didnt think fast enough! Questions: what would our Georgia and Tallahassee neighbors do if they had driven there with boat in tow and no money? I know the county is broke beyond repair but it would help a lot if they would advertise fee increases in advance instead of putting them into effect with no notice. It is possible that the increases, both for Suicide Beach and the boat launch, were advertised in The Wakulla News but I didnt see them. Thank you, Bill Catalina Crawfordville SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe car being removed from Emerald Sink in 1995. Editor, The News: As a resident of Shell Point, I would like to commend our Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce work crew, managed by officer Ron Crum. They come weekly to clean our beautiful beach. They not only pick up trash and recycling but have rebuilt our fences and added new plants. They always offer a smile and a wave as I am a regular walker going by. Besides the crews wonderful work ethic and great attitude, they went above and beyond one day in April. There were severe winds and whitecaps galore. A local neighbor decided to burn his trash pile on this unfavorable day. Unfortunately, it got out of control and not only spread up, but over! As my daughter and I were walking, we not only saw smoke, but insurmountable ” ames! We ran over to assist the house that was being invaded as my friend has a baby and a young son. Plus, the homeowner is in her 90s. Upon getting there, we observed the sheriffs work crew already there hosing down the fire, slamming down flames with their shovels and sweating profusely. These were the men we just observed minutes ago at the beach. How they saw the ” ames, left their job site, tied shirts around their faces trying not to breathe in the smoke and tackled the “ re is beyond me. They would escape the tremendous temperatures for just a few moments, gain their bearings and tackle the “ re again. These four workers and Of“ cer Crum put out this raging “ re singlehandedly. When the trained professionals arrived, this courageous crew went back to the beach and “ nished their task before heading on to the next county park. Please note, these courageous men were not trained volunteers or professional “ re“ ghters, they were caring Wakulla citizens just like the rest of us. Thank you, gentlemen! E. King Shell PointREADERS WRITE:Editor, The News: Recently, more than ever, law-abiding gun owners and the National Ri” e Association have been under attack by the Liberal Left media. Therefore it was a relief to see the article by Marj Law portray gun ownership in a positive light. (Laws column, Home on the Range,Ž appears in The Wakulla News on an occasional basis.) In the wake of the MartinZimmerman case, anti-gun liberals and the media sensationalists have nominated Zimmerman as the face of the NRA. I challenged the editors of the Tallahassee Democrat to “ nd just one NRA member who has committed a felony with, or otherwise misused, a “ rearm. Im still waiting, and it aint George Zimmerman. One writer stated that NRA members had much to lose, and were cheering for Zimmerman. Nothing could be further from the truth. As a Life Endowment member of the NRA, I believe all our members expect all laws to be enforced to the maximum, and that especially applies to “ rearms. Its the liberal left who water down the law, thereby enhancing criminality by opposing capital punishment as being Draconian, and insisting that prison life be a Club Med experience. H. Davis Quick Crawfordville

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Page 6 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events ObituariesMedart Area Crawfordville Area Crawfordville Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY NIGHT SERVICES6:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study3086 Crawfordville Highway (One block south of Courthouse)850-926-7896www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc. 551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Digni“ed Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Tallahassee Church BriefsCharles ‘Chris’ Seward Allen Loran Vann HaddockBy ETHEL SKIPPER Remembering the 20th of May in Sopchoppy and Buckhorn, we didnt visit around the other community a lot. The churches and community leaders would come together and have a good time. During election years, the candidates running for of“ ce always took part in the celebration. There were always free “ sh frys, and a little money was passed out to those people who would see that people got to the voting place. At that time, a small number of people had cars. The 20th of May was a time everyone shared. Ladies cooked cakes and pies and other good food. Everybody was welcome. That was in the past. People showed love and cared for each other. It was not about color. Surely things have changed. If we could turn the clock back, what number would you choose? Yes, we need to be fair with each other, make a difference. Teach love, preach love, sing it, show love. As Bible readers and churchgoers, believers of Jesus Christ our Lord, will make a difference in our lives. We are told to forget those things behind us and press on for a better way, focus on a day we all can come together. Happy birthday to Arianna Hawkins on June 2, Lachritan Skipper on June 4, Pastor Ethel Skipper on June 23, and Willie Skipper Jr. on June 25.Buckhorn NewsLoran Vann Haddock, born April 19, 1941, passed from this life on May 24 at his home in Medart. He was a longtime resident of Wakulla County and a former employee of Jones Plumbing Company. He now joins his mother, Lena Phillips; father, Dellmar L. Haddock; sister, Voncile; two brothers, D.L and Marion; daughter, Phyllis; and beloved mother, Betty. He was a loving father to his children, Lora Richey, Vann, Phyllis, Vonn, Joseph and Robert. He was a kind grandfather and great-grandfather who will be missed by all of us. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel was assisting with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Loran Vann Haddock Charles ‘Chris’ Seward Allen Jeffrey Calaluca Gaballi Taste Sampler is June 16 SpaceQuest VBS at First Baptist Macedonia to host VBS June 18-22Charles ChrisŽ Seward Allen, 53, of St. Marks, passed away Saturday, June 2, in St. Marks. He was born Sept. 14, 1958, in Ocala. He moved to this area in 1980 coming from Apalachicola. He was a selfemployed Aquatic Horticulturist. He attended River of Life Church. He enjoyed “ shing and hunting. He was a member of the Christian Motorcycle Association and ABATE. Chris loved his daughters more than anything and loved his animals too. Memorial services will be Saturday, June 9 at 11 a.m. at River of Life Church in Crawfordville. In lieu of ” owers, please make donations to Florida Wild Mammal Association (FWMA), 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville FL 32327. He is survived by two daughters, Nicole Anne Allen and Hannah Dane Allen of Wakulla County; and their mother, Stephanie Kaye Allen; father, Virgil Jerome Allen of Apalachicola; brother, Clifford Allen of Apalachicola; sisters, Bonnie Jean Allen of Wakulla and Terra Carni of Gainesville, and her children, William David Carni III and Shannon J. Carni. He was predeceased by his mother, Anne OQuinn Allen. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting with arrangements. Gaballi Food Taste Sampler will be held Saturday, June 16, from 9 a.m. to noon at Ocklockonee Bay United Methodist Church, 2780 Surf Road in Panacea. For more information, go to www.obayumc.com or call (850) 984-0127. The next Gaballi order deadline is Sunday, June 23, before midnight for distribution on Saturday, June 30, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Referral code is ochlokoneebayumc. Crawfordville First Baptist Church will be having their Vacation Bible School all day on Saturday, June 23. Registration will begin at 9:30 a.m. The travelers will blast off promptly at 10 a.m. and will explore the mission Jesus has for them in John 14:6. They will jet off to “ ve different space stops, and enjoy interplanetary crafts, recreation and lunch. All children entering kindergarten through completing “ fth grade are welcome to travel the galaxies with us. There will be a launchpad return celebration and program for parents at 5 p.m. For more information call the church of“ ce at 9267896. Macedonia Church of Christ Written in Heaven will hold a Vacation Bible School the week of June 18-22 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. Breakfast and lunch will be served daily and transportation may be provided. For more information, contact Elder Alfred Nelson, pastor, at (850) 264-6621, or Elder Delores Nelson, youth minister, at (850) 933-9587.By REV. JAMES L. SNYDERI would agree with the idea that religion comes in all shapes, sizes and temperaments. It is quite obvious that sanity is not a prerequisite of religion. If it were, most religions would go out of business within the 30day money back guarantee period. Every religion has some sort of litmus test for faith. It is in this area of religion that smacks so loudly of insanity. Superstition, regardless of the basis, is one great common denominator of all religion. It is not that I mind superstition; I just do not want it associated with my religion. I read in the newspaper headlines just this week a pastor was killed by a rattlesnake bite. I had almost forgotten this sort of thing went on in our sophisticated, enlightenedŽ world. As a young preacher, I was visiting a congregation in Kentucky as the guest speaker for that Sunday. Never mind the town or the church that is beside the point. I got to the church a little early and was escorted around the church looking at the facilities. Then they took me into the sanctuary where I could look at the pulpit and the sanctuary where I would be preaching. Being the observant person that I am, I noticed a basket next to the pulpit. I had never seen such a basket before him all my life. I really did not know too much about the church and now I cannot remember exactly why I was invited to preach there. Be that as it may, I was greatly curious about the basket next to the pulpit. I did not know if it was a wastebasket or if perhaps it was the offering basket and the congregation would “ ll it up before the service was over. So, I asked my host what the basket was next to the pulpit. Thats where we keep the rattlesnake,Ž he said rather passively. Say what!Ž That basket there is where we keep the rattlesnake that we use in our service.Ž I can take a joke and give it joke back with the best of them. I responded with a hearty laugh. Ha, ha, ha,Ž I said goodnaturedly. Really, what is that basket for?Ž I could see my host was not the least bit amused with my persistent inquiry. I said,Ž he said rather sternly, thats where we keep our rattlesnake for our church service.Ž He then stared at me for a few moments and then said, I dont think well need it in our service today. You dont look like you have enough faith.Ž Inside me, I sighed a deep sigh of relief. Continued on Page 19Snake, rattle and roll in the aislesThe memorial service for Jeffrey Calaluca will take place on Tuesday, June 12, at 4:30 p.m. at the First Baptist Church of St. Marks.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 – Page 7happenings in our community CommunityArea at WHS is certi“ ed wildlife habitat The property of Wakulla High School has been recognized as a Certi“ ed Wildlife Habitat site by the National Wildlife Federation. The property attracts birds, butter” ies and other local animals by providing a wildlife-friendly landscape. More information about gardening for wildlife or how to get a yard certi“ ed can be found at www.nwf.org/gardenforwildlife.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Jenny Brock, of North Florida Wildlife Federation, and Debra Madden of Wakulla High School Nicole Stanton graduated from the University of Rhode Island with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering on May 20. She is the daughter of Gregg and Ann Stanton of Crawfordville. The main campus of the University of Rhode Island is located in Kingston, R.I.Stanton earns degree Nicole Stanton with her parents Birth announcement Christina Pope and Craig Revell of Crawfordville announce the birth of their son Thomas Craig Revell Jr. on May 14 at 5:29 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He was 8 pounds, 1 ounce and was 20.5 inches. He has two brothers, Richard Pope 13, and Dalson Pope, 11, and two sisters, Alayna Pope, 7, and Ava Pope, 4. His maternal grandparents are Ross and Debbie Lee of Southport. His paternal grandparents are Debra and Sam Simmons of Crawfordville. His great-grandparents are the late Doris Sanders of Sopchoppy and the late Carlton Revell of Sopchoppy. omas C. Revell Jr. Free meals o ered during the summer for children Special to The NewsMore than 1.6 million kids across Florida can receive free meals during the summer at the Summer BreakSpot, the states summer nutrition program for children 18 and under provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Summer BreakSpots will open in Wakulla County beginning June 6. Families can “ nd locations in their community by calling 2-1-1 or visiting www.summerfood” orida.org. An aggressive statewide outreach campaign was launched last month to ensure more families know about the sites in their community. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is leading the campaign in partnership with Florida Impact and the Florida Partnership to End Childhood Hunger, representing hundreds of communitybased organizations across the state. Were excited that Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, his staff and our community partners in Wakulla County have made it a priority to expand and promote the summer feeding program so more kids have access to nutritious meals during the summer,Ž said Debra Susie, executive director of Florida Impact. We encourage families in Wakulla County to find a Summer BreakSpot near them for free nutritious meals in a safe, supervised environment for their children.Ž To “ nd a Summer BreakSpot site, visit www.summerfood” orida.org or call 2-1-1. The following school sites in Wakulla County will be participating in the Summer Food Service Program: € Wakulla Education Center located at 87 Andrew Hargrett Sr. Road. Meals will be served beginning Wednesday, June 6 and ending Aug. 7. The site will offer meals Monday through Thursday and on Friday, June 8. The site will be closed Wednesday, July 4, and Thursday, July 5. Breakfast will be served from 8:30 to 9:15 a.m. Lunch will be served from 11:30a.m. to 12:15p.m. € Wakulla High School located at 3237 Coastal Highway. Meals will be served beginning Monday, June 11, and ending July 12. The site will offer meals Monday through Thursday. The site will be closed Wednesday, July 4 and Thursday, July 5. Lunch will be served from 11:30-12:15p.m. € Medart Elementary School located at 2558 Coastal Highway. Meals will be served beginning Monday, June 11 and ending July 12. The site will offer meals Monday through Thursday. The site will be closed Wednesday, July 4 and Thursday, July 5. Breakfast will be served from 8:30 to 9:15 a.m. Lunch will be served from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15p.m. Healthy food and non-perishables are needed at local food pantries during the summer Special to The NewsThere continues to be an economic situation in the county that makes it difficult for citizens to feed their families. Consider stocking up on non-perishables that can be given to those in need or donate extra gardening vegetables and fruits to enhance overall diets. Canned goods come with varying amounts of added salt. Everyone should be trying to cut back on their sodium intake so consider buying canned goods with that in mind. Beans and rice are excellent ways to provide rich protein to families. They are inexpensive and “ lling and can be used in a variety of recipes. Pasta, especially if made with whole wheat, is also excellent. Canned meats and soups are always appreciated. Oatmeal, instant, dry or evaporated milk are versatile additions to any household pantry. Peanut butter and dried fruits, cold cereals, especially those that are low in sodium and sugar, are also great. Community collection containers have been placed around the county to take the food to the local food pantries. The Wakulla County Extension Office, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville, is one place to leave donated food, as well as the public library. When a quantity is realized, volunteers deliver the food to all of the food pantries on as equitable basis as possible. Consider a food drive through the groups with whom you af“ liate. Advertise that you have added the requirement of a canned good or box of cereal for admission. A collection of bars of soap or other cleaning products during a hot weather sporting event is also fun. Email your community news to jjensen@thewakullanews.net or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Email is preferred. News is published when space becomes available. All submissions are edited for style, clarity and grammar.Community News Submissions SUMMER Fitness Fitness and Weight Loss Program for TEENS • It’s a High Intensity Training (HIT) program to help build their endurance strength and agility, while keeping teens motivated on their goals. • Teens will be accountable through weigh-ins, measurements and daily journal entries. • Twice weekly program throughout the summer starting on June 14th, under the supervision of a Certified Personal Trainer.Specifically designed for teenagers who need to lose weight, gain strength and endurance! Take advantage of this great summer program for your teenager. Contact Pam at 459-5279 for rates and schedule. and Weight Loss Program for TEENS LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) 10AM (TUE-FRI) HAIR SALON FREE HAIRCUT FEATHER LOCKS are here!!FULL SERVICE FAMILY SALON www.hicksair.com

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Page 8 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comWherever you go, go with all your heart. … Confucius Broadway, ZacharyBrown-Nelson, Danielle Brown, JohnBrown, KalaBrown, KeynaBrown, Vincent Brunow, KelseyBurgess, KierraBurns, KendalinBurns, StevenBurnsed, JenniferBurse, Daniel Busby, BrandonCalloway, NyeshaCampbell, CarolineCarroll, MeaghanCarson, BrandonCarter, Cedar Buddy Wells Supervisor of Elections 926-7575 Frances Casey Lowe. Attorney at Law Cash, Cody Chadwell, Kenneth Because of a production error, this page of senior photos was missing from last week’s Graduation section: education news from local schools SchoolCongrats Wakulla Christian graduates Wakulla Christian Schools kindergarten graduation took place on Tuesday, May 29 at 7 p.m. The 5K students performed A Day in Kindergarten at WCSŽ for their families and friends before they received their diplomas. Congratulations to the following WCS kindergarten graduates: Seth Barwick, Seth Cobb, Logan Kennon, Freddy McClendon, Cole Sanders, Madeline Jones, Hannah Land, Hailey Risoldi, Leaston Spears, Brandun Carroll, Camden Methvin and Tyler Howe.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Christian Schools “ fth grade class of 2012 graduated from elementary school on Wednesday, May 30 at 10 a.m. Congratulations to the following new WCS middle schoolers: Connor Fisher, Mackenzie Kennon, Storm Lawler, Jeremiah Payne, Bailey Rutledge and Hailey Spears. PHOTOS BY KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents at the graduation ceremony for Sopchoppy Education Center prepare to receive their diplomas on May 29. Free intensive math course o ered for students By BETH ODONNELL Assistant SuperintendentWakulla High School will offer an Algebra 1 Intensive Math course from June 26 through July 12. The course is free to eligible students. Transportation and lunch is provided at no cost. Students in grades eight and nine for the 2011-2012 school year have to pass the Algebra 1 End of Course (EOC) exam to earn high school credit for Algebra 1. This is a state requirement for graduation. This course is for students who did not pass the Spring, 2012 Algebra 1 EOC exam. Test scores should be available soon at Wakulla High School for WHS ninth graders and at the middle schools for students who took Algebra 1 in eighth grade. Students with an exceptional education disability may be exempt from passing the EOC if they have shown pro“ ciency in the course. The Algebra 1 review course will begin on Tuesday, June 26. There are no Friday classes. Dates for the nine day session are June 26, 27, 28 and July 2, 3, 9, 10, 11 and 12. Students can earn half a credit in Intensive Math if they attend every day. This will be factored into their grade point average. The Algebra 1 EOC exam retake will be given at Wakulla High School during the week of July 23. Students who pass this July retake of the Algebra 1 EOC exam will not have to take an Intensive Math course in the fall. Contact Wakulla High School Assistant Principal Sunny Chancy at 926-7125/ sunny.chancy@wcsb.us or Assistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell at 926-0065/ mary.odonnell@wcsb.us for more information.Graduation at Sopchoppy Education Center

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 – Page 9 Michael King Michael Michael Michael We are So Proud of You!We Love You,Granddaddy, Memaw, Dad, Brandy, Uncle Chris and Aunt Gigi sports news and team views Sports By LISA KINARDSpecial to The NewsTuesdays semi-final game featured the No. 1 ranked Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws against the Badcock Furniture Rays. Pitcher Shane Davis threw the entire game for the Rays while the Outlaws started Greysen Rudd and Skyler Talavera The Rays had hits from Aaron Price, Seth Carroll, Nolan Terry and Davis with Terry scoring Carroll. The Outlaws had hits from Lentz, Chase Forester and Talavera with Lucas Briggs scoring Forester and Jacob Dempsey scoring Brandon Bennett for the 2-1 win and a place in the “ nals. In the second semi-“ nal held Thursday, it was a battle between the Ameris Bank Sluggers and the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans, ranked 2 and 3 respectively. The Sluggers pitched Kaleb Bennett, Michael McGlamry, Tyler Teegan and Jake Bryan and had hits from McGlamry, Bryan and Thomas Davis (who also stole second and third), with runs scored by Marc Carter, McGlamry and Bryan (RBI to Josh Conway ). The Titans pitched Jordan Vaughan and John Weber. Their hitters were Zach Norman (2 doubles), Weber (2), Zeke Bryan (2), RJ Kinard (3 RBIs) and Jake McCarl who stole home during a squeeze play in the sixth. The Titans runs were scored by Norman (2), Weber, Vaughan, AC Ginn (2) (2 RBIs), Z Bryan (1 RBI) and McCarl. Another RBI scored by Jackson Montgomery. The game featured two spectacular catches in deep left by Carter, a catch in center“ eld by Daniel LaMarche to end the “ fth, and a hit stolen from Dylan Causseaux who hit to short right but a phenomenal play by McCarl to “ rst baseman Kinard got the third out and saved the tying run by Joshua Isman Titans won 8-3 and a spot in the Championship game. CHAMPIONSHIP GAME The Championship Game featured the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans and the Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws. The Outlaws, under the direction of head coach John Lentz, took the “ eld “ rst with Nick Lentz on the mound and Skyler Talavera behind the plate. The Titans, lead by head coach Darrell Norman came ready to play. Zach Norman took a walk and stole second but after Lentz struck out two Titans, it was the Outlaws chance with the bat. Titans started Jordan Vaughan pitching to Norman behind the plate. Outlaws lead-off Greysen Rudd started it off with a hit followed by Lentz but the inning ended with no score. The Outlaws switched pitchers and threw Chase Forrester to catcher Lucas Briggs. After two up. two down, Jake McCarl smacked a hit but the Titans couldnt capitalize on it. The Outlaws answered with a hit by James Calhoun. CJ Langston tried to get Calhoun home, but the Outlaws couldnt score. In the third, Sebastian Brahier led off for the Titans, followed by Norman getting a hit to left “ eld. It looked like the Titans were going to be on the board when John Weber shot one deep to left, but a well played catch by TJ Parramore forced Norman back to “ rst. The Outlaws tried their luck with a high and deep ball hit by Lentz to left but Michael Days awesome out“ eld skills robbed him of the hit and the game moved into the fourth still 0-0. Outfield prowess still kept the Titans off the scoreboard when Oakley Ward caught a shot deep to left by Jackson Montgomery The fifth started with McCarl getting a walk. Michael Sizemore tried to move him around the bases followed by another walk for Day. Zach Norman popped another hit followed by Weber shooting one up the middle, scoring McCarl. Vaughn also hit bringing Day home. First baseman Greysen Rudd snatched a hard line drive hit by AC Ginn for an unassisted double play, ending the Titans charge. Titans switched pitchers and Jackson Montgomery took the mound moving RJ Kinard to catcher. Jacob Dempsey hit to left and stole second. A great in“ eld from Montgomery to Ginn ended the inning with the Titans up 2-0. Nick Lentz returned to the mound in the sixth, with Talavera catching. After Lentz threw a wicked curveball for a strike out, Montgomery got a hit but was later out on a “ elders choice. Following McCarl stealing second on a passed ball, Davis Hammond hit scoring McCarl and bringing the score to 3-0 Titans. Montgomery returned to the mound for the Titans and held the Outlaws hitless for the inning. In the top of the seventh, John Weber hit the only double of the game and was moved to third with a hit from Vaughan but the Titans couldnt score and left men on the corners. The Outlaws came up for their last at bats. Brandon Bennett took a walk and stole all the way to third but the Titans refused to let up and ended the game with a quick 4-3 out, ending the game at 3-0 and as the 2012 Babe Ruth League Champions. Check out the Wakulla Babe Ruth League 2012s Facebook page for pictures and status updates. Up next will be All-Star play. Karlyn Scott was a 2008 graduate of Wakulla High School and was awarded an athletic scholarship to attend Florida Southern College in Lakeland. She recently graduated Summa Cum Laude, 4.0 GPA with a B.S. in biology and a minor in chemistry. The senior center“ elder was recently voted to the Capital One Academic All-American Team as a First Team selection. Scott led Florida Southern this year with a .358 batting average that ranked sixth in the Sunshine State Conference. She also led the team with 67 hits and 44 runs scored, with both of those “ gures good for third in the Sunshine State Conference. She added four doubles, two triples, one home run and 20 RBIs to her stat line while hitting either leadoff or in the No. 2 position in all 57 games. Her 18-game hitting streak from February 29-March 24 was the second longest single-season streak in team history. During her senior year, Scott was 29-for-29 on stolen base attempts and was one of only four players in Division II with at least 20 steals who was not caught the entire season. No other Moccasin had ever accomplished that feat before this season. In her career, Scott was 43-for-43 on the bases, a school record for perfection. Her streak of 43 in a row was the second longest in team history, trailing only the Division II record of 78 straight set in 1994-95. Scott is the Mocs “ rst Academic All-American since 2009, when Sara Lovestrand was a team selection. Ironically, Lovestrand and Scott are both Wakulla High School graduates and were War Eagle teammates in 2005. Scott was the only softball player from Florida to be named First-Team Academic All-American in the 2012 season. The Moccasins “ nished the 2012 season with a record of 39-18, earning them a spot in the NCAA Tournament. The Mocs went on to win their half of the South Region bracket before falling to eventual national champion Valdosta State in the Super Regional. Karlyns plans are to coach softball, study for the Dental Admissions test and then attend dental school.BABE RUTH BASEBALLTSA Titans take the title LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSOFTBALLKarlyn Scott is first team Academic All-American at Florida Southern WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT ADULT SOFTBALL LEAGUEEntry fee is $300 per team Teams must provide their own balls for games. Teams will play two games per night for a total of ten games. Registration Deadline is Friday, June 29th at 5:00 P.M. Rosters and entry fees are due at this time. The league will start the week of July 2nd and run for approximately “ve weeks. Game times are 6:45, 8:00 and 9:15 P.M. All games will be played at Medart Recreation Park located off U.S. 98, across the street from Wakulla High School. Mens League and Coed League will probably play on Monday and Tuesday nights. Both leagues might have games on Thursday nights depending on the number of teams that register. Homerun rule for Mens League is 3 and a foul. Homerun rule for Coed League is 3 and an out. Coed League will play with a 12 inch ball. Contact W.C.P.R.D 926-7227 or www.wcprd.com for any additional information.

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Page 10 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsIts hard to believe it is already June and one month until scallop season opens. I havent talked to anyone about seeing scallops, but as clear as the water is and with as little rain as we have had they should be there again this year. Hopefully there wont be as many jelly“ sh as were there last year. The water is extremely clear and the water temperature is now in the low 80s. Fishing is still very good and folks are doing well both inshore and off. Bob Palmer from Shell Point went out Saturday and came in with a cobia that probably weighed about 35 pounds. Bucky at Shell Island Fish Camp said Frank Cox has been “ shing a lot so that means there are a lot of cobia around. Jeff and Kay May “ shed this last week and caught lots of grouper and red snapper. Jeff said they had one snapper that weighed 13 pounds and one that was close to 15. He also said they caught some nice kings ” oating live baits. Glen and Alicia Peel from Shell Point went out Saturday and came in with their limit of red snapper. Bucky at Shell Island said they have one more big group coming in to “ sh this weekend and then it will start slowing down. Capt. Sid Stringer took a party out this weekend and came in with a bunch of trout. They “ shed the West ” ats out of St. Marks. Bucky said he went up in several of the creeks east of St. Marks and caught some big trout and quite a few reds. He was using a Gulp twitch bait. Capt. Luke Frazier over at AMS said he and Mike Crum “ shed out of Panacea last week and caught their limit of nice trout using a white gulp under a cork. They fished around the Shell Point Reef in 3 to 4 feet of water. He said the day they “ shed was awfully clear and they saw a lot of tarpon as well. Capt. Randy Peart has been catching lots of “ sh out of the Econ“ na. Using the Rapala twitch and rep he has been catching lots of reds and a bunch of them are oversize. Plenty of big trout are being caught in three to four feet of water on the Gulp under a cork and also out in 12 feet of water around the rock piles. Dr. Phil Sharp of Shell Point caught another tripletail this past weekend “ shing on one of the crab traps out in about 15 feet of water. Capt. David Fife has been catching trout up to 24 inches using mud minnows and reds up to 26 inches. He has been “ shing between Shell Point and Piney Island. He said he was also doing fairly well on nice trout out on the ” ats. Ken Voland of Shell Point has his son down last week and they “ shed around the Stake Line off Live Oak Island and caught lots of nice trout. He said they went early and would be home by noon. They used live shrimp and Gulp and had several “ sh over 20 inches. Mark and Louise Prance fished out of Shell Point and came in with trout and ” ounder. They used shrimp and pin“ sh and Mark said they kept seven trout and probably caught 30 that were all legal. I “ shed with Dr. Chuck Kent, Dr. Chris Van Sickle and Dr. William Kepper from Tallahassee on Saturday and we came in with four blues, three Spanish, 10 trout and “ ve ” ounder. We caught most everything on live shrimp though quite a few of the trout we caught on the white Gulp. We “ shed mainly between Shell Point and Piney Island in 3 to 5 feet of water. If you havent already done so you need to mark your calendars for July 6…8. This is the granddaddy of all “ shing tournaments in our area, the 24h annual Big Bend Saltwater Classic. Typically held Fathers Day Weekend, the board of directors of the classic decided to change the date so gag grouper will be in season and can be included. The “ rst tournament was held in 1989 out of Shields Marina in St. Marks and 223 anglers participated. In past years that number has averaged around 700. Now the tournament is headquartered out of Carrabelle Boat Club, just over the bridge in Carrabelle. The tournament was launched by and supports The Organization of Arti“ cial Reefs. Shawn Abbott, Ron Harrigan, Skip Hood, Dave Iacampo, Steve Leukanech, Jim Sapp, Frank Stephenson and Panaceas own Quill Turk. Good luck to all the anglers and lets hope for good weather. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Water’s clear and warm, and lots of sh being caughtSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety course in Leon County. The course will be held in the second-” oor conference room of the Farris Bryant Building, 620 S. Meridian St., in Tallahassee. Instruction is from 6 to 9 p.m. on June 12, 14, 19 and 21. The range portion of the class is June 23. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satis“ es hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling the FWCs regional of“ ce in Panama City at (850) 265-3676. For more information on this course, call George Warthen at (850) 265-3676.Hunter Safety Course o ered in Leon County Red snapper quota and recreational seasonNOAA Fisheries Service published a “ nal rule for Gulf of Mexico Red Snapper (77 FR 31734) that increases the commercial and recreational quotas and establishes the 2012 recreational red snapper “ shing season. The recreational season opened on June 1 at 12:01 a.m. and closes on July 11, at 12:01 a.m. The rule sets the 2012 and 2013 quotas for commercial and recreational red snapper harvest. The quotas have been increased because recent population assessments show that over“ shing has ended. The red snapper allowable catch increased from 7.185 million pounds whole weight in 2011 to 8.08 million pounds in 2012 and 8.69 million in 2013. The commercial allocation (51 percent) is 4.12 million pounds in 2012 and 4.43 million in 2013. The recreational allocation (49 percent) is 3.95 million pounds in 2012 and 4.25 million in 2013. If the combined commercial and recreational catch exceeds the 8.08 million pound acceptable catch level, the 2013 quota increase would require further scienti“ c review and potential modi“ cation by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council.From FWC NewsJune is celebrated across the nation as Great Outdoors Month. President Barack Obama issued a proclamation urging Americans to spend time outdoors and to uphold our nations legacy of conserving our lands for future generations. The proclamation suggests families and friends explore, play and grow together, while hiking, wildlife-watching, canoeing, hunting, fishing or playing in the neighborhood park … activities that help kids stay healthy, active and energized. Gov. Rick Scotts 2012 proclamation says during Great Outdoors Month, we celebrate the rich blessings of our states natural beauty and we renew our commitment to protecting our environment so that we can leave our children and grandchildren a healthy and ” ourishing land.Ž It goes on to say, Great Outdoors Month will encourage cooperative conservation and new technologies to help ensure Americas outdoors remain places where families and friends can learn, exercise, and create meaningful memories.Ž The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, along with Florida State Parks, the Florida Forest Service and national forests, parks and wildlife refuges each promote a variety of activities to support Great Outdoors Month and other events in June. Get Outdoors Florida! lists June events across the state on its website, GetOutdoorsFlorida.org. The Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation is asking Facebook fans (Facebook.com/takeme“ shing) to choose the Top Eight State ParksŽ in the U.S. that offer “ shing. Florida is the only twotime winner of the National Gold Medal Award for Excellence in Park and Recreation Management, as well as being the Fishing Capital of the World, so visit your favorite state park fishing spot, then vote. You will be eligible for weekly Bass Pro Shops gift card giveaways, as well as the grand prize: an allexpense-paid vacation to your choice of one of the Top Eight State Parks. June is also recognized as Recreational Fishing Month by Visit Florida, which helps promote Florida as the Fishing Capital of the World (FishingCapital. com). Events at its visitors centers help highlight the tourism value of recreational “ shing to Florida. Florida has about a million anglers who come from out-of-state each year, and they make up a substantial part of the $7.5 billion economic impact from recreational “ sheries that support nearly 80,000 Florida jobs. June 2-10 is promoted as National Fishing and Boating Week (TakeMeFishing. org). The FWC supports this effort by providing license-free saltwater “ shing on the “ rst Saturday (June 2) and license-free freshwater “ shing on the second Saturday (June 9). Floridas license-free “ shing days are an excellent opportunity to share the fun, excitement and togetherness of a “ shing trip with the entire family. This also is a great time for experienced anglers to introduce friends to the sport, even if they dont have a “ shing license,Ž said Nick Wiley, FWC executive director. By having these events on weekends, we hope Florida residents and visitors will experience the joy of saltwater and freshwater “ shing. We expect many will discover a healthy sport they can enjoy for a lifetime.Ž All other “ shing rules apply on these days (MyFWC. com/Fishing). In addition, June 2 is National Trails Day (AmericanHiking.org), and the theme is Americas Largest Trailgating Party!Ž The American Hiking Society is encouraging hikers and volunteers to help maintain their favorite trails and afterward celebrate with an eco-friendly party. June 9 is also National Get Outdoors Day, the purpose of which is to increase “ rst-time visitors to public lands and reconnect youth to the great outdoors. As a result, it is a Fee-Free Day for U.S. Department of Interior sites, such as national wildlife refuges, national parks and national forests (Recreation.gov). Finally, the Great American Campout is June 23. Visit NWF.org for great tips, suggestions and to share your adventure. The neat thing about this day is that families do it in the safety and comfort of their own backyard. So get together to reconnect not only with each other but with nature. Get Outdoors Florida! and enjoy your summer.June is an outdoor extravaganza and a chance to Get Outdoors Florida! IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle SNAPPER SEASON www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service CA TCH MORE FISH FREE LINE WINDINGwith purchase Made in USA G BUY IN BULK & SAVE B B B B B B B B B B B B B Y Y U Y U Y UY Y Y Y U Y U U U U U U U U U Y Y Y Y Y UY U U UY Y Y U Y UY I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N B U L K B U L K U L U L K U L L K L & S A V E & S A S A V A VE A VE VE V E BUY IN BULK & SAVE 850-274-8000 WEVE MOVED Modern Communications Modern Communications NEXT TO EL JALISCOS2481 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY.CRAWFORDVILLE U NLIMITED TALK & TEXT $4000 PER MO.DATA CHARGES MAY APPLY 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 – Page 11a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD This week, I owe Larry Kolk a huge thank you for submitting this article, The Bottom Line on Safe Boating.Ž I am always asking for news and information from other ” otilla members, and I am never let down. When you invest your money, energy and time for a desirable boating day on the water, hopefully you think of all the details that will keep you, your friends and family safe and legally compliant with U.S. Coast Guard and State Safe Boating Regulations. Well, dont be overly con“ dent if you have followed the letter of the law having all the required equipment on board your boat. You could have missed thinking about the bottom line. The Coast Guard with all its attention focused on approved Personal Flotation Devices, fire extinguishers, ” ame arresters, visual distress signals and sound warning devices does not require a boat having an anchor as safety equipment. Given all the difficulties a boater can encounter not having an anchor, it hasnt moved from its recommended status with the Coast Guard to being required. In nine years of teaching boating safety courses in the Coast Guard Auxiliary, I continue to impress upon the students the wisdom of not leaving dockside without having an anchor and appropriate length of line for the depth of water theyll be in (a bottom line so to speak) on their boat. A safe ratio is 10 feet of line for every foot of water you will be boating in. The threats so commonly encountered on the water for which an anchor could make a difference in avoiding dangerous and lifethreatening situations are plentiful, especially in our area. They deserve our full attention in being prepared for such risks. Consider the dangerous situations that can follow the loss of engine power with a storm bearing down on your boat. You are at the mercy of the wind, tide, or both. Moving farther offshore or drifting toward sand bars, shoals or into the channel are likely outcomes when a boater is not able to hold their position. These risks increase with the wind increases and waves rise. Changes in the direction of the wind and waves can throw a boat all around if it is not secured by an anchor. Even more frightening is being surrounded by fog, drifting freely, and unable to see impending danger. And if help is needed from the Coast Guard or commercial boating services, being able to report your position and maintain that position makes the chances of assistance and/or rescue more plausible. Fishermen know how critical it is to hold ones position over schooling “ sh if they are to be successful. Island picnickers know how easily they could be marooned if their boats drift away on a rising tide or a change in wind conditions, so many wisely tether their boats to an anchor onshore or an anchor planted “ rmly in shallow water. It would be helpful if all recreational boaters had some similar activityrelated need to carrying an anchor onboard their boats. Having an anchor and appropriate length of line onboard your boat, in my opinion, has too many factors going for it as a safety device that the time has come to reconsider it moving from recommended equipment to required. After all, the bottom line for safe boating should include all the equipment one needs to have on board to ensure having a safe and rewarding day on the water. Once again a great thanks to Larry Kolk for writing this! I recently looked up Wikipedia for a list of diving hazards and precautions when preparing a lesson on Zero Visibility Diving. The list is impressive, considering that the human terrestrial condition taken underwater is complicated by constraints resulting from the density of the water (800 times that of air). We are predominantly a visual animal on land. Visual distortions of lights refraction, re” ection and absorption, when available and when light is absent, limit our productivity underwater. Use of remote sensing technology, such as photography, videography, magnetometry and the wide range of sonar (side scan, beacon, Didson, and fathom) assist when light is limited. Under these conditions, why dive? Most people agree, there is little reason to get wet if you cannot enjoy the experience. But we forget that while recreational diving is the most common form of scuba diving, most of these dives include good visibility (even at night) as a prerequisite. There are those, however, who dive our river bottom in search of fossil. The river current can erode the ” oor and banks, creating near zero visibility and continuously expose paleontology remains which are often found by touch. Shipwreck and cave diving can also be visually challenged by high sediments often kicked up by the divers themselves. In all of these cases, underwater lamps are of little help as the sediments re” ect or absorb the light around the bulb, producing little effect. I found this to be true when my father asked me to retrieve his anchor in a reservoir one day. What could be easier? He had tied the anchor line to a tree so all I needed to do was follow it down. Visibility midday dropped to zero within a few feet of the surface. And I was soon following the line through submerged entangling tree limbs for another 30 feet. I found the anchor, had to cut it loose and spent the rest of an hour extricating myself out. Afterward, I advised my father to next time purchase a new anchor. Professional diving obligates diving beyond enjoyment. These are people who search for items in a lightless environment. Divers in the Apalachicola River mine for lost harvested wood, now preserved in the mud after inundation for centuries. We have lined our Dive Center with such wood creating a rustic motif. Underwater archaeologists have perfected zero visibility techniques to study historic shipwrecks such as the Maple Leaf. Once the ship is located, usually by remote sensing technology, special cameras embedded in clear water bags are lowered over structures to document details otherwise not visible. On a student project of ours conducted in Mobile Bay, Ala., we dragged a magnetometer behind our boat, which identi“ ed anomalies, or magnetic ticks on a paper plotter. Then, we sent a dive team down on every anomaly. The most successful team was the one with an artist. He would feel the anomaly at depth and return to draw it out on paper on the surface. Some were refrigerators or anchors or cars dumped as arti“ cial reefs, while others were small and medium vessels buried in the sediment with portions protruding up through the mud. The data retrieved was better than a photograph! We soon assigned an artist to every dive team. Police dive teams are routinely asked to search for missing people and items such as cars, guns and safes, dropped into watery graves less likely to be visited by the recreational minded divers. Hazards abound in zero visibility, from unseen entanglements, to chemical and biological contaminants. Only the best trained should go searching for lost items in such conditions. Once found, underwater crime scene investigation protocols must be followed or the quality of the evidence can be compromised. Fingerprints, for example, can be pulled from submerged items, providing the items are handled properly. Once removed from the water, items must be properly preserved or they will rapidly deteriorate. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Jun 7, 12 Fri Jun 8, 12 Sat Jun 9, 12 Sun Jun 10, 12 Mon Jun 11, 12 Tue Jun 12, 12 Wed Jun 13, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 5:28 AM 3.2 ft. 6:08 AM High 1.5 ft. 10:31 AM 1.5 ft. 11:18 AM 0.2 ft. 12:26 AM 0.6 ft. 1:06 AM 1.1 ft. 1:47 AM 1.4 ft. 2:35 AM 1.7 ft. 3:31 AM Low 4.0 ft. 4:30 PM 3.7 ft. 5:16 PM 3.1 ft. 6:47 AM 3.0 ft. 7:28 AM 3.0 ft. 8:15 AM 3.0 ft. 9:08 AM 3.1 ft. 10:08 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:46 PM 1.5 ft. 12:12 PM 1.5 ft. 1:17 PM 1.4 ft. 2:40 PM 1.2 ft. 4:15 PM 0.9 ft. 5:34 PM Low 3.3 ft. 6:06 PM 2.9 ft. 7:09 PM 2.5 ft. 8:42 PM 2.4 ft. 10:34 PM 2.5 ft. 11:59 PM High Thu Jun 7, 12 Fri Jun 8, 12 Sat Jun 9, 12 Sun Jun 10, 12 Mon Jun 11, 12 Tue Jun 12, 12 Wed Jun 13, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 5:25 AM 3.2 ft. 6:05 AM High 1.7 ft. 10:28 AM 1.6 ft. 11:15 AM 0.2 ft. 12:23 AM 0.7 ft. 1:03 AM 1.1 ft. 1:44 AM 1.5 ft. 2:32 AM 1.8 ft. 3:28 AM Low 4.1 ft. 4:27 PM 3.7 ft. 5:13 PM 3.1 ft. 6:44 AM 3.1 ft. 7:25 AM 3.1 ft. 8:12 AM 3.1 ft. 9:05 AM 3.2 ft. 10:05 AM High -0.3 ft. 11:43 PM 1.6 ft. 12:09 PM 1.6 ft. 1:14 PM 1.6 ft. 2:37 PM 1.3 ft. 4:12 PM 1.0 ft. 5:31 PM Low 3.3 ft. 6:03 PM 2.9 ft. 7:06 PM 2.6 ft. 8:39 PM 2.5 ft. 10:31 PM 2.6 ft. 11:56 PM High Thu Jun 7, 12 Fri Jun 8, 12 Sat Jun 9, 12 Sun Jun 10, 12 Mon Jun 11, 12 Tue Jun 12, 12 Wed Jun 13, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 6:04 AM High 1.4 ft. 11:35 AM -0.2 ft. 12:50 AM 0.2 ft. 1:30 AM 0.6 ft. 2:10 AM 1.0 ft. 2:51 AM 1.3 ft. 3:39 AM 1.5 ft. 4:35 AM Low 3.7 ft. 5:06 PM 2.9 ft. 6:44 AM 2.9 ft. 7:23 AM 2.8 ft. 8:04 AM 2.8 ft. 8:51 AM 2.8 ft. 9:44 AM 2.9 ft. 10:44 AM High 1.4 ft. 12:22 PM 1.4 ft. 1:16 PM 1.4 ft. 2:21 PM 1.3 ft. 3:44 PM 1.1 ft. 5:19 PM 0.9 ft. 6:38 PM Low 3.4 ft. 5:52 PM 3.0 ft. 6:42 PM 2.7 ft. 7:45 PM 2.3 ft. 9:18 PM 2.2 ft. 11:10 PM High Thu Jun 7, 12 Fri Jun 8, 12 Sat Jun 9, 12 Sun Jun 10, 12 Mon Jun 11, 12 Tue Jun 12, 12 Wed Jun 13, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 5:20 AM 2.4 ft. 6:00 AM High 1.1 ft. 10:42 AM 1.1 ft. 11:29 AM 0.1 ft. 12:37 AM 0.5 ft. 1:17 AM 0.8 ft. 1:58 AM 1.0 ft. 2:46 AM 1.2 ft. 3:42 AM Low 3.0 ft. 4:22 PM 2.8 ft. 5:08 PM 2.3 ft. 6:39 AM 2.3 ft. 7:20 AM 2.3 ft. 8:07 AM 2.3 ft. 9:00 AM 2.3 ft. 10:00 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:57 PM 1.1 ft. 12:23 PM 1.1 ft. 1:28 PM 1.1 ft. 2:51 PM 0.9 ft. 4:26 PM 0.7 ft. 5:45 PM Low 2.5 ft. 5:58 PM 2.1 ft. 7:01 PM 1.9 ft. 8:34 PM 1.8 ft. 10:26 PM High Thu Jun 7, 12 Fri Jun 8, 12 Sat Jun 9, 12 Sun Jun 10, 12 Mon Jun 11, 12 Tue Jun 12, 12 Wed Jun 13, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 5:12 AM 2.5 ft. 5:52 AM High 1.5 ft. 10:10 AM 1.5 ft. 10:57 AM 0.2 ft. 12:05 AM 0.6 ft. 12:45 AM 1.0 ft. 1:26 AM 1.4 ft. 2:14 AM 1.6 ft. 3:10 AM Low 3.1 ft. 4:14 PM 2.9 ft. 5:00 PM 2.4 ft. 6:31 AM 2.4 ft. 7:12 AM 2.3 ft. 7:59 AM 2.4 ft. 8:52 AM 2.4 ft. 9:52 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:25 PM 1.5 ft. 11:51 AM 1.5 ft. 12:56 PM 1.4 ft. 2:19 PM 1.2 ft. 3:54 PM 0.9 ft. 5:13 PM Low 2.6 ft. 5:50 PM 2.2 ft. 6:53 PM 2.0 ft. 8:26 PM 1.9 ft. 10:18 PM 2.0 ft. 11:43 PM High Thu Jun 7, 12 Fri Jun 8, 12 Sat Jun 9, 12 Sun Jun 10, 12 Mon Jun 11, 12 Tue Jun 12, 12 Wed Jun 13, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 6:41 AM 2.5 ft. 7:09 AM 2.5 ft. 7:36 AM High 1.7 ft. 10:01 AM 1.5 ft. 11:05 AM 1.3 ft. 12:16 PM 0.4 ft. 12:34 AM 0.7 ft. 1:10 AM 1.0 ft. 1:47 AM 1.2 ft. 2:28 AM Low 2.9 ft. 3:43 PM 2.7 ft. 4:42 PM 2.4 ft. 5:48 PM 2.5 ft. 8:02 AM 2.6 ft. 8:29 AM 2.7 ft. 8:56 AM 2.7 ft. 9:25 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:17 PM 0.1 ft. 11:57 PM 1.1 ft. 1:33 PM 0.8 ft. 2:50 PM 0.5 ft. 3:58 PM 0.3 ft. 4:58 PM Low 2.1 ft. 7:07 PM 1.8 ft. 8:47 PM 1.8 ft. 10:53 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJune 7 June 13First June 26 Full July 3 Last June 11 New June 19Major Times 4:24 AM 6:24 AM 4:51 PM 6:51 PM Minor Times 9:56 AM 10:56 AM 11:38 PM 12:38 AM Major Times 5:17 AM 7:17 AM 5:42 PM 7:42 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:59 AM 11:59 AM Major Times 6:07 AM 8:07 AM 6:30 PM 8:30 PM Minor Times 12:17 AM 1:17 AM 11:59 AM 12:59 PM Major Times 6:53 AM 8:53 AM 7:15 PM 9:15 PM Minor Times 12:52 AM 1:52 AM 12:57 PM 1:57 PM Major Times 7:37 AM 9:37 AM 7:59 PM 9:59 PM Minor Times 1:26 AM 2:26 AM 1:52 PM 2:52 PM Major Times 8:20 AM 10:20 AM 8:42 PM 10:42 PM Minor Times 1:58 AM 2:58 AM 2:46 PM 3:46 PM Major Times 9:03 AM 11:03 AM 9:25 PM 11:25 PM Minor Times 2:30 AM 3:30 AM 3:40 PM 4:40 PM Average Average Average Average Average Average Average+6:35 am 8:37 pm 11:39 pm 9:57 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:35 am 8:37 pm --:-11:00 am 6:35 am 8:37 pm 12:18 am 12:00 pm 6:35 am 8:38 pm 12:53 am 12:58 pm 6:35 am 8:38 pm 1:26 am 1:53 pm 6:35 am 8:39 pm 1:58 am 2:47 pm 6:35 am 8:39 pm 2:31 am 3:40 pm78% 71% 64% 58% 51% 45% 39% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance facebook.com/GamerZParadise (850) 926-9100 | theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635 Wakulla Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fiMON THURS: SUMMER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI: 12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!Saturday, June 9Live Music all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta

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Page 12 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comIn the Court Shorts that appeared on May 24, it was reported that Walter Carey was charged in 1996 with DUI manslaughter. He was not. He was charged and pleaded no contest to charges of leaving the scene of an accident with death and driving with a suspended license with death. The News regrets the error. reports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn May 24, Amanda Fisher of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed unauthorized charges on her bank account totaling $160. Other attempts were made to charge from her account but the attempts were denied by the bank, including one for $2,800. The charges were created in Europe. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On May 24, Jill Swift of Tallahassee reported a vehicle burglary at WalMart. Someone removed the victims GPS from her vehicle. The GPS is valued at $100. The vehicle was left unlocked at the time of the theft. € On May 24, Gene Bennett of Crawfordville reported a grand theft from his vehicle while he was in the Apalachicola National Forest. The victim reported that a man took a large amount of cash from him while he was at a hunt camp. € On May 24, Judy Parker of Crawfordville reported the theft of jewelry from her home. A suspect has been identi“ ed and the missing property is valued at $92. € On May 24, Melinda Fewell of Crawfordville reported a fraud. An unauthorized charge was observed on the victims bank account. The charge was for $419. € On May 24, Sharon Bijak of Tyrone, Ga., reported a grand theft of jewelry from Panacea. The jewelry was lost while the victim was staying in Panacea for a festival. It is valued at $9,400. € On May 24, Lavetric Davis of Tallahassee reported a theft in Crawfordville. The victim reported the theft of a GPS and an electronic game. The items are believed to have been stolen while the victim was moving. The items are valued at $600. € On May 24, Deputy Cole Wells investigated a vehicle crash at Highway 267 and Springhill Road. The deputy discovered a vehicle overturned in the median. A witness reported that John William Cox, 64, of Havana, was driving erratically on Springhill Road before misjudging the intersection and overturning his vehicle. The motorist consented to give a blood sample so Deputy Wells could conduct the traf“ c crash as a possible DUI. The investigation continues. EMS of“ cials treated Cox at the scene and he was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. € On May 25, Dickie McKenzie of Crawfordville reported the theft of copper wire, a knife and metal bed. The items were taken from the victims yard and are valued at $265. € On May 25, Toby Barfield of Crawfordville reported damage to his fence. The victim believes the fence was damaged by a motor vehicle. A corner post will need to be replaced as it appeared a vehicle failed to slow enough to complete the turn without striking the fence. Damage was estimated at $50. This is not the “ rst time a vehicle has struck the same location. € On May 25, George Begley of Crawfordville reported a brush “ re on Cajer Posey Road. Wakulla firefighters extinguished the “ re without any structural damage. € On May 25, Dominique Hawkins of Wal-Mart reported a retail theft. Hawkins observed a subject grab two containers of beer. But the suspect dropped the beer when he was confronted and fled the scene in a yellow Chevrolet Cavalier. A suspect has been identi“ ed. The beer was valued at $26. € On May 26, Bridgett Lee of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the theft of cash from her vehicle which was left unlocked. The money was taken from the victims purse. The loss was more than $400. € On May 26, William Rodeheaver of Crawfordville reported a trespass at his property. The suspect, Brandi Marie Hicks, 28, of Panacea, left the property before deputies arrived. However, later in the day a second trespass complaint was received from the victim. Deputy Nick Gray arrested Hicks on two counts of trespassing and one count of resisting arrest without violence. € On May 26, a fraud was reported at Winn-Dixie as someone posing as a Western Union employee contacted the store and requested a test run of the system. During the fraudulent test $937 was sent to an open card. The case investigation by the WCSO Fraud Unit is ongoing. € On May 26, Melody Sellner of Crawfordville fell off the back of a motorcycle near the Medart Volunteer Fire Department. The operator of the motorcycle drove away and did not check on the victim. Deputy Mike Zimba observed a subject that “ t the description of the motorcycle operator at a nearby convenience store. Field sobriety exercises were administered to Caleb Dalton Shoemaker, 22, of Crawfordville. Shoemaker was arrested for DUI and leaving the scene of an accident with injuries. The victim sustained injuries to her arms, shoulder and hands but refused EMS transport. € On May 27, Ashley Gavin of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the theft of her wallet. The wallet and contents were valued at $65. Later, the wallet was recovered by the victim but cash was missing from it. € On May 27, Hubertus Weijers of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash at the St. Marks Boat Ramp. Someone struck the victims vehicle while it was parked at the ramp. Someone placed folded paper underneath the victims windshield wiper, but the paper was blank. € On May 27, Mary Meeks of Panacea reported a theft at her residence. The stolen items included a utility wagon, wheelbarrow, garden hose and extension ladder, valued at $240. The missing items were recovered at a nearby residence that has been abandoned. € On May 27, Deputy Mike Zimba observed Michael Ryan Graham, 26, of Crawfordville walking out of a Crawfordville area convenience store. Deputy Zimba had knowledge that the suspect had a trespass warning at the location. The subject was arrested without incident. € On May 27, Sedrick Williams of Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief. Someone keyed the victims vehicle. Marks were observed on four sides of the vehicle and damage was estimated at $2,500. € On May 27, Rachel Sadler of Tallahassee reported the theft of a credit card. The victim was at a St. Marks establishment when she used her card to purchase beverages. The card was lost at the establishment. € On May 28, David Mitchell of Sopchoppy reported a theft of a camera from his home. The camera was valued at $550. Two persons of interest have been identi“ ed. € On May 28 a retail theft was reported at Wal-Mart. Ramon Angelo Medina, 21, of Crawfordville was arrested for retail theft of taking $54 worth of playing cards and failing to pay for them. € On May 29, Deirdre Farrington of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. Unauthorized charges were observed on the victims card. She had four charges totaling $217 that she did not create. € On May 29, Heather Lane of Crawfordville reported the theft of a money order. The money order, valued at $50, was taken from the victims wallet. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On May 29, Millie Hilliard of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her home. Pills were discovered missing from the bottle. Two individuals of interest have been identi“ ed. € On May 29, Joseph Davis of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A motorcycle suffered $915 worth of damage to a custom paint job. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On May 29, Tawanna Maxwell of Woodville reported a Crawfordville burglary. The victim discovered storage unit latches cut at the construction site of her new residence. The storage units were ransacked but nothing appeared to be missing. Damage was estimated at $200. € On May 29, Caleb Harmon of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at his former home. The victim was moving items out of the home when he discovered furniture and military gear from the U.S. Marine Corps missing. The missing items are valued at $3,300. € On May 29, Deputy Cole Wells discovered a blue cellular telephone on the bicycle path while patrolling Mashes Sands Road. Contact was made with a male in Quincy before the battery died. The phone was turned into the Evidence Division. € On May 29, Deputy Cole Wells was investigating a shots “ red complaint on Floyd Gray Road with Deputies Sean Wheeler and Stephen Simmons. During the course of the investigation, Marcus Anthony Owens of Tallahassee was identi“ ed as one of the parties at the home. He had two active warrants out of Leon County for violation of probation for trespassing and criminal mischief. While he was being arrested for the active warrants, Owens admitted having three Xanax pills in his pocket but no prescription. Owens was also arrested for possession of a Schedule 4 substance and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. € On May 30, Milagros Jensen of Crawfordville reported a burglary. Someone broke into the victims shed and removed a mountain bike and light up ornaments. The property is valued at $275. € On May 30, Emily Marie Davis, 18, of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash on Government Road. Davis was driving southbound on the road when she lost control of the vehicle and ran into trees on the east side of the road. The victims mother arrived on scene and picked her up to transport her to the hospital. The vehicle was towed from the scene. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 706 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce detectives arrested two teenage boys on narcotics charges following the execution of a search warrant Wednesday, May 30, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Kyle Brandon Burdeshaw, 18, of Crawfordville and a 15-year-old Crawfordville male were arrested for cultivation of marijuana and possession of narcotic equipment and taken to the Wakulla County Jail. Detectives obtained a search warrant for the Buck Miller Road home in Crawfordville as part of an ongoing investigation into stolen “ rearms and illegal drug activity. During the search of the home, detectives located multiple items of drug paraphernalia including smoking pipes, scales and aluminum foil with drug residue. A ri” e was also seized and submitted into evidence. Outside the home, detectives discovered 14 marijuana plants. The plants ranged in size to 15 inches high. Detectives are attempting to determine the ownership of the “ rearm as the investigation continues. Lt. C.L. Morrison, Detective Lorne Whaley and Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. Kyle Brandon BurdeshawTwo drug arrests after search warrant served SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCorrectionCar ” ips in crash This wreck occurred on Monday, June 4, at about 8 a.m. on Wakulla Arran Road one block west of 319. A single vehicle car hit a tree and turned over. Wakulla County Fire Rescue and Wakulla County EMS responded. The crash was investigated by WCSO. The lone driver had minor injuries. HAS MOVEDOur new location is: The Barry Building, Back Building, #4 3295 Crawfordville Highway(of“ce entrance is located between the 2 buildings) Of“ce Hours: Monday … Thursday, 8:00 am … 5:00 pm (closed 12 noon … 2:00 pm) For help with your utility bill and other assistance, call us at 850-926-3122 www.cacaainc.org Hair Place That 850-926-6020 We Have Gift Certi“catesMiranda545-2905Robyn926-6020Linda294-2085 OOPS! Styles for Men, Women & ChildrenFULL SERVICE HAIR SALONBarber on Duty Thursday SaturdayCuts Colors Highlights Perms UpDo’s Flat Tops Special Cuts Facial Waxing HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 – Page 13By JO ANN PALMERChamber MemberNiraj Patel accepted the award for the 2012 Business of the Year for Best Western Plus Wakulla Inns & Suites. The award was presented at the Wakulla Chamber of Commerces eighth annual Business Excellence Awards banquet held at the senior center on May 17. Patel achieved PlusŽ status with Best Western with a series of customer service and cleanliness tests. Patel and his family invest in the community with very generous contributions to local organizations and by promoting tourism, bringing economic growth to the area. The evening began with Chamber President Amy Geiger welcoming those in attendance and recognizing the events sponsors, CenturyLink and Waste Pro. Herb Donaldson, president of the Healing Arts of Wakulla County and founder of the Palaver Tree Theatre, talked about his life experiences as a young man in Buckhorn, working summers, and how money burnt a hole in his pocket. His storytelling led to the inspirational message that we could grow a business if we just put our mind to it. There were two special recognitions of Chamber members who have supported the organization since the early 1970s and who have been in business much longer. Ronald Fred Crum was recognized for 58 years of business. He was in the audience as everyone heard that what they now know as Crums Mini-Mall was once the state inspection station, an auto body repair shop, tire and oil distributor and even the county ambulance service. Crums is now known as the house of 3,000 “ shing rods and reels, and where you can buy a pair of shoes, a souvenir of Florida, or “ ll you tank with gasoline or diesel. Congratulations Ronald Fred and Eloise for your years of continuous business. Jumping forward a couple of decades to 1986. Noah and Mildred Posey had already been in business for 20 years. If you have ever eaten deviled crab from an authentic crab shell, it was probably produced by the Poseys. Noah still arrives at work every morning at 4:30 a.m. to make sure things run smoothly at their two current businesses, Poseys Up the Creek and Poseys Dock Side Caf. Through their businesses, the Poseys have generously been able to give back to our community. Congratulations to the Posey family for being one of the oldest Chamber members. Winner of Start-Up Business of the Year was International Gold Gymnastics, which prides itself on being the best gymnastics facility in the Big Bend area, offering certi“ ed coaches and a safe environment for all their students to achieve great skills in gymnastics.Continued on Page 16 Geiger with Chamber Member of the Year Gail Campbell and Youth Coalition President Bruce Ashley. By AMY GEIGERChamber PresidentThe Chamber has had a very busy beginning to 2012 as we continue to focus on our three top goals: membership, education and advocating for our business community. We are always proud to support our local businesses as they strive to weather this economy. On May 17 we had our annual Business Excellence Awards Banquet and recognized the following individuals and their businesses for being leaders in our community: The award winners were: € Start-up Business of the Year … International Gold Gymnastics. € Non-Pro“ t Organization of the Year … Friends of the Wakulla County Library. € Environmental Stewardship Award … Wildwood Resort. € Wakulla Area Business of the Year … Callaway Auto and Truck Repair. € Member of the Year … Gail Campbell. € Business of the Year … Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites. Special Recognition went to Noah Posey and Ronald Fred Crum for continuing to support the Chamber since the early 1970s. We thank them both for their passion and commitment to Wakulla County. Herb Donaldson was our speaker for the evening and did not disappoint. If you have not heard Herb speak, you are missing out. I would like to recognize the committee that put this event together lead by Jo Ann Palmer, with Courtney Peacock, Tammie Bar“ eld, Sharol Brown, JoAnne Strickland and last but not least Petra Shuff. In addition, Mary Harrison and her army of volunteers served a spectacular dinner for us at the Senior Center. A huge thank you goes out to CenturyLink and Waste Pro for being our primary sponsors. Events such as our banquet could not happen without our sponsors. Again, thank you! One initiative I wanted to accomplish this year was to introduce a young professionals group and Im proud to say it is happening. It is with great pleasure that I introduce Focus Wakulla, a young professionals group designed to target Chamber members 45 and younger. Tara Kieser, membership committee chair, along with several others met in early April and began talking about the needs of the young professionals in Wakulla County. Based on that information, the council quickly came up with a name and goals that will be the cornerstone of this group: F … Foster and support economic development O … Optimize networking opportunities C … Create and cultivate future leaders U … Understanding and awareness of government processes S … Strengthen and enrich our community Focus Wakulla will hold quarterly functions that will touch one of these “ ve goals. Ideas for this group include inviting guest speakers to educate on how government works in Wakulla County, holding seminars on how to network and meet others to help you grow your business and professionally, having small intimate discussions on the importance of local businesses and supporting them. We will encourage members to participate in regular Chamber events as well. The “ rst event is being held June 29 at Poseys Dockside Caf in Panacea beginning at 6 p.m. This event will lay out the purpose and initiatives of Focus Wakulla and we will announce the next exciting event. So if you or the business you work for is a member of the Chamber, please join us for our inaugural event. ŽLikeŽ Focus Wakulla on Facebook www.facebook. com/FocusWakulla … the council will post information about the community and future events. Please contact Tara Kieser at (850) 294-5955 or tarakieser@synovusmortgage.com or Courtney Peacock at (850) 926-6751 or peacock.courtney@ccbg. com to have your name and email address added to our distribution list. As always, it is an honor and privilege to serve our business community. Thank you for allowing me this opportunity. Yours in Service, Amy Geiger, President. T a k i n g C a r e o f B u s i n e s s Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Business Spotlight:MyOf ceProducts Page 15 Should I stay or should I go? Candidates qualify for of ceWeekly Roundup, Page 23 Chamber Networking Luncheon catered by Kast Net Page 15 Presidents MessageGoals are membership, education and advocate for local businessBest Western Plus is named Business of the Year PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENChamber President Amy Geiger with Best Western Plus owner Niraj Patel. Start Up Business … International Gold Gymnastics. Area Business … Callaway Auto and Truck Repair. Environmental Stewardship … Wildwood Resort.Non-Pro“ t Organization … Friends of the Library. Business Excellence Winners: Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com •Interior Remodeling •Doors •Floors •Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling •Decks/Barns/Fences • Portable, Private, Outdoor Showers FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS NEW! Crawler Tractors, Hydraulic Excavators, Motor Graders, Wheel Loaders, Loader Backhoes, Farm Tractors, Service & Bucket/Sign Trucks, Flatbed & Dump Trucks, Truck Tractor & Lowboys, Paving Equipment, Durangos, Late Model Chevrolet, Ford and Dodge Pickups and MUCH, MUCH MORE! For Detailed Listing & Photos, Go To www.jmwood.com Absolute Public AuctionAlabama Dept. of Transportation € June 15 & 16, 2012 1409 Coliseum Blvd., Montgomery, Alabama Bryant Wood AL LIC #1137(334) 264-3265

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Page 14 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, June 7  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF WAKULLA will host a public records forum at 7 p.m. at the library. Barbara Petersen, president of the Florida First Amendment Foundation, will lead the forum. Friday, June 8  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, June 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. Sunday, June 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, June 11  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach.  WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. at the library. Tuesday, June 12  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  WAKULLA COUNTY MAH JONGG GROUP will meet from 12:45 p.m. to 3 p.m. at precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road, the rst left after Wal-Mart heading north. The “little mah jongg house” is the rst building on the left. For more information, call 926 9254. Thursday, June 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a las 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Hwy. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350.Special EventsThursday, June 7  MEET AND GREET WITH COUNTY COMMISSION CANDIDATE EMILY SMITH will be held at Posh Java at 6 p.m. Smith is a candidate for District 5. The evening will begin with music by Sammy Tedder and a brief presentation by Smtih. More music by Grant Peeples will follow. She will be available throughout the evening to respond to questions and concerns. For more information, contact Judith Harriss at joereme@gmail.com.  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public roundtable meeting from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge Education Building. It will begin with a brief presentation on recent TDC activities and initiatives, followed by a facilitated discussion of how to keep the tourism industry engaged in responsible promotion of resources, ways that TDC can improve its marketing/advertising activities, and new ideas for marketing campaigns.  CANDIDATE DEBATE FOR FLORIDA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVE District 7 will be held by the Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee in conjunction with the Wakulla County Republican Club at The Bistro at Wildwood at 7 p.m. There will be a meet and greet from 6 to 7 p.m. Candidates are Don Curtis, Jamey Westbrook and Mike Williams. Special guest is Daryn Iwicki, North Florida regional director of the Republican Party of Florida.  LIBRARY SUMMER PROGRAM REGISTRATION will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. This is for the children’s summer programs. Friday, June 8  WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE HEADQUARTERS will hold a grand opening from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at North Pointe Center, Building 1626, Unit B.  LIBRARY SUMMER PROGRAM REGISTRATION will be held from 10 a.m. to noon and 2 to 4 p.m. at the library. Sign up is for children’s summer program. Saturday, June 9  WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 2002 10 year reunion will be held at Wildwood Resort at 6:30 p.m. Visit www.whs2002.com for more information.  SJOGREN’S SUPPORT GROUP FOR NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA will be held at 1 p.m. at the Leon County Public Library,1583 Pedrick Road, Tallahassee. Come and meet others with Sjogren’s(show-grins), share experiences and learn about resources for living and coping with this complex, auto-immune disease. The meeting is free and handicap accessible. For more information, contact Kathleen Abrams, support group leader, at kabrams408@ gmail.com or 668-3586. Monday, June 11  WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will be from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the library. The meeting is open to the public. Tuesday, June 12  APALACHEE REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL will hold a public meeting of the Wakulla County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board at 10 a.m. at the library. Upcoming EventsFriday, June 15  BLOOD DRIVE will be held at Wal-Mart from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Donors will receive a free T-shirt.  WAKULLA SUPER USER WORKSHOP will be held at 8:30 a.m. at WorkForce Plus’ Wakulla Of ce, 3278 Crawfordville Highway. A class on Microsoft Word will be from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., followed by a class on Microsoft Excel from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 16  GOLF GONE WILD to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association will be held at St. James Bay Golf Resort. There will be cash prizes, a silent art auction and a nature photography slide-show and presentation, “The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay” (which will soon be a published book), by award-winning nature photographer John Spohrer. The event will bene t the FWMA, a 501(c)3 wildlife rehabilitation center located in Wakulla County that cares for sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife in our area. Enjoy golf at the gorgeous Audubon-sanctioned St. James Bay Golf Resort (151 Laughing Gull Lane in Carrabelle, Florida). To help by sponsoring the event or donating auction items, contact Lois Swoboda at 653-5857. For more details, see the brochure on the website at www.wakullawildlife.org or call Lynne Cooper at (850) 697-9507.  GABALLI FOOD TASTE SAMPLER will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at Ocklockonee Bay United Methodist Church, 2780 Surf Road, Panacea. For more information, call 9840127. Saturday, June 23  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at Myra Jean’s restaurant from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. This will be a farewell party for April Schreiber. They will have cake and a gift for her. This event will not be structured with activities as the past meetings have been. RSVP to Carrie Stevens by calling 274-9474 or emailing carriejstevens@comcast.net.Sunday, June 24A GET-TOGETHER TO SUPPORT Randy Harrison, who has leukemia, will be held at the American Legion in Tallahassee from 2 to 6 p.m. There will be music and a silent auction. Money raised will help with expenses. For more information, call 962-5282 or email sopchoppyriver@gmail.com. Tourist Development Council public meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the St. Marks Refuge. Library Summer Program registration 10 a.m. to noon and 2 to 4 p.m. WHS Class of ‘02 10-year reunion at Wildwood at 6:30 p.m. Wakulla County Audit Committee meeting at 2 p.m. ThursdayFridaySaturdayWednesday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com By SCOTT JOYNERWCPL DirectorBook Extravaganza another success! Wed like to thank all who came out to our Book Extravaganza Fundraiser last Saturday. Your generous donations raised over $600 in three hours for the Friends of the Library! There were more than 50 people waiting to be let in when the doors opened at 9 a.m. and the crowd just built from there. The money raised goes directly to the Friends and helps fund the Summer Program of Events kicking off this week (more on that below), makes up part of our book budget, and assists in purchasing needed items like the 12 new public computers and e-book service in the coming months. We appreciate your support and encourage any who are interested in helping the library grow join the Friends. Information is available at the library. Friday Night Movie This Friday, June 8, were kicking off our summer of movies by showing the sequel to the “ lm of a couple years back, Journey to the Center of the Earth.Ž This sequel stars Dwayne The RockŽ Johnson, Michael Caine, Josh Hutcherson and Vanessa Hudgens and tells the story of 17-year-old Sean Anderson who receives a coded distress signal from a mysterious island where no island should exist. Unable to stop tracking the signal, he sets out with a small group on a journey to the mysterious island … a place few people have ever seen or lived to tell about. What they “ nd is an island of stunning beauty, strange and threatening life forms, volcanoes, mountains of gold and more than one astonishing secret. This PG (for action and some language) rated “ lm is fun for the whole family so beat the heat and join us. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show. Popcorn and water will be provided by Capital City Bank for donations to the library. Summer Registration Fun Day and Tallahassee Museum Field Trip Signup Our summer registration will be held on Thursday, June 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. and on Friday, June 9 from 10 a.m. to noon and 2 to 4 p.m. We will have detailed information on the Summer Program, the signup sheets for our “ rst “ eld trip to the Tallahassee (or as longtime residents of the area still call it, Jr.) Museum and a bouncy house on hand for the kids to play in while mom and dad get information on all the fun were planning here this summer. The Friends of the Library will also have a table manned for anyone who wishes to join or get info on all they do for the library. Please come out, see Molly and I, and get any questions you may have about the Summer Program answered before everything gets going on June 12. TutuOla Drum and Dance Company comes to WCPL On Thursday, June 14 at 7 p.m., our “ rst performance of the summer will be a “ rst time visitor to the library. The TutuOla Drum and Dance Company is based out of Tallahassee and states that Our show brings African culture closer to those who are not already familiar with it. Our aim is to connect the cultures of African peoples all over the world for our audiences. This is done through our dynamic blend of different genres of music and dance such as Hip Hop, Funk, Marching Band and Caribbean styles. The central point that ties it all together is that the root of it all is African.Ž For those of our patrons who remember Mama Koku and the drum circles weve had previous summer, this high energy show should be a combination of both. Lets give TutuOla a big crowd on June 14 and kick our summer series of performance off with a bang! Library News... Government MeetingsMonday, June 11  WAKULLA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION will meet at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Wednesday, June 13  WAKULLA COUNTY AUDIT COMMITTEE will meet at 2 p.m. in the county commissioner administration conference room. Thursday, June 14  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, June 18  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for its regular meeting.  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. at city hall.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 – Page 15 S p o t l i g h t o n B u s i n e s s Spotlight on Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from By PETRA SHUFFof the ChamberThe Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce was once again our meeting ground for the Chambers monthly networking luncheon held Wednesday, May 23. This is the perfect place for us to rent if any of the local restaurants do not have suf“ cient space to accommodate our luncheons, and their regular lunch crowd, and want to participate in these monthly events showcasing their business. Everybody seems to enjoy this midday networking event, and it is exciting to see new faces each month, and meet guests invited by our members. While the buffet was being set up for our 54 attendees, Mary introduced our new members for June: Kast Net, AGLA … American General Life & Accident Insurance agents Cindy Samford and Lynn Cox, Walgreens, Lou Kellenberger Photography, Savary Academy and Dickeys Barbecue Pit #535. New members Cindy and Lynn are based in Tallahassee and are looking forward to working more with the Chamber, Wakulla businesses and residents. Their clients in Wakulla currently include several small businesses, the Clerk of Courts Of“ ce, Board of County Commissioners and Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce employees. Lou Kellenberger lives in Tallahassee, but spends most of his time in Wakulla hunting subjects for his exquisite wildlife photography, and currently also has an exhibit at the Welcome Center in Panacea. Additionally, he volunteers for the Wakulla Tourist Development Center and is a member of the Friends of the Wakulla Springs Park, and posts phenomenal pictures on Facebook. Our hosts Fred and Thu Mohrfeld have been operating Kast Net at Wakulla Station since 2003, starting out catering from their home kitchen 33 years ago. Fred was telling us about their business, and then was outside in their catering truck cooking up piping hot monstrous egg rolls, cheese grits, hush puppies, fried shrimp, “ sh “ llets and grilled chicken, served with a salad and cole slaw and homemade dressings. I think everyone would agree that it was an excellent meal! Thus signature chocolate lasagna cake was absolutely out of this world. It was so moist and delicious, and the mousse like icing itself would have made a wonderful dessert. Mary Wallace introduced her guest Adam Brugner with ASI, American Strategic Insurance. The company was formed in St. Petersburg in 1997, and in only three years went from non-rated to an A…rated company. Les Harrison with the Extension Of“ ce again reiterated that rooms are for rent at very reasonable rates, and also shared about the Get trees ready for hurricane seasonŽ workshop he held. Please check their website for many interesting classes and workshops coming up, including local food production and master gardening classes. Sherri Kraeft, with UF/IFAS, Wakulla 4-H thanked local businesses for their generous support of the second Annual Jam for Camps. Kraefts honey bee educational program has been very successful, and she will be traveling to Grenada to share her wisdom in January. Congrats! Continued on Page 16AGLA – American General Life & Accident Insurance Co. Agents Cindy Samford and Lynn Cox Walgreens Crawfordville Lou Kellenberger Photography Savary Academy Dickey’s Barbecue Pit # 535 Kast Net Restaurant and CateringMembers of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce and friends attended a ribbon cutting ceremony for Lisas Timeless Treasures antique shop on Friday, May 11. Lisa Russell is the owner. The shop is located at 44 Rose Street in downtown Sopchoppy, in an historic building that was built more than 75 years ago. J. R. Lawhon and his son J. Edward Lawhon operated a general store together there for many years. Mr. Ed, as he was called by the locals, lived to be 104 years old! In days past, you could “ nd Sopchoppys old timers swapping stories and passing time on the bench outside the shop which came to be affectionately known as the loafers bench.Ž You can now “ nd rare antiques, vintage items and unique collectibles that will take you back in time to days gone by. Lisa would like to invite everyone to come visit her shop in Sopchoppy to sit a spell on the loafers bench, take a trip down memory lane and perhaps “ nd a treasure you cant live without. Shop hours are Wednesday and Thursday, noon to 6 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call Lisa at (850) 559-6567 for more information. On Friday, May 18, Anytime Fitness of Crawfordville held a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house to celebrate the new owners Chris and Michelle Roberts and their induction into the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce. Anytime Fitness is the best place for “ tness 24 hours a day, seven days a week! At Anytime Fitness they “ t your busy schedule and on-the-go lifestyle. Their exclusive membership allows their members to workout ANYTIME of the day or night. Anytime Fitness has state-of-the-art strength training equipment and cutting edge cardiovascular equipment. Anytime Fitness is a locally owned and operated franchise. Anytime Fitness proudly supports many community programs and events. They offer special rates for law enforcement, “ re“ ghters, government and county employees. Stop in ANYTIME! Tell us about your business (include unique facts and history): MyOf“ ceProducts is the largest national independent of“ ce products dealer and the “ fth largest of“ ce products dealer in the U.S. Our workforce is comprised of 500 employees, 200 of whom are dedicated sales associates. While we pride ourselves in our continuous growth and reach, our main focus is providing individual customers with the very best services and products. With 47 locations and 37 distribution points across the country, we are able to ef“ ciently and correctly service all of your office needs including desktop accessories, paper products, toner and ink, dated goods, writing instruments and information technology supplies. Additionally, we provide a furniture offering including systems furniture, case goods, seating, design services, and space-planning. Lastly, our product offering also includes custom printing, ad specialty products, janitorial supplies and coffee and breakroom services. MyOf“ ceProducts business strategy is centered “ rmly on customer service, distribution, and technology. Our mission is to continue building a successful, pre-eminent organization that creates signi“ cant, measureable, and meaningful value for our customers, employees, and stockholders. To accomplish our goal, we ensure that all of our decisions are driven by integrity, that all of our actions exemplify professionalism, and that each individual customer is truly valued. We are con“ dent that our comprehensive and ef“ cient services will allow your own company to grow and thrive. What services, products do you offer? MyOf“ ceProducts has designed and implemented a broad array of services that provide total support for your organization. We offer a Single Sourcing Program that gives our customers one-stop shopping not only for office supplies, but also products previously considered peripheral items to of“ ce products. Our complete line of services include: of“ ce supplies, promotional items, of“ ce furniture, forms, managed print services, janitorial supplies, coffee and breakroom supplies, and greenŽ products. What sets your business apart from the competition? A simple value proposition … one order, one box, one invoice, zero errors! Rapid problem resolution „ this is a key internal customer service benchmark for MyOf“ ceProducts. We provide incentives that drive customer service, accounting, sales, operations, delivery, and all other functions toward a high performance culture in terms of ensuring quality outcomes to our customers and in terms of ensuring rapid resolution of problems should the initial order involve any quality failures. Cultural considerations „ the key ingredient that ultimately distinguishes one organization from another is the quality of the organizations personnel and their commitment to exceeding customer expectations. This begins with a working environment in which all employees are empowered to make decisions that impact our customers in a positive way. It continues with an ongoing commitment to the importance of the employees and their relationships with the customers. Items such as reliability, responsiveness, courtesy, competence, credibility, access, and communication are constantly reinforced. What should the community/ customer expect when they visit your business? Great prices, courteous customer service, huge selections with professional support from beginning to end. How long have you been a Chamber member? I have been a member for three years. Why did you join the Chamber? The Wakulla Chamber of Commerce is a great way to meet the local business owners and support the local community. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? The monthly business mixers, and the holiday parties. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? When I purchase locally, I am supporting the jobs of my neighbors. When my neighbors has improvements, my houses value increases. Like a rising tide, we all are elevated when we support each other. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Simply call me at (850) 508-2660 or email me at james.hodges@myof“ ceproducts.com Additional comments: Diversity: MyOf“ ceProducts aggressively supports both Tier 1 and Tier 2 diversity partners from both the service and manufacturing sectors. If a customer has a need for Tier 1 Diversity spend, MyOf“ ceProducts has teaming agreements with an SBA Small, Disadvantaged, Woman-Owned Diversity Business, MetroOf“ ceSolutions. We also have an agreement with Veteran Corps, which is an 8(a) Service Disabled Veteran, Small Disadvantaged business. Our teaming agreements with these companies allow our customers to participate with diversity service companies in needing any contracting Tier 1 Diversity credit goals. Additionally, the MyOf“ ceProducts, MetroOfficeProducts and Veteran Corps of“ ce products catalogs designates MBE (Minority-Owned Business Enterprises) and WBE (Women-Owned Business Enterprise) manufacturers and all of the products purchased from these manufacturers qualify as a Tier 2 spend. MyOf“ ceProducts can generate diversity reports on an annual, quarterly, monthly, or as needed basis speci“ c to diversity spend. Collection/Pickup Services: MyOf“ ceProducts has developed a comprehensive program to recycle our customers empty laser toner and inkjet cartridges through our sister company, ShredX. MyOfficeProducts drivers will empty the collection bins on a standard schedule, and our warehouse team will manage the return of the empty cartridges to HP for the purpose of earning HP Rewards Points and tracking the collection of toners from our customer. Pickup schedules will vary depending on the department from weekly, bi-weekly or monthly services. There is no minimum or maximum number of cartridges needed for recycling and there is no training required. The system is as easy as depositing paper into recycling bins. Name: James Hodges, 300 Wakulla Springs Highway. Phone Number (850) 508-2660. Name of business: MyOf ceProducts Name of owner: Hi Touch Ribbon cuttings:SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLisas Timeless Treasures Anytime FitnessNew members:Chamber networking luncheon catered by Kast Net SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPart of the crowd at the Chambers networking luncheon held at the county extension of“ ce with food served by Kast Net.

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Page 16 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 13 Nominees for the catergory were GamerZ Paradise, Black Bean Cuban Cuisine, Tally Up Tax and Accounting, Wakulla Produce, Dreams Daycare, Mikes Seafood Grille, R. Alan Andrews P.A., Learning Curve Tutoring, Rock Landing Marina, Synovus Mortgage Corporation and Jos Dollar World. Non-Pro“ t Organization of the Year was Friends of the Wakulla County Library. The Friends have made it possible for Wakulla County to have the library building, and to offer the outstanding services to our community, which include a summer program for both children and adults. Nominees were Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, CHAT of Wakulla, Harvest Thrift Store, Big Bend Hospice, Florida Green Guide Association, Covenant Hospice, Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center, Workforce Plus, Big Brothers Big Sister of the Big Bend, NAMI Wakulla, Gulf Specimen Marine Lab and Panacea Waterfronts Florida Partnership Wildwood Resort proudly claimed the Environmental Stewarship Award. Wildwood represents an organization that considers the impact on our environment before every business decision. Environmental Stewardship nominees were Waste Pro, Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Hydra Engineering, Florida Environmental & Land Services Inc, Tallahassee Energy & Construction, wakulla.com, and St. Marks Out“ tter. Callaway Auto and Truck Repair won Wakulla Area Business of the Year. Mike and Sherry Callaway were nominated by a customer who sang their praises of honesty, hard work and outstanding customer service. Other nominees were Subway, Talk O The Town Deli and Shepherd Spring Animal Hospital. Gail Campbell won the award as Chamber Member of the Year. A new award this year, it was intended to recognize an outstanding employee or volunteer of a Chamber business. Congratulations to Gail Campbell, an outstanding member of this community. Other Member of the Year nominees were John Shuff, Sharol Brown, Mary Wallace, Amy Geiger, Kimberly Moore, Sherri Kraeft, Ronald Fred Crum, Courtney Peacock and Jo Ann Palmer. Besides Best Western Plus, the nominees for Business of the Year were VCA Wakulla Animal Hospital, Poseys Up the Creek, Ouzts Too Oyster Bar & Grill, Inspired Technologies, Cook Insurance Agency, Wakulla Area Times, 3Y Ranch & Outdoor Equipment, Bright Beginnings Daycare, Crawfordville Ace Hardware, Hydra Engineering, The Wakulla News, BlueWater Realty, Ed Gardner O.D., Keith Key Heating & Air, wakulla.com, Wal-Mart and Waste Pro. Congratulations to all the winners. If you are not a member of the Wakulla County Chamber, “ nd out about the bene“ ts by going to wakullacountychamber.com. Continued from Page 15 Tim Center introduced himself as the new director of Capital Area Community Action Agency. He shared that 14 percent of the population in the eight-county region they serve live in poverty, whereas the number of people living in poverty in Wakulla is 20 percent. He added that he would like interested Wakulla residents to consider serving on their board of directors. Tara Kieser, Chamber Board member and committee chair for FOCUS Wakulla, told our crowd about the inaugural event for this new group of young professionals, our future community and business leaders. Details about the event will be forthcoming via email and ads in The Wakulla News. Please dont forget that your employees are Chamber members through your membership, and will always be welcome at any of our events. Meagan Picht introduced herself as the new United Way representative for Wakulla County. She has been working for United Way for two years, and is looking to get more involved in Wakulla. Luis Serna, head of Wakulla Planning and Zoning Department, invited guests to the Wakulla County/Environmental Protection Agency Technical Assistance Workshop June 5 and 6. This workshop and discussion focuses on the Crawfordville Town Plan and rural roads, particularly the Big Bend Scenic Byway, and is open to the public. Karol Shepard with VCA Wakulla Animal Hospital briefly spoke about their clinic, which is part of over 500 animal hospitals nationwide, in Canada and internationally. She also handed out VIP cards, which are available to all Chamber members. So if you are adding a new pet to your family in the near future, or currently have a pet that needs care, be sure to contact us for a membership card and save 10 percent on veterinary services, and a free first exam. Jo Ann Palmer, head of the Chambers internal events program recognized Niraj Patel of Best Western as the winner of the 2012 Business of the Year Award, and would like everyone to get “ red upŽ for next years awards. Please do take the time to nominate when the paperwork gets emailed out early next year … it may be your business announced as winner next time around. Andrew Maus with Tallahassee Technology introduced himself as the local Xerox representative, and pointed out that Xerox is an American-based company and all earned dollars stay in the U.S. Whatever your printing needs, Xerox will accommodate. He also introduced Steve Mitchell, the new rep for print services. He will visit and analyze your individual needs. He also proudly announced no tonerŽ printing, a plus for environmentally conscious customers. Louis Garcia, CEO for Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend thanked the community for helping raise $3,000 at a recent local event, totaling local fundraising at around $17,000. He also urged to consider becoming a mentor for the local program. The minimum required time to spend with a youth is only four or “ ve hours per month, and it will make a huge difference in a childs life! Amanda Wright told us about the new equestrian center off Lawhon Mill Road, and encouraged everyone to come out the third Saturday each month to enjoy different horse presentations. The Wakulla Horsemans Association still needs to purchase an announcer booth and other items, and is offering annual advertising at the equestrian center. If interested, contact Jim Porter at 509-0555. Susan Schatzman reminded everyone of the Motorcycle Run set for June 2, held by Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County, which included stops at various locations in Wakulla. Cindy Samford, our new member won the $54 cash drawing. We had 19 donated items, including homemade jams, gift cards, gardening books, ” ashlight, stepping stones, etc. Thanks to Brooks Concrete, Adam Brugner, Cook Insurance, The Wakulla News, UF/IFAS, Harvest Thrift Store, Susan Schatzman, Farm Bureau Insurance, Centennial Bank, Graphic Visions, Lamar Advertising, Jo Ann Palmer, and Tallahassee Technology for their contributions!Chamber networking luncheon catered by Kast NetBest Western Plus is named Business of the Year Herb Donaldson gives an entertaining speech at the Chambers Business Excellence Awards banquet. Organizer Jo Ann Palmer, Waste Pros Ralph Mills, Chamber President Amy Geiger, Broward Sapp of CenturyLink.WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChamber members network during the luncheon. Fred Mohrfeld of Kast Net. Golf Gone WILD! A golf tournament and art auction to help injured, orphaned birds and wildlifeJune 16, 2012Come join our golf tournament with CASH PRIZESand an art auction to helpFlorida Wild Mammal Association AND ALSO ENJOY: AND ALSO ENJ O Y : Nature Photography Presentationby John Spohrer telling the stories behind the images of his award-winning work and a preview of images from his new large-format book, The Seasons of Apalachicola BayŽ. Sponsored by St. James Bay Golf Resort & Forgotten Coast TVFor more information or help registering call Lynne Cooper, Events Coordinator, at 850-697-9507Crooked River GrillA prime rib dinner buffet with all the trimmings and decadent desserts for only $30. AND PLEASE SHAREŽ ATTORNEY ADVERTISING. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outc ome. We may associate with local firms in states wherein we do not maintain an office. If no recovery, no fees or costs are charged, unless prohibited by State Law or Rule. Weitz & Luxenb erg, PC is licensed by, and a member of good standing of the New York State Bar. Lawrence Goldhirsch, Esq., member, FL Bar. P.C. LAW OFFICES &WEITZ LUXENBERGASBESTOS |DRUGS/MEDICAL DEVICES | ENVIRONMENTAL |NEGLIGENCE We are also investigatingFOSAMAXFEMUR / HIP FRACTURES1.888.411.LAWS |www.weitzlux.com700 BROADWAY| NEWYORK, NY 10003BRANCH OFFICES IN NEW JERSEY & CALIFORNIA Weitz & Luxenberg can help you understand your legal options. For a free and discrete consultation please call us today at 1-888-411-LAWS (5297) or visit us on the web at www.HipDeviceRecall.com.Have you experienced failure of your hip implant, resulting in pain and disability that may have required revision surgery to replace the failed component? Common symptoms include groin pain, dislocations, instability, and pain associated with loosening of the device and the release of metal particles into the joint. We are accepting cases for injuries caused by certain hip replacement component products manufactured by several companies. www.HipDeviceRecall.comAre you suffering from a DEFECTIVE METALONMETAL HIP REPLACEMENT? 1-866-742-1373 Get your business noticed One Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Don’t make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.facebook.com/AdNetFlorida Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 – Page 17By JASON ALDERMAN As parents, we hope were doing a good job raising our children … teaching them right from wrong, instilling the desire to learn and demonstrating how to manage money responsibly. But what if they see us preaching one behavior while practicing another? Whats to stop them from following in our sometimes misguided footsteps? As Fathers Day approaches, let me share a few things dads can do to teach their kids sound “ nancial habits that will last them a lifetime … and point out a few bad behaviors you may not even be aware of. Ask yourself: Do you avoid conversations about money with your kids because thats how you were raised? Or because you dont feel quali“ ed to give advice? Do you pay your bills on time to prevent late fees and possible dings to your credit score? Do you balance your checkbook regularly to avoid overdrafts and bounced checks? Have you set up an emergency fund … and are you disciplined enough not to tap it for everyday expenses? Are you sometimes caught off-guard by bills you should anticipate? If your family is experiencing “ nancial dif“ culties (layoff, foreclosure, massive bills), are you having ageappropriate, non-traumatic discussions about the need for everyone to make sacri“ ces? Do you complain about your job within their earshot or say youd rather stay home with them but need to earn money? You could be setting them up to resent both work and money. If college is on the horizon, have you had frank discussions about how it will be “ nanced? Have you started a college savings fund, explored student loan programs or discussed contributions theyll be expected to make? When your kids constantly break or lose expensive items or run through their allowance early, do you repeatedly bail them out with no consequences? Okay, thats a lot of potentially negative outcomes. Lets concentrate on a few positive actions you can take that will encourage responsible “ nancial behavior in your kids: € Use allowances to teach your kids how to handle money wisely, not as a tool to reinforce good behavior. Track their discretionary (toys, candy) and non-discretionary (school supplies, clothes) expenses. Depending on their ages and maturity, decide which expenses they should be responsible for managing, and dedicate a reasonable amount for each category in their allowances. A few other suggestions: € Use allowances to teach important life lessons. For example, build in dedicated percentages they must set aside for savings, charity and investments … then involve them in choosing how the money is spent. € When you use an ATM explain that its not free money, but rather has been earned and saved by you. € To encourage saving during these times of low interest rates, offer to match their savings at 50 percent. € Teach by example. If money is tight and you have to deny your kids nonnecessary items, give up something of your own that they know youll miss. € Open a 529 Quali“ ed State Tuition Plan or a Coverdell Education Savings Account to start saving for your childrens education … and let them know about it well before you start discussing college choices. Fathers Day is when children traditionally express love for their dads. Show how much you care in return by starting them out with a healthy, realistic attitude toward personal “ nances.Jason Alderman directs Visas “ nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter, www. twitter.com/PracticalMoney.By WORKFORCE PLUSSpecial to The NewsWhile at “ rst glance they seem to have more differences than they can count, these two men from Wakulla hold something very important in common: the drive to overcome their circumstances and come out ahead in a still-struggling economy. Justin Keith and Spencer Gavin have both beaten unemployment despite staggering odds. Keith, a single parent of two young children, has worked as a maintenance technician for years. Gavin, 24, hasnt yet developed an employment history since a series of bad decisions as a young teen landed him in prison as a juvenile offender for eight years. They both found themselves in need of second chances in January when Keith lost his position through a lay-off and Gavin was released from prison after completing his sentence. I lost my home, my “ anc, and my kids had to transfer schools,Ž Keith said. Just watching them struggle was my biggest motivation to get a job.Ž His family helped to “ ll in the gaps by covering gas money and grocery money, as well as letting Keith and his children move in with them. Gavins family was central to his journey back to the workforce as well. If it werent for my mom, I wouldnt be here,Ž he said. Even when I did get in trouble, she was still there for me.Ž Gavin entered a juvenile center when he was 15 years old and spent the next eight years serving time and being transferred from prison center to prison center across the state. I started committing crimes, and that was out of my character,Ž Gavin said. Once I decided I didnt want to do it any morethats when I got caught. And I regret it.Ž Workforce Plus customized a response to support the individual journeys of Keith and Gavin. We couldnt afford the internet bill,Ž Keith said. So I came into Workforce Plus to get online.Ž Gavin learned about the Food Stamp Employment and Training Program available through Workforce Plus and took advantage of the services there, such as rsum writing and one-on-one individual assistance to create a career plan with a Career Counselor. Coming in to Workforce Plus made Keith realize the abundance of services available to him at no cost. Id been paying to make rsums and to fax documents that whole time,Ž Keith said. But Workforce Plus was great. There was never a time when I came in that they couldnt help. They rebuilt my resume, help me to post applications and went out of their way a few times to help me.Ž Keith used the services of the Workforce Plus of“ ce in Crawfordville. Workforce Plus called every day checking up on me,Ž Keith said. The persistence of Workforce Plus was matched by Keiths diligence. Every single day I was online searching for jobs. I dropped off a rsum to every company in my “ eld,Ž Keith said. Keith “ nally secured a position in his “ eld making enough to support his family. With that “ rst paycheck I was able to take my kids to the springs, get them a toy and go out to dinner,Ž Keith said. It felt great.Ž While Gavins story differs from Keiths in plot, the endings are similar and the characters share important traits. Loneliness accompanied Gavin to each prison. The worst part was being away from my family,Ž he said. Learning a hard lesson, Gavin took advantage of the training programs in prison and picked up trades in culinary studies and graphic arts. I learned to develop “ lm, make prints and the like. I bust my behind working at bettering myself.Ž He began applying for positions as soon as he was released. When asked if hed consider returning to his old ways, he was shocked. Whos going to do something illegal again? You dont do the same thing twice … thats crazy. It didnt work the “ rst time … it aint going to work the second time.Ž Gavin applied for positions at small businesses in Crawfordville and Tallahassee, always being honest about his background. With help from Workforce Plus on his rsum and interviewing, he landed a position at the Dollar Tree within two months of his release. People understand that situations happen. And thats the same thing my boss said … she said she believed in second chances. So its always possible to get a job. Its always possible. Some people believe in God, so its a forgiveness thing. You have to be willing to look past peoples wrongs.Ž Keith would echo Gavins advice. Be diligent in your job search. If youve got a ” at tire on the side of the road, you cant just leave it there; you “ x it and drive on.Ž When it comes to motivation, the two men from Wakulla agree that it is an internal element that comes from within that helps job seekers to overcome their circumstances. I knew I was going to “ nd a job. I dont think about my limitations … that Id been locked up.Ž Gavin said. I just want a family and to be able to take care of them. Thats all I want.Ž Keiths ability to secure his position is a tribute to the motivation and determination of a hard-working single dad and a beacon of light for others trying to get back on their feet. There are a lot of jobs out there,Ž Keith said. Youve just got to be persistent.Ž Dont stop searching,Ž Gavins parallel words encourage job seekers with the same message. A job will come through.Ž Workforce Plus is proud to bring you a series of stories straight from the community. In partnership with The Wakulla News, well showcase one of our own every six weeks whose journey in their career will serve to inspire, uplift and encourage. A tale of two job seekers driven to overcome Real Stories, Real People: A special series from Workforce Plus Justin KeithSpencer Gavin This Father’s Day, teach your kids how to manage their finances Special to The NewsWhen it comes to the best ways to use money, too many Americans operate under a key misconception, says investment adviser and “ nancial planner Ike Ikokwu. Money is opportunity, and having a blind spot for maximizing investment can drastically reduce ones future options,Ž says Ikokwu, author of Winning the Money Game: Separating the Myths from the TruthŽ (www. winningthemoneygame. net). That blind spot is debt, he says. Some myths born from the idea that all debt is bad include: € Paying off your home mortgage provides “ nancial security. € A 15-year mortgage is always the quickest way to pay off your home. € Putting money in your 401K or other quali“ ed plan saves you taxes. € The stock market is the only place to generate high, double-digit returns. My definition of being debt-free is to have enough money so that you can pay off your debt at any time … if you need to, he says. But you dont necessarily want to do that. Good debt can save you money on taxes, increase your investment gains and allow you to take advantage of wealth-building opportunities. Bad debt, on the other hand, is like having a big hole in your money bucket.ŽDefending debt … why its good the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Mike HarveyApril 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromI really appreciate this program. We eat at all the restaurants participating. It is a Great Deal to Win!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l a nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for quali“ed applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and ”oor rate of 2.5% GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116

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Page 18 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy CARESS KENNEDYSpecial to The NewsThe need for safety is often associated with actions such as driving and swimming. But as a consumer purchasing a product or service, safety should also be top of mind. You need to make informed buying decisions to safe guard against physical harm and “ nancial loss. According to ConsumerReports.org, last year could have been considered the year of awful consumer product news, judging by the amount of safety recalls made by regulatory agencies. As a consumer, there are resources available to help you make the most out of your purchasing experience to ensure that it is not only going to be enjoyable, but safe. There are laws regulated by the government on national and state levels to protect consumers against fraud and scams, unsafe products, and deceitful business practices. Consumer awareness is de“ ned as the understanding by an individual of their rights as a consumer concerning available products and services being marketed and sold. There are eight basic rights to protect you when making a purchase according to Consumers International: € The right to be heard. € The right to choose. € The right to consumer education. € The right to a healthy environment. €The right to be informed, € The right to redress. € The right to safety. € The right to satisfaction of basic needs. It is necessary for agencies to create laws to protect consumers from crooked business and to warn shoppers of deceitful goods. However, it is important to educate yourself to make sure you are making informed and safe buying decisions. If nothing else, be smart and follow your instinct when making a purchase. RESEARCH FIRST Organizations such as Consumer Reports, the Federal Trade Commission and others deal with issues that touch the economic life of every American. They can be a vital resource for product and safety information and recalls. Consumer review websites can also help in the research stage of a purchase as they gather information and feedback from product users and make it available for potential purchasers. Use your own judgment when reading a consumer review. Once you make a purchase, you can post feedback so that others can also become better informed. BUY SMART While consumers need to be proactive and responsible, consumer agencies have made signi“ cant strides in ensuring product safety. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission works to ensure the safety of consumer products which has contributed signi“ cantly to the 30 percent decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 30 years. Consumers should make product choices based on desired functionality and intended user. Ensure that purchases for children are age appropriate and do not contain dangerous substances or small parts. Use your best judgment when buying for children as you know the childs maturity level and can best decide if the toy is suitable or not. Food and other products that have expiration dates are also items that should be carefully selected. You can research expiration dates from the Food and Drug Associations website below. If you have a concern about a products safety or quality, contact the manufacturer or an appropriate agency. If there is a problem or recall with the product, act on it. Discard, return, repair or discontinue the use of the product until you have been informed of the proper next steps. € U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission € The Food and Drug Association € National Highway Traf“ c Safety Administration USE AS DIRECTED Directions are supplied with products to inform users of proper procedures for the item and safety standards. Some products may direct users for at home use only and may not be able to meet commercial demands. When making a purchase, ensure the product will meet your needs without going beyond its intended usage. Remember to always gather as much information as possible about a product before making a purchase. You and your familys safety depend on it. Caress Kennedy is a vice president at AlliedBarton Security Services, www.alliedbarton.com, a premier provider of trained security personnel to many industries.From FSU NEWSAll businesses want engagedŽ employees „ those who are committed to the success of the company and are willing to go the extramile to see it ” ourish. But theres a dark side to engagement that many organizations dont consider: Engaged employees can quickly become disengaged if they feel taken advantage of „ and a formerly engaged employee can do more harm to the company than one who was never engaged to begin with. Thats a key finding in a new study conducted by Wayne Hochwarter, the Jim Moran Professor of Business Administration in the Florida State University College of Business. Hochwarter surveyed 1,000 people, in both blueand white-collar occupations, to gain a clearerpicture of the concept of employee engagement, its bene“ ts for the employer, and its possible dangers when not managed well. Engaged employees work harder, are more creative and more committed, and they represent an important predictor of company productivity,Ž he said. Unquestionably, organizations with engaged workers have weathered recessionary pressures more successfully. However, those same organizations have to be sensitive to the fact that even model employees can give up if they sense that theyre being asked to do more and more, and with fewer resources, while comparatively little is being asked of their less-engaged colleagues.Ž In his study, Hochwarter found that engaged employees reported: € 50 percent higher rate of job satisfaction; € 45 percent higher rate of job performance; € 40 percent higher rate of life satisfaction; € 33 percent lower rate of turnover intention; and € 30 percent higher rate of commitment to their employer. The tricky part comes in keeping those employees engaged. Hochwarters “ ndings clearly illustrate that engaged workers, without needed company support and other resources, can begin to exhibit a number of undesirable attitudes and behaviors. Engagement often means taking on more tasks than ones less engaged coworkers, but with the expectation that the company will provide more of what is needed to assist along the way,Ž he said. Without those additionalresources, engaged employees began to display the following negative attributes: € A decline in helping behavior (50 percent lower); € Increased anger at supervisors (35 percent higher); € A view that expectations are beyond ones capabilities (33 percent higher); € Additional stress (30 percent higher); and € Lower overall productivity (25 percent lower). Put another way: Engaged employees can easily become disengaged. Hochwarter cited the example of one study participant who falls into that category. The 32-year-old “ nancial consultant wrote, I really did my best, worked long hours, contributed something every day... But the more I did, the more resources they took from me and gave to other employees.Ž The dif“ cult economic realities of the past few years have in” uenced engagement in both good and bad ways, said Hochwarter, whose “ eld of expertise is organizational behavior,particularly with regard to employer-employee dynamics. Business leaders are learning more about generating employee engagement, he added; however, little is known about how it should be maintained and cultivated. Helping to “ ll that knowledge gap was the reason Hochwarter conducted his study. Hochwarter offered several points for organizations to consider as they work to engage employees and keep them engaged. First, understand that getting employees engaged isnt like ” ipping a switch,Ž he said. Often, it takes a while for engagement to kick in, but it can be lost in only one incident. Second, realize that onceengaged employees who are now disengaged can cause more harm to a company than those who were never engaged. Third, getting employees engaged is like planting a tree: If you walk away from it, its unlikely to grow. And “ nally, many leaders feel that managing engaged workers is easier than managing those who are not engaged. This is simply not the reality in most companies.ŽBREAKING OFF THE ENGAGEMENT:FSU study shows that even loyal employees can become jaded if they’re not treated wellBe aware: Stay informed and safe when making a purchaseSpecial to The NewsWhat customers value most changes constantly, and the pace of change has increased exponentially with the economic recession, says marketing/management expert and best-selling author Jaynie L. Smith. The businesses who become relevant by addressing what customers really value at any given time will be the “ rst ones out of the recession,Ž says Smith, whose newest book, Relevant SellingŽ (www.smartadvantage. com), is now available. One year ago, people were looking for “ nancial stability in companies they were purchasing from because of all of the business closings,Ž she says, citing surveys conducted by her company, Smart Advantage Inc. Now, on-time delivery outranks that because so many businesses cut back their inventory during the worst of the recession. With demand increasing, customers have more dif“ culty getting what they want on time.Ž Smiths company analyzed more than 150 customer surveys to learn why customers buy particular products or services from particular companies. Its an essential practice for any business owner during any economic cycle, Smith says, but most dont do it. Her analysis of 10 years of double-blind customer market research for more than 100 businesses revealed that 90 percent of the time most businesses do not know their customers top values. They are often shocked to learn what is at the top of the customers value list. Smith offers these tips for getting to know your customers … and potential customers … so you can deliver what they want and adjust your sales and marketing message to become more relevant. € Customers are usually looking for howŽ things are sold, not what.Ž For most products, there are any number of suppliers. If someone wants to buy a camera, a doorknob, a car, they can drive to the nearest store or order from the “ rst company that pops up on Google. But they dont. Why? Because theres something else they value more than the product itself. It may be product durability, the companys reputation for customer service, or safety features. If you dont value what you bring to the customer, they wont value it either,Ž is Smiths mantra. Very few companies know how to effectively articulate what differentiates them, so price often becomes the tiebreaker. € Understand that existing customers and prospects usually have different values. Smiths company research analysis shows that 70 percent of the time, customers and prospective customers differ in what they most value. When that happens, your message to customers should be different than your message to prospects. Very few companies make this distinction in sales and marketing messaging. Existing customers may have come to depend on your top-notch help desk. Its what theyve grown to value most about your company. Prospective customers havent yet used your help desk so they dont know how essential this bene“ t is yet. € Use what you learn. If you “ nd customers most value speedy responses when they have a problem, and your customer service department is slow, then “ x customer service. Make sure to tell the customer service employees that customers have rated fast response time as their top priority. When youve got stats you can brag about … brag away: 98 percent of customer calls are returned within 30 minutes; 2 percent within 1 hour.Ž Now youve used that information in two valuable ways: to make your company more relevant to customers, and to let customers know youve got what they want. € Invest in disciplined customer research. Research data collection costs have gone down 30 to 35 percent in the past few years and can now be affordable to smaller companies. Double-blind customer market research is the gold standard and well worth the expense, but its not feasible for all companies. However, even a small investment in research can reap huge returns. Some less expensive and free alternatives to “ nd out what your customers want include sharing the expense with an industry association; partnering with an organization that needs the same information or a peer that doesnt compete with you; hiring a college intern; or creating an online survey using a free basic service, such as Survey Monkey.Jaynie L. Smith is CEO of Smart Advantage Inc., a marketing/management consultancy whose clients range from mid-sized to Fortune 500 companies.Research shows most businesses dont know what customers want Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. THG-12901 Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Joint pain € Arthritis pain € Muscle pain € Back pain Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate r i s Crawfordville (850) 926-2700 Also Now Open in Tallahassee Young Chamber Professionals focuswakulla Focus Wakulla is a young professionals group through the Wakulla County Chamber. This group will host events and special functions to meet the needs of our future leaders as they seek to grow and develop professionally as Chamber Members and Citizens of Wakulla County.Join us for our Inaugural Eventtarakieser@synovusmortgage.comFriday June 29th beginning at 6:00 p.m. Posey’s Dockside Caf RSVP: 850.294.5955 t ara ki eser @ synov u Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 – Page 19Continued from Page 6 There is a time when I want to bolster my faith, but in the circumstance before me, I did not want enough faith to handle some rattlesnake. One of the tenants of my religion is to run as fast as I can away from any and all rattlesnakes. It is one part of my religion I take rather seriously. My host tried explaining to me what was going on. He pointed to a passage in Mark 16:17-18 (KJV), And these signs shall follow them that believe; In my name shall they cast out devils; they shall speak with new tongues; They shall take up serpents; and if they drink any deadly thing, it shall not hurt them; they shall lay hands on the sick, and they shall recover.Ž My “ rst reaction was to think he was pulling the wool over my eyes, so to speak, and I almost laughed out loud. I caught myself in time when I realized this man was serious. According to him, he could have enough faith in God to pick up the poisonous rattlesnake and if it bit him, it would not hurt him at all. According to their religion, when they are truly in the Spirit,Ž they have the power to pick up a poisonous rattlesnake, and if it bites you, it will not hurt you. They keep the basket containing a rattlesnake in the front of the church for when such an occasion arises. I was hoping it would not arise during my time in the pulpit. All during my sermon, I could not help casting a wistful eye in the general direction of the basket next to the pulpit. At one point, I thought I did see the basket move. I yelled at this point, which excited the congregation thinking I had gotten in the spirit,Ž and then everybody cast a wistful eye in the direction of the basket. I respect other peoples views on everything, I suppose. However, there are some things I have dif“ culty wrapping my tired brain around. This has to be one of them. How you can pull the bit about the rattlesnake out of that verse of Scripture and ignore the rest of it is really beyond me. Religion will make you do many silly things that has no sanity behind it. Many people just go through the motions not really knowing why they are doing what they are doing. At least the snake handlers have a little bit of excitement in their services. Nothing I want to experience, but then who am I to criticize. I rest my faith upon the Scripture. Particularly, So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of GodŽ (Romans 10:17 KJV). My faith keeps me away from poisonous rattlesnakes. The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (352) 687-4240 or email him at jamessnyder2@att.net. The church web site is www.whatafellowship.com. -Janet From LivingOnADime.comTawra Kellam, editor of LivingOnADime.com, does something that most people think they cant do today. She feeds her family of six for $400 a month. Most people say thats an impossible feat but whats even more impressive is that she does it without using coupons. How does she do it? First, Tawra says, I use what I have. If I dont have milk in the house, I dont make a special trip to the store to buy it. The kids wont die from malnutrition if they miss drinking milk for a day or two. If Im out of bread, Ill make some cornbread or muf“ ns. If Im out of fresh veggies, I will use canned or frozen vegetables instead. Stop going to the store for one or two things. I shop for food two or three times a month and thats it. Ž Shop the clearance sections. I regularly find milk on clearance for $1.50 a gallon. My store marks the milk down a few days before the sell by date. The great part is that milk stays fresh for one week after its opened. I just throw several in the freezer and then I dont have to make a special trip for milk. Just thaw, shake and serve.Ž Purchase meat only on sale or on clearance. Again, butchers mark down their meat a day or two before the sell byŽ date. Generally, meat is good for three to four days after the sell byŽ date in the fridge or six months in the freezer. I never buy meat unless its on sale for $1.99 or less a pound. If its not on sale, we dont eat it. You can get some great unadvertised deals just by watching the meat counters clearance items. I found 5 lb. rolls of hamburger for $2.95 each after New Years Day. Of course we stocked up and will have enough hamburger to last six months. I can get soup bones with enough meat on them to make a great vegetable stew for under $2 for the entire family! Add some rolls and you have a complete meal for six for less than $3. When chicken is on sale for $1.66 per pound, I stock up. I do this with all my meats. This way we can always have a variety of meats.Ž Ask. Most people are intimidated by asking, but Tawra regularly asks when things will go on sale or be marked down. By asking, she found out that bananas, milk and meat are marked down each morning. She tries to shop in the mornings to get the best deals. When we lived in another state, they marked things down in the evening so thats when we went shopping. Adjust your shopping times to “ nd the best deals.Ž Serve your family proper portions of food. Most parents give their kids way too much milk, juice and soda. My kids get soda on special occasions only. They get milk with their cereal. For snacks, they eat a piece of string cheese, fruit or one or two cookies. The kids dont sip on milk or juice all day long. They drink water and are just “ ne with it. As a general rule, I try to give them one vegetable and one fruit for lunch and dinner and then a piece of fruit with cookies or cheese as a snack. This gets their “ ve a day in very easily. Stop letting kids just graze on chips and other snack food all day. My kids get one small bowl of chips a day and thats it.Ž So what do the Kellams eat? Tawra shares some of their menus with us: € Slow cooked roast, brown gravy, onions, carrots, potatoes, buttermilk muf“ ns and a fruit plate. (The next day, the leftovers from the roast are used as BBQ beef along with potato salad, green beans and strawberries or grapes.) € Pizza (homemade), tossed salad and fruit. € Maple glazed chicken, scalloped potatoes, glazed carrots, applesauce and dinner rolls. € Sloppy Joes, cucumbers and tomatoes. € Tacos, refried beans, green beans, sliced apples and tortilla chips w/ honey. With savvy shopping, you too can cut your grocery bill even when prices are going up! Tawra Kellam and Jill Cooper are the publishers of the website http:// www.LivingOnADime.com and the authors of the Dining On A Dime Cookbook.Snake, rattle and roll in the aislesHow to save money on groceries Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Open: Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 • Sun. 11-9 850 697-9191 Thurs. 11 3 Grouper & Popcorn Shrimp w/ 2 sides Fri. 11 3 Dozen Shrimp w/ 2 sidesCome Enjoy Live Music on the deck this weekend Provided by Marshall TaylorEnjoy Oysters on the Half Shell with Mike Eastman. $ 7 99 $ 7 99 Fried • Grilled • Blackened

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Page 20 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com A-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432“we sell and service most makes and models” Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan Strickland’s POOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE S S S S S S Licensed & InsuredGreen Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469 Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC HURLEY’S ROOF Construction, Inc.Roof Inspection Repair CleaningNEW ROOF • RE-ROOFING • SHINGLES • METAL850-544-1217FREE ESTIMATES Local, experienced and dependable management for Condo and Homeowners Associations.925-9911Kelly’s Association Management Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053887408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONS RE-ROOFING REPAIRS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980Will help you make the most of your outdoor space. Wood and Metal buildings, carports, barns, swings, gazebos & More! Sizes and Pricing to “t your needs. RENT-TO-OWN options. $25 credit on a new building with this ad! See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care 850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements A DVERTISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS!! Call now to grow your business. Get your classified ad in 119 newspapers with one order. Advertising Networks of Florida. 866-742-1373 Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 General Help Help Wanted€ FT Food Service Mgr € PT Bus Drivers € FT VPK TeacherCoast Charter School St. Marks, 850-925-6344 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLEMoving Sale Sat. June 9th, 8a-2pm 230 Lost Creek Lane Selling the Farm DWMH on 10 Acres Tractor, Farm equip. Tools, Equestrian items, chickens, household goods, ETC.For Details schatzman@ comcast.net or 519-2292 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLESat. June 9, 7a-2pm 2 Family Sale Kids clothes, Misc. Items 53 Goldfinch Way Songbird Subdivsion General Let us sell your items for you at our next auction. Well do the work, move & sell for you! www.Gallery319.biz or 850 926 7355 Musical Instruments LIKE NEW 7PC DRUM SET DDrum $450.00 new, also, Proform treadmill $50 Palates equip $50 352-563-1518 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Near Georgous Lake Ellen quiet neighborhood completely rennovated, New Central AC, 1,400 sf, 33 John David Drive $650 mo. (850) 443-3300 Apartments $99. Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Apartments Sopchoppy RiverCharming, Partially furnished 2-story loft on private pond. Custom features, 1.5BA, walk-in-closet, W/D, D/W, TV w/ satellite. Very private. $650/month. 850-962-2849. Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm, 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Efficiencies/ Cottages Large room/bath, microwave, fridge, with deck, on Wakulla River, $90 week or $400 month, includes utilities 850-926-2783 Rental Houses OYSTER BAY2/1 on the canal with boat ramp. Refurbished, furnished or Not $960 mo + Utilities + dep. 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEGorgeous 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout. Low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood. $850, mo 37 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 443-3300 Open House PANACEA OPEN HOUSE Sun, June 10th between 2pm and 4pm 3/2 under air 1344sq. ft on canal w/boatlift has metal roof $240K Crystal River Homes Country Club Road 3 bedroom. 1 bath. Home for Sale: $105,000 Country Club Road, Crystal River Florida. Location, Location, Location!!!!!!!!!! Across the street from the famous Plantation Golf and Resort. 3 bedroom, Privacy, this is private large lot but close to all that Crystal River has to offer! Fenced in yard with storage shed in the back yard. Also plenty of room for boat/trailer storage.Updated with newer ac/furnace, roof, interior totally professionally updated, tile and carpet thru out. Rental history is great with tenant in place. Check it out! Seller says Sell! REaltors, I will pay a bonus if you bring me a buyer!(352) 795-3668 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 850-926-3546 5242-0607 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice Under Fictitious Name Law. pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under thefictitious name of: Fresh Scent Cleaning Services located at 78 Jared St, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of Fictitious Name Notices State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Wakulla, FL this 26th of May 2012. /s/Frank Harrell, owner /s/Naomi Harrell, owner June 7, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices 5248-0607 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice Under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in busiFictitious Name Notices ness under the fictitious name of JESSIES LIGHTHOUSE FOR HUMANITY located at 2775 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in the County of Wakulla intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this ist day of June, 2012. /s/ Jessica M. Taylor, owner 06/07/2012 C & P Towing NOS 5244-0607 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Public Notice is hereby given that the C & P Towing will sell at Public Auction pursuant to Florida Statutes section 731.78. C & P Towing reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. To be held at C & P Towing at 2235 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at 8:00 a.m. on June 26, 2012 the following vehicle: 1989 Ford IFCTR10A2KVB79039 Published one time (1) in The Wakulla News June 7, 2012 5244-0607 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5247-0614 TWN Vs. Burke, Terrence M. Case No. CACE12-0032439(11) Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEVENTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. CACE12-0032439(11) DANNY DANIELS and LINDA DANIELS, his wife Plaintiff, vs. TERRANCE M. BURKE, et all, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 22, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. CACE 12-003243(11) of the Circuit Court of the17th Judicial Circuit in and for Broward County, Florida, whereinDANNY DANIELS and Linda DANIELS are Plaintiff and TERRANCE M. BURKE; et al., are Defendant(s). 5250-0614 vs. Vaillancourt, Debra Case No:2012CA000083 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ,CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO: 2012CA000083 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, DEBRA VAILLANCOURT, et, al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL T BRACKIN LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 30 CHICKAT TRL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ALSO ATTEMPTED AT: 2142 HIGHWAY 98 E, CARRIABLLE, FL 32322 AND 1349 BRANCH HILL CT, APOPKA, FL 32712 CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOTS 63 AND 64, BLOCK 48Ž, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT V, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address i is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or before June 7th, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in The Wakulla Times and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. I f you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coo rdinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled Court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or Voiice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 25th day of May, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News 5250-0614 : Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices YARD SALE!June 9th, 8AM-12N MEDART ASSEMBLY OF GOD 4647 Crawfordville Hwy., MedartYOUTH FUNDRAISER --INDOOR ---GREAT STUFF AT A GREAT PRICE!--NO EARLY BIRDS --3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $925mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $475mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $700mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S S S S A A&W

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 – Page 21 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 11 Purple Martin 4BR/3.5BA, 2,887 sq. ft, located in Songbird, $1,500 monthly, $1,500 Deposit, Available August 1. • 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $1,000 Mo. • 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets • 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok • 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets • 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced • 239 Magnolia Ridge 3 BR/2BA $1,200 mo., $1,200 Deposit • 67 Cochise 2BR/2BA $825. mo., Available July 1 • 145 Rochelsie 2BR/2BA $700. mo., Pets okay up to 40lbs with non-refundable $250. Deposit. Available July 1 • 165 Sam Smith Circle 2BR/1BA $450. mo. • 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595. mo. $595. Deposit Call Mitchell Todayƒ850-792-3402mkauffman117@gmail.comRealtorWelcomes Mitchell Kauffman I will sell to the highest bidder for cash, online at www.broward.realforeclose.com at 10:00 oclock a.m. on the 21 day ofJune, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: See Attached Exhibit AŽ Broward County Property: 17431 SW 54th Street, Southwest Ranches, FL 33331 Wakulla County Property: 276 Fox Hollow Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 23 day of May, 2012. HOWARD FORMAN,Clerk of Circuit Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ W. Jackson, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commence at an Iron pipe marking the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and thence run South 88 degrees 45 minutes 42 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, a distance of 240.89 feet to a concrete monument for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run North 89 degrees 11 minutes 25 seconds East along said North boundary 479.39 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 00 minutes 11 second East 701.89 feet to the centerline of a 60.00 foot roadway easement, said point lying on a curve concave to the Northeasterly, thence run Northwesterly along said centerline and along said curve with a radius of 994.14 feet thru a central angle of 31 degrees 57 minutes 52 seconds for an arc distance of 554.62 feet, the chord of said arc being North 75 degrees 53 minutes 53 seconds West 542.83 feet, thence run North 04 degrees 45 minutes 58 seconds East 563.47 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 7.67 acres, more or less. SUBJECT TO a roadway easement over and across the Southerly 30.00 feet thereof. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO WIT: A 60.00 foot roadway easement lying 30.00 feet on each side of the following described centerline: Commence at an Iron pipe marking the Southeast corner of Section 28, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 00 degrees 08 minutes East along the East boundary of said Section 28, a distance of 342.70 feet to the Southerly maintained right-of-way boundary of a graded county road, thence run South 57 degrees 49 minutes 36 seconds West along said Southerly maintained right-of-way boundary 451.09 to the POINT OF BEGINNING of said centerline. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run South 27 degrees 24 minutes 55 seconds East 59.67 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Southeasterly along said curve with a radius of 823.79 fee feet thru a central angle of 09 degrees 42 minutes 50 seconds for an arc distance of 139.66 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 07 minutes 45 seconds East 300.67 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Southeasterly along said curve with a radius of 994.14 feet thru a central angle of 60 degrees 00 minutes 52 seconds for an arc distance of 1041.32 feet, thence run North 82 degrees 51 minutes 23 seconds East 169.24 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Easterly along said curve with a radius of 551.21 feet thru a central angle of 14 degrees 28 minutes 30 seconds for an arc distance of 139.25 feet, thence run South 82 degrees 40 minutes 7 seconds East 489.65 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Easterly along said curve with a radius of 928.78 feet thru a central angle of 09 degrees 14 minutes 00 seconds for an arc distance of 149.67 feet, thence run North 88 degrees 05 minutes 53 seconds East 199.47 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Easterly along said curve with a radius of 2695.04 feet thru a central angle of 04 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds for an arc distance of 199.91 feet, thence run South 87 degrees 39 minutes 07 seconds East 308.37 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Northeasterly along said curve with a radius of 126.91 feet thru a central angle of 54 degrees 14 minutes 20 seconds for an arc distance of 120.14 feet, thence run North 38 degrees 06 minutes 33 seconds East 1525.20 feet to the termination point of said centerline. Daniel S. Mandel, Esq. DANIEL S. MANDEL, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff, 2700 N. Military Trail, Ste. 355, Boca Raton, FL 33431 Tel: (561) 826-1740 Fax: (561) 626-1741 Published in The Wakulla News June 7 & 14, 2012 5247-0614 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5226-0531 TWN v. Poka, Tim, Case No # 16-69 CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 16-69 CA SCORE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, v. TIM POKA A/K/A TIMOTHY POKA; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TIM POKA (IF ANY); CAPITAL ONE BANK USA, N.A.;WALKERS CROSSING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; TENANTS OR UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,THROUGH OR UNDER ANY DEFENDANTS NAMED HEREIN Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Tim Poka A/K/A Timothy Poka 29 Chance Street Crawfordville, Florida 32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 23, WALKERS CROSSING (UNRECORDED): COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8 A DISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTTES 22 SECONDS WEST 690.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 229.82 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT, SAID PONT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID 5239-0607 TWN Vs. Flowers, Linda 65-2011-CA-000173 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 65-2011-CA-000173 Division: FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB Plaintiff, v. LINDA FLOWERS A/K/A LINDA MARIA FLOWERS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMINGINTERESTS BY THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, 5243-0614 vs. Dana Carter Case No. 65-2012-CA-000093 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000093, DIVISION: Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. : DANA CARTER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ANDREW T. CARTER LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:: 1951 Woodville Hwy Crawfordville, FL 32327 1710 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLIAM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 101 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 1748.95 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 903.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 142.62 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 617.33 FEET TO POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 60.29 FEET TO A POINT THENCE RUN SOUTH 14 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 145.67 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 684.28 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 30.00 FEET WIDE EXCLUSIVE PERPETUAL, INGRESS, EGRESS, AND UTILITY EASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 92 OF THE HARTSFIELD, SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 629.81 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 74 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 13 SEC OND EAST 1783.13, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 565.46 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 627.91 FEET TO A 3 INCHES ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT 9MARKED NO. 2919),THENCE RUN SOUTH 14 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 115.66 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED $4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 14 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 30.01 FEET TO A 4 INCHES BY 4 INCHES CONCRETE MONUMENT ,THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 300.07 FEET TO A 3 INCHES ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO.2919) LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE NORTHEASTERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT -OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF PURIFY BAY ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 33 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OFWAY 31.42 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED NO. 4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 310.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1997 RDMNŽ DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME, ID#11430190A TITLE # 90701645 AND ID# 11430190B, TITLE # 90701714 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for therelief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 22nd of May, 2012. Brent. X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, as Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News June 7 and 14, 2012 5243-0614 Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment datedMay 2, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 65-2011-CA-000173, DIVISION: ____________, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and LINDA FLOWERS A/K/A LINDA MARIA FLOWERS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m., at front door of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on the 14th day of June, 2012the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 33, BLOCK 7, OF WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 93 Pueblo Trl, Crawfordville, FL 32327. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on May 3, 2012 (COURT SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT By; /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk Attor ney for Plaintif f: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544,Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 working days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 31, and June 7, 2012 5239-0607 File No. 3524-10206 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Florida Coastal Properties, Inc. OPEN HOUSESaturday, June 9 10 A.M. 2 P.M. For details please call Owner/Agent Susan Schatzman 850-519-2292BRING THE HORSES! This 10.4 acres is fenced, cross fenced, and planted with Argentine Bahia grass. The property includes a 3 stall barn with tack room, grooming area, chicken coops and storage areas. 3 Bedroom 1.5 Bath DWMH features an additional of ce, front screened porch, wheelchair access ramp, large covered back porch, and carport. The property is located directly adjacent to the National Forest with access to miles of trails. Gorgeous property with large live oaks, laurel oaks and pear trees. Owner relocating, must sell. Price reduced to $117,000. We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Diekson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets.

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Page 22 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 45 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 29 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 182.25 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 41 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 177.58 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID REVERSE CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 290.00 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 10 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 22 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 53.08 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 58 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 53.10 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 73.81 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 61 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 412.18 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 370.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH 1996 DOUBLEWIDE PALM MOBILE HOME, VIN #PH09871AFL AND PH098701BFL, ID#0071388796 & 0071388795 has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Henry L. Miller, Jr., Esq., whose address is 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida, 32303, on or before thirty days from the date of the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated:May 22, 2012 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By; /s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 31 and June 7, 2012 5226-0531 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5151-0614 TWN vs. Harrell, Tracy N. Case No. 65-2010-CA-000282 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000282 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. TRACY N. HARRELL A/K/A TRACY HARRELL A/K/A TRACY NICOLE HARRELL AND BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES, et. al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in 65-2010-CA-000282 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and TRACY N HARRELL A/K/A TRACY HARRELL A/K/A TRACY HARRELL A/K/A TRACY NICOLE HARRELL; BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; JOHN DOE; AMY DENISE LALONDE; BRYAN DOLPHIS LALONDE; WAKULLA BANK are the Defendants.Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., lobby Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at 11:00 a.m. on August 2, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22, WALKERS CROSSING COMMENCING AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, A DISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 360.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 198.19 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT ; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 212.39 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITHA RADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 31 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.19 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST, 229.82 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 330.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. THE ABOVE LEGAL DESCRIPTION BEING MORE RECENTLY SURVEYED BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES, DATED APRIL 4, 2002, UNDER JOB NO. 01-034, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, A DISTANCE OF 1697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST, 360.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 200.49 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF CHANCE COURT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE A DISTANCE OF 212.88 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 231.49 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 38 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 61.66 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 11 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 61.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 232.20 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919); THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 330.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1998 OR 1999 HOMES OF LEGEND SINGLE -WIDE VIN #HL9774AL. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 24th day of May, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) IMPOR T ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News June 7 & 14, 2012 11-05421 5214-0614 TWN Vs. Parker, Brittany Rachelle Case No. 65-2012-CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.65-2012-CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v. BRITTANY RACHELLE PARKER, ET AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: BRITTANY RACHELLE PARKER, and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants Current Residence Unknown, but whose last known address was: 187 ROCHELSIE RD., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2719 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: LOT 24, BLOCK 22, WAKULLA GARDENS, ACCORDING TO MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL 33716, on or before June 7th, 2012 or within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327-0337, either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 18 day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850)926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARY INJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. June 7 and 14, 2012. 665112464 5230-0614 TWN Heirs of Martinson Kenneth H., Case No. 12-158CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-158CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN MARTINSON, husband and wife, and as Trustee of THE MARTINSON REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN H. MARTINSON, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 25, Block E. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10972-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5230-0531 5231-0614 TWN heirs of Arnold, Bert C. Case No. 12-159CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-159CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U.ARNOLDHUSBAND AND WIFE, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U. ARNOLD, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 53, BlockD. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10951-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the compliaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5231-0531 5235-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-130-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-130-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 22, Block K of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11131-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. 5236-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-131-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-131-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 19, Block L of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11178-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5236-0614 5237-0614 vs. Matthews Dorothy C. Case No: 12-124-CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-124-CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DOROTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, IF DECEASED OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DECEASED OR ALIVE, HER UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HER; OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PARTIES; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DORTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 142, Block A of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10859-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a de-fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: /s/ Glenda Porter, AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5237-0614 5238-0607 est. Peters, William M, Case # 12-32CP Notice to Cred. PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-32 CP. IN RE : ESTATE OF WILLIAM MATHIAS PETERS a/k/a WILLIAM M. PETERS Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of William Mathias Peters, deceased, File 12-32 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is May 31, 2012. Personal Representative: George A. Dock, 86 Quail Run, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850)926-8245 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 31 and June 7, 2012 5238-0607 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5246-0614 Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida StatuesŽ, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, June 22, 2012 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Heather Simmons Before the sale date of June 22, 2012, the owner may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the StowAway Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 June 7 and 14th, 2012. 5246-0614 5245-0614 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART 1V Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Self Storage Notices Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, Saturday, June 23, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Sara E. Skipper Self Storage Notices Wendy Gray Evelyn Green Before the sale date of Saturday,June 23, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. June 7 & June 14, 2012 5245-0614 Self Storage Notices 5211-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 001 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that CASPIAN I LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2570 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-121-351-11968-A01 THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT 2 BLOCK A LOT 1 OR 722 P305 Name in which assessed RWC INVESTMENTS LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, June 7, 2012 5211-0607 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5235-0614 5 Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2 Go to http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click ContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 – Page 23By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, June 1 … With qualifying set for next week, the electionyear scramble by politicians to decide what of“ ce theyre actually going to seek kicked into high gear this week. At the same time, a federal judge and the U.S. Department of Justice moved to try to make clear what was necessary for groups registering the voters who will choose between those candidates … and whether some already-registered voters could remain on the rolls. Meanwhile, the seemingly never-ending drive to reform higher education got another fresh start when a blue-ribbon task force convened by Gov. Rick Scott started its work. And Scott and the Florida Board of Governors were considering applications to serve on the “ rst board of trustees for the soon-to-be independent Florida Polytechnic University. NO CALM AFTER STORMS Sen. Ronda Storms decision last week to leave the Legislature and run for Hillsborough County property appraiser didnt really cause a ” ood of potential replacements. But there were by weeks end a couple of high-pro“ le names preparing to take a shot at replacing the Valrico Republican in the upper chamber. So far, the biggest name to con“ rm an interest in running in Senate District 24 is former Senate President Tom Lee. Rep. Rachel Burgin, R-Riverview, also indicated she will pursue the seat. Rep. Rich Glorioso, who toyed with running for the seat, decided in the end to stay out. Leadership seemed to be lining up behind Lee, with incoming Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, issuing a statement on Friday endorsing Lee. He will hit the ground running at full speed with the knowledge and skill to help build Floridas future,Ž Gaetz said. Tom Lee will be a leader in the Florida Senate the moment he walks on the ” oor.Ž University of South Florida political science professor Susan MacManus described such a primary as the old guard and the young guardŽ and also said Burgin would be more conservative than Lee on social issues. Youve got generational, ideological and gender (differences), MacManus said. Advocates for the causes that Storms championed in the Senate, meanwhile, worried about what would come next. Storms was perhaps the most vocal Republican in the Legislature on issues affecting children, the elderly and Floridians with disabilities. This is a tragic blow for elderly citizens,Ž said former state long term care ombudsman Brian Lee, who worked with Storms on protections for residents of nursing homes and assisted living facilities. There were other moves in the run-up to qualifying. Rep. Scott Randolph, an Orlando Democrat who won national acclaim among liberals for saying uterusŽ on the House ” oor, said he would leave the Legislature to focus on a race for chairman of the Florida Democratic Party. He endorsed former Orange County Commissioner Linda Stewart for his House seat. And Rep. Jeff Brandes, R-St. Petersburg, filed paperwork Friday to run in Senate District 22, a Tampaarea seat that will likely pit him against either Rep. Jim Frishe, R-St. Petersburg, or Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater. THE RIGHT TO VOTE (AND REGISTER) The people who will decide those races, of course, are voters … at least those who are left if and when Secretary of State Ken Detzner and the supervisors of elections “ nish clearing off what they say are ineligible voters. Word came Thursday that the attempt to rid the rolls of those who shouldnt be casting ballots had drawn the interest of the U.S. Department of Justice. The feds are interested in whether the purge runs afoul of federal laws, and sent a letter to the state saying as much. Our records do not reflect that these changes affecting voting have been submitted to the United States District Court for the District of Columbia for judicial review or to the attorney general for administrative review as required by Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, the letter said. Accordingly, it is necessary that they either be brought before that court or submitted to the attorney general for a determination that they neither have the purpose nor will have the effect of discriminating on account of race, color or membership in a language minority group under Section 5.Ž The DOJ also expressed concern that the law generally says states cant remove voters less than 90 days before an election, and the states primary is Aug. 14. That prompted the organization that represents the states elected county elections supervisors to recommend holding off on removing anyone from the states voter rolls in light of DOJs concerns. Coincidentally … or perhaps not … the letter came after Detzner asked federal of“ cials to help with untangling the legal status of some immigrants. Detzner said he planned to get back to the agency. As to the speci“ c concerns presented by the Department of Justice, we will be responding next week,Ž he said in statement late Friday. There could also be more names on the rolls by the time the Justice Department gets its answers. Also on Thursday, a federal judge blocked the state from enforcing new restrictions on nongovernmental groups that register voters, like the League of Women Voters. Among the rules swatted away by Judge Robert Hinkle was a requirement that forms be turned in within 48 hours of being “ lled out, instead of 10 days. HIGHER (AND LOWER) ED CHANGES Education reform efforts also had their turns in the spotlight this week. A blueribbon panel that Scott asked to look at changes to the states university system held its “ rst meeting … and already seemed to be turning its attention to funding issues. Its very hard to do any strategic planning with absolutely no idea, is your budget going up or down?Ž said University of North Florida President John Delaney, a member of the task force. And Administrative Law Judge John Van Landing-ham held a four-hour hearing about whether the state Department of Education exceeded its legal power in a proposed rule that helps spell out how school districts will evaluate teachers under the states landmark merit-pay bill. Tony Demma, an attorney for the Florida Education Association union and two teachers, said the proposed rule includes such thing as an elaborate 13page checklistŽ that school districts would have to use to get state approval of their evaluation systems. But Jonathan Glogau, an attorney for the state, said the department is well withinŽ its authority. How do you approve something if you dont tell the districts what the standards are they have to meet?Ž Glogau asked. STORY OF THE WEEK: The U.S. Department of Justice raises concerns about the states attempt to get ineligible voters off the rolls, throwing into question the initiatives future. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: If the goal is to discourage voter-registration drives and thus also to make it harder for new voters to register, the 48-hour deadline may succeed. But if the goal is to further the states legitimate interests without unduly burdening the rights of voters and voter registration organizations, 48 hours is a bad choice.Ž … U.S. District Court Judge Robert Hinkle, striking down a rule requiring third-party groups to return voter registration forms within 48 hours.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Should I stay or should I go?SCOTT DEFENDS EFFORT TO PURGE VOTER ROLLS: Gov. Rick Scott on Monday, June 4, defended the states effort to remove potentially ineligible voters from the rolls. When you go out to vote you want to make sure that the other individuals that are voting have a right to vote. Thats what I care about,Ž Scott said during a stop for a business roundtable Monday morning in Quincy. If youre a candidate, you want to make sure that the people who vote in your election are the people that have a right to vote. So my focus is in making sure that our state has fair elections, people that have a right to vote, vote, because I dont want to disenfranchise anybody in their voting rights.Ž Scott said the timing … just months before the election … was due to the state trying to get information from the federal Homeland Security agency that would make the list of pontentially ineligible voters more complete. So far, the state has been unable to get access to that database. Theres no perfect time to do any of these things,Ž Scott said.Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 32 37 40 43 51 57 60 63 2 33 52 3 34 53 4 24 26 54 18 21 44 46 5 15 38 41 6 35 58 61 64 7 27 55 8 25 47 22 45 9 16 19 39 42 10 28 36 59 62 65 11 29 48 56 12 30 49 13 31 50 ACROSS 1. In the altogether 5. Reedy instrument 9. Go's mate 14. Say for sure 15. Act the goldbrick 16. Bring a smile to 17. Turned down an invitation 19. Flaxen fabric 20. "Exodus" hero 21. Baloney 22. Bernadette of "Silent Movie" 23. Readied for mailing 25. __ Clemente 26. Intl. group since 1948 27. Sunday readings 32. Some saxes 35. Take-out order? 36. Butler, to Gable 37. Risked future harm 40. Mold-ripened cheese 41. Not exactly a world-beater 42. Part of a step 43. Overhaul, as a country road 45. __ Solo of "Star Wars" 46. Checkers side 47. Slowest on the uptake 51. Producer Bochco 55. Act the ratfink 56. Bath bathroom 57. Insertion mark 58. Scrammed surreptitiously 60. Automobileeschewing sect 61. Gofer 62. Pew's place 63. Words before car or cop 64. Deuce beater 65. Like batik fabricsDOWN1. Cakes with kicks 2. Manage to avoid 3. Aqua __ (gold dissolver) 4. Bit of work 5. Doo-wop selections 6. Serenaded the ump 7. Clodhoppers 8. Gee preceder 9. Lead ore 10. Give off 11. Ignore, with "out" 12. Netizen, e .g. 13. Confident solvers' tools 18. Rio Grande city 22. KP implement 24. Heavyweight champ dethroned by Foreman 25. Like bar snacks 27. Gas or clutch 28. Bobby Orr's team 29. Arcing tosses 30. Fashion mag 31. Crystal ball gazer 32. E.g., e.g. 33. Handed-down history 34. Pre-calc course 35. Fooled on the ice 38. Like cheesecloth 39. Popsicle flavor 44. Motown's Franklin 45. Regatta site 47. Part of LED 48. Broncos great John 49. Vino variety 50. Fiddled 51. Lingering emotional injury 52. Unlikely to bite 53. Ms. Brockovich 54. Ed Norton's wear 55. Culinary directive 58. Calendar col. 59. "Tell me more ..." American Prole Hometown Content 5/13/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 23 456 7869 82 714 65 37162 4 537 286 941 200 9 HometownContent 916 2753 4 8 458913627 273486951 825 367194 691842735 347159862 164 538279 532791486 789624513 B A B A S A B B R S C A R A V E R T L O R E T A M E R E G I A T R I G E R I N E R G M O O R E R V E S T E L P A S O A R E T H A O L D I E S W O V E N B O O E D D E K E D S A T O A F S P E D A L S T I R E F F S A L T Y D I O D E P A R E R H E N L E Y G A L E N A O R A N G E E M I T B R U I N S A N D T U N E L O B S E L W A Y U S E R E L L E S O A V E P E N S S E E R T O Y E D TALLAHASSEE, June 1 … The organization that represents the states elected county elections supervisors is recommending they hold off on removing anyone from the states voter rolls in light of new concerns raised by the federal Department of Justice. The DOJ noti“ ed the state Division of Elections and Secretary of State Ken Detzner this week that it is concerned that the states effort to cull illegal voters from the rolls may run afoul of a federal law that requires states to “ nish removing ineligible voters 90 days before an election. Florida is inside that window, with the primary scheduled for Aug. 14. DOJ didnt immediately order the state to stop removing voters, but along with the warning that Florida could be violating the law, demanded to know whether the state plans to continue the purge. The states effort is intended to remove non-citizens from the rolls, something state of“ cials said was possible by matching voter registration lists with a drivers license database that flags possible non-citizens. Critics have said the list is inaccurate and could lead to legal voters being purged. On Friday, Ron Labasky, the legal counsel for the Florida State Association of Supervisors of Elections, sent elections supervisors around the state a memo suggesting they stop using the state list to remove people from voter rolls, at least for now.Election supervisors: Back off purges

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Page 24 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comGRADUATION 2012 Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook ANTIQUES C ARRIE’S C OVEC ARRIE’S C OVE NEW FURNITURE & NEW CONSIGNORSHAVE ARRIVEDDOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PET STOP P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pe t Holistic Select WellnessC L P A ALL Y P N.W S PSpecial Orders AvailablePhone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. CommunityFINANCE, LLC ASK ABOUT FIN A NCING t y C W a l k t h e S h o p s Walk the Shops N e a r C o u r t h o u s e S q u a r e Near Courthouse Square Tamika Peterson hugs her son, Marshane Godbolt. Senior class of“ cers Emily McCullers, Ashley Roberts, Sara Glavey, Kristine Gallamore, Cody Cash. Schools board members, WHS administrators and seniors stand during the National Anthem. Excited seniors take the “ eld for graduation ceremonies. Members of the Class of 2012 performing the class song, Ill See You When I See You.Ž Seniors link arms to sing the Alma Mater. More photos online at thewakullanews.net PHOTOS BY KAREN JAMES



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Wakulla FCAT ResultsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County Commissioner Alan Brock has decided to seek reelection for his seat in District 1. Brock, who was born and raised in Wakulla County, was elected to the commission in 2008. Brock said he has learned a lot from his time on the commission and has thoroughly enjoyed his experience. He said he felt he has done a good job. I want to try and help make the progress we made continue to move forward, Brock said. Brock will face challengers Ralph Thomas, Republican, and Jenny Brock, NPA, in the November election. Although some projects have moved slower than he would like, such as making Crawfordville a walkable, shoppable community, Brock said he felt the commission and the community is working together a lot better than in the past. The county commission meetings are no longer the best thing on TV, Brock joked. He said he has worked hard to cut back on the rhetoric, as well as bringing the environmental community and business community together. Brock said there is a way to be in the middle, to promote jobs and environmental protection. One of his biggest accomplishments, he said, was helping to find a solution for the countys solid waste problem and leading the initiative for the county to require mandatory curbside garbage pickup. We were forced to make a choice, Brock said. The county was losing $500,000 in solid waste, he said. He added that illegal dumping has decreased by 50 percent and recycling has increased by 50 percent in the county. Most people seem happy with the change, he said. And most people are saving money. The county has also shifted from being reactive to proactive, Brock said. Which was a radical change, he added. Now, the county is planning ahead and creating 5-year plans and budgeting for future improvements and maintenance. This helps serve the community better, he said. Brock said he was also proud of his work on the Restore Act, which sought to ensure that at least 80 percent of the penalties paid by BP and others responsible for the oil spill are returned to the Gulf, the areas that were most affected by the BP Oil Spill. Brock said he wants to help bring back the most money he can for Wakulla County. The last four years serving the citizens have been an honor, he said. I really appreciate the opportunity to serve the citizens, he said. Brock is a consultant, focusing on public health advocacy, policy and community campaigns.Continued on Page 3 Alan Brock is seeking another term as county commissioner for District 1. Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 22nd Issue Thursday, June 7, 2012 One Sections One Sections75 Cents 75 Cents kll h h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyThe WakullanewsThe Opinion Page ..............................................................Page 4 Church................................................................................Page 6 Community ........................................................................Page 7 School ................................................................................Page 8 Sports ................................................................................Page 9 Outdoors .........................................................................Page 10 Water Ways.....................................................................Page 11 Sheriffs Report ................................................................Page 12 Taking Care of Business ...................................................Page 13 Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 14 Classi eds ........................................................................Page 20 Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 20 Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 23INDEX OBITUARIES Charles Chris Seward Allen Loran Vann Haddock Alan Brock is seeking re-election to the commission By BETH ODONNELLAssistant Superintendent Wakulla School District students placed top 10 in the state on the most recently released Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) scores. This last wave of FCAT scores was published on Tuesday, June 5, by the Florida Department of Education for grades four through eight in Reading, Math and Science. Wakulla students ranked No. 1 in the region consisting of Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla, Jefferson, Liberty, Franklin, Madison, Calhoun and Taylor counties on all 12 of the scored areas released on June 5. Wakulla ranked No. 1 alone on fourth through eighth grade Reading, fth through eighth grade Math, and fth and eighth grade Science. Wakulla tied for No. 1 with Leon County for fourth grade Math. This years test scores re ect new, more rigorous standards coupled with higher cut scores for pro ciency made more dif cult to attain from last year. Considering the tougher standards and increase in cut scores, this may be the best all around performance Ive seen by our students in my 17 years as superintendent, said Superintendent David Miller. Our students, teachers, staff and parents are to be commended for keeping the focus on student achievement, no matter what changes they are faced with. Of the 22 FCAT areas tested overall, Wakulla ranked in the top 10 in the state in 19 areas. In the regional districts of Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla, Jefferson, Liberty, Franklin, Madison, Calhoun and Taylor, students in Wakulla ranked rst in 14 areas, second in six areas and third in the remaining two areas. All areas released June 5 were above the state average. Individual student score reports will be available at the school sites after June 20. Parents may want to call their childs school ahead of time to make sure there is someone there who can help them. Score reports are coming back from the state later this year due to testing done later in the spring to capture more of what a student learns over the course of the entire school year. Earlier released scores for Wakulla High School ninth and 10th grade students showed them performing well on FCAT Reading and on the Geometry and Biology End of Course exams. In Reading, Wakulla ninth graders came in tied for No. 1 with Leon County in the region and at 10th highest in the state. Wakulla 10th graders came in at No. 2 in the region, behind only Calhoun County, and at sixth highest in the state. Continued on Page 2KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Top 10 in final FCAT scoresClass of 2012 GraduatesNew septic tank policy sent to stateBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.comThe Wakulla County Commission is proceeding with proposed changes to septic tank regulations, that include limiting the area where performance based septic systems are required in the county. At its June 4 meeting, the commission voted, three to two, with commissioners Alan Brock and Lynn Artz opposing, to send the policy amendments of the comprehensive plan to the state for comments. The item was heard at the planning commission meeting and was unanimously rejected. The current septic tank regulations are in the infrastructure element of the comprehensive plan and require a homeowner to replace a septic tank with a performance based septic system when the existing system fails or requires replacement or modi- cation. The regulations are enforced county-wide. The policy also mandates that the systems must be inspected every three years. Many citizens have complained about the high cost of upgrading to a performance based system. Commissioner Randy Merritt brought the idea forward because he said he felt the commission that passed the change in 2006 simply threw a blanket regulation over the whole county. He has said previously that he believes the performance based septic systems should be limited to certain environmentally sensitive areas of the county. Continued on Page 3 County Commissioner Randy Merritt The rain threatened, but stayed away during Friday nights graduation at Wakulla High School, in which the Class of 2012 turned their tassels. For more photos of the ceremony, see Page 24. Reading: 5th in state, 1st in region Math: 10th in state, tied for 1st in region Reading: 9th in state, 1st in region Math: 4th in state, 1st in region Reading: 5th in state, 1st in region Math: 7th in state, 1st in region Reading: 6th in state, 1st in region Math: 5th in state, 1st in region Science: 6th in state, 1st in region Reading: 5th in state, 1st in region Math: 7th in state, 1st in region Science: 5th in state, 1st in region4th grade 6th grade 7th grade 5th grade 8th grade Taking Care of Taking Care of BusinessBusiness News Business News from from See Page 13Page 9 TITANS ARE CHAMPSSports

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Qualifying is underwayQualifying for candidates is underway this week, beginning on Monday, June 4, at noon and running through Friday, June 8 at noon. For information, contact the Supervisor of Elections of ce at 926-7575. Reminder about signsAs election season gears up across Northwest Florida, the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) is reminding all citizens that state law prohibits political signs on state right of way. In Section 479.11(8), Florida Statutes provide that no signs shall be erected, used, operated, or maintained on the right of way of any highway on the State Highway System. Political signs placed on state right of way will be removed by FDOT staff and placed at one of the departments operations centers. Democrat HQ to openThe grand opening of the Wakulla County Democratic Party Headquarters will be held on Friday, June 8, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. The headquarters is located in the North Pointe Center, 1626-B Crawfordville Highway near Iris Annes and Auto Trim Design. Refreshments will be served. Candidates who will be attending the event include Cheryll Olah, Tax Collector; Donnie Sparkman, Property Appraiser; Buddy Wells, Supervisor of Elections; Bobby Pearce, Superintendent of Schools Alan Brock, County Commission District 1; and John Shuff, County Commission, District 5. Retiring Superintendent of Schools David Miller will also be attending. Staff report Page 2 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1 On the Geometry EOC, ninth and 10th graders tied at No. 2 in the region and No. 5 in the state. Biology EOC scores in 10th grade came in at No. 2 in the region and at No. 3 in the state. On the Algebra EOC exam taken by students in grades eight and nine, the scores rated No. 9 in the state and No. 2 in the region. Although this is one snapshot of our students success, I believe that they would do well on any accountability piece as our country moves toward national Common Core Standards, said Miller. I welcome the chance to see how well our students will be able to compete with other students across the nation and across the world, he said.Wakulla Top 10 in nal FCAT scoresSpecial to The NewsFloridas students continue to exceed expectations on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT 2.0), according to a press release from the state Department of Education. The results for FCAT 2.0 Reading and Mathematics, released on Tuesday, June 5, show that students did better than expected overall when measured on more demanding standards. The 2011-12 school year is the rst time that new Achievement Levels are in place for FCAT 2.0 Reading and Mathematics. Florida is leading the nation by preparing our children for more challenging Common Core Standards and assessments. I applaud our students and teachers for their inspired efforts, said Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson. Our state has spent more than a decade reforming public education and we know that sound transition takes time and patience, he said. Floridas children will compete for the jobs of tomorrow and we must do everything possible to ensure that they are ready. We cannot be fearful of change and the ambitious goals set before us, Robinson said. We will meet them together and I am confident that our students are on the path to success. In both reading and mathematics, students performed better than expected based on applying the new higher standards to 2011 performance data. Results for 2012 FCAT 2.0 Reading show that 59 percent of students in grades four through eight are performing at Achievement Level 3 and above (compared to 57 percent in 2011). In FCAT 2.0 Mathematics, 2012 results show that 57 percent of students in grades four through eight are performing at Achievement Level 3 and above (compared to 56 percent in 2011). Results for 2012 FCAT 2.0 Science for grades ve and eight show that 51 percent of students in grade ve performing at or above Achievement Level 3, and 46 percent in grade eight. Results for 2012 FCAT 2.0 Science are reported as FCAT Equivalent Scores. This means that student scores were measured using the existing FCAT Achievement Level scoring table. Scores on the new FCAT 2.0 Science achievement scale will be available beginning in 2013. While the state does not base grade promotion or student progression decisions on the FCAT 2.0 results, individual districts may have progression policies tied to the scores. As a valuable indicator of student achievement, FCAT 2.0 scores give parents and educators the ability to make informed educational decisions. In December 2011, the State Board of Education reviewed data showing the impact of new achievement levels on students and schools. Based on the data and feedback from educators, parents, and community members, the State Board raised the expectations for Floridas students and set new achievement levels for FCAT 2.0. To view information about the new achievement levels for FCAT 2.0 Reading and Mathematics, visit http://fcat. doe.org/ fcat2/pdf/spring12ffs.pdf. By DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 30 Sometime next year, you might be watching C-Span and listening to a roll call vote from the oor of Congress. Mr. Van Hollen? Aye. Ms. Velazquez? Aye. Mr. Visclosky? Aye. Mr. VoteforEddie. com? No!. Wait. Who? VoteforEddie.com is running for the 25th Congressional District as a no party candidate, challenging Republican Rep. Mario DiazBalart. VoteforEddie.com is the guys name on the ballot. From his website which is the same as his name he appears to be serious about his run. VoteforEddie. com says ending Americas addiction to oil, is his top priority. He also wants to push for tax cuts. VoteforEddie.com doesnt try to hide his more conventional original name, Eddie Gonzalez, putting it at the top of a biographical sketch on his Web page. He was born in 1980, the son of Cuban immigrants. His father was a distribution manager for the Miami Herald, his mother has a dental practice. He lives in Hialeah. VoteforEddie.com says he wants to represent independent voters in Congress, noting that nobody in Congress now really does that, even though more than a third of Americans identify themselves as such. I, along with a majority of Americans feel that career politicians have lost touch with the working class, he says on his website. The 249 millionaires and 202 lawyers that are in Congress are not a true representation of this nation as a whole. They are the silver spooned elite that are guiding this country on an unsustainable course. We cannot continue to follow them into record de cits, crushing debt and endless dependence on oil for their own personal gains or indifference. The candidate formerly known as Eddie Gonzalez legally changed his name to VoteforEddie.com, according to a document led with the circuit court in Miami that he provided to state elections of cials after they initially noti ed him that he appeared to have forgotten to include his name when he rst signed up to run instead giving them only a web address. Ah, but it wasnt a mistake, he told them. State of cials also sent VoteforEddie.com a copy of a Division of Elections opinion saying he couldnt use a nickname so he sent them a copy of the court order from January in which he legally changed his name. The next day, the Division of Elections sent him a letter back, beginning, Dear Mr. VoteforEddie.com, that acknowledged receipt of his request to be listed on the states candidate website, which he now is. VoteforEddie.com, who didnt immediately respond to a request for comment, seems to have some grassroots support he will qualify for the ballot by having turned in petition signatures.State FCAT scores show better than expected results overall The Wakulla News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.comVoteforEddie.com wants you to vote for VoteforEddie.comPolitical Briefs JUNE 201217 Fathers Day Subscribe Now 10 Months for $ 20 12New Subscribers Only! Honor your Dad today by giving him a gift subscription to The Wakulla News! SALE ENDS JUNE 30, 2012 Happy Fathers Day $ 20.12Mail or bring coupon with payment to Offer good for Wakulla County subscribers only.All major credit cards accepted. Offer expires 6/30/2012NAME _____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ CITY ________________ZIP __________________________ PHONE _________________ NEWNEW SUBSCRIBERS

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Special to The NewsThe clear morning air around Wakulla Correctional Institution split with the crackling of a 21-gun salute on Thursday, May 31, as the culmination of a ceremony to fallen of cers who had died in the line of duty. Bereaved family members, Florida Department of Corrections of cers and members and other public safety professionals gathered to pay homage to the men of the department who had fallen in the course of the past year. This memorial service is important because our people are important, said DOC Secretary Ken Tucker. Dedicated does not begin to explain the men and women of the Department, Tucker said during the ceremony that also honored the families of the fallen. Deputy DOC Secretary Mike Crews echoed that thought: Not a day goes by that Secretary Tucker and I arent proud of your dedication and service to Florida, he told the assembly of more than 500 men and women at the ceremony. Those honored included 24-year-old Sergeant Ruben Thomas III, who was stabbed to death by a Columbia Correctional Institution inmate on March 18, Behavioral Specialist Kirk Cummings, who died from a heart attack while on duty at Union Correctional Institution and Colonel Greg Malloy of Holmes Correctional Institution, who died in an ambush set by a eeing suspect. The ceremony included speeches from Tucker and Crews and Assistant Secretary of Institutions Tim Cannon as well as Wakulla CI Warden Ricky Dixon. The names of all of those honored over the years were read off. The ceremony ended with a playing of Taps. We can never repay our brothers and sisters for what theyve given us, Tucker said. They kept our families safe. They exempli ed bravery in their sel ess actions. And they are missed. While we cannot repay them, it behooves all of us to learn from them and to remember those employees who have sacri ced everything for us, he said. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 Page 3 PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1His main years in of ce, he has spent the majority of his time focused on being a commissioner. It gives me the exibility to serve the people of Wakulla County, Brock said.He serves on the Big Bend Homeless Coalition Board and is a commission representative on the Small County Coalition of Florida and Wakulla County Tourist Development Council. He has also served as chairman for the last year, voted in by his fellow commissioners. He is also active with the United Way of the Big Bend, being named the volunteer of the year. He is also very involved with Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend and is a member of Wakulla United Methodist Church.Brock seeks re-electionContinued from Page 1Commissioner Mike Stewart agreed and said the policy was too far reaching. The nitrogen reducing systems would be required to be installed for new development that are smaller than 5 contiguous acres and located within Bloxham Cutoff at the county line traveling east to Crawfordville Highway; from Crawfordville Highway from Bloxham Cutoff to East Ivan Road; East Ivan Road to Wakulla Arran Road; Wakulla Arran Road west to Cajer Posey Road; Cajer Posey Road south to Shadeville Highway; Shadeville Highway from Cajer Posey Road to Bloxham Cutoff; Bloxham Cuttoff from Shadeville Highway to Woodville Highway; Woodville Highway to the county line; from the county line back to the beginning point at Bloxham Cutoff. They will also be required within 150 feet of the high water level of any surface water, wet sink, swallet or within 300 feet of a rst or second magnitude spring, as well as properties where the total acreage is less than 0.229 contiguous acres of deeded property. Some residents have expressed their desire to see the protection zone expanded. Cal Jamison, former Wakulla Springs Ambassador, said, This is a very fragile, highly vulnerable area. He told the commission of the hundreds of sinkholes located within the county and said the proposed area does not even include all of the Wakulla Springs protection zone. Brock was concerned about Spring Creek not being included in the protection area. Thats the part that gives me great pause, Brock said. The proposed revisions will also delete the countys requirement that nitrogen levels must be reduced by 90 percent. The county would then fall under state standards, which is 50 percent. I still cant find science to tell me that the performance based septic systems work as well as they advertise it does, Stewart said. At a previous meeting, Health Department Administrator Padraic Juarez said most of the systems in the county did not reduce the nitrogen levels by 90 percent. There were a few that did obtain 90 percent, he said, but most were reaching the national average of 50 percent. Artz said if the systems are only reducing levels by 50 percent, that was still signi cant. Its cutting the risk to our countys health, Artz said. Stewart said recent studies have shown that septic tanks in Wakulla County are responsible for less than 1 percent of the pollution in Wakulla Springs. We arent generating it, Stewart said. Commissioner Jerry Moore said the percentage Wakulla County contributes is .76 percent. He demonstrated this by stacking three cases of bottled water, which represented the pollution coming from Tallahassee, and pouring the .76 percent of water into a glass showing Wakullas amount. Requiring everyone in the county to have a performance based system is just bull, he said. Artz urged the board to look at the nancial aspect of the regulations if money was the issue instead of going backward and decreasing the protection zone, but her plea would not sway Moore, Stewart or Merritt. Its just short-sighted, Artz said. Once the areas are heavily polluted, it will be hard to correct it, she said. Previously, the commission was looking at taking out the speci c septic tank language in the comprehensive plan and incorporating general protection language. The more speci c requirements would be made in the land Development code. However, the Florida Legislature adopted House Bill 1263 which repealed the requirement for septic tank inspections and limited the area where performance based systems can be required. The countys comprehensive plan provisions are grandfathered in and to ensure that the county is in the best legal position, County Attorney Heather Encinosa suggested instead to propose a separate policy that includes these revisions and narrows the policy already in the comprehensive plan. The policy amendments will be sent to the state for its comments and then will appear before the county commission one last time for a nal vote.By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netSeveral transportation projects are proposed in the Wakulla 2020 plan and former Chamber president John Shuff, who is leading the charge, gave the Wakulla County Commission an overview of those projects at its June 4 meeting. Previously, the idea was to focus solely on Highway 319. The Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee has now broadened its scope to include all areas in the county. However, Shuff said the rst project would be improving six intersections along Highway 319. The intersections would start at Bloxham Cuttoff and go up to U.S. Highway 98. There were also plans to include sidewalks in Crawfordville, Medart, Panacea, St. Marks and Sopchoppy. However, it isnt clear whether the money generated from the half-cent sales tax would be allowed to be used for sidewalks, under Florida Statutes. County Attorney Heather Encinosa said she believes sidewalks can only be included if work is being done on that road, but planned to delve a little deeper. It was Shuffs understanding that it was allowed for small counties, as long as an ordinance was adopted by the county commission. Other projects include adding a couple of turn lanes in Medart and a few in Panacea for better traf- c ow, as well as paving Tower Road near Panacea for hurricane evacuation safety. There were two road resurfacing projects suggested in St. Marks, paving Old Woodville Highway in Wakulla Station and widening the shoulder on Shell Point Road and Smith Creek Road. Extending the Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail into Sopchoppy was also on the list. Currently, the trail stops right outside the city. That trail goes from Mashes Sands to Highway 319 near the city limits. The committee also added a bike path that would extend to Wakulla Springs in Wakulla Station. Shuff said there was also an idea to have transportation for those people who live in Wakulla County and commute to Tallahassee for work. Wakulla is destined to be a retirement, bedroom community, Shuff said. All these priorities were established by the Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee, who have been meeting since it was created by the board in February. It is Shuffs hope that if the citizens decide to move forward with the Wakulla 2020 plan and vote for the half-cent sales tax on the November ballot, that fourlaning Highway 319 would move up on the priority list. Shuff, County Commissioner Randy Merritt and County Administrator David Edwards were meeting with representatives from DOT this week to discuss Wakulla 2020. The whole idea for Wakulla 2020 began because of several citizens frustration with the 20-year delay of four-laning Highway 318 from DOT. An ad-hoc committee of chamber members and economic development council members started meeting more than a year ago to nd a solution. Their idea came from Tallahassees BluePrint 2000 concept. If the referendum is approved by voters in November, the county commission would then create an interlocal authority that would oversee Wakulla 2020. Shuff said the tax is estimated to generate about $20 million over the next 15 years, and with a bonding stream and debt service estimate, it would leave them with a total between $14 million and $15 million to spend. The committee will also seek out grant funding. There is also the hope that DOT would help fund projects. Commissioner Randy Merritt again stated his concern that this referendum might jeopardize the extension of the one-cent sales tax in 2014. Sixty percent goes to transportation and roads and the remaining goes to the library, parks and recreation, public facilities and public safety. Commissioner Mike Stewart said he hopes it passes in November, but reiterated Merritts concerns about the one-cent sales tax not being renewed. If we lose it, were up the creek, Stewart said. In a previous vote, Stewart and Merritt voted against the measure moving forward. While Commissioners Alan Brock, Lynn Artz and Jerry Moore voted in favor of adding it to the ballot. The ballot language will come before the board to approve at the July meeting.COUNTY COMMISSIONProposed projects for Wakulla 2020 announcedBoards new septic tank policy is sent to stateDOC remembers its fallen in ceremony ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: CITY OF ST. MARKS CDBG STREETSCAPE PROJECT (C.D.B.G. #:11DB-C5-02-75-02-C02) JUNE 7, 2012 PUBLIC NOTIFICATION MAY 17, 24, 31 JUNE 7, 2012 000ARJS 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926 or 510 HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET?

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Page 4 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Wakulla Gardens residents face pay for paving A DOGS LIFE: Abandoned at the animal shelter, today Geist is training for DOC Coast Guard Auxiliary for June 7 Charles Chris Seward Allen obituary Conference covered important issues (Letter) Loran Vann Haddock obituary From the Dock for June 7 Good News About Aging: Dreaming of deep sleep thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Clarifying Emerald Sink incident Sheri s work crew were heroes Law-abiding gun owners under attack Were boat launch fees advertised? Emerald Sink story was awedEditor, The News:The May 24 Underwater Wakulla article by Gregg Stanton regarding Emerald Sink includes several incorrect statements. The story implies the Wakulla Springs State Park staff was irresponsible and unconcerned with protecting resources such as Emerald Sink. When it was discovered there was a car in the privately owned Emerald Sink, it was quickly removed. Staff from Wakulla Springs State Park, DEP, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce, St. Joe and volunteers worked together to quickly remove the car and put measures in place to prevent another car from being dumped in the sink. As people became aware of the importance of protecting sinkholes there were more requests for assistance with cleaning up privately owned sinkholes. Tons of debris have been removed from Wakulla Countys karst windows that lead to our drinking water. It would be another 7 years before Emerald Sink was acquired by the state. During that 7-year period, several parcels of land that contained sinkholes, including Emerald, were leased by the Woodville Karst Plain Project, an exploration cave diving team, from the St. Joe Company. These leases were much like those by hunt clubs and resulted in restricted access to these private lands. This in turn protected the resources from further vandalism. In 2003, Emerald Sink, along with numerous other sinks, was purchased with funds from the Florida Forever program. The primary purpose of the acquisition was groundwater protection. There were no funds or staff provided for park development or adding recreational activities. Johnny Richards did in fact rally the troops and because of his efforts $8,900 was donated by divers and dive organizations. Wakulla Diving Center contributed $100. The funds were managed by the Friends of Wakulla Springs. Park staff obtained the required state and county permits. State funds and staff were used to install fencing and to construct an access road and parking lot. Vince Ferris, a diver from Panama City, donated his professional services to produce the drawings and manage the project. It was a great group of volunteers who worked four weekends to construct the rst class facility. I was impressed and thoroughly enjoyed being with the group. The next challenge was to determine how best to allow recreational diving without serious injuries or causing damage to the resource. Representatives from the following organizations developed the criteria for allowing dive access to Emerald Sink: Global Underwater Explorers, International Association of Nitrox and Technical Divers Inc., National Association for Cave Diving, National Speleological Society-Cave Diving Section and Technical Diving International. Because of the highly technical nature of the activity, park staff did not vote on the criteria. After much discussion the criteria were accepted and a reservation procedure was put in place. In April 2007, Emerald Sink was once again open for recreational diving. In 2011, another site, Clear Cut, was opened using the same criteria. Since being established 125 divers have met the criteria and are currently authorized to dive Emerald and Clear Cut Sinks. In todays society, it is easy to sit back and complain when things dont go your way. It is never easy working through issues where there is disagreement. People like Jason Ottinger, Kelly Jessop and several others who worked on the Emerald Sink project showed that we could work together. Sandy Cook Wakulla Springs Park Manager 1992-2008 Editor, The News: In response to Gregg Stantons column of May 24 about a stolen car dumped in Emerald Sink, I would like to provide clari cation on the matter of protecting Emerald Sink. Mr. Stanton states, I called friends I knew in state government to get the car out as soon as possible, but found little interest. I nally threatened to go to the press. There is more to this story than Mr. Stanton knows. In December 1994, the Wakulla Springs Basin Working Group had begun working with the county commission and public and private landowners along the route of the Wakulla Springs cave system to protect the sinks on their properties. Three weeks before the car was dumped in Emerald Sink, The Wakulla News ran a news release prepared by the Working Group and the Wakulla County planning of ce to raise local awareness about protecting sinkholes so as to protect drinking water and Wakulla Springs. On Sunday, April 30, 1995, divers discovered the car in Emerald Sink. The Wakulla County and the Leon County sheriffs departments began coordinating the removal of the car which occurred three days later on May 3. The Tallahassee Democrat ran an article about the incident that day having interviewed staff of the Florida Department of Health, the Department of Environmental Protection and the Wakulla Springs State Park manager. On June 13, 1995, I met with the manager of St Joe Development, which owned Emerald Sink, and asked him to block the roads to Emerald and Split Sinks to protect them from further vandalism. Within two weeks St Joe blocked the roads. We installed signs in the area to keep vehicles away from the sinks in a cooperative effort by the DEP, Northwest Florida Water Management District, Wakulla County Sheriff and St Joe. We also printed lea ets to educate the public, including divers, about keeping their vehicles away from sinks. The lea ets were distributed by the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, and at the Coral Reef and the Scuba Discovery dive shops in Tallahassee. Fortunately, Emerald and several other sinks connected to the cave system have been acquired by the state and added to Wakulla Springs State Park for management. This action has protected the sinks, Wakulla Springs and the drinking water of Wakulla County citizens. It is all the same water. It is clear that federal, state and local government agencies and private landowners have been responsive and provided leadership to protect our water.Jim Stevenson Coordinator, Wakulla Springs Basin Working Group 1992-2010 Editor, The News: Ive been a subscriber almost always since I arrived in this beautiful county in 1995. I have just reviewed completely the last issue of The Wakulla News to make sure of something I wasnt aware of. There was no notice given, at least in your newspaper, of the county now charging $5 for a boat launch fee at Mashes Sands. I was informed by a gentleman living there at county expense that this was made effective on May 1. Hmmm? The previous week, the county had a collection booth set up beyond the boat launch to collect a fee from people brave enough to go to Mashes Sands Beach. In my opinion, that beach should be declared a disaster area and an area waiting for a lawsuit to happen. Its full of stumps, rocks, stones and the beach itself has all but disappeared. The county, if anything, should be paying people to go there and not charging them for the privilege! There was no fee for entering the boat launch at that time because the collection point was set up further down the road. So much for the May 1 declaration unless he was talking about the beach collection? With that being said, I approached the collection point on Sunday, June 3. with my pontoon boat in tow. I did see the booth and a young gentleman standing nearby. I thought that they had just decided, for some reason, to move the booth inward to where it was now at the boat launch area. I gave it no more thought than that as I moved pass the collection point and entered the launch area. I was approached shortly thereafter by a gentleman telling me that I had blown past the collection point (at a whopping 3 mph). I replied, What collection point, I thought that was for the foolhardy braving the so-called beach? He said we are now collecting for the boat launch too. I said Ive lived here for 18 years and this launch was always free as far as I could recall. He said things are changing. Indeed. I think we are witnessing the Wakulla version of the Obama Administration. Talking to a fellow boater who arrived after me, he said that he didnt have to pay the $5, that the collector gentleman had run out of orange tabs that they used to identify who had entered. Then another boater told me he didnt have to pay either because he was a veteran! I am too, I just didnt think fast enough! Questions: what would our Georgia and Tallahassee neighbors do if they had driven there with boat in tow and no money? I know the county is broke beyond repair but it would help a lot if they would advertise fee increases in advance instead of putting them into effect with no notice. It is possible that the increases, both for Suicide Beach and the boat launch, were advertised in The Wakulla News but I didnt see them. Thank you, Bill Catalina Crawfordville SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe car being removed from Emerald Sink in 1995. Editor, The News: As a resident of Shell Point, I would like to commend our Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce work crew, managed by officer Ron Crum. They come weekly to clean our beautiful beach. They not only pick up trash and recycling but have rebuilt our fences and added new plants. They always offer a smile and a wave as I am a regular walker going by. Besides the crews wonderful work ethic and great attitude, they went above and beyond one day in April. There were severe winds and whitecaps galore. A local neighbor decided to burn his trash pile on this unfavorable day. Unfortunately, it got out of control and not only spread up, but over! As my daughter and I were walking, we not only saw smoke, but insurmountable ames! We ran over to assist the house that was being invaded as my friend has a baby and a young son. Plus, the homeowner is in her 90s. Upon getting there, we observed the sheriffs work crew already there hosing down the fire, slamming down flames with their shovels and sweating profusely. These were the men we just observed minutes ago at the beach. How they saw the ames, left their job site, tied shirts around their faces trying not to breathe in the smoke and tackled the re is beyond me. They would escape the tremendous temperatures for just a few moments, gain their bearings and tackle the re again. These four workers and Of cer Crum put out this raging re singlehandedly. When the trained professionals arrived, this courageous crew went back to the beach and nished their task before heading on to the next county park. Please note, these courageous men were not trained volunteers or professional re ghters, they were caring Wakulla citizens just like the rest of us. Thank you, gentlemen! E. King Shell PointREADERS WRITE:Editor, The News: Recently, more than ever, law-abiding gun owners and the National Ri e Association have been under attack by the Liberal Left media. Therefore it was a relief to see the article by Marj Law portray gun ownership in a positive light. (Laws column, Home on the Range, appears in The Wakulla News on an occasional basis.) In the wake of the MartinZimmerman case, anti-gun liberals and the media sensationalists have nominated Zimmerman as the face of the NRA. I challenged the editors of the Tallahassee Democrat to nd just one NRA member who has committed a felony with, or otherwise misused, a rearm. Im still waiting, and it aint George Zimmerman. One writer stated that NRA members had much to lose, and were cheering for Zimmerman. Nothing could be further from the truth. As a Life Endowment member of the NRA, I believe all our members expect all laws to be enforced to the maximum, and that especially applies to rearms. Its the liberal left who water down the law, thereby enhancing criminality by opposing capital punishment as being Draconian, and insisting that prison life be a Club Med experience. H. Davis Quick Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 Page 5

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Page 6 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events ObituariesMedart Area Crawfordville Area Crawfordville Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY NIGHT SERVICES6:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study3086 Crawfordville Highway (One block south of Courthouse)850-926-7896www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc. 551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Dignied Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Tallahassee Church BriefsCharles Chris Seward Allen Loran Vann HaddockBy ETHEL SKIPPER Remembering the 20th of May in Sopchoppy and Buckhorn, we didnt visit around the other community a lot. The churches and community leaders would come together and have a good time. During election years, the candidates running for of ce always took part in the celebration. There were always free sh frys, and a little money was passed out to those people who would see that people got to the voting place. At that time, a small number of people had cars. The 20th of May was a time everyone shared. Ladies cooked cakes and pies and other good food. Everybody was welcome. That was in the past. People showed love and cared for each other. It was not about color. Surely things have changed. If we could turn the clock back, what number would you choose? Yes, we need to be fair with each other, make a difference. Teach love, preach love, sing it, show love. As Bible readers and churchgoers, believers of Jesus Christ our Lord, will make a difference in our lives. We are told to forget those things behind us and press on for a better way, focus on a day we all can come together. Happy birthday to Arianna Hawkins on June 2, Lachritan Skipper on June 4, Pastor Ethel Skipper on June 23, and Willie Skipper Jr. on June 25.Buckhorn NewsLoran Vann Haddock, born April 19, 1941, passed from this life on May 24 at his home in Medart. He was a longtime resident of Wakulla County and a former employee of Jones Plumbing Company. He now joins his mother, Lena Phillips; father, Dellmar L. Haddock; sister, Voncile; two brothers, D.L and Marion; daughter, Phyllis; and beloved mother, Betty. He was a loving father to his children, Lora Richey, Vann, Phyllis, Vonn, Joseph and Robert. He was a kind grandfather and great-grandfather who will be missed by all of us. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel was assisting with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Loran Vann Haddock Charles Chris Seward Allen Jeffrey Calaluca Gaballi Taste Sampler is June 16 SpaceQuest VBS at First Baptist Macedonia to host VBS June 18-22Charles Chris Seward Allen, 53, of St. Marks, passed away Saturday, June 2, in St. Marks. He was born Sept. 14, 1958, in Ocala. He moved to this area in 1980 coming from Apalachicola. He was a selfemployed Aquatic Horticulturist. He attended River of Life Church. He enjoyed shing and hunting. He was a member of the Christian Motorcycle Association and ABATE. Chris loved his daughters more than anything and loved his animals too. Memorial services will be Saturday, June 9 at 11 a.m. at River of Life Church in Crawfordville. In lieu of owers, please make donations to Florida Wild Mammal Association (FWMA), 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville FL 32327. He is survived by two daughters, Nicole Anne Allen and Hannah Dane Allen of Wakulla County; and their mother, Stephanie Kaye Allen; father, Virgil Jerome Allen of Apalachicola; brother, Clifford Allen of Apalachicola; sisters, Bonnie Jean Allen of Wakulla and Terra Carni of Gainesville, and her children, William David Carni III and Shannon J. Carni. He was predeceased by his mother, Anne OQuinn Allen. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting with arrangements. Gaballi Food Taste Sampler will be held Saturday, June 16, from 9 a.m. to noon at Ocklockonee Bay United Methodist Church, 2780 Surf Road in Panacea. For more information, go to www.obayumc.com or call (850) 984-0127. The next Gaballi order deadline is Sunday, June 23, before midnight for distribution on Saturday, June 30, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Referral code is ochlokoneebayumc. Crawfordville First Baptist Church will be having their Vacation Bible School all day on Saturday, June 23. Registration will begin at 9:30 a.m. The travelers will blast off promptly at 10 a.m. and will explore the mission Jesus has for them in John 14:6. They will jet off to ve different space stops, and enjoy interplanetary crafts, recreation and lunch. All children entering kindergarten through completing fth grade are welcome to travel the galaxies with us. There will be a launchpad return celebration and program for parents at 5 p.m. For more information call the church of ce at 9267896. Macedonia Church of Christ Written in Heaven will hold a Vacation Bible School the week of June 18-22 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. Breakfast and lunch will be served daily and transportation may be provided. For more information, contact Elder Alfred Nelson, pastor, at (850) 264-6621, or Elder Delores Nelson, youth minister, at (850) 933-9587.By REV. JAMES L. SNYDERI would agree with the idea that religion comes in all shapes, sizes and temperaments. It is quite obvious that sanity is not a prerequisite of religion. If it were, most religions would go out of business within the 30day money back guarantee period. Every religion has some sort of litmus test for faith. It is in this area of religion that smacks so loudly of insanity. Superstition, regardless of the basis, is one great common denominator of all religion. It is not that I mind superstition; I just do not want it associated with my religion. I read in the newspaper headlines just this week a pastor was killed by a rattlesnake bite. I had almost forgotten this sort of thing went on in our sophisticated, enlightened world. As a young preacher, I was visiting a congregation in Kentucky as the guest speaker for that Sunday. Never mind the town or the church that is beside the point. I got to the church a little early and was escorted around the church looking at the facilities. Then they took me into the sanctuary where I could look at the pulpit and the sanctuary where I would be preaching. Being the observant person that I am, I noticed a basket next to the pulpit. I had never seen such a basket before him all my life. I really did not know too much about the church and now I cannot remember exactly why I was invited to preach there. Be that as it may, I was greatly curious about the basket next to the pulpit. I did not know if it was a wastebasket or if perhaps it was the offering basket and the congregation would ll it up before the service was over. So, I asked my host what the basket was next to the pulpit. Thats where we keep the rattlesnake, he said rather passively. Say what! That basket there is where we keep the rattlesnake that we use in our service. I can take a joke and give it joke back with the best of them. I responded with a hearty laugh. Ha, ha, ha, I said goodnaturedly. Really, what is that basket for? I could see my host was not the least bit amused with my persistent inquiry. I said, he said rather sternly, thats where we keep our rattlesnake for our church service. He then stared at me for a few moments and then said, I dont think well need it in our service today. You dont look like you have enough faith. Inside me, I sighed a deep sigh of relief. Continued on Page 19Snake, rattle and roll in the aislesThe memorial service for Jeffrey Calaluca will take place on Tuesday, June 12, at 4:30 p.m. at the First Baptist Church of St. Marks.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 Page 7happenings in our community CommunityArea at WHS is certi ed wildlife habitat The property of Wakulla High School has been recognized as a Certi ed Wildlife Habitat site by the National Wildlife Federation. The property attracts birds, butter ies and other local animals by providing a wildlife-friendly landscape. More information about gardening for wildlife or how to get a yard certi ed can be found at www.nwf.org/gardenforwildlife.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Jenny Brock, of North Florida Wildlife Federation, and Debra Madden of Wakulla High School Nicole Stanton graduated from the University of Rhode Island with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering on May 20. She is the daughter of Gregg and Ann Stanton of Crawfordville. The main campus of the University of Rhode Island is located in Kingston, R.I.Stanton earns degree Nicole Stanton with her parents Birth announcement Christina Pope and Craig Revell of Crawfordville announce the birth of their son Thomas Craig Revell Jr. on May 14 at 5:29 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He was 8 pounds, 1 ounce and was 20.5 inches. He has two brothers, Richard Pope 13, and Dalson Pope, 11, and two sisters, Alayna Pope, 7, and Ava Pope, 4. His maternal grandparents are Ross and Debbie Lee of Southport. His paternal grandparents are Debra and Sam Simmons of Crawfordville. His great-grandparents are the late Doris Sanders of Sopchoppy and the late Carlton Revell of Sopchoppy. omas C. Revell Jr. Free meals o ered during the summer for children Special to The NewsMore than 1.6 million kids across Florida can receive free meals during the summer at the Summer BreakSpot, the states summer nutrition program for children 18 and under provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Summer BreakSpots will open in Wakulla County beginning June 6. Families can nd locations in their community by calling 2-1-1 or visiting www.summerfood orida.org. An aggressive statewide outreach campaign was launched last month to ensure more families know about the sites in their community. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is leading the campaign in partnership with Florida Impact and the Florida Partnership to End Childhood Hunger, representing hundreds of communitybased organizations across the state. Were excited that Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, his staff and our community partners in Wakulla County have made it a priority to expand and promote the summer feeding program so more kids have access to nutritious meals during the summer, said Debra Susie, executive director of Florida Impact. We encourage families in Wakulla County to find a Summer BreakSpot near them for free nutritious meals in a safe, supervised environment for their children. To nd a Summer BreakSpot site, visit www.summerfood orida.org or call 2-1-1. The following school sites in Wakulla County will be participating in the Summer Food Service Program: Wakulla Education Center located at 87 Andrew Hargrett Sr. Road. Meals will be served beginning Wednesday, June 6 and ending Aug. 7. The site will offer meals Monday through Thursday and on Friday, June 8. The site will be closed Wednesday, July 4, and Thursday, July 5. Breakfast will be served from 8:30 to 9:15 a.m. Lunch will be served from 11:30a.m. to 12:15p.m. Wakulla High School located at 3237 Coastal Highway. Meals will be served beginning Monday, June 11, and ending July 12. The site will offer meals Monday through Thursday. The site will be closed Wednesday, July 4 and Thursday, July 5. Lunch will be served from 11:30-12:15p.m. Medart Elementary School located at 2558 Coastal Highway. Meals will be served beginning Monday, June 11 and ending July 12. The site will offer meals Monday through Thursday. The site will be closed Wednesday, July 4 and Thursday, July 5. Breakfast will be served from 8:30 to 9:15 a.m. Lunch will be served from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15p.m. Healthy food and non-perishables are needed at local food pantries during the summer Special to The NewsThere continues to be an economic situation in the county that makes it difficult for citizens to feed their families. Consider stocking up on non-perishables that can be given to those in need or donate extra gardening vegetables and fruits to enhance overall diets. Canned goods come with varying amounts of added salt. Everyone should be trying to cut back on their sodium intake so consider buying canned goods with that in mind. Beans and rice are excellent ways to provide rich protein to families. They are inexpensive and lling and can be used in a variety of recipes. Pasta, especially if made with whole wheat, is also excellent. Canned meats and soups are always appreciated. Oatmeal, instant, dry or evaporated milk are versatile additions to any household pantry. Peanut butter and dried fruits, cold cereals, especially those that are low in sodium and sugar, are also great. Community collection containers have been placed around the county to take the food to the local food pantries. The Wakulla County Extension Office, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville, is one place to leave donated food, as well as the public library. When a quantity is realized, volunteers deliver the food to all of the food pantries on as equitable basis as possible. Consider a food drive through the groups with whom you af liate. Advertise that you have added the requirement of a canned good or box of cereal for admission. A collection of bars of soap or other cleaning products during a hot weather sporting event is also fun. Email your community news to jjensen@thewakullanews.net or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Email is preferred. News is published when space becomes available. All submissions are edited for style, clarity and grammar.Community News Submissions SUMMERFitness Fitness and Weight Loss Program for TEENS Its a High Intensity Training (HIT) program to help build their endurance strength and agility, while keeping teens motivated on their goals. Teens will be accountable through weigh-ins, measurements and daily journal entries. Twice weekly program throughout the summer starting on June 14th, under the supervision of a Certified Personal Trainer.Specifically designed for teenagers who need to lose weight, gain strength and endurance! Take advantage of this great summer program for your teenager. Contact Pam at 459-5279 for rates and schedule. and Weight Loss Program for TEENS LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . nt 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) 10AM (TUE-FRI) HAIR SALON FREE HAIRCUT FEATHER LOCKS are here!!FULL SERVICE FAMILY SALON www.hicksair.com

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Page 8 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comWherever you go, go with all your heart. Confucius Broadway, ZacharyBrown-Nelson, Danielle Brown, JohnBrown, KalaBrown, KeynaBrown, Vincent Brunow, KelseyBurgess, KierraBurns, KendalinBurns, StevenBurnsed, JenniferBurse, Daniel Busby, BrandonCalloway, NyeshaCampbell, CarolineCarroll, MeaghanCarson, BrandonCarter, Cedar Buddy Wells Supervisor of Elections 926-7575 Frances Casey Lowe. Attorney at Law Cash, Cody Chadwell, Kenneth Because of a production error, this page of senior photos was missing from last weeks Graduation section: education news from local schools SchoolCongrats Wakulla Christian graduates Wakulla Christian Schools kindergarten graduation took place on Tuesday, May 29 at 7 p.m. The 5K students performed A Day in Kindergarten at WCS for their families and friends before they received their diplomas. Congratulations to the following WCS kindergarten graduates: Seth Barwick, Seth Cobb, Logan Kennon, Freddy McClendon, Cole Sanders, Madeline Jones, Hannah Land, Hailey Risoldi, Leaston Spears, Brandun Carroll, Camden Methvin and Tyler Howe.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Christian Schools fth grade class of 2012 graduated from elementary school on Wednesday, May 30 at 10 a.m. Congratulations to the following new WCS middle schoolers: Connor Fisher, Mackenzie Kennon, Storm Lawler, Jeremiah Payne, Bailey Rutledge and Hailey Spears. PHOTOS BY KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents at the graduation ceremony for Sopchoppy Education Center prepare to receive their diplomas on May 29. Free intensive math course o ered for students By BETH ODONNELL Assistant SuperintendentWakulla High School will offer an Algebra 1 Intensive Math course from June 26 through July 12. The course is free to eligible students. Transportation and lunch is provided at no cost. Students in grades eight and nine for the 2011-2012 school year have to pass the Algebra 1 End of Course (EOC) exam to earn high school credit for Algebra 1. This is a state requirement for graduation. This course is for students who did not pass the Spring, 2012 Algebra 1 EOC exam. Test scores should be available soon at Wakulla High School for WHS ninth graders and at the middle schools for students who took Algebra 1 in eighth grade. Students with an exceptional education disability may be exempt from passing the EOC if they have shown pro ciency in the course. The Algebra 1 review course will begin on Tuesday, June 26. There are no Friday classes. Dates for the nine day session are June 26, 27, 28 and July 2, 3, 9, 10, 11 and 12. Students can earn half a credit in Intensive Math if they attend every day. This will be factored into their grade point average. The Algebra 1 EOC exam retake will be given at Wakulla High School during the week of July 23. Students who pass this July retake of the Algebra 1 EOC exam will not have to take an Intensive Math course in the fall. Contact Wakulla High School Assistant Principal Sunny Chancy at 926-7125/ sunny.chancy@wcsb.us or Assistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell at 926-0065/ mary.odonnell@wcsb.us for more information.Graduation at Sopchoppy Education Center

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 Page 9 Michael King Michael Michael Michael We are So Proud of You!We Love You,Granddaddy, Memaw, Dad, Brandy, Uncle Chris and Aunt Gigi sports news and team views Sports By LISA KINARDSpecial to The NewsTuesdays semi-final game featured the No. 1 ranked Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws against the Badcock Furniture Rays. Pitcher Shane Davis threw the entire game for the Rays while the Outlaws started Greysen Rudd and Skyler Talavera. The Rays had hits from Aaron Price, Seth Carroll, Nolan Terry and Davis with Terry scoring Carroll. The Outlaws had hits from Lentz, Chase Forester and Talavera with Lucas Briggs scoring Forester and Jacob Dempsey scoring Brandon Bennett for the 2-1 win and a place in the nals. In the second semi- nal held Thursday, it was a battle between the Ameris Bank Sluggers and the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans, ranked 2 and 3 respectively. The Sluggers pitched Kaleb Bennett, Michael McGlamry, Tyler Teegan and Jake Bryan and had hits from McGlamry, Bryan and Thomas Davis (who also stole second and third), with runs scored by Marc Carter, McGlamry and Bryan (RBI to Josh Conway). The Titans pitched Jordan Vaughan and John Weber. Their hitters were Zach Norman (2 doubles), Weber (2), Zeke Bryan (2), RJ Kinard (3 RBIs) and Jake McCarl who stole home during a squeeze play in the sixth. The Titans runs were scored by Norman (2), Weber, Vaughan, AC Ginn (2) (2 RBIs), Z Bryan (1 RBI) and McCarl. Another RBI scored by Jackson Montgomery. The game featured two spectacular catches in deep left by Carter, a catch in center eld by Daniel LaMarche to end the fth, and a hit stolen from Dylan Causseaux, who hit to short right but a phenomenal play by McCarl to rst baseman Kinard got the third out and saved the tying run by Joshua Isman. Titans won 8-3 and a spot in the Championship game. CHAMPIONSHIP GAME The Championship Game featured the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans and the Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws. The Outlaws, under the direction of head coach John Lentz, took the eld rst with Nick Lentz on the mound and Skyler Talavera behind the plate. The Titans, lead by head coach Darrell Norman came ready to play. Zach Norman took a w alk and stole second but after Lentz struck out two Titans, it was the Outlaws chance with the bat. Titans started Jordan Vaughan pitching to Norman behind the plate. Outlaws lead-off Greysen Rudd started it off with a hit followed by Lentz but the inning ended with no score. The Outlaws switched pitchers and threw Chase Forrester to catcher Lucas Briggs. After two up. two down, Jake McCarl smacked a hit but the Titans couldnt capitalize on it. The Outlaws answered with a hit by James Calhoun. CJ Langston tried to get Calhoun home, but the Outlaws couldnt score. In the third, Sebastian Brahier led off for the Titans, followed by Norman getting a hit to left eld. It looked like the Titans were going to be on the board when John Weber shot one deep to left, but a well played catch by TJ Parramore forced Norman back to rst. The Outlaws tried their luck with a high and deep ball hit by Lentz to left but Michael Days awesome out eld skills robbed him of the hit and the game moved into the fourth still 0-0. Outfield prowess still kept the Titans off the scoreboard when Oakley Ward caught a shot deep to left by Jackson Montgomery The fifth started with McCarl getting a walk. Michael Sizemore tried to move him around the bases followed by another walk for Day. Zach Norman popped another hit followed by Weber shooting one up the middle, scoring McCarl. Vaughn also hit bringing Day home. First baseman Greysen Rudd snatched a hard line drive hit by AC Ginn for an unassisted double play, ending the Titans charge. Titans switched pitchers and Jackson Montgomery took the mound moving RJ Kinard to catcher. Jacob Dempsey hit to left and stole second. A great in eld from Montgomery to Ginn ended the inning with the Titans up 2-0. Nick Lentz returned to the mound in the sixth, with Talavera catching. After Lentz threw a wicked curveball for a strike out, Montgomery got a hit but was later out on a elders choice. Following McCarl stealing second on a passed ball, Davis Hammond hit scoring McCarl and bringing the score to 3-0 Titans. Montgomery returned to the mound for the Titans and held the Outlaws hitless for the inning. In the top of the seventh, John Weber hit the only double of the game and was moved to third with a hit from Vaughan but the Titans couldnt score and left men on the corners. The Outlaws came up for their last at bats. Brandon Bennett took a walk and stole all the way to third but the Titans refused to let up and ended the game with a quick 4-3 out, ending the game at 3-0 and as the 2012 Babe Ruth League Champions. Check out the Wakulla Babe Ruth League 2012s Facebook page for pictures and status updates. Up next will be All-Star play. Karlyn Scott was a 2008 graduate of Wakulla High School and was awarded an athletic scholarship to attend Florida Southern College in Lakeland. She recently graduated Summa Cum Laude, 4.0 GPA with a B.S. in biology and a minor in chemistry. The senior center elder was recently voted to the Capital One Academic All-American Team as a First Team selection. Scott led Florida Southern this year with a .358 batting average that ranked sixth in the Sunshine State Conference. She also led the team with 67 hits and 44 runs scored, with both of those gures good for third in the Sunshine State Conference. She added four doubles, two triples, one home run and 20 RBIs to her stat line while hitting eit her leadoff or in the No. 2 position in all 57 games. Her 18-game hitting streak from February 29-March 24 was the second longest single-season streak in team history. During her senior year, Scott was 29-for-29 on stolen base attempts and was one of only four players in Division II with at least 20 steals who was not caught the entire season. No other Moccasin had ever accomplished that feat before this season. In her career, Scott was 43-for-43 on the bases, a school record for perfection. Her streak of 43 in a row was the second longest in team history, trailing only the Division II record of 78 straight set in 1994-95. Scott is the Mocs rst Academic All-American since 2009, when Sara Lovestrand was a team selection. Ironically, Lovestrand and Scott are both Wakulla High School graduates and were War Eagle teammates in 2005. Scott was the only softball player from Florida to be named First-Team Academic All-American in the 2012 season. The Moccasins nished the 2012 season with a record of 39-18, earning them a spot in the NCAA Tournament. The Mocs went on to win their half of the South Region bracket before falling to eventual national champion Valdosta State in the Super Regional. Karlyns plans are to coach softball, study for the Dental Admissions test and then attend dental school.BABE RUTH BASEBALLTSA Titans take the title LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSOFTBALLKarlyn Scott is first team Academic All-American at Florida Southern WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT ADULT SOFTBALL LEAGUEEntry fee is $300 per team Teams must provide their own balls for games. Teams will play two games per night for a total of ten games. Registration Deadline is Friday, June 29th at 5:00 P.M. Rosters and entry fees are due at this time. The league will start the week of July 2nd and run for approximately ve weeks. Game times are 6:45, 8:00 and 9:15 P.M. All games will be played at Medart Recreation Park located off U.S. 98, across the street from Wakulla High School. Mens League and Coed League will probably play on Monday and Tuesday nights. Both leagues might have games on Thursday nights depending on the number of teams that register. Homerun rule for Mens League is 3 and a foul. Homerun rule for Coed League is 3 and an out. Coed League will play with a 12 inch ball. Contact W.C.P.R.D 926-7227 or www.wcprd.com for any additional information.

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Page 10 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsIts hard to believe it is already June and one month until scallop season opens. I havent talked to anyone about seeing scallops, but as clear as the water is and with as little rain as we have had they should be there again this year. Hopefully there wont be as many jelly sh as were there last year. The water is extremely clear and the water temperature is now in the low 80s. Fishing is still very good and folks are doing well both inshore and off. Bob Palmer from Shell Point went out Saturday and came in with a cobia that probably weighed about 35 pounds. Bucky at Shell Island Fish Camp said Frank Cox has been shing a lot so that means there are a lot of cobia around. Jeff and Kay May shed this last week and caught lots of grouper and red snapper. Jeff said they had one snapper that weighed 13 pounds and one that was close to 15. He also said they caught some nice kings oating live baits. Glen and Alicia Peel from Shell Point went out Saturday and came in with their limit of red snapper. Bucky at Shell Island said they have one more big group coming in to sh this weekend and then it will start slowing down. Capt. Sid Stringer took a party out this weekend and came in with a bunch of trout. They shed the West ats out of St. Marks. Bucky said he went up in several of the creeks east of St. Marks and caught some big trout and quite a few reds. He was using a Gulp twitch bait. Capt. Luke Frazier over at AMS said he and Mike Crum shed out of Panacea last week and caught their limit of nice trout using a white gulp under a cork. They fished around the Shell Point Reef in 3 to 4 feet of water. He said the day they shed was awfully clear and they saw a lot of tarpon as well. Capt. Randy Peart has been catching lots of sh out of the Econ na. Using the Rapala twitch and rep he has been catching lots of reds and a bunch of them are oversize. Plenty of big trout are being caught in three to four feet of water on the Gulp under a cork and also out in 12 feet of water around the rock piles. Dr. Phil Sharp of Shell Point caught another tripletail this past weekend shing on one of the crab traps out in about 15 feet of water. Capt. David Fife has been catching trout up to 24 inches using mud minnows and reds up to 26 inches. He has been shing between Shell Point and Piney Island. He said he was also doing fairly well on nice trout out on the ats. Ken Voland of Shell Point has his son down last week and they shed around the Stake Line off Live Oak Island and caught lots of nice trout. He said they went early and would be home by noon. They used live shrimp and Gulp and had several sh over 20 inches. Mark and Louise Prance fished out of Shell Point and came in with trout and ounder. They used shrimp and pin sh and Mark said they kept seven trout and probably caught 30 that were all legal. I shed with Dr. Chuck Kent, Dr. Chris Van Sickle and Dr. William Kepper from Tallahassee on Saturday and we came in with four blues, three Spanish, 10 trout and ve ounder. We caught most everything on live shrimp though quite a few of the trout we caught on the white Gulp. We shed mainly between Shell Point and Piney Island in 3 to 5 feet of water. If you havent already done so you need to mark your calendars for July 6. This is the granddaddy of all shing tournaments in our area, the 24h annual Big Bend Saltwater Classic. Typically held Fathers Day Weekend, the board of directors of the classic decided to change the date so gag grouper will be in season and can be included. The rst tournament was held in 1989 out of Shields Marina in St. Marks and 223 anglers participated. In past years that number has averaged around 700. Now the tournament is headquartered out of Carrabelle Boat Club, just over the bridge in Carrabelle. The tournament was launched by and supports The Organization of Arti cial Reefs. Shawn Abbott, Ron Harrigan, Skip Hood, Dave Iacampo, Steve Leukanech, Jim Sapp, Frank Stephenson and Panaceas own Quill Turk. Good luck to all the anglers and lets hope for good weather. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Waters clear and warm, and lots of sh being caughtSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety course in Leon County. The course will be held in the second- oor conference room of the Farris Bryant Building, 620 S. Meridian St., in Tallahassee. Instruction is from 6 to 9 p.m. on June 12, 14, 19 and 21. The range portion of the class is June 23. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satis es hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling the FWCs regional of ce in Panama City at (850) 265-3676. For more information on this course, call George Warthen at (850) 265-3676.Hunter Safety Course o ered in Leon County Red snapper quota and recreational seasonNOAA Fisheries Service published a nal rule for Gulf of Mexico Red Snapper (77 FR 31734) that increases the commercial and recreational quotas and establishes the 2012 recreational red snapper shing season. The recreational season opened on June 1 at 12:01 a.m. and closes on July 11, at 12:01 a.m. The rule sets the 2012 and 2013 quotas for commercial and recreational red snapper harvest. The quotas have been increased because recent population assessments show that over shing has ended. The red snapper allowable catch increased from 7.185 million pounds whole weight in 2011 to 8.08 million pounds in 2012 and 8.69 million in 2013. The commercial allocation (51 percent) is 4.12 million pounds in 2012 and 4.43 million in 2013. The recreational allocation (49 percent) is 3.95 million pounds in 2012 and 4.25 million in 2013. If the combined commercial and recreational catch exceeds the 8.08 million pound acceptable catch level, the 2013 quota increase would require further scienti c review and potential modi cation by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council.From FWC NewsJune is celebrated across the nation as Great Outdoors Month. President Barack Obama issued a proclamation urging Americans to spend time outdoors and to uphold our nations legacy of conserving our lands for future generations. The proclamation suggests families and friends explore, play and grow together, while hiking, wildlife-watching, canoeing, hunting, fishing or playing in the neighborhood park activities that help kids stay healthy, active and energized. Gov. Rick Scotts 2012 proclamation says during Great Outdoors Month, we celebrate the rich blessings of our states natural beauty and we renew our commitment to protecting our environment so that we can leave our children and grandchildren a healthy and ourishing land. It goes on to say, Great Outdoors Month will encourage cooperative conservation and new technologies to help ensure Americas outdoors remain places where families and friends can learn, exercise, and create meaningful memories. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, along with Florida State Parks, the Florida Forest Service and national forests, parks and wildlife refuges each promote a variety of activities to support Great Outdoors Month and other events in June. Get Outdoors Florida! lists June events across the state on its website, GetOutdoorsFlorida.org. The Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation is asking Facebook fans (Facebook.com/takeme shing) to choose the Top Eight State Parks in the U.S. that offer shing. Florida is the only twotime winner of the National Gold Medal Award for Excellence in Park and Recreation Management, as well as being the Fishing Capital of the World, so visit your favorite state park fishing spot, then vote. You will be eligible for weekly Bass Pro Shops gift card giveaways, as well as the grand prize: an allexpense-paid vacation to your choice of one of the Top Eight State Parks. June is also recognized as Recreational Fishing Month by Visit Florida, which helps promote Florida as the Fishing Capital of the World (FishingCapital. com). Events at its visitors centers help highlight the tourism value of recreational shing to Florida. Florida has about a million anglers who come from out-of-state each year, and they make up a substantial part of the $7.5 billion economic impact from recreational sheries that support nearly 80,000 Florida jobs. June 2-10 is promoted as National Fishing and Boating Week (TakeMeFishing. org). The FWC supports this effort by providing license-free saltwater shing on the rst Saturday (June 2) and license-free freshwater shing on the second Saturday (June 9). Floridas license-free shing days are an excellent opportunity to share the fun, excitement and togetherness of a shing trip with the entire family. This also is a great time for experienced anglers to introduce friends to the sport, even if they dont have a shing license, said Nick Wiley, FWC executive director. By having these events on weekends, we hope Florida residents and visitors will experience the joy of saltwater and freshwater shing. We expect many will discover a healthy sport they can enjoy for a lifetime. All other shing rules apply on these days (MyFWC. com/Fishing). In addition, June 2 is National Trails Day (AmericanHiking.org), and the theme is Americas Largest Trailgating Party! The American Hiking Society is encouraging hikers and volunteers to help maintain their favorite trails and afterward celebrate with an eco-friendly party. June 9 is also National Get Outdoors Day, the purpose of which is to increase rst-time visitors to public lands and reconnect youth to the great outdoors. As a result, it is a Fee-Free Day for U.S. Department of Interior sites, such as national wildlife refuges, national parks and national forests (Recreation.gov). Finally, the Great American Campout is June 23. Visit NWF.org for great tips, suggestions and to share your adventure. The neat thing about this day is that families do it in the safety and comfort of their own backyard. So get together to reconnect not only with each other but with nature. Get Outdoors Florida! and enjoy your summer.June is an outdoor extravaganza and a chance to Get Outdoors Florida! IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle SNAPPER SEASON www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service CA TCH MORE FISH FREE LINE WINDINGwith purchase Made in USA G BUY IN BULK & SAVE B B B B B B B B B B B B B Y Y U Y U Y UY Y Y Y U Y U U U U U U U U U Y Y Y Y Y UY U U UY Y Y U Y UY I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N B U L K B U L K U L U L K U L L K L & S A V E & S A S A V A VE A VE VE V E BUY IN BULK & SAVE 850-274-8000 WEVE MOVED Modern Communications Modern CommunicationsNEXT TO EL JALISCOS2481 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY.CRAWFORDVILLE U NLIMITED TALK & TEXT$4000 PER MO.DATA CHARGES MAY APPLY 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 Page 11a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD This week, I owe Larry Kolk a huge thank you for submitting this article, The Bottom Line on Safe Boating. I am always asking for news and information from other otilla members, and I am never let down. When you invest your money, energy and time for a desirable boating day on the water, hopefully you think of all the details that will keep you, your friends and family safe and legally compliant with U.S. Coast Guard and State Safe Boating Regulations. Well, dont be overly con- dent if you have followed the letter of the law having all the required equipment on board your boat. You could have missed thinking about the bottom line. The Coast Guard with all its attention focused on approved Personal Flotation Devices, fire extinguishers, ame arresters, visual distress signals and sound warning devices does not require a boat having an anchor as safety equipment. Given all the difficulties a boater can encounter not having an anchor, it hasnt moved from its recommended status with the Coast Guard to being required. In nine years of teaching boating safety courses in the Coast Guard Auxiliary, I continue to impress upon the students the wisdom of not leaving dockside without having an anchor and appropriate length of line for the depth of water theyll be in (a bottom line so to speak) on their boat. A safe ratio is 10 feet of line for every foot of water you will be boating in. The threats so commonly encountered on the water for which an anchor could make a difference in avoiding dangerous and lifethreatening situations are plentiful, especially in our area. They deserve our full attention in being prepared for such risks. Consider the dangerous situations that can follow the loss of engine power with a storm bearing down on your boat. You are at the mercy of the wind, tide, or both. Moving farther offshore or drifting toward sand bars, shoals or into the channel are likely outcomes when a boater is not able to hold their position. These risks increase with the wind increases and waves rise. Changes in the direction of the wind and waves can throw a boat all around if it is not secured by an anchor. Even more frightening is being surrounded by fog, drifting freely, and unable to see impending danger. And if help is needed from the Coast Guard or commercial boating services, being able to report your position and maintain that position makes the chances of assistance and/or rescue more plausible. Fishermen know how critical it is to hold ones position over schooling sh if they are to be successful. Island picnickers know how easily they could be marooned if their boats drift away on a rising tide or a change in wind conditions, so many wisely tether their boats to an anchor onshore or an anchor planted rmly in shallow water. It would be helpful if all recreational boaters had some similar activityrelated need to carrying an anchor onboard their boats. Having an anchor and appropriate length of line onboard your boat, in my opinion, has too many factors going for it as a safety device that the time has come to reconsider it moving from recommended equipment to required. After all, the bottom line for safe boating should include all the equipment one needs to have on board to ensure having a safe and rewarding day on the water. Once again a great thanks to Larry Kolk for writing this! I recently looked up Wikipedia for a list of diving hazards and precautions when preparing a lesson on Zero Visibility Diving. The list is impressive, considering that the human terrestrial condition taken underwater is complicated by constraints resulting from the density of the water (800 times that of air). We are predominantly a visual animal on land. Visual distortions of lights refraction, re ection and absorption, when available and when light is absent, limit our productivity underwater. Use of remote sensing technology, such as photography, videography, magnetometry and the wide range of sonar (side scan, beacon, Didson, and fathom) assist when light is limited. Under these conditions, why dive? Most people agree, there is little reason to get wet if you cannot enjoy the experience. But we forget that while recreational diving is the most common form of scuba diving, most of these dives include good visibility (even at night) as a prerequisite. There are those, however, who dive our river bottom in search of fossil. The river current can erode the oor and banks, creating near zero visibility and continuously expose paleontology remains which are often found by touch. Shipwreck and cave diving can also be visually challenged by high sediments often kicked up by the divers themselves. In all of these cases, underwater lamps are of little help as the sediments re ect or absorb the light around the bulb, producing little effect. I found this to be true when my father asked me to retrieve his anchor in a reservoir one day. What could be easier? He had tied the anchor line to a tree so all I needed to do was follow it down. Visibility midday dropped to zero within a few feet of the surface. And I was soon following the line through submerged entangling tree limbs for another 30 feet. I found the anchor, had to cut it loose and spent the rest of an hour extricating myself out. Afterward, I advised my father to next time purchase a new anchor. Professional diving obligates diving beyond enjoyment. These are people who search for items in a lightless environment. Divers in the Apalachicola River mine for lost harvested wood, now preserved in the mud after inundation for centuries. We have lined our Dive Center with such wood creating a rustic motif. Underwater archaeologists have perfected zero visibility techniques to study historic shipwrecks such as the Maple Leaf. Once the ship is located, usually by remote sensing technology, special cameras embedded in clear water bags are lowered over structures to document details otherwise not visible. On a student project of ours conducted in Mobile Bay, Ala., we dragged a magnetometer behind our boat, which identi ed anomalies, or magnetic ticks on a paper plotter. Then, we sent a dive team down on every anomaly. The most successful team was the one with an artist. He would feel the anomaly at depth and return to draw it out on paper on the surface. Some were refrigerators or anchors or cars dumped as arti cial reefs, while others were small and medium vessels buried in the sediment with portions protruding up through the mud. The data retrieved was better than a photograph! We soon assigned an artist to every dive team. Police dive teams are routinely asked to search for missing people and items such as cars, guns and safes, dropped into watery graves less likely to be visited by the recreational minded divers. Hazards abound in zero visibility, from unseen entanglements, to chemical and biological contaminants. Only the best trained should go searching for lost items in such conditions. Once found, underwater crime scene investigation protocols must be followed or the quality of the evidence can be compromised. Fingerprints, for example, can be pulled from submerged items, providing the items are handled properly. Once removed from the water, items must be properly preserved or they will rapidly deteriorate. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Jun 7, 12 Fri Jun 8, 12 Sat Jun 9, 12 Sun Jun 10, 12 Mon Jun 11, 12 Tue Jun 12, 12 Wed Jun 13, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 5:28 AM 3.2 ft. 6:08 AM High 1.5 ft. 10:31 AM 1.5 ft. 11:18 AM 0.2 ft. 12:26 AM 0.6 ft. 1:06 AM 1.1 ft. 1:47 AM 1.4 ft. 2:35 AM 1.7 ft. 3:31 AM Low 4.0 ft. 4:30 PM 3.7 ft. 5:16 PM 3.1 ft. 6:47 AM 3.0 ft. 7:28 AM 3.0 ft. 8:15 AM 3.0 ft. 9:08 AM 3.1 ft. 10:08 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:46 PM 1.5 ft. 12:12 PM 1.5 ft. 1:17 PM 1.4 ft. 2:40 PM 1.2 ft. 4:15 PM 0.9 ft. 5:34 PM Low 3.3 ft. 6:06 PM 2.9 ft. 7:09 PM 2.5 ft. 8:42 PM 2.4 ft. 10:34 PM 2.5 ft. 11:59 PM High Thu Jun 7, 12 Fri Jun 8, 12 Sat Jun 9, 12 Sun Jun 10, 12 Mon Jun 11, 12 Tue Jun 12, 12 Wed Jun 13, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 5:25 AM 3.2 ft. 6:05 AM High 1.7 ft. 10:28 AM 1.6 ft. 11:15 AM 0.2 ft. 12:23 AM 0.7 ft. 1:03 AM 1.1 ft. 1:44 AM 1.5 ft. 2:32 AM 1.8 ft. 3:28 AM Low 4.1 ft. 4:27 PM 3.7 ft. 5:13 PM 3.1 ft. 6:44 AM 3.1 ft. 7:25 AM 3.1 ft. 8:12 AM 3.1 ft. 9:05 AM 3.2 ft. 10:05 AM High -0.3 ft. 11:43 PM 1.6 ft. 12:09 PM 1.6 ft. 1:14 PM 1.6 ft. 2:37 PM 1.3 ft. 4:12 PM 1.0 ft. 5:31 PM Low 3.3 ft. 6:03 PM 2.9 ft. 7:06 PM 2.6 ft. 8:39 PM 2.5 ft. 10:31 PM 2.6 ft. 11:56 PM High Thu Jun 7, 12 Fri Jun 8, 12 Sat Jun 9, 12 Sun Jun 10, 12 Mon Jun 11, 12 Tue Jun 12, 12 Wed Jun 13, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 6:04 AM High 1.4 ft. 11:35 AM -0.2 ft. 12:50 AM 0.2 ft. 1:30 AM 0.6 ft. 2:10 AM 1.0 ft. 2:51 AM 1.3 ft. 3:39 AM 1.5 ft. 4:35 AM Low 3.7 ft. 5:06 PM 2.9 ft. 6:44 AM 2.9 ft. 7:23 AM 2.8 ft. 8:04 AM 2.8 ft. 8:51 AM 2.8 ft. 9:44 AM 2.9 ft. 10:44 AM High 1.4 ft. 12:22 PM 1.4 ft. 1:16 PM 1.4 ft. 2:21 PM 1.3 ft. 3:44 PM 1.1 ft. 5:19 PM 0.9 ft. 6:38 PM Low 3.4 ft. 5:52 PM 3.0 ft. 6:42 PM 2.7 ft. 7:45 PM 2.3 ft. 9:18 PM 2.2 ft. 11:10 PM High Thu Jun 7, 12 Fri Jun 8, 12 Sat Jun 9, 12 Sun Jun 10, 12 Mon Jun 11, 12 Tue Jun 12, 12 Wed Jun 13, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 5:20 AM 2.4 ft. 6:00 AM High 1.1 ft. 10:42 AM 1.1 ft. 11:29 AM 0.1 ft. 12:37 AM 0.5 ft. 1:17 AM 0.8 ft. 1:58 AM 1.0 ft. 2:46 AM 1.2 ft. 3:42 AM Low 3.0 ft. 4:22 PM 2.8 ft. 5:08 PM 2.3 ft. 6:39 AM 2.3 ft. 7:20 AM 2.3 ft. 8:07 AM 2.3 ft. 9:00 AM 2.3 ft. 10:00 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:57 PM 1.1 ft. 12:23 PM 1.1 ft. 1:28 PM 1.1 ft. 2:51 PM 0.9 ft. 4:26 PM 0.7 ft. 5:45 PM Low 2.5 ft. 5:58 PM 2.1 ft. 7:01 PM 1.9 ft. 8:34 PM 1.8 ft. 10:26 PM High Thu Jun 7, 12 Fri Jun 8, 12 Sat Jun 9, 12 Sun Jun 10, 12 Mon Jun 11, 12 Tue Jun 12, 12 Wed Jun 13, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 5:12 AM 2.5 ft. 5:52 AM High 1.5 ft. 10:10 AM 1.5 ft. 10:57 AM 0.2 ft. 12:05 AM 0.6 ft. 12:45 AM 1.0 ft. 1:26 AM 1.4 ft. 2:14 AM 1.6 ft. 3:10 AM Low 3.1 ft. 4:14 PM 2.9 ft. 5:00 PM 2.4 ft. 6:31 AM 2.4 ft. 7:12 AM 2.3 ft. 7:59 AM 2.4 ft. 8:52 AM 2.4 ft. 9:52 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:25 PM 1.5 ft. 11:51 AM 1.5 ft. 12:56 PM 1.4 ft. 2:19 PM 1.2 ft. 3:54 PM 0.9 ft. 5:13 PM Low 2.6 ft. 5:50 PM 2.2 ft. 6:53 PM 2.0 ft. 8:26 PM 1.9 ft. 10:18 PM 2.0 ft. 11:43 PM High Thu Jun 7, 12 Fri Jun 8, 12 Sat Jun 9, 12 Sun Jun 10, 12 Mon Jun 11, 12 Tue Jun 12, 12 Wed Jun 13, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 6:41 AM 2.5 ft. 7:09 AM 2.5 ft. 7:36 AM High 1.7 ft. 10:01 AM 1.5 ft. 11:05 AM 1.3 ft. 12:16 PM 0.4 ft. 12:34 AM 0.7 ft. 1:10 AM 1.0 ft. 1:47 AM 1.2 ft. 2:28 AM Low 2.9 ft. 3:43 PM 2.7 ft. 4:42 PM 2.4 ft. 5:48 PM 2.5 ft. 8:02 AM 2.6 ft. 8:29 AM 2.7 ft. 8:56 AM 2.7 ft. 9:25 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:17 PM 0.1 ft. 11:57 PM 1.1 ft. 1:33 PM 0.8 ft. 2:50 PM 0.5 ft. 3:58 PM 0.3 ft. 4:58 PM Low 2.1 ft. 7:07 PM 1.8 ft. 8:47 PM 1.8 ft. 10:53 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJune 7 June 13First June 26 Full July 3 Last June 11 New June 19Major Times 4:24 AM 6:24 AM 4:51 PM 6:51 PM Minor Times 9:56 AM 10:56 AM 11:38 PM 12:38 AM Major Times 5:17 AM 7:17 AM 5:42 PM 7:42 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:59 AM 11:59 AM Major Times 6:07 AM 8:07 AM 6:30 PM 8:30 PM Minor Times 12:17 AM 1:17 AM 11:59 AM 12:59 PM Major Times 6:53 AM 8:53 AM 7:15 PM 9:15 PM Minor Times 12:52 AM 1:52 AM 12:57 PM 1:57 PM Major Times 7:37 AM 9:37 AM 7:59 PM 9:59 PM Minor Times 1:26 AM 2:26 AM 1:52 PM 2:52 PM Major Times 8:20 AM 10:20 AM 8:42 PM 10:42 PM Minor Times 1:58 AM 2:58 AM 2:46 PM 3:46 PM Major Times 9:03 AM 11:03 AM 9:25 PM 11:25 PM Minor Times 2:30 AM 3:30 AM 3:40 PM 4:40 PM Average Average Average Average Average Average Average+6:35 am 8:37 pm 11:39 pm 9:57 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:35 am 8:37 pm --:-11:00 am 6:35 am 8:37 pm 12:18 am 12:00 pm 6:35 am 8:38 pm 12:53 am 12:58 pm 6:35 am 8:38 pm 1:26 am 1:53 pm 6:35 am 8:39 pm 1:58 am 2:47 pm 6:35 am 8:39 pm 2:31 am 3:40 pm78% 71% 64% 58% 51% 45% 39% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance facebook.com/GamerZParadise (850) 926-9100 | theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635 Wakulla Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fiMON THURS: SUMMER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI: 12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!Saturday, June 9Live Music all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta

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Page 12 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comIn the Court Shorts that appeared on May 24, it was reported that Walter Carey was charged in 1996 with DUI manslaughter. He was not. He was charged and pleaded no contest to charges of leaving the scene of an accident with death and driving with a suspended license with death. The News regrets the error. reports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn May 24, Amanda Fisher of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed unauthorized charges on her bank account totaling $160. Other attempts were made to charge from her account but the attempts were denied by the bank, including one for $2,800. The charges were created in Europe. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On May 24, Jill Swift of Tallahassee reported a vehicle burglary at WalMart. Someone removed the victims GPS from her vehicle. The GPS is valued at $100. The vehicle was left unlocked at the time of the theft. On May 24, Gene Bennett of Crawfordville reported a grand theft from his vehicle while he was in the Apalachicola National Forest. The victim reported that a man took a large amount of cash from him while he was at a hunt camp. On May 24, Judy Parker of Crawfordville reported the theft of jewelry from her home. A suspect has been identi ed and the missing property is valued at $92. On May 24, Melinda Fewell of Crawfordville reported a fraud. An unauthorized charge was observed on the victims bank account. The charge was for $419. On May 24, Sharon Bijak of Tyrone, Ga., reported a grand theft of jewelry from Panacea. The jewelry was lost while the victim was staying in Panacea for a festival. It is valued at $9,400. On May 24, Lavetric Davis of Tallahassee reported a theft in Crawfordville. The victim reported the theft of a GPS and an electronic game. The items are believed to have been stolen while the victim was moving. The items are valued at $600. On May 24, Deputy Cole Wells investigated a vehicle crash at Highway 267 and Springhill Road. The deputy discovered a vehicle overturned in the median. A witness reported that John William Cox, 64, of Havana, was driving erratically on Springhill Road before misjudging the intersection and overturning his vehicle. The motorist consented to give a blood sample so Deputy Wells could conduct the traf c crash as a possible DUI. The investigation continues. EMS of cials treated Cox at the scene and he was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. On May 25, Dickie McKenzie of Crawfordville reported the theft of copper wire, a knife and metal bed. The items were taken from the victims yard and are valued at $265. On May 25, Toby Barfield of Crawfordville reported damage to his fence. The victim believes the fence was damaged by a motor vehicle. A corner post will need to be replaced as it appeared a vehicle failed to slow enough to complete the turn without striking the fence. Damage was estimated at $50. This is not the rst time a vehicle has struck the same location. On May 25, George Begley of Crawfordville reported a brush re on Cajer Posey Road. Wakulla firefighters extinguished the re without any structural damage. On May 25, Dominique Hawkins of Wal-Mart reported a retail theft. Hawkins observed a subject grab two containers of beer. But the suspect dropped the beer when he was confronted and fled the scene in a yellow Chevrolet Cavalier. A suspect has been identi- ed. The beer was valued at $26. On May 26, Bridgett Lee of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the theft of cash from her vehicle which was left unlocked. The money was taken from the victims purse. The loss was more than $400. On May 26, William Rodeheaver of Crawfordville reported a trespass at his property. The suspect, Brandi Marie Hicks, 28, of Panacea, left the property before deputies arrived. However, later in the day a second trespass complaint was received from the victim. Deputy Nick Gray arrested Hicks on two counts of trespassing and one count of resisting arrest without violence. On May 26, a fraud was reported at Winn-Dixie as someone posing as a Western Union employee contacted the store and requested a test run of the system. During the fraudulent test $937 was sent to an open card. The case investigation by the WCSO Fraud Unit is ongoing. On May 26, Melody Sellner of Crawfordville fell off the back of a motorcycle near the Medart Volunteer Fire Department. The operator of the motorcycle drove away and did not check on the victim. Deputy Mike Zimba observed a subject that t the description of the motorcycle operator at a nearby convenience store. Field sobriety exercises were administered to Caleb Dalton Shoemaker, 22, of Crawfordville. Shoemaker was arrested for DUI and leaving the scene of an accident with injuries. The victim sustained injuries to her arms, shoulder and hands but refused EMS transport. On May 27, Ashley Gavin of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the theft of her wallet. The wallet and contents were valued at $65. Later, the wallet was recovered by the victim but cash was missing from it. On May 27, Hubertus Weijers of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash at the St. Marks Boat Ramp. Someone struck the victims vehicle while it was parked at the ramp. Someone placed folded paper underneath the victims windshield wiper, but the paper was blank. On May 27, Mary Meeks of Panacea reported a theft at her residence. The stolen items included a utility wagon, wheelbarrow, garden hose and extension ladder, valued at $240. The missing items were recovered at a nearby residence that has been abandoned. On May 27, Deputy Mike Zimba observed Michael Ryan Graham, 26, of Crawfordville walking out of a Crawfordville area convenience store. Deputy Zimba had knowledge that the suspect had a trespass warning at the location. The subject was arrested without incident. On May 27, Sedrick Williams of Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief. Someone keyed the victims vehicle. Marks were observed on four sides of the vehicle and damage was estimated at $2,500. On May 27, Rachel Sadler of Tallahassee reported the theft of a credit card. The victim was at a St. Marks establishment when she used her card to purchase beverages. The card was lost at the establishment. On May 28, David Mitchell of Sopchoppy reported a theft of a camera from his home. The camera was valued at $550. Two persons of interest have been identi ed. On May 28 a retail theft was reported at Wal-Mart. Ramon Angelo Medina, 21, of Crawfordville was arrested for retail theft of taking $54 worth of playing cards and failing to pay for them. On May 29, Deirdre Farrington of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. Unauthorized charges were observed on the victims card. She had four charges totaling $217 that she did not create. On May 29, Heather Lane of Crawfordville reported the theft of a money order. The money order, valued at $50, was taken from the victims wallet. A suspect has been identi ed. On May 29, Millie Hilliard of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her home. Pills were discovered missing from the bottle. Two individuals of interest have been identi ed. On May 29, Joseph Davis of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A motorcycle suffered $915 worth of damage to a custom paint job. A suspect has been identi ed. On May 29, Tawanna Maxwell of Woodville reported a Crawfordville burglary. The victim discovered storage unit latches cut at the construction site of her new residence. The storage units were ransacked but nothing appeared to be missing. Damage was estimated at $200. On May 29, Caleb Harmon of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at his former home. The victim was moving items out of the home when he discovered furniture and military gear from the U.S. Marine Corps missing. The missing items are valued at $3,300. On May 29, Deputy Cole Wells discovered a blue cellular telephone on t he bicycle path while patrolling Mashes Sands Road. Contact was made with a male in Quincy before the battery died. The phone was turned into the Evidence Division. On May 29, Deputy Cole Wells was investigating a shots red complaint on Floyd Gray Road with Deputies Sean Wheeler and Stephen Simmons. During the course of the investigation, Marcus Anthony Owens of Tallahassee was identi ed as one of the parties at the home. He had two active warrants out of Leon County for violation of probation for trespassing and criminal mischief. While he was being arrested for the active warrants, Owens admitted having three Xanax pills in his pocket but no prescription. Owens was also arrested for possession of a Schedule 4 substance and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. On May 30, Milagros Jensen of Crawfordville reported a burglary. Someone broke into the victims shed and removed a mountain bike and light up ornaments. The property is valued at $275. On May 30, Emily Marie Davis, 18, of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash on Government Road. Davis was driving southbound on the road when she lost control of the vehicle and ran into trees on the east side of the road. The victims mother arrived on scene and picked her up to transport her to the hospital. The vehicle was towed from the scene. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 706 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of ce detectives arrested two teenage boys on narcotics charges following the execution of a search warrant Wednesday, May 30, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Kyle Brandon Burdeshaw, 18, of Crawfordville and a 15-year-old Crawfordville male were arrested for cultivation of marijuana and possession of narcotic equipment and taken to the Wakulla County Jail. Detectives obtained a search warrant for the Buck Miller Road home in Crawfordville as part of an ongoing investigation into stolen rearms and illegal drug activity. During the search of the home, detectives located multiple items of drug paraphernalia including smoking pipes, scales and aluminum foil with drug residue. A ri e was also seized and submitted into evidence. Outside the home, detectives discovered 14 marijuana plants. The plants ranged in size to 15 inches high. Detectives are attempting to determine the ownership of the rearm as the investigation continues. Lt. C.L. Morrison, Detective Lorne Whaley and Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. Kyle Brandon BurdeshawTwo drug arrests after search warrant served SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCorrectionCar ips in crash This wreck occurred on Monday, June 4, at about 8 a.m. on Wakulla Arran Road one block west of 319. A single vehicle car hit a tree and turned over. Wakulla County Fire Rescue and Wakulla County EMS responded. The crash was investigated by WCSO. The lone driver had minor injuries. HAS MOVEDOur new location is: The Barry Building, Back Building, #4 3295 Crawfordville Highway(ofce entrance is located between the 2 buildings) Ofce Hours: Monday Thursday, 8:00 am 5:00 pm (closed 12 noon 2:00 pm) For help with your utility bill and other assistance, call us at 850-926-3122 www.cacaainc.org Hair Place That 850-926-6020 We Have Gift CerticatesMiranda545-2905Robyn926-6020Linda294-2085 OOPS! Styles for Men, Women & ChildrenFULL SERVICE HAIR SALONBarber on Duty Thursday SaturdayCuts Colors Highlights Perms UpDos Flat Tops Special Cuts Facial Waxing HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 Page 13By JO ANN PALMERChamber MemberNiraj Patel accepted the award for the 2012 Business of the Year for Best Western Plus Wakulla Inns & Suites. The award was presented at the Wakulla Chamber of Commerces eighth annual Business Excellence Awards banquet held at the senior center on May 17. Patel achieved Plus status with Best Western with a series of customer service and cleanliness tests. Patel and his family invest in the community with very generous contributions to local organizations and by promoting tourism, bringing economic growth to the area. The evening began with Chamber President Amy Geiger welcoming those in attendance and recognizing the events sponsors, CenturyLink and Waste Pro. Herb Donaldson, president of the Healing Arts of Wakulla County and founder of the Palaver Tree Theatre, talked about his life experiences as a young man in Buckhorn, working summers, and how money burnt a hole in his pocket. His storytelling led to the inspirational message that we could grow a business if we just put our mind to it. There were two special recognitions of Chamber members who have supported the organization since the early 1970s and who have been in business much longer. Ronald Fred Crum was recognized for 58 years of business. He was in the audience as everyone heard that what they now know as Crums Mini-Mall was once the state inspection station, an auto body repair shop, tire and oil distributor and even the county ambulance service. Crums is now known as the house of 3,000 shing rods and reels, and where you can buy a pair of shoes, a souvenir of Florida, or ll you tank with gasoline or diesel. Congratulations Ronald Fred and Eloise for your years of continuous business. Jumping forward a couple of decades to 1986. Noah and Mildred Posey had already been in business for 20 years. If you have ever eaten deviled crab from an authentic crab shell, it was probably produced by the Poseys. Noah still arrives at work every morning at 4:30 a.m. to make sure things run smoothly at their two current businesses, Poseys Up the Creek and Poseys Dock Side Caf. Through their businesses, the Poseys have generously been able to give back to our community. Congratulations to the Posey family for being one of the oldest Chamber members. Winner of Start-Up Business of the Year was International Gold Gymnastics, which prides itself on being the best gymnastics facility in the Big Bend area, offering certi ed coaches and a safe environment for all their students to achieve great skills in gymnastics.Continued on Page 16 Geiger with Chamber Member of the Year Gail Campbell and Youth Coalition President Bruce Ashley. By AMY GEIGERChamber PresidentThe Chamber has had a very busy beginning to 2012 as we continue to focus on our three top goals: membership, education and advocating for our business community. We are always proud to support our local businesses as they strive to weather this economy. On May 17 we had our annual Business Excellence Awards Banquet and recognized the following individuals and their businesses for being leaders in our community: The award winners were: Start-up Business of the Year International Gold Gymnastics. Non-Pro t Organization of the Year Friends of the Wakulla County Library. Environmental Stewardship Award Wildwood Resort. Wakulla Area Business of the Year Callaway Auto and Truck Repair. Member of the Year Gail Campbell. Business of the Year Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites. Special Recognition went to Noah Posey and Ronald Fred Crum for continuing to support the Chamber since the early 1970s. We thank them both for their passion and commitment to Wakulla County. Herb Donaldson was our speaker for the evening and did not disappoint. If you have not heard Herb speak, you are missing out. I would like to recognize the committee that put this event together lead by Jo Ann Palmer, with Courtney Peacock, Tammie Bar eld, Sharol Brown, JoAnne Strickland and last but not least Petra Shuff. In addition, Mary Harrison and her army of volunteers served a spectacular dinner for us at the Senior Center. A huge thank you goes out to CenturyLink and Waste Pro for being our primary sponsors. Events such as our banquet could not happen without our sponsors. Again, thank you! One initiative I wanted to accomplish this year was to introduce a young professionals group and Im proud to say it is happening. It is with great pleasure that I introduce Focus Wakulla, a young professionals group designed to target Chamber members 45 and younger. Tara Kieser, membership committee chair, along with several others met in early April and began talking about the needs of the young professionals in Wakulla County. Based on that information, the council quickly came up with a name and goals that will be the cornerstone of this group: F Foster and support economic development O Optimize networking opportunities C Create and cultivate future leaders U Understanding and awareness of government processes S Strengthen and enrich our community Focus Wakulla will hold quarterly functions that will touch one of these ve goals. Ideas for this group include inviting guest speakers to educate on how government works in Wakulla County, holding seminars on how to network and meet others to help you grow your business and professionally, having small intimate discussions on the importance of local businesses and supporting them. We will encourage members to participate in regular Chamber events as well. The rst event is being held June 29 at Poseys Dockside Caf in Panacea beginning at 6 p.m. This event will lay out the purpose and initiatives of Focus Wakulla and we will announce the next exciting event. So if you or the business you work for is a member of the Chamber, please join us for our inaugural event. Like Focus Wakulla on Facebook www.facebook. com/FocusWakulla the council will post information about the community and future events. Please contact Tara Kieser at (850) 294-5955 or tarakieser@synovusmortgage.com or Courtney Peacock at (850) 926-6751 or peacock.courtney@ccbg. com to have your name and email address added to our distribution list. As always, it is an honor and privilege to serve our business community. Thank you for allowing me this opportunity. Yours in Service, Amy Geiger, President. Taking Care of Business Taking Care of BusinessBusiness News from Business News from Business Spotlight:MyOf ceProductsPage 15Should I stay or should I go? Candidates qualify for of ceWeekly Roundup, Page 23Chamber Networking Luncheon catered by Kast Net Page 15 Presidents MessageGoals are membership, education and advocate for local businessBest Western Plus is named Business of the Year PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENChamber President Amy Geiger with Best Western Plus owner Niraj Patel. Start Up Business International Gold Gymnastics. Area Business Callaway Auto and Truck Repair. Environmental Stewardship Wildwood Resort.Non-Pro t Organization Friends of the Library. Business Excellence Winners: Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com Interior Remodeling Doors Floors Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling Decks/Barns/Fences Portable, Private, Outdoor ShowersFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS NEW! Crawler Tractors, Hydraulic Excavators, Motor Graders, Wheel Loaders, Loader Backhoes, Farm Tractors, Service & Bucket/Sign Trucks, Flatbed & Dump Trucks, Truck Tractor & Lowboys, Paving Equipment, Durangos, Late Model Chevrolet, Ford and Dodge Pickups and MUCH, MUCH MORE! For Detailed Listing & Photos, Go To www.jmwood.com Absolute Public AuctionAlabama Dept. of Transportation June 15 & 16, 2012 1409 Coliseum Blvd., Montgomery, AlabamaBryant Wood AL LIC #1137(334) 264-3265

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Page 14 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, June 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF WAKULLA will host a public records forum at 7 p.m. at the library. Barbara Petersen, president of the Florida First Amendment Foundation, will lead the forum. Friday, June 8 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, June 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. Sunday, June 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, June 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. at the library. Tuesday, June 12 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. WAKULLA COUNTY MAH JONGG GROUP will meet from 12:45 p.m. to 3 p.m. at precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road, the rst left after Wal-Mart heading north. The little mah jongg house is the rst building on the left. For more information, call 926 9254. Thursday, June 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a las 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Hwy. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350.Special EventsThursday, June 7 MEET AND GREET WITH COUNTY COMMISSION CANDIDATE EMILY SMITH will be held at Posh Java at 6 p.m. Smith is a candidate for District 5. The evening will begin with music by Sammy Tedder and a brief presentation by Smtih. More music by Grant Peeples will follow. She will be available throughout the evening to respond to questions and concerns. For more information, contact Judith Harriss at joereme@gmail.com. WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public roundtable meeting from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge Education Building. It will begin with a brief presentation on recent TDC activities and initiatives, followed by a facilitated discussion of how to keep the tourism industry engaged in responsible promotion of resources, ways that TDC can improve its marketing/advertising activities, and new ideas for marketing campaigns. CANDIDATE DEBATE FOR FLORIDA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVE District 7 will be held by the Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee in conjunction with the Wakulla County Republican Club at The Bistro at Wildwood at 7 p.m. There will be a meet and greet from 6 to 7 p.m. Candidates are Don Curtis, Jamey Westbrook and Mike Williams. Special guest is Daryn Iwicki, North Florida regional director of the Republican Party of Florida. LIBRARY SUMMER PROGRAM REGISTRATION will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. This is for the childrens summer programs. Friday, June 8 WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE HEADQUARTERS will hold a grand opening from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at North Pointe Center, Building 1626, Unit B. LIBRARY SUMMER PROGRAM REGISTRATION will be held from 10 a.m. to noon and 2 to 4 p.m. at the library. Sign up is for childrens summer program. Saturday, June 9 WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 2002 10 year reunion will be held at Wildwood Resort at 6:30 p.m. Visit www.whs2002.com for more information. SJOGRENS SUPPORT GROUP FOR NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA will be held at 1 p.m. at the Leon County Public Library,1583 Pedrick Road, Tallahassee. Come and meet others with Sjogrens(show-grins), share experiences and learn about resources for living and coping with this complex, auto-immune disease. The meeting is free and handicap accessible. For more information, contact Kathleen Abrams, support group leader, at kabrams408@ gmail.com or 668-3586. Monday, June 11 WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will be from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the library. The meeting is open to the public. Tuesday, June 12 APALACHEE REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL will hold a public meeting of the Wakulla County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board at 10 a.m. at the library. Upcoming EventsFriday, June 15 BLOOD DRIVE will be held at Wal-Mart from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Donors will receive a free T-shirt. WAKULLA SUPER USER WORKSHOP will be held at 8:30 a.m. at WorkForce Plus Wakulla Of ce, 3278 Crawfordville Highway. A class on Microsoft Word will be from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., followed by a class on Microsoft Excel from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 16 GOLF GONE WILD to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association will be held at St. James Bay Golf Resort. There will be cash prizes, a silent art auction and a nature photography slide-show and presentation, The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay (which will soon be a published book), by award-winning nature photographer John Spohrer. The event will bene t the FWMA, a 501(c)3 wildlife rehabilitation center located in Wakulla County that cares for sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife in our area. Enjoy golf at the gorgeous Audubon-sanctioned St. James Bay Golf Resort (151 Laughing Gull Lane in Carrabelle, Florida). To help by sponsoring the event or donating auction items, contact Lois Swoboda at 653-5857. For more details, see the brochure on the website at www.wakullawildlife.org or call Lynne Cooper at (850) 697-9507. GABALLI FOOD TASTE SAMPLER will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at Ocklockonee Bay United Methodist Church, 2780 Surf Road, Panacea. For more information, call 9840127. Saturday, June 23 TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at Myra Jeans restaurant from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. This will be a farewell party for April Schreiber. They will have cake and a gift for her. This event will not be structured with activities as the past meetings have been. RSVP to Carrie Stevens by calling 274-9474 or emailing carriejstevens@comcast.net.Sunday, June 24A GET-TOGETHER TO SUPPORT Randy Harrison, who has leukemia, will be held at the American Legion in Tallahassee from 2 to 6 p.m. There will be music and a silent auction. Money raised will help with expenses. For more information, call 962-5282 or email sopchoppyriver@gmail.com. Tourist Development Council public meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the St. Marks Refuge. Library Summer Program registration 10 a.m. to noon and 2 to 4 p.m. WHS Class of 10-year reunion at Wildwood at 6:30 p.m. Wakulla County Audit Committee meeting at 2 p.m. ThursdayFridaySaturdayWednesday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.comBy SCOTT JOYNERWCPL DirectorBook Extravaganza another success! Wed like to thank all who came out to our Book Extravaganza Fundraiser last Saturday. Your generous donations raised over $600 in three hours for the Friends of the Library! There were more than 50 people waiting to be let in when the doors opened at 9 a.m. and the crowd just built from there. The money raised goes directly to the Friends and helps fund the Summer Program of Events kicking off this week (more on that below), makes up part of our book budget, and assists in purchasing needed items like the 12 new public computers and e-book service in the coming months. We appreciate your support and encourage any who are interested in helping the library grow join the Friends. Information is available at the library. Friday Night Movie This Friday, June 8, were kicking off our summer of movies by showing the sequel to the lm of a couple years back, Journey to the Center of the Earth. This sequel stars Dwayne The Rock Johnson, Michael Caine, Josh Hutcherson and Vanessa Hudgens and tells the story of 17-year-old Sean Anderson who receives a coded distress signal from a mysterious island where no island should exist. Unable to stop tracking the signal, he sets out with a small group on a journey to the mysterious island a place few people have ever seen or lived to tell about. What they nd is an island of stunning beauty, strange and threatening life forms, volcanoes, mountains of gold and more than one astonishing secret. This PG (for action and some language) rated lm is fun for the whole family so beat the heat and join us. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show. Popcorn and water will be provided by Capital City Bank for donations to the library. Summer Registration Fun Day and Tallahassee Museum Field Trip Signup Our summer registration will be held on Thursday, June 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. and on Friday, June 9 from 10 a.m. to noon and 2 to 4 p.m. We will have detailed information on the Summer Program, the signup sheets for our rst eld trip to the Tallahassee (or as longtime residents of the area still call it, Jr.) Museum and a bouncy house on hand for the kids to play in while mom and dad get information on all the fun were planning here this summer. The Friends of the Library will also have a table manned for anyone who wishes to join or get info on all they do for the library. Please come out, see Molly and I, and get any questions you may have about the Summer Program answered before everything gets going on June 12. TutuOla Drum and Dance Company comes to WCPL On Thursday, June 14 at 7 p.m., our rst performance of the summer will be a rst time visitor to the library. The TutuOla Drum and Dance Company is based out of Tallahassee and states that Our show brings African culture closer to those who are not already familiar with it. Our aim is to connect the cultures of African peoples all over the world for our audiences. This is done through our dynamic blend of different genres of music and dance such as Hip Hop, Funk, Marching Band and Caribbean styles. The central point that ties it all together is that the root of it all is African. For those of our patrons who remember Mama Koku and the drum circles weve had previous summer, this high energy show should be a combination of both. Lets give TutuOla a big crowd on June 14 and kick our summer series of performance off with a bang! Library News... Government MeetingsMonday, June 11 WAKULLA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION will meet at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Wednesday, June 13 WAKULLA COUNTY AUDIT COMMITTEE will meet at 2 p.m. in the county commissioner administration conference room. Thursday, June 14 ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, June 18 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for its regular meeting. SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. at city hall.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 Page 15 Spotlight on Business Spotlight on BusinessBusiness News from Business News from By PETRA SHUFFof the ChamberThe Wakulla County Extension Of ce was once again our meeting ground for the Chambers monthly networking luncheon held Wednesday, May 23. This is the perfect place for us to rent if any of the local restaurants do not have suf cient space to accommodate our luncheons, and their regular lunch crowd, and want to participate in these monthly events showcasing their business. Everybody seems to enjoy this midday networking event, and it is exciting to see new faces each month, and meet guests invited by our members. While the buffet was being set up for our 54 attendees, Mary introduced our new members for June: Kast Net, AGLA American General Life & Accident Insurance agents Cindy Samford and Lynn Cox, Walgreens, Lou Kellenberger Photography, Savary Academy and Dickeys Barbecue Pit #535. New members Cindy and Lynn are based in Tallahassee and are looking forward to working more with the Chamber, Wakulla businesses and residents. Their clients in Wakulla currently include several small businesses, the Clerk of Courts Of ce, Board of County Commissioners and Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce employees. Lou Kellenberger lives in Tallahassee, but spends most of his time in Wakulla hunting subjects for his exquisite wildlife photography, and currently also has an exhibit at the Welcome Center in Panacea. Additionally, he volunteers for the Wakulla Tourist Development Center and is a member of the Friends of the Wakulla Springs Park, and posts phenomenal pictures on Facebook. Our hosts Fred and Thu Mohrfeld have been operating Kast Net at Wakulla Station since 2003, starting out catering from their home kitchen 33 years ago. Fred was telling us about their business, and then was outside in their catering truck cooking up piping hot monstrous egg rolls, cheese grits, hush puppies, fried shrimp, sh llets and grilled chicken, served with a salad and cole slaw and homemade dressings. I think everyone would agree that it was an excellent meal! Thus signature chocolate lasagna cake was absolutely out of this world. It was so moist and delicious, and the mousse like icing itself would have made a wonderful dessert. Mary Wallace introduced her guest Adam Brugner with ASI, American Strategic Insurance. The company was formed in St. Petersburg in 1997, and in only three years went from non-rated to an Arated company. Les Harrison with the Extension Of ce again reiterated that rooms are for rent at very reasonable rates, and also shared about the Get trees ready for hurricane season workshop he held. Please check their website for many interesting classes and workshops coming up, including local food production and master gardening classes. Sherri Kraeft, with UF/IFAS, Wakulla 4-H thanked local businesses for their generous support of the second Annual Jam for Camps. Kraefts honey bee educational program has been very successful, and she will be traveling to Grenada to share her wisdom in January. Congrats! Continued on Page 16AGLA American General Life & Accident Insurance Co. Agents Cindy Samford and Lynn Cox Walgreens Crawfordville Lou Kellenberger Photography Savary Academy Dickeys Barbecue Pit # 535 Kast Net Restaurant and CateringMembers of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce and friends attended a ribbon cutting ceremony for Lisas Timeless Treasures antique shop on Friday, May 11. Lisa Russell is the owner. The shop is located at 44 Rose Street in downtown Sopchoppy, in an historic building that was built more than 75 years ago. J. R. Lawhon and his son J. Edward Lawhon operated a general store together there for many years. Mr. Ed, as he was called by the locals, lived to be 104 years old! In days past, you could nd Sopchoppys old timers swapping stories and passing time on the bench outside the shop which came to be affectionately known as the loafers bench. You can now nd rare antiques, vintage items and unique collectibles that will take you back in time to days gone by. Lisa would like to invite everyone to come visit her shop in Sopchoppy to sit a spell on the loafers bench, take a trip down memory lane and perhaps nd a treasure you cant live without. Shop hours are Wednesday and Thursday, noon to 6 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call Lisa at (850) 559-6567 for more information. On Friday, May 18, Anytime Fitness of Crawfordville held a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house to celebrate the new owners Chris and Michelle Roberts and their induction into the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce. Anytime Fitness is the best place for tness 24 hours a day, seven days a week! At Anytime Fitness they t your busy schedule and on-the-go lifestyle. Their exclusive membership allows their members to workout ANYTIME of the day or night. Anytime Fitness has state-of-the-art strength training equipment and cutting edge cardiovascular equipment. Anytime Fitness is a locally owned and operated franchise. Anytime Fitness proudly supports many community programs and events. They offer special rates for law enforcement, re ghters, government and county employees. Stop in ANYTIME! Tell us about your business (include unique facts and history): MyOf ceProducts is the largest national independent of ce products dealer and the fth largest of ce products dealer in the U.S. Our workforce is comprised of 500 employees, 200 of whom are dedicated sales associates. While we pride ourselves in our continuous growth and reach, our main focus is providing individual customers with the very best services and products. With 47 locations and 37 distribution points across the country, we are able to ef ciently and correctly service all of your office needs including desktop accessories, paper products, toner and ink, dated goods, writing instruments and information technology supplies. Additionally, we provide a furniture offering including systems furniture, case goods, seating, design services, and space-planning. Lastly, our product offering also includes custom printing, ad specialty products, janitorial supplies and coffee and breakroom services. MyOf ceProducts business strategy is centered rmly on customer service, distribution, and technology. Our mission is to continue building a successful, pre-eminent organization that creates signi cant, measureable, and meaningful value for our customers, employees, and stockholders. To accomplish our goal, we ensure that all of our decisions are driven by integrity, that all of our actions exemplify professionalism, and that each individual customer is truly valued. We are con dent that our comprehensive and ef cient services will allow your own company to grow and thrive. What services, products do you offer? MyOf ceProducts has designed and implemented a broad array of services that provide total support for your organization. We offer a Single Sourcing Program that gives our customers one-stop shopping not only for office supplies, but also products previously considered peripheral items to of ce products. Our complete line of services include: of ce supplies, promotional items, of ce furniture, forms, managed print services, janitorial supplies, coffee and breakroom supplies, and green products. What sets your business apart from the competition? A simple value proposition one order, one box, one invoice, zero errors! Rapid problem resolution this is a key internal customer service benchmark for MyOf ceProducts. We provide incentives that drive customer service, accounting, sales, operations, delivery, and all other functions toward a high performance culture in terms of ensuring quality outcomes to our customers and in terms of ensuring rapid resolution of problems should the initial order involve any quality failures. Cultural considerations the key ingredient that ultimately distinguishes one organization from another is the quality of the organizations personnel and their commitment to exceeding customer expectations. This begins with a working environment in which all employees are empowered to make decisions that impact our customers in a positive way. It continues with an ongoing commitment to the importance of the employees and their relationships with the customers. Items such as reliability, responsiveness, courtesy, competence, credibility, access, and communication are constantly reinforced. What should the community/ customer expect when they visit your business? Great prices, courteous customer service, huge selections with professional support from beginning to end. How long have you been a Chamber member? I have been a member for three years. Why did you join the Chamber? The Wakulla Chamber of Commerce is a great way to meet the local business owners and support the local community. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? The monthly business mixers, and the holiday parties. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? When I purchase locally, I am supporting the jobs of my neighbors. When my neighbors has im provements, my houses value increases. Like a rising tide, we all are elevated when we support each other. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Simply call me at (850) 508-2660 or email me at james.hodges@myof ceproducts.com Additional comments: Diversity: MyOf ceProducts aggressively supports both Tier 1 and Tier 2 diversity partners from both the service and manufacturing sectors. If a customer has a need for Tier 1 Diversity spend, MyOf ceProducts has teaming agreements with an SBA Small, Disadvantaged, Woman-Owned Diversity Business, MetroOf- ceSolutions. We also have an agreement with Veteran Corps, which is an 8(a) Service Disabled Veteran, Small Disadvantaged business. Our teaming agreements with these companies allow our customers to participate with diversity service companies in needing any contracting Tier 1 Diversity credit goals. Additionally, the MyOf ceProducts, MetroOfficeProducts and Veteran Corps of ce products catalogs designates MBE (Minority-Owned Business Enterprises) and WBE (Women-Owned Business Enterprise) manufacturers and all of the products purchased from these manufacturers qualify as a Tier 2 spend. MyOf ceProducts can generate diversity reports on an annual, quarterly, monthly, or as needed basis speci c to diversity spend. Collection/Pickup Services: MyOf- ceProducts has developed a comprehensive program to recycle our customers empty laser toner and inkjet cartridges through our sister company, ShredX. MyOfficeProducts drivers will empty the collection bins on a standard schedule, and our warehouse team will manage the return of the empty cartridges to HP for the purpose of earning HP Rewards Points and tracking the collection of toners from our customer. Pickup schedules will vary depending on the department from weekly, bi-weekly or monthly services. There is no minimum or maximum number of cartridges needed for recycling and there is no training required. The system is as easy as depositing paper into recycling bins. Name: James Hodges, 300 Wakulla Springs Highway. Phone Number (850) 508-2660. Name of business: MyOf ceProducts Name of owner: Hi Touch Ribbon cuttings:SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLisas Timeless Treasures Anytime FitnessNew members:Chamber networking luncheon catered by Kast Net SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPart of the crowd at the Chambers networking luncheon held at the county extension of ce with food served by Kast Net.

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Page 16 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 13 Nominees for the catergory were GamerZ Paradise, Black Bean Cuban Cuisine, Tally Up Tax and Accounting, Wakulla Produce, Dreams Daycare, Mikes Seafood Grille, R. Alan Andrews P.A., Learning Curve Tutoring, Rock Landing Marina, Synovus Mortgage Corporation and Jos Dollar World. Non-Pro t Organization of the Year was Friends of the Wakulla County Library. The Friends have made it possible for Wakulla County to have the library building, and to offer the outstanding services to our community, which include a summer program for both children and adults. Nominees were Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, CHAT of Wakulla, Harvest Thrift Store, Big Bend Hospice, Florida Green Guide Association, Covenant Hospice, Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center, Workforce Plus, Big Brothers Big Sister of the Big Bend, NAMI Wakulla, Gulf Specimen Marine Lab and Panacea Waterfronts Florida Partnership Wildwood Resort proudly claimed the Environmental Stewarship Award. Wildwood represents an organization that considers the impact on our environment before every business decision. Environmental Stewardship nominees were Waste Pro, Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Hydra Engineering, Florida Environmental & Land Services Inc, Tallahassee Energy & Construction, wakulla.com, and St. Marks Out tter. Callaway Auto and Truck Repair won Wakulla Area Business of the Year. Mike and Sherry Callaway were nominated by a customer who sang their praises of honesty, hard work and outstanding customer service. Other nominees were Subway, Talk O The Town Deli and Shepherd Spring Animal Hospital. Gail Campbell won the award as Chamber Member of the Year. A new award this year, it was intended to recognize an outstanding employee or volunteer of a Chamber business. Congratulations to Gail Campbell, an outstanding member of this community. Other Member of the Year nominees were John Shuff, Sharol Brown, Mary Wallace, Amy Geiger, Kimberly Moore, Sherri Kraeft, Ronald Fred Crum, Courtney Peacock and Jo Ann Palmer. Besides Best Western Plus, the nominees for Business of the Year were VCA Wakulla Animal Hospital, Poseys Up the Creek, Ouzts Too Oyster Bar & Grill, Inspired Technologies, Cook Insurance Agency, Wakulla Area Times, 3Y Ranch & Outdoor Equipment, Bright Beginnings Daycare, Crawfordville Ace Hardware, Hydra Engineering, The Wakulla News, BlueWater Realty, Ed Gardner O.D., Keith Key Heating & Air, wakulla.com, Wal-Mart and Waste Pro. Congratulations to all the winners. If you are not a member of the Wakulla County Chamber, nd out about the bene ts by going to wakullacountychamber.com. Continued from Page 15 Tim Center introduced himself as the new director of Capital Area Community Action Agency. He shared that 14 percent of the population in the eight-county region they serve live in poverty, whereas the number of people living in poverty in Wakulla is 20 percent. He added that he would like interested Wakulla residents to consider serving on their board of directors. Tara Kieser, Chamber Board member and committee chair for FOCUS Wakulla, told our crowd about the inaugural event for this new group of young professionals, our future community and business leaders. Details about the event will be forthcoming via email and ads in The Wakulla News. Please dont forget that your employees are Chamber members through your membership, and will always be welcome at any of our events. Meagan Picht introduced herself as the new United Way representative for Wakulla County. She has been working for United Way for two years, and is looking to get more involved in Wakulla. Luis Serna, head of Wakulla Planning and Zoning Department, invited guests to the Wakulla County/Environmental Protection Agency Technical Assistance Workshop June 5 and 6. This workshop and discussion focuses on the Crawfordville Town Plan and rural roads, particularly the Big Bend Scenic Byway, and is open to the public. Karol Shepard with VCA Wakulla Animal Hospital briefly spoke about their clinic, which is part of over 500 animal hospitals nationwide, in Canada and internationally. She also handed out VIP cards, which are available to all Chamber members. So if you are adding a new pet to your family in the near future, or currently have a pet that needs care, be sure to contact us for a membership card and save 10 percent on veterinary services, and a free first exam. Jo Ann Palmer, head of the Chambers internal events program recognized Niraj Patel of Best Western as the winner of the 2012 Business of the Year Award, and would like everyone to get red up for next years awards. Please do take the time to nominate when the paperwork gets emailed out early next year it may be your business announced as winner next time around. Andrew Maus with Tallahassee Technology introduced himself as the local Xerox representative, and pointed out that Xerox is an American-based company and all earned dollars stay in the U.S. Whatever your printing needs, Xerox will accommodate. He also introduced Steve Mitchell, the new rep for print services. He will visit and analyze your individual needs. He also proudly announced no toner printing, a plus for environmentally conscious customers. Louis Garcia, CEO for Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend thanked the community for helping raise $3,000 at a recent local event, totaling local fundraising at around $17,000. He also urged to consider becoming a mentor for the local program. The minimum required time to spend with a youth is only four or ve hours per month, and it will make a huge difference in a childs life! Amanda Wright told us about the new equestrian center off Lawhon Mill Road, and encouraged everyone to come out the third Saturday each month to enjoy different horse presentations. The Wakulla Horsemans Association still needs to purchase an announcer booth and other items, and is offering annual advertising at the equestrian center. If interested, contact Jim Porter at 509-0555. Susan Schatzman reminded everyone of the Motorcycle Run set for June 2, held by Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County, which included stops at various locations in Wakulla. Cindy Samford, our new member won the $54 cash drawing. We had 19 donated items, including homemade jams, gift cards, gardening books, ashlight, stepping stones, etc. Thanks to Brooks Concrete, Adam Brugner, Cook Insurance, The Wakulla News, UF/IFAS, Harvest Thrift Store, Susan Schatzman, Farm Bureau Insurance, Centennial Bank, Graphic Visions, Lamar Advertising, Jo Ann Palmer, and Tallahassee Technology for their contributions!Chamber networking luncheon catered by Kast NetBest Western Plus is named Business of the Year Herb Donaldson gives an entertaining speech at the Chambers Business Excellence Awards banquet. Organizer Jo Ann Palmer, Waste Pros Ralph Mills, Chamber President Amy Geiger, Broward Sapp of CenturyLink.WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChamber members network during the luncheon. Fred Mohrfeld of Kast Net. Golf Gone WILD! A golf tournament and art auction to help injured, orphaned birds and wildlifeJune 16, 2012Come join our golf tournament with CASH PRIZESand an art auction to helpFlorida Wild Mammal Association AND ALSO ENJOY: AND ALSO ENJ O Y : Nature Photography Presentationby John Spohrer telling the stories behind the images of his award-winning work and a preview of images from his new large-format book, The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay. Sponsored by St. James Bay Golf Resort & Forgotten Coast TVFor more information or help registering call Lynne Cooper, Events Coordinator, at 850-697-9507Crooked River GrillA prime rib dinner buffet with all the trimmings and decadent desserts for only $30. AND PLEASE SHARE ATTORNEY ADVERTISING. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outc ome. We may associate with local firms in states wherein we do not maintain an office. If no recovery, no fees or costs are charged, unless prohibited by State Law or Rule. Weitz & Luxenb erg, PC is licensed by, and a member of good standing of the New York State Bar. Lawrence Goldhirsch, Esq., member, FL Bar. P.C. LAW OFFICES &WEITZ LUXENBERGASBESTOS |DRUGS/MEDICAL DEVICES | ENVIRONMENTAL |NEGLIGENCEWe are also investigatingFOSAMAXFEMUR / HIP FRACTURES1.888.411.LAWS |www.weitzlux.com700 BROADWAY| NEWYORK, NY 10003BRANCH OFFICES IN NEW JERSEY & CALIFORNIA Weitz & Luxenberg can help you understand your legal options. For a free and discrete consultation please call us today at 1-888-411-LAWS (5297) or visit us on the web at www.HipDeviceRecall.com.Have you experienced failure of your hip implant, resulting in pain and disability that may have required revision surgery to replace the failed component? Common symptoms include groin pain, dislocations, instability, and pain associated with loosening of the device and the release of metal particles into the joint. We are accepting cases for injuries caused by certain hip replacement component products manufactured by several companies. www.HipDeviceRecall.comAre you suffering from aDEFECTIVE METALONMETAL HIP REPLACEMENT? 1-866-742-1373 Get your business noticed One Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Dont make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.facebook.com/AdNetFlorida Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 Page 17By JASON ALDERMAN As parents, we hope were doing a good job raising our children teaching them right from wrong, instilling the desire to learn and demonstrating how to manage money responsibly. But what if they see us preaching one behavior while practicing another? Whats to stop them from following in our sometimes misguided footsteps? As Fathers Day approaches, let me share a few things dads can do to teach their kids sound nancial habits that will last them a lifetime and point out a few bad behaviors you may not even be aware of. Ask yourself: Do you avoid conversations about money with your kids because thats how you were raised? Or because you dont feel quali- ed to give advice? Do you pay your bills on time to prevent late fees and possible dings to your credit score? Do you balance your checkbook regularly to avoid overdrafts and bounced checks? Have you set up an emergency fund and are you disciplined enough not to tap it for everyday expenses? Are you sometimes caught off-guard by bills you should anticipate? If your family is experiencing nancial dif culties (layoff, foreclosure, massive bills), are you having ageappropriate, non-traumatic discussions about the need for everyone to make sacri ces? Do you complain about your job within their earshot or say youd rather stay home with them but need to earn money? You could be setting them up to resent both work and money. If college is on the horizon, have you had frank discussions about how it will be nanced? Have you started a college savings fund, explored student loan programs or discussed contributions theyll be expected to make? When your kids constantly break or lose expensive items or run through their allowance early, do you repeatedly bail them out with no consequences? Okay, thats a lot of potentially negative outcomes. Lets concentrate on a few positive actions you can take that will encourage responsible nancial behavior in your kids: Use allowances to teach your kids how to handle money wisely, not as a tool to reinforce good behavior. Track their discretionary (toys, candy) and non-discretionary (school supplies, clothes) expenses. Depending on their ages and maturity, decide which expenses they should be responsible for managing, and dedicate a reasonable amount for each category in their allowances. A few other suggestions: Use allowances to teach important life lessons. For example, build in dedicated percentages they must set aside for savings, charity and investments then involve them in choosing how the money is spent. When you use an ATM explain that its not free money, but rather has been earned and saved by you. To encourage saving during these times of low interest rates, offer to match their savings at 50 percent. Teach by example. If money is tight and you have to deny your kids nonnecessary items, give up something of your own that they know youll miss. Open a 529 Quali ed State Tuition Plan or a Coverdell Education Savings Account to start saving for your childrens education and let them know about it well before you start discussing college choices. Fathers Day is when children traditionally express love for their dads. Show how much you care in return by starting them out with a healthy, realistic attitude toward personal nances.Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter, www. twitter.com/PracticalMoney.By WORKFORCE PLUSSpecial to The NewsWhile at rst glance they seem to have more differences than they can count, these two men from Wakulla hold something very important in common: the drive to overcome their circumstances and come out ahead in a still-struggling economy. Justin Keith and Spencer Gavin have both beaten unemployment despite staggering odds. Keith, a single parent of two young children, has worked as a maintenance technician for years. Gavin, 24, hasnt yet developed an employment history since a series of bad decisions as a young teen landed him in prison as a juvenile offender for eight years. They both found themselves in need of second chances in January when Keith lost his position through a lay-off and Gavin was released from prison after completing his sentence. I lost my home, my anc, and my kids had to transfer schools, Keith said. Just watching them struggle was my biggest motivation to get a job. His family helped to ll in the gaps by covering gas money and grocery money, as well as letting Keith and his children move in with them. Gavins family was central to his journey back to the workforce as well. If it werent for my mom, I wouldnt be here, he said. Even when I did get in trouble, she was still there for me. Gavin entered a juvenile center when he was 15 years old and spent the next eight years serving time and being transferred from prison center to prison center across the state. I started committing crimes, and that was out of my character, Gavin said. Once I decided I didnt want to do it any morethats when I got caught. And I regret it. Workforce Plus customized a response to support the individual journeys of Keith and Gavin. We couldnt afford the internet bill, Keith said. So I came into Workforce Plus to get online. Gavin learned about the Food Stamp Employment and Training Program available through Workforce Plus and took advantage of the services there, such as rsum writing and one-on-one individual assistance to create a career plan with a Career Counselor. Coming in to Workforce Plus made Keith realize the abundance of services available to him at no cost. Id been paying to make rsums and to fax documents that whole time, Keith said. But Workforce Plus was great. There was never a time when I came in that they couldnt help. They rebuilt my resume, help me to post applications and went out of their way a few times to help me. Keith used the services of the Workforce Plus of ce in Crawfordville. Workforce Plus called every day checking up on me, Keith said. The persistence of Workforce Plus was matched by Keiths diligence. Every single day I was online searching for jobs. I dropped off a rsum to every company in my eld, Keith said. Keith nally secured a position in his eld making enough to support his family. With that rst paycheck I was able to take my kids to the springs, get them a toy and go out to dinner, Keith said. It felt great. While Gavins story differs from Keiths in plot, the endings are similar and the characters share important traits. Loneliness accompanied Gavin to each prison. The worst part was being away from my family, he said. Learning a hard lesson, Gavin took advantage of the training programs in prison and picked up trades in culinary studies and graphic arts. I learned to develop lm, make prints and the like. I bust my behind working at bettering myself. He began applying for positions as soon as he was released. When asked if hed consider returning to his old ways, he was shocked. Whos going to do something illegal again? You dont do the same thing twice thats crazy. It didnt work the rst time it aint going to work the second time. Gavin applied for positions at small businesses in Crawfordville and Tallahassee, always being honest about his background. With help from Workforce Plus on his rsum and interviewing, he landed a position at the Dollar Tree within two months of his release. People understand that situations happen. And thats the same thing my boss said she said she believed in second chances. So its always possible to get a job. Its always possible. Some people believe in God, so its a forgiveness thing. You have to be willing to look past peoples wrongs. Keith would echo Gavins advice. Be diligent in your job search. If youve got a at tire on the side of the road, you cant just leave it there; you x it and drive on. When it comes to motivation, the two men from Wakulla agree that it is an internal element that comes from within that helps job seekers to overcome their circumstances. I knew I was going to nd a job. I dont think about my limitations that Id been locked up. Gavin said. I just want a family and to be able to take care of them. Thats all I want. Keiths ability to secure his position is a tribute to the motivation and determination of a hard-working single dad and a beacon of light for others trying to get back on their feet. There are a lot of jobs out there, Keith said. Youve just got to be persistent. Dont stop searching, Gavins parallel words encourage job seekers with the same message. A job will come through. Workforce Plus is proud to bring you a series of stories straight from the community. In partnership with The Wakulla News, well showcase one of our own every six weeks whose journey in their career will serve to inspire, uplift and encourage. A tale of two job seekers driven to overcome Real Stories, Real People: A special series from Workforce Plus Justin Keith Spencer Gavin This Fathers Day, teach your kids how to manage their finances Special to The NewsWhen it comes to the best ways to use money, too many Americans operate under a key misconception, says investment adviser and nancial planner Ike Ikokwu. Money is opportunity, and having a blind spot for maximizing investment can drastically reduce ones future options, says Ikokwu, author of Winning the Money Game: Separating the Myths from the Truth (www. winningthemoneygame. net). That blind spot is debt, he says. Some myths born from the idea that all debt is bad include: Paying off your home mortgage provides nancial security. A 15-year mortgage is always the quickest way to pay off your home. Putting money in your 401K or other quali- ed plan saves you taxes. The stock market is the only place to generate high, double-digit returns. My definition of being debt-free is to have enough money so that you can pay off your debt at any time if you need to, he says. But you dont necessarily want to do that. Good debt can save you money on taxes, increase your investment gains and allow you to take advantage of wealth-building opportunities. Bad debt, on the other hand, is like having a big hole in your money bucket.Defending debt why its good the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringMike HarveyApril 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromI really appreciate this program. We eat at all the restaurants participating. It is a Great Deal to Win! OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l a nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlorank You So Much! SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for qualied applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and oor rate of 2.5% GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926

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Page 18 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy CARESS KENNEDYSpecial to The NewsThe need for safety is often associated with actions such as driving and swimming. But as a consumer purchasing a product or service, safety should also be top of mind. You need to make informed buying decisions to safe guard against physical harm and nancial loss. According to ConsumerReports.org, last year could have been considered the year of awful consumer product news, judging by the amount of safety recalls made by regulatory agencies. As a consumer, there are resources available to help you make the most out of your purchasing experience to ensure that it is not only going to be enjoyable, but safe. There are laws regulated by the government on national and state levels to protect consumers against fraud and scams, unsafe products, and deceitful business practices. Consumer awareness is de ned as the understanding by an individual of their rights as a consumer concerning available products and services being marketed and sold. There are eight basic rights to protect you when making a purchase according to Consumers International: The right to be heard. The right to choose. The right to consumer education. The right to a healthy environment. The right to be informed, The right to redress. The right to safety. The right to satisfaction of basic needs. It is necessary for agencies to create laws to protect consumers from crooked business and to warn shoppers of deceitful goods. However, it is important to educate yourself to make sure you are making informed and safe buying decisions. If nothing else, be smart and follow your instinct when making a purchase. RESEARCH FIRST Organizations such as Consumer Reports, the Federal Trade Commission and others deal with issues that touch the economic life of every American. They can be a vital resource for product and safety information and recalls. Consumer review websites can also help in the research stage of a purchase as they gather information and feedback from product users and make it available for potential purchasers. Use your own judgment when reading a consumer review. Once you make a purchase, you can post feedback so that others can also become better informed. BUY SMART While consumers need to be proactive and responsible, consumer agencies have made signi cant strides in ensuring product safety. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission works to ensure the safety of consumer products which has contributed signi cantly to the 30 percent decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 30 years. Consumers should make product choices based on desired functionality and intended user. Ensure that purchases for children are age appropriate and do not contain dangerous substances or small parts. Use your best judgment when buying for children as you know the childs maturity level and can best decide if the toy is suitable or not. Food and other products that have expiration dates are also items that should be carefully selected. You can research expiration dates from the Food and Drug Associations website below. If you have a concern about a products safety or quality, contact the manufacturer or an appropriate agency. If there is a problem or recall with the product, act on it. Discard, return, repair or discontinue the use of the product until you have been informed of the proper next steps. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission The Food and Drug Association National Highway Traf- c Safety Administration USE AS DIRECTED Directions are supplied with products to inform users of proper procedures for the item and safety standards. Some products may direct users for at home use only and may not be able to meet commercial demands. When making a purchase, ensure the product will meet your needs without going beyond its intended usage. Remember to always gather as much information as possible about a product before making a purchase. You and your familys safety depend on it. Caress Kennedy is a vice president at AlliedBarton Security Services, www.alliedbarton.com, a premier provider of trained security personnel to many industries.From FSU NEWSAll businesses want engaged employees those who are committed to the success of the company and are willing to go the extramile to see it ourish. But theres a dark side to engagement that many organizations dont consider: Engaged employees can quickly become disengaged if they feel taken advantage of and a formerly engaged employee can do more harm to the company than one who was never engaged to begin with. Thats a key finding in a new study conducted by Wayne Hochwarter, the Jim Moran Professor of Business Administration in the Florida State University College of Business. Hochwarter surveyed 1,000 people, in both blueand white-collar occupations, to gain a clearerpicture of the concept of employee engagement, its bene ts for the employer, and its possible dangers when not managed well. Engaged employees work harder, are more creative and more committed, and they represent an important predictor of company productivity, he said. Unquestionably, organizations with engaged workers have weathered recessionary pressures more successfully. However, those same organizations have to be sensitive to the fact that even model employees can give up if they sense that theyre being asked to do more and more, and with fewer resources, while comparatively little is being asked of their less-engaged colleagues. In his study, Hochwarter found that engaged employees reported: 50 percent higher rate of job satisfaction; 45 percent higher rate of job performance; 40 percent higher rate of life satisfaction; 33 percent lower rate of turnover intention; and 30 percent higher rate of commitment to their employer. The tricky part comes in keeping those employees engaged. Hochwarters ndings clearly illustrate that engaged workers, without needed company support and other resources, can begin to exhibit a number of undesirable attitudes and behaviors. Engagement often means taking on more tasks than ones less engaged coworkers, but with the expectation that the company will provide more of what is needed to assist along the way, he said. Without those additionalresources, engaged employees began to display the following negative attributes: A decline in helping behavior (50 percent lower); Increased anger at supervisors (35 percent higher); A view that expectations are beyond ones capabilities (33 percent higher); Additional stress (30 percent higher); and Lower overall productivity (25 percent lower). Put another way: Engaged employees can easily become disengaged. Hochwarter cited the example of one study participant who falls into that category. The 32-year-old nancial consultant wrote, I really did my best, worked long hours, contributed something every day... But the more I did, the more resources they took from me and gave to other employees. The dif cult economic realities of the past few years have in uenced engagement in both good and bad ways, said Hochwarter, whose eld of expertise is organizational behavior,particularly with regard to employer-employee dynamics. Business leaders are learning more about generating employee engagement, he added; however, little is known about how it should be maintained and cultivated. Helping to ll that knowledge gap was the reason Hochwarter conducted his study. Hochwarter offered several points for organizations to consider as they work to engage employees and keep them engaged. First, understand that getting employees engaged isnt like ipping a switch, he said. Often, it takes a while for engagement to kick in, but it can be lost in only one incident. Second, realize that onceengaged employees who are now disengaged can cause more harm to a company than those who were never engaged. Third, getting employees engaged is like planting a tree: If you walk away from it, its unlikely to grow. And nally, many leaders feel that managing engaged workers is easier than managing those who are not engaged. This is simply not the reality in most companies.BREAKING OFF THE ENGAGEMENT:FSU study shows that even loyal employees can become jaded if theyre not treated wellBe aware: Stay informed and safe when making a purchaseSpecial to The NewsWhat customers value most changes constantly, and the pace of change has increased exponentially with the economic recession, says marketing/management expert and best-selling author Jaynie L. Smith. The businesses who become relevant by addressing what customers really value at any given time will be the rst ones out of the recession, says Smith, whose newest book, Relevant Selling (www.smartadvantage. com), is now available. One year ago, people were looking for nancial stability in companies they were purchasing from because of all of the business closings, she says, citing surveys conducted by her company, Smart Advantage Inc. Now, on-time delivery outranks that because so many businesses cut back their inventory during the worst of the recession. With demand increasing, customers have more dif culty getting what they want on time. Smiths company analyzed more than 150 customer surveys to learn why customers buy particular products or services from particular companies. Its an essential practice for any business owner during any economic cycle, Smith says, but most dont do it. Her analysis of 10 years of double-blind customer market research for more than 100 businesses revealed that 90 percent of the time most businesses do not know their customers top values. They are often shocked to learn what is at the top of the customers value list. Smith offers these tips for getting to know your customers and potential customers so you can deliver what they want and adjust your sales and marketing message to become more relevant. Customers are usually looking for how things are sold, not what. For most products, there are any number of suppliers. If someone wants to buy a camera, a doorknob, a car, they can drive to the nearest store or order from the rst company that pops up on Google. But they dont. Why? Because theres something else they value more than the product itself. It may be product durability, the companys reputation for customer service, or safety features. If you dont value what you bring to the customer, they wont value it either, is Smiths mantra. Very few companies know how to effectively articulate what differentiates them, so price often becomes the tiebreaker. Understand that existing customers and prospects usually have different values. Smiths company research analysis shows that 70 percent of the time, customers and prospective customers differ in what they most value. When that happens, your message to customers should be different than your message to prospects. Very few companies make this distinction in sales and marketing messaging. Existing customers may have come to depend on your top-notch help desk. Its what theyve grown to value most about your company. Prospective customers havent yet used your help desk so they dont know how essential this bene t is yet. Use what you learn. If you nd customers most value speedy responses when they have a problem, and your customer service department is slow, then x customer service. Make sure to tell the customer service employees that customers have rated fast response time as their top priority. When youve got stats you can brag about brag away: percent of customer calls are returned within 30 minutes; 2 percent within 1 hour. Now youve used that information in two valuable ways: to make your company more relevant to customers, and to let customers know youve got what they want. Invest in disciplined customer research. Research data collection costs have gone down 30 to 35 percent in the past few years and can now be affordable to smaller companies. Double-blind customer market research is the gold standard and well worth the expense, but its not feasible for all companies. However, even a small investment in research can reap huge returns. Some less expensive and free alternatives to nd out what your customers want include sharing the expense with an industry association; partnering with an organization that needs the same information or a peer that doesnt compete with you; hiring a college intern; or creating an online survey using a free basic service, such as Survey Monkey.Jaynie L. Smith is CEO of Smart Advantage Inc., a marketing/management consultancy whose clients range from mid-sized to Fortune 500 companies.Research shows most businesses dont know what customers want Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. THG-12901Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Joint pain Arthritis pain Muscle pain Back pain Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate r i s Crawfordville (850) 926-2700 Also Now Open in Tallahassee Young Chamber Professionals focuswakulla Focus Wakulla is a young professionals group through the Wakulla County Chamber. This group will host events and special functions to meet the needs of our future leaders as they seek to grow and develop professionally as Chamber Members and Citizens of Wakulla County.Join us for our Inaugural Eventtarakieser@synovusmortgage.comFriday June 29th beginning at 6:00 p.m. Poseys Dockside Caf RSVP: 850.294.5955 t ara ki eser @ synov u Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 Page 19Continued from Page 6 There is a time when I want to bolster my faith, but in the circumstance before me, I did not want enough faith to handle some rattlesnake. One of the tenants of my religion is to run as fast as I can away from any and all rattlesnakes. It is one part of my religion I take rather seriously. My host tried explaining to me what was going on. He pointed to a passage in Mark 16:17-18 (KJV), And these signs shall follow them that believe; In my name shall they cast out devils; they shall speak with new tongues; They shall take up serpents; and if they drink any deadly thing, it shall not hurt them; they shall lay hands on the sick, and they shall recover. My rst reaction was to think he was pulling the wool over my eyes, so to speak, and I almost laughed out loud. I caught myself in time when I realized this man was serious. According to him, he could have enough faith in God to pick up the poisonous rattlesnake and if it bit him, it would not hurt him at all. According to their religion, when they are truly in the Spirit, they have the power to pick up a poisonous rattlesnake, and if it bites you, it will not hurt you. They keep the basket containing a rattlesnake in the front of the church for when such an occasion arises. I was hoping it would not arise during my time in the pulpit. All during my sermon, I could not help casting a wistful eye in the general direction of the basket next to the pulpit. At one point, I thought I did see the basket move. I yelled at this point, which excited the congregation thinking I had gotten in the spirit, and then everybody cast a wistful eye in the direction of the basket. I respect other peoples views on everything, I suppose. However, there are some things I have dif- culty wrapping my tired brain around. This has to be one of them. How you can pull the bit about the rattlesnake out of that verse of Scripture and ignore the rest of it is really beyond me. Religion will make you do many silly things that has no sanity behind it. Many people just go through the motions not really knowing why they are doing what they are doing. At least the snake handlers have a little bit of excitement in their services. Nothing I want to experience, but then who am I to criticize. I rest my faith upon the Scripture. Particularly, So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God (Romans 10:17 KJV). My faith keeps me away from poisonous rattlesnakes. The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (352) 687-4240 or email him at jamessnyder2@att.net. The church web site is www.whatafellowship.com. -Janet From LivingOnADime.comTawra Kellam, editor of LivingOnADime.com, does something that most people think they cant do today. She feeds her family of six for $400 a month. Most people say thats an impossible feat but whats even more impressive is that she does it without using coupons. How does she do it? First, Tawra says, I use what I have. If I dont have milk in the house, I dont make a special trip to the store to buy it. The kids wont die from malnutrition if they miss drinking milk for a day or two. If Im out of bread, Ill make some cornbread or muf- ns. If Im out of fresh veggies, I will use canned or frozen vegetables instead. Stop going to the store for one or two things. I shop for food two or three times a month and thats it. Shop the clearance sections. I regularly find milk on clearance for $1.50 a gallon. My store marks the milk down a few days before the sell by date. The great part is that milk stays fresh for one week after its opened. I just throw several in the freezer and then I dont have to make a special trip for milk. Just thaw, shake and serve. Purchase meat only on sale or on clearance. Again, butchers mark down their meat a day or two before the sell by date. Generally, meat is good for three to four days after the sell by date in the fridge or six months in the freezer. I never buy meat unless its on sale for $1.99 or less a pound. If its not on sale, we dont eat it. You can get some great unadvertised deals just by watching the meat counters clearance items. I found 5 lb. rolls of hamburger for $2.95 each after New Years Day. Of course we stocked up and will have enough hamburger to last six months. I can get soup bones with enough meat on them to make a great vegetable stew for under $2 for the entire family! Add some rolls and you have a complete meal for six for less than $3. When chicken is on sale for $1.66 per pound, I stock up. I do this with all my meats. This way we can always have a variety of meats. Ask. Most people are intimidated by asking, but Tawra regularly asks when things will go on sale or be marked down. By asking, she found out that bananas, milk and meat are marked down each morning. She tries to shop in the mornings to get the best deals. When we lived in another state, they marked things down in the evening so thats when we went shopping. Adjust your shopping times to nd the best deals. Serve your family proper portions of food. Most parents give their kids way too much milk, juice and soda. My kids get soda on special occasions only. They get milk with their cereal. For snacks, they eat a piece of string cheese, fruit or one or two cookies. The kids dont sip on milk or juice all day long. They drink water and are just ne with it. As a general rule, I try to give them one vegetable and one fruit for lunch and dinner and then a piece of fruit with cookies or cheese as a snack. This gets their ve a day in very easily. Stop letting kids just graze on chips and other snack food all day. My kids get one small bowl of chips a day and thats it. So what do the Kellams eat? Tawra shares some of their menus with us: Slow cooked roast, brown gravy, onions, carrots, potatoes, buttermilk muf ns and a fruit plate. (The next day, the leftovers from the roast are used as BBQ beef along with potato salad, green beans and strawberries or grapes.) Pizza (homemade), tossed salad and fruit. Maple glazed chicken, scalloped potatoes, glazed carrots, applesauce and dinner rolls. Sloppy Joes, cucumbers and tomatoes. Tacos, refried beans, green beans, sliced apples and tortilla chips w/ honey. With savvy shopping, you too can cut your grocery bill even when prices are going up! Tawra Kellam and Jill Cooper are the publishers of the website http:// www.LivingOnADime.com and the authors of the Dining On A Dime Cookbook.Snake, rattle and roll in the aislesHow to save money on groceries Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Open: Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 Sun. 11-9 850 697-9191 Thurs. 11 3 Grouper & Popcorn Shrimp w/ 2 sides Fri. 11 3 Dozen Shrimp w/ 2 sidesCome Enjoy Live Music on the deck this weekend Provided by Marshall TaylorEnjoy Oysters on the Half Shell with Mike Eastman. $ 7 99 $ 7 99 Fried Grilled Blackened

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Page 20 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com A-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432we sell and service most makes and models Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan StricklandsPOOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE S S S S S S Licensed & InsuredGreen Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC HURLEYS ROOF Construction, Inc.Roof Inspection Repair CleaningNEW ROOF RE-ROOFING SHINGLES METAL850-544-1217FREE ESTIMATES Local, experienced and dependable management for Condo and Homeowners Associations.925-9911Kellys Association Management Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053887408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONS RE-ROOFING REPAIRS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980Will help you make the most of your outdoor space. Wood and Metal buildings, carports, barns, swings, gazebos & More! Sizes and Pricing to t your needs. RENT-TO-OWN options. $25 credit on a new building with this ad! See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care 850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEmploymentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements ADVERTISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS!! Call now to grow your business. Get your classified ad in 119 newspapers with one order. Advertising Networks of Florida. 866-742-1373 Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 General Help Help Wanted FT Food Service Mgr PT Bus Drivers FT VPK TeacherCoast Charter School St. Marks, 850-925-6344 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLEMoving Sale Sat. June 9th, 8a-2pm 230 Lost Creek Lane Selling the Farm DWMH on 10 Acres Tractor, Farm equip. Tools, Equestrian items, chickens, household goods, ETC.For Details schatzman@ comcast.net or 519-2292 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLESat. June 9, 7a-2pm 2 Family Sale Kids clothes, Misc. Items 53 Goldfinch Way Songbird Subdivsion General Let us sell your items for you at our next auction. Well do the work, move & sell for you! www.Gallery319.biz or 850 926 7355 Musical Instruments LIKE NEW 7PC DRUM SET DDrum $450.00 new, also, Proform treadmill $50 Palates equip $50 352-563-1518 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Near Georgous Lake Ellen quiet neighborhood completely rennovated, New Central AC, 1,400 sf, 33 John David Drive $650 mo. (850) 443-3300 Apartments $99. Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Apartments Sopchoppy RiverCharming, Partially furnished 2-story loft on private pond. Custom features, 1.5BA, walk-in-closet, W/D, D/W, TV w/ satellite. Very private. $650/month. 850-962-2849. Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm, 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Efficiencies/ Cottages Large room/bath, microwave, fridge, with deck, on Wakulla River, $90 week or $400 month, includes utilities 850-926-2783 Rental Houses OYSTER BAY2/1 on the canal with boat ramp. Refurbished, furnished or Not $960 mo + Utilities + dep. 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEGorgeous 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout. Low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood. $850, mo 37 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 443-3300 Open House PANACEA OPEN HOUSE Sun, June 10th between 2pm and 4pm 3/2 under air 1344sq. ft on canal w/boatlift has metal roof $240K Crystal River Homes Country Club Road 3 bedroom. 1 bath. Home for Sale: $105,000 Country Club Road, Crystal River Florida. Location, Location, Location!!!!!!!!!! Across the street from the famous Plantation Golf and Resort. 3 bedroom, Privacy, this is private large lot but close to all that Crystal River has to offer! Fenced in yard with storage shed in the back yard. Also plenty of room for boat/trailer storage.Updated with newer ac/furnace, roof, interior totally professionally updated, tile and carpet thru out. Rental history is great with tenant in place. Check it out! Seller says Sell! REaltors, I will pay a bonus if you bring me a buyer!(352) 795-3668 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 850-926-3546 5242-0607 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice Under Fictitious Name Law. pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under thefictitious name of: Fresh Scent Cleaning Services located at 78 Jared St, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of Fictitious Name Notices State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Wakulla, FL this 26th of May 2012. /s/Frank Harrell, owner /s/Naomi Harrell, owner June 7, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices 5248-0607 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice Under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in busiFictitious Name Notices ness under the fictitious name of JESSIES LIGHTHOUSE FOR HUMANITY located at 2775 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in the County of Wakulla intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this ist day of June, 2012. /s/ Jessica M. Taylor, owner 06/07/2012 C & P Towing NOS 5244-0607 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Public Notice is hereby given that the C & P Towing will sell at Public Auction pursuant to Florida Statutes section 731.78. C & P Towing reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. To be held at C & P Towing at 2235 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at 8:00 a.m. on June 26, 2012 the following vehicle: 1989 Ford IFCTR10A2KVB79039 Published one time (1) in The Wakulla News June 7, 2012 5244-0607 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5247-0614 TWN Vs. Burke, Terrence M. Case No. CACE12-0032439(11) Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEVENTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. CACE12-0032439(11) DANNY DANIELS and LINDA DANIELS, his wife Plaintiff, vs. TERRANCE M. BURKE, et all, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 22, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. CACE 12-003243(11) of the Circuit Court of the17th Judicial Circuit in and for Broward County, Florida, whereinDANNY DANIELS and Linda DANIELS are Plaintiff and TERRANCE M. BURKE; et al., are Defendant(s). 5250-0614 vs. Vaillancourt, Debra Case No:2012CA000083 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ,CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO: 2012CA000083 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, DEBRA VAILLANCOURT, et, al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL T BRACKIN LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 30 CHICKAT TRL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ALSO ATTEMPTED AT: 2142 HIGHWAY 98 E, CARRIABLLE, FL 32322 AND 1349 BRANCH HILL CT, APOPKA, FL 32712 CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOTS 63 AND 64, BLOCK WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT V, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address i is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or before June 7th, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in The Wakulla Times and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coo rdinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled Court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or Voiice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 25th day of May, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News 5250-0614 : Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices YARD SALE!June 9th, 8AM-12N MEDART ASSEMBLY OF GOD 4647 Crawfordville Hwy., MedartYOUTH FUNDRAISER --INDOOR ---GREAT STUFF AT A GREAT PRICE!--NO EARLY BIRDS --3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $925mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $475mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $700mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATIONTECHNICAL SUPPORTLic. # CAC181S061 1221 Commercial Park Drive G-3 Tallahassee, FL 32303(850) 504-6053 SERVICES, LLCARMSTRONG WHETSTONE S S S S S S S S A A&W

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 Page 21 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 11 Purple Martin 4BR/3.5BA, 2,887 sq. ft, located in Songbird, $1,500 monthly, $1,500 Deposit, Available August 1. 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $1,000 Mo. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 239 Magnolia Ridge 3 BR/2BA $1,200 mo., $1,200 Deposit 67 Cochise 2BR/2BA $825. mo., Available July 1 145 Rochelsie 2BR/2BA $700. mo., Pets okay up to 40lbs with non-refundable $250. Deposit. Available July 1 165 Sam Smith Circle 2BR/1BA $450. mo. 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595. mo. $595. Deposit Call Mitchell Today850-792-3402mkauffman117@gmail.comRealtorWelcomes Mitchell KauffmanI will sell to the highest bidder for cash, online at www.broward.realforeclose.com at 10:00 oclock a.m. on the 21 day ofJune, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: See Attached Exhibit A Broward County Property: 17431 SW 54th Street, Southwest Ranches, FL 33331 Wakulla County Property: 276 Fox Hollow Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 23 day of May, 2012. HOWARD FORMAN,Clerk of Circuit Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ W. Jackson, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commence at an Iron pipe marking the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and thence run South 88 degrees 45 minutes 42 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, a distance of 240.89 feet to a concrete monument for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run North 89 degrees 11 minutes 25 seconds East along said North boundary 479.39 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 00 minutes 11 second East 701.89 feet to the centerline of a 60.00 foot roadway easement, said point lying on a curve concave to the Northeasterly, thence run Northwesterly along said centerline and along said curve with a radius of 994.14 feet thru a central angle of 31 degrees 57 minutes 52 seconds for an arc distance of 554.62 feet, the chord of said arc being North 75 degrees 53 minutes 53 seconds West 542.83 feet, thence run North 04 degrees 45 minutes 58 seconds East 563.47 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 7.67 acres, more or less. SUBJECT TO a roadway easement over and across the Southerly 30.00 feet thereof. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO WIT: A 60.00 foot roadway easement lying 30.00 feet on each side of the following described centerline: Commence at an Iron pipe marking the Southeast corner of Section 28, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 00 degrees 08 minutes East along the East boundary of said Section 28, a distance of 342.70 feet to the Southerly maintained right-of-way boundary of a graded county road, thence run South 57 degrees 49 minutes 36 seconds West along said Southerly maintained right-of-way boundary 451.09 to the POINT OF BEGINNING of said centerline. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run South 27 degrees 24 minutes 55 seconds East 59.67 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Southeasterly along said curve with a radius of 823.79 fee feet thru a central angle of 09 degrees 42 minutes 50 seconds for an arc distance of 139.66 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 07 minutes 45 seconds East 300.67 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Southeasterly along said curve with a radius of 994.14 feet thru a central angle of 60 degrees 00 minutes 52 seconds for an arc distance of 1041.32 feet, thence run North 82 degrees 51 minutes 23 seconds East 169.24 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Easterly along said curve with a radius of 551.21 feet thru a central angle of 14 degrees 28 minutes 30 seconds for an arc distance of 139.25 feet, thence run South 82 degrees 40 minutes 7 seconds East 489.65 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Easterly along said curve with a radius of 928.78 feet thru a central angle of 09 degrees 14 minutes 00 seconds for an arc distance of 149.67 feet, thence run North 88 degrees 05 minutes 53 seconds East 199.47 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Easterly along said curve with a radius of 2695.04 feet thru a central angle of 04 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds for an arc distance of 199.91 feet, thence run South 87 degrees 39 minutes 07 seconds East 308.37 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Northeasterly along said curve with a radius of 126.91 feet thru a central angle of 54 degrees 14 minutes 20 seconds for an arc distance of 120.14 feet, thence run North 38 degrees 06 minutes 33 seconds East 1525.20 feet to the termination point of said centerline. Daniel S. Mandel, Esq. DANIEL S. MANDEL, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff, 2700 N. Military Trail, Ste. 355, Boca Raton, FL 33431 Tel: (561) 826-1740 Fax: (561) 626-1741 Published in The Wakulla News June 7 & 14, 2012 5247-0614 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5226-0531 TWN v. Poka, Tim, Case No # 16-69 CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 16-69 CA SCORE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, v. TIM POKA A/K/A TIMOTHY POKA; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TIM POKA (IF ANY); CAPITAL ONE BANK USA, N.A.;WALKERS CROSSING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; TENANTS OR UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,THROUGH OR UNDER ANY DEFENDANTS NAMED HEREIN Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Tim Poka A/K/A Timothy Poka 29 Chance Street Crawfordville, Florida 32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 23, WALKERS CROSSING (UNRECORDED): COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8 A DISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTTES 22 SECONDS WEST 690.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 229.82 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT, SAID PONT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID 5239-0607 TWN Vs. Flowers, Linda 65-2011-CA-000173 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 65-2011-CA-000173 Division: FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB Plaintiff, v. LINDA FLOWERS A/K/A LINDA MARIA FLOWERS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMINGINTERESTS BY THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, 5243-0614 vs. Dana Carter Case No. 65-2012-CA-000093 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000093, DIVISION: Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. : DANA CARTER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ANDREW T. CARTER LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:: 1951 Woodville Hwy Crawfordville, FL 32327 1710 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLIAM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 101 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 1748.95 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 903.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 142.62 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 617.33 FEET TO POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 60.29 FEET TO A POINT THENCE RUN SOUTH 14 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 145.67 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 684.28 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 30.00 FEET WIDE EXCLUSIVE PERPETUAL, INGRESS, EGRESS, AND UTILITY EASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 92 OF THE HARTSFIELD, SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 629.81 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 74 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 13 SEC OND EAST 1783.13, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 565.46 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 627.91 FEET TO A 3 INCHES ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT 9MARKED NO. 2919),THENCE RUN SOUTH 14 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 115.66 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED $4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 14 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 30.01 FEET TO A 4 INCHES BY 4 INCHES CONCRETE MONUMENT ,THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 300.07 FEET TO A 3 INCHES ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO.2919) LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE NORTHEASTERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT -OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF PURIFY BAY ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 33 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OFWAY 31.42 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED NO. 4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 310.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1997 RDMN DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME, ID#11430190A TITLE # 90701645 AND ID# 11430190B, TITLE # 90701714 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for therelief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 22nd of May, 2012. Brent. X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, as Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News June 7 and 14, 2012 5243-0614 Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment datedMay 2, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 65-2011-CA-000173, DIVISION: ____________, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and LINDA FLOWERS A/K/A LINDA MARIA FLOWERS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m., at front door of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on the 14th day of June, 2012the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 33, BLOCK 7, OF WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 93 Pueblo Trl, Crawfordville, FL 32327. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on May 3, 2012 (COURT SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT By; /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk Attor ney for Plaintif f: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544,Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 working days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 31, and June 7, 2012 5239-0607 File No. 3524-10206 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Florida Coastal Properties, Inc.OPEN HOUSESaturday, June 9 10 A.M. 2 P.M. For details please call Owner/Agent Susan Schatzman 850-519-2292BRING THE HORSES! This 10.4 acres is fenced, cross fenced, and planted with Argentine Bahia grass. The property includes a 3 stall barn with tack room, grooming area, chicken coops and storage areas. 3 Bedroom 1.5 Bath DWMH features an additional of ce, front screened porch, wheelchair access ramp, large covered back porch, and carport. The property is located directly adjacent to the National Forest with access to miles of trails. Gorgeous property with large live oaks, laurel oaks and pear trees. Owner relocating, must sell. Price reduced to $117,000. We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Diekson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets.

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Page 22 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 45 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 29 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 182.25 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 41 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 177.58 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID REVERSE CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 290.00 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 10 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 22 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 53.08 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 58 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 53.10 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 73.81 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 61 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 412.18 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 370.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH 1996 DOUBLEWIDE PALM MOBILE HOME, VIN #PH09871AFL AND PH098701BFL, ID#0071388796 & 0071388795 has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Henry L. Miller, Jr., Esq., whose address is 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida, 32303, on or before thirty days from the date of the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated:May 22, 2012 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By; /s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 31 and June 7, 2012 5226-0531 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5151-0614 TWN vs. Harrell, Tracy N. Case No. 65-2010-CA-000282 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000282 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. TRACY N. HARRELL A/K/A TRACY HARRELL A/K/A TRACY NICOLE HARRELL AND BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES, et. al. Defendant NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in 65-2010-CA-000282 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and TRACY N HARRELL A/K/A TRACY HARRELL A/K/A TRACY HARRELL A/K/A TRACY NICOLE HARRELL; BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRANDON T. DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON DEJAYNES A/K/A BRANDON THOMAS DEJAYNES; JOHN DOE; AMY DENISE LALONDE; BRYAN DOLPHIS LALONDE; WAKULLA BANK are the Defendants.Brent Thurmond as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., lobby Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at 11:00 a.m. on August 2, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22, WALKERS CROSSING COMMENCING AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, A DISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 360.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 198.19 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT ; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 212.39 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITHA RADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 31 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.19 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST, 229.82 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST, 330.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. THE ABOVE LEGAL DESCRIPTION BEING MORE RECENTLY SURVEYED BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES, DATED APRIL 4, 2002, UNDER JOB NO. 01-034, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, A DISTANCE OF 1697.41 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST, 360.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 200.49 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF CHANCE COURT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE A DISTANCE OF 212.88 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 231.49 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 15 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 38 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 61.66 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 11 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 61.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 232.20 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919); THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 330.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1998 OR 1999 HOMES OF LEGEND SINGLE -WIDE VIN #HL9774AL. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 24th day of May, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) IMPOR T ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahasse, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News June 7 & 14, 2012 11-05421 5214-0614 TWN Vs. Parker, Brittany Rachelle Case No. 65-2012-CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.65-2012-CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v. BRITTANY RACHELLE PARKER, ET AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: BRITTANY RACHELLE PARKER, and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants Current Residence Unknown, but whose last known address was: 187 ROCHELSIE RD., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2719 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: LOT 24, BLOCK 22, WAKULLA GARDENS, ACCORDING TO MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL 33716, on or before June 7th, 2012 or within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327-0337, either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 18 day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850)926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARY INJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. June 7 and 14, 2012. 665112464 5230-0614 TWN Heirs of Martinson Kenneth H., Case No. 12-158CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-158CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN MARTINSON, husband and wife, and as Trustee of THE MARTINSON REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN H. MARTINSON, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 25, Block E. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10972-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5230-0531 5231-0614 TWN heirs of Arnold, Bert C. Case No. 12-159CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-159CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U.ARNOLDHUSBAND AND WIFE, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U. ARNOLD, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 53, BlockD. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10951-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the compliaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5231-0531 5235-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-130-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-130-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 22, Block K of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11131-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. 5236-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-131-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-131-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 19, Block L of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11178-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5236-0614 5237-0614 vs. Matthews Dorothy C. Case No: 12-124-CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-124-CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DOROTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, IF DECEASED OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DECEASED OR ALIVE, HER UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HER; OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PARTIES; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DORTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 142, Block A of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10859-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a de-fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: /s/ Glenda Porter, AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5237-0614 5238-0607 est. Peters, William M, Case # 12-32CP Notice to Cred. PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-32 CP. IN RE : ESTATE OF WILLIAM MATHIAS PETERS a/k/a WILLIAM M. PETERS Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of William Mathias Peters, deceased, File 12-32 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is May 31, 2012. Personal Representative: George A. Dock, 86 Quail Run, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850)926-8245 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 31 and June 7, 2012 5238-0607 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5246-0614 Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida Statues, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, June 22, 2012 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Heather Simmons Before the sale date of June 22, 2012, the owner may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the StowAway Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 June 7 and 14th, 2012. 5246-0614 5245-0614 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART 1V Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Self Storage Notices Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, Saturday, June 23, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Sara E. Skipper Self Storage Notices Wendy Gray Evelyn Green Before the sale date of Saturday,June 23, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. June 7 & June 14, 2012 5245-0614 Self Storage Notices 5211-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 001 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that CASPIAN I LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2570 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-121-351-11968-A01 THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT 2 BLOCK A LOT 1 OR 722 P305 Name in which assessed RWC INVESTMENTS LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, June 7, 2012 5211-0607 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5235-0614 5Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2Go to http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click Continue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click Continue.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 Page 23By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, June 1 With qualifying set for next week, the electionyear scramble by politicians to decide what of ce theyre actually going to seek kicked into high gear this week. At the same time, a federal judge and the U.S. Department of Justice moved to try to make clear what was necessary for groups registering the voters who will choose between those candidates and whether some already-registered voters could remain on the rolls. Meanwhile, the seemingly never-ending drive to reform higher education got another fresh start when a blue-ribbon task force convened by Gov. Rick Scott started its work. And Scott and the Florida Board of Governors were considering applications to serve on the rst board of trustees for the soon-to-be independent Florida Polytechnic University. NO CALM AFTER STORMS Sen. Ronda Storms decision last week to leave the Legislature and run for Hillsborough County property appraiser didnt really cause a ood of potential replacements. But there were by weeks end a couple of high-pro le names preparing to take a shot at replacing the Valrico Republican in the upper chamber. So far, the biggest name to con rm an interest in running in Senate District 24 is former Senate President Tom Lee. Rep. Rachel Burgin, R-Riverview, also indicated she will pursue the seat. Rep. Rich Glorioso, who toyed with running for the seat, decided in the end to stay out. Leadership seemed to be lining up behind Lee, with incoming Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, issuing a statement on Friday endorsing Lee. He will hit the ground running at full speed with the knowledge and skill to help build Floridas future, Gaetz said. Tom Lee will be a leader in the Florida Senate the moment he walks on the oor. University of South Florida political science professor Susan MacManus described such a primary as the old guard and the young guard and also said Burgin would be more conservative than Lee on social issues. Youve got generational, ideological and gender (differences), MacManus said. Advocates for the causes that Storms championed in the Senate, meanwhile, worried about what would come next. Storms was perhaps the most vocal Republican in the Legislature on issues affecting children, the elderly and Floridians with disabilities. This is a tragic blow for elderly citizens, said former state long term care ombudsman Brian Lee, who worked with Storms on protections for residents of nursing homes and assisted living facilities. There were other moves in the run-up to qualifying. Rep. Scott Randolph, an Orlando Democrat who won national acclaim among liberals for saying uterus on the House oor, said he would leave the Legislature to focus on a race for chairman of the Florida Democratic Party. He endorsed former Orange County Commissioner Linda Stewart for his House seat. And Rep. Jeff Brandes, R-St. Petersburg, filed paperwork Friday to run in Senate District 22, a Tampaarea seat that will likely pit him against either Rep. Jim Frishe, R-St. Petersburg, or Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater. THE RIGHT TO VOTE (AND REGISTER) The people who will decide those races, of course, are voters at least those who are left if and when Secretary of State Ken Detzner and the supervisors of elections nish clearing off what they say are ineligible voters. Word came Thursday that the attempt to rid the rolls of those who shouldnt be casting ballots had drawn the interest of the U.S. Department of Justice. The feds are interested in whether the purge runs afoul of federal laws, and sent a letter to the state saying as much. Our records do not reflect that these changes affecting voting have been submitted to the United States District Court for the District of Columbia for judicial review or to the attorney general for administrative review as required by Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, the letter said. Accordingly, it is necessary that they either be brought before that court or submitted to the attorney general for a determination that they neither have the purpose nor will have the effect of discriminating on account of race, color or membership in a language minority group under Section 5. The DOJ also expressed concern that the law generally says states cant remove voters less than 90 days before an election, and the states primary is Aug. 14. That prompted the organization that represents the states elected county elections supervisors to recommend holding off on removing anyone from the states voter rolls in light of DOJs concerns. Coincidentally or perhaps not the letter came after Detzner asked federal of cials to help with untangling the legal status of some immigrants. Detzner said he planned to get back to the agency. As to the speci c concerns presented by the Department of Justice, we will be responding next week, he said in statement late Friday. There could also be more names on the rolls by the time the Justice Department gets its answers. Also on Thursday, a federal judge blocked the state from enforcing new restrictions on nongovernmental groups that register voters, like the League of Women Voters. Among the rules swatted away by Judge Robert Hinkle was a requirement that forms be turned in within 48 hours of being lled out, instead of 10 days. HIGHER (AND LOWER) ED CHANGES Education reform efforts also had their turns in the spotlight this week. A blueribbon panel that Scott asked to look at changes to the states university system held its rst meeting and already seemed to be turning its attention to funding issues. Its very hard to do any strategic planning with absolutely no idea, is your budget going up or down? said University of North Florida President John Delaney, a member of the task force. And Administrative Law Judge John Van Landingham held a four-hour hearing about whe ther the state Department of Education exceeded its legal power in a proposed rule that helps spell out how school districts will evaluate teachers under the states landmark merit-pay bill. Tony Demma, an attorney for the Florida Education Association union and two teachers, said the proposed rule includes such thing as an elaborate 13page checklist that school districts would have to use to get state approval of their evaluation systems. But Jonathan Glogau, an attorney for the state, said the department is well within its authority. How do you approve something if you dont tell the districts what the standards are they have to meet? Glogau asked. STORY OF THE WEEK: The U.S. Department of Justice raises concerns about the states attempt to get ineligible voters off the rolls, throwing into question the initiatives future. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: If the goal is to discourage voter-registration drives and thus also to make it harder for new voters to register, the 48-hour deadline may succeed. But if the goal is to further the states legitimate interests without unduly burdening the rights of voters and voter registration organizations, 48 hours is a bad choice. U.S. District Court Judge Robert Hinkle, striking down a rule requiring third-party groups to return voter registration forms within 48 hours.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Should I stay or should I go?SCOTT DEFENDS EFFORT TO PURGE VOTER ROLLS: Gov. Rick Scott on Monday, June 4, defended the states effort to remove potentially ineligible voters from the rolls. When you go out to vote you want to make sure that the other individuals that are voting have a right to vote. Thats what I care about, Scott said during a stop for a business roundtable Monday morning in Quincy. If youre a candidate, you want to make sure that the people who vote in your election are the people that have a right to vote. So my focus is in making sure that our state has fair elections, people that have a right to vote, vote, because I dont want to disenfranchise anybody in their voting rights. Scott said the timing just months before the election was due to the state trying to get information from the federal Homeland Security agency that would make the list of pontentially ineligible voters more complete. So far, the state has been unable to get access to that database. Theres no perfect time to do any of these things, Scott said.Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 32 37 40 43 51 57 60 63 2 33 52 3 34 53 4 24 26 54 18 21 44 46 5 15 38 41 6 35 58 61 64 7 27 55 8 25 47 22 45 9 16 19 39 42 10 28 36 59 62 65 11 29 48 56 12 30 49 13 31 50 ACROSS 1. In the altogether 5. Reedy instrument 9. Go's mate 14. Say for sure 15. Act the goldbrick 16. Bring a smile to 17. Turned down an invitation 19. Flaxen fabric 20. "Exodus" hero 21. Baloney 22. Bernadette of "Silent Movie" 23. Readied for mailing 25. __ Clemente 26. Intl. group since 1948 27. Sunday readings 32. Some saxes 35. Take-out order? 36. Butler, to Gable 37. Risked future harm 40. Mold-ripened cheese 41. Not exactly a world-beater 42. Part of a step 43. Overhaul, as a country road 45. __ Solo of "Star Wars" 46. Checkers side 47. Slowest on the uptake 51. Producer Bochco 55. Act the ratfink 56. Bath bathroom 57. Insertion mark 58. Scrammed surreptitiously 60. Automobileeschewing sect 61. Gofer 62. Pew's place 63. Words before car or cop 64. Deuce beater 65. Like batik fabricsDOWN1. Cakes with kicks 2. Manage to avoid 3. Aqua __ (gold dissolver) 4. Bit of work 5. Doo-wop selections 6. Serenaded the ump 7. Clodhoppers 8. Gee preceder 9. Lead ore 10. Give off 11. Ignore, with "out" 12. Netizen, e .g. 13. Confident solvers' tools 18. Rio Grande city 22. KP implement 24. Heavyweight champ dethroned by Foreman 25. Like bar snacks 27. Gas or clutch 28. Bobby Orr's team 29. Arcing tosses 30. Fashion mag 31. Crystal ball gazer 32. E.g., e.g. 33. Handed-down history 34. Pre-calc course 35. Fooled on the ice 38. Like cheesecloth 39. Popsicle flavor 44. Motown's Franklin 45. Regatta site 47. Part of LED 48. Broncos great John 49. Vino variety 50. Fiddled 51. Lingering emotional injury 52. Unlikely to bite 53. Ms. Brockovich 54. Ed Norton's wear 55. Culinary directive 58. Calendar col. 59. "Tell me more ..."American Prole Hometown Content 5/13/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 1 23 45 6 7869 82 714 65 37162 4 537 28 6 941 00 9 HometownContent 916 2753 4 8 458913627 273486951 825 367194 691842735 347159862 164 538279 532791486 789624513 B A B A S A B B R S C A R A V E R T L O R E T A M E R E G I A T R I G E R I N E R G M O O R E R V E S T E L P A S O A R E T H A O L D I E S W O V E N B O O E D D E K E D S A T O A F S P E D A L S T I R E F F S A L T Y D I O D E P A R E R H E N L E Y G A L E N A O R A N G E E M I T B R U I N S A N D T U N E L O B S E L W A Y U S E R E L L E S O A V E P E N S S E E R T O Y E D TALLAHASSEE, June 1 The organization that represents the states elected county elections supervisors is recommending they hold off on removing anyone from the states voter rolls in light of new concerns raised by the federal Department of Justice. The DOJ noti ed the state Division of Elections and Secretary of State Ken Detzner this week that it is concerned that the states effort to cull illegal voters from the rolls may run afoul of a federal law that requires states to nish removing ineligible voters 90 days before an election. Florida is inside that window, with the primary scheduled for Aug. 14. DOJ didnt immediately order the state to stop removing voters, but along with the warning that Florida could be violating the law, demanded to know whether the state plans to continue the purge. The states effort is intended to remove non-citizens from the rolls, something state of cials said was possible by matching voter registration lists with a drivers license database that flags possible non-citizens. Critics have said the list is inaccurate and could lead to legal voters being purged. On Friday, Ron Labasky, the legal counsel for the Florida State Association of Supervisors of Elections, sent elections supervisors around the state a memo suggesting they stop using the state list to remove people from voter rolls, at least for now.Election supervisors: Back off purges

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Page 24 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 7, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comGRADUATION 2012 Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111 Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook ANTIQUES C ARRIES C OVEC ARRIES C OVENEW FURNITURE & NEW CONSIGNORSHAVE ARRIVEDDOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PET STOP P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pe t Holistic Select WellnessC Lbt n Pfr tf Ab n ALL Yr P Nf.Wbf Sbt n PrbSpecial Orders AvailablePhone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. CommunityFINANCE, LLC ASK ABOUT FIN ANCING t y C Walk the Shops Walk the Shops Near Courthouse Square Near Courthouse Square Tamika Peterson hugs her son, Marshane Godbolt. Senior class of cers Emily McCullers, Ashley Roberts, Sara Glavey, Kristine Gallamore, Cody Cash. Schools board members, WHS administrators and seniors stand during the National Anthem. Excited seniors take the eld for graduation ceremonies. Members of the Class of 2012 performing the class song, Ill See You When I See You. Seniors link arms to sing the Alma Mater.More photos online at thewakullanews.netPHOTOS BY KAREN JAMES