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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00411
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 05-31-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00411
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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter entering her essay into the The Elie Wiesel Prize In Ethics Essay Contest, Crawfordville resident Logan Byrd said she never expected to “ nish in the top “ ve. However, she did. She received an honorable mention and $500 prize for her essay titled, True North,Ž which told her story of being pregnant and trying to decide how she would deliver her baby. She has also been invited to a reception in New York in the fall to honor the winners. Her essay will be published by Yale University Press. Its very prestigious to have this award,Ž Byrd said. Byrd entered the contest after one of her administrators from Brescia University, where she is majoring in social work, sent out an email letting students know about the contest. The contest is held by The Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity and is open to junior and senior college students. The essays are judged by a board led by Wiesel himself and Wiesel reads each essay, Byrd said. It still hasnt sunk in,Ž Byrd said. Its so amazing.Ž Wiesel is a Holocaust survivor, author, professor and Nobel Peace Prize winner. Students were to articulate with clarity an ethical issue that they have encountered and analyze what it has taught them about ethics and themselves, according to the contest guidelines. Continued on Page 2A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netEmily Smith has announced her candidacy for District 5 Wakulla County Commission seat. Smith is from Woodruff, S.C., and moved to Sopchoppy after visiting one weekend. She said she became really smitten with the area. She has been in Sopchoppy for more than “ ve years. She came to Sopchoppy after the biodiesel cooperative she worked with in North Carolina was contacted by Florida A&M University. Smith said the co-op gives educational presentations on alternative fuel. Smith then began working with FAMUs Statewide Small Farms Program and went to the organic farm in Sopchoppy, Crescent Moon Farm. Smith will face candidates Richard Harden, Republican, and John Shuff, Democrat, in the upcoming election. Smith is running with no party af“ liation. Incumbent Commissioner Lynn Artz has chosen not to run for re-election. Smith said running for a commission seat had always been something she thought about doing, but had planned to wait until later on. But after hearing Artz would not run again, she decided it was the perfect time. I decided to act now, rather than wait,Ž she said. Her mother was a councilwoman when she was in high school, so Smith said she is familiar with the challenges of the job. She said she feels there is a need for diversity on the commission … race, age, gender and background. Smith recognized her age might cause pause for some voters. She is 27, but pointed out that she will be 28 by November. Smith said she believes her energy and enthusiasm are vital assets. I will be able to appeal to a wide variety of citizens,Ž Smith said. Plus, she said, she has the time and ” exibility to make serving the citizens of the county a full-time job. She recently graduated from Florida State University with a masters degree in English. During that time, she taught freshmen composition. She holds a bachelors degree in biology from Wofford College. Smith said she has thought about becoming a high school teacher. She said she enjoyed teaching freshmen at FSU. Theyre bright-eyed and optimistic,Ž she said. Smith believed some of the big issues facing the county are its revenue stream, economic development and environmental protection. Again and again, our county is struggling with shortfalls,Ž Smith said. Smith said the county commission needs to diversify its revenues and have consistency and transparency when making decisions about the budget. It is the county commissions responsibility to ensure that the county has a secure “ scal foundation, she said.Continued on Page 3A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyOur 117th Year, 21st Issue Thursday, May 31, 2012 T h r e e S e c t i o n s Three Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents kll h h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6B INDEX OBITUARIES Emily Smith is running for county commissionRemembering the fallenLogan Byrd wins honorable mention for Elie Wiesel Prize Jeffrey ‘Doc’ Calaluca Michael David Haynes Elmer Eugene Strickland Commission candidate Emily Smith Logan Byrd A crowd of Wakulla County residents turned out for the Memorial Day ceremony on the courthouse grounds to remember those who died in service. Four Wakulla Countians who died in recent con” icts were remembered: € Sgt. Arthur Lee Andrews, U.S. Army, died in Vietnam in February 1969; € Chief Petty Of“ cer Matthew Bourgeois, U.S. Navy, died in Afghanistan in March 2002; € Lance Corporal Charles A. Hanson Jr., U.S. Marines, died in Iraq in November 2004; and € Sgt. Javier Garcia, U.S. Army, died in Iraq in April 2005. While the ceremony memorialized those soldiers who died, County Veteran Services Of“ cer J.D. Johnson told the crowd that soldiers returning from war come back broken and fragmented. Its up to us to put them back together.Ž Laying of the wreath as Taps was played marked the end of the Memorial Day ceremony. Pamela Joy, who served as narrator, addresses the crowd, above. The Skipper sisters … Glenda Simmon, Chinesta Skipper Smith and Collen Skipper … sing at the event.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN HUNGER IS PROBLEMSEE PAGE 1B A S p e c i a l S e c t i o n i n s i d e A Special Section inside T h e The W a k u l l a Wakulla n n e w s ews a a 2012 WHS Graduation Special Section

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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn 2013, Florida will celebrate its 500 year anniversary. Florida was the “ rst place of European arrival in America. Ponce de Leon arrived in 1513 to explore Florida. St. Augustine is the oldest city in the United States and it was established 42 years before the English settled in Jamestown. But St. Augustine is not the only city in Florida rich with history. St. Marks is the oldest river town in the United States and the fort at San Marcos de Apalache was the last outpost of the Spanish empire. Other than two other places, that area had the longest amount of contact with Europeans in Florida, says historian Madeleine Carr. We should embrace that,Ž Carr says. Viva Florida 500 will commemorate Floridas anniversary and events will take place all across the state to showcase its history. As part of this celebration, Cynthia Paulson, with Palmetto Expeditions, has set up tours and adventures in Wakulla County that highlight specific areas. One of these tours was held recently at San Marcos de Apalache led by Carr and focused on the early history of the fort. People have lived in this area for more than 20,000 years, Carr says. Prior to the Spanish coming, The Apalachee were already living in this area. This tribe was known as the farmers because the land was great for agriculture. In 1528, the “ rst Spanish conquistador, Panfilo de Narvaez, arrived in the area with 300 men, after first landing near Tampa. They came to conquer, but also looked for places to settle,Ž Carr says. After arriving in Tampa, some of the men walked north while others sailed to meet them. Those walking never found the ships, Carr says. When the Spanish arrived in the land of the Apalachee, they were attacked, Carr says. Narvaez was wounded and his men were starving. They left the area to look for food. Theres bugs, heat and no food,Ž Carr says. The men had to kill their horses for food. Then they decided they would not wait any longer for the boats to arrive, they would build their own to escape from this new world. They made “ ve boats and used their clothes for sails. These were the first boats built by Europeans in the New World,Ž Carr says. Once the boats went out into the Gulf, many were sucked up and never seen again. Only four men survived and landed somewhere near Galveston, Texas. Eventually, in 1536, they made it to Mexico City. Several years later, one of the men, Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, wrote a memoir of his experience. It was the “ rst written account of what happened here,Ž Carr says. After reading Cabeza de Vacas memoir, Conquistador Hernando de Soto wanted to explore Florida, Carr says. He left Spain in April 1538. He really was ruthless,Ž Carr says. He brought 600 men, horses, pigs and dogs with him. He landed near Tampa Bay in 1539. He eventually made it to the Apalachee province in current-day Jefferson County and continued on to the town of Anhaica, the home base of the Apalachee, Carr says. He sent a map maker south who went along the coast to Pensacola. De Soto continued traveling, looking for gold and died on the other side of Mississippi, Carr says. This was the end of the first period of Spaniards in the area, which was focused on conquering. The next period was the mission period, which lasted several decades, Carr says. Missions were established throughout the state. The Indians in the area became ill from diseases brought by the Spaniards and sought help from the friars who ran the missions, Carr says. Then they began to interact with each other. Carr says there are letters from the Apalachee to the king thanking him for gifts. In 1679, the Spanish governor of Florida started construction on the “ rst fort built at the con” uence of the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers. The fort was made out of wood and it was painted white to look like stone. It stood for three years before it was attacked by French pirates. The pirates stayed for a while and when they left, they burned the fort down. The English begin to attack the Spanish missions in the early 1700s. A second fort was then built in 1718. Construction of the “ rst stone fort began in 1739. Limestone was cut to make the fort and barges transported the limestone rock, Carr says. There was also a 45-foot watch tower built across the river to serve as a lookout point. There was a ” ame that was lit at night and looked very similar to a lighthouse. In 1763, the English were delivered the fort. By 1787, the Spanish regained control of the fort. And in 1821 Spain relinquished Florida to the United States. Stones from the fort were eventually used to build a marine hospital in 1857, prior to the Civil War. In 1861, the confederates took the fort, renaming it Fort Ward. Several ” ags ” y at the fort, which shows the different countries that have occupied the fort throughout its long history. Paulson plans to have several different tours available for the rest of this year leading up to the anniversary celebration next year. Visit www.VivaFlorida. org to learn about the different events to be held throughout the state. Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 13 Months … For only $31Call 1-877-401-6408Price good for in county subscriptions only. Offer available until 5/31/2012 is offering Remember those who died for our freedom on Memorial Day. Remember those who died for our freedom on Memorial Day. May 28, 2012 May 28, 2012 Subscription Special YARD SALEJUNE 1 & 2 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS! SUMMERTIME SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for quali“ed applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and ”oor rate of 2.5% Continued from Page 1AByrd said she decided to write about her own experience and childbearing for the contest because it is a topic she is passionate about. She had a faculty member sponsor her and they also helped in the writing process. In her own experience, she said she learned that there was a lack of services available to childbearing woman when it came to answering questions, dealing with their concerns and helping them emotionally. Medical needs are very well taken care of,Ž Byrd said. Many woman may not have accurate information and may not have a necessary support system during their pregnancy, she said. She began doing research and found that many women do not know all their options. This made her want to continue to learn and try and make an impact. After graduating from Brescia University, she plans to go to Florida State University to get her masters degree. She is a trained doula, which is a person trained and experienced in childbirth who provides continuous physical, emotional and informational support to the mother before, during and just after childbirth. She is currently working on her certi“ cation. She currently works at the FSU Foundation as the production coordinator. She lives in Crawfordville with her husband Chris and son Ebin.Logan Byrd wins honorable mention for Elie Wiesel PrizeCelebrate Florida’s 500th anniversary at San Marcos de Apalache JENNIFER JENSENHistorian Madeleine Carr gives a tour of Fort San Marcos on the St. Marks River. Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe WakuulanewsYou’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper.  High school yearbooks are still availableThere are more than 100 seniors who have not purchased yearbooks. The yearbook staff will be set up at baccalaureate on May 30 at 7 p.m. and at graduation on June 1 at 7:30 p.m. at J.D. Jones Stadium at Reynolds Field. The books are $85 and the school is only accepting cash, money orders or cashiers checks. Look for the yearbook stand inside the main gate. Republican Committee to host candidates debateThe Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee in conjunction with the Wakulla County Republican Club will host a Candidate Debate for the Florida House of Representatives District 7 at The Bistro at Wildwood on Thursday, June 7. The debate will be formatted to give each candidate an opportunity to answer questions from the club, from the executive committee and from the audience. This will allow Republicans in District 7 an opportunity to see the candidates and make an informed decision on who to vote for in the Republican primary. The candidate scheduled to appear are Don Curtis, Jamey Westbrook and Mike Williams. Special guest will be Daryn Iwicki, North Florida regional director of the Republican Party of Florida. The event begins with social hour from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. and the candidate debates begin at 7 p.m. TDC will hold roundtable meeting on June 7The Wakulla County Tourist Development Council will be holding the next Public Roundtable Meeting on Thursday, June 7, at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge Education Building from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The mission of the TDC is to promote and facilitate travel to and within Wakulla County for the bene t of its economy, residents, and travel/tourism industry. Help them sustain the tourism industry and improve the local economy by participating in this vital public forum. The June 7 Public Roundtable will begin with a brief presentation on recent TDC activities and initiatives, including some educational opportunities we can offer to our local tourism-related businesses to increase their visibility to the traveling public. This will be followed by a facilitated discussion of how to keep our tourism industry engaged in responsible promotion of our incredible resources, ways that TDC can improve its marketing/ advertising activities, and new ideas for marketing campaigns that can be fully developed to reach our target audiences. They would also like to have participation from local historians, artists, photographers, etc that can be valuable collaborators in our tourism development. Help them continue to grow the local economy through its rich natureand heritage-based tourism industry.  Candidate Emily Smith to host eventEmily Smith, candidate for District 5 County Commission, will be introduced to the community at Posh Java in Sopchoppy on Thursday, June 7. The evening will begin with music by Sammy Tedder at 6 p.m. and a brief presentation by Smith. More music by Grant Peeples will follow. Smith will be available throughout the evening to respond to questions and concerns. For more information, contact Judith Harriss at joereme@gmail.com.  Golf Gone Wild to benefit Florida Wild MammalSt. James Bay Golf Resort and Forgotten Coast TV are sponsoring a golf tournament on June 16 called "Golf Gone Wild," a bene t for the Florida Wild Mammal Association. FWMA is located in Wakulla County and provides care for sick, injured, and orphaned wildlife from Wakulla, Leon, Franklin and adjacent counties. For information regarding the "Golf Gone Wild" or to register, please contact Lynne Cooper at (850) 697-9507. FWMA and tournament information is also available at www.wakullawildlife. org. Staff ReportsBriefs The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, June 18, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.MAY 31, 2012 NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TEXT AND MAP AMENDMENTS ADOPTION PUBLIC HEARINGS PUBLIC NOTIFICATION MAY 17, 24, 31 JUNE 7, 2012 Continued from Page 1A Repealing impact fees is one example of inconsistency and the lack of planning on the commissions part, she said. They eliminated a hardship for new development, but then levied new and increased old taxes on current residents,Ž Smith said. She said she would like to see impact fees reinstated to ensure that public services, such as the library and parks, stay funded. Eliminating those services isnt an option for me and I think the commission should make them a priority,Ž she said. She added that there needs to be transparency when increasing taxes or fees or adding new ones. The public needs to know exactly what those fees are taxes are funding, she said. In dealing with economic development, Smith said the county needs to stick to the plan it has laid out for the Crawfordville core to ensure development is centralized and viable. We shouldnt stray from the foundation we have laid out,Ž she said. In dealing with economic development, Smith said improving the overall quality of life for residents is key, which includes protecting the environment. This means leaving protections like the wetlands ordinance in place, promoting ef“ cient use of resources and making the dif“ cult decisions to minimize impacts, she said. The commission needs to stand “ rm and make the tough decisions, especially when issues of stormwater and wastewater are addressed, she said. Its not just our “ scal livelihood, but our quality of life,Ž Smith said. Protecting the countys assets is also key to establishing Wakulla County as an eco-tourism destination, she said. And the county commission needs to be in support of that idea and be consistent with that message when making decisions, she said. As an avid outdoors person, Smith said she is a huge supporter of eco-tourism and believed Tallahassee Community Colleges Wakulla Environmental Institute will be huge for the area. Thats where we can be competitive,Ž Smith said. Wakulla County cant compete with the retail base of Tallahassee, but Wakulla County has beautiful features, and can be competitive with eco-tourism, she said. Eco-tourism will be especially bene“ cial to the small communities in the county like Sopchoppy, she said. It will bring people to those areas, she said. Smith is a member of the Friends of the Wakulla Springs and the local chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society. To learn more about Smith, visit her website at www.emilyforwakulla.com or email her at emilyforwakulla@gmail.com.Emily Smith is running for county commission NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will Hold a Public Hearing on June 18, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327, to Consider: A copy of this ordinance and the rate resolution shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance and the rate resolution. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201. MAY 31, 2012 By LYNN ARTZ County CommissionerOn Tuesday, June 5, the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners invites the public to attend a Smart Growth Open House from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Wakulla County Library. The open house will include a presentation by Chris Duerksen on Smart Growth Fixes for Rural Communities.Ž Duerksen will describe common barriers that can hinder the development of an attractive, walkable downtown … and easy ways to remove these stumbling blocks. He will discuss effective ways to encourage rural commercial development, and will describe ways to preserve the beauty of rural roads. Residents and business owners within downtown Crawfordville … and property owners along the Big Bend Scenic Byway … are especially encouraged to attend. Refreshments will be served and those present will have an opportunity to socialize, ask questions and share their opinions. The June 5 meet and greet will kick off a two-day visit by a technical assistance team working for EPAs Sustainable Communities Building Blocks Program. Team leader Chris Duerksen is senior counsel with Clarion Associates and is based in their Florida of“ ce. He has helped many communities to update their land development codes to allow and encourage smart growth. If unable to attend the evening presentation, consider attending the county commission Workshop on Wednesday, June 6, from noon to 1:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. A similar presentation will be given at that time. For additional information, please contact Melissa Corbett, Senior Planner, at 926-3695 ext. 433.County to host Smart Growth Open House on June 5Special to The NewsThe League of Women Voters of Wakulla will host a public records forum on Thursday, June 7 at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. Barbara Petersen, the President of the Florida First Amendment Foundation has agreed to present this and we feel very lucky to have her,Ž said Mary Cortese, Wakulla League chair. She has so much experience and expertise in the open government arena, writing and working in the area for many years.Ž We feel that this is an important issue and have invited all constitutional of“ cers, the county administrator, staff and commissioners,Ž said Cortese. And we have a wonderful and exceptional presenter, a person who knows so much about the law and has so much experience.Ž Petersen is a veteran of open government advocacy with a long history of open government work. In 1995, she became president of the First Amendment Foundation. Prior to that she was staff attorney for the Florida Legislature where she worked exclusively on public record legislation and issues. Most recently she was the chair of Floridas Commission on Government Reform. She is a passionate advocate of the publics right to know,Ž said Cortese. If a government agency came to me and said, Barbara Petersen thinks its a bad idea then Id say, Well, then its a bad idea isnt it?Ž said Pat Gleason, the top lawyer for Florida on open government. Petersen grew up in Virginia with two sisters. After high school, she wanted to study art, but her father disapproved, and she left school. Shes lived in Brussels, the Caribbean and six other states, including Missouri where she moved with her husband, National Book Award-winning writer Bob Shacochis, and where she “ nished school at the University of Missouri-Columbia. At 34, Petersen decided she wanted to be a lawyer and she and Shacochis moved to Florida, where she attended Florida State University in Tallahassee and later joined the Legislature as a staff attorney. There she helped research and write a law that ensured access to electronic records and became interested in the laws around records. In 1995 she left to become the first and only employee of the First Amendment Foundation, started by media groups statewide with the mission of protecting access to government records. Currently a member of the board of the National Freedom on Information Coalition and the Florida Society of News Editors, she will be introduced by Tammie Bar“ eld, general manager of The Wakulla News and a board member of the Florida Press Association. Clear and open access to government is the “ rst step in government accountability,Ž said Cortese, without it, facts and records the public are constitutionally guaranteed cannot be accessed and government cannot be held accountable.ŽPublic records forum is set

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• A DOG’S LIFE: Abandoned at the animal shelter, today Geist is training for DOC • Wakulla Gardens residents face pay for paving • Coast Guard Auxiliary for May 31 •Week in Wakulla: May 17-24 • Michael David Haynes obituary • Board says yes to 2020, later to children • Overcoming loneliness and social isolation• Elmer Eugene Strickland obituary € thewakullanews.com Follow us onREADERS WRITE:Editor, The News:The Wakulla County Democratic Executive Committee proudly hosted the 2012 Small County Coalition Conference at the Inn at Wildwood Resort May 11-13th. People came from small counties all over the state to enjoy Wakullas natural beauty and an excellent program. We met with fellow Democrats over a wonderful reception and lunch at the Wildwood Bistro, a delicious “ sh fry dinner catered by Poseys, and bluegrass music by the Coon Bottom Creek Band. The event provided an economic boost to our local Wakulla economy. The program agenda included such important issues as party leadership, voter suppression, precinct organization, equality/human rights and current voting laws. Speakers included Omar Khan, associate political director for Obama for America and Rod Smith, chairman of the Florida Democratic Party. Also in attendance were Democratic candidates for local, state, and federal of“ ce: Alan Brock (Wakulla County Commission, District 1); John Shuff (Wakulla County Commission, District 5); Bobby Pearce (Superintendent of Schools); Bill Montford (Florida Senate, 6th District); Thomas Dickens, Robert Hill, and A.J. Smith (Florida House District 7); Leonard Bembry, Al Lawson, Jay Liles, and Alvin Peters (Second Congressional District of the U.S. House). Alan Clendenin, Rep. Scott Randolph, and Hon. Mark Alan Siegel, who are seeking the future chairmanship of the Florida Democratic Party, were also present. Many other leaders in the Florida Democratic Party joined us, as well. I would like to thank Chair Rachel Sutz Pienta, members of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee and the Wakulla Democratic Womens Club for their efforts in hosting this outstanding event. I am looking forward to the Grand Opening of our local headquarters on June 8 from 4 to 8 p.m. at North Pointe Center, 1626 Crawfordville Highway (near Iris Annes) and hope many from the community will join us.Jane Jones Crawfordville Editor, The News: An open letter to all county commissioners: I am writing concerning the on-going problems facing home owners in Wakulla Gardens. I do not live in Wakulla Gardens, but I know a lot of good, hard working people who do. The majority of the homeowners take pride in their homes and not only desire, but deserve better treatment from our elected of“ cials. They work, pay taxes and vote just as most Wakulla County citizens do. I am baf” ed about the on-going indecisiveness about what can be done about the multitude of problems they face every single day. So far, nothing but a lot of talk and a lot of dust for them to deal with. And now there is talk about an assessment on their property taxes. Are the commissioners serious? How much was Mike Stewart and the other property owners on Rehwinkle Road assessed for the recent resurfacing? How much was Jerry Moore and the other property owners on 319 assessed, or property owners on Lonnie Raker Road or the half dozen people who actually live on Old Shell Point Road? Or any other roads paved in Wakulla County within the last few years? Why is it that you feel it is okay to take money (in the form of property taxes) from all of the hard working individuals in Wakulla Gardens year after year and offer them nothing for it? Wakulla County permitted all of these homes and allowed the continuous building (while collecting permitting fees), with no regard to infrastructure. If they did not realize they were creating a monster, they should be ashamed to admit it. Ralph Thomas wrote an interesting article in The Wakulla Times concerning Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA). According to the article, this option came up brie” y at a commission meeting preceding the writing of his article, and the discussion was quickly shut down. Does that have anything to do with the fact that no commissioners or major campaign contributors live in Wakulla Gardens? I am also very concerned about a statement made by our county administrator in the May 17 issue of the Wakulla News that As Wakulla Gardens builds out, the stormwater problem will be worse,Ž Does this mean Wakulla County actually plans to permit more houses in a subdivision that already has so many problems? S. Roberts Crawfordville Editor, The News: We would like to thank the person who dropped off our chocolate Cocker Spaniel to the Wakulla Animal Control, and the Wakulla Animal Control for getting Princess back to us! We appreciate it very much. Johnny and Diane Lynn Crawfordville Editor, The News: During dif“ cult times it is sometimes hard to smell the roses and appreciate the good around us. There used to be a show called, Kids Say the Darndest Things.Ž Often the childs remarks were very funny; and often they were very insightful and thought provoking. Children see life differently from adults. And senior citizens see things from still another perspective. The child, the senior and the handicapped and disabled all have special needs. Our library, Senior Center, and associated support services for those less fortunate than us are existing gems. With a limited budget, our library provides activities for young and old. Our library is one of the focal points of our community. It needs to be open more hours so that more people can take advantage of what our library has to offer. Our senior center is one of the best! It is a very busy place and provides programs for children and seniors. It also provides important transportation for our seniors. Since I retired from doing orthopedic surgery 10 years ago, I have volunteered my services at medical clinics. Those clinics often depend on transportation services. Assisting our children and seniors with medical expenses is not effective if they dont have transportation to take them to a medical facility. We need to continue to support services and activities directed to those who have special needs. Where vital state support has been reduced or eliminated, our county government must make up the shortfall. There is enough waste and lower priority items in our countys budget to accomplish this. Howard Kessler, M.D. Panacea Editor, The News: On behalf of the Wakulla County Christian Coalition, the Greater Mount Trial Church, and the Palaver Tree Theater Company, I would like to say THANK YOU to all who supported and participated in the Wakulla County 2012 May 20th Celebration this past month. The response from the community was most welcoming and events throughout the month of May have opened the door to continue the growth of this southern holiday next year. We offer our sincere thanks to those who partnered with us in this endeavor, including G-Signs, Wakulla County Public Library, Price Transportation Service Inc, Lindys Fried Chicken, along with The Wakulla News and wakulla.com, for their generous coverage. Wed also like to thank those individual sponsors who gave their support either financially, or in kind. They include Tonya Price, the Rev. Bernard Plummer, and the entire congregation of Mount Trial Church (thank you for opening your arms to this possibility), Jarvis Rosier, Thessalonia Church, Herbert and Rachel Donaldson; Jamie Hayes; George Nathan Green; Elinor Elfner, Pat Chamburs; Skipper Temple, Macedonia Church of Christ Written in Heaven, Cathy Frank, the Riley House Museum, Wakulla County Historical Societys Genealogy Group, Wakulla County Extension Office, Alan Brock, Thomas Dickens, Howard Kessler, John and Petra Shuff, Emily Smith, Henry Buddy and Letha Wells, Charles and Cheryl Creel, and Robert Randolph Pearce. None of this couldve been achieved without the support … and willing spirit … of those listed, as well as those who worked behind the scenes, doing whatever they could to make it happen. Our goal is to partner with more organizations next year and make this celebration even larger, and to eventually offer an economic boost to our county during the month of May. Again, thank you so much, Wakulla, for taking a chance on resurrecting another positive page from our countys illustrious history. Herb Donaldson Palaver Tree Theater Co. Artistic DirectorConference covered important issuesSupport of May 20th Celebration appreciatedCounty must help children and seniors anks to the person who found our dog Wakulla Gardens isnt treated fairly May was such a busy month. There was Mothers Day, when I became the mother of the cutest, most adorable, smartest, cleverest and unique kitten in the world. What puzzles me is when I send his picture to people, they all say, ŽOh, he looks just like my Al“ e, my Panda, my Boots etc..Ž I cant understand this. All I can “ gure is that their cats are Bee Bee wannabes. There is no other cat as perfect as my garbage can rescue baby. Then, there was my birthday, which lasted for days “ lled with cake, ice cream and wonderful friends. When the frivolity of that began to dissipate, my cutest, most adorable, smartest, cleverest and unique daughter in the world celebrated her birthday. (Nurse Judy, that vain alter ego of mine, has forbidden me to mention her age since that might lead you to conclude that I myself might be a tri” e OLD. Of course, she doesnt think she is even as old as my daughter. What a dreamer!) All of these events pale in comparison to Mays “ nal big holiday … Memorial Day. That was a weekend for parades, festooning of graves with flowers and ” ags, and eternal gratitude for all our servicemen and women who have sacri“ ced their lives for our freedom over the years, and those, who still are putting their lives on the line to protect us today. We surely owe a huge debt of gratitude to these, our heroes. Even Nurse Judy was properly respectful during this holiday, although she donned the most outrageous costumes during the entire weekend. One day she had navy pants, a white T-shirt with a ” ag on the front, a red jacket and red shoes with ” ags across the front. Next, red pants and shirt and a blue jacket with the same shoes. At home, she wore white pants with a blue pajama top and a red robe as she lay on the couch watching the Indy 500 and the NASCAR races in Charlotte, while eating red, white and blue iced cupcakes. I tried to tell her I was on a diet, but she refused to listen. Of course, she will be the “ rst to mention my added pounds caused by her lack of eating discretion. Uh-oh. Nurse Judy is whispering in my ear. Whats that?Ž I ask. More whispering ensues. Ah, theres something she wants me to say to you. Please know I am adding this under duress. Any resemblance to the truth is completely impossible, since the words are coming directly from the mouth of that deluded alter ego of mine. Here is what she wants me to say: Merry was the month of May, Since Nurse Judy was with me every day, And she is the cutest, most adorable, smartest, cleverest and unique alter ego in the world.Ž And shes humble too. Goodbye, May. Hello, June. More later,Judy Conlin is a nurse in Wakulla and Gadsden counties. Visit her website at nursejudyinfo.com. Judy Conlin Nurse Judy’s Nook A lot was happening in May SPECIAL TO THE NEWSEnjoying the Maypole at the May 20th Celebration.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 – Page 5A

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesChurch BriefsJeffrey ‘Doc’ Calaluca Michael David Haynes Elmer Eugene Strickland Pioneer Baptist to host VBS ‘Breaking Through’ with Vivian WattsJeffrey DocŽ Calaluca, 53, of Sopchoppy, died on Friday, May 18. He was born on March 6, 1959, to Anthony John Calaluca and Jennie Theresa Rutakowski Calaluca in Newburgh, N.Y. He was a podiatrist and had practiced in Panacea until his illness. He was predeceased by his parents. He is survived by his wife and best friend of 20 years, CindyLee B. Calaluca; two brothers, Thomas (Cynthia Leigh) Calaluca of Weston, and Brian (Maxine) Calaluca of Davie; a brother-in-law, James A. Wilson, of Indiana, Penn.; and four nieces and two nephews. A memorial service will be held at a future date at the First Baptist Church in St. Marks. Michael David Haynes, 50, died on Monday, May 21, in Crawfordville. He was born Aug. 26, 1961, in Murray, Ky. He worked in the Golf Pro Shop at Wildwood Country Club in Crawfordville. Memorial services were held for family and friends on Saturday, May 26, at Hopewell Baptist Church in Suwannee, Ky. He is survived by his wife, Rosemary Moore Haynes of Crawfordville; father and stepmother, William C. and Valerie Haynes of Las Vegas, Nev.; mother and stepfather, Velda Jones Renfrow and Clyde Renfrow of Niceville; three children, Justin Haynes (Heather) of Paducah, Ky., Jerrica Haynes Richardson (Michael) of Malden, Mo., and Joshua Haynes (Charlse) of Benton, Ky.; two stepchildren, Audrey and Bradley Erwin of Crawfordville; six grandchildren; a brother, William Douglas Haynes (Julie) of Las Vegas, Nev.; four stepsisters, Boni Eyler (Rick) of Tehachapi, Calif., Donna Tindall (Pete) of Mary Esther, Kym Coleman (Kevin) of Las Vegas, Nev., and Lisa Fuller (Mike) of Las Vegas, Nev.; and numerous nephews, nieces, aunts, uncles, cousins and extended family and friends. He was predeceased by his grandparents, S.C. and Hilda Haynes and Ophus and Doris Jones; a grandchild, Ethan Richardson; aunts, Joann Haynes Orchow and Marie Haynes Langston; uncle, Donald M. Haynes; and nephew, Cody Douglas Haynes. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting with arrangements. Elmer Eugene Strickland, 55, passed away May 23, in Crawfordville. He is survived by his loving wife of 22 years, Brenda Strickland of Smith Creek. He was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County and a member of Crawfordville First Baptist Church. He was an avid sportsman, enjoyed “ shing and hunting in the rivers and woods of Wakulla and Taylor County. He loved his life at the river in Smith Creek, where he was considered the High SheriffŽ by his friends and neighbors there. He was a loving father to his boys, and favorite Uncle GeneŽ to his many nieces and nephews. In addition to his wife, he is survived by two sons, Jarvis JesŽ Eugene Strickland (Amanda) and Benjamin BenŽ Wayne Strickland and granddaughter, Savanna of Wakulla County; his favorite sister, Kathy Lawhon (Larry) of Crawfordville; brothers, Kenneth Alvice Strickland Jr. of Milton and Richard Strickland (Callie) of Crawfordville; and numerous nieces, nephews and extended family members who will forever miss him. He was predeceased by his parents, Kenneth Alvice Strickland Sr. and Katherine Rose Strickland Woods; and a nephew, Colby. Visitation was held Sunday, May 27, from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Crawfordville First Baptist Church with memorial services immediately following. Memorial donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville, is assisting with arrangements (850926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Jeffrey ‘Doc’ Calaluca Michael David Haynes Elmer Eugene StricklandPioneer Baptist Church will host a community-wide Vacation Bible School beginning Monday, June 4, through Friday, June 8. Pioneer Baptist Church invites all children to encounter Gods awesome power as we ” y to some of the worlds greatest natural wonders. This yearss VBS theme is Amazing Wonders Aviation. Classes are for students who have completed pre-Kindergarten through the “ fth grade. Class times are 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. A light dinner meal is provided each night. There is no cost for attending VBS. Sorry, but transportation is not available. Pioneer Baptist Church is located at 486 Beechwood Drive, north of the intersection of Spring Creek Highway and the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road. For more information, call Pastor Dennis Hall at 8785224. We hope to see you each night. Minister Vivian Watts will hold a workshop on Breaking Through and Moving ForwardŽ at Charlottes Faith & Deliverance Temple on Saturday, June 2, at 7 p.m. The workshop is being hosted by Senior Pastor Alice Williams at the church, located at 150 Brown Donaldson Road in Crawfordville. Watts is a minister at Love House Ministries in Beaufort, S.C., where her shepherds are Senior Pastor Randy and Co-Pastor Theresa Roberts. She also serves as the Praise Team Leader and Minister of Music in where she ” ows strongly prophetically. Watts was born and raised in Crawfordville where she was called into ministry at a very young age. She is the mother of two children, Tawain Watts Jr. and Tia Watts. Minister Vivian currently works for the U.S. Navy and loves nothing more than serving in Gods kingdom. She also currently leads and directs a choir for the Naval Hospital in Beaufort. She is gifted in the area of intercessory prayer and breaking down strong holds for the kingdom. She leads the singles ministry and has a heart and passion for Evangelism. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER June is quite famous for the variety of nuptial activities. I am not sure exactly why June is the month of choice for these couples; I just go along with the ” ow. Consequently, through the years, I have of“ ciated at many weddings during the month of June. I must confess that weddings are not my favorite form of activity. When I first began this area of my pastoral work, I was very nervous. I was concerned that people were watching and judging me and therefore I needed to have everything perfect. The day of the wedding found me an absolute nervous wreck. I remember when I came to the shocking conclusion that nobody at the wedding ceremony was watching me. The wedding ceremony was concluded and the reception was over and I was in the restroom washing my hands when I happened to look into the mirror. There to my chagrin I discovered that the back of my collar was not covering my tie. Nobody even hinted that I had a wardrobe malfunction. It was then I realized that nobody was paying any attention to me. Since this amazing discovery, weddings have not been quite so dif“ cult for me. I often counsel young grooms who seem quite nervous that nobody is even aware of their presence. Nobody comes to a wedding to see the groom. The only thing that really matters is the bride. After a wedding everybody always says, Wasnt the bride beautiful?Ž I have yet to hear somebody say, Wasnt that groom handsome?Ž This is the reason why every groom wears a rented tuxedo. Nobody is admiring him or his attire. One reason I am not so very fond of weddings is the premarital counseling involved. Of all the counseling I have given through the years, I am wondering if anybody ever paid attention to what I said. With that in mind, I have tried through the years to make the counseling sessions as long and painful as possible. If they can survive a series of premarital counseling sessions from me, then they deserve a lifetime of holy matrimonial bliss. One strange phenomenon I have seen in weddings throughout the years is the number of people who cry at weddings. The father of the bride is the one I watch. It is very hard for some of these fathers to keep back the tears, not because they are losing a daughter, but because they are losing a whole lot of money on this wedding. When anybody asks me about performing the wedding ceremony and how much I charge, I always say that I do not charge anything. What I am really saying is that I would prefer cash. I always leave that to the discretion of the groom. Usually, the groom is so discreet in paying me that I actually never see any money. When I discover how much the wedding has cost and how much I was not given as an honorarium for my services, I too weep at weddings. Occasionally, I meet a young couple who understand the importance of a Christian marriage. Although it is viewed as old-fashioned, I like to re” ect what the Bible says. Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one ” eshŽ (Genesis 2:24 KJV). This kind of a wedding calls for tears of joy.The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at 352-687-4240 or e-mail jamess-n yder2@att. net. I cry at weddings too Out to pastor

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Special to The NewsBlood Red DawnŽ is a collection of war poetry from Jon Shutt, a soldier who served tours in both Iraq and Afghanistan. It will be released on May 31 by local literary press company Kitsune Books. Following his tour in Afghanistan, it was suggested to Shutt that he seek counseling for post traumatic stress disorder. Instead, he wrote poems. Seventy-two of his poems appear in this collection. All proceeds from royalties of Blood Red DawnŽ will be donated to the USO, United Service Organizations. Searing, soaring, gutwrenching, sardonic, and philosophical, its hard to read this eloquent work without holding your breath because of the immediacy with which each poem places you right in the soldiers shoes,Ž said Anne Petty, editor in chief of Kitsune Books which published the collection. Blood Red Dawn will stick with you long after you close its covers.Ž Shutt has served 10 years in the Army National Guard as an Engineer. In 2004, he deployed with a marine engineer unit as an electrician where he spent most of his days doing construction projects around northern Iraq. In 2007, he earned his bachelors degree in English teaching from the University of New Hampshire. He began teaching “ fth grade in Lebanon, Maine, in 2008. In late 2009, he put his teaching career on hold to deploy with a New Hampshire Infantry unit to Afghanistan. In Afghanistan, he was primarily an assistant 240 gunner, but his engineering skills kept him busy building tables, lofts, TV stands and other creature comforts in his off time. Upon returning from Afghanistan in late 2010, he found his love for building, propelling him into teaching woodshop to young, eager minds and hands, which is what he does today in Berwick, Maine. He and his wife, Monique, live in Milton Mills, N.H. Contact anne@kitsunebooks.com or visit www. kitsunebooks.com to order the collection. Kitsune Books is a small literary press located in Crawfordville. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 – Page 7Ahappenings in our community Community MIKE JETTS CELEBRATION OF MIKE JETTS CELEBRATION OF will be held on Saturday, June 2 at 4:00 p.m. at Capt. Seanile's (4360 Crawfordville Hwy.) All friends and musicians welcome! Bring something to share. LEGISLATIVEREPORTFloridaHouseofRepresentatives District10LEONARDL.BEMBRYDearNeighbors: ThankyoufortheopportunitytoserveyouintheFloridaHouseofRepresentatives.Thesepast fouryearshavebeenrewarding,fulfillingandsomeofthemostmeaningfulyearsofmylife.It hastrulybeenanhonortoworkforthepeopleofHouseDistrict10.Therehavebeenmany opportunitiestoserveyouthispastterm.Thispastsession,IfiledanamendmenttotheBudget AppropriationsBilltoprovide$10.3milliontokeepJeffersonCorrectionalInstituteopenand operatinginordertosave158jobs.WiththesupportofmycolleaguesintheFloridaHouse,Ihad thehonortosponsorsuccessfullegislationduringmy2011/2012termthat: €Createstrueruraleconomicopportunitiesunderthenewlyformed DepartmentofEconomicOpportunity. €Waivesstateparkfeesforimmediatefamilymembersoffallenveterans,policeofficers, andfirefighters. €Clarifiestheenvironmentalpermittingexemptionsfarmershaveforbonafide agriculturalactivities. €Authorizescontinuingcareretirementcommunitiestooffercontinuingcareat-home contractstoresidentslivingathomeorinthefacility. €Providesanexemptionfromregulationaspubliclodgingestablishmentsforallrooming housesandanyapartmentbuildingsinspectedbyHUDthataredesignatedprimarilyas housingforpersonsage62orolder. €Providesmoreprivatelandstobecomeavailabletothepublicforoutdoorrecreational activitiesbyprovidingadditionalincentivestoprivatelandownersthanwhatcurrently existinlaw. The2012LegislativeSessionpresentedmanyopportunitiesandchallengesasthiswasthefourth consecutiveyearofrevenueestimateshortfallsandbudgetcuts.The$70billionbudgetcut spendinginmanyareasthatwilltouchallofourlives.Therewerecutsto:CountyClerks, Medicaidreimbursement,stateemployees,ruralhealthdepartments,ruralhospitalsandnursing homes,andmanyotherareasthatwillaffectworkingpeople.Insomecases,therearespending increasesinthebudgetthatIdonotthinkwillbenefitourstate.IwasamongseveralHouse memberswhoopposedthebudgetbecausewecouldnotagreeonthenecessityofthecuts,nor thebudgetincreases. ThroughouttheSession,thereweremanycontroversialissues: €PrisonPrivatization,whichfailedintheSenate,couldhavehadunforeseennegative economicconsequencesfortheStateofFlorida. €TheSepticTankRegulationwasrepealedandreplacedwithamorebalancedapproach. €RedistrictingmapsforSenate,HouseandCongressionaldistrictswerepassed. €ASchoolPrivatizationBill,whichIvotedagainst,alsofailedintheFloridaSenate. Ilookforwardtocontinueworkingforyou.Wemustkeepupthefightformorejobsandto bringmoregood-payingprivatesectoremploymenttoourregion.Ibelievethatavibrantsmall businesscommunityiswhatwillbringprosperitytoourstateandnation. Again,thankyouforallowingmetheopportunitytoserveyou! StateRepresentative LauraJersey, LegislativeAssistant 405HouseOfficeBuilding 402SouthMonroeStreet Tallahassee,FL32399-1300 850-488-7870 MickieSalter, LegislativeAssistant 304NWCraneAvenue Building36 Madison,FL32304 850-973-5630 TeresaWatson, LegislativeAssistant P.O.Box1325 23Southeast2ndAvenue Chiefland,FL32644 850-493-6848COMMITTEEASSIGNMENTSAppropriations€Agriculture&NaturalResourcesAppropriations-RankingMember StateAffairs€SelectCommitteeonWaterPolicy€K-20EducationInnovationContactRepresentativeLeonardBembry:Leonard.Bembry@myfloridahouse.gov Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. Special to The NewsHabitat for Humanity of Wakulla County held a Home Dedication Ceremony for the their new homeowner on May 19. Kenny and Megan Dipietrantonio are the proud owners of the home located on Ted Lott Lane in Crawfordville. The family has already started a garden and have been busy with landscaping improvements and decorating the interior for their family. The family continues to participate in classes held at the Wakulla County Extension Service and working at the Habitat ReStore on Shadeville Road as part of their sweat equity requirement. The get together was hosted by Habitat board members who offered support to the family and welcomed them into the Habitat family. Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County is currently working on raising funds for their 11th home build. A Motorcycle Poker Run will be held Saturday, June 2. For more information on how to get involved, call President Peggy Mackin at the ReStore at 926-4544. Andrew Robert Meister was born on May 18 at 12:16 a.m. He weighed 7 pounds, 8 ounces and was 19.7 inches. He is the son of Jessica and Jacob Meister of Crawfordville. His maternal grandparents are Cindy and Wendell Miller of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are Judy and John Meister of Crawfordville. His maternal greatgrandmother is Martha Clenney of Tallahassee.Habitat holds home dedication SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHabitat for Humanity has a ceremony for 11th home built for a Wakulla County family. The Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta Foundation Inc. presents a $16,000 check to Dr. Sharp for the American Cancer Society at their wrap up party on Friday, May 18. Linda Downey is making the presentation. The regatta was held April 27-29 at Shell Point. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Regatta presents check to cancer society Proceeds from poems to bene“ t USOLocal literary press, Kitsune Books, publishes collection of poems written by soldierMeisters welcome baby boy on May 18North Florida Community College congratulated the following two students who were awarded certi“ cates at the conclusion of NFCCs Spring Term 2012. NFCCs Spring Term 2012 graduates for Wakulla County are James Day of Crawfordville who received a certi“ cate in public safety and law enforcement, and Judith Day, of Crawfordville, who also received a certi“ cate in public safety and law enforcement.NFCC announces graduates for spring 2012 Email community news to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is published when space becomes available and is edited for style, clarity and grammar.

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools School Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555 The college of choice! Invest in yourself today EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT THE RISING COST OF COLLEGEƒ at TCC, tuition is signicantly lower than most other universities and colleges •Interior Remodeling •Doors •Floors •Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling •Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS Styles for Men, Women & ChildrenFULL SURVICE HAIR SALONHair Place That 850-926-6020We Have Gift Certi“catesBooking NOWProm updo’s starting at$65OOPS!WelcomeMavis 274-0700Miranda545-2905Robyn926-6020Linda294-2085 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE Special to The NewsMay Employee of the Month is Riversprings Middle School Bookkeeper Sandy Moore. Moore started her career with the Wakulla County School District in 1994, transferring to Riversprings Middle School in 2000, when the school opened. Prior to working with the district, she worked in the family business at the Wakulla IGA. Moore is a third generation native Wakulla County resident, attended school at Sopchoppy Elementary and graduated from Wakulla High School. Moore said, The real enjoyment of my job is the involvement with the students and being a part of what this wonderful school system does for the children of our community. The school system is so much more than a provider of education, it is a big family, pulling together, meeting the needs of children. I love being a part of that.Ž However, as a bookkeeper, Moore takes pride in perfect audit reports. She has also served as the school fundraiser coordinator and on the district calendar committee. Riversprings Principal Dod Walker said, Ms. Moore of“ cially became the Riversprings bookkeeper on the “ rst day of school in August 2000. From art supplies to zoo “ eld trips she ensures that our “ nancial house is in order. An ardent Bear fan, she loves the students and teachers that count on her. She has led the front of“ ce through her work ethic and dedication this year. I appreciate what she does for our school.Ž Moore is employee of the month Sandy Moore Free workshops for college planning Special to The NewsMelisa Taylor with The Learning Curve Tutoring Center will be offering free seminars this summer designed to answer many of the questions parents and students may have as they begin to plan for college. There will be two separate workshops. Get Me to College Now is offered for students who will be seniors in the 2012-13 school year. These students must expedite the process of completing activities, community service, financial aid, college and scholarship applications. The second, Get Me to College seminar is for parents of students entering ninth through 11th grades in the 2012-13 school year. They have more time to complete the necessary steps needed to assure college acceptance and the “ nancial aid needed to get to the students college of choice; however, the earlier students and parents begin to prepare for the college process, the easier it is to be viewed as a stronger candidate for each college. Some of the topics that will be addressed at the free seminar are: € What does it really cost to go to college today? € Which classes do I need to take in high school? € When do I begin to take the ACT or SAT test? € Is the PSAT test important to me? €What will Floridas Bright Futures scholarship be like when I get to college? €How much is my family expected to contribute to my college education? € Are there other scholarships available? €Which college is right for me? € How do I choose a major? € Is community service important? € What kind of community service is worthwhile for admissions? € How do I sell myself and my activities to a college? € How will my chances of entering the college I desire be affected by my grades freshman year? € What should I be doing each year? € Is there a difference between preparing to go to a Florida college or an Ivy League college? € When should I apply for college? The seminars should be attended by both a parent and his or her student, and each family will leave with a notebook and checklist of steps to take to become a sought after candidate. With the increase in the number of students applying to college, competition is “ erce, and students must take the initiative to be the type of student each college desires. Due to limited seating, parents must register in advance at 926-2179 or online at: http://tlctutoring. wordpress.com/get-me-tocollege to attend the free seminars. Get Me to College Now, for 2012-13 seniors will be held at these different times. Only attend one below. June 12, 6-7:30 p.m. June 19, 6-7:30 p.m. June 26, 6-7:30 p.m. Get Me to CollegeFor Students entering ninth through 11th grades in 201213 (only attend 1 below): July 10, 6-7:30 p.m. July 24, 6-7:30 p.m. July 31, 6-7:30 p.m. By BETH ODONNELLAssistant Superintendent of instruction Wakulla County School District third grade students came in tied for “ rst in the region and “ fth in the state for their Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) Reading scores recently released by the Florida Department of Education. Of the nine districts in the region consisting of Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla, Jefferson, Liberty, Franklin, Madison, Calhoun and Taylor, Wakulla came in tied with Calhoun County. The state average for third grade Reading was 56 percent pro“ cient at Level 3 or higher on a scale of 1 to 6. Wakulla students came in at 68 percent, which is defined as on or above grade level. Although we were geared up to expect more students needing remediation this summer due to a tougher FCAT test coupled with raised cut scores, there are only seven more students who will need to attend the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp, an increase of only two percent over last year,Ž said Superintendent David Miller. Our teachers and students continue to rise to the challenges of tougher standards and controversial cut score changes.Ž Third grade is a high stakes testing area as Florida law deems it the only mandatory retention grade for students scoring a Level 1 in Reading who do not qualify for state exemptions. Each district must offer those students a Summer Reading Camp where they work on skills and take another test at the end of summer school or show their pro“ ciency on speci“ c portfolio lessons. In addition to Reading, third grade FCAT Math scores, plus high school End of Course (EOC) exam scores for Biology and Geometry were released May 24. In Math, Wakulla third graders came in at 64 percent pro“ cient, exceeding the state “ gure of 58 percent. Of the nine counties, Wakulla came in third. In the state, they were 11th. Wakulla High School students took new EOC exams designed to take the place of FCAT Math and Science because they are more speci“ c to the standards in each course. The “ rst year each EOC is given, it counts 30 percent of the students grade. After that, students must pass the EOC for each course in order to earn credit in the class. EOC scores released May 24 were divided into the top third, the middle third and the bottom third. On the Biology EOC, 79 percent of Wakulla High 10th graders scored in the top two-thirds compared to 66 percent for the state. Their mean scale score put them second in the region and third in the state. On the Geometry EOC, 74 percent of Wakulla High ninth and 10th graders scored in the top two-thirds compared to 65 percent for the state. Their mean scale score put them second in the region and “ fth in the state. Still to be released are scores for FCAT Reading and Math in grades four through eight, and FCAT Science scores in grades “ ve and eight. Also, Algebra I EOC scores are coming for students in grades eight and nine. This is the second year of the Algebra I EOC, so it must be passed in order to earn high school credit. The Algebra I EOC will be offered at additional times throughout high school for students who do not pass on the “ rst try. There have been more changes in a shorter amount of time to prepare teachers and students than in any other year I can think of,Ž observed Miller of his 39 years in education. We want what is best for our students, so we will continue to provide them with the skills they need to be competitive with any student from any other district, state, or country.Ž ird grade FCAT scores rank in top 10 Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $10 A Week 877676-1403

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 – Page 9Asports news and team views Sports WRESTLINGSeven named rst team All Big BendPHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS LUCY CARTER/PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS KEN FIELDS/PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCoach of the Year Will Pafford with All Big Bend Wrestler of the Year Zach Malik. Seven Wakulla War Eagle wrestlers were selected as All Big Bend Wrestlers “ rst team, one All Big Bend Wrestling second team and three Honorable Mention. In the photograph are the “ rst team wrestlers. A total of 20 young men were selected from the Big Bend Area. Front Row: Bill Morgan, James Douin, Travis Hinsey, Zack Malik, Cole Woofter; back row: Luke Taylor, Coach Will Pafford, Kevon White. By LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsWith a strong arm and a sure smile, Senior Pitcher Jordan JordyŽ Montague signed a baseball scholarship with Florida A&M University on Tuesday May 22. Jordy has always been a competitor and hes going to take that with him to the next level,Ž said Wakulla High Athletic Director Mike Smith. Montague also sees the edgeŽ that baseball has given him. Im a whole different person when Im on the baseball “ eld,Ž he said. I zone everything out. Im concentrated on winning that baseball game.Ž Montague thanked Varsity Baseball Coach Mike Gauger for his support and guidance, saying Coach Gauger taught me everything I know … he molded me into the pitcher I am today.Ž Montague plans to pursue a degree in criminology and become a wildlife of“ cer. My dream has always been to go play college ball,Ž he said, and now that dream has come true.ŽMontague signs with FAMU BASEBALL FOOTBALLWar Eagles show promise in spring gameBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles traveled to Monticello on May 26 for spring games, losing the half against Madison, 20-7, and beating Jefferson, 15-12. Head Coach Scott Klees said overall he was pleased with the teams performance. I think we have a chance to be good this year,Ž said Klees. Klees said the score against Madison didnt indicate how close it was. The offense was handicapped in that game by fumbling “ ve times. Thats going to happen with the triple option until they get the timing down,Ž Klees said. Demetrius Lindsey scored against Madison on an 8-yard run. In the second game against Jefferson, Mikal Cromartie scored a touchdown on a run, as did DeQuan Simmons. Dylan Norman kicked the extra points. The defense didnt play near as good as I thought we should,Ž Klees said. While the defense only gave up three big runs all night, he said, they still gave up 28 points. (One touchdown was scored on Wakullas offense by Madison when a hand-off went to a defensive lineman who took it in.) I was impressed with the offensive line,Ž Klees said. Overall, 12 different guys carried the ball in the games. A lot of guys got looks and got touches,Ž Klees said. Overall, I was very pleased,Ž Klees said. It was a chance to see if we were gonna hit and be physical … and we did.Ž The main thing with the spring game, Klees said, was to give a lot of people an opportunity to show what they could do. The team is young this year. Klees noted that the War Eagles lost about 25 seniors. Thats a lot to replace,Ž he said. Last years War Eagles went all the way to the state championship game. This years team is relying on returning quarterback Caleb Stephens, and offfensive linemen Johnathan Chunn and Chris Grif“ n. How well the team does in the fall depends on how hard they work in the summer once the two--a-days start, Klees said. Demetrius Lindsey carries the ball against the Madison Cowboys in the spring game. proudly presents No needles, pain or radiation! Visit CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.com for more information. 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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBy MARJ LAW Wednesday morning is the time women get together at the WCSO Range in Sopchoppy. The other day, we women were discussing men who purchase guns for their wives. A man wants his wife to be safe. This is a reason why he purchases a gun for her. One of his main considerations is stopping power. When his wife shoots Mr. BadŽ, the husband wants Mr. Bad to be stopped in his tracks. He does not want his wife to shoot and merely wound Mr. Bad. A husband wants Mr. Bad to be down, down, down. Once he makes the decision to purchase a gun for his wife, he looks for one that will put Mr. Bad down with a single shot. Hell handle many guns; usually choosing a 9, 40 or 45 mm pistol. These handguns have great stopping power. After the gun is purchased, the man takes his wife to the range to learn to shoot. He discusses the safety rules of the range. He talks about the gun, showing its parts and then he goes over gun safety. He demonstrates how to load and shoot the gun. After his demonstration, he hands the gun to his wife. She shoots. Her shooting arm ” ies up in the air. Her eyes are wide with surprise. Wow!Ž she cries. This gun has Some Kick!Ž And its loud!Ž Then she sits down. Her husband encourages her to shoot again. No, Ill just sit here and watch and learn from you,Ž she responds agreeably. After that, there is little chance she will shoot again. As I see it, this is a huge problem. Will the wife ever shoot that gun again? Will she ever want to return to the range? If the answer is no, then the wife has no protection, and the husbands concern for her safety is not answered. To avoid this situation, every husband who wants his wife to shoot should bring her with him when he purchases the gun. This is because most men are larger: they have more body mass and larger hands than women. A gun “ ts differently in different hands. What is comfortable to one person may not be comfortable to another. Firepower is important. A 9 mm has good stopping power. However not all 9 mm guns shoot the same. Some have more recoil than others. Several women who attend the Wednesday morning gatherings can handle a lot of recoil. Several cannot. This should be taken into consideration before the gun purchase. Next, if the woman is new to shooting she many well need to learn to walk before she can run. A gun has power and a gun makes a sudden loud noise. This can take some getting used to. Id suggest her husband might want to bring or have borrowed a .22-caliber gun with a sturdy weight when they visit the range. This gun is easy to shoot and doesnt make a huge noise. It will help the woman lose her fear and be successful. She will learn not to ” inch when the gun goes off. Most likely, she will hit that target right away. Hitting the target brings confidence. Hitting the target is fun. After she becomes secure with the .22, then she will be ready to try a gun with more stopping power. Yes, it will have more recoil and be louder than the .22, but by this time, she will be prepared. It is now likely she will be successful and happy in shooting a larger caliber gun. What a husband wants for his wife when he buys her a gun is safety. If he takes her shopping with him to purchase the gun, and if he allows her the time to get used to shooting, she stands a good chance of enjoying herself at the range. And he will feel secure that she is safer in the home.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid gunner in her retirement.Capt. Jody Campbells column, From The Dock, will return next week.HOME ON THE RANGEWhat a man wants for a woman As part of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Departments Annual Fishing Tournament on May 19, local adults with boats volunteered to take kids “ shing. Two proud winners in the Spanish Mackerel Division display their catch and trophy and new rod and reel. Lil Daniel Lamarche, left, took third place Spanish mackerel and Trent Martin won “ rst place in Spanish mackerel. The boys “ shed aboard Daniels grandfathers boat out of Shell Point and Daniel Lamarche Sr. served as First Mate. Brag book:SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SUE DAMON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSKira Flanders of Crawfordville caught these two sharks while “ shing over the weekend at Shell Point. From FWC News The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is considering permanently adding two weeks to the end of the recreational season for bay scallops and it is asking the public to take this short survey to determine interest in the potential change. You may click on the link below to take the survey (the survey will be available until June 6): https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ZGB6R7D The survey is also available at MyFWC.com/Fishing by clicking on Saltwater.ŽFrom FWC NewsThe 2012 Gulf of Mexico red snapper recreational harvest season begins June 1 in state and federal waters. The last day of the 40-day season is July 10. This years state season, which is the same as the 2012 federal recreational red snapper season in the Gulf of Mexico, was set in May at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission meeting. Florida state waters in the Gulf extend from shore to nine nautical miles; federal waters extend beyond that line to 200 nautical miles. The Gulf red snapper stock is improving, but the population still needs an increase in the number of older “ sh for it to be sustainable, according to FWC. Red snapper are estimated to live more than 50 years, but the current stock consists primarily of “ sh that are only a few years old. More information about red snapper “ shing is available online at MyFWC. com/Fishing. Click on Saltwater,Ž Recreational RegulationsŽ then Gulf Red Snapper.ŽGulf red snapper season begins June 1FWC polling bay scallop harvesters with survey 713-0014 99 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Perfect Weather for Outdoor Seating Overlooking Beautiful Dickerson Bay!SATURDAY AND SUNDAY LUNCH SPECIALS 11a.m. 3p.m. All Under $10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS $2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 27 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. 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Summer certainly felt as if it arrived over Memorial Day weekend in our area. With temperatures reaching into the 90s it is a great time to be out on the water. The 98 degree temperature did not stop our Flotilla Staff Of“ cer for Vessel Exams Steve Hults from setting up a free vessel inspection day on Saturday. He was joined by Tim Ashely, Raye Crews, Mike Harrison, Phil Hill and Mark Rosen. In addition to the Vessel Exams, the groups also set up a booth with various information on local and federal regulations for boating. Steve Hults began the day inspecting almost a dozen vessels at Shell Island Fish Camp before heading over to Fort St. Marks to meet up with the rest of the Auxiliarists. By days end, almost 50 boats had been inspected. Not all of the boats that were inspected passed. The main reason for not passing were out of date flares and registration that was missing or out of date. Thankfully for boaters, the Auxiliary is a complimentary service and we cannot issue any tickets or “ nes for improper equipment, however FWC and other law enforcement agencies can. Our free service can help to make sure that you have all of the legally required items onboard if you were to be stopped. When we check your boat, we are looking for speci“ c items. Are your registration numbers displayed properly? Do you have your registration papers and are they current? Do you have enough life jackets for everyone on board and preferably at least one or two extra? A good point here is also that the life jackets are easy to reach and are properly “ tted for the passengers on board. Visual distress signals are your ” ares. Not only do they need to be on board, but they need to be current. It is never a bad idea to keep out of date ” ares as a back up, but to pass the inspection you need to have ones that have not expired. Every boat needs a way to produce sound either by a bell or horn. Also required for all boats are navigation lights that work. We do ask you to turn them on during a safety check. Depending on the size of your boat, you are required to have certain equipment. On of the required items is a “ re extinguisher that is not expired. Every boat should have at least one, and the larger your boat the more you are required to have. Optional or situational are proper ventilation and a backfire flame control. Boats over 26 feet must have a pollution Packard if they have a machine compartment and a MARPOL trash placard. If you have a toilet on your boat, we inspect it to make sure it is in good working order. All boats need a copy of the Coast Guard Navigation Rules on board and be in good working order. If there are any additional requirement for an area, we also check for these, but in are area of Florida there are no additional things we look for. While not required, we also look to see if you have a radio, an anchor, a way to remove water from your boat and a “ rst aid kit. EVEN EXPERIENCED BOATERS NEED A VESSEL SAFETY CHECK! Fifteen minutes could save your life and the life of your family. Next week, we will get back to some navigation rules and other good information on boating safety. And, as Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAuxiliarists Raye Crews and Mike Harrison perform at boat inspection in St. Marks over Memorial Day weekend. The Coast Guard Auxiliarists tent with a banner promoting free vessel inspections for boaters..Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Cemetery Science.Mockingbirds defend their territory by patrolling their boundary displaying to their neighbors. In the spring, my graduate mentor sent many of us aspiring scientists out into the “ eld to document mockingbird territory, and what better place than the cemetery. Each headstone was uniquely identi“ able by both observer and subject bird alike. The cemetery was and still is a quiet place for re” ection and study, a perfect place to sit under a shade tree and draw out the headstone the birds selected while singing to or engaging with their neighbors. By the end of an hour or two, I would have not only the territory of one, but several birds mapped out, and their respective community of dearly departed resting below. Resources such as a nest, standing water, and protected high perch, were also identi“ ed, with the amount of time spent in each dutifully recorded for a time budget. The scene was serene, with blooming ” owers of spring, the hustle of the birds and the bustle of the insects competing with my attention for the science lesson at hand. Then a bird would ” y up and out of its territory to go visit another on a distant meadow, causing me to jump up and be quick to the chase. Sharing time and space with this community of bird and departed was cathartic. Someone told me “ sh were the birds of the sea. In the course of time, I soon found myself on a patchreef and with time on my hands, mapping the territory of “ sh in the same fashion as I did with my cemetery birds. The Coco damsel“ sh is remarkably like the mockingbird, in that it defends a part of the reef that is de“ ned by structures by engaging in mock battle with its neighbors. Coral and sponge colonies replaced headstones, but the rest was very similar. A time budget revealed the value of a nest, cleaning station (shrimp and “ sh that clean others), grazing area and defensive perch. I was ever so surprised one day to see my subject swim up over the reef and race off to brie” y visit with others on a distant undefended part of the reef. Other diving scientists reported that these territorial “ sh were communicating by sound as well! Did these two very different groups of animals read the same manual? I then began to see other “ sh species with underor overlapping territories -some so small like the Bicolor, several “ t inside of one Coco territory, others that included several Coco territories, all species tolerant of each other, but seldom of itself. Then one day, a 5-inch Butter” y “ sh came into the patch reef community. Some “ sh are territory defenders and some are territory marauders. This long nose Butter” y “ sh attacked the anemone that housed a cleaning station, ripping out half before detection. The smallest defenders, in which the shared cleaning station resided, were the “ rst to attack. They were no match for the Butter” y “ sh, measuring 1/10th the size, but the ruckus they rose attracted the Coco damsel“ sh, which were half its size, but willing to attack. As the Butter” y “ sh rose up out of the reef, the Three Spot joined in biting small mouthfuls of scales from a now ” eeing marauder. Then to my right the Grasby grouper, an 18-inch resident that rested on his favorite perch and seldom defended the patch, lifted off and bit the Butter” y “ sh in two. In the end, the crabs had a feast, as the grouper showed no further interest. Now that is community action! Perhaps reef “ sh are more complicated than the cemetery birds, or perhaps I just did not stay long enough in the cemetery to see the bigger picture. I do enjoy the serenity and mystery of the reef, but miss the dearly departed and their distinctive headstones. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday y Thu May 31, 12 Fri Jun 1, 12 Sat Jun 2, 12 Sun Jun 3, 12 Mon Jun 4, 12 Tue Jun 5, 12 Wed Jun 6, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 12:31 AM 3.3 ft. 1:34 AM 3.5 ft. 2:29 AM 3.5 ft. 3:19 AM 3.5 ft. 4:05 AM 3.4 ft. 4:48 AM High 1.3 ft. 4:46 AM 1.4 ft. 5:47 AM 1.6 ft. 6:42 AM 1.6 ft. 7:32 AM 1.6 ft. 8:19 AM 1.6 ft. 9:03 AM 1.6 ft. 9:47 AM Low 3.6 ft. 11:13 AM 3.8 ft. 12:01 PM 4.0 ft. 12:48 PM 4.2 ft. 1:34 PM 4.3 ft. 2:19 PM 4.3 ft. 3:03 PM 4.2 ft. 3:47 PM High 0.2 ft. 6:06 PM -0.3 ft. 7:04 PM -0.7 ft. 7:58 PM -0.9 ft. 8:48 PM -1.0 ft. 9:36 PM -0.9 ft. 10:21 PM -0.6 ft. 11:05 PM Low Thu May 31, 12 Fri Jun 1, 12 Sat Jun 2, 12 Sun Jun 3, 12 Mon Jun 4, 12 Tue Jun 5, 12 Wed Jun 6, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 12:28 AM 3.4 ft. 1:31 AM 3.5 ft. 2:26 AM 3.6 ft. 3:16 AM 3.6 ft. 4:02 AM 3.5 ft. 4:45 AM High 1.4 ft. 4:43 AM 1.6 ft. 5:44 AM 1.7 ft. 6:39 AM 1.8 ft. 7:29 AM 1.8 ft. 8:16 AM 1.7 ft. 9:00 AM 1.7 ft. 9:44 AM Low 3.7 ft. 11:10 AM 3.9 ft. 11:58 AM 4.1 ft. 12:45 PM 4.3 ft. 1:31 PM 4.4 ft. 2:16 PM 4.4 ft. 3:00 PM 4.3 ft. 3:44 PM High 0.2 ft. 6:03 PM -0.3 ft. 7:01 PM -0.8 ft. 7:55 PM -1.0 ft. 8:45 PM -1.1 ft. 9:33 PM -0.9 ft. 10:18 PM -0.7 ft. 11:02 PM Low Thu May 31, 12 Fri Jun 1, 12 Sat Jun 2, 12 Sun Jun 3, 12 Mon Jun 4, 12 Tue Jun 5, 12 Wed Jun 6, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 1:07 AM 3.1 ft. 2:10 AM 3.2 ft. 3:05 AM 3.3 ft. 3:55 AM 3.2 ft. 4:41 AM 3.2 ft. 5:24 AM High 1.1 ft. 5:50 AM 1.3 ft. 6:51 AM 1.4 ft. 7:46 AM 1.5 ft. 8:36 AM 1.5 ft. 9:23 AM 1.5 ft. 10:07 AM 1.4 ft. 10:51 AM Low 3.3 ft. 11:49 AM 3.5 ft. 12:37 PM 3.7 ft. 1:24 PM 3.9 ft. 2:10 PM 4.0 ft. 2:55 PM 4.0 ft. 3:39 PM 3.9 ft. 4:23 PM High 0.2 ft. 7:10 PM -0.3 ft. 8:08 PM -0.6 ft. 9:02 PM -0.8 ft. 9:52 PM -0.9 ft. 10:40 PM -0.8 ft. 11:25 PM Low Thu May 31, 12 Fri Jun 1, 12 Sat Jun 2, 12 Sun Jun 3, 12 Mon Jun 4, 12 Tue Jun 5, 12 Wed Jun 6, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 12:23 AM 2.5 ft. 1:26 AM 2.6 ft. 2:21 AM 2.6 ft. 3:11 AM 2.6 ft. 3:57 AM 2.5 ft. 4:40 AM High 0.9 ft. 4:57 AM 1.0 ft. 5:58 AM 1.1 ft. 6:53 AM 1.2 ft. 7:43 AM 1.2 ft. 8:30 AM 1.2 ft. 9:14 AM 1.2 ft. 9:58 AM Low 2.7 ft. 11:05 AM 2.9 ft. 11:53 AM 3.0 ft. 12:40 PM 3.1 ft. 1:26 PM 3.2 ft. 2:11 PM 3.2 ft. 2:55 PM 3.2 ft. 3:39 PM High 0.1 ft. 6:17 PM -0.2 ft. 7:15 PM -0.5 ft. 8:09 PM -0.7 ft. 8:59 PM -0.7 ft. 9:47 PM -0.6 ft. 10:32 PM -0.5 ft. 11:16 PM Low Thu May 31, 12 Fri Jun 1, 12 Sat Jun 2, 12 Sun Jun 3, 12 Mon Jun 4, 12 Tue Jun 5, 12 Wed Jun 6, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 12:15 AM 2.6 ft. 1:18 AM 2.7 ft. 2:13 AM 2.7 ft. 3:03 AM 2.7 ft. 3:49 AM 2.6 ft. 4:32 AM High 1.2 ft. 4:25 AM 1.4 ft. 5:26 AM 1.5 ft. 6:21 AM 1.6 ft. 7:11 AM 1.6 ft. 7:58 AM 1.6 ft. 8:42 AM 1.5 ft. 9:26 AM Low 2.8 ft. 10:57 AM 3.0 ft. 11:45 AM 3.1 ft. 12:32 PM 3.3 ft. 1:18 PM 3.4 ft. 2:03 PM 3.4 ft. 2:47 PM 3.3 ft. 3:31 PM High 0.2 ft. 5:45 PM -0.3 ft. 6:43 PM -0.7 ft. 7:37 PM -0.9 ft. 8:27 PM -1.0 ft. 9:15 PM -0.9 ft. 10:00 PM -0.6 ft. 10:44 PM Low Thu May 31, 12 Fri Jun 1, 12 Sat Jun 2, 12 Sun Jun 3, 12 Mon Jun 4, 12 Tue Jun 5, 12 Wed Jun 6, 12 Date 2.2 ft. 1:26 AM 2.4 ft. 2:49 AM 2.5 ft. 3:53 AM 2.6 ft. 4:46 AM 2.6 ft. 5:30 AM 2.6 ft. 6:08 AM High 1.2 ft. 3:37 AM 1.5 ft. 4:39 AM 1.7 ft. 5:38 AM 1.9 ft. 6:33 AM 1.9 ft. 7:24 AM 1.9 ft. 8:13 AM 1.8 ft. 9:04 AM Low 2.8 ft. 10:22 AM 2.9 ft. 10:56 AM 3.1 ft. 11:34 AM 3.2 ft. 12:17 PM 3.2 ft. 1:04 PM 3.2 ft. 1:55 PM 3.1 ft. 2:47 PM High 0.1 ft. 5:41 PM -0.2 ft. 6:34 PM -0.5 ft. 7:25 PM -0.6 ft. 8:15 PM -0.7 ft. 9:03 PM -0.6 ft. 9:50 PM -0.4 ft. 10:34 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 31 June 6First June 26 Full June 4 Last June 11 New June 19Major Times 9:53 AM 11:53 AM 10:20 PM 12:20 AM Minor Times 3:17 AM 4:17 AM 4:34 PM 5:34 PM Major Times 10:48 AM 12:48 PM 11:17 PM 1:17 AM Minor Times 3:59 AM 4:59 AM 5:42 PM 6:42 PM Major Times --:---:-11:47 AM 1:47 PM Minor Times 4:46 AM 5:46 AM 6:51 PM 7:51 PM Major Times 12:18 AM 2:18 AM 12:50 PM 2:50 PM Minor Times 5:40 AM 6:40 AM 8:00 PM 9:00 PM Major Times 1:21 AM 3:21 AM 1:53 PM 3:53 PM Minor Times 6:40 AM 7:40 AM 9:04 PM 10:04 PM Major Times 2:25 AM 4:25 AM 2:56 PM 4:56 PM Minor Times 7:44 AM 8:44 AM 10:02 PM 11:02 PM Major Times 3:26 AM 5:26 AM 3:55 PM 5:55 PM Minor Times 8:50 AM 9:50 AM 10:53 PM 11:53 PM Average Average Better Best Best Better Good6:36 am 8:33 pm 4:35 pm 3:18 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:36 am 8:34 pm 5:43 pm 4:00 am 6:36 am 8:34 pm 6:52 pm 4:47 am 6:35 am 8:35 pm 8:01 pm 5:41 am 6:35 am 8:35 pm 9:05 pm 6:41 am 6:35 am 8:36 pm 10:03 pm 7:45 am 6:35 am 8:36 pm 10:54 pm 8:51 am68% 75% 83% 91% 99% 94% 86% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsA 37-year-old Crawfordville man was arrested following the execution of a search warrant at a home at 277 Woodville Highway in Crawfordville Tuesday, May 22, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Anthony Devirgil Miller was arrested for possession of a vehicle with altered numbers, vehicle theft, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of cocaine during the investigation. During more than two months of investigation, Wakulla County Sheriffs Office detectives determined that stolen property was being stored at the location. A motorcycle, reported stolen by the Florida State University Police Department, was on the property and was seized March 2. A second motorcycle was observed on the property during the execution of the search warrant on May 22 along with motorcycle parts and spray paint. The stolen motorcycle was spray painted black. A ramp at the rear of the home which allowed a motorcycle or other wheeled vehicles to be introduced inside the home was also observed. Cocaine, marijuana and drug paraphernalia were also observed in the home. The stolen motorcycle had an ignition removed and the vehicle identi“ cation number was scratched off. The motorcycle was seized as evidence. It had been reported stolen by the Tallahassee Police Department on May 8. Miller was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Detectives Nick Boutwell, Rob Giddens and Lorne Whaley investigated.Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum recognized Ashley Renee Methvin with a Special Recognition Award Friday, May 25. Methvin, who is about to graduate from nursing school, was traveling on Crawfordville Highway near Trice Lane on Tuesday, April 17 when she stopped her vehicle and administered assistance to two individuals who were injured in a traffic crash while riding a moped without a helmet. The moped riders became involved in a traf“ c crash with another vehicle and Methvins action resulted in a positive outcome for the two teenagers. Methvin said she was riding with her young child when the accident occurred in front of her. She said she gave her son pizza to keep him occupied while she determined how she could help the teenagers. I would never ride a moped without a helmet,Ž she said. I wasnt sure if I was going to have to administer my “ rst CPR on a teenager. My son got his pizza a little early.Ž We appreciate you taking the time to render assistance on the scene,Ž said Sheriff Crum. Thanks to your actions and others at the scene there was a positive outcome.Ž Methvin was joined at the award presentation by her mother and aunt, Virginia Carter and Frances Trumbull. Lt. Billy Jones also took part in the recognition event.Special to The NewsFocus Wakulla is a young professionals group designed to target Chamber members 45 years of age or younger. This group will host events and special functions to meet the needs of our future leaders as they seek to grow and develop professionally as Chamber members and citizens of Wakulla County. The group will hold its inaugural event at Poseys Dockside Caf on June 29 beginning at 6 p.m. The groups stated goals are: F oster and support economic development. O ptimize networking opportunities. C reate and cultivate future leaders. U nderstanding and awareness of government processes. S trengthen and enrich our community. 000BBXI 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) 10AM (TUE-FRI) HAIR SALON FREE HAIRCUT FEATHER LOCKS are here!!FULL SERVICE FAMILY SALON all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ Special to The NewsA crew of off-duty Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce volunteers helped build a handicapped ramp at the Crawfordville home of Dallas Miller on Tuesday, May 29. Ability 1st provides several services to Wakulla residents who qualify under their guidelines including those who accessibility issues. Dallas Miller said he was concerned about being able to safely navigate the steps at his home as he has gotten older. Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum encourages members of his staff to volunteer their time and he has participated in similar projects in the past. Road Patrol deputies Lt. Mike Kemp, Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Clint Beam used their day off to build Miller a ramp under the supervision of Ability 1sts Eric Evans. Undersheriff Maurice Langston took part of his lunch hour to hammer several nails to help the crew reach its goal of finishing the ramp in one day. Dallas Miller contributed some money to pay for part of the cost of his ramp materials while the work crew volunteered the labor time. The ramp was part of the 6 Ramps in 6 DaysŽ building initiative and each project is managed by Accessibility Program Manager Kevin Ogden. Ability 1st received funding from the Wakulla County United Way campaign to provide the materials needed for the work project. Miller smiled as his new ramp began to take place. Im excited,Ž he said. I was scared of those old stairs. I am not a young Marine anymore.ŽArrest made after searchMethvin receives award Focus Wakulla will meetSheri s volunteers help with ramp Anthony Devirgil Miller Sheriff Crum presents Methvin with the award. Her aunt and mother look on. Sheriffs of“ ce volunteers work on a ramp for Ability 1st.Rescue: Several crashes were reported over Memorial Day weekend, including an an overturned vehicle on Spring Hill Road on Thursday night, above. On Friday night, a near head-on at Shadeville Highway, rightBoth vehicles received extensive damage, but no injuries were reported.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 – Page 13Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn May 18, Brian Lewis Charles, 33, of Crawfordville was charged with three counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill for threatening three juveniles with his automobile. The three male victims, ages 13, 14 and 15, were walking on Crawfordville Highway near Hardees when a PT Cruiser left the highway and attempted to run them over. A witness observed the vehicle nearly strike the boys as all four vehicle tires left the roadway. The victims knew the suspect and the witness was also able to identify the suspect. Deputy Scott Powell transported Charles to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. The juveniles were not injured. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce this week: € On May 17, Felicia Thornton of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. An electronic game system, valued at $300, was stolen from her home. The property is owned by Anthony Connell of Crawfordville. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € On May 17, a retail theft was reported at WalMart. Michael David Turner, 19, of Eastpoint allegedly removed MTG cards without paying for them. The cards are valued at $29. Turner was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On May 17, Kevin James of Crawfordville reported the theft of an air conditioning unit. The unit was removed from a Sopchoppy residence. Persons of interest were interviewed following a traf“ c stop on Sopchoppy Highway. The driver had a suspended driver license. Deanqunette Lashay Thomas, 25, of Tallahassee was issued a Uniform Traf“ c Citation for driving while license was suspended or revoked. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € On May 18, Michael William Lindert of Crawfordville reported a structure “ re. The back porch of his residence was on “ re. Lindert and a roommate were able to put the “ re out with a garden hose. Damage was estimated at $5,100. The state Fire Marshal investigated and determined the “ re to be an accident due to individuals smoking on the porch. € On May 18, Deputy Nick Gray, Sgt. Ronald Mitchell, Deputy Mike Zimba and Detective Derek Lawhon were investigating a structure “ re when they responded to the Wakulla County Courthouse to investigate a suspicious person. Two subjects were observed walking near the facility at 5 a.m. One of the subjects ran when approached by law enforcement. Joshua Thomas Collins, 18, of Crawfordville did not run but was belligerent toward deputies. Collins refused to answer questions as to why he was walking in the area at that hour. He was arrested for loitering and prowling and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The other suspect was identi“ ed. € On May 18, Cody Cripe of Sopchoppy reported a residential burglary. Electronic gaming systems and change, valued at $757, were reported missing. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. € On May 18, a 14-yearold female reported that she and her Chihuahua were attacked by a pit bull in the Klickitat Drive area. EMS arrived on scene and treated the juvenile for several lacerations. Her dog also suffered a large laceration to his leg. The Animal Control Unit caught the canine. The bulldog was taken to the Wakulla Animal Shelter while the investigation continues. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. € On May 18, Steven Rice of Crawfordville was involved in a vehicle crash with a parked vehicle at Wal-Mart. Rice struck a parked vehicle owned by Auburn Hambrick of Crawfordville. Rices vehicle did not contain sufficient power steering ” uid which caused the steering to fail and the crash to occur. Rice was found at fault for the crash for operating an unsafe vehicle. Each vehicle suffered $1,500 worth of damage. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € On May 19, David Settles of Tallahassee reported a residential burglary in Crawfordville. A total of $1,150 worth of property including a transmission, dune buggy, lead and ammunition brass, were removed from sheds on the property that were also damaged. Damage to the sheds was estimated at $225. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € On May 20, Sarah Herrin of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at her home. A suspect, who has been identi“ ed, moved out of the home and removed several items owned by the victim including a television bar stools, food items, coffee pot, picture frames and other items, valued at $375. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On May 20, Michael Barrett of Tallahassee was southbound on U.S. Highway 319 with Jason Davis of Crawfordville following behind him. Barrett slowed to turn onto Emmett Whaley Road and Davis failed to yield and struck the rear of the Barrett vehicle. Davis was issued a traf“ c citation for careless driving. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On May 20, Erin Juszczyk of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone poured an undetermined liquid on her vehicle which was parked in her driveway. Damage to the vehicle has not been determined. Sgt. Mike Helms determined that the liquid may have had a tomato base. € On May 21, Cynthia Thomas of Amerifirst Mortgage in Crawfordville reported the theft of an air conditioning unit. The power and copper lines to the unit were cut. The unit is valued at $2,000. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On May 21, Kathryn Briggs of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim noticed 22 unauthorized charges on her bank card. The charges were valued at $549. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € On May 21, Kenneth Strickland of Crawfordville reported the theft of an iPhone and currency, valued at $1,050. The property was removed from the victims boat after a trip on a river. Lt. Dale Evans investigated. € On May 21, Chelsea Gregory of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone placed roofing tacks on the victims driveway. Three tires were reported damaged on one vehicle and two tires were damaged on a second vehicle. Damage was estimated at $990. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € On May 21, Damian Smith of Crawfordville reported a trespass on property owned by Debra Sparks in Crawfordville. Smith observed a wooden stump missing which is used for wood lighter and is valued at $200. A juvenile suspect was identi“ ed. He used a rider mower to drag the stump off the victims property. The 13-year-old boy was issued a civil citation and eight hours of community service. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € On May 21, Jason Killion of Crawfordville reported an animal incident. The victim was walking his dog in Mysterious Waters when a bulldog attacked his dog. The victim was able to separate the two dogs with only minor injuries to his hand. The dogs owner was noti“ ed and the investigation was turned over to the Animal Control Unit. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On May 17, Michael Williams of Tallahassee reported a vehicle “ re in Medart. Fire“ ghters put out the blaze but the vehicle was a total loss. During the investigation it was determined that Williams had an outstanding warrant in Leon County. He was arrested and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Clint Beam and Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € On May 22, Laura White of Crawfordville reported the theft of a computer as she was moving from an old home to a new home. The computer is valued at $1,300 and suspects have been identified. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € On May 23, Theresa Monroe of Panacea reported the theft of household appliances from her home. The items were taken while she was moving and are valued at $145. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € On May 23, Janice Allen of Crawfordville reported the theft of a Florida license plate off a trailer. The plate was entered into the NCIC/FCIC computer. The property is valued at $100. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € On May 23, Detectives Nick Boutwell, Matt Helms and Derek Lawhon were investigating a case related to some stolen property when they observed marijuana growing at a Crawfordville residence. Three marijuana plants were discovered in plain view. The small plants were seized and turned over to the WCSO Evidence Division. € On May 23, John Gerhardt of the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department reported the theft of computer equipment from county of“ ces on Crescent Way. The stolen property was valued at $800 and evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 914 calls for service during the past week including 25 residential and business alarms; 86 citizen contacts; 18 disturbances; 19 abandoned E-911 calls; 29 regular E-911 calls; 40 investigations; 12 loud music/noise complaints; 37 medical emergencies; 261 residential and business security checks; 18 special details; 12 suspicious people; 80 traf“ c enforcements; 78 traf“ c stops; 11 abandoned vehicles; and 24 reckless vehicles.Sheri s Report Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the top-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011…2012.Ž Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Friday, June 8 Friday, June 22 Firday, July 13 Friday, July 27 Friday, August 10 Friday, August 24 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA Law Oce Est. 1998Fore cl osures Creditor/Debtor Business L aw1 7 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordvi ll e, F l orida HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

PAGE 14

Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant – AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerEl Jalisco – Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans – Grilled Chicken Pita with side Hamaknockers – Flatbread HoagiePulled Pork or Chicken Bouys By The Bay – Shrimp Basket & Drink Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. € 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99 Mixed Tues. & urs. Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under 926-4329 mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza 926432 9 9 2 6 4 3 29 2 9 Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.com Open 7 Days Open 7 Days 926-7530 Restaurant 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville Private Party Rooms Private Party Rooms Tuesday Nights Tuesday Nights $ 4 95 $ 4 95 Spaghetti with Meat Sauce Spaghetti with Meat Sauce OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Win One Meal from Every Restaurant! E A T I N ’ p a t h … EATIN’ path… O F F OFF t h e the EATIN’ path…OFF the Winner Lorra Phillipsdrawn from Hamaknockers in Crawfordville SWEET SHOP NOW OPEN WITH ICE CREAM SWEET SHOP NOW OPEN WITH ICE CREAM 850-984-9994 SEAFOOD RESTAURANT & MORE 1349 B COASTAL HWY 98, PANACEA FL. 850-984-9994 12 PIECE SHRIMP BASKET ......... $ 7 99 LUNCH BUFFET ................... $ 10 00 MON. FRI. 11 2 SEAFOOD BUFFET THURSDAY 11 2pm Open Lunch & Dinner 7 Days A Week 11 9 11 10 on Weekends COME IN AND SEE US COME IN AND SEE US Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Menu Myra Jean’s : Old School Scoopin !The art of making a chocolate malt is still alive at Myra Jean’s in Crawfordville. Three scoops of Blue Bell, Hershey’s chocolate syrup, whole milk and malted milk powder. No plastic bag of gelatinous slurry like you get from the fast food guys. Myra jean’s still scoops. It’s why the girls of Myra Jean’s have such strong right arms, and it’s why a Malt or shake from there tastes so fantastic. They’re not easy to make and they’re not quick to make. Sometimes the ice cream gets bunched up inside the stainless steel cup and the mixing rotors violently sling the whole shake at the preparer forcing them to rescoop and start over. They may even need a change of clothes. It’s worth it though. The work, the wait, the mess, the price. It’s worth it. When Myra Jean’s is nished crafting a Malt or Shake, They pour half of it in a pretty parfait glass and top it with a dollop of whipped cream and place a sweet, red cherry on top. The other half is left in the stainless steel mixing cup causing the outside of it to frost. Both halves are brought to your table or seat at the counter for you to sip on, share and savor. Many things have been improved during the last 50 years. Cars are better and so are televisions. Myra Jean’s feels the milkshake was perfected in the 1930s and there is no reason to screw them now up by modernizing. They still serve their Sundaes, Splits and Shakes in fancy glassware and they still believe in the art of old school scoopin.Consultant proposes more multi-use trails around the countyBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAt the May 17 Wakulla County Commission workshop, the countys consultant Kimley-Horn and Associates presented a preliminary recommendation for the countys bicycle, pedestrian, blueways master plan. Several multi-use trails were proposed around the county, as well as policy recommendations, safe routes to schools, extra launch sites, improving launch faciltiies, adding sidewalks and having uni“ ed signage throughout the county. These recommendations were formulated from meetings with community stakeholders and public workshops. A public workshop was held on Feb. 16 by Kimley-Horn seeking ideas on how to improve walking, biking and paddling in Wakulla County. Included in the draft master plan, is extending the Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail, which is currently being constructed, to Sopchoppy. Jon Sewell, of KimelyHorn, said he and his staff met with city employees and of“ cials with Sopchoppy to address the possibility. Currently, the trail terminates at Highway 319 right outside Sopchoppy. There was some discussion about using city property as a park and trail head. Sewell said they plan to set up a meeting with the Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency to try and get funding for that project. There was also a proposed trail along the U.S. Highway 98 corridor. This area was brought up the most by the public, Sewell said. The trail would be broken into seven segments, going from Highway 319 through Panacea and Medart and cross the Wakulla and St. Marks rivers, Sewell said. This corridor is vital to the proposed Capital City to Sea Loop, which goes from Tallahassee south to St. Marks, west to Panacea, up to Sopchoppy, down to Carrabelle, and back to Tallahassee, Sewell said. There were also a trail proposed on the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road corridor. This would run from MLK Jr, Road to Highway 319 to Spring Creek. It would connect to U.S. Highway 98 and start to connect Crawfordville, Sewell said. There was also a trail proposed along Arran Road, which could possibly connect Crawfordville to the Capital City to Sea Loop, and one on Bloxham Cutoff. Widening shoulders and paving markers for bike lanes were also recommended. For sidewalks, the biggest need is near the Wakulla County Senior Center, Sewell said. They also incorporated the Crawfordville Town Plan recommendations, as well as recommendations from the Panacea public access plan and St. Marks. Sopchoppy sent in sidewalk enhancement ideas for downtown. Safe routes to schools were also recommended for Crawfordville Elementary School, COAST Charter School, Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School. Under blueways, additional launch sites were suggested at the Sopchoppy River, Lower Ochlockonee, Wakulla River, St. Marks River and the Gulf of Mexico. They also suggested designating St. Marks River as a paddling trail. Tourist Development Council Director Pam Portwood said the TDC has received grant funding to establish an Apalachee Bay Maritime Heritage paddling trail. Kimley-Horn staff also recommended improving launch facilities for non-motorized boats and provide amenities at all access points. They also suggested applying to become a blueway community, which Portwood said TDC is also working on that designation, as well as becoming a part of the Florida Paddling Trails Association. Uniform signage was also suggested, as well as information kiosk signs. Policy recommendations included designating a bicycle, pedestrian, blueway program manager to be a contact person for projects and for the Department of Transportation and the CRTPA, as well as creating an advisory committee, setting performance standards and establishing maintenance policies that address repair of trails, bike lanes and sidewalks. An annual report on plan progress should be done and the master plan should be updated every “ ve years, Sewell said. Funding sources were also discussed. Some possibilities included CRTPA funding, VisitFlorida, money from the BP Oil Spill, Florida Forever and Community Redevelopment Block Grants. The “ nal report will be “ nished in June. COUNTY COMMISSION

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012The Wakulla news EXTRA! Hunger is a problem in WakullaBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net One of the major issues facing those in need in Wakulla County is the lack of food. There are 4,480 people in Wakulla County that live with food insecurity, not knowing at one time where their next meal might come from. Food insecurity is USDAs measure of the lack of access, at times, to enough food for an active, healthy life for all members of a household and limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate foods. There are some state and federal programs available to assist low income families, as well as food pantries and emergency food assistance. However, there is still not enough to meet the needs of everyone suffering. Many of these programs follow the federal poverty guidelines for eligibility. A two-person household making less than $14,710 would qualify and a four-person making $22,350 would qualify. The food pantries in Wakulla County are usually donation-driven and some also buy food from Americas Second Harvest of the Big Bend. It is estimated that there are about 11 pantries in the county, each one doing the best it can with the resources available. Some are more self sufficient than others,Ž said Shelley Swenson, Wakulla County extension agent. Spokespeople for several of the organizations indicated that they are so scared of being overwhelmed with a large number of people, that they wont allow their locations to be published. They rely solely on word of mouth. Some are also concerned about people taking advantage of the pantries. President of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth Bruce Ashley said a few people take advantage, but that doesnt mean they should stop helping. The coalition has tried to establish lines of communication between the pantries so they can better serve those in need. The coalition has applied for a hunger grant from the Wal-Mart Foundation to help stock the existing food pantries. The grant award will be announced in October. Elma Gillette is one of the food ministry coordinators for Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church. Their pantry is open the last two Saturdays of the month, unless there is a holiday. They are also available for emergency assistance. The pantry was opened in 2010 after members of Crawfordville United Methodist Church had a surplus of food and gave it to her church. After that, they kept it going. It is completely donation driven and Gillette said they are lucky to have generous donors. The pantry serves 15 to 40 people a month, Gillette said. We dont turn anyone away,Ž she said. However, they do ask customers to “ ll out a form with the number of people in the household, their ages, as well as if they receive any other type of assistance and have been to a food pantry in the last 60 days. Families are given two to three bags of non-perishable food items and they can come to the pantry every six weeks.Continued on Page 3B POVERTY FILE PHOTOPeople line up for a recent food distribution at Manna Mission in Sopchoppy. is is the second story in an ongoing series on poverty in Wakulla. e March 29 issue featured a story on the lack of adequate, a ordable housing in the county. FOR FREE QUIT TIPS AND COUNSELING IN WAKULLA COUNTY CALL 850.926.0401 ext. 217 You’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe Wakuulanews

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, May 31  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, June 1  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, June 2  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB, a member of the National Button Society, will meet at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594, or email bardon56@aol.com. Sunday, June 3  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, June 4  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, June 5  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 6  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, June 7  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF WAKULLA will host a public records forum at 7 p.m. at the library. Barbara Petersen, president of the Florida First Amendment Foundation, will lead the forum. Special EventsThursday, May 31  PROJECT GRADUATION will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park from 2 p.m. to 2 a.m. The event is free to all Wakulla High School seniors. Students will have access to the lodge, swimming area, boat rides, food and entertainment. There will also be gift drawings. Friday, June 1  WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION CEREMONY will be held at 7 p.m. at Reynolds Field at J. D. Jones Stadium. Saturday, June 2  MOTORCYCLE POKER RUN “CARDS FOR CARING” will be held to bene t Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County. Registration is from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Capital City Harley Davidson, 1745 Capital Circle NW, Tallahassee. Registration is $15 per bike and $10 for a passenger. The best hand wins $250. For more information call Peggy at 926-5037 or Susan at 519-2292.  GARAGE SALE to bene t the League of Women Voters and its programs from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1357 Martin Luther King Road.  BOOK SALE EXTRAVAGANZA will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the library. Sunday, June 3  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Barbara Hines, outreach coordinator for the North Central Region of the Florida Public Archaeology Network as she presents “A Sticky Situation: The Naval Stores Industry in North Florida” at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The naval stores industry once dominated vast segments of Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and surrounding counties, including large areas of the St. Marks Refuge. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850.925-6121 for information. Thursday, June 7  MEET AND GREET WITH COUNTY COMMISSION CANDIDATE EMILY SMITH will be held at Posh Java at 6 p.m. Smith is a candidate for District 5. The evening will begin with music by Sammy Tedder and a brief presentation by Smtih. More music by Grant Peeples will follow. She will be available throughout the evening to respond to questions and concerns. For more information, contact Judith Harriss at joereme@gmail.com.  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public roundtable meeting from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge Education Building. It will begin with a brief presentation on recent TDC activities and initiatives, including some educational opportunities for local tourism-related businesses to increase their visibility to the traveling public. This will be followed by a facilitated discussion of how to keep our tourism industry engaged in responsible promotion of our incredible resources, ways that TDC can improve its marketing/advertising activities, and new ideas for marketing campaigns that can be fully developed to reach our target audiences. Upcoming EventsSaturday, June 9  WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 2002 10 year reunion will be held at Wildwood Resort at 6:30 p.m.  SJOGREN’S SUPPORT GROUP FOR NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA will be held at 1 p.m. at the Leon County Public Library,1583 Pedrick Road, Tallahassee. Come and meet others with Sjogren’s(showgrins), share experiences and learn about resources for living and coping with this complex, auto-immune disease. The meeting is free and handicap accessible. For more information, contact Kathleen Abrams, support group leader, at kabrams408@gmail.com or 668-3586. Friday, June 15  BLOOD DRIVE will be held at Wal-Mart from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Donors will receive a free T-shirt. Saturday, June 16  GOLF GONE WILD to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association will be held at St. James Bay Golf Resort. There will be cash prizes, a silent art auction and a nature photography slide-show and presentation, “The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay” (which will soon be a published book), by award-winning nature photographer John Spohrer. The event will bene t the FWMA, a 501(c)3 wildlife rehabilitation center located in Wakulla County that cares for sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife in our area. Enjoy golf at the gorgeous Audubon-sanctioned St. James Bay Golf Resort (151 Laughing Gull Lane in Carrabelle, Florida). To help by sponsoring the event or donating auction items, contact Lois Swoboda at 6535857. For more details, see the brochure on the website at www.wakullawildlife.org or call Lynne Cooper at (850) 697-9507. Saturday, June 23  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at Myra Jean’s restaurant from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. This will be a farewell party for April Schreiber. They will have cake and a gift to give her for all her hard work. This event will not be structured with activities as the past meetings have been. They are having the party at Myra Jean’s so that the kids can enjoy the trains set up in the restaurant. RSVP to Carrie Stevens by calling 274-9474 or emailing carriejstevens@comcast.net. Friday, June 29  BLOOD DRIVE will be held at the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Donors will receive a free T-shirt. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Project Graduation at Wakulla Springs from 2 p.m. to 2 a.m. Wakulla High School graduation at 7 p.m. at Reynolds Field. Habitat for Humanity Motorcycle Poker Run at 9:30 a.m., Capital City Harley Davidson. First Sunday at the Refuge at 2 p.m. at St. Marks Wildlife Refuge. ThursdayFridaySaturdayMonday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com By SCOTT JOYNERWCPL DirectorBook Extravaganza Fundraiser on Saturday, June 2 Our bi-monthly Book Extravaganza to bene“ t the Friends of the Library will be held on Saturday, June 2 from 9 a.m. to noon in our Main Meeting Room. As always, thousands of books, video and audio will be available for your browsing pleasure. Come early to get the best stuffŽ as we usually have a couple dozen people waiting to be let in when we open at 9 a.m. Come “ nd that perfect summer beach read, a great “ lm to watch while beating the heat and help support your library. All funds raised go directly toward funding our Summer Program, childrens programs throughout the year, part of our book budget and other library needs. Two new additions to the WCPL Family! Were very happy to announce that our Childrens Coordinator Leilania Nichols gave birth to her third daughter Lacey Catherine on Saturday May 19. Mom and daughter are doing great and we cant wait to see the newest member of the Nichols family. Congratulations to Leilania, her husband Paul, and the two big sisters Lily, and Laurel. As Leilania is obviously taking some well deserved time off, Molly Clore will be stepping in this summer to help us with the Summer Program. Clore is a former teacher and an active participant in library events, bringing her son and niece to our childrens programs, and being a member of the Library Advisory Board. Leilania and I thank Clore for pinch hitting this summer and Clore is very excited to have some fun with our great younger patrons. Summer Program Registration June 7 and 8 Its finally time. Registration for our Summer Programs takes place on Thursday, June 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. and Friday, June 8 from 10 a.m. to noon and 2 to 4 p.m. Detailed information on the program will be available along with signup sheets for our “ rst “ eld trip to the Tallahassee (Jr.) Museum. A bouncy house will be available outside for the kids while the parents are getting information on all the family fun this summer from Clore and myself. I dropped off brochures at every elementary and middle school for the students to take home, but if you need one, stop by and pick one up, or contact me and Ill be happy to email one to you. Sunshine State Readers Books The Sunshine State Young Readers books have arrived. We have the lists available at the library, or you can access the lists from our online library catalog at our website: http:// www.wakullalibrary.org/. (Just click on lists). Once you have logged into your account, you can place holds on any items that are checked out. If the book is not checked out, please call the library to check current availability. Please be aware that, as in past years, there will be no renewals allowed on these items. This will give other students a chance to check out these books. If you need assistance or want to place holds with us directly, please call the library and we will be glad to help. As with the high school summer reading books, we strongly encourage you to read these early or get placed on the hold list as soon as possible as the wait only gets longer the further into summer we go. Library News... Government MeetingsMonday, June 4  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular board meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, June 5  SMART GROWTH OPEN HOUSE will be held by the County Commission from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. It will include a presentation by Chris Duerksen on “Smart Growth Fixes for Rural Communities.” Duerksen will describe common barriers that can hinder the development of an attractive, walkable downtown and easy ways to remove these stumbling blocks, discuss effective ways to encourage rural commercial development and describe ways to preserve the beauty of rural roads. Wednesday, June 6  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop from noon to 1:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. Environmental Protection Agency experts, county commissioners, planning commissioners and other key stakeholders will discuss the Crawfordville Town Plan and ways to maintain its rural character of county roads, particularly the Big Bend Scenic Byway.

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Continued from Page 1B Gillette said they serve many low income families and seafood workers, as well as a number of people who have never had to ask for assistance. One woman Gillette helped went to her church and she said she knew her family was struggling, but the woman wouldnt come to the food pantry. She was ashamed,Ž Gillette said. So Gillette showed up at the womans of“ ce with several bags of food. She just cried,Ž Gillette said and then the woman asked her, How did you know?Ž I can just look at a person and know,Ž Gillette said. It isnt the way they look or the way they dress, Gillette said a persons demeanor changes. She never thought she would ever have to go to a food pantry,Ž she said. Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist isnt the only church that operates a food pantry. Radical Restoration Ministries in Panacea has a pantry, as well as Crawfordville United Methodist, Wakulla United Methodist Church, Promise Land Ministries and Manna Community Mission. There are other food pantries that arent publicized. Promise Land Ministries has a food pantry, along with a shelter for men. The pantry is open the first Wednesday of the month from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Manna Community Mission, located in Sopchoppy, opened a food pantry last year and serves people every Thursday. They buy food from Second Harvest and the truck arrives sometime between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. They start handing out numbers at 10 a.m. In April, co-founder Janet Culbertson estimates that they served about 1,140 people, about 100 people come through the pantry each week. Requirements are based on income and the amount of food given is based on the number of people in a household. The Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce serves as a drop-off location for nonperishable food items to distribute to the food pantries, as well as the senior center and library. Wakulla Springs Baptist Church is also growing a garden to supplement one of the food pantries. Another agency that provides food assistance is Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida, which serves seven counties including Wakulla County. They provide emergency assistance. There are also several churches that serve as host sites for Gaballi Foods. This is a faith-based program that helps the public save 30 to 70 percent in groceries. Anyone can purchase food from the program, regardless of income level. Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist, Harvest Fellowship and Christ Church Anglican serve as sites. The Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center tries to help the seniors in the county. They provide meals five days a week at the center. They also provide meals on wheels, or home delivered meals, to the elderly once a week. The meal consists of a main course, bread, milk and dessert. There are also several federal and state programs that are available to those in need. One of these programs is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as food stamps. To meet the income requirement, households must pass a gross income limit at 200 percent of Federal Poverty Guidelines. A family of four would need to make less than $46,100 a year. If they meet the income requirement, they received an EBT card which acts like a debit card. A family of four would receive $668 a month. According to Erin Gillespie, press secretary for Florida Department of Children and Families, there were 4,451 people who received food stamps in March in Wakulla County. That number is 10 percent higher than March 2011, she said. This is the most common program, she said. DCF also has Medicaid and Welfare. Another program is the Special Supplemental Nutrition for Women, Infant and Children. This program is intended for pregnant, breastfeeding mothers, infants under 1 year old and children up to 5 years old. The program is for low income people and those at high risk. Income eligibility is set at 185 percent of federal poverty guidelines, which is $41,348 for a family of four. WIC provides nutritious food to the mothers by providing them with checks on a monthly or bimonthly basis. These checks can only be used to purchase nutritious foods, such as milk, peanut butter, cheese, eggs, fruits, vegetables, etc. They cant buy junk,Ž said Merlinda Borgersen, senior public health nutritionist. Borgersen said they also offer nutrition counseling and education. Borgersen runs the WIC program for the Leon County Health Department which administers the program in Wakulla County and several other areas. Borgersen and her staff meet with clients every Wednesday at the Wakulla County Health Department from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. In Wakulla County, there are 448 participants in the WIC program, Borgersen said. To make an appointment or get started in the program, call (850) 606-3300. There are also a few programs available for students. The National School Lunch Program offer students who qualify free or reduced price lunch. Children with families with incomes at or below 130 percent of the poverty level are eligible for free lunch. Those with incomes between 130 percent and 185 percent are eligible for reduced lunch. Students can be charged no more than 30 cents for lunch in the program. As of May 22, there were 4,965 students enrolled in schools in the county. Out of these students, 2,069 were on free lunch and 463 were on reduced lunch, according to Gail Mathers, food service director for the district. Thats 50.9 percent of students in the county who are on free or reduced lunch, meaning a majority of families with children in the county are low income. According to Ebony Yarbrough, with Florida Impact, several years ago, that percentage was 25 to 30 percent. Majority of children in Wakulla County are most likely in need,Ž she said. Another program offered during the school year is Blessings in a Backpack.Ž Wakulla Pre-K has imple-mented this program where students who are on free or reduced lunch go home on Friday with a backpack full of food for the weekend. The program is funded by donations. Manna Community Mission recently implemented this type of program at Medart Elementary School through Second Harvest. Once school is out, the Summer Break Spot is offered, which is the USDA Summer Food Service Program. Free breakfast and lunch is provided at three sites around Wakulla County to all children under 18 years old. They do not have to qualify for free or reduced lunch during the school year. It is open to everyone. The three sites are Wakulla Education Center, Medart Elementary School and Wakulla High School. One of the problems with this program is getting children who truly need the food to these sites. Many lack transportation and the sites are too far away to walk or bike. If you can get them there, well feed them,Ž said Beth ODonnell, assistant superintendent for instruction. At a recent coalition for youth meeting, members discussed the need for mobile sites or more host sites. They planned to educate the public about the current sites and plan for next year. The need for food and other assistance are huge for many families and individuals in Wakulla County and these needs must be addressed by the community, said Gail Campbell, executive director for the coalition for youth. Ashley said if groups and churches are willing to come together, even more people could be helped. Organizations and churches are in need of help in the form of volunteers, support and donations. LOCATIONS AND NUMBERS Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist: 2780 Surf Road, Panacea, (850) 9840127. Harvest Thrift Store, Harvest Fellowship: 1596 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, (850) 9263535. Promise Land Ministries: 20 Church Road, Crawfordville, (850) 926-3281. Wakulla County Senior Center: 33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville, (850) 926-7145 Manna Community Mission: 110 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, (850) 926-5434 Wakulla United Methodist: 1584 Old Woodville Highway, (850) 421-5741 Crawfordville United Methodist: 176 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville, (850) 926-7209 Christ Church Anglican: 3383 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, (850) 7458412. Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce: 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville, (850) 926-3931 Americas Second Harvest of the Big Bend: (850) 562-3033. 211 Big Bend, information directory: 2-1-1 or (850) 617-6333, 211bigbend.net. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 – Page 3BHunger is a problem in WakullaBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net During the summer, free lunch and breakfast are provided to students at three different host sites. The problem for many students is getting there. The school district serves as a sponsor of the USDA’s Summer Feeding Program and offers the meals at three different schools, Medart Elementary, Wakulla Education Center and Wakulla High School. Sites can only be in areas where 50 percent or more of the children in the area qualify for free or reduced price meals during the school year. “Getting those kids to those existing sites is the issue,” said Shelley Swenson, Wakulla County extension agent. For many students, transportation is an issue and the sites are too far from home to bike or walk to. “They’re not reaching all that many kids,” said Fern Sloan, of Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Her church plans to feed children this summer, but not under the USDA program. A few years ago, Sloan said church members approached the school district to see if the church could become a host site. Sloan said they planned to pick up the food from another location and bring it back to the church to distribute the meals. This way more children were served, she said. But, the district would not approve it. Sloan, along with several other members of the community, met for a hunger meeting set up by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth on May 22 to discuss the issues with the program. They discussed the need for more sites and mobile sites where food can be served at several different locations around the county. Sloan said Wakulla County is mixed demographically and there isn’t a single poor area. All recognized the need of assistance seems to be growing. “A person who didn’t qualify yesterday, quali es today,” said Peggy Mackin, Wakulla County Senior Center board member and president of Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County. Elma Gillette, food ministry coordinator for Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church, agreed and said, “More and more are going below the poverty line.” Michelle Morris with the Department of Agriculture, who administers the feeding program for the state, suggested the county look at providing mobile sites. The only requirement is that the van or bus must stay long enough at each location for the children to consume the meal. She added that someone at each site must also be trained by the sponsor, which is the school district. “Anyone can manage a site as long as they have the training,” Morris said. The food can be served anywhere. She has seen food being distributed in parks, parking lots, churches and driveways. Franklin and Putnam counties have good programs established for mobile sites, she said. President of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth Bruce Ashley said they should reach out to these counties and learn from them. They all agreed to try and reach out to counties with existing programs and to focus on educating the public about the current sites. They also decided to wait until next year to start the mobile sites and use this year to plan. SUMMER FEEDING SITES  Wakulla Education Center, 87 Andrew Hargrett Sr. Road. Meals will be served June 6 to Aug. 7, Monday through Thursday. Closed on July 4 and 5. Breakfast will be served 8:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. Lunch will be 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.  Wakulla High School, 3237 Coastal Highway. Meals will be served June 11 to July 12. Closed July 4 and 5. Lunch will be served 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. No breakfast will be served.  Medart Elementary School, 2558 Coastal Highway. Meals will be served June 11 to July 12. Closed July 4 and 5. Breakfast will be served 8:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. Lunch will be served from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Summer feeding sites Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICEƒ EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Of WakullaHeat i ng & A i rServ i ng Wakulla & Frankl i n Count i es850-926-5592Sales & Serv i ce All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. 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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Hours:Tu-W & F 10 6 Th 12 8 Sat 8 NOON Sun & Mon Closed850.926.83192809 Crawfordville Hwy across from Hudson Parkwww.root319salon.com A full service hair and nail salon. W elcomesWelcomes iss est Now AvailableƒHave a Manicure or Pedicure in between your color sk bout our pecials! Certi“ed Nail Tech Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE … Wakullas unemployment rate in April fell to 7.0 percent. Tallahassee Metropolitan Area, which consists of Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla counties, also continued to see improvements in the local economy with an unemployment rate of 6.7 percent in April. This was 0.6 percentage points lower than the regions year-ago rate of 7.3 percent. Gadsdens unemployment rate for April was 8.2 percent and Leons fell to 6.5 percent. Floridas jobless rate in April fell to 8.7 percent as the state continued an employment rebound that began 11 months ago, the Department of Economic Opportunity reported recently. But Aprils drop was also affected by the fact that nearly 28,000 job seekers dropped out of the hunt. The number of jobless in April was 0.3 percentage points lower than March and 1.9 points below April 2011. The national unemployment rate for April was 8.1 percent. Gov. Rick Scott said the continued downward trend was testament to the states economic recovery and bodes well for Floridas continued climb back toward full employment. The April “ gures also shows job gains in comparison to the nation as a whole. This continued drop in Floridas unemployment rate is proving our economy is on the path to recovery and Floridians are getting back to work,Ž Scott said in a statement. With Florida being ranked as one of the top two states for business in the nation, employers are sure to continue expanding and moving to Florida creating jobs that help us ensure this pattern will continue.Ž University of Central Florida economist Sean Snaith, however, say the good news is tempered by the fact that Floridas civilian labor force shrunk between March and April by 28,000, a shrinking job pool that pushes unemployment lower without putting more people back to work. Taking into account discouraged workers and those working part time, Floridas jobless rate was 17.3 percent for the quarter ending March 31. Having the unemployment rate fall because people have given up looking for a job is not an improvement,Ž Snaith said. Payroll growth has also remained relatively ” at, another indication that fewer job seekers are being added to the rolls of employed workers. There is not a lot to encourage people to get back in the hunt,Ž Snaith said. But the number of available jobs does continue to grow. Overall, the number of jobs in Florida was 7,325,300 in April, up 52,600 jobs compared to a year ago. It was the 21st consecutive month of year-to-year job growth. Leading sectors of the economy included employment services, which grew by nearly 11 percent, or 16,800 jobs. Education and Health Service employment grew by 2.3 percent, adding 25,100 jobs over the 12 month period. Construction employment continued its contraction in April. The number of construction jobs shrunk by 7.4 percent year-to-year, a drop of 24,800 jobs in that bellwether sector. Building construction jobs fell by nearly 11 percent. Monroe County had the lowest unemployment rate in the state at 4.8 percent. It was followed by Walton County (5.2 percent), Okaloosa County (5.7 percent), Franklin County (6.1 percent), and Alachua County (6.2 percent). Flagler County had the states highest jobless rate in April a 11.6 percent. It was followed by Hernando County (10.8 percent); Hendry and St. Lucie counties (10.7 percent each); Dixie County (10.2 percent); and Putnam County (9.9 percent). The number of counties with double-digit unemployment rates continued to fall, dropping by half from 10 in March to “ ve in April.Wakulla’s unemployment falls to 7 percent in April Wakullas lowest unemployment rate since 2008.By JASON ALDERMANWith summer vacation right around the corner, youre probably busy planning itineraries, shopping for new bathing suits and finishing up work projects. But before you completely check out, take a few minutes to review a few financial safeguards that could save you a ton of grief and money … and protect your identity. Credit and debit cards. If youre planning to travel … especially overseas … follow these precautions: Tell your card issuers where and how long youre traveling so theyll be on guard against unauthorized transactions. Also, bank fraud departments have sophisticated systems for detecting unusual account activity, so if a transaction raises concern and youre not home to field their call, your account could be frozen until you can be reached. Immediately report lost or stolen cards and/or unauthorized transactions to your card issuer. Carry at least two cards in case one gets damaged or closed temporarily. It might take a few days for the bank to mail you a new card. In case of theft, carry a list of card issuers fraud hotlines and your account numbers separate from your wallet. Perhaps leave a copy with a trusted friend. I also program these numbers into my cell phone for quick access. Some banks toll-free numbers may not work internationally, so ask for the right numbers before you leave. Avoid using standalone or unusual-looking ATMs not located in secure areas. They might be altered or have hidden cameras that can shoulder surfŽ your account information and PIN. Beware of card skimming, where dishonest restaurant or store employees use a portable card reader to copy information from your credit or debit cards magnetic strip. Save and check all receipts against your statement; also scan your statement for unauthorized transactions. Guard your travel plans. Resist sharing your vacation itinerary on social networking sites or in outgoing phone or email messages. It can alert criminals that youre away from home or work. Even friends who know better might inadvertently forward an email or Facebook posting that contains critical dates and destinations. Also make sure your kids understand that this information is off limits until youre safely home. Streamline your wallet. Dont carry too much personal information. Youll of course need identi“ cation, like a drivers license or passport, but dont bring your Social Security card or other highly sensitive papers. But do carry your health and car insurance identi“ cation. Also, photocopy, scan or make a list of your wallets contents and keep it in a secure location, such as a hotel safe; and leave a copy with someone at home you can call should your wallet be stolen. Electronic precautions. Whenever logging onto the Internet at a WiFi hotspot, hotel business center or other public facility whose server may not be encrypted, be extra cautious before conducting online banking or other password-protected transactions. And, it probably goes without saying, but your computer and cellphone should always be password protected in case of theft. Safeguard your home. If no one will be housesitting in your absence: Have the post office hold your mail. Suspend newspaper subscriptions. Park a car in the driveway and put a prominent interior light on a timer. Ask a friend or neighbor to remove ” iers, packages or free newspapers. Have a great vacation. Just dont forget to take basic identity theft precautions.Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www. twitter.com/PracticalMoney.Make a security checklist for summer vacation A pair of organizations who advocate for unemployed Floridians say a state law passed last year makes it too dif cult for people without work to get unemployment bene ts. In a ling with the U.S. Department of Labor, the National Employment Law Project and Florida Legal Services blasted changes to the process for applying for or receiving bene ts, including the requirement of a 45-question test. "Under the federal-state unemployment insurance program, states have an obligation to ensure that involuntarily unemployed workers who meet basic eligibility criteria are able to access bene ts that provide temporary partial wage replacement between jobs," the groups said, asking the federal agency to review the claims. "Florida is no longer ful lling that obligation." Lawmakers approved the changes in 2011 in what supporters promoted as an effort to make the unemployment system more solvent. News Service of FloridaOrganizations challenge unemployment changes Special to The NewsDont worry about record-breaking gas prices … the U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates prices to be $3.79 a gallon this summer, less than in 2008. Thats good news for families considering reviving the tradition of a road trip vacation, one of the best experiences parents and kids can share, says Michael DiLorenzo, author of Adventures with Jonny: Road Trip to the Parks!Ž (www.adventureswithjonny. com). This is a shared experience, and one that will be talked about during family gatherings for years to come,Ž says DiLorenzo, a father of three. For busy parents, this is a time to savor their childrens youth. As moms and dads eventually “ nd out, they grow up fast.Ž Its also a chance to get children outside and away from their computers, he says. Children today already have a deeprooted interest in technology, which is why a road trip to a natural, outdoor destination is an opportunity to give your child the gift of the outdoors, which is a gift for life,Ž says DiLorenzo. The journey to a national park in the United States or Canada … perhaps Yellowstone in Wyoming or Banff in Alberta … is as bonding an experience as whatever happens at the destination. And there are parks in every state,Ž he notes. If you dont have the time or money to go cross country, pick a park closer to home.Ž DiLorenzo offers these helpful tips for the road: € Games, games, games!: Yes, there is ample entertainment for both drivers and riders in cars these days. BUT, the goal is to bond with the family, so consider a fun, albeit off-color game like Road Kill Round-Up.Ž A point system might break down like this: two points for the “ rst to spot a poor critter; three for whoever “ rst correctly identi“ es the species; two points subtracted for a false road-kill call; three points subtracted for misidentifying the kind. € Beware of dairy drinks (and other smelly snacks): A spill in the backseat can eventually create quite a stink during a summer road trip. But do pack plenty of healthy snacks to save on pricey pit stops and avoid all the sugar and salt in junk food. € Avoid big-city rush hours: When traveling through metropolitan areas, consider the busiest traf“ c periods. Whether you plan to stop and check out the city or simply zip through it, bumper-to-bumper traf“ c is something to avoid. A bit of consideration can save your family hours of grid-locked misery. € Tech help: Various apps and websites can help drivers “ nd the cheapest gas prices, food options, hotel rates and travel routes. Also, dont forget a music mix that appeals to the entire family on one of these devices. (Remember, leave work at home … forget about work-related calls, texts and emails! Use a non-work-related smartphone, if needed.) € Schedule pit stops: Being in a hurry should be left for the morning commute; vacation should be different. When traveling across states and provinces, consider local culture. For example, barbecue in South Carolina is very different from Missouris version. Enjoy diners and unique attractions, and dont be afraid to take notes. The greatest family memories are created in shared adventure,Ž DiLorenzo says. Outdoor recreation is “ lled with these memories just looking for a family to bring them home.ŽMichael A. DiLorenzo is a married father of three living in the outdoor-rich environs of Michigan. He created the Adventures with JonnyŽ series to entertain and educate children (and parents!) about the activities available in the great outdoors.Family time: Unplugged and outdoorsMemories are made on vacations; heres some tips for the road

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 – Page 5B LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t Special to The NewsThe June Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Monday, June 4. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:37 p.m. and the moon will rise at 9:07 p.m. on June 4. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at (850) 927-7744 or toll free at (888) 927-7744. By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 29 … With opponents arguing that lawmakers cant make such changes in the recesses of the budget,Ž a Leon County circuit judge heard arguments Tuesday about the constitutionality of a plan to contract with private companies for prison health services. Judge Kevin Carroll, who held a two-hour hearing, did not give a speci“ c time when he will rule but indicated a decision might come early next week. The Florida Nurses Association and a state-employees union are challenging a legislative move last year to privatize health care at prisons throughout Florida. The case centers on a decision by legislative leaders to include the move in budget “ ne print known as provisoŽ language. The opponents say such policy decisions need to be made by changing state law, not including them in the budget. It needs to be debated back and forth, the pros and cons, said Thomas Brooks, an attorney for the union, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. But Jonathan Glogau, chief of complex litigation in the Attorney Generals Of“ ce, said lawmakers could use proviso language in privatizing health services. He said the key is that the proviso language must be directly and rationallyŽ related to the part of the budget it carries out --in this case, inmate health care. Heres a pot of money for prison health care, Glogau said at one point, describing the relationship. Heres how to spend it.Ž Carroll asked some questions during the hearing but did not hint how he will rule. He emphasized, however, that he will look only at the legal issues --not the broader controversy about whether it is wise for lawmakers to turn over prison health care to private companies. Its clearly not my job (to decide the wisdom), said Carroll, who added he expects his ruling to be appealed. The hearing came almost exactly a month before the 1st District Court of Appeal is scheduled to listen to arguments about another legislative plan to privatize 29 prison facilities across the southern part of the state. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford last year ruled that the plan, which also was included in proviso language in the 201112 budget, was unconstitutional. Privatization is a hotly debated issue, in part, because state employees fear they will lose jobs or see pay or benefit cuts if contractors provide public services. Two licensed-practical nurses who work in the prison system are named plaintiffs in the case argued Tuesday. The health-care proviso directed the Department of Corrections to seek proposals from companies and called for privatization to lead to cost savings of at least 7 percent for the state, compared to 2009-10 expenses. The process led to the department recommending that Corizon, Inc., receive a contract for prisons in North and Central Florida, and that Wexford Health Sources receive a contract in South Florida. A heavily debated issue in the lawsuit is whether state law already gave the Department of Corrections the authority to privatize health services, regardless of the proviso language. Glogau said the department has the authority and had already completed a business plan for privatization of the services before lawmakers started the 2011 session. But M. Stephen Turner, an attorney for the Florida Nurses Association, described the potential contracting as proviso-driven procurement.Ž The departments discretion is not being exercised, Turner said. It is the proviso that is being followed.ŽPrison health privatization ready for ruling, court saysFull moon climb set at St. George LighthouseThis years hurricane season is expected to be normal in the Atlantic and Caribbean basins, the federal government said this week. The NOAA Climate Prediction Center said theres a 70 percent chance of nine to 15 named storms, four to eight of which are expected to become hurricanes … about the average over the last few decades. It would be a return to a more normal summer after a few active years. NOAAs outlook predicts a less active season compared to recent years,Ž said NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco. But regardless of the outlook, its vital for anyone living or vacationing in hurricane-prone locations to be prepared. We have a stark reminder this year with the 20th anniversary of Hurricane Andrew.Ž Forecasters cautioned that if an El Nino warming pattern develops in late summer, conditions would change … keeping the season even quieter.… NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDAState briefsBush would think about VP, but doesn’t expect it Times: DEP wetlands specialist suspended for saying no Normal hurricane season expectedFormer Gov. Jeb Bush told an Italian online news site that if Mitt Romney offered the vice presidential spot to him he would consider it with great attentionŽ but that he doesnt think Romney will pick him. In an interview written about in Italian … leaving open to interpretation what Bush actually said in English … the site, Linkiesta, also says the Republican Party Bush envisions would have a culture of inclusion.ŽBut I dont think he will choose me,Ž Bush told the interviewer. Days after refusing to approve a permit for a controversial wetlands mitigation deal, the states top wetlands expert was suspended from her job at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the Tampa Bay Times reported Monday. Connie Bersok was suspended earlier this month after refusing to sign off on a permit application that would have allowed Highland Ranch Mitigation Bank to use pine forest acreage to satisfy a wetlands mitigation requirement, the Times reported. State law allows developers to set aside wetlands to offset construction in other areas that may damage other wetland tracts. Former DEP deputy secretary Kirby Green told the Times that Bersok and others have been suspended or let go for running afoul of the more development-oriented agenda of Gov. Rick Scott. The DEP declined comment while a Highland Ranch spokesman said the company did not attempt to in” uence the agency to suspend Bersok, whose supervisor referred to as a a model representative for the departmentŽ in her last review. By DAVID WHITE With Memorial Day behind us, summer has of“ cially arrived. This means more time outside, and consequently, a different cocktail menu. For lazy days by the pool or at the beach, its hard to beat a pia colada, margarita, or other tropical drink. When enjoying a hot dog or hamburger at a barbeque, beer is the obvious choice. For wine drinkers, “ nding the perfect summertime match can be daunting. When lounging on the deck or patio, red wine can seem too heavy. And sometimes, that simple white wine is just, well, too simple. Thats why its hard to beat a crisp ros when the weather is warm. Its easy to dismiss pink wine. After all, most Americans associate ros with cheap, sweet blushŽ wines, like Sutter Homes white Zinfandel. This style of wine traces its roots to the early 1970s. Back then, demand for white wine outpaced supply, so many California winemakers started producing white wine from red grapes, taking advantage of the fact that even red grapes give off white juice. In 1975, the winemaker at Sutter Home, Bob Trinchero, had a problem while making his white Zinfandel. A portion of the wine experienced a stuck fermentation,Ž meaning the yeast died before all the sugar had converted into alcohol. Rather than fixŽ the wine by adding more yeast, Trinchero decided to let it sit for two weeks. When he revisited the wine, he knew it would be a hit … and Sutter Homes modern-day white Zinfandel was born. Countless imitators would soon follow. This style of pink wine remains quite popular and it will always have fans. More often than not, though, white Zinfandel and other blush wines are just too sweet. Many taste more like Kool-Aid or strawberry fruit punch than wine. True ross are bone dry, textured, and refreshing. And they can be just as complex and food friendly as traditional wines. True ross are made in one of two ways. In the “ rst method, the winemaker crushes red wine grapes and leaves the juice in contact with the skin for a brief period, typically one or two days. She then discards the skins, allowing the juice to “ nish fermentation on its own. T hanks to the short period of skin contact, the wine retains some color. Here, ros is the only goal. In the second method, ros is a byproduct of red wine fermentation. Red wine obtains color, tannin, structure, and ” avors from grape skins. If a winemaker wants to increase the skin-to-juice ratio during fermentation, she can simply remove some juice at an early stage. This pink juice can be fermented separately to create ros. This method is known as saigne. True ross have been a part of life in France for centuries. In the southeastern part of the country, residents and visitors alike have long recognized the splendor of pairing ros with warm weather and coastal cuisine. France remains the source of many fantastic ross … great examples can be found in Bandol, Tavel, Sancerre, and many other regions. When looking for French ross, its best to look for reliable importers, like Kermit Lynch, Beaune Imports, Weygandt-Metzler, and Robert Kacher. All four bring in a number of knockout wines. Plenty of delightful pink wines come from outside France, as well. Across the world, more and more producers are making topnotch, authentic ross. In the United States, some producers to look for include Alexander Valley Vineyards, which makes a splendid ros of Sangiovese, Copain, and Ponzi. Another favorite is made by Mulderbosch in South Africa. The world is still awash in bad ross, of course. Its still quite easy to accidently wind up with a bottle thats too heavy, alcoholic, or sweet. So if your local wine shop offers tastings, be sure to stop in when ross are open … you might “ nd a crisp, refreshing wine thats worth stocking up on. After all, pink wine is the perfect accompaniment to summer. So why not grab a case?David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet. Whites Wines is summer, drink pink Like us on

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 General Help Freight Up = More $ 2 Mos.CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www. melton truck.com/drive Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Sopchoppy RiverCharming, Partially furnished 2story loft on private pond. Custom features, 1.5BA, walk-in-closet, W/D, D/W, TV w/ satellite. Very private. $650/month. 850-962-2849. Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rent: Houses Unfurnished 3BR/2BA, Medart,central h/a,big-fenced yard, very clean, front/back porches, shed. No pets or smking $850/month+deposit. 850-545-0126 Must see!! CRAWFORDVILLE2 BD, 1BA, $575 mo. 1st & last mo. $800 dep (850) 926-5619 CRAWFORDVILLEShell Point Rental 2/2 Town home on Canal, with office or 3rd BR Loft, enjoy your private boat slip and community pool $1,300 mo. 850-509-2667 or 850 -926-7158 Mysterious Waters2BR/2BA, Washer Dryer, wood-detail, vaulted ceiling, large -porch, covered parking, short walk to Wakulla River, community park, boat-ramp, dock $875/mo.incl water & garbage 850-926-6289. Sport/Utility Vehicles CHEVROLET2009 Tahoe LTZ 4WD, 29,700 miles, white, leather, DVD, navigation, sunroof, warranty, excellent condition, $12700, ppeo@netscape.com Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 850-926-3546 5240-0531 PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE:School Board Policy 2.70 Prohibiting Discrimination, includ ing Sexual and other forms of Harassment. PURPOSE AND EFFECT:To reflect legislative requirements and district proce dures. LEGAL AUTHORITY:120.54, 1001.41, 1001.42, 1012.23, Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED:112.51, 119.07, 760.01 et seq., 1000.05, 1000.21, 1001.43, 1001.22 Florida Statutes 34 CFR 99, 34 CFR 108, 34 CFR 200.43, P.L. 110-233 ECONOMIC IMPACT:None REVISION ORIGINATED BY:Beth ODonnell Assistant Superintendent for Instruction REVISION APPROVED BY: David Miller, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, A HEARING WILL BE HELD TIME:5:45 p.m. PLACE:Administrative Offices Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE:July 16, 2012 A COPY OF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAY BE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board Post Office Box 100 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, FL 32326-0100 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Published One time (1) time in The Wakulla News May 31, 2012 5240-0531 5229-0531 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULL A COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCHLOCKONEE BAY TRAIL -PHASE IV Invitation to Bid No. 2012-10 Advertisement Begin Date/Time: Thursday, May 17, 2012 at 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Sealed responses for the OCHLOCKONEE BAY TRAIL-PHASE IV will be received until 10:00 a.m on Friday, June 15, 2012: responses should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Office, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at which time all proposals will be publicly opened. Responses received after the time and date specified will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. Please direct all questions to: Administrative: Sheree Keeler, Phone: 850-926-9500, FAX: 950-926-0940, email skeeler@mywakulla.com Technical: George Roland, PE, Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. Phone: 904-828-3900, FAX: 904-367-1692, email geor ge.r oland@kimley hor n.com ITB documents will be available at www.mywakulla.com or can be picked up at the location listed above after 8:00 a.m. on Thursday, May 17, 2012. Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Alan Brock, Chairman Sheree Keeler, Grants Coordinator Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 24 and 31, 2012 5229-0531 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5239-0607 TWN Vs. Flowers, Linda 65-2011-CA-000173 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 65-2011-CA-000173 Division: FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB Plaintiff, v. LINDA FLOWERS A/K/A LINDA MARIA FLOWERS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMINGINTERESTS BY THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment datedMay 2, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 65-2011-CA-000173, DIVISION: ____________, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and LINDA FLOWERS A/K/A LINDA MARIA FLOWERS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m., at front door of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on the 14th day of June, 2012the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 33, BLOCK 7, OF WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 93 Pueblo Trl, Crawfordville, FL 32327. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on May 3, 2012 (COURT SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT By; /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk Attor ney for Plaintif f: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544,Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 working days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 31, and June 7, 2012 5239-0607 File No. 3524-10206 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices A-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432“we sell and service most makes and models” Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 HURLEY’S ROOF Construction, Inc.Roof Inspection Repair CleaningNEW ROOF • RE-ROOFING • SHINGLES • METAL850-544-1217FREE ESTIMATES Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053887408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONS RE-ROOFING REPAIRS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net YARD SALE!! Saturday, June 2nd, 8AM-2PM SUMMERTIME YARD SALE! NO EARLY BIRDSNO EARLY BIRDS 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $925mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $475mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $10 A Week 877676-1403 Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 – Page 7B Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5223-0524 Vs. Kilbourn, Rodney P. Case No. 2011-CA-000364 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.2011-CA-000364 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. RODNEY P. KILBOURN, Defendant, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-364-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and RODNEY P. KILBOURN, is the Defendant, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on June, 14, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: EXHIBITS AŽ and BŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 3rd day of May, 2012. (SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 34, A DISTANCE OF 2650.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 858.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 327.60 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 309.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 156.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261)THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 125.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 156.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 125.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A 15.00 FOOT WIDE INGRESS/EGRESS EASEMENT LYING OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 7.5 FEET THEREOF AND BEING PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 174, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. EXHIBIT BŽ Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 89 degrees 25 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, 2650.93 feet to a found 4Žx4Ž concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of said Section 34, thence run South 00 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds East 858.48 feet to a concrete monument on the Southerly right-of-way of State Road S-299 and said POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right-of-way run South 00 degrees 23 minutes 34 seconds East 112.89 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 29 minutes 36 seconds West 183.71 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 23 minutes 34 seconds West 101.83 feet to the Southerly right-of-way of said State Road S-299, thence run North 86 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East along said right-of-way 184.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.45 acres, more or less. 5226-0531 TWN v. Poka, Tim, Case No # 16-69 CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 16-69 CA SCORE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, v. TIM POKA A/K/A TIMOTHY POKA; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TIM POKA (IF ANY); CAPITAL ONE BANK USA, N.A.;WALKERS CROSSING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; TENANTS OR UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,THROUGH OR UNDER ANY DEFENDANTS NAMED HEREIN Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Tim Poka A/K/A Timothy Poka 29 Chance Street Crawfordville, Florida 32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 23, WALKERS CROSSING (UNRECORDED): COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8 A DISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTTES 22 SECONDS WEST 690.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 229.82 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT, SAID PONT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 45 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 29 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 182.25 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 41 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 177.58 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID REVERSE CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 290.00 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 10 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 22 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 53.08 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 58 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 53.10 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 73.81 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 61 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 412.18 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 370.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH 1996 DOUBLEWIDE PALM MOBILE HOME, VIN #PH09871AFL AND PH098701BFL, ID#0071388796 & 0071388795 has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Henry L. Miller, Jr., Esq., whose address is 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida, 32303, on or before thirty days from the date of the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated:May 22, 2012 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By; /s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 31 and June 7, 2012 5226-0531 5232-0531 v. Home Placement Inc.Case No. 2011-CA-000212 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-CA-000212 PREMIER BANK a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff v. HOME PLACEMENT, INC., a Florida Corporation, R. RICHARD YATES, JR., Corporation R. RICHARD YATES, JR., individually, DANNY R. MCCLELLAN individually, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure en5233-0531 v. Kevin Scott Grigsby.Case No. 2012-CA-0007 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-CA-0007 CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff v. KEVIN SCOTT GRIGSBY an individual, UNKNOWN TENANT #1 and UNKNOWN TENANT #2 Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla 5234-0531 TWN v. Veal James C. Case No. 2011-CA-000263 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2011-CA-000263 COASTAL STATES MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs, James. C. Veal; Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 2011-CA-00263, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, COASTAL STATES MORTGAGE CORPORATION IS Plaintiff and JAMES C. VEAL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES C. VEAL; CENTENNIAL BANK SUCCESSOR TO WAKULLA BANK; WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANTS (S) IN POSSESSION; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Clerks Conference the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at 11:00 a.m., on the 21st day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Parcel 1 Lot 1, Wildwood Country Club, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, page 35 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. And Parcel 2 Begin at the Northeast corner of Lot 1 of Wildwood Country Club, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat book 3, page 35 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North 49 degrees 02 minutes 40 seconds West along the Northerly boundary of said Lot 97.89 feet; thence run North 87 de grees 22 minutes 19 seconds West along said Northerly boundary 55.00 feet; thence run North 30 degrees 12 minutes 41 seconds East 119.97 feet; thence run South 64 degrees 28 minutes 47 seconds East 154.06 feet; thence run South 34 degrees 08 minutes 38 seconds West 125.64 feet to the Point of Beginning. a/k/a 2 COUNTRY CLUB DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 DATED this 19th day of April, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND As Clerk of said Court By; /s/ Desiree D Willis as Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe, Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon county is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850)577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page. Submitted by: Heller & Zion, LLP, 1428 Brickell Avenue,Suite 700, Maimi, FL 33131 Telephone (305)373-8001, Facsimile: (305)373-8030 File No. 10766.372 Published two times in The Wakulla News May 24th and 31st, 2012 County, Florida, described as follows, to-wit: Commence at the Southwest Corner of the Northeast Quarter of Lot 56 of The Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 18 degrees 22 minutes 14 seconds West along the West boundary of the Northeast Quarter of said Lot 56. H.S., a distance of 2037.62 feet to a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of said Lot 56, H.S., thence run North 71 degrees 29 minutes 54 seconds East 50.05 feet to an old concrete monument, thence run North 15 degrees 31 minutes 30 seconds West 276.21 feet to an old concrete monument, thence run North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 626.02 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning, continue North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 150.00 feet, thence run South 18 degrees 23 minutes 18 seconds East 292.81 feet to the centerline of a roadway easement, thence run South 71 degrees 39 minutes West along said centerline 150.00 feet, thence run North 18 degrees 23 minutes 17 seconds West 292.32 feet to the point of beginning. (Lot 5 of an unrecorded plat of East Ivan Estates). Subject to a roadway easement over and across the Southerly 20.00 feet thereof. Said property being more recently described by surveyor as follows: Lot 5, East Ivan Estates (Unrecorded), Wakulla County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of Lot 56 of The Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 18 degrees 22 minutes 14 seconds West 2037.62 feet; thence North 71 degrees 29 minutes 54 seconds East 50.05 feet; thence North 15 degrees 31 minutes 30 seconds West 276.21 feet; thence North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 626.02 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence leaving said point of beginning run North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 149.87 feet to a concrete monument thence South 18 degrees 26 minutes 07 seconds East 292.81 feet to a point lying on the centerline of a 40 foot wide access easement; thence run along said centerline South 71 degrees 38 minutes 59 seconds West 150.01 feet; thence leaving said centerline run North 18 degrees 24 minutes 27 seconds West 292.32 feet to the Point of Beginning. Subject to and together with a 10 foot wide utility easement lying over and across the easterly 10 feet described thereof. And also: Together with any and all interest that Grantor may have in those two parcels as granted from Claude W. Tooke and Susie Tooke to Edward Sinnott et al, and recorded in Official Records Book 382, Page 456-457, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Together with that certain 1986 Chad Mobile Home having VIN#AFLCW2AG240511553, Title #43248298, and Real Property decal number R253847 and that certain 1986 Chad Mobile Home having VIN #AFLCW2BG240511553, Title #43370649, and Real Property decal number R253848. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door of the Clerks office in the Courthouse of Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 14th day of June, 2012. Dated this 14th day of May, 2012. Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 24 & 31, 2012 5233-0531 tered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to-wit: Lot 28, Block JŽ and Lot 41, Block KŽ of MAGNOLIA GARDENS as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door of the Clerks office in the Courthouse of Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 14th day of June, 2012. Dated this 14th day of May, 2012. Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 24 & 31, 2012 5232-0531 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com a 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 2797 Surf Rd.Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA house $700 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickerson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay. 3BR/2BA house on the bay $700 mo. No Pets, No Smoking. RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 11 Purple Martin 4BR/3.5BA, 2,887 sq. ft, located in Songbird, $1,500 monthly, $1,500 Deposit, Available August 1. • 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $1,000 Mo. Available May 1.• 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available May 1. • 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok • 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets • 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced • 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Townhouse. 850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Sandy Moore was recognized as Employee of the Month and was presented with a plaque by Chairman Scott. Sharon Mitchell presented the PAEC Annual Report and Beth Mims gave a presentation regarding Literacy Week and the Return on Investment. All Board Members and Superintendent Miller were in attendance. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Evans. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the agenda. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the following consent items: 1.Approved Minutes of the Meeting held on April 16, 2012. 2.Approved the following Employment of Personnel: New Hires: 10 Month Employee Name Program/Center Position Term of Service McCabe, Jacqueline WHS Teacher 04/19/12-06/04/12 9 Month Employee Name Program/Center Position Term of Service Ropp, Cristi Transportation Bus Driver 05/03/12-05/31/12 Transfers: 12 Month Employee Name Position Program Position To Program To Term of Service From From Brown, Elizabeth Teacher MES Energy Ed Spec. District Of“. 05/01/12-06/30/12 Peltier, Tammy Data Entry RES Admin. Secretary CES 05/21/12-06/30/12 9 Month Employee Name Position Program Position To Program To Term of Service From From Lockhart, John Paraprofessional CES Paraprofessional Pre-K/SEC 04/16/12-06/04/12 9 Month Employee Time Limited Part-time Name Position Program Position To Program To Term of Service From From Carr, Mary Bus Attendant Transportation Bus Driver Transportation 05/14/12-05/31/12 Walden, BarbaraBus Driver Transportation Bus Attendant Transportation 05/14/12-05/31/12 Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) Name Program/Center Position Term of Service Allen, Annette MES A/S Remediation Teacher 02/29/12-04/11/12 Allen, Carol MES Remedial Teacher … Time Limited 03/21/12-04/12/12 Coxetter, Catherine MES Teacher … Time Limited 04/25/12-06/04/12 Dugger, Hillari Transportation Other/Of“ce 11/03/11-05/31/12 Fojtik, Jessica Pre-K/WEC CDA … Time Limited 04/26/12-06/04/12 Haubrick, Andrew Facilities/Maintenance Trades Specialist … Time Limited 05/09/12-06/30/12 Holt, Joan WCSB Annex/Adult Ed Career Pathways Specialist 04/30/12-06/04/12 Whaley, Cheryl Transportation Other/Of“ce 04/24/12-06/30/12 3.Approved the following Letters of Resignation: Katie Marley/effective June 1, 2012 Kaila Slater/effective April 25, 2012 Al Mills/effective May 2, 2012 Julie Stanford (Phillips)/effective May 4, 2012. 4.Approved the following Letters of Retirement: Waltraud Grantham/effective May 4, 2012 Linda Camp/effective April 12, 2012 Karen Sanders/effective April 1, 2012 and enter DROP Karen Wells/effective July 1, 2012 and enter DROP. 5.Approved the Illness in the Line of Duty/FMLA. (See Supplemental File #22) 6.Approved a request for Leave of Absence on Bridgette Hallum from April 3 through April 21, 2012. 7.Approved the W.C.T.A.s Memorandum of Understanding. 8.Approved Budget Amendments #11/12 … 8 & 9. 9.Approved the April “nancial statement. 10.Approved Warrants for payment. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the 504 Coordinators Handbook and Accommodations Plan. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Data Management Agreement with Medicaid Administrative Claiming System. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve an amended Contractual Agreement between the Wakulla County School Board and Putnam County School Board on behalf of the North East Florida Educational Consortium. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Reading Endorsement Revisions. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the Summer Payroll Reporting Schedule. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the 2012-2013 Payroll Reporting Periods. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the 2012-13 AVID Implementation Agreement. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve School Board Policy 2.70 … Prohibiting Discrimination, including sexual and other forms of harassment for advertising. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Carl D. Perkins Rural and Sparsely Populated Grant and the Carl D. Perkins Secondary Career and Technical Education Grant. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Program of Study. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the FloridaLearns STEM Declaration of INTERdependence addressing STEM talent in Florida. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the VPK Summer School Handbook and the 2012-2013 VPK Parent Handbook. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the Use of School Buses. (See Supplemental File #22) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. An executive session was held immediately after the board meeting to discuss issues pertaining to collective bargaining. Superintendent Miller, Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott, Mr. Thomas, Mrs. ODonnell, Mr. Beach and Mr. Pearce were in attendance.MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON MAY 21, 2012MAY 31, 2012

PAGE 22

Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com The above legal description being more recently surveyed by Thurman Roddenberry and Associates, Inc., dated April 26, 2006, under job no. 90-132, and described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 89 degrees 25 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, a distance of 2650.93 feet to the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of said Section 34, thence run South 00 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds East 858.48 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Curtis Mill Road (State Road S-299) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 00 degrees 20 minutes 12 seconds East 112.70 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run South 89 degrees 27 minutes 49 seconds West 183.76 feet to a concrete monument(marked#4261), thence run North 00 degrees 18 minutes 00 seconds West 101.74 feet to a nail and cap (marked #7160) lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of said Curtis Mill Road, thence run North 86 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East 184.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 0.45 acres, more or less. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5223-0524 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5213-0531 vs. Roddenberry James T. Case No. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES T. RODDENBERRY d/b/a THE JAMES T. RODDENBERRY LAND COMPANY; JAMES T. RODDENBERRY, individually;KIMBERLY S. RODDENBERRY; and HAMAKNOCKERS LTD. CO., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count I and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count II of Plaintiffs Amended Complaint rendered in the above-styled case on March 7, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 15th day of June 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Easter n T ime), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida: Real Pr operty THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 & E 1/2 OF SW 1/4 OF NE 1/4) OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAVING AND EXCEPTING THEREFROM AS EASEMENT FOR ROADWAY OVER AND ACCROSS THE NORTH 6 FEET OF SAID PROPERTY. Personal Property Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and further improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estates described above(all referred to as PropertyŽ). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshal, Northern 5214-0531 vs. Rodenberry James T. Case No. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff vs. JAMES T. RODDENBERRY d/b/a THE JAMES T. RODDENBERRY LAND COMPANY; JAMES T. RODDENBERRY, individually;KIMBERLY S. RODDENBERRY; and HAMAKNOCKERS LTD. CO., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count III and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count IV of Plaintiffs Amended Complaint rendered in the above-styled case on March 7, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 15th day of June 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Easter n T ime) at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida: PARCEL #1 COMMENCE AT AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF AN UNNUMBERED LOT LYING NORTH OF LOT 89 OF THE SAID HARTSFIELD SURVEY AND THENCE RUN WEST 641.74 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 803.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319 AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 104.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 412.07 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 105.60 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES06 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 416.75 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING THAT SAME PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL. RECORDS BOOK 23, PAGE 533 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL #3 COMMENCE AT A LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF AN UNNUMBERED LOT LYING NORTH OF LOT 89 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 04 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 387.72 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT 111.76 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 420.12 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNCIL MOORE ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES13 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNCIL MOORE ROAD 60.21 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID COUNCIL MOORE ROAD RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT 551.90 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 167.45 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 650.12 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY 319, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WESTERLY, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND CURVE TO THE RIGHT WITH A RADIUS OF 1942.86 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 06 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 11 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 205.21 FEET (CHORD BEING NORTH 04 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 235.07 FEET) TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 142.64 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 416.73 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 320.85 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) THENCE RUN SOUTH 11 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 53.82 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN NORTH 76 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 1706.34 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY 687.92 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF LOT 77, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 77 A DISTANCE OF 1763.34 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 380.12 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) SAID POINT BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT 191.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS A PORTION OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER THEREOF DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 317, PAGE 416 OF THE OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Personal Pr operty Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and further improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estates described above(all referred to as PropertyŽ). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and all water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an inter est in the surplus fr om the sale, if any, other than the pr operty owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshall, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated May 4th, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL 32591-3010,Count III Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 10, 17, 24 & 31, 2012 5214-0531 5228-0531 TWN re: Estate of Sanders Deborah A. Case No. 12-33CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE; ESTATE OF PROBATE DIVISION DEBORAH A. SANDERS Case No. 12 -33CP Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRA TION TO ALL having claims or demands against the above named Estate: You are notified that the administration of the Estate of Deborah A. Sanders Case No. 2012-33CP, is pending in Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, the address of which is: 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The Personal Representative of the Estate is Sam Jack Sanders whose address is: 211 Sanders Cemetery Rd., Sopchoppy, FL 32358. The name and address of the Personal Representatives attorney is set forth below. 5230-0614 TWN Heirs of Martinson Kenneth H., Case No. 12-158CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-158CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN MARTINSON, husband and wife, and as Trustee of THE MARTINSON REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN H. MARTINSON, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 25, Block E. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10972-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5230-0531 5231-0614 TWN heirs of Arnold, Bert C. Case No. 12-159CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-159CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U.ARNOLDHUSBAND AND WIFE, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U. ARNOLD, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 53, BlockD. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10951-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the compliaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5231-0531 5235-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-130-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-130-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 22, Block K of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11131-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5235-0614 5236-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-131-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-131-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 19, Block L of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11178-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5236-0614 5237-0614 vs. Matthews Dorothy C. Case No: 12-124-CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-124-CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DOROTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, IF DECEASED OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DECEASED OR ALIVE, HER UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HER; OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PARTIES; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DORTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 142, Block A of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10859-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a de-fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: /s/ Glenda Porter, AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5237-0614 5238-0607 est. Peters, William M, Case # 12-32CP Notice to Cred. PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-32 CP. IN RE : ESTATE OF WILLIAM MATHIAS PETERS a/k/a WILLIAM M. PETERS Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of William Mathias Peters, deceased, File 12-32 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is May 31, 2012. Personal Representative: George A. Dock, 86 Quail Run, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850)926-8245 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 31 and June 7, 2012 5238-0607 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration All persons having claims or demands against the Estate are required, within three months from the date of the first publication of this Notice, to file with the clerk in the above court, a written statement of any claim against the Estate in the form and manner prescribed in section 733.703 of Fla. Statutes, Rule 5.490 of Fla. Rules of Probate and Guardianship procedure. All claims, demands and objections not so filed will be FOREVER BARRED. Publication of this Notice has begun on the 24th day of May, 2012. CHARLES A. McMURRY, Attorney At Law, 910 N. Duval St. Tallahassee, Florida 32303, Florida Bar No. 03336911 (850)425-3000;Fax(850)224-6655 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 24 and 31, 2012 5228-0531 5227-0531 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Auction Under the authority of the Florida StorageFacility Act the property described below has been seized for non payment of rent and Self Storage Notices other accrued expenses. The property will be sold at auction to the highest bidder as provided by the Self Storage Facility Act 83.806 Double D Storage LLC reserves the right to refuse any and all bids. Self Storage Notices Cash only. Troy Hale unit 35 Household items, Terry Pafford Unit#16household, auction to be held @ Double D StorageLLC 289 Cajer Posey Rd Crawfordville FL 32327 June 6, 2012 Self Storage Notices 5209-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 002 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that SEAN HILLIER the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2535 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-115-000-11897-000 LOT 115 HS P 20-1-M-25D A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SW 1/4 OF HS 115 OR 611 P 246 Name in which assessed SHEPARD FAMILY TRUST said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5209-0531 5210-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 003 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 710 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 12-6S-02W 000-03873-000 12-6S-2W P-8-M-55 A PARCEL OF LAND W OF US 98 IN SECTION 12 OR 12P 6 & 7 and OR 74 P 219 Name in which assessed TERRY C NELSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5210-0531 5211-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 001 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that CASPIAN I LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2570 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-121-351-11968-A01 THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT 2 BLOCK A LOT 1 OR 722 P305 Name in which assessed RWC INVESTMENTS LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, June 7, 2012 5211-0607 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated: May 4th, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL 32591-3010 Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 10, 17, 24, & 31, 2012 5213-0531#1 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 – Page 9BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 25, … Florida education of“ cials crisscrossed the state this week offering a series of apologies over the admittedly botched roll out of tougher writing assessments that if taken at face value showed that seven of 10 Florida students did not make the grade. Following the release of the FCAT writing assessment results the week before, Department of Education Secretary Gerard Robinson went on the road to explain why the number of students making satisfactory scores on the test fell from over 80 percent last year to as low as 27 percent. Having a better week was Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney, who pulled ahead of President Barack Obama in one poll, though he still trailed the incumbent president in another. That poll that had Romney ahead also showed most Floridians stand behind Stand Your GroundŽ but dont want folks carrying concealed weapons into the Capitol. (Though more think it isOK to be packin at the Republican National Convention.) While Robinson spent the week mending bridges, Gov. Rick Scott may have burned one as Floridas head of state became a comedy target for an apparent gaffe with Spanish King Juan Carlos by gleefully bringing to light an embarrassing moment for the monarch involving a not-so-secret trip involving elephants and guns. Back here at home, lobbyists reported strong earnings for the quarter ending March 31. And the Senate will be without one of its more independent members and provocative debaters as Republican Sen. Ronda Storms of Valrico announced on Friday she will run for a local of“ ce instead of making a run for another term. MR. ROBINSON IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD Acknowledging that his of“ ce may have undersold the importance of new FCAT writing standards, the education commissioner met with concerned parents, teachers and administrators to calm nerves frayed last week when the state board had to meet in emergency session to lower passing scores on the statewide test. The governors office stepped in to help, playing a key role in coordinating the states response after the drop in scores. The test crisis began when passing scores on the writing test plummeted from 81 percent to 27 percent for fourth graders and showed similar drop in eighth and 10th grades. The Florida Board of Education eventually met in emergency session to lower the passing grade from 4.0 to 3.0 while they develop a longer-term answer. Since then, Robinson has been on a nonstop remediation tour (hes even working Memorial Day) as part of a Full-Court Press,Ž that included attempts to get supportive letters to the editor written by organizations like the Florida Chamber and the Council of 100, and having Robinson record onhold phone messages. Despite the hoopla, Scott made it clear that he has Robinsons back. QPOLL: ROMNEY ON TOP With a contentious primary behind him, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney pulled ahead of the president in the latest Quinnipiac University poll, which showed Romney with a 47-41 percent lead. The poll was good news for Romney, who back in March trailed Obama by a 49-42 margin. Peter Brown, assistant vice president of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, said Romneys good fortune is likely tied to the fact that hes not getting beaten up daily by fellow Republicans. Obamas recent support of same-sex marriage may also have helped. While 63 percent said Obamas support would not affect their vote, those that do care say they are less likely to support the president. But if presidential race observers in Florida know anything, its that the race is likely to be close here, and maybe too close to call this far out. If you have any doubt, we point to a counterbalancing poll that confusingly shows Obama still leading in the purple state. That poll, by NBC News and Marist College, showed Obama would get 45 percent in Florida if the election were held today, while Romney would get 40 percent. The margin would move around a bit depending on who Romney picks for a running mate … with Romneys best bet for getting Florida votes appearing to be to ask Jeb Bush to join the ticket. Also this week, Scott got some good news about his own popularity … he has some. After months of embarrassingly low poll numbers, his approval rating this past week went up over 40 percent for the “ rst time in the Quinnipiac Poll, though the percentage who dont really like him still is higher. Still, after several months of lower unemployment rate announcements, it appears things are moving in the right direction for Scott, who has already said he will run for reelection in 2014. LOBBYISTS REPORT QUARTERLY EARNINGS Legislative lobbyists collected an estimated $36 million during the “ rst three months of 2012, an increase of about $3 million over the same period last year. The increase likely stems, at least in part, from the earlier start of this years legislative session. Among the biggest spenders on lobbyists were AT&T, with an estimated $1.161 million, and “ rms linked to Miami casino backer Genting, with $445,000, according to the report. STORMS TARGETS PROPERTY APPRAISER POST State Sen. Ronda Storms, R-Valrico, announced she would not seek re-election to the 40-member chamber but would instead challenge the Republican incumbent to become the Hillsborough County property appraiser. Storms announcement opens up the race for the Tampa Bay area district. Former Senate President Tom Lee, R-Brandon, is rumored to be interested. SCOTT: A REY OF SUNSHINE The Court back in Spain hasnt been so confused about whats up with Florida since King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella heard there wasnt much gold. Meeting with heads of state, especially kings, is usually a staid, protocol“ lled affair. Not so this week as Gov. Rick Scott met with Spains King Juan Carlos during a business development mission. Juan Carlos, still stinging from Spanish media accounts of his recent elephant hunting trip to Botswana, may never forget his meet and greet with the governor and his wife, Ann Scott. In what has become a trademark Scott break-theice move, the governor told the king a personal story about his own recent trip to the African nation. Ive ridden elephants, Ive never tried to shoot one,Ž Scott told the monarch, before going on … and on … about the trip. The exchange got wide play in Spain, where the king had been lampooned for the embarrassing secret hunting trip. Upon his return to Mi-ami, Scott apologized for any discomfort he may have caused the 74-year-old king, who broke his hip during his African visit. If I did anything to do „ anything wrong „ I completely apologize,Ž Scott told reporters upon his return at Miami International Airport. The kings a wonderful person. Hes a wonderful world leader. Hes done so many wonderful things in his life.Ž STORY OF THE WEEK: Department of Education Secretary Gerard Robinson spent the week trying to put out “ res caused by FCAT writing assessment scores, released the week before, which showed precipitous drops among Florida students. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Ive ridden elephants, Ive never tried to shoot one,Ž Gov. Rick Scott to Spanish King Juan Carlos about the monarchs recent elephant hunt in Botswana. WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)D.O.E. on C.Y.A. TourBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 25 – With debate and votes taking place around the state and polls showing a growing acceptance, the issue of same-sex marriage and domestic partner rights will likely be among a host of second tier issues that could determine which presidential candidate takes the state. In a Quinnipiac University Polling Institute poll released this week, a majority of voters said the candidates’ stance on same-sex marriage would not affect the way they would vote. But a signi cant minority say the issue is likely to move them away from President Barack Obama and toward his Republican opponent, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. One in four respondents told pollsters Obama’s support of gay marriage would make it more dif cult to support the incumbent president. That’s more than twice the number of voters who say it makes them more likely to support him. Conversely, Romney’s opposition to the concept makes 23 percent of respondents say they are more likely to cast their ballot for him, while fewer, 19 percent, say his stance will hurt. Meanwhile this week, votes by the Orange County Commission and public hearings in Jacksonville underscored the growing attention being paid to the issue following the 2008 constitutional amendment de ning marriage in Florida as an institution solely reserved for unions between one man and one woman. Over the past several months, voters in several cities have passed local ordinances or proposed referenda that guarantee domestic partner rights, whether for same-sex or unmarried heterosexual couples. Backers say the efforts signify the growing acceptance of nontraditional relationships, both straight and gay, by providing protections for committed couples similar to those enjoyed by married pairs. “In some ways the 2008 ballot measure on marriage really made people stop and think about and have to acknowledge the discrimination that gay couples face,” said Nadine Smith, executive director of Equality Florida. Gay marriage issue looms in November Brain Teaser 1 13 16 19 26 32 39 43 51 56 63 67 70 2 27 52 3 28 53 4 29 47 17 22 44 5 14 23 33 40 48 64 68 71 6 24 45 54 7 20 30 49 57 8 25 34 55 65 9 31 41 66 21 35 50 58 15 18 42 46 59 69 72 10 36 60 11 37 61 12 38 62 ACROSS 1. "A __ formality" 5. Of a pelvic bone 10. Stashed away 13. Tennis great Lendl 14. Aqua __ (gold dissolver) 15. Put to the grindstone 16. Life during a power outage? 18. Writer Sarah __ Jewett 19. Linda Ellerbee's "__ It Goes" 20. Sowed again 22. Prefix with natal 25. Two-sport man Deion 26. Henrik Ibsen drama 31. Legendary big bird 32. Mob chief 33. School founded by Henry VI 35. Dry Italian wine 39. Make stout 40. More achy 42. "Mila 18" author 43. Built for speed 45. One of The Three Bear s 46. Stink to high heaven 47. When doubled, an African antelope 49. Natural environments 51. Shoe pads 55. Novelist Deighton 56. Wine server 58. "Over There" composer 63. Jim Croce's "__ a Name" 64. Long, long poem? 67. Kicks a grounder 68. Get down pat 69. Bowls over 70. Anonymous John 71. Surrealist Max 72. Post-Mardi Gras periodDOWN1. Easily split mineral 2. Politico Bayh 3. South African cash 4. Goes no further 5. Ill temper 6. NASA moon craft 7. Humpbacked helper 8. Hospital helpers 9. Salad choice 10. Huge swarm 11. City or circle preceder 12. Monopoly stack 15. Farmer's handiwork at Wimbledon? 17. Huey of Louisiana politics 21. Seth's son 23. Peepers 24. In the lead 26. Toxins banned in the '70s 27. Jurist Warren 28. Blunted sword 29. Arrays at the Cheerios factory? 30. Bar Mitzvah reading 34. Neighbor of Tibet 36. Gazetteer datum 37. __ Cong 38. Igloo dwellers: Abbr. 41. Broccoli __ 44. Ceramist's oven 48. Stovetop whistler 50. Pizarro victim 51. "__ a Thousand Times" (1955 Jack Palance film) 52. The "N" in UNCF 53. Beat the goalie 54. Urban conduit 57. Parti-colored horse 59. Like the Sabin vaccine 60. Hockey great Gordie 61. Yemeni seaport 62. Arboreal abode 65. Decade divs. 66. Otorhinolaryngology abbr. American Prole Hometown Content 5/6/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 23 34156 762 8 961 43 3127 9 86 56374 619 200 9 HometownContent 651 8237 4 9 329471856 874569321 287 936415 416758293 935142678 193 284567 562397184 748615932 M I C A P C B S I D I E D E V A N E A R L N E G R O R A N D E P E E S C O R E E N D S R O W E D O A T S L O N G K I L N I R E E Y E S K E T T L E L E M O N T O P S E W E R I G O R T O R A H R O A N A I D E S N E P A L Y R S C A E S A R R A B E E N T E N O S I N C A H O E D C O U R T O R A L H O R D E A R E A H O W E I N N E R V I E T A D E N D E E D S E S K S N E S T

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Up To $ 1 0 0 0 0 O F F M S R P $10,000 off MSRP: Stk#12D113, 2012 Ram 2500 LaramieLonghorn Crew Cab Dealer Retains all rebates and incentives 850-766-8530 I refuse to be beat on price! Bring me any deal and I will beat it! Call me, Eric Lee, for the best deal in town!! By LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsWithout batŽ-ting an eye, a team of bat scientists from across the country braved the Wakulla mud of a small cypress pond in the Apalachicola National Forest on Thursday, May 24, to construct a bat-capturing net and set up a makeshift research station. The scientists were seeking to catch and release bats in this area in order to survey the present species and populations and to monitor their health. The mission was part of Bat Blitz, a three-day event held in Hosford and sponsored by the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network, the U.S. Forest Service and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission. For three days, scientists, researchers and bat enthusiasts gathered from their respective states, universities and agencies, and headed in to the forests and Wildlife Management Areas located around Hosford and in surrounding counties, to track and test native bats of the region. This marked the “ rst year that a Bat Blitz was held in Florida, but the 11th year that such blitzs have taken place across the country. Melissa Tucker, an organizer of the event with the state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, saw the gathering as part of a process of pooling together lots of expertise and knowledge.Ž Passion, though, and fun, also came in to the mix. The group, headquartered at the Woodsmen of the World Camp in Hosford, kept tally of which teams captured the most bats, and the rarest bats, and enjoyed a little friendly competition as they worked. Indeed, the work was challenging … with teams out in the “ eld from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m braving the natural elements to collect data and gathering in the morning to slowly piece together an idea of what bat life looks like in the Panhandle. Bat Blitz is the “ rst specifically bat scienti“ c research event, and is an unusual variation on the standard conferences that scientists are used to attending. Its not a typical thing to do this kind of data collection, learn new techniques and work at this level with so many other scientists,Ž said Holly Ober, an assistant professor in the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation at the University of Florida. Ober also discussed the value of the research for the public. We know bats have an enormous impact on the insect populations of an area … its free pest control. In this way, theyre good for the environment because less pesticides go into the air. Farmers can save thousands of dollars on pesticides by putting up bat houses and monitoring their bat populations,Ž Ober said. With bat care as the main priority, scientists exercise many precautions to keep themselves and the bats safe. The teams wipe down all the equipment, soak the nets, and wear masks and gloves to keep the bat populations healthy. One of the reasons for such safeguards is the sudden incidence of White Nose Syndrome which has spread from European bat populations to North American populations via fungal spores that cave explorers, or spelunkers, inadvertently carry out on their equipment. The disease affects the hibernation patterns of cave bats who awaken weak, with their fat reserves depleted and, unable to “ nd food; often die of starvation. It has killed literally hundreds of thousands of bats … it just gives me goosebumps,Ž said Andrea Korman of Oklahoma, who works with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Though White Nose Syndrome hasnt been found in Florida yet, events like the Bat Blitz help to raise public awareness for the issues affecting bats. Korman was in attendance to learn how a Bat BlitzŽ was organized, so that Oklahoma might have its “ rst Blitz next year. Overall, the entire group went to 31 different sites over the course of three nights and caught 250 bats. It was a great success,Ž said Ober. It has been really exciting to go out every nightƒ Once you start working with bats, they just hook you.Ž For more information on Bat Blitz, and to “ nd other Bat Blitz or bat research opportunities in the future, visit the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network, at www. sbdn.org/index.html.Scientists trek into the national forest to study bats A Seminole bat. Stuck in mud. Untangling the mist net. Setting up a support for the nets to catch bats.PHOTOS BY LUCY CARTERFWC PHOTO



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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter entering her essay into the The Elie Wiesel Prize In Ethics Essay Contest, Crawfordville resident Logan Byrd said she never expected to nish in the top ve. However, she did. She received an honorable mention and $500 prize for her essay titled, True North, which told her story of being pregnant and trying to decide how she would deliver her baby. She has also been invited to a reception in New York in the fall to honor the winners. Her essay will be published by Yale University Press. Its very prestigious to have this award, Byrd said. Byrd entered the contest after one of her administrators from Brescia University, where she is majoring in social work, sent out an email letting students know about the contest. The contest is held by The Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity and is open to junior and senior college students. The essays are judged by a board led by Wiesel himself and Wiesel reads each essay, Byrd said. It still hasnt sunk in, Byrd said. Its so amazing. Wiesel is a Holocaust survivor, author, professor and Nobel Peace Prize winner. Students were to articulate with clarity an ethical issue that they have encountered and analyze what it has taught them about ethics and themselves, according to the contest guidelines. Continued on Page 2A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netEmily Smith has announced her candidacy for District 5 Wakulla County Commission seat. Smith is from Woodruff, S.C., and moved to Sopchoppy after visiting one weekend. She said she became really smitten with the area. She has been in Sopchoppy for more than ve years. She came to Sopchoppy after the biodiesel cooperative she worked with in North Carolina was contacted by Florida A&M University. Smith said the co-op gives educational presentations on alternative fuel. Smith then began working with FAMUs Statewide Small Farms Program and went to the organic farm in Sopchoppy, Crescent Moon Farm. Smith will face candidates Richard Harden, Republican, and John Shuff, Democrat, in the upcoming election. Smith is running with no party af liation. Incumbent Commissioner Lynn Artz has chosen not to run for re-election. Smith said running for a commission seat had always been something she thought about doing, but had planned to wait until later on. But after hearing Artz would not run again, she decided it was the perfect time. I decided to act now, rather than wait, she said. Her mother was a councilwoman when she was in high school, so Smith said she is familiar with the challenges of the job. She said she feels there is a need for diversity on the commission race, age, gender and background. Smith recognized her age might cause pause for some voters. She is 27, but pointed out that she will be 28 by November. Smith said she believes her energy and enthusiasm are vital assets. I will be able to appeal to a wide variety of citizens, Smith said. Plus, she said, she has the time and exibility to make serving the citizens of the county a full-time job. She recently graduated from Florida State University with a masters degree in English. During that time, she taught freshmen composition. She holds a bachelors degree in biology from Wofford College. Smith said she has thought about becoming a high school teacher. She said she enjoyed teaching freshmen at FSU. Theyre bright-eyed and optimistic, she said. Smith believed some of the big issues facing the county are its revenue stream, economic development and environmental protection. Again and again, our county is struggling with shortfalls, Smith said. Smith said the county commission needs to diversify its revenues and have consistency and transparency when making decisions about the budget. It is the county commissions responsibility to ensure that the county has a secure scal foundation, she said.Continued on Page 3A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyOur 117th Year, 21st Issue Thursday, May 31, 2012 Three Sections Three Sections75 Cents 75 Cents kll h h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6BINDEX OBITUARIES Emily Smith is running for county commissionRemembering the fallenLogan Byrd wins honorable mention for Elie Wiesel Prize Jeffrey Doc Calaluca Michael David Haynes Elmer Eugene Strickland Commission candidate Emily Smith Logan Byrd A crowd of Wakulla County residents turned out for the Memorial Day ceremony on the courthouse grounds to remember those who died in service. Four Wakulla Countians who died in recent con icts were remembered: Sgt. Arthur Lee Andrews, U.S. Army, died in Vietnam in February 1969; Chief Petty Of cer Matthew Bourgeois, U.S. Navy, died in Afghanistan in March 2002; Lance Corporal Charles A. Hanson Jr., U.S. Marines, died in Iraq in November 2004; and Sgt. Javier Garcia, U.S. Army, died in Iraq in April 2005. While the ceremony memorialized those soldiers who died, County Veteran Services Of cer J.D. Johnson told the crowd that soldiers returning from war come back broken and fragmented. Its up to us to put them back together. Laying of the wreath as Taps was played marked the end of the Memorial Day ceremony. Pamela Joy, who served as narrator, addresses the crowd, above. The Skipper sisters Glenda Simmon, Chinesta Skipper Smith and Collen Skipper sing at the event.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN HUNGER IS PROBLEMSEE PAGE 1B A Special Section inside A Special Section inside The TheWakulla Wakulla n news ews a a 2012 WHS Graduation Special Section

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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn 2013, Florida will celebrate its 500 year anniversary. Florida was the rst place of European arrival in America. Ponce de Leon arrived in 1513 to explore Florida. St. Augustine is the oldest city in the United States and it was established 42 years before the English settled in Jamestown. But St. Augustine is not the only city in Florida rich with history. St. Marks is the oldest river town in the United States and the fort at San Marcos de Apalache was the last outpost of the Spanish empire. Other than two other places, that area had the longest amount of contact with Europeans in Florida, says historian Madeleine Carr. We should embrace that, Carr says. Viva Florida 500 will commemorate Floridas anniversary and events will take place all across the state to showcase its history. As part of this celebration, Cynthia Paulson, with Palmetto Expeditions, has set up tours and adventures in Wakulla County that highlight specific areas. One of these tours was held recently at San Marcos de Apalache led by Carr and focused on the early history of the fort. People have lived in this area for more than 20,000 years, Carr says. Prior to the Spanish coming, The Apalachee were already living in this area. This tribe was known as the farmers because the land was great for agriculture. In 1528, the rst Spanish conquistador, Panfilo de Narvaez, arrived in the area with 300 men, after first landing near Tampa. They came to conquer, but also looked for places to settle, Carr says. After arriving in Tampa, some of the men walked north while others sailed to meet them. Those walking never found the ships, Carr says. When the Spanish arrived in the land of the Apalachee, they were attacked, Carr says. Narvaez was wounded and his men were starving. They left the area to look for food. Theres bugs, heat and no food, Carr says. The men had to kill their horses for food. Then they decided they would not wait any longer for the boats to arrive, they would build their own to escape from this new world. They made ve boats and used their clothes for sails. These were the first boats built by Europeans in the New World, Carr says. Once the boats went out into the Gulf, many were sucked up and never seen again. Only four men survived and landed somewhere near Galveston, Texas. Eventually, in 1536, they made it to Mexico City. Several years later, one of the men, Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, wrote a memoir of his experience. It was the rst written account of what happened here, Carr says. After reading Cabeza de Vacas memoir, Conquistador Hernando de Soto wanted to explore Florida, Carr says. He left Spain in April 1538. He really was ruthless, Carr says. He brought 600 men, horses, pigs and dogs with him. He landed near Tampa Bay in 1539. He eventually made it to the Apalachee province in current-day Jefferson County and continued on to the town of Anhaica, the home base of the Apalachee, Carr says. He sent a map maker south who went along the coast to Pensacola. De Soto continued traveling, looking for gold and died on the other side of Mississippi, Carr says. This was the end of the first period of Spaniards in the area, which was focused on conquering. The next period was the mission period, which lasted several decades, Carr says. Missions were established throughout the state. The Indians in the area became ill from diseases brought by the Spaniards and sought help from the friars who ran the missions, Carr says. Then they began to interact with each other. Carr says there are letters from the Apalachee to the king thanking him for gifts. In 1679, the Spanish governor of Florida started construction on the rst fort built at the con uence of the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers. The fort was made out of wood and it was painted white to look like stone. It stood for three years before it was attacked by French pirates. The pirates stayed for a while and when they left, they burned the fort down. The English begin to attack the Spanish missions in the early 1700s. A second fort was then built in 1718. Construction of the rst stone fort began in 1739. Limestone was cut to make the fort and barges transported the limestone rock, Carr says. There was also a 45-foot watch tower built across the river to serve as a lookout point. There was a ame that was lit at night and looked very similar to a lighthouse. In 1763, the English were delivered the fort. By 1787, the Spanish regained control of the fort. And in 1821 Spain relinquished Florida to the United States. Stones from the fort were eventually used to build a marine hospital in 1857, prior to the Civil War. In 1861, the confederates took the fort, renaming it Fort Ward. Several ags y at the fort, which shows the different countries that have occupied the fort throughout its long history. Paulson plans to have several different tours available for the rest of this year leading up to the anniversary celebration next year. Visit www.VivaFlorida. org to learn about the different events to be held throughout the state. Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 13 Months For only $31Call 1-877-401-6408Price good for in county subscriptions only. Offer available until 5/31/2012 is offering Remember those who died for our freedom on Memorial Day. Remember those who died for our freedom on Memorial Day. May 28, 2012 May 28, 2012Subscription Special YARD SALEJUNE 1 & 2 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS! SUMMERTIME SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for qualied applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and oor rate of 2.5% Continued from Page 1AByrd said she decided to write about her own experience and childbearing for the contest because it is a topic she is passionate about. She had a faculty member sponsor her and they also helped in the writing process. In her own experience, she said she learned that there was a lack of services available to childbearing woman when it came to answering questions, dealing with their concerns and helping them emotionally. Medical needs are very well taken care of, Byrd said. Many woman may not have accurate information and may not have a necessary support system during their pregnancy, she said. She began doing research and found that many women do not know all their options. This made her want to continue to learn and try and make an impact. After graduating from Brescia University, she plans to go to Florida State University to get her masters degree. She is a trained doula, which is a person trained and experienced in childbirth who provides continuous physical, emotional and informational support to the mother before, during and just after childbirth. She is currently working on her certi cation. She currently works at the FSU Foundation as the production coordinator. She lives in Crawfordville with her husband Chris and son Ebin.Logan Byrd wins honorable mention for Elie Wiesel PrizeCelebrate Floridas 500th anniversary at San Marcos de Apalache JENNIFER JENSENHistorian Madeleine Carr gives a tour of Fort San Marcos on the St. Marks River. Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe WakuulanewsYouve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. High school yearbooks are still availableThere are more than 100 seniors who have not purchased yearbooks. The yearbook staff will be set up at baccalaureate on May 30 at 7 p.m. and at graduation on June 1 at 7:30 p.m. at J.D. Jones Stadium at Reynolds Field. The books are $85 and the school is only accepting cash, money orders or cashiers checks. Look for the yearbook stand inside the main gate. Republican Committee to host candidates debateThe Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee in conjunction with the Wakulla County Republican Club will host a Candidate Debate for the Florida House of Representatives District 7 at The Bistro at Wildwood on Thursday, June 7. The debate will be formatted to give each candidate an opportunity to answer questions from the club, from the executive committee and from the audience. This will allow Republicans in District 7 an opportunity to see the candidates and make an informed decision on who to vote for in the Republican primary. The candidate scheduled to appear are Don Curtis, Jamey Westbrook and Mike Williams. Special guest will be Daryn Iwicki, North Florida regional director of the Republican Party of Florida. The event begins with social hour from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. and the candidate debates begin at 7 p.m. TDC will hold roundtable meeting on June 7The Wakulla County Tourist Development Council will be holding the next Public Roundtable Meeting on Thursday, June 7, at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge Education Building from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The mission of the TDC is to promote and facilitate travel to and within Wakulla County for the bene t of its economy, residents, and travel/tourism industry. Help them sustain the tourism industry and improve the local economy by participating in this vital public forum. The June 7 Public Roundtable will begin with a brief presentation on recent TDC activities and initiatives, including some educational opportunities we can offer to our local tourism-related businesses to increase their visibility to the traveling public. This will be followed by a facilitated discussion of how to keep our tourism industry engaged in responsible promotion of our incredible resources, ways that TDC can improve its marketing/ advertising activities, and new ideas for marketing campaigns that can be fully developed to reach our target audiences. They would also like to have participation from local historians, artists, photographers, etc that can be valuable collaborators in our tourism development. Help them continue to grow the local economy through its rich natureand heritage-based tourism industry. Candidate Emily Smith to host eventEmily Smith, candidate for District 5 County Commission, will be introduced to the community at Posh Java in Sopchoppy on Thursday, June 7. The evening will begin with music by Sammy Tedder at 6 p.m. and a brief presentation by Smith. More music by Grant Peeples will follow. Smith will be available throughout the evening to respond to questions and concerns. For more information, contact Judith Harriss at joereme@gmail.com. Golf Gone Wild to benefit Florida Wild MammalSt. James Bay Golf Resort and Forgotten Coast TV are sponsoring a golf tournament on June 16 called Golf Gone Wild, a bene t for the Florida Wild Mammal Association. FWMA is located in Wakulla County and provides care for sick, injured, and orphaned wildlife from Wakulla, Leon, Franklin and adjacent counties. For information regarding the Golf Gone Wild or to register, please contact Lynne Cooper at (850) 697-9507. FWMA and tournament information is also available at www.wakullawildlife. org. Staff ReportsBriefs The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, June 18, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.MAY 31, 2012 NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TEXT AND MAP AMENDMENTS ADOPTION PUBLIC HEARINGS PUBLIC NOTIFICATION MAY 17, 24, 31 JUNE 7, 2012 Continued from Page 1A Repealing impact fees is one example of inconsistency and the lack of planning on the commissions part, she said. They eliminated a hardship for new development, but then levied new and increased old taxes on current residents, Smith said. She said she would like to see impact fees reinstated to ensure that public services, such as the library and parks, stay funded. Eliminating those services isnt an option for me and I think the commission should make them a priority, she said. She added that there needs to be transparency when increasing taxes or fees or adding new ones. The public needs to know exactly what those fees are taxes are funding, she said. In dealing with economic development, Smith said the county needs to stick to the plan it has laid out for the Crawfordville core to ensure development is centralized and viable. We shouldnt stray from the foundation we have laid out, she said. In dealing with economic development, Smith said improving the overall quality of life for residents is key, which includes protecting the environment. This means leaving protections like the wetlands ordinance in place, promoting ef cient use of resources and making the dif cult decisions to minimize impacts, she said. The commission needs to stand rm and make the tough decisions, especially when issues of stormwater and wastewater are addressed, she said. Its not just our scal livelihood, but our quality of life, Smith said. Protecting the countys assets is also key to establishing Wakulla County as an eco-tourism destination, she said. And the county commission needs to be in support of that idea and be consistent with that message when making decisions, she said. As an avid outdoors person, Smith said she is a huge supporter of eco-tourism and believed Tallahassee Community Colleges Wakulla Environmental Institute will be huge for the area. Thats where we can be competitive, Smith said. Wakulla County cant compete with the retail base of Tallahassee, but Wakulla County has beautiful features, and can be competitive with eco-tourism, she said. Eco-tourism will be especially bene cial to the small communities in the county like Sopchoppy, she said. It will bring people to those areas, she said. Smith is a member of the Friends of the Wakulla Springs and the local chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society. To learn more about Smith, visit her website at www.emilyforwakulla.com or email her at emilyforwakulla@gmail.com.Emily Smith is running for county commission NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will Hold a Public Hearing on June 18, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327, to Consider: A copy of this ordinance and the rate resolution shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance and the rate resolution. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201. MAY 31, 2012 By LYNN ARTZ County CommissionerOn Tuesday, June 5, the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners invites the public to attend a Smart Growth Open House from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Wakulla County Library. The open house will include a presentation by Chris Duerksen on Smart Growth Fixes for Rural Communities. Duerksen will describe common barriers that can hinder the development of an attractive, walkable downtown and easy ways to remove these stumbling blocks. He will discuss effective ways to encourage rural commercial development, and will describe ways to preserve the beauty of rural roads. Residents and business owners within downtown Crawfordville and property owners along the Big Bend Scenic Byway are especially encouraged to attend. Refreshments will be served and those present will have an opportunity to socialize, ask questions and share their opinions. The June 5 meet and greet will kick off a two-day visit by a technical assistance team working for EPAs Sustainable Communities Building Blocks Program. Team leader Chris Duerksen is senior counsel with Clarion Associates and is based in their Florida of ce. He has helped many communities to update their land development codes to allow and encourage smart growth. If unable to attend the evening presentation, consider attending the county commission Workshop on Wednesday, June 6, from noon to 1:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. A similar presentation will be given at that time. For additional information, please contact Melissa Corbett, Senior Planner, at 926-3695 ext. 433.County to host Smart Growth Open House on June 5Special to The NewsThe League of Women Voters of Wakulla will host a public records forum on Thursday, June 7 at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. Barbara Petersen, the President of the Florida First Amendment Foundation has agreed to present this and we feel very lucky to have her, said Mary Cortese, Wakulla League chair. She has so much experience and expertise in the open government arena, writing and working in the area for many years. We feel that this is an important issue and have invited all constitutional of cers, the county administrator, staff and commissioners, said Cortese. And we have a wonderful and exceptional presenter, a person who knows so much about the law and has so much experience. Petersen is a veteran of open government advocacy with a long history of open government work. In 1995, she became president of the First Amendment Foundation. Prior to that she was staff attorney for the Florida Legislature where she worked exclusively on public record legislation and issues. Most recently she was the chair of Floridas Commission on Government Reform. She is a passionate advocate of the publics right to know, said Cortese. If a government agency came to me and said, Barbara Petersen thinks its a bad idea then Id say, Well, then its a bad idea isnt it? said Pat Gleason, the top lawyer for Florida on open government. Petersen grew up in Virginia with two sisters. After high school, she wanted to study art, but her father disapproved, and she left school. Shes lived in Brussels, the Caribbean and six other states, including Missouri where she moved with her husband, National Book Award-winning writer Bob Shacochis, and where she nished school at the University of Missouri-Columbia. At 34, Petersen decided she wanted to be a lawyer and she and Shacochis moved to Florida, where she attended Florida State University in Tallahassee and later joined the Legislature as a staff attorney. There she helped research and write a law that ensured access to electronic records and became interested in the laws around records. In 1995 she left to become the first and only employee of the First Amendment Foundation, started by media groups statewide with the mission of protecting access to government records. Currently a member of the board of the National Freedom on Information Coalition and the Florida Society of News Editors, she will be introduced by Tammie Bar eld, general manager of The Wakulla News and a board member of the Florida Press Association. Clear and open access to government is the rst step in government accountability, said Cortese, without it, facts and records the public are constitutionally guaranteed cannot be accessed and government cannot be held accountable.Public records forum is set

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: A DOGS LIFE: Abandoned at the animal shelter, today Geist is training for DOC Wakulla Gardens residents face pay for paving Coast Guard Auxiliary for May 31 Week in Wakulla: May 17-24 Michael David Haynes obituary Board says yes to 2020, later to children Overcoming loneliness and social isolation Elmer Eugene Strickland obituary thewakullanews.com Follow us onREADERS WRITE:Editor, The News:The Wakulla County Democratic Executive Committee proudly hosted the 2012 Small County Coalition Conference at the Inn at Wildwood Resort May 11-13th. People came from small counties all over the state to enjoy Wakullas natural beauty and an excellent program. We met with fellow Democrats over a wonderful reception and lunch at the Wildwood Bistro, a delicious sh fry dinner catered by Poseys, and bluegrass music by the Coon Bottom Creek Band. The event provided an economic boost to our local Wakulla economy. The program agenda included such important issues as party leadership, voter suppression, precinct organization, equality/human rights and current voting laws. Speakers included Omar Khan, associate political director for Obama for America and Rod Smith, chairman of the Florida Democratic Party. Also in attendance were Democratic candidates for local, state, and federal of ce: Alan Brock (Wakulla County Commission, District 1); John Shuff (Wakulla County Commission, District 5); Bobby Pearce (Superintendent of Schools); Bill Montford (Florida Senate, 6th District); Thomas Dickens, Robert Hill, and A.J. Smith (Florida House District 7); Leonard Bembry, Al Lawson, Jay Liles, and Alvin Peters (Second Congressional District of the U.S. House). Alan Clendenin, Rep. Scott Randolph, and Hon. Mark Alan Siegel, who are seeking the future chairmanship of the Florida Democratic Party, were also present. Many other leaders in the Florida Democratic Party joined us, as well. I would like to thank Chair Rachel Sutz Pienta, members of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee and the Wakulla Democratic Womens Club for their efforts in hosting this outstanding event. I am looking forward to the Grand Opening of our local headquarters on June 8 from 4 to 8 p.m. at North Pointe Center, 1626 Crawfordville Highway (near Iris Annes) and hope many from the community will join us.Jane Jones Crawfordville Editor, The News: An open letter to all county commissioners: I am writing concerning the on-going problems facing home owners in Wakulla Gardens. I do not live in Wakulla Gardens, but I know a lot of good, hard working people who do. The majority of the homeowners take pride in their homes and not only desire, but deserve better treatment from our elected of cials. They work, pay taxes and vote just as most Wakulla County citizens do. I am baf ed about the on-going indecisiveness about what can be done about the multitude of problems they face every single day. So far, nothing but a lot of talk and a lot of dust for them to deal with. And now there is talk about an assessment on their property taxes. Are the commissioners serious? How much was Mike Stewart and the other property owners on Rehwinkle Road assessed for the recent resurfacing? How much was Jerry Moore and the other property owners on 319 assessed, or property owners on Lonnie Raker Road or the half dozen people who actually live on Old Shell Point Road? Or any other roads paved in Wakulla County within the last few years? Why is it that you feel it is okay to take money (in the form of property taxes) from all of the hard working individuals in Wakulla Gardens year after year and offer them nothing for it? Wakulla County permitted all of these homes and allowed the continuous building (while collecting permitting fees), with no regard to infrastructure. If they did not realize they were creating a monster, they should be ashamed to admit it. Ralph Thomas wrote an interesting article in The Wakulla Times concerning Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA). According to the article, this option came up brie y at a commission meeting preceding the writing of his article, and the discussion was quickly shut down. Does that have anything to do with the fact that no commissioners or major campaign contributors live in Wakulla Gardens? I am also very concerned about a statement made by our county administrator in the May 17 issue of the Wakulla News that As Wakulla Gardens builds out, the stormwater problem will be worse, Does this mean Wakulla County actually plans to permit more houses in a subdivision that already has so many problems? S. Roberts Crawfordville Editor, The News: We would like to thank the person who dropped off our chocolate Cocker Spaniel to the Wakulla Animal Control, and the Wakulla Animal Control for getting Princess back to us! We appreciate it very much. Johnny and Diane Lynn Crawfordville Editor, The News: During dif cult times it is sometimes hard to smell the roses and appreciate the good around us. There used to be a show called, Kids Say the Darndest Things. Often the childs remarks were very funny; and often they were very insightful and thought provoking. Children see life differently from adults. And senior citizens see things from still another perspective. The child, the senior and the handicapped and disabled all have special needs. Our library, Senior Center, and associated support services for those less fortunate than us are existing gems. With a limited budget, our library provides activities for young and old. Our library is one of the focal points of our community. It needs to be open more hours so that more people can take advantage of what our library has to offer. Our senior center is one of the best! It is a very busy place and provides programs for children and seniors. It also provides important transportation for our seniors. Since I retired from doing orthopedic surgery 10 years ago, I have volunteered my services at medical clinics. Those clinics often depend on transportation services. Assisting our children and seniors with medical expenses is not effective if they dont have transportation to take them to a medical facility. We need to continue to support services and activities directed to those who have special needs. Where vital state support has been reduced or eliminated, our county government must make up the shortfall. There is enough waste and lower priority items in our countys budget to accomplish this. Howard Kessler, M.D. Panacea Editor, The News: On behalf of the Wakulla County Christian Coalition, the Greater Mount Trial Church, and the Palaver Tree Theater Company, I would like to say THANK YOU to all who supported and participated in the Wakulla County 2012 May 20th Celebration this past month. The response from the community was most welcoming and events throughout the month of May have opened the door to continue the growth of this southern holiday next year. We offer our sincere thanks to those who partnered with us in this endeavor, including G-Signs, Wakulla County Public Library, Price Transportation Service Inc, Lindys Fried Chicken, along with The Wakulla News and wakulla.com, for their generous coverage. Wed also like to thank those individual sponsors who gave their support either financially, or in kind. They include Tonya Price, the Rev. Bernard Plummer, and the entire congregation of Mount Trial Church (thank you for opening your arms to this possibility), Jarvis Rosier, Thessalonia Church, Herbert and Rachel Donaldson; Jamie Hayes; George Nathan Green; Elinor Elfner, Pat Chamburs; Skipper Temple, Macedonia Church of Christ Written in Heaven, Cathy Frank, the Riley House Museum, Wakulla County Historical Societys Genealogy Group, Wakulla County Extension Office, Alan Brock, Thomas Dickens, Howard Kessler, John and Petra Shuff, Emily Smith, Henry Buddy and Letha Wells, Charles and Cheryl Creel, and Robert Randolph Pearce. None of this couldve been achieved without the support and willing spirit of those listed, as well as those who worked behind the scenes, doing whatever they could to make it happen. Our goal is to partner with more organizations next year and make this celebration even larger, and to eventually offer an economic boost to our county during the month of May. Again, thank you so much, Wakulla, for taking a chance on resurrecting another positive page from our countys illustrious history. Herb Donaldson Palaver Tree Theater Co. Artistic DirectorConference covered important issuesSupport of May 20th Celebration appreciatedCounty must help children and seniors anks to the person who found our dog Wakulla Gardens isnt treated fairly May was such a busy month. There was Mothers Day, when I became the mother of the cutest, most adorable, smartest, cleverest and unique kitten in the world. What puzzles me is when I send his picture to people, they all say, Oh, he looks just like my Al e, my Panda, my Boots etc.. I cant understand this. All I can gure is that their cats are Bee Bee wannabes. There is no other cat as perfect as my garbage can rescue baby. Then, there was my birthday, which lasted for days lled with cake, ice cream and wonderful friends. When the frivolity of that began to dissipate, my cutest, most adorable, smartest, cleverest and unique daughter in the world celebrated her birthday. (Nurse Judy, that vain alter ego of mine, has forbidden me to mention her age since that might lead you to conclude that I myself might be a tri e OLD. Of course, she doesnt think she is even as old as my daughter. What a dreamer!) All of these events pale in comparison to Mays nal big holiday Memorial Day. That was a weekend for parades, festooning of graves with flowers and ags, and eternal gratitude for all our servicemen and women who have sacri ced their lives for our freedom over the years, and those, who still are putting their lives on the line to protect us today. We surely owe a huge debt of gratitude to these, our heroes. Even Nurse Judy was properly respectful during this holiday, although she donned the most outrageous costumes during the entire weekend. One day she had navy pants, a white T-shirt with a ag on the front, a red jacket and red shoes with ags across the front. Next, red pants and shirt and a blue jacket with the same shoes. At home, she wore white pants with a blue pajama top and a red robe as she lay on the couch watching the Indy 500 and the NASCAR races in Charlotte, while eating red, white and blue iced cupcakes. I tried to tell her I was on a diet, but she refused to listen. Of course, she will be the rst to mention my added pounds caused by her lack of eating discretion. Uh-oh. Nurse Judy is whispering in my ear. Whats that? I ask. More whispering ensues. Ah, theres something she wants me to say to you. Please know I am adding this under duress. Any resemblance to the truth is completely impossible, since the words are coming directly from the mouth of that deluded alter ego of mine. Here is what she wants me to say: Merry was the month of May, Since Nurse Judy was with me every day, And she is the cutest, most adorable, smartest, cleverest and unique alter ego in the world. And shes humble too. Goodbye, May. Hello, June. More later,Judy Conlin is a nurse in Wakulla and Gadsden counties. Visit her website at nursejudyinfo.com. Judy Conlin Nurse Judys Nook A lot was happening in May SPECIAL TO THE NEWSEnjoying the Maypole at the May 20th Celebration.

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesChurch BriefsJeffrey Doc Calaluca Michael David Haynes Elmer Eugene Strickland Pioneer Baptist to host VBS Breaking Through with Vivian WattsJeffrey Doc Calaluca, 53, of Sopchoppy, died on Friday, May 18. He was born on March 6, 1959, to Anthony John Calaluca and Jennie Theresa Rutakowski Calaluca in Newburgh, N.Y. He was a podiatrist and had practiced in Panacea until his illness. He was predeceased by his parents. He is survived by his wife and best friend of 20 years, CindyLee B. Calaluca; two brothers, Thomas (Cynthia Leigh) Calaluca of Weston, and Brian (Maxine) Calaluca of Davie; a brother-in-law, James A. Wilson, of Indiana, Penn.; and four nieces and two nephews. A memorial service will be held at a future date at the First Baptist Church in St. Marks. Michael David Haynes, 50, died on Monday, May 21, in Crawfordville. He was born Aug. 26, 1961, in Murray, Ky. He worked in the Golf Pro Shop at Wildwood Country Club in Crawfordville. Memorial services were held for family and friends on Saturday, May 26, at Hopewell Baptist Church in Suwannee, Ky. He is survived by his wife, Rosemary Moore Haynes of Crawfordville; father and stepmother, William C. and Valerie Haynes of Las Vegas, Nev.; mother and stepfather, Velda Jones Renfrow and Clyde Renfrow of Niceville; three children, Justin Haynes (Heather) of Paducah, Ky., Jerrica Haynes Richardson (Michael) of Malden, Mo., and Joshua Haynes (Charlse) of Benton, Ky.; two stepchildren, Audrey and Bradley Erwin of Crawfordville; six grandchildren; a brother, William Douglas Haynes (Julie) of Las Vegas, Nev.; four stepsisters, Boni Eyler (Rick) of Tehachapi, Calif., Donna Tindall (Pete) of Mary Esther, Kym Coleman (Kevin) of Las Vegas, Nev., and Lisa Fuller (Mike) of Las Vegas, Nev.; and numerous nephews, nieces, aunts, uncles, cousins and extended family and friends. He was predeceased by his grandparents, S.C. and Hilda Haynes and Ophus and Doris Jones; a grandchild, Ethan Richardson; aunts, Joann Haynes Orchow and Marie Haynes Langston; uncle, Donald M. Haynes; and nephew, Cody Douglas Haynes. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting with arrangements. Elmer Eugene Strickland, 55, passed away May 23, in Crawfordville. He is survived by his loving wife of 22 years, Brenda Strickland of Smith Creek. He was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County and a member of Crawfordville First Baptist Church. He was an avid sportsman, enjoyed shing and hunting in the rivers and woods of Wakulla and Taylor County. He loved his life at the river in Smith Creek, where he was considered the High Sheriff by his friends and neighbors there. He was a loving father to his boys, and favorite Uncle Gene to his many nieces and nephews. In addition to his wife, he is survived by two sons, Jarvis Jes Eugene Strickland (Amanda) and Benjamin Ben Wayne Strickland and granddaughter, Savanna of Wakulla County; his favorite sister, Kathy Lawhon (Larry) of Crawfordville; brothers, Kenneth Alvice Strickland Jr. of Milton and Richard Strickland (Callie) of Crawfordville; and numerous nieces, nephews and extended family members who will forever miss him. He was predeceased by his parents, Kenneth Alvice Strickland Sr. and Katherine Rose Strickland Woods; and a nephew, Colby. Visitation was held Sunday, May 27, from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Crawfordville First Baptist Church with memorial services immediately following. Memorial donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville, is assisting with arrangements (850926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Jeffrey Doc Calaluca Michael David Haynes Elmer Eugene StricklandPioneer Baptist Church will host a community-wide Vacation Bible School beginning Monday, June 4, through Friday, June 8. Pioneer Baptist Church invites all children to encounter Gods awesome power as we y to some of the worlds greatest natural wonders. This yearss VBS theme is Amazing Wonders Aviation. Classes are for students who have completed pre-Kindergarten through the fth grade. Class times are 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. A light dinner meal is provided each night. There is no cost for attending VBS. Sorry, but transportation is not available. Pioneer Baptist Church is located at 486 Beechwood Drive, north of the intersection of Spring Creek Highway and the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road. For more information, call Pastor Dennis Hall at 8785224. We hope to see you each night. Minister Vivian Watts will hold a workshop on Breaking Through and Moving Forward at Charlottes Faith & Deliverance Temple on Saturday, June 2, at 7 p.m. The workshop is being hosted by Senior Pastor Alice Williams at the church, located at 150 Brown Donaldson Road in Crawfordville. Watts is a minister at Love House Ministries in Beaufort, S.C., where her shepherds are Senior Pastor Randy and Co-Pastor Theresa Roberts. She also serves as the Praise Team Leader and Minister of Music in where she ows strongly prophetically. Watts was born and raised in Crawfordville where she was called into ministry at a very young age. She is the mother of two children, Tawain Watts Jr. and Tia Watts. Minister Vivian currently works for the U.S. Navy and loves nothing more than serving in Gods kingdom. She also currently leads and directs a choir for the Naval Hospital in Beaufort. She is gifted in the area of intercessory prayer and breaking down strong holds for the kingdom. She leads the singles ministry and has a heart and passion for Evangelism. By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER June is quite famous for the variety of nuptial activities. I am not sure exactly why June is the month of choice for these couples; I just go along with the ow. Consequently, through the years, I have of ciated at many weddings during the month of June. I must confess that weddings are not my favorite form of activity. When I first began this area of my pastoral work, I was very nervous. I was concerned that people were watching and judging me and therefore I needed to have everything perfect. The day of the wedding found me an absolute nervous wreck. I remember when I came to the shocking conclusion that nobody at the wedding ceremony was watching me. The wedding ceremony was concluded and the reception was over and I was in the restroom washing my hands when I happened to look into the mirror. There to my chagrin I discovered that the back of my collar was not covering my tie. Nobody even hinted that I had a wardrobe malfunction. It was then I realized that nobody was paying any attention to me. Since this amazing discovery, weddings have not been quite so dif cult for me. I often counsel young grooms who seem quite nervous that nobody is even aware of their presence. Nobody comes to a wedding to see the groom. The only thing that really matters is the bride. After a wedding everybody always says, Wasnt the bride beautiful? I have yet to hear somebody say, Wasnt that groom handsome? This is the reason why every groom wears a rented tuxedo. Nobody is admiring him or his attire. One reason I am not so very fond of weddings is the premarital counseling involved. Of all the counseling I have given through the years, I am wondering if anybody ever paid attention to what I said. With that in mind, I have tried through the years to make the counseling sessions as long and painful as possible. If they can survive a series of premarital counseling sessions from me, then they deserve a lifetime of holy matrimonial bliss. One strange phenomenon I have seen in weddings throughout the years is the number of people who cry at weddings. The father of the bride is the one I watch. It is very hard for some of these fathers to keep back the tears, not because they are losing a daughter, but because they are losing a whole lot of money on this wedding. When anybody asks me about performing the wedding ceremony and how much I charge, I always say that I do not charge anything. What I am really saying is that I would prefer cash. I always leave that to the discretion of the groom. Usually, the groom is so discreet in paying me that I actually never see any money. When I discover how much the wedding has cost and how much I was not given as an honorarium for my services, I too weep at weddings. Occasionally, I meet a young couple who understand the importance of a Christian marriage. Although it is viewed as old-fashioned, I like to re ect what the Bible says. Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one esh (Genesis 2:24 KJV). This kind of a wedding calls for tears of joy.The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at 352-687-4240 or e-mail jamess-n yder2@att. net. I cry at weddings too Out to pastor

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Special to The NewsBlood Red Dawn is a collection of war poetry from Jon Shutt, a soldier who served tours in both Iraq and Afghanistan. It will be released on May 31 by local literary press company Kitsune Books. Following his tour in Afghanistan, it was suggested to Shutt that he seek counseling for post traumatic stress disorder. Instead, he wrote poems. Seventy-two of his poems appear in this collection. All proceeds from royalties of Blood Red Dawn will be donated to the USO, United Service Organizations. Searing, soaring, gutwrenching, sardonic, and philosophical, its hard to read this eloquent work without holding your breath because of the immediacy with which each poem places you right in the soldiers shoes, said Anne Petty, editor in chief of Kitsune Books which published the collection. Blood Red Dawn will stick with you long after you close its covers. Shutt has served 10 years in the Army National Guard as an Engineer. In 2004, he deployed with a marine engineer unit as an electrician where he spent most of his days doing construction projects around northern Iraq. In 2007, he earned his bachelors degree in English teaching from the University of New Hampshire. He began teaching fth grade in Lebanon, Maine, in 2008. In late 2009, he put his teaching career on hold to deploy with a New Hampshire Infantry unit to Afghanistan. In Afghanistan, he was primarily an assistant 240 gunner, but his engineering skills kept him busy building tables, lofts, TV stands and other creature comforts in his off time. Upon returning from Afghanistan in late 2010, he found his love for building, propelling him into teaching woodshop to young, eager minds and hands, which is what he does today in Berwick, Maine. He and his wife, Monique, live in Milton Mills, N.H. Contact anne@kitsunebooks.com or visit www. kitsunebooks.com to order the collection. Kitsune Books is a small literary press located in Crawfordville. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 Page 7Ahappenings in our community Community MIKE JETTS CELEBRATION OF MIKE JETTS CELEBRATION OF will be held on Saturday, June 2 at 4:00 p.m. at Capt. Seanile's (4360 Crawfordville Hwy.) All friends and musicians welcome! Bring something to share. LEGISLATIVEREPORTFloridaHouseofRepresentatives District10LEONARDL.BEMBRYDearNeighbors: ThankyoufortheopportunitytoserveyouintheFloridaHouseofRepresentatives.Thesepast fouryearshavebeenrewarding,fulfillingandsomeofthemostmeaningfulyearsofmylife.It hastrulybeenanhonortoworkforthepeopleofHouseDistrict10.Therehavebeenmany opportunitiestoserveyouthispastterm.Thispastsession,IfiledanamendmenttotheBudget AppropriationsBilltoprovide$10.3milliontokeepJeffersonCorrectionalInstituteopenand operatinginordertosave158jobs.WiththesupportofmycolleaguesintheFloridaHouse,Ihad thehonortosponsorsuccessfullegislationduringmy2011/2012termthat: Createstrueruraleconomicopportunitiesunderthenewlyformed DepartmentofEconomicOpportunity. Waivesstateparkfeesforimmediatefamilymembersoffallenveterans,policeofficers, andfirefighters. Clarifiestheenvironmentalpermittingexemptionsfarmershaveforbonafide agriculturalactivities. Authorizescontinuingcareretirementcommunitiestooffercontinuingcareat-home contractstoresidentslivingathomeorinthefacility. Providesanexemptionfromregulationaspubliclodgingestablishmentsforallrooming housesandanyapartmentbuildingsinspectedbyHUDthataredesignatedprimarilyas housingforpersonsage62orolder. Providesmoreprivatelandstobecomeavailabletothepublicforoutdoorrecreational activitiesbyprovidingadditionalincentivestoprivatelandownersthanwhatcurrently existinlaw. The2012LegislativeSessionpresentedmanyopportunitiesandchallengesasthiswasthefourth consecutiveyearofrevenueestimateshortfallsandbudgetcuts.The$70billionbudgetcut spendinginmanyareasthatwilltouchallofourlives.Therewerecutsto:CountyClerks, Medicaidreimbursement,stateemployees,ruralhealthdepartments,ruralhospitalsandnursing homes,andmanyotherareasthatwillaffectworkingpeople.Insomecases,therearespending increasesinthebudgetthatIdonotthinkwillbenefitourstate.IwasamongseveralHouse memberswhoopposedthebudgetbecausewecouldnotagreeonthenecessityofthecuts,nor thebudgetincreases. ThroughouttheSession,thereweremanycontroversialissues: PrisonPrivatization,whichfailedintheSenate,couldhavehadunforeseennegative economicconsequencesfortheStateofFlorida. TheSepticTankRegulationwasrepealedandreplacedwithamorebalancedapproach. RedistrictingmapsforSenate,HouseandCongressionaldistrictswerepassed. ASchoolPrivatizationBill,whichIvotedagainst,alsofailedintheFloridaSenate. Ilookforwardtocontinueworkingforyou.Wemustkeepupthefightformorejobsandto bringmoregood-payingprivatesectoremploymenttoourregion.Ibelievethatavibrantsmall businesscommunityiswhatwillbringprosperitytoourstateandnation. Again,thankyouforallowingmetheopportunitytoserveyou! StateRepresentative LauraJersey, LegislativeAssistant 405HouseOfficeBuilding 402SouthMonroeStreet Tallahassee,FL32399-1300 850-488-7870 MickieSalter, LegislativeAssistant 304NWCraneAvenue Building36 Madison,FL32304 850-973-5630 TeresaWatson, LegislativeAssistant P.O.Box1325 23Southeast2ndAvenue Chiefland,FL32644 850-493-6848COMMITTEEASSIGNMENTSAppropriationsAgriculture&NaturalResourcesAppropriations-RankingMember StateAffairsSelectCommitteeonWaterPolicyK-20EducationInnovationContactRepresentativeLeonardBembry:Leonard.Bembry@myfloridahouse.gov Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. Special to The NewsHabitat for Humanity of Wakulla County held a Home Dedication Ceremony for the their new homeowner on May 19. Kenny and Megan Dipietrantonio are the proud owners of the home located on Ted Lott Lane in Crawfordville. The family has already started a garden and have been busy with landscaping improvements and decorating the interior for their family. The family continues to participate in classes held at the Wakulla County Extension Service and working at the Habitat ReStore on Shadeville Road as part of their sweat equity requirement. The get together was hosted by Habitat board members who offered support to the family and welcomed them into the Habitat family. Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County is currently working on raising funds for their 11th home build. A Motorcycle Poker Run will be held Saturday, June 2. For more information on how to get involved, call President Peggy Mackin at the ReStore at 926-4544. Andrew Robert Meister was born on May 18 at 12:16 a.m. He weighed 7 pounds, 8 ounces and was 19.7 inches. He is the son of Jessica and Jacob Meister of Crawfordville. His maternal grandparents are Cindy and Wendell Miller of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are Judy and John Meister of Crawfordville. His maternal greatgrandmother is Martha Clenney of Tallahassee.Habitat holds home dedication SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHabitat for Humanity has a ceremony for 11th home built for a Wakulla County family. The Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta Foundation Inc. presents a $16,000 check to Dr. Sharp for the American Cancer Society at their wrap up party on Friday, May 18. Linda Downey is making the presentation. The regatta was held April 27-29 at Shell Point. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Regatta presents check to cancer society Proceeds from poems to bene t USOLocal literary press, Kitsune Books, publishes collection of poems written by soldierMeisters welcome baby boy on May 18North Florida Community College congratulated the following two students who were awarded certi cates at the conclusion of NFCCs Spring Term 2012. NFCCs Spring Term 2012 graduates for Wakulla County are James Day of Crawfordville who received a certi cate in public safety and law enforcement, and Judith Day, of Crawfordville, who also received a certi cate in public safety and law enforcement.NFCC announces graduates for spring 2012 Email community news to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is published when space becomes available and is edited for style, clarity and grammar.

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools School Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555The college of choice! Invest in yourself today EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT THE RISING COST OF COLLEGE at TCC, tuition is signicantly lower than most other universities and colleges Interior Remodeling Doors Floors Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS Styles for Men, Women & ChildrenFULL SURVICE HAIR SALONHair Place That 850-926-6020We Have Gift CerticatesBooking NOWProm updos starting at$65OOPS!WelcomeMavis 274-0700Miranda545-2905Robyn926-6020Linda294-2085 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Special to The NewsMay Employee of the Month is Riversprings Middle School Bookkeeper Sandy Moore. Moore started her career with the Wakulla County School District in 1994, transferring to Riversprings Middle School in 2000, when the school opened. Prior to working with the district, she worked in the family business at the Wakulla IGA. Moore is a third generation native Wakulla County resident, attended school at Sopchoppy Elementary and graduated from Wakulla High School. Moore said, The real enjoyment of my job is the involvement with the students and being a part of what this wonderful school system does for the children of our community. The school system is so much more than a provider of education, it is a big family, pulling together, meeting the needs of children. I love being a part of that. However, as a bookkeeper, Moore takes pride in perfect audit reports. She has also served as the school fundraiser coordinator and on the district calendar committee. Riversprings Principal Dod Walker said, Ms. Moore of cially became the Riversprings bookkeeper on the rst day of school in August 2000. From art supplies to zoo eld trips she ensures that our nancial house is in order. An ardent Bear fan, she loves the students and teachers that count on her. She has led the front of ce through her work ethic and dedication this year. I appreciate what she does for our school. Moore is employee of the month Sandy Moore Free workshops for college planning Special to The NewsMelisa Taylor with The Learning Curve Tutoring Center will be offering free seminars this summer designed to answer many of the questions parents and students may have as they begin to plan for college. There will be two separate workshops. Get Me to College Now is offered for students who will be seniors in the 2012-13 school year. These students must expedite the process of completing activities, community service, financial aid, college and scholarship applications. The second, Get Me to College seminar is for parents of students entering ninth through 11th grades in the 2012-13 school year. They have more time to complete the necessary steps needed to assure college acceptance and the nancial aid needed to get to the students college of choice; however, the earlier students and parents begin to prepare for the college process, the easier it is to be viewed as a stronger candidate for each college. Some of the topics that will be addressed at the free seminar are: What does it really cost to go to college today? Which classes do I need to take in high school? When do I begin to take the ACT or SAT test? Is the PSAT test important to me? What will Floridas Bright Futures scholarship be like when I get to college? How much is my family expected to contribute to my college education? Are there other scholarships available? Which college is right for me? How do I choose a major? Is community service important? What kind of community service is worthwhile for admissions? How do I sell myself and my activities to a college? How will my chances of entering the college I desire be affected by my grades freshman year? What should I be doing each year? Is there a difference between preparing to go to a Florida college or an Ivy League college? When should I apply for college? The seminars should be attended by both a parent and his or her student, and each family will leave with a notebook and checklist of steps to take to become a sought after candidate. With the increase in the number of students applying to college, competition is erce, and students must take the initiative to be the type of student each college desires. Due to limited seating, parents must register in advance at 926-2179 or online at: http://tlctutoring. wordpress.com/get-me-tocollege to attend the free seminars. Get Me to College Now, for 2012-13 seniors will be held at these different times. Only attend one below. June 12, 6-7:30 p.m. June 19, 6-7:30 p.m. June 26, 6-7:30 p.m. Get Me to CollegeFor Students entering ninth through 11th grades in 201213 (only attend 1 below): July 10, 6-7:30 p.m. July 24, 6-7:30 p.m. July 31, 6-7:30 p.m. By BETH ODONNELLAssistant Superintendent of instruction Wakulla County School District third grade students came in tied for rst in the region and fth in the state for their Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) Reading scores recently released by the Florida Department of Education. Of the nine districts in the region consisting of Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla, Jefferson, Liberty, Franklin, Madison, Calhoun and Taylor, Wakulla came in tied with Calhoun County. The state average for third grade Reading was 56 percent pro cient at Level 3 or higher on a scale of 1 to 6. Wakulla students came in at 68 percent, which is defined as on or above grade level. Although we were geared up to expect more students needing remediation this summer due to a tougher FCAT test coupled with raised cut scores, there are only seven more students who will need to attend the Third Grade Summer Reading Camp, an increase of only two percent over last year, said Superintendent David Miller. Our teachers and students continue to rise to the challenges of tougher standards and controversial cut score changes. Third grade is a high stakes testing area as Florida law deems it the only mandatory retention grade for students scoring a Level 1 in Reading who do not qualify for state exemptions. Each district must offer those students a Summer Reading Camp where they work on skills and take another test at the end of summer school or show their pro ciency on speci c portfolio lessons. In addition to Reading, third grade FCAT Math scores, plus high school End of Course (EOC) exam scores for Biology and Geometry were released May 24. In Math, Wakulla third graders came in at 64 percent pro cient, exceeding the state gure of 58 percent. Of the nine counties, Wakulla came in third. In the state, they were 11th. Wakulla High School students took new EOC exams designed to take the place of FCAT Math and Science because they are more speci c to the standards in each course. The rst year each EOC is given, it counts 30 percent of the students grade. After that, students must pass the EOC for each course in order to earn credit in the class. EOC scores released May 24 were divided into the top third, the middle third and the bottom third. On the Biology EOC, 79 percent of Wakulla High 10th graders scored in the top two-thirds compared to 66 percent for the state. Their mean scale score put them second in the region and third in the state. On the Geometry EOC, 74 percent of Wakulla High ninth and 10th graders scored in the top two-thirds compared to 65 percent for the state. Their mean scale score put them second in the region and fth in the state. Still to be released are scores for FCAT Reading and Math in grades four through eight, and FCAT Science scores in grades ve and eight. Also, Algebra I EOC scores are coming for students in grades eight and nine. This is the second year of the Algebra I EOC, so it must be passed in order to earn high school credit. The Algebra I EOC will be offered at additional times throughout high school for students who do not pass on the rst try. There have been more changes in a shorter amount of time to prepare teachers and students than in any other year I can think of, observed Miller of his 39 years in education. We want what is best for our students, so we will continue to provide them with the skills they need to be competitive with any student from any other district, state, or country. ird grade FCAT scores rank in top 10 Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $10 A Week 877676-1403

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 Page 9Asports news and team views Sports WRESTLINGSeven named rst team All Big BendPHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS LUCY CARTER/PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS KEN FIELDS/PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCoach of the Year Will Pafford with All Big Bend Wrestler of the Year Zach Malik. Seven Wakulla War Eagle wrestlers were selected as All Big Bend Wrestlers rst team, one All Big Bend Wrestling second team and three Honorable Mention. In the photograph are the rst team wrestlers. A total of 20 young men were selected from the Big Bend Area. Front Row: Bill Morgan, James Douin, Travis Hinsey, Zack Malik, Cole Woofter; back row: Luke Taylor, Coach Will Pafford, Kevon White. By LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsWith a strong arm and a sure smile, Senior Pitcher Jordan Jordy Montague signed a baseball scholarship with Florida A&M University on Tuesday May 22. Jordy has always been a competitor and hes going to take that with him to the next level, said Wakulla High Athletic Director Mike Smith. Montague also sees the edge that baseball has given him. Im a whole different person when Im on the baseball eld, he said. I zone everything out. Im concentrated on winning that baseball game. Montague thanked Varsity Baseball Coach Mike Gauger for his support and guidance, saying Coach Gauger taught me everything I know he molded me into the pitcher I am today. Montague plans to pursue a degree in criminology and become a wildlife of cer. My dream has always been to go play college ball, he said, and now that dream has come true.Montague signs with FAMU BASEBALL FOOTBALLWar Eagles show promise in spring gameBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles traveled to Monticello on May 26 for spring games, losing the half against Madison, 20-7, and beating Jefferson, 15-12. Head Coach Scott Klees said overall he was pleased with the teams performance. I think we have a chance to be good this year, said Klees. Klees said the score against Madison didnt indicate how close it was. The offense was handicapped in that game by fumbling ve times. Thats going to happen with the triple option until they get the timing down, Klees said. Demetrius Lindsey scored against Madison on an 8-yard run. In the second game against Jefferson, Mikal Cromartie scored a touchdown on a run, as did DeQuan Simmons. Dylan Norman kicked the extra points. The defense didnt play near as good as I thought we should, Klees said. While the defense only gave up three big runs all night, he said, they still gave up 28 points. (One touchdown was scored on Wakullas offense by Madison when a hand-off went to a defensive lineman who took it in.) I was impressed with the offensive line, Klees said. Overall, 12 different guys carried the ball in the games. A lot of guys got looks and got touches, Klees said. Overall, I was very pleased, Klees said. It was a chance to see if we were gonna hit and be physical and we did. The main thing with the spring game, Klees said, was to give a lot of people an opportunity to show what they could do. The team is young this year. Klees noted that the War Eagles lost about 25 seniors. Thats a lot to replace, he said. Last years War Eagles went all the way to the state championship game. This years team is relying on returning quarterback Caleb Stephens, and offfensive linemen Johnathan Chunn and Chris Grif n. How well the team does in the fall depends on how hard they work in the summer once the two--a-days start, Klees said. Demetrius Lindsey carries the ball against the Madison Cowboys in the spring game. proudly presents No needles, pain or radiation! Visit CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.com for more information. 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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBy MARJ LAW Wednesday morning is the time women get together at the WCSO Range in Sopchoppy. The other day, we women were discussing men who purchase guns for their wives. A man wants his wife to be safe. This is a reason why he purchases a gun for her. One of his main considerations is stopping power. When his wife shoots Mr. Bad, the husband wants Mr. Bad to be stopped in his tracks. He does not want his wife to shoot and merely wound Mr. Bad. A husband wants Mr. Bad to be down, down, down. Once he makes the decision to purchase a gun for his wife, he looks for one that will put Mr. Bad down with a single shot. Hell handle many guns; usually choosing a 9, 40 or 45 mm pistol. These handguns have great stopping power. After the gun is purchased, the man takes his wife to the range to learn to shoot. He discusses the safety rules of the range. He talks about the gun, showing its parts and then he goes over gun safety. He demonstrates how to load and shoot the gun. After his demonstration, he hands the gun to his wife. She shoots. Her shooting arm ies up in the air. Her eyes are wide with surprise. Wow! she cries. This gun has Some Kick! And its loud! Then she sits down. Her husband encourages her to shoot again. No, Ill just sit here and watch and learn from you, she responds agreeably. After that, there is little chance she will shoot again. As I see it, this is a huge problem. Will the wife ever shoot that gun again? Will she ever want to return to the range? If the answer is no, then the wife has no protection, and the husbands concern for her safety is not answered. To avoid this situation, every husband who wants his wife to shoot should bring her with him when he purchases the gun. This is because most men are larger: they have more body mass and larger hands than women. A gun ts differently in different hands. What is comfortable to one person may not be comfortable to another. Firepower is important. A 9 mm has good stopping power. However not all 9 mm guns shoot the same. Some have more recoil than others. Several women who attend the Wednesday morning gatherings can handle a lot of recoil. Several cannot. This should be taken into consideration before the gun purchase. Next, if the woman is new to shooting she many well need to learn to walk before she can run. A gun has power and a gun makes a sudden loud noise. This can take some getting used to. Id suggest her husband might want to bring or have borrowed a .22-caliber gun with a sturdy weight when they visit the range. This gun is easy to shoot and doesnt make a huge noise. It will help the woman lose her fear and be successful. She will learn not to inch when the gun goes off. Most likely, she will hit that target right away. Hitting the target brings confidence. Hitting the target is fun. After she becomes secure with the .22, then she will be ready to try a gun with more stopping power. Yes, it will have more recoil and be louder than the .22, but by this time, she will be prepared. It is now likely she will be successful and happy in shooting a larger caliber gun. What a husband wants for his wife when he buys her a gun is safety. If he takes her shopping with him to purchase the gun, and if he allows her the time to get used to shooting, she stands a good chance of enjoying herself at the range. And he will feel secure that she is safer in the home.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid gunner in her retirement.Capt. Jody Campbells column, From The Dock, will return next week.HOME ON THE RANGEWhat a man wants for a woman As part of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Departments Annual Fishing Tournament on May 19, local adults with boats volunteered to take kids shing. Two proud winners in the Spanish Mackerel Division display their catch and trophy and new rod and reel. Lil Daniel Lamarche, left, took third place Spanish mackerel and Trent Martin won rst place in Spanish mackerel. The boys shed aboard Daniels grandfathers boat out of Shell Point and Daniel Lamarche Sr. served as First Mate. Brag book:SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SUE DAMON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSKira Flanders of Crawfordville caught these two sharks while shing over the weekend at Shell Point. From FWC News The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is considering permanently adding two weeks to the end of the recreational season for bay scallops and it is asking the public to take this short survey to determine interest in the potential change. You may click on the link below to take the survey (the survey will be available until June 6): https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ZGB6R7D The survey is also available at MyFWC.com/Fishing by clicking on Saltwater.From FWC NewsThe 2012 Gulf of Mexico red snapper recreational harvest season begins June 1 in state and federal waters. The last day of the 40-day season is July 10. This years state season, which is the same as the 2012 federal recreational red snapper season in the Gulf of Mexico, was set in May at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission meeting. Florida state waters in the Gulf extend from shore to nine nautical miles; federal waters extend beyond that line to 200 nautical miles. The Gulf red snapper stock is improving, but the population still needs an increase in the number of older sh for it to be sustainable, according to FWC. Red snapper are estimated to live more than 50 years, but the current stock consists primarily of sh that are only a few years old. More information about red snapper shing is available online at MyFWC. com/Fishing. Click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations then Gulf Red Snapper.Gulf red snapper season begins June 1FWC polling bay scallop harvesters with survey 713-0014 99 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Perfect Weather for Outdoor Seating Overlooking Beautiful Dickerson Bay!SATURDAY AND SUNDAY LUNCH SPECIALS 11a.m. 3p.m. All Under $10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS $2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 27 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. 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Summer certainly felt as if it arrived over Memorial Day weekend in our area. With temperatures reaching into the 90s it is a great time to be out on the water. The 98 degree temperature did not stop our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Vessel Exams Steve Hults from setting up a free vessel inspection day on Saturday. He was joined by Tim Ashely, Raye Crews, Mike Harrison, Phil Hill and Mark Rosen. In addition to the Vessel Exams, the groups also set up a booth with various information on local and federal regulations for boating. Steve Hults began the day inspecting almost a dozen vessels at Shell Island Fish Camp before heading over to Fort St. Marks to meet up with the rest of the Auxiliarists. By days end, almost 50 boats had been inspected. Not all of the boats that were inspected passed. The main reason for not passing were out of date flares and registration that was missing or out of date. Thankfully for boaters, the Auxiliary is a complimentary service and we cannot issue any tickets or nes for improper equipment, however FWC and other law enforcement agencies can. Our free service can help to make sure that you have all of the legally required items onboard if you were to be stopped. When we check your boat, we are looking for speci c items. Are your registration numbers displayed properly? Do you have your registration papers and are they current? Do you have enough life jackets for everyone on board and preferably at least one or two extra? A good point here is also that the life jackets are easy to reach and are properly tted for the passengers on board. Visual distress signals are your ares. Not only do they need to be on board, but they need to be current. It is never a bad idea to keep out of date ares as a back up, but to pass the inspection you need to have ones that have not expired. Every boat needs a way to produce sound either by a bell or horn. Also required for all boats are navigation lights that work. We do ask you to turn them on during a safety check. Depending on the size of your boat, you are required to have certain equipment. On of the required items is a re extinguisher that is not expired. Every boat should have at least one, and the larger your boat the more you are required to have. Optional or situational are proper ventilation and a backfire flame control. Boats over 26 feet must have a pollution Packard if they have a machine compartment and a MARPOL trash placard. If you have a toilet on your boat, we inspect it to make sure it is in good working order. All boats need a copy of the Coast Guard Navigation Rules on board and be in good working order. If there are any additional requirement for an area, we also check for these, but in are area of Florida there are no additional things we look for. While not required, we also look to see if you have a radio, an anchor, a way to remove water from your boat and a rst aid kit. EVEN EXPERIENCED BOATERS NEED A VESSEL SAFETY CHECK! Fifteen minutes could save your life and the life of your family. Next week, we will get back to some navigation rules and other good information on boating safety. And, as Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAuxiliarists Raye Crews and Mike Harrison perform at boat inspection in St. Marks over Memorial Day weekend. The Coast Guard Auxiliarists tent with a banner promoting free vessel inspections for boaters..Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Cemetery Science.Mockingbirds defend their territory by patrolling their boundary displaying to their neighbors. In the spring, my graduate mentor sent many of us aspiring scientists out into the eld to document mockingbird territory, and what better place than the cemetery. Each headstone was uniquely identi able by both observer and subject bird alike. The cemetery was and still is a quiet place for re ection and study, a perfect place to sit under a shade tree and draw out the headstone the birds selected while singing to or engaging with their neighbors. By the end of an hour or two, I would have not only the territory of one, but several birds mapped out, and their respective community of dearly departed resting below. Resources such as a nest, standing water, and protected high perch, were also identi ed, with the amount of time spent in each dutifully recorded for a time budget. The scene was serene, with blooming owers of spring, the hustle of the birds and the bustle of the insects competing with my attention for the science lesson at hand. Then a bird would y up and out of its territory to go visit another on a distant meadow, causing me to jump up and be quick to the chase. Sharing time and space with this community of bird and departed was cathartic. Someone told me sh were the birds of the sea. In the course of time, I soon found myself on a patchreef and with time on my hands, mapping the territory of sh in the same fashion as I did with my cemetery birds. The Coco damsel sh is remarkably like the mockingbird, in that it defends a part of the reef that is de ned by structures by engaging in mock battle with its neighbors. Coral and sponge colonies replaced headstones, but the rest was very similar. A time budget revealed the value of a nest, cleaning station (shrimp and sh that clean others), grazing area and defensive perch. I was ever so surprised one day to see my subject swim up over the reef and race off to brie y visit with others on a distant undefended part of the reef. Other diving scientists reported that these territorial sh were communicating by sound as well! Did these two very different groups of animals read the same manual? I then began to see other sh species with underor overlapping territories -some so small like the Bicolor, several t inside of one Coco territory, others that included several Coco territories, all species tolerant of each other, but seldom of itself. Then one day, a 5-inch Butter y sh came into the patch reef community. Some sh are territory defenders and some are territory marauders. This long nose Butter y sh attacked the anemone that housed a cleaning station, ripping out half before detection. The smallest defenders, in which the shared cleaning station resided, were the rst to attack. They were no match for the Butter y sh, measuring 1/10th the size, but the ruckus they rose attracted the Coco damsel sh, which were half its size, but willing to attack. As the Butter y sh rose up out of the reef, the Three Spot joined in biting small mouthfuls of scales from a now eeing marauder. Then to my right the Grasby grouper, an 18-inch resident that rested on his favorite perch and seldom defended the patch, lifted off and bit the Butter y sh in two. In the end, the crabs had a feast, as the grouper showed no further interest. Now that is community action! Perhaps reef sh are more complicated than the cemetery birds, or perhaps I just did not stay long enough in the cemetery to see the bigger picture. I do enjoy the serenity and mystery of the reef, but miss the dearly departed and their distinctive headstones. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday y Thu May 31, 12 Fri Jun 1, 12 Sat Jun 2, 12 Sun Jun 3, 12 Mon Jun 4, 12 Tue Jun 5, 12 Wed Jun 6, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 12:31 AM 3.3 ft. 1:34 AM 3.5 ft. 2:29 AM 3.5 ft. 3:19 AM 3.5 ft. 4:05 AM 3.4 ft. 4:48 AM High 1.3 ft. 4:46 AM 1.4 ft. 5:47 AM 1.6 ft. 6:42 AM 1.6 ft. 7:32 AM 1.6 ft. 8:19 AM 1.6 ft. 9:03 AM 1.6 ft. 9:47 AM Low 3.6 ft. 11:13 AM 3.8 ft. 12:01 PM 4.0 ft. 12:48 PM 4.2 ft. 1:34 PM 4.3 ft. 2:19 PM 4.3 ft. 3:03 PM 4.2 ft. 3:47 PM High 0.2 ft. 6:06 PM -0.3 ft. 7:04 PM -0.7 ft. 7:58 PM -0.9 ft. 8:48 PM -1.0 ft. 9:36 PM -0.9 ft. 10:21 PM -0.6 ft. 11:05 PM Low Thu May 31, 12 Fri Jun 1, 12 Sat Jun 2, 12 Sun Jun 3, 12 Mon Jun 4, 12 Tue Jun 5, 12 Wed Jun 6, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 12:28 AM 3.4 ft. 1:31 AM 3.5 ft. 2:26 AM 3.6 ft. 3:16 AM 3.6 ft. 4:02 AM 3.5 ft. 4:45 AM High 1.4 ft. 4:43 AM 1.6 ft. 5:44 AM 1.7 ft. 6:39 AM 1.8 ft. 7:29 AM 1.8 ft. 8:16 AM 1.7 ft. 9:00 AM 1.7 ft. 9:44 AM Low 3.7 ft. 11:10 AM 3.9 ft. 11:58 AM 4.1 ft. 12:45 PM 4.3 ft. 1:31 PM 4.4 ft. 2:16 PM 4.4 ft. 3:00 PM 4.3 ft. 3:44 PM High 0.2 ft. 6:03 PM -0.3 ft. 7:01 PM -0.8 ft. 7:55 PM -1.0 ft. 8:45 PM -1.1 ft. 9:33 PM -0.9 ft. 10:18 PM -0.7 ft. 11:02 PM Low Thu May 31, 12 Fri Jun 1, 12 Sat Jun 2, 12 Sun Jun 3, 12 Mon Jun 4, 12 Tue Jun 5, 12 Wed Jun 6, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 1:07 AM 3.1 ft. 2:10 AM 3.2 ft. 3:05 AM 3.3 ft. 3:55 AM 3.2 ft. 4:41 AM 3.2 ft. 5:24 AM High 1.1 ft. 5:50 AM 1.3 ft. 6:51 AM 1.4 ft. 7:46 AM 1.5 ft. 8:36 AM 1.5 ft. 9:23 AM 1.5 ft. 10:07 AM 1.4 ft. 10:51 AM Low 3.3 ft. 11:49 AM 3.5 ft. 12:37 PM 3.7 ft. 1:24 PM 3.9 ft. 2:10 PM 4.0 ft. 2:55 PM 4.0 ft. 3:39 PM 3.9 ft. 4:23 PM High 0.2 ft. 7:10 PM -0.3 ft. 8:08 PM -0.6 ft. 9:02 PM -0.8 ft. 9:52 PM -0.9 ft. 10:40 PM -0.8 ft. 11:25 PM Low Thu May 31, 12 Fri Jun 1, 12 Sat Jun 2, 12 Sun Jun 3, 12 Mon Jun 4, 12 Tue Jun 5, 12 Wed Jun 6, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 12:23 AM 2.5 ft. 1:26 AM 2.6 ft. 2:21 AM 2.6 ft. 3:11 AM 2.6 ft. 3:57 AM 2.5 ft. 4:40 AM High 0.9 ft. 4:57 AM 1.0 ft. 5:58 AM 1.1 ft. 6:53 AM 1.2 ft. 7:43 AM 1.2 ft. 8:30 AM 1.2 ft. 9:14 AM 1.2 ft. 9:58 AM Low 2.7 ft. 11:05 AM 2.9 ft. 11:53 AM 3.0 ft. 12:40 PM 3.1 ft. 1:26 PM 3.2 ft. 2:11 PM 3.2 ft. 2:55 PM 3.2 ft. 3:39 PM High 0.1 ft. 6:17 PM -0.2 ft. 7:15 PM -0.5 ft. 8:09 PM -0.7 ft. 8:59 PM -0.7 ft. 9:47 PM -0.6 ft. 10:32 PM -0.5 ft. 11:16 PM Low Thu May 31, 12 Fri Jun 1, 12 Sat Jun 2, 12 Sun Jun 3, 12 Mon Jun 4, 12 Tue Jun 5, 12 Wed Jun 6, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 12:15 AM 2.6 ft. 1:18 AM 2.7 ft. 2:13 AM 2.7 ft. 3:03 AM 2.7 ft. 3:49 AM 2.6 ft. 4:32 AM High 1.2 ft. 4:25 AM 1.4 ft. 5:26 AM 1.5 ft. 6:21 AM 1.6 ft. 7:11 AM 1.6 ft. 7:58 AM 1.6 ft. 8:42 AM 1.5 ft. 9:26 AM Low 2.8 ft. 10:57 AM 3.0 ft. 11:45 AM 3.1 ft. 12:32 PM 3.3 ft. 1:18 PM 3.4 ft. 2:03 PM 3.4 ft. 2:47 PM 3.3 ft. 3:31 PM High 0.2 ft. 5:45 PM -0.3 ft. 6:43 PM -0.7 ft. 7:37 PM -0.9 ft. 8:27 PM -1.0 ft. 9:15 PM -0.9 ft. 10:00 PM -0.6 ft. 10:44 PM Low Thu May 31, 12 Fri Jun 1, 12 Sat Jun 2, 12 Sun Jun 3, 12 Mon Jun 4, 12 Tue Jun 5, 12 Wed Jun 6, 12 Date 2.2 ft. 1:26 AM 2.4 ft. 2:49 AM 2.5 ft. 3:53 AM 2.6 ft. 4:46 AM 2.6 ft. 5:30 AM 2.6 ft. 6:08 AM High 1.2 ft. 3:37 AM 1.5 ft. 4:39 AM 1.7 ft. 5:38 AM 1.9 ft. 6:33 AM 1.9 ft. 7:24 AM 1.9 ft. 8:13 AM 1.8 ft. 9:04 AM Low 2.8 ft. 10:22 AM 2.9 ft. 10:56 AM 3.1 ft. 11:34 AM 3.2 ft. 12:17 PM 3.2 ft. 1:04 PM 3.2 ft. 1:55 PM 3.1 ft. 2:47 PM High 0.1 ft. 5:41 PM -0.2 ft. 6:34 PM -0.5 ft. 7:25 PM -0.6 ft. 8:15 PM -0.7 ft. 9:03 PM -0.6 ft. 9:50 PM -0.4 ft. 10:34 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 31 June 6First June 26 Full June 4 Last June 11 New June 19Major Times 9:53 AM 11:53 AM 10:20 PM 12:20 AM Minor Times 3:17 AM 4:17 AM 4:34 PM 5:34 PM Major Times 10:48 AM 12:48 PM 11:17 PM 1:17 AM Minor Times 3:59 AM 4:59 AM 5:42 PM 6:42 PM Major Times --:---:-11:47 AM 1:47 PM Minor Times 4:46 AM 5:46 AM 6:51 PM 7:51 PM Major Times 12:18 AM 2:18 AM 12:50 PM 2:50 PM Minor Times 5:40 AM 6:40 AM 8:00 PM 9:00 PM Major Times 1:21 AM 3:21 AM 1:53 PM 3:53 PM Minor Times 6:40 AM 7:40 AM 9:04 PM 10:04 PM Major Times 2:25 AM 4:25 AM 2:56 PM 4:56 PM Minor Times 7:44 AM 8:44 AM 10:02 PM 11:02 PM Major Times 3:26 AM 5:26 AM 3:55 PM 5:55 PM Minor Times 8:50 AM 9:50 AM 10:53 PM 11:53 PM Average Average Better Best Best Better Good6:36 am 8:33 pm 4:35 pm 3:18 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:36 am 8:34 pm 5:43 pm 4:00 am 6:36 am 8:34 pm 6:52 pm 4:47 am 6:35 am 8:35 pm 8:01 pm 5:41 am 6:35 am 8:35 pm 9:05 pm 6:41 am 6:35 am 8:36 pm 10:03 pm 7:45 am 6:35 am 8:36 pm 10:54 pm 8:51 am68% 75% 83% 91% 99% 94% 86% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsA 37-year-old Crawfordville man was arrested following the execution of a search warrant at a home at 277 Woodville Highway in Crawfordville Tuesday, May 22, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Anthony Devirgil Miller was arrested for possession of a vehicle with altered numbers, vehicle theft, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of cocaine during the investigation. During more than two months of investigation, Wakulla County Sheriffs Office detectives determined that stolen property was being stored at the location. A motorcycle, reported stolen by the Florida State University Police Department, was on the property and was seized March 2. A second motorcycle was observed on the property during the execution of the search warrant on May 22 along with motorcycle parts and spray paint. The stolen motorcycle was spray painted black. A ramp at the rear of the home which allowed a motorcycle or other wheeled vehicles to be introduced inside the home was also observed. Cocaine, marijuana and drug paraphernalia were also observed in the home. The stolen motorcycle had an ignition removed and the vehicle identi cation number was scratched off. The motorcycle was seized as evidence. It had been reported stolen by the Tallahassee Police Department on May 8. Miller was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Detectives Nick Boutwell, Rob Giddens and Lorne Whaley investigated.Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum recognized Ashley Renee Methvin with a Special Recognition Award Friday, May 25. Methvin, who is about to graduate from nursing school, was traveling on Crawfordville Highway near Trice Lane on Tuesday, April 17 when she stopped her vehicle and administered assistance to two individuals who were injured in a traffic crash while riding a moped without a helmet. The moped riders became involved in a traf c crash with another vehicle and Methvins action resulted in a positive outcome for the two teenagers. Methvin said she was riding with her young child when the accident occurred in front of her. She said she gave her son pizza to keep him occupied while she determined how she could help the teenagers. I would never ride a moped without a helmet, she said. I wasnt sure if I was going to have to administer my rst CPR on a teenager. My son got his pizza a little early. We appreciate you taking the time to render assistance on the scene, said Sheriff Crum. Thanks to your actions and others at the scene there was a positive outcome. Methvin was joined at the award presentation by her mother and aunt, Virginia Carter and Frances Trumbull. Lt. Billy Jones also took part in the recognition event.Special to The NewsFocus Wakulla is a young professionals group designed to target Chamber members 45 years of age or younger. This group will host events and special functions to meet the needs of our future leaders as they seek to grow and develop professionally as Chamber members and citizens of Wakulla County. The group will hold its inaugural event at Poseys Dockside Caf on June 29 beginning at 6 p.m. The groups stated goals are: F oster and support economic development. O ptimize networking opportunities. C reate and cultivate future leaders. U nderstanding and awareness of government processes. S trengthen and enrich our community. 000BBXI 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) 10AM (TUE-FRI) HAIR SALON FREE HAIRCUT FEATHER LOCKS are here!!FULL SERVICE FAMILY SALON all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor Special to The NewsA crew of off-duty Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce volunteers helped build a handicapped ramp at the Crawfordville home of Dallas Miller on Tuesday, May 29. Ability 1st provides several services to Wakulla residents who qualify under their guidelines including those who accessibility issues. Dallas Miller said he was concerned about being able to safely navigate the steps at his home as he has gotten older. Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum encourages members of his staff to volunteer their time and he has participated in similar projects in the past. Road Patrol deputies Lt. Mike Kemp, Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Clint Beam used their day off to build Miller a ramp under the supervision of Ability 1sts Eric Evans. Undersheriff Maurice Langston took part of his lunch hour to hammer several nails to help the crew reach its goal of finishing the ramp in one day. Dallas Miller contributed some money to pay for part of the cost of his ramp materials while the work crew volunteered the labor time. The ramp was part of the Ramps in 6 Days building initiative and each project is managed by Accessibility Program Manager Kevin Ogden. Ability 1st received funding from the Wakulla County United Way campaign to provide the materials needed for the work project. Miller smiled as his new ramp began to take place. Im excited, he said. I was scared of those old stairs. I am not a young Marine anymore.Arrest made after searchMethvin receives award Focus Wakulla will meetSheri s volunteers help with ramp Anthony Devirgil Miller Sheriff Crum presents Methvin with the award. Her aunt and mother look on. Sheriffs of ce volunteers work on a ramp for Ability 1st.Rescue: Several crashes were reported over Memorial Day weekend, including an an overturned vehicle on Spring Hill Road on Thursday night, above. On Friday night, a near head-on at Shadeville Highway, rightBoth vehicles received extensive damage, but no injuries were reported.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 Page 13Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn May 18, Brian Lewis Charles, 33, of Crawfordville was charged with three counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill for threatening three juveniles with his automobile. The three male victims, ages 13, 14 and 15, were walking on Crawfordville Highway near Hardees when a PT Cruiser left the highway and attempted to run them over. A witness observed the vehicle nearly strike the boys as all four vehicle tires left the roadway. The victims knew the suspect and the witness was also able to identify the suspect. Deputy Scott Powell transported Charles to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. The juveniles were not injured. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: On May 17, Felicia Thornton of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. An electronic game system, valued at $300, was stolen from her home. The property is owned by Anthony Connell of Crawfordville. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. On May 17, a retail theft was reported at WalMart. Michael David Turner, 19, of Eastpoint allegedly removed MTG cards without paying for them. The cards are valued at $29. Turner was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On May 17, Kevin James of Crawfordville reported the theft of an air conditioning unit. The unit was removed from a Sopchoppy residence. Persons of interest were interviewed following a traf c stop on Sopchoppy Highway. The driver had a suspended driver license. Deanqunette Lashay Thomas, 25, of Tallahassee was issued a Uniform Traf c Citation for driving while license was suspended or revoked. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. On May 18, Michael William Lindert of Crawfordville reported a structure re. The back porch of his residence was on re. Lindert and a roommate were able to put the re out with a garden hose. Damage was estimated at $5,100. The state Fire Marshal investigated and determined the re to be an accident due to individuals smoking on the porch. On May 18, Deputy Nick Gray, Sgt. Ronald Mitchell, Deputy Mike Zimba and Detective Derek Lawhon were investigating a structure re when they responded to the Wakulla County Courthouse to investigate a suspicious person. Two subjects were observed walking near the facility at 5 a.m. One of the subjects ran when approached by law enforcement. Joshua Thomas Collins, 18, of Crawfordville did not run but was belligerent toward deputies. Collins refused to answer questions as to why he was walking in the area at that hour. He was arrested for loitering and prowling and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The other suspect was identi ed. On May 18, Cody Cripe of Sopchoppy reported a residential burglary. Electronic gaming systems and change, valued at $757, were reported missing. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. On May 18, a 14-yearold female reported that she and her Chihuahua were attacked by a pit bull in the Klickitat Drive area. EMS arrived on scene and treated the juvenile for several lacerations. Her dog also suffered a large laceration to his leg. The Animal Control Unit caught the canine. The bulldog was taken to the Wakulla Animal Shelter while the investigation continues. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. On May 18, Steven Rice of Crawfordville was involved in a vehicle crash with a parked vehicle at Wal-Mart. Rice struck a parked vehicle owned by Auburn Hambrick of Crawfordville. Rices vehicle did not contain sufficient power steering uid which caused the steering to fail and the crash to occur. Rice was found at fault for the crash for operating an unsafe vehicle. Each vehicle suffered $1,500 worth of damage. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. On May 19, David Settles of Tallahassee reported a residential burglary in Crawfordville. A total of $1,150 worth of property including a transmission, dune buggy, lead and ammunition brass, were removed from sheds on the property that were also damaged. Damage to the sheds was estimated at $225. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On May 20, Sarah Herrin of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at her home. A suspect, who has been identi ed, moved out of the home and removed several items owned by the victim including a television bar stools, food items, coffee pot, picture frames and other items, valued at $375. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On May 20, Michael Barrett of Tallahassee was southbound on U.S. Highway 319 with Jason Davis of Crawfordville following behind him. Barrett slowed to turn onto Emmett Whaley Road and Davis failed to yield and struck the rear of the Barrett vehicle. Davis was issued a traf c citation for careless driving. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On May 20, Erin Juszczyk of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone poured an undetermined liquid on her vehicle which was parked in her driveway. Damage to the vehicle has not been determined. Sgt. Mike Helms determined that the liquid may have had a tomato base. On May 21, Cynthia Thomas of Amerifirst Mortgage in Crawfordville reported the theft of an air conditioning unit. The power and copper lines to the unit were cut. The unit is valued at $2,000. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On May 21, Kathryn Briggs of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim noticed 22 unauthorized charges on her bank card. The charges were valued at $549. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. On May 21, Kenneth Strickland of Crawfordville reported the theft of an iPhone and currency, valued at $1,050. The property was removed from the victims boat after a trip on a river. Lt. Dale Evans investigated. On May 21, Chelsea Gregory of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone placed roofing tacks on the victims driveway. Three tires were reported damaged on one vehicle and two tires were damaged on a second vehicle. Damage was estimated at $990. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. On May 21, Damian Smith of Crawfordville reported a trespass on property owned by Debra Sparks in Crawfordville. Smith observed a wooden stump missing which is used for wood lighter and is valued at $200. A juvenile suspect was identi ed. He used a rider mower to drag the stump off the victims property. The 13-year-old boy was issued a civil citation and eight hours of community service. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. On May 21, Jason Killion of Crawfordville reported an animal incident. The victim was walking his dog in Mysterious Waters when a bulldog attacked his dog. The victim was able to separate the two dogs with only minor injuries to his hand. The dogs owner was noti ed and the investigation was turned over to the Animal Control Unit. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On May 17, Michael Williams of Tallahassee reported a vehicle re in Medart. Fire ghters put out the blaze but the vehicle was a total loss. During the investigation it was determined that Williams had an outstanding warrant in Leon County. He was arrested and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Clint Beam and Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. On May 22, Laura White of Crawfordville reported the theft of a computer as she w as moving from an old home to a new home. The computer is valued at $1,300 and suspects have been identified. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. On May 23, Theresa Monroe of Panacea reported the theft of household appliances from her home. The items were taken while she was moving and are valued at $145. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. On May 23, Janice Allen of Crawfordville reported the theft of a Florida license plate off a trailer. The plate was entered into the NCIC/FCIC computer. The property is valued at $100. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. On May 23, Detectives Nick Boutwell, Matt Helms and Derek Lawhon were investigating a case related to some stolen property when they observed marijuana growing at a Crawfordville residence. Three marijuana plants were discovered in plain view. The small plants were seized and turned over to the WCSO Evidence Division. On May 23, John Gerhardt of the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department reported the theft of computer equipment from county of ces on Crescent Way. The stolen property was valued at $800 and evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 914 calls for service during the past week including 25 residential and business alarms; 86 citizen contacts; 18 disturbances; 19 abandoned E-911 calls; 29 regular E-911 calls; 40 investigations; 12 loud music/noise complaints; 37 medical emergencies; 261 residential and business security checks; 18 special details; 12 suspicious people; 80 traf c enforcements; 78 traf c stops; 11 abandoned vehicles; and 24 reckless vehicles.Sheri s Report Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the t op-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011. Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943 ) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Friday, June 8 F riday, June 22 Firday, July 13 Friday, July 27 Friday, August 10 Friday, August 24 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA Law Oce Est. 1998Fore closures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, F lorida HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerEl Jalisco Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with side Hamaknockers Flatbread HoagiePulled Pork or Chicken Bouys By The Bay Shrimp Basket & Drink Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99 Mixed Tues. & urs. Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under 926-4329mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza 926432 9 9 2 6 4 3 29 2 9 Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.com Open 7 Days Open 7 Days 926-7530 Restaurant 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville Private Party Rooms Private Party Rooms Tuesday Nights Tuesday Nights $ 4 95 $ 4 95 Spaghetti with Meat Sauce Spaghetti with Meat Sauce OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringWin One Meal from Every Restaurant!EATIN path EATIN pathOFF OFF the theEATIN pathOFF the Winner Lorra Phillipsdrawn from Hamaknockers in Crawfordville SWEET SHOP NOW OPEN WITH ICE CREAM SWEET SHOP NOW OPEN WITH ICE CREAM 850-984-9994 SEAFOOD RESTAURANT & MORE 1349 B COASTAL HWY 98, PANACEA FL. 850-984-9994 12 PIECE SHRIMP BASKET ......... $ 7 99 LUNCH BUFFET ................... $ 10 00 MON. FRI. 11 2 SEAFOOD BUFFET THURSDAY 11 2pm Open Lunch & Dinner 7 Days A Week 11 9 11 10 on Weekends COME IN AND SEE US COME IN AND SEE US Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Menu Myra Jeans : Old School Scoopin !The art of making a chocolate malt is still alive at Myra Jeans in Crawfordville. Three scoops of Blue Bell, Hersheys chocolate syrup, whole milk and malted milk powder. No plastic bag of gelatinous slurry like you get from the fast food guys. Myra jeans still scoops. Its why the girls of Myra Jeans have such strong right arms, and its why a Malt or shake from there tastes so fantastic. Theyre not easy to make and theyre not quick to make. Sometimes the ice cream gets bunched up inside the stainless steel cup and the mixing rotors violently sling the whole shake at the preparer forcing them to rescoop and start over. They may even need a change of clothes. Its worth it though. The work, the wait, the mess, the price. Its worth it. When Myra Jeans is nished crafting a Malt or Shake, They pour half of it in a pretty parfait glass and top it with a dollop of whipped cream and place a sweet, red cherry on top. The other half is left in the stainless steel mixing cup causing the outside of it to frost. Both halves are brought to your table or seat at the counter for you to sip on, share and savor. Many things have been improved during the last 50 years. Cars are better and so are televisions. Myra Jeans feels the milkshake was perfected in the 1930s and there is no reason to screw them now up by modernizing. They still serve their Sundaes, Splits and Shakes in fancy glassware and they still believe in the art of old school scoopin.Consultant proposes more multi-use trails around the countyBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAt the May 17 Wakulla County Commission workshop, the countys consultant Kimley-Horn and Associates presented a preliminary recommendation for the countys bicycle, pedestrian, blueways master plan. Several multi-use trails were proposed around the county, as well as policy recommendations, safe routes to schools, extra launch sites, improving launch faciltiies, adding sidewalks and having uni ed signage throughout the county. These recommendations were formulated from meetings with community stakeholders and public workshops. A public workshop was held on Feb. 16 by Kimley-Horn seeking ideas on how to improve walking, biking and paddling in Wakulla County. Included in the draft master plan, is extending the Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail, which is currently being constructed, to Sopchoppy. Jon Sewell, of KimelyHorn, said he and his staff met with city employees and of cials with Sopchoppy to address the possibility. Currently, the trail terminates at Highway 319 right outside Sopchoppy. There was some discussion about using city property as a park and trail head. Sewell said they plan to set up a meeting with the Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency to try and get funding for that project. There was also a proposed trail along the U.S. Highway 98 corridor. This area was brought up the most by the public, Sewell said. The trail would be broken into seven segments, going from Highway 319 through Panacea and Medart and cross the Wakulla and St. Marks rivers, Sewell said. This corridor is vital to the proposed Capital City to Sea Loop, which goes from Tallahassee south to St. Marks, west to Panacea, up to Sopchoppy, down to Carrabelle, and back to Tallahassee, Sewell said. There were also a trail proposed on the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road corridor. This would run from MLK Jr, Road to Highway 319 to Spring Creek. It would connect to U.S. Highway 98 and start to connect Crawfordville, Sewell said. There was also a trail proposed along Arran Road, which could possibly connect Crawfordville to the Capital City to Sea Loop, and one on Bloxham Cutoff. Widening shoulders and paving markers for bike lanes were also recommended. For sidewalks, the biggest need is near the Wakulla County Senior Center, Sewell said. They also incorporated the Crawfordville Town Plan recommendations, as well as recommendations from the Panacea public access plan and St. Marks. Sopchoppy sent in sidewalk enhancement ideas for downtown. Safe routes to schools were also recommended for Crawfordville Elementary School, COAST Charter School, Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School. Under blueways, additional launch sites were suggested at the Sopchoppy River, Lower Ochlockonee, Wakulla River, St. Marks River and the Gulf of Mexico. They also suggested designating St. Marks River as a paddling trail. Tourist Development Council Director Pam Portwood said the TDC has received grant funding to establish an Apalachee Bay Maritime Heritage paddling trail. Kimley-Horn staff also recommended improving launch facilities for non-motorized boats and provide amenities at all access points. They also suggested applying to become a blueway community, which Portwood said TDC is also working on that designation, as well as becoming a part of the Florida Paddling Trails Association. Uniform signage was also suggested, as well as information kiosk signs. Policy recommendations included designating a bicycle, pedestrian, blueway program manager to be a contact person for projects and for the Department of Transportation and the CRTPA, as well as creating an advisory committee, setting performance standards and establishing maintenance policies that address repair of trails, bike lanes and sidewalks. An annual report on plan progress should be done and the master plan should be updated every ve years, Sewell said. Funding sources were also discussed. Some possibilities included CRTPA funding, VisitFlorida, money from the BP Oil Spill, Florida Forever and Community Redevelopment Block Grants. The nal report will be nished in June. COUNTY COMMISSION

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012The Wakulla news EXTRA! Hunger is a problem in WakullaBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net One of the major issues facing those in need in Wakulla County is the lack of food. There are 4,480 people in Wakulla County that live with food insecurity, not knowing at one time where their next meal might come from. Food insecurity is USDAs measure of the lack of access, at times, to enough food for an active, healthy life for all members of a household and limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate foods. There are some state and federal programs available to assist low income families, as well as food pantries and emergency food assistance. However, there is still not enough to meet the needs of everyone suffering. Many of these programs follow the federal poverty guidelines for eligibility. A two-person household making less than $14,710 would qualify and a four-person making $22,350 would qualify. The food pantries in Wakulla County are usually donation-driven and some also buy food from Americas Second Harvest of the Big Bend. It is estimated that there are about 11 pantries in the county, each one doing the best it can with the resources available. Some are more self sufficient than others, said Shelley Swenson, Wakulla County extension agent. Spokespeople for several of the organizations indicated that they are so scared of being overwhelmed with a large number of people, that they wont allow their locations to be published. They rely solely on word of mouth. Some are also concerned about people taking advantage of the pantries. President of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth Bruce Ashley said a few people take advantage, but that doesnt mean they should stop helping. The coalition has tried to establish lines of communication between the pantries so they can better serve those in need. The coalition has applied for a hunger grant from the Wal-Mart Foundation to help stock the existing food pantries. The grant award will be announced in October. Elma Gillette is one of the food ministry coordinators for Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church. Their pantry is open the last two Saturdays of the month, unless there is a holiday. They are also available for emergency assistance. The pantry was opened in 2010 after members of Crawfordville United Methodist Church had a surplus of food and gave it to her church. After that, they kept it going. It is completely donation driven and Gillette said they are lucky to have generous donors. The pantry serves 15 to 40 people a month, Gillette said. We dont turn anyone away, she said. However, they do ask customers to ll out a form with the number of people in the household, their ages, as well as if they receive any other type of assistance and have been to a food pantry in the last 60 days. Families are given two to three bags of non-perishable food items and they can come to the pantry every six weeks.Continued on Page 3B POVERTY FILE PHOTOPeople line up for a recent food distribution at Manna Mission in Sopchoppy. is is the second story in an ongoing series on poverty in Wakulla. e March 29 issue featured a story on the lack of adequate, a ordable housing in the county. FOR FREE QUIT TIPS AND COUNSELING IN WAKULLA COUNTY CALL 850.926.0401 ext. 217 Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com A OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, May 31 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, June 1 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, June 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB, a member of the National Button Society, will meet at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594, or email bardon56@aol.com. Sunday, June 3 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, June 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, June 5 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 6 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, June 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF WAKULLA will host a public records forum at 7 p.m. at the library. Barbara Petersen, president of the Florida First Amendment Foundation, will lead the forum. Special EventsThursday, May 31 PROJECT GRADUATION will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park from 2 p.m. to 2 a.m. The event is free to all Wakulla High School seniors. Students will have access to the lodge, swimming area, boat rides, food and entertainment. There will also be gift drawings. Friday, June 1 WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION CEREMONY will be held at 7 p.m. at Reynolds Field at J. D. Jones Stadium. Saturday, June 2 MOTORCYCLE POKER RUN CARDS FOR CARING will be held to bene t Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County. Registration is from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Capital City Harley Davidson, 1745 Capital Circle NW, Tallahassee. Registration is $15 per bike and $10 for a passenger. The best hand wins $250. For more information call Peggy at 926-5037 or Susan at 519-2292. GARAGE SALE to bene t the League of Women Voters and its programs from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1357 Martin Luther King Road. BOOK SALE EXTRAVAGANZA will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the library. Sunday, June 3 FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Barbara Hines, outreach coordinator for the North Central Region of the Florida Public Archaeology Network as she presents A Sticky Situation: The Naval Stores Industry in North Florida at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The naval stores industry once dominated vast segments of Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and surrounding counties, including large areas of the St. Marks Refuge. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850.925-6121 for information. Thursday, June 7 MEET AND GREET WITH COUNTY COMMISSION CANDIDATE EMILY SMITH will be held at Posh Java at 6 p.m. Smith is a candidate for District 5. The evening will begin with music by Sammy Tedder and a brief presentation by Smtih. More music by Grant Peeples will follow. She will be available throughout the evening to respond to questions and concerns. For more information, contact Judith Harriss at joereme@gmail.com. WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public roundtable meeting from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge Education Building. It will begin with a brief presentation on recent TDC activities and initiatives, including some educational opportunities for local tourism-related businesses to increase their visibility to the traveling public. This will be followed by a facilitated discussion of how to keep our tourism industry engaged in responsible promotion of our incredible resources, ways that TDC can improve its marketing/advertising activities, and new ideas for marketing campaigns that can be fully developed to reach our target audiences. Upcoming EventsSaturday, June 9 WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 2002 10 year reunion will be held at Wildwood Resort at 6:30 p.m. SJOGRENS SUPPORT GROUP FOR NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA will be held at 1 p.m. at the Leon County Public Library,1583 Pedrick Road, Tallahassee. Come and meet others with Sjogrens(showgrins), share experiences and learn about resources for living and coping with this complex, auto-immune disease. The meeting is free and handicap accessible. For more information, contact Kathleen Abrams, support group leader, at kabrams408@gmail.com or 668-3586. Friday, June 15 BLOOD DRIVE will be held at Wal-Mart from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Donors will receive a free T-shirt. Saturday, June 16 GOLF GONE WILD to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association will be held at St. James Bay Golf Resort. There will be cash prizes, a silent art auction and a nature photography slide-show and presentation, The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay (which will soon be a published book), by award-winning nature photographer John Spohrer. The event will bene t the FWMA, a 501(c)3 wildlife rehabilitation center located in Wakulla County that cares for sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife in our area. Enjoy golf at the gorgeous Audubon-sanctioned St. James Bay Golf Resort (151 Laughing Gull Lane in Carrabelle, Florida). To help by sponsoring the event or donating auction items, contact Lois Swoboda at 6535857. For more details, see the brochure on the website at www.wakullawildlife.org or call Lynne Cooper at (850) 697-9507. Saturday, June 23 TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at Myra Jeans restaurant from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. This will be a farewell party for April Schreiber. They will have cake and a gift to give her for all her hard work. This event will not be structured with activities as the past meetings have been. They are having the party at Myra Jeans so that the kids can enjoy the trains set up in the restaurant. RSVP to Carrie Stevens by calling 274-9474 or emailing carriejstevens@comcast.net. Friday, June 29 BLOOD DRIVE will be held at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Donors will receive a free T-shirt. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Project Graduation at Wakulla Springs from 2 p.m. to 2 a.m. Wakulla High School graduation at 7 p.m. at Reynolds Field. Habitat for Humanity Motorcycle Poker Run at 9:30 a.m., Capital City Harley Davidson. First Sunday at the Refuge at 2 p.m. at St. Marks Wildlife Refuge. ThursdayFridaySaturdayMonday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.comBy SCOTT JOYNERWCPL DirectorBook Extravaganza Fundraiser on Saturday, June 2 Our bi-monthly Book Extravaganza to bene t the Friends of the Library will be held on Saturday, June 2 from 9 a.m. to noon in our Main Meeting Room. As always, thousands of books, video and audio will be available for your browsing pleasure. Come early to get the best stuff as we usually have a couple dozen people waiting to be let in when we open at 9 a.m. Come nd that perfect summer beach read, a great lm to watch while beating the heat and help support your library. All funds raised go directly toward funding our Summer Program, childrens programs throughout the year, part of our book budget and other library needs. Two new additions to the WCPL Family! Were very happy to announce that our Childrens Coordinator Leilania Nichols gave birth to her third daughter Lacey Catherine on Saturday May 19. Mom and daughter are doing great and we cant wait to see the newest member of the Nichols family. Congratulations to Leilania, her husband Paul, and the two big sisters Lily, and Laurel. As Leilania is obviously taking some well deserved time off, Molly Clore will be stepping in this summer to help us with the Summer Program. Clore is a former teacher and an active participant in library events, bringing her son and niece to our childrens programs, and being a member of the Library Advisory Board. Leilania and I thank Clore for pinch hitting this summer and Clore is very excited to have some fun with our great younger patrons. Summer Program Registration June 7 and 8 Its finally time. Registration for our Summer Programs takes place on Thursday, June 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. and Friday, June 8 from 10 a.m. to noon and 2 to 4 p.m. Detailed information on the program will be available along with signup sheets for our rst eld trip to the Tallahassee (Jr.) Museum. A bouncy house will be available outside for the kids while the parents are getting information on all the family fun this summer from Clore and myself. I dropped off brochures at every elementary and middle school for the students to take home, but if you need one, stop by and pick one up, or contact me and Ill be happy to email one to you. Sunshine State Readers Books The Sunshine State Young Readers books have arrived. We have the lists available at the library, or you can access the lists from our online library catalog at our website: http:// www.wakullalibrary.org/. (Just click on lists). Once you have logged into your account, you can place holds on any items that are checked out. If the book is not checked out, please call the library to check current availability. Please be aware that, as in past years, there will be no renewals allowed on these items. This will give other students a chance to check out these books. If you need assistance or want to place holds with us directly, please call the library and we will be glad to help. As with the high school summer reading books, we strongly encourage you to read these early or get placed on the hold list as soon as possible as the wait only gets longer the further into summer we go. Library News... Government MeetingsMonday, June 4 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular board meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, June 5 SMART GROWTH OPEN HOUSE will be held by the County Commission from 6 to 8 p.m. at the library. It will include a presentation by Chris Duerksen on Smart Growth Fixes for Rural Communities. Duerksen will describe common barriers that can hinder the development of an attractive, walkable downtown and easy ways to remove these stumbling blocks, discuss effective ways to encourage rural commercial development and describe ways to preserve the beauty of rural roads. Wednesday, June 6 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop from noon to 1:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. Environmental Protection Agency experts, county commissioners, planning commissioners and other key stakeholders will discuss the Crawfordville Town Plan and ways to maintain its rural character of county roads, particularly the Big Bend Scenic Byway.

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Continued from Page 1B Gillette said they serve many low income families and seafood workers, as well as a number of people who have never had to ask for assistance. One woman Gillette helped went to her church and she said she knew her family was struggling, but the woman wouldnt come to the food pantry. She was ashamed, Gillette said. So Gillette showed up at the womans of ce with several bags of food. She just cried, Gillette said and then the woman asked her, How did you know? I can just look at a person and know, Gillette said. It isnt the way they look or the way they dress, Gillette said a persons demeanor changes. She never thought she would ever have to go to a food pantry, she said. Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist isnt the only church that operates a food pantry. Radical Restoration Ministries in Panacea has a pantry, as well as Crawfordville United Methodist, Wakulla United Methodist Church, Promise Land Ministries and Manna Community Mission. There are other food pantries that arent publicized. Promise Land Ministries has a food pantry, along with a shelter for men. The pantry is open the first Wednesday of the month from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Manna Community Mission, located in Sopchoppy, opened a food pantry last year and serves people every Thursday. They buy food from Second Harvest and the truck arrives sometime between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. They start handing out numbers at 10 a.m. In April, co-founder Janet Culbertson estimates that they served about 1,140 people, about 100 people come through the pantry each week. Requirements are based on income and the amount of food given is based on the number of people in a household. The Wakulla County Extension Of ce serves as a drop-off location for nonperishable food items to distribute to the food pantries, as well as the senior center and library. Wakulla Springs Baptist Church is also growing a garden to supplement one of the food pantries. Another agency that provides food assistance is Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida, which serves seven counties including Wakulla County. They provide emergency assistance. There are also several churches that serve as host sites for Gaballi Foods. This is a faith-based program that helps the public save 30 to 70 percent in groceries. Anyone can purchase food from the program, regardless of income level. Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist, Harvest Fellowship and Christ Church Anglican serve as sites. The Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center tries to help the seniors in the county. They provide meals five days a week at the center. They also provide meals on wheels, or home delivered meals, to the elderly once a week. The meal consists of a main course, bread, milk and dessert. There are also several federal and state programs that are available to those in need. One of these programs is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as food stamps. To meet the income requirement, households must pass a gross income limit at 200 percent of Federal Poverty Guidelines. A family of four would need to make less than $46,100 a year. If they meet the income requirement, they received an EBT card which acts like a debit card. A family of four would receive $668 a month. According to Erin Gillespie, press secretary for Florida Department of Children and Families, there were 4,451 people who received food stamps in March in Wakulla County. That number is 10 percent higher than March 2011, she said. This is the most common program, she said. DCF also has Medicaid and Welfare. Another program is the Special Supplemental Nutrition for Women, Infant and Children. This program is intended for pregnant, breastfeeding mothers, infants under 1 year old and children up to 5 years old. The program is for low income people and those at high risk. Income eligibility is set at 185 percent of federal poverty guidelines, which is $41,348 for a family of four. WIC provides nutritious food to the mothers by providing them with checks on a monthly or bimonthly basis. These checks can only be used to purchase nutritious foods, such as milk, peanut butter, cheese, eggs, fruits, vegetables, etc. They cant buy junk, said Merlinda Borgersen, senior public health nutritionist. Borgersen said they also offer nutrition counseling and education. Borgersen runs the WIC program for the Leon County Health Department which administers the program in Wakulla County and several other areas. Borgersen and her staff meet with clients every Wednesday at the Wakulla County Health Department from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. In Wakulla County, there are 448 participants in the WIC program, Borgersen said. To make an appointment or get started in the program, call (850) 606-3300. There are also a few programs available for students. The National School Lunch Program offer students who qualify free or reduced price lunch. Children with families with incomes at or below 130 percent of the poverty level are eligible for free lunch. Those with incomes between 130 percent and 185 percent are eligible for reduced lunch. Students can be charged no more than 30 cents for lunch in the program. As of May 22, there were 4,965 students enrolled in schools in the county. Out of these students, 2,069 were on free lunch and 463 were on reduced lunch, according to Gail Mathers, food service director for the district. Thats 50.9 percent of students in the county who are on free or reduced lunch, meaning a majority of families with children in the county are low income. According to Ebony Yarbrough, with Florida Impact, several years ago, that percentage was 25 to 30 percent. Majority of children in Wakulla County are most likely in need, she said. Another program offered during the school year is Blessings in a Backpack. Wakulla Pre-K has implemented this program where s tudents who are on free or reduced lunch go home on Friday with a backpack full of food for the weekend. The program is funded by donations. Manna Community Mission recently implemented this type of program at Medart Elementary School through Second Harvest. Once school is out, the Summer Break Spot is offered, which is the USDA Summer Food Service Program. Free breakfast and lunch is provided at three sites around Wakulla County to all children under 18 years old. They do not have to qualify for free or reduced lunch during the school year. It is open to everyone. The three sites are Wakulla Education Center, Medart Elementary School and Wakulla High School. One of the problems with this program is getting children who truly need the food to these sites. Many lack transportation and the sites are too far away to walk or bike. If you can get them there, well feed them, said Beth ODonnell, assistant superintendent for instruction. At a recent coalition for youth meeting, members discussed the need for mobile sites or more host sites. They planned to educate the public about the current sites and plan for next year. The need for food and other assistance are huge for many families and individuals in Wakulla County and these needs must be addressed by the community, said Gail Campbell, executive director for the coalition for youth. Ashley said if groups and churches are willing to come together, even more people could be helped. Organizations and churches are in need of help in the form of volunteers, support and donations. LOCATIONS AND NUMBERS Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist: 2780 Surf Road, Panacea, (850) 9840127. Harvest Thrift Store, Harvest Fellowship: 1596 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, (850) 9263535. Promise Land Ministries: 20 Church Road, Crawfordville, (850) 926-3281. Wakulla County Senior Center: 33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville, (850) 926-7145 Manna Community Mission: 110 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, (850) 926-5434 Wakulla United Methodist: 1584 Old Woodville Highway, (850) 421-5741 Crawfordville United Methodist: 176 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville, (850) 926-7209 Christ Church Anglican: 3383 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, (850) 7458412. Wakulla County Extension Of ce: 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville, (850) 926-3931 Americas Second Harvest of the Big Bend: (850) 562-3033. 211 Big Bend, information directory: 2-1-1 or (850) 617-6333, 211bigbend.net. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 Page 3BHunger is a problem in WakullaBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.net During the summer, free lunch and breakfast are provided to students at three different host sites. The problem for many students is getting there. The school district serves as a sponsor of the USDAs Summer Feeding Program and offers the meals at three different schools, Medart Elementary, Wakulla Education Center and Wakulla High School. Sites can only be in areas where 50 percent or more of the children in the area qualify for free or reduced price meals during the school year. Getting those kids to those existing sites is the issue, said Shelley Swenson, Wakulla County extension agent. For many students, transportation is an issue and the sites are too far from home to bike or walk to. Theyre not reaching all that many kids, said Fern Sloan, of Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Her church plans to feed children this summer, but not under the USDA program. A few years ago, Sloan said church members approached the school district to see if the church could become a host site. Sloan said they planned to pick up the food from another location and bring it back to the church to distribute the meals. This way more children were served, she said. But, the district would not approve it. Sloan, along with several other members of the community, met for a hunger meeting set up by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth on May 22 to discuss the issues with the program. They discussed the need for more sites and mobile sites where food can be served at several different locations around the county. Sloan said Wakulla County is mixed demographically and there isnt a single poor area. All recognized the need of assistance seems to be growing. A person who didnt qualify yesterday, quali es today, said Peggy Mackin, Wakulla County Senior Center board member and president of Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County. Elma Gillette, food ministry coordinator for Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church, agreed and said, More and more are going below the poverty line. Michelle Morris with the Department of Agriculture, who administers the feeding program for the state, suggested the county look at providing mobile sites. The only requirement is that the van or bus must stay long enough at each location for the children to consume the meal. She added that someone at each site must also be trained by the sponsor, which is the school district. Anyone can manage a site as long as they have the training, Morris said. The food can be served anywhere. She has seen food being distributed in parks, parking lots, churches and driveways. Franklin and Putnam counties have good programs established for mobile sites, she said. President of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth Bruce Ashley said they should reach out to these counties and learn from them. They all agreed to try and reach out to counties with existing programs and to focus on educating the public about the current sites. They also decided to wait until next year to start the mobile sites and use this year to plan. SUMMER FEEDING SITES Wakulla Education Center, 87 Andrew Hargrett Sr. Road. Meals will be served June 6 to Aug. 7, Monday through Thursday. Closed on July 4 and 5. Breakfast will be served 8:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. Lunch will be 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Wakulla High School, 3237 Coastal Highway. Meals will be served June 11 to July 12. Closed July 4 and 5. Lunch will be served 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. No breakfast will be served. Medart Elementary School, 2558 Coastal Highway. Meals will be served June 11 to July 12. Closed July 4 and 5. Breakfast will be served 8:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. Lunch will be served from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Summer feeding sites Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. 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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Hours:Tu-W & F 10 6 Th 12 8 Sat 8 NOON Sun & Mon Closed850.926.83192809 Crawfordville Hwy across from Hudson Parkwww.root319salon.com A full service hair and nail salon. W elcomesWelcomes iss est Now AvailableHave a Manicure or Pedicure in between your color sk bout our pecials! Certied Nail Tech Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE Wakullas unemployment rate in April fell to 7.0 percent. Tallahassee Metropolitan Area, which consists of Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla counties, also continued to see improvements in the local economy with an unemployment rate of 6.7 percent in April. This was 0.6 percentage points lower than the regions year-ago rate of 7.3 percent. Gadsdens unemployment rate for April was 8.2 percent and Leons fell to 6.5 percent. Floridas jobless rate in April fell to 8.7 percent as the state continued an employment rebound that began 11 months ago, the Department of Economic Opportunity reported recently. But Aprils drop was also affected by the fact that nearly 28,000 job seekers dropped out of the hunt. The number of jobless in April was 0.3 percentage points lower than March and 1.9 points below April 2011. The national unemployment rate for April was 8.1 percent. Gov. Rick Scott said the continued downward trend was testament to the states economic recovery and bodes well for Floridas continued climb back toward full employment. The April gures also shows job gains in comparison to the nation as a whole. This continued drop in Floridas unemployment rate is proving our economy is on the path to recovery and Floridians are getting back to work, Scott said in a statement. With Florida being ranked as one of the top two states for business in the nation, employers are sure to continue expanding and moving to Florida creating jobs that help us ensure this pattern will continue. University of Central Florida economist Sean Snaith, however, say the good news is tempered by the fact that Floridas civilian labor force shrunk between March and April by 28,000, a shrinking job pool that pushes unemployment lower without putting more people back to work. Taking into account discouraged workers and those working part time, Floridas jobless rate was 17.3 percent for the quarter ending March 31. Having the unemployment rate fall because people have given up looking for a job is not an improvement, Snaith said. Payroll growth has also remained relatively at, another indication that fewer job seekers are being added to the rolls of employed workers. There is not a lot to encourage people to get back in the hunt, Snaith said. But the number of available jobs does continue to grow. Overall, the number of jobs in Florida was 7,325,300 in April, up 52,600 jobs compared to a year ago. It was the 21st consecutive month of year-to-year job growth. Leading sectors of the economy included employment services, which grew by nearly 11 percent, or 16,800 jobs. Education and Health Service employment grew by 2.3 percent, adding 25,100 jobs over the 12 month period. Construction employment continued its contraction in April. The number of construction jobs shrunk by 7.4 percent year-to-year, a drop of 24,800 jobs in that bellwether sector. Building construction jobs fell by nearly 11 percent. Monroe County had the lowest unemployment rate in the state at 4.8 percent. It was followed by Walton County (5.2 percent), Okaloosa County (5.7 percent), Franklin County (6.1 percent), and Alachua County (6.2 percent). Flagler County had the states highest jobless rate in April a 11.6 percent. It was followed by Hernando County (10.8 percent); Hendry and St. Lucie counties (10.7 percent each); Dixie County (10.2 percent); and Putnam County (9.9 percent). The number of counties with double-digit unemployment rates continued to fall, dropping by half from 10 in March to ve in April.Wakullas unemployment falls to 7 percent in April Wakullas lowest unemployment rate since 2008.By JASON ALDERMANWith summer vacation right around the corner, youre probably busy planning itineraries, shopping for new bathing suits and finishing up work projects. But before you completely check out, take a few minutes to review a few financial safeguards that could save you a ton of grief and money and protect your identity. Credit and debit cards. If youre planning to travel especially overseas follow these precautions: Tell your card issuers where and how long youre traveling so theyll be on guard against unauthorized transactions. Also, bank fraud departments have sophisticated systems for detecting unusual account activity, so if a transaction raises concern and youre not home to field their call, your account could be frozen until you can be reached. Immediately report lost or stolen cards and/or unauthorized transactions to your card issuer. Carry at least two cards in case one gets damaged or closed temporarily. It might take a few days for the bank to mail you a new card. In case of theft, carry a list of card issuers fraud hotlines and your account numbers separate from your wallet. Perhaps leave a copy with a trusted friend. I also program these numbers into my cell phone for quick access. Some banks toll-free numbers may not work internationally, so ask for the right numbers before you leave. Avoid using standalone or unusual-looking ATMs not located in secure areas. They might be altered or have hidden cameras that can shoulder surf your account information and PIN. Beware of card skimming, where dishonest restaurant or store employees use a portable card reader to copy information from your credit or debit cards magnetic strip. Save and check all receipts against your statement; also scan your statement for unauthorized transactions. Guard your travel plans. Resist sharing your vacation itinerary on social networking sites or in outgoing phone or email messages. It can alert criminals that youre away from home or work. Even friends who know better might inadvertently forward an email or Facebook posting that contains critical dates and destinations. Also make sure your kids understand that this information is off limits until youre safely home. Streamline your wallet. Dont carry too much personal information. Youll of course need identi cation, like a drivers license or passport, but dont bring your Social Security card or other highly sensitive papers. But do carry your health and car insurance identi- cation. Also, photocopy, scan or make a list of your wallets contents and keep it in a secure location, such as a hotel safe; and leave a copy with someone at home you can call should your wallet be stolen. Electronic precautions. Whenever logging onto the Internet at a WiFi hotspot, hotel business center or other public facility whose server may not be encrypted, be extra cautious before conducting online banking or other password-protected transactions. And, it probably goes without saying, but your computer and cellphone should always be password protected in case of theft. Safeguard your home. If no one will be housesitting in your absence: Have the post office hold your mail. Suspend newspaper subscriptions. Park a car in the driveway and put a prominent interior light on a timer. Ask a friend or neighbor to remove iers, packages or free newspapers. Have a great vacation. Just dont forget to take basic identity theft precautions.Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www. twitter.com/PracticalMoney.Make a security checklist for summer vacation A pair of organizations who advocate for unemployed Floridians say a state law passed last year makes it too dif cult for people without work to get unemployment bene ts. In a ling with the U.S. Department of Labor, the National Employment Law Project and Florida Legal Services blasted changes to the process for applying for or receiving bene ts, including the requirement of a 45-question test. Under the federal-state unemployment insurance program, states have an obligation to ensure that involuntarily unemployed workers who meet basic eligibility criteria are able to access bene ts that provide temporary partial wage replacement between jobs, the groups said, asking the federal agency to review the claims. Florida is no longer ful lling that obligation. Lawmakers approved the changes in 2011 in what supporters promoted as an effort to make the unemployment system more solvent. News Service of FloridaOrganizations challenge unemployment changes Special to The NewsDont worry about record-breaking gas prices the U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates prices to be $3.79 a gallon this summer, less than in 2008. Thats good news for families considering reviving the tradition of a road trip vacation, one of the best experiences parents and kids can share, says Michael DiLorenzo, author of Adventures with Jonny: Road Trip to the Parks! (www.adventureswithjonny. com). This is a shared experience, and one that will be talked about during family gatherings for years to come, says DiLorenzo, a father of three. For busy parents, this is a time to savor their childrens youth. As moms and dads eventually nd out, they grow up fast. Its also a chance to get children outside and away from their computers, he says. Children today already have a deeprooted interest in technology, which is why a road trip to a natural, outdoor destination is an opportunity to give your child the gift of the outdoors, which is a gift for life, says DiLorenzo. The journey to a national park in the United States or Canada perhaps Yellowstone in Wyoming or Banff in Alberta is as bonding an experience as whatever happens at the destination. And there are parks in every state, he notes. If you dont have the time or money to go cross country, pick a park closer to home. DiLorenzo offers these helpful tips for the road: Games, games, games!: Yes, there is ample entertainment for both drivers and riders in cars these days. BUT, the goal is to bond with the family, so consider a fun, albeit off-color game like Road Kill Round-Up. A point system might break down like this: two points for the rst to spot a poor critter; three for whoever rst correctly identi es the species; two points subtracted for a false road-kill call; three points subtracted for misidentifying the kind. Beware of dairy drinks (and other smelly snacks): A spill in the backseat can eventually create quite a stink during a summer road trip. But do pack plenty of healthy snacks to save on pricey pit stops and avoid all the sugar and salt in junk food. Avoid big-city rush hours: When traveling through metropolitan areas, consider the busiest traf c periods. Whether you plan to stop and check out the city or simply zip through it, bumper-to-bumper traf c is something to avoid. A bit of consideration can save your family hours of grid-locked misery. Tech help: Various apps and websites can help drivers nd the cheapest gas prices, food options, hotel rates and travel routes. Also, dont forget a music mix that appeals to the entire family on one of these devices. (Remember, leave work at home forget about work-related calls, texts and emails! Use a non-work-related smartphone, if needed.) Schedule pit stops: Being in a hurry should be left for the morning commute; vacation should be different. When traveling across states and provinces, consider local culture. For example, barbecue in South Carolina is very different from Missouris version. Enjoy diners and unique attractions, and dont be afraid to take notes. The greatest family memories are created in shared adventure, DiLorenzo says. Outdoor recreation is lled with these memories just looking for a family to bring them home.Michael A. DiLorenzo is a married father of three living in the outdoor-rich environs of Michigan. He created the Adventures with Jonny series to entertain and educate children (and parents!) about the activities available in the great outdoors.Family time: Unplugged and outdoorsMemories are made on vacations; heres some tips for the road

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 Page 5B LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t Special to The NewsThe June Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Monday, June 4. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:37 p.m. and the moon will rise at 9:07 p.m. on June 4. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at (850) 927-7744 or toll free at (888) 927-7744. By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 29 With opponents arguing that lawmakers cant make such changes in the recesses of the budget, a Leon County circuit judge heard arguments Tuesday about the constitutionality of a plan to contract with private companies for prison health services. Judge Kevin Carroll, who held a two-hour hearing, did not give a speci c time when he will rule but indicated a decision might come early next week. The Florida Nurses Association and a state-employees union are challenging a legislative move last year to privatize health care at prisons throughout Florida. The case centers on a decision by legislative leaders to include the move in budget ne print known as proviso language. The opponents say such policy decisions need to be made by changing state law, not including them in the budget. It needs to be debated back and forth, the pros and cons, said Thomas Brooks, an attorney for the union, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. But Jonathan Glogau, chief of complex litigation in the Attorney Generals Of ce, said lawmakers could use proviso language in privatizing health services. He said the key is that the proviso language must be directly and rationally related to the part of the budget it carries out --in this case, inmate health care. Heres a pot of money for prison health care, Glogau said at one point, describing the relationship. Heres how to spend it. Carroll asked some questions during the hearing but did not hint how he will rule. He emphasized, however, that he will look only at the legal issues --not the broader controversy about whether it is wise for lawmakers to turn over prison health care to private companies. Its clearly not my job (to decide the wisdom), said Carroll, who added he expects his ruling to be appealed. The hearing came almost exactly a month before the 1st District Court of Appeal is scheduled to listen to arguments about another legislative plan to privatize 29 prison facilities across the southern part of the state. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford last year ruled that the plan, which also was included in proviso language in the 201112 budget, was unconstitutional. Privatization is a hotly debated issue, in part, because state employees fear they will lose jobs or see pay or benefit cuts if contractors provide public services. Two licensed-practical nurses who work in the prison system are named plaintiffs in the case argued Tuesday. The health-care proviso directed the Department of Corrections to seek proposals from companies and called for privatization to lead to cost savings of at least 7 percent for the state, compared to 2009-10 expenses. The process led to the department recommending that Corizon, Inc., receive a contract for prisons in North and Central Florida, and that Wexford Health Sources receive a contract in South Florida. A heavily debated issue in the lawsuit is whether state law already gave the Department of Corrections the authority to privatize health services, regardless of the proviso language. Glogau said the department has the authority and had already completed a business plan for privatization of the services before lawmakers started the 2011 session. But M. Stephen Turner, an attorney for the Florida Nurses Association, described the potential contracting as proviso-driven procurement. The departments discretion is not being exercised, Turner said. It is the proviso that is being followed.Prison health privatization ready for ruling, court saysFull moon climb set at St. George LighthouseThis years hurricane season is expected to be normal in the Atlantic and Caribbean basins, the federal government said this week. The NOAA Climate Prediction Center said theres a 70 percent chance of nine to 15 named storms, four to eight of which are expected to become hurricanes about the average over the last few decades. It would be a return to a more normal summer after a few active years. NOAAs outlook predicts a less active season compared to recent years, said NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco. But regardless of the outlook, its vital for anyone living or vacationing in hurricane-prone locations to be prepared. We have a stark reminder this year with the 20th anniversary of Hurricane Andrew. Forecasters cautioned that if an El Nino warming pattern develops in late summer, conditions would change keeping the season even quieter. NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDAState briefsBush would think about VP, but doesnt expect it Times: DEP wetlands specialist suspended for saying no Normal hurricane season expectedFormer Gov. Jeb Bush told an Italian online news site that if Mitt Romney offered the vice presidential spot to him he would consider it with great attention but that he doesnt think Romney will pick him. In an interview written about in Italian leaving open to interpretation what Bush actually said in English the site, Linkiesta, also says the Republican Party Bush envisions would have a culture of inclusion.But I dont think he will choose me, Bush told the interviewer. Days after refusing to approve a permit for a controversial wetlands mitigation deal, the states top wetlands expert was suspended from her job at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the Tampa Bay Times reported Monday. Connie Bersok was suspended earlier this month after refusing to sign off on a permit application that would have allowed Highland Ranch Mitigation Bank to use pine forest acreage to satisfy a wetlands mitigation requirement, the Times reported. State law allows developers to set aside wetlands to offset construction in other areas that may damage other wetland tracts. Former DEP deputy secretary Kirby Green told the Times that Bersok and others have been suspended or let go for running afoul of the more development-oriented agenda of Gov. Rick Scott. The DEP declined comment while a Highland Ranch spokesman said the company did not attempt to in uence the agency to suspend Bersok, whose supervisor referred to as a a model representative for the department in her last review. By DAVID WHITE With Memorial Day behind us, summer has of- cially arrived. This means more time outside, and consequently, a different cocktail menu. For lazy days by the pool or at the beach, its hard to beat a pia colada, margarita, or other tropical drink. When enjoying a hot dog or hamburger at a barbeque, beer is the obvious choice. For wine drinkers, nding the perfect summertime match can be daunting. When lounging on the deck or patio, red wine can seem too heavy. And sometimes, that simple white wine is just, well, too simple. Thats why its hard to beat a crisp ros when the weather is warm. Its easy to dismiss pink wine. After all, most Americans associate ros with cheap, sweet blush wines, like Sutter Homes white Zinfandel. This style of wine traces its roots to the early 1970s. Back then, demand for white wine outpaced supply, so many California winemakers started producing white wine from red grapes, taking advantage of the fact that even red grapes give off white juice. In 1975, the winemaker at Sutter Home, Bob Trinchero, had a problem while making his white Zinfandel. A portion of the wine experienced a stuck fermentation, meaning the yeast died before all the sugar had converted into alcohol. Rather than fix the wine by adding more yeast, Trinchero decided to let it sit for two weeks. When he revisited the wine, he knew it would be a hit and Sutter Homes modern-day white Zinfandel was born. Countless imitators would soon follow. This style of pink wine remains quite popular and it will always have fans. More often than not, though, white Zinfandel and other blush wines are just too sweet. Many taste more like Kool-Aid or strawberry fruit punch than wine. True ross are bone dry, textured, and refreshing. And they can be just as complex and food friendly as traditional wines. True ross are made in one of two ways. In the rst method, the winemaker crushes red wine grapes and leaves the juice in contact with the skin for a brief period, typically one or two days. She then discards the skins, allowing the juice to nish fermentation on its own. T hanks to the short period of skin contact, the wine retains some color. Here, ros is the only goal. In the second method, ros is a byproduct of red wine fermentation. Red wine obtains color, tannin, structure, and avors from grape skins. If a winemaker wants to increase the skin-to-juice ratio during fermentation, she can simply remove some juice at an early stage. This pink juice can be fermented separately to create ros. This method is known as saigne. True ross have been a part of life in France for centuries. In the southeastern part of the country, residents and visitors alike have long recognized the splendor of pairing ros with warm weather and coastal cuisine. France remains the source of many fantastic ross great examples can be found in Bandol, Tavel, Sancerre, and many other regions. When looking for French ross, its best to look for reliable importers, like Kermit Lynch, Beaune Imports, Weygandt-Metzler, and Robert Kacher. All four bring in a number of knockout wines. Plenty of delightful pink wines come from outside France, as well. Across the world, more and more producers are making topnotch, authentic ross. In the United States, some producers to look for include Alexander Valley Vineyards, which makes a splendid ros of Sangiovese, Copain, and Ponzi. Another favorite is made by Mulderbosch in South Africa. The world is still awash in bad ross, of course. Its still quite easy to accidently wind up with a bottle thats too heavy, alcoholic, or sweet. So if your local wine shop offers tastings, be sure to stop in when ross are open you might nd a crisp, refreshing wine thats worth stocking up on. After all, pink wine is the perfect accompaniment to summer. So why not grab a case?David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Wines.com, the fastest growing wine portal on the Internet. Whites Wines is summer, drink pink Like us on

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 General Help Freight Up = More $ 2 Mos.CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www. melton truck.com/drive Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Sopchoppy RiverCharming, Partially furnished 2story loft on private pond. Custom features, 1.5BA, walk-in-closet, W/D, D/W, TV w/ satellite. Very private. $650/month. 850-962-2849. Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rent: Houses Unfurnished 3BR/2BA, Medart,central h/a,big-fenced yard, very clean, front/back porches, shed. No pets or smking $850/month+deposit. 850-545-0126 Must see!! CRAWFORDVILLE2 BD, 1BA, $575 mo. 1st & last mo. $800 dep (850) 926-5619 CRAWFORDVILLEShell Point Rental 2/2 Town home on Canal, with office or 3rd BR Loft, enjoy your private boat slip and community pool $1,300 mo. 850-509-2667 or 850 -926-7158 Mysterious Waters2BR/2BA, Washer Dryer, wood-detail, vaulted ceiling, large -porch, covered parking, short walk to Wakulla River, community park, boat-ramp, dock $875/mo.incl water & garbage 850-926-6289. Sport/Utility Vehicles CHEVROLET2009 Tahoe LTZ 4WD, 29,700 miles, white, leather, DVD, navigation, sunroof, warranty, excellent condition, $12700, ppeo@netscape.com Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 850-926-3546 5240-0531 PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE:School Board Policy 2.70 Prohibiting Discrimination, includ ing Sexual and other forms of Harassment. PURPOSE AND EFFECT:To reflect legislative requirements and district proce dures. LEGAL AUTHORITY:120.54, 1001.41, 1001.42, 1012.23, Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED:112.51, 119.07, 760.01 et seq., 1000.05, 1000.21, 1001.43, 1001.22 Florida Statutes 34 CFR 99, 34 CFR 108, 34 CFR 200.43, P.L. 110-233 ECONOMIC IMPACT:None REVISION ORIGINATED BY:Beth ODonnell Assistant Superintendent for Instruction REVISION APPROVED BY: David Miller, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, A HEARING WILL BE HELD TIME:5:45 p.m. PLACE:Administrative Offices Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE:July 16, 2012 A COPY OF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAY BE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board Post Office Box 100 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, FL 32326-0100 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Published One time (1) time in The Wakulla News May 31, 2012 5240-0531 5229-0531 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULL A COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCHLOCKONEE BAY TRAIL -PHASE IV Invitation to Bid No. 2012-10 Advertisement Begin Date/Time: Thursday, May 17, 2012 at 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Sealed responses for the OCHLOCKONEE BAY TRAIL-PHASE IV will be received until 10:00 a.m on Friday, June 15, 2012: responses should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Office, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at which time all proposals will be publicly opened. Responses received after the time and date specified will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. Please direct all questions to: Administrative: Sheree Keeler, Phone: 850-926-9500, FAX: 950-926-0940, email skeeler@mywakulla.com Technical: George Roland, PE, Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. Phone: 904-828-3900, FAX: 904-367-1692, email geor ge.r oland@kimley hor n.com ITB documents will be available at www.mywakulla.com or can be picked up at the location listed above after 8:00 a.m. on Thursday, May 17, 2012. Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Alan Brock, Chairman Sheree Keeler, Grants Coordinator Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 24 and 31, 2012 5229-0531 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5239-0607 TWN Vs. Flowers, Linda 65-2011-CA-000173 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 65-2011-CA-000173 Division: FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB Plaintiff, v. LINDA FLOWERS A/K/A LINDA MARIA FLOWERS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMINGINTERESTS BY THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment datedMay 2, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 65-2011-CA-000173, DIVISION: ____________, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and LINDA FLOWERS A/K/A LINDA MARIA FLOWERS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m., at front door of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on the 14th day of June, 2012the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 33, BLOCK 7, OF WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 93 Pueblo Trl, Crawfordville, FL 32327. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on May 3, 2012 (COURT SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT By; /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk Attor ney for Plaintif f: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544,Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 working days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 31, and June 7, 2012 5239-0607 File No. 3524-10206 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices A-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432we sell and service most makes and models Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 HURLEYS ROOF Construction, Inc.Roof Inspection Repair CleaningNEW ROOF RE-ROOFING SHINGLES METAL850-544-1217FREE ESTIMATES Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053887408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONS RE-ROOFING REPAIRS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net YARD SALE!! Saturday, June 2nd, 8AM-2PM SUMMERTIME YARD SALE! NO EARLY BIRDSNO EARLY BIRDS 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $925mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $475mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $10 A Week 877676-1403 Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 Page 7B Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5223-0524 Vs. Kilbourn, Rodney P. Case No. 2011-CA-000364 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.2011-CA-000364 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. RODNEY P. KILBOURN, Defendant, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-364-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and RODNEY P. KILBOURN, is the Defendant, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on June, 14, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: EXHIBITS A and B Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 3rd day of May, 2012. (SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 34, A DISTANCE OF 2650.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 858.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 327.60 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 309.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 156.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261)THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 125.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 156.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 125.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A 15.00 FOOT WIDE INGRESS/EGRESS EASEMENT LYING OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 7.5 FEET THEREOF AND BEING PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 174, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. EXHIBIT B Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 89 degrees 25 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, 2650.93 feet to a found 4x4 concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of said Section 34, thence run South 00 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds East 858.48 feet to a concrete monument on the Southerly right-of-way of State Road S-299 and said POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right-of-way run South 00 degrees 23 minutes 34 seconds East 112.89 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 29 minutes 36 seconds West 183.71 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 23 minutes 34 seconds West 101.83 feet to the Southerly right-of-way of said State Road S-299, thence run North 86 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East along said right-of-way 184.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.45 acres, more or less. 5226-0531 TWN v. Poka, Tim, Case No # 16-69 CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 16-69 CA SCORE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, v. TIM POKA A/K/A TIMOTHY POKA; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TIM POKA (IF ANY); CAPITAL ONE BANK USA, N.A.;WALKERS CROSSING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; TENANTS OR UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,THROUGH OR UNDER ANY DEFENDANTS NAMED HEREIN Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Tim Poka A/K/A Timothy Poka 29 Chance Street Crawfordville, Florida 32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 23, WALKERS CROSSING (UNRECORDED): COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8 A DISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTTES 22 SECONDS WEST 690.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 229.82 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT, SAID PONT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 45 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 29 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 182.25 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 41 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 177.58 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID REVERSE CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 290.00 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 10 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 22 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 53.08 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 58 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 53.10 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 73.81 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 61 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 412.18 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 370.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH 1996 DOUBLEWIDE PALM MOBILE HOME, VIN #PH09871AFL AND PH098701BFL, ID#0071388796 & 0071388795 has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Henry L. Miller, Jr., Esq., whose address is 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida, 32303, on or before thirty days from the date of the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated:May 22, 2012 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By; /s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 31 and June 7, 2012 5226-0531 5232-0531 v. Home Placement Inc.Case No. 2011-CA-000212 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-CA-000212 PREMIER BANK a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff v. HOME PLACEMENT, INC., a Florida Corporation, R. RICHARD YATES, JR., Corporation, R. RICHARD YATES, JR., individually, DANNY R. MCCLELLAN, individually, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure en5233-0531 v. Kevin Scott Grigsby.Case No. 2012-CA-0007 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-CA-0007 CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff v. KEVIN SCOTT GRIGSBY an individual, UNKNOWN TENANT #1, and UNKNOWN TENANT #2 Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla 5234-0531 TWN v. Veal James C. Case No. 2011-CA-000263 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2011-CA-000263 COASTAL STATES MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs, James. C. Veal; Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 2011-CA-00263, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, COASTAL STATES MORTGAGE CORPORATION IS Plaintiff and JAMES C. VEAL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES C. VEAL; CENTENNIAL BANK SUCCESSOR TO WAKULLA BANK; WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANTS (S) IN POSSESSION; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Clerks Conference the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at 11:00 a.m., on the 21st day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Parcel 1 Lot 1, Wildwood Country Club, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, page 35 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. And Parcel 2 Begin at the Northeast corner of Lot 1 of Wildwood Country Club, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat book 3, page 35 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North 49 degrees 02 minutes 40 seconds West along the Northerly boundary of said Lot 97.89 feet; thence run North 87 de grees 22 minutes 19 seconds West along said Northerly boundary 55.00 feet; thence run North 30 degrees 12 minutes 41 seconds East 119.97 feet; thence run South 64 degrees 28 minutes 47 seconds East 154.06 feet; thence run South 34 degrees 08 minutes 38 seconds West 125.64 feet to the Point of Beginning. a/k/a 2 COUNTRY CLUB DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 DATED this 19th day of April, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND As Clerk of said Court By; /s/ Desiree D Willis as Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe, Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon county is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850)577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page. Submitted by: Heller & Zion, LLP, 1428 Brickell Avenue,Suite 700, Maimi, FL 33131 Telephone (305)373-8001, Facsimile: (305)373-8030 File No. 10766.372 Published two times in The Wakulla News May 24th and 31st, 2012 County, Florida, described as follows, to-wit: Commence at the Southwest Corner of the Northeast Quarter of Lot 56 of The Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 18 degrees 22 minutes 14 seconds West along the West boundary of the Northeast Quarter of said Lot 56. H.S., a distance of 2037.62 feet to a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of said Lot 56, H.S., thence run North 71 degrees 29 minutes 54 seconds East 50.05 feet to an old concrete monument, thence run North 15 degrees 31 minutes 30 seconds West 276.21 feet to an old concrete monument, thence run North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 626.02 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning, continue North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 150.00 feet, thence run South 18 degrees 23 minutes 18 seconds East 292.81 feet to the centerline of a roadway easement, thence run South 71 degrees 39 minutes West along said centerline 150.00 feet, thence run North 18 degrees 23 minutes 17 seconds West 292.32 feet to the point of beginning. (Lot 5 of an unrecorded plat of East Ivan Estates). Subject to a roadway easement over and across the Southerly 20.00 feet thereof. Said property being more recently described by surveyor as follows: Lot 5, East Ivan Estates (Unrecorded), Wakulla County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of Lot 56 of The Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 18 degrees 22 minutes 14 seconds West 2037.62 feet; thence North 71 degrees 29 minutes 54 seconds East 50.05 feet; thence North 15 degrees 31 minutes 30 seconds West 276.21 feet; thence North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 626.02 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence leaving said point of beginning run North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 149.87 feet to a concrete monument thence South 18 degrees 26 minutes 07 seconds East 292.81 feet to a point lying on the centerline of a 40 foot wide access easement; thence run along said centerline South 71 degrees 38 minutes 59 seconds West 150.01 feet; thence leaving said centerline run North 18 degrees 24 minutes 27 seconds West 292.32 feet to the Point of Beginning. Subject to and together with a 10 foot wide utility easement lying over and across the easterly 10 feet described thereof. And also: Together with any and all interest that Grantor may have in those two parcels as granted from Claude W. Tooke and Susie Tooke to Edward Sinnott et al, and recorded in Official Records Book 382, Page 456-457, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Together with that certain 1986 Chad Mobile Home having VIN#AFLCW2AG240511553, Title #43248298, and Real Property decal number R253847 and that certain 1986 Chad Mobile Home having VIN #AFLCW2BG240511553, Title #43370649, and Real Property decal number R253848. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door of the Clerks office in the Courthouse of Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 14th day of June, 2012. Dated this 14th day of May, 2012. Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 24 & 31, 2012 5233-0531 tered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to-wit: Lot 28, Block J and Lot 41, Block K of MAGNOLIA GARDENS as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door of the Clerks office in the Courthouse of Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 14th day of June, 2012. Dated this 14th day of May, 2012. Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 24 & 31, 2012 5232-0531 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com a 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 2797 Surf Rd.Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA house $700 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickerson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay. 3BR/2BA house on the bay $700 mo. No Pets, No Smoking. RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 11 Purple Martin 4BR/3.5BA, 2,887 sq. ft, located in Songbird, $1,500 monthly, $1,500 Deposit, Available August 1. 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $1,000 Mo. Available May 1. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available May 1. 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Townhouse. 850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Sandy Moore was recognized as Employee of the Month and was presented with a plaque by Chairman Scott. Sharon Mitchell presented the PAEC Annual Report and Beth Mims gave a presentation regarding Literacy Week and the Return on Investment. All Board Members and Superintendent Miller were in attendance. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Evans. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the agenda. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the following consent items: 1.Approved Minutes of the Meeting held on April 16, 2012. 2.Approved the following Employment of Personnel: New Hires: 10 Month Employee Name Program/Center Position Term of Service McCabe, Jacqueline WHS Teacher 04/19/12-06/04/12 9 Month Employee Name Program/Center Position Term of Service Ropp, Cristi Transportation Bus Driver 05/03/12-05/31/12 Transfers: 12 Month Employee Name Position Program Position To Program To Term of Service From From Brown, Elizabeth Teacher MES Energy Ed Spec. District Of. 05/01/12-06/30/12 Peltier, Tammy Data Entry RES Admin. Secretary CES 05/21/12-06/30/12 9 Month Employee Name Position Program Position To Program To Term of Service From From Lockhart, John Paraprofessional CES Paraprofessional Pre-K/SEC 04/16/12-06/04/12 9 Month Employee Time Limited Part-time Name Position Program Position To Program To Term of Service From From Carr, Mary Bus Attendant Transportation Bus Driver Transportation 05/14/12-05/31/12 Walden, BarbaraBus Driver Transportation Bus Attendant Transportation 05/14/12-05/31/12 Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) Name Program/Center Position Term of Service Allen, Annette MES A/S Remediation Teacher 02/29/12-04/11/12 Allen, Carol MES Remedial Teacher Time Limited 03/21/12-04/12/12 Coxetter, Catherine MES Teacher Time Limited 04/25/12-06/04/12 Dugger, Hillari Transportation Other/Ofce 11/03/11-05/31/12 Fojtik, Jessica Pre-K/WEC CDA Time Limited 04/26/12-06/04/12 Haubrick, Andrew Facilities/Maintenance Trades Specialist Time Limited 05/09/12-06/30/12 Holt, Joan WCSB Annex/Adult Ed Career Pathways Specialist 04/30/12-06/04/12 Whaley, Cheryl Transportation Other/Ofce 04/24/12-06/30/12 3.Approved the following Letters of Resignation: Katie Marley/effective June 1, 2012 Kaila Slater/effective April 25, 2012 Al Mills/effective May 2, 2012 Julie Stanford (Phillips)/effective May 4, 2012. 4.Approved the following Letters of Retirement: Waltraud Grantham/effective May 4, 2012 Linda Camp/effective April 12, 2012 Karen Sanders/effective April 1, 2012 and enter DROP Karen Wells/effective July 1, 2012 and enter DROP. 5.Approved the Illness in the Line of Duty/FMLA. (See Supplemental File #22) 6.Approved a request for Leave of Absence on Bridgette Hallum from April 3 through April 21, 2012. 7.Approved the W.C.T.A.s Memorandum of Understanding. 8.Approved Budget Amendments #11/12 8 & 9. 9.Approved the April nancial statement. 10.Approved Warrants for payment. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the 504 Coordinators Handbook and Accommodations Plan. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Data Management Agreement with Medicaid Administrative Claiming System. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve an amended Contractual Agreement between the Wakulla County School Board and Putnam County School Board on behalf of the North East Florida Educational Consortium. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Reading Endorsement Revisions. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the Summer Payroll Reporting Schedule. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the 2012-2013 Payroll Reporting Periods. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the 2012-13 AVID Implementation Agreement. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve School Board Policy 2.70 Prohibiting Discrimination, including sexual and other forms of harassment for advertising. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Carl D. Perkins Rural and Sparsely Populated Grant and the Carl D. Perkins Secondary Career and Technical Education Grant. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Program of Study. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the FloridaLearns STEM Declaration of INTERdependence addressing STEM talent in Florida. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the VPK Summer School Handbook and the 2012-2013 VPK Parent Handbook. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the Use of School Buses. (See Supplemental File #22) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. An executive session was held immediately after the board meeting to discuss issues pertaining to collective bargaining. Superintendent Miller, Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott, Mr. Thomas, Mrs. ODonnell, Mr. Beach and Mr. Pearce were in attendance.MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON MAY 21, 2012MAY 31, 2012

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com The above legal description being more recently surveyed by Thurman Roddenberry and Associates, Inc., dated April 26, 2006, under job no. 90-132, and described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 89 degrees 25 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, a distance of 2650.93 feet to the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of said Section 34, thence run South 00 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds East 858.48 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Curtis Mill Road (State Road S-299) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 00 degrees 20 minutes 12 seconds East 112.70 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run South 89 degrees 27 minutes 49 seconds West 183.76 feet to a concrete monument(marked#4261), thence run North 00 degrees 18 minutes 00 seconds West 101.74 feet to a nail and cap (marked #7160) lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of said Curtis Mill Road, thence run North 86 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East 184.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 0.45 acres, more or less. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5223-0524 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5213-0531 vs. Roddenberry James T. Case No. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES T. RODDENBERRY d/b/a THE JAMES T. RODDENBERRY LAND COMPANY; JAMES T. RODDENBERRY, individually;KIMBERLY S. RODDENBERRY; and HAMAKNOCKERS LTD. CO., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count I and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count II of Plaintiffs Amended Complaint rendered in the above-styled case on March 7, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 15th day of June 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Easter n T ime), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida: Real Pr operty THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 & E 1/2 OF SW 1/4 OF NE 1/4) OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAVING AND EXCEPTING THEREFROM AS EASEMENT FOR ROADWAY OVER AND ACCROSS THE NORTH 6 FEET OF SAID PROPERTY. Personal Property Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and further improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estates described above(all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshal, Northern 5214-0531 vs. Rodenberry James T. Case No. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff vs. JAMES T. RODDENBERRY d/b/a THE JAMES T. RODDENBERRY LAND COMPANY; JAMES T. RODDENBERRY, individually;KIMBERLY S. RODDENBERRY; and HAMAKNOCKERS LTD. CO., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count III and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count IV of Plaintiffs Amended Complaint rendered in the above-styled case on March 7, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 15th day of June 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Easter n T ime) at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida: PARCEL #1 COMMENCE AT AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF AN UNNUMBERED LOT LYING NORTH OF LOT 89 OF THE SAID HARTSFIELD SURVEY AND THENCE RUN WEST 641.74 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 803.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319 AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 104.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 412.07 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 105.60 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES06 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 416.75 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING THAT SAME PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL. RECORDS BOOK 23, PAGE 533 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL #3 COMMENCE AT A LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF AN UNNUMBERED LOT LYING NORTH OF LOT 89 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 04 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 387.72 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT 111.76 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 420.12 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNCIL MOORE ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES13 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNCIL MOORE ROAD 60.21 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID COUNCIL MOORE ROAD RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT 551.90 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 167.45 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 650.12 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY 319, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WESTERLY, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND CURVE TO THE RIGHT WITH A RADIUS OF 1942.86 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 06 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 11 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 205.21 FEET (CHORD BEING NORTH 04 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 235.07 FEET) TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 142.64 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 416.73 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 320.85 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) THENCE RUN SOUTH 11 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 53.82 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN NORTH 76 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 1706.34 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY 687.92 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF LOT 77, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 77 A DISTANCE OF 1763.34 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 380.12 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) SAID POINT BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT 191.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS A PORTION OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER THEREOF DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 317, PAGE 416 OF THE OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Personal Pr operty Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and further improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estates described above(all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and all water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an inter est in the surplus fr om the sale, if any, other than the pr operty owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshall, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated May 4th, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL 32591-3010,Count III Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 10, 17, 24 & 31, 2012 5214-0531 5228-0531 TWN re: Estate of Sanders Deborah A. Case No. 12-33CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE; ESTATE OF PROBATE DIVISION DEBORAH A. SANDERS Case No. 12 -33CP Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRA TION TO ALL having claims or demands against the above named Estate: You are notified that the administration of the Estate of Deborah A. Sanders Case No. 2012-33CP, is pending in Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, the address of which is: 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The Personal Representative of the Estate is Sam Jack Sanders, whose address is: 211 Sanders Cemetery Rd., Sopchoppy, FL 32358. The name and address of the Personal Representatives attorney is set forth below. 5230-0614 TWN Heirs of Martinson Kenneth H., Case No. 12-158CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-158CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN MARTINSON, husband and wife, and as Trustee of THE MARTINSON REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN H. MARTINSON, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 25, Block E. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10972-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5230-0531 5231-0614 TWN heirs of Arnold, Bert C. Case No. 12-159CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-159CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U.ARNOLDHUSBAND AND WIFE, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U. ARNOLD, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 53, BlockD. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10951-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the compliaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5231-0531 5235-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-130-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-130-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 22, Block K of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11131-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5235-0614 5236-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-131-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-131-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 19, Block L of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11178-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5236-0614 5237-0614 vs. Matthews Dorothy C. Case No: 12-124-CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-124-CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DOROTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, IF DECEASED OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DECEASED OR ALIVE, HER UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HER; OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PARTIES; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DORTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 142, Block A of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10859-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a de-fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: /s/ Glenda Porter, AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5237-0614 5238-0607 est. Peters, William M, Case # 12-32CP Notice to Cred. PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-32 CP. IN RE : ESTATE OF WILLIAM MATHIAS PETERS a/k/a WILLIAM M. PETERS Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of William Mathias Peters, deceased, File 12-32 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is May 31, 2012. Personal Representative: George A. Dock, 86 Quail Run, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850)926-8245 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 31 and June 7, 2012 5238-0607 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration All persons having claims or demands against the Estate are required, within three months from the date of the first publication of this Notice, to file with the clerk in the above court, a written statement of any claim against the Estate in the form and manner prescribed in section 733.703 of Fla. Statutes, Rule 5.490 of Fla. Rules of Probate and Guardianship procedure. All claims, demands and objections not so filed will be FOREVER BARRED. Publication of this Notice has begun on the 24th day of May, 2012. CHARLES A. McMURRY, Attorney At Law, 910 N. Duval St. Tallahassee, Florida 32303, Florida Bar No. 03336911 (850)425-3000;Fax(850)224-6655 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 24 and 31, 2012 5228-0531 5227-0531 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Auction Under the authority of the Florida StorageFacility Act the property described below has been seized for non payment of rent and Self Storage Notices other accrued expenses. The property will be sold at auction to the highest bidder as provided by the Self Storage Facility Act 83.806 Double D Storage LLC reserves the right to refuse any and all bids. Self Storage Notices Cash only. Troy Hale unit 35 Household items, Terry Pafford Unit#16household, auction to be held @ Double D StorageLLC 289 Cajer Posey Rd Crawfordville FL 32327 June 6, 2012 Self Storage Notices 5209-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 002 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that SEAN HILLIER the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2535 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-115-000-11897-000 LOT 115 HS P 20-1-M-25D A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SW 1/4 OF HS 115 OR 611 P 246 Name in which assessed SHEPARD FAMILY TRUST said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5209-0531 5210-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 003 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 710 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 12-6S-02W 000-03873-000 12-6S-2W P-8-M-55 A PARCEL OF LAND W OF US 98 IN SECTION 12 OR 12P 6 & 7 and OR 74 P 219 Name in which assessed TERRY C NELSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5210-0531 5211-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 001 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that CASPIAN I LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2570 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-121-351-11968-A01 THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT 2 BLOCK A LOT 1 OR 722 P305 Name in which assessed RWC INVESTMENTS LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, June 7, 2012 5211-0607 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated: May 4th, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL 32591-3010 Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 10, 17, 24, & 31, 2012 5213-0531#1 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 Page 9BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 25, Florida education of cials crisscrossed the state this week offering a series of apologies over the admittedly botched roll out of tougher writing assessments that if taken at face value showed that seven of 10 Florida students did not make the grade. Following the release of the FCAT writing assessment results the week before, Department of Education Secretary Gerard Robinson went on the road to explain why the number of students making satisfactory scores on the test fell from over 80 percent last year to as low as 27 percent. Having a better week was Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney, who pulled ahead of President Barack Obama in one poll, though he still trailed the incumbent president in another. That poll that had Romney ahead also showed most Floridians stand behind Stand Your Ground but dont want folks carrying concealed weapons into the Capitol. (Though more think it isOK to be packin at the Republican National Convention.) While Robinson spent the week mending bridges, Gov. Rick Scott may have burned one as Floridas head of state became a comedy target for an apparent gaffe with Spanish King Juan Carlos by gleefully bringing to light an embarrassing moment for the monarch involving a not-so-secret trip involving elephants and guns. Back here at home, lobbyists reported strong earnings for the quarter ending March 31. And the Senate will be without one of its more independent members and provocative debaters as Republican Sen. Ronda Storms of Valrico announced on Friday she will run for a local of ce instead of making a run for another term. MR. ROBINSON IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD Acknowledging that his of ce may have undersold the importance of new FCAT writing standards, the education commissioner met with concerned parents, teachers and administrators to calm nerves frayed last week when the state board had to meet in emergency session to lower passing scores on the statewide test. The governors office stepped in to help, playing a key role in coordinating the states response after the drop in scores. The test crisis began when passing scores on the writing test plummeted from 81 percent to 27 percent for fourth graders and showed similar drop in eighth and 10th grades. The Florida Board of Education eventually met in emergency session to lower the passing grade from 4.0 to 3.0 while they develop a longer-term answer. Since then, Robinson has been on a nonstop remediation tour (hes even working Memorial Day) as part of a Full-Court Press, that included attempts to get supportive letters to the editor written by organizations like the Florida Chamber and the Council of 100, and having Robinson record onhold phone messages. Despite the hoopla, Scott made it clear that he has Robinsons back. QPOLL: ROMNEY ON TOP With a contentious primary behind him, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney pulled ahead of the president in the latest Quinnipiac University poll, which showed Romney with a 47-41 percent lead. The poll was good news for Romney, who back in March trailed Obama by a 49-42 margin. Peter Brown, assistant vice president of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, said Romneys good fortune is likely tied to the fact that hes not getting beaten up daily by fellow Republicans. Obamas recent support of same-sex marriage may also have helped. While 63 percent said Obamas support would not affect their vote, those that do care say they are less likely to support the president. But if presidential race observers in Florida know anything, its that the race is likely to be close here, and maybe too close to call this far out. If you have any doubt, we point to a counterbalancing poll that confusingly shows Obama still leading in the purple state. That poll, by NBC News and Marist College, showed Obama would get 45 percent in Florida if the election were held today, while Romney would get 40 percent. The margin would move around a bit depending on who Romney picks for a running mate with Romneys best bet for getting Florida votes appearing to be to ask Jeb Bush to join the ticket. Also this week, Scott got some good news about his own popularity he has some. After months of embarrassingly low poll numbers, his approval rating this past week went up over 40 percent for the rst time in the Quinnipiac Poll, though the percentage who dont really like him still is higher. Still, after several months of lower unemployment rate announcements, it appears things are moving in the right direction for Scott, who has already said he will run for reelection in 2014. LOBBYISTS REPORT QUARTERLY EARNINGS Legislative lobbyists collected an estimated $36 million during the rst three months of 2012, an increase of about $3 million over the same period last year. The increase likely stems, at least in part, from the earlier start of this years legislative session. Among the biggest spenders on lobbyists were AT&T, with an estimated $1.161 million, and rms linked to Miami casino backer Genting, with $445,000, according to the report. STORMS TARGETS PROPERTY APPRAISER POST State Sen. Ronda Storms, R-Valrico, announced she would not seek re-election to the 40-member chamber but would instead challenge the Republican incumbent to become the Hillsborough County property appraiser. Storms announcement opens up the race for the Tampa Bay area district. Former Senate President Tom Lee, R-Brandon, is rumored to be interested. SCOTT: A REY OF SUNSHINE The Court back in Spain hasnt been so confused about whats up with Florida since King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella heard there wasnt much gold. Meeting with heads of state, especially kings, is usually a staid, protocol- lled affair. Not so this week as Gov. Rick Scott met with Spains King Juan Carlos during a business development mission. Juan Carlos, still stinging from Spanish media accounts of his recent elephant hunting trip to Botswana, may never forget his meet and greet with the governor and his wife, Ann Scott. In what has become a trademark Scott break-theice move, the governor told the king a personal story about his own recent trip to the African nation. Ive ridden elephants, Ive never tried to shoot one, Scott told the monarch, before going on and on about the trip. The exchange got wide play in Spain, where the king had been lampooned for the embarrassing secret hunting trip. Upon his return to Miami, Scott apologized for an y discomfort he may have caused the 74-year-old king, who broke his hip during his African visit. If I did anything to do anything wrong I completely apologize, Scott told reporters upon his return at Miami International Airport. The kings a wonderful person. Hes a wonderful world leader. Hes done so many wonderful things in his life. STORY OF THE WEEK: Department of Education Secretary Gerard Robinson spent the week trying to put out res caused by FCAT writing assessment scores, released the week before, which showed precipitous drops among Florida students. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Ive ridden elephants, Ive never tried to shoot one, Gov. Rick Scott to Spanish King Juan Carlos about the monarchs recent elephant hunt in Botswana. WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)D.O.E. on C.Y.A. TourBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 25 With debate and votes taking place around the state and polls showing a growing acceptance, the issue of same-sex marriage and domestic partner rights will likely be among a host of second tier issues that could determine which presidential candidate takes the state. In a Quinnipiac University Polling Institute poll released this week, a majority of voters said the candidates stance on same-sex marriage would not affect the way they would vote. But a signi cant minority say the issue is likely to move them away from President Barack Obama and toward his Republican opponent, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. One in four respondents told pollsters Obamas support of gay marriage would make it more dif cult to support the incumbent president. Thats more than twice the number of voters who say it makes them more likely to support him. Conversely, Romneys opposition to the concept makes 23 percent of respondents say they are more likely to cast their ballot for him, while fewer, 19 percent, say his stance will hurt. Meanwhile this week, votes by the Orange County Commission and public hearings in Jacksonville underscored the growing attention being paid to the issue following the 2008 constitutional amendment de ning marriage in Florida as an institution solely reserved for unions between one man and one woman. Over the past several months, voters in several cities have passed local ordinances or proposed referenda that guarantee domestic partner rights, whether for same-sex or unmarried heterosexual couples. Backers say the efforts signify the growing acceptance of nontraditional relationships, both straight and gay, by providing protections for committed couples similar to those enjoyed by married pairs. In some ways the 2008 ballot measure on marriage really made people stop and think about and have to acknowledge the discrimination that gay couples face, said Nadine Smith, executive director of Equality Florida. Gay marriage issue looms in November Brain Teaser 1 13 16 19 26 32 39 43 51 56 63 67 70 2 27 52 3 28 53 4 29 47 17 22 44 5 14 23 33 40 48 64 68 71 6 24 45 54 7 20 30 49 57 8 25 34 55 65 9 31 41 66 21 35 50 58 15 18 42 46 59 69 72 10 36 60 11 37 61 12 38 62 ACROSS 1. "A __ formality" 5. Of a pelvic bone 10. Stashed away 13. Tennis great Lendl 14. Aqua __ (gold dissolver) 15. Put to the grindstone 16. Life during a power outage? 18. Writer Sarah __ Jewett 19. Linda Ellerbee's "__ It Goes" 20. Sowed again 22. Prefix with natal 25. Two-sport man Deion 26. Henrik Ibsen drama 31. Legendary big bird 32. Mob chief 33. School founded by Henry VI 35. Dry Italian wine 39. Make stout 40. More achy 42. "Mila 18" author 43. Built for speed 45. One of The Three Bear s 46. Stink to high heaven 47. When doubled, an African antelope 49. Natural environments 51. Shoe pads 55. Novelist Deighton 56. Wine server 58. "Over There" composer 63. Jim Croce's "__ a Name" 64. Long, long poem? 67. Kicks a grounder 68. Get down pat 69. Bowls over 70. Anonymous John 71. Surrealist Max 72. Post-Mardi Gras periodDOWN1. Easily split mineral 2. Politico Bayh 3. South African cash 4. Goes no further 5. Ill temper 6. NASA moon craft 7. Humpbacked helper 8. Hospital helpers 9. Salad choice 10. Huge swarm 11. City or circle preceder 12. Monopoly stack 15. Farmer's handiwork at Wimbledon? 17. Huey of Louisiana politics 21. Seth's son 23. Peepers 24. In the lead 26. Toxins banned in the '70s 27. Jurist Warren 28. Blunted sword 29. Arrays at the Cheerios factory? 30. Bar Mitzvah reading 34. Neighbor of Tibet 36. Gazetteer datum 37. __ Cong 38. Igloo dwellers: Abbr. 41. Broccoli __ 44. Ceramist's oven 48. Stovetop whistler 50. Pizarro victim 51. "__ a Thousand Times" (1955 Jack Palance film) 52. The "N" in UNCF 53. Beat the goalie 54. Urban conduit 57. Parti-colored horse 59. Like the Sabin vaccine 60. Hockey great Gordie 61. Yemeni seaport 62. Arboreal abode 65. Decade divs. 66. Otorhinolaryngology abbr.American Prole Hometown Content 5/6/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 1 23 34156 762 8 961 43 3127 9 86 56374 619 00 9 HometownContent 651 8237 4 9 329471856 874569321 287 936415 416758293 935142678 193 284567 562397184 748615932 M I C A P C B S I D I E D E V A N E A R L N E G R O R A N D E P E E S C O R E E N D S R O W E D O A T S L O N G K I L N I R E E Y E S K E T T L E L E M O N T O P S E W E R I G O R T O R A H R O A N A I D E S N E P A L Y R S C A E S A R R A B E E N T E N O S I N C A H O E D C O U R T O R A L H O R D E A R E A H O W E I N N E R V I E T A D E N D E E D S E S K S N E S T

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 31, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Up To $ 1 0 0 0 0 O F F M S R P $10,000 off MSRP: Stk#12D113, 2012 Ram 2500 LaramieLonghorn Crew Cab Dealer Retains all rebates and incentives 850-766-8530 I refuse to be beat on price! Bring me any deal and I will beat it! Call me, Eric Lee, for the best deal in town!! By LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsWithout bat-ting an eye, a team of bat scientists from across the country braved the Wakulla mud of a small cypress pond in the Apalachicola National Forest on Thursday, May 24, to construct a bat-capturing net and set up a makeshift research station. The scientists were seeking to catch and release bats in this area in order to survey the present species and populations and to monitor their health. The mission was part of Bat Blitz, a three-day event held in Hosford and sponsored by the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network, the U.S. Forest Service and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission. For three days, scientists, researchers and bat enthusiasts gathered from their respective states, universities and agencies, and headed in to the forests and Wildlife Management Areas located around Hosford and in surrounding counties, to track and test native bats of the region. This marked the rst year that a Bat Blitz was held in Florida, but the 11th year that such blitzs have taken place across the country. Melissa Tucker, an organizer of the event with the state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, saw the gathering as part of a process of pooling together lots of expertise and knowledge. Passion, though, and fun, also came in to the mix. The group, headquartered at the Woodsmen of the World Camp in Hosford, kept tally of which teams captured the most bats, and the rarest bats, and enjoyed a little friendly competition as they worked. Indeed, the work was challenging with teams out in the eld from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m braving the natural elements to collect data and gathering in the morning to slowly piece together an idea of what bat life looks like in the Panhandle. Bat Blitz is the rst specifically bat scienti c research event, and is an unusual variation on the standard conferences that scientists are used to attending. Its not a typical thing to do this kind of data collection, learn new techniques and work at this level with so many other scientists, said Holly Ober, an assistant professor in the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation at the University of Florida. Ober also discussed the value of the research for the public. We know bats have an enormous impact on the insect populations of an area its free pest control. In this way, theyre good for the environment because less pesticides go into the air. Farmers can save thousands of dollars on pesticides by putting up bat houses and monitoring their bat populations, Ober said. With bat care as the main priority, scientists exercise many precautions to keep themselves and the bats safe. The teams wipe down all the equipment, soak the nets, and wear masks and gloves to keep the bat populations healthy. One of the reasons for such safeguards is the sudden incidence of White Nose Syndrome which has spread from European bat populations to North American populations via fungal spores that cave explorers, or spelunkers, inadvertently carry out on their equipment. The disease affects the hibernation patterns of cave bats who awaken weak, with their fat reserves depleted and, unable to nd food; often die of starvation. It has killed literally hundreds of thousands of bats it just gives me goosebumps, said Andrea Korman of Oklahoma, who works with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Though White Nose Syndrome hasnt been found in Florida yet, events like the Bat Blitz help to raise public awareness for the issues affecting bats. Korman was in attendance to learn how a Bat Blitz was organized, so that Oklahoma might have its rst Blitz next year. Overall, the entire group went to 31 different sites over the course of three nights and caught 250 bats. It was a great success, said Ober. It has been really exciting to go out every night Once you start working with bats, they just hook you. For more information on Bat Blitz, and to nd other Bat Blitz or bat research opportunities in the future, visit the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network, at www. sbdn.org/index.html.Scientists trek into the national forest to study bats A Seminole bat. Stuck in mud. Untangling the mist net. Setting up a support for the nets to catch bats.PHOTOS BY LUCY CARTERFWC PHOTO